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WELCOME
A MESSAGE FROM THE CHANCELLOR
The modern university experience should inspire both the intellect and
the heart, and at UC Davis we are blessed with many such places that do
each exceedingly well. At the top of the list must surely be our Robert
and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, which for the past
decade has been a beacon of outstanding entertainment and culture for
UC Davis and the greater Sacramento region.
Looking through the schedule for the upcoming season, you will find
a rich array of artists and performances to choose from. The eclectic
LINDA P.B. KATEHI
UC DAVIS CHANCELLOR
range of entertainers who come through our campus to perform at the
Mondavi are some of the most dynamic and exciting artists anywhere,
from ground-breaking comedians to classical opera, much-loved writers,
vocalists and more.
I know firsthand that
your experience at
No matter what appeals to you, there are shows at the Mondavi Center in
the upcoming season that will delight, inspire and captivate you and your
families and friends. My husband and I make it a point to attend as many
the Mondavi will be
Mondavi Center events as possible and we hope to see you there during
highly rewarding
the 2015–16 season. Whether this is your first time visiting the center or
and memorable.
be highly rewarding and memorable.
you are coming back for more, I know firsthand that your experience will
Thank you for supporting the performing arts on our campus. Enjoy the
show and please come back for more!
encoreartsprograms.com 3
SPONSORS
SEASON SPONSOR
MONDAVI CENTER STAFF
Don Roth, Ph.D.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Jeremy Ganter
ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Liz King
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
CORPORATE PARTNERS
PLATINUM
Nancy Petrisko
DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT
Liz King
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
MARKETING
Rob Tocalino
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING
Dana Werdmuller
MARKETING MANAGER
Erin Kelley
ART DIRECTOR/SENIOR
DESIGNER
Chloe Fox
DIGITAL MARKETING
SPECIALIST
TICKET OFFICE
Sarah Herrera
COPPER
TICKET OFFICE MANAGER
Susie Evon
EVENT SUPERVISOR AND
GROUP SALES COORDINATOR
4 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
Ciocolat
Yuri Rodriguez
PUBLIC EVENTS MANAGER
Natalia Deardorff
ASSISTANT PUBLIC EVENTS
MANAGER
Dawn Kincade
ASSISTANT PUBLIC EVENTS
MANAGER
Kerrilee Knights
ASSISTANT PUBLIC EVENTS
MANAGER
Nancy Temple
ASSISTANT PUBLIC EVENTS
MANAGER
HEAD USHERS
Huguette Albrecht
Ralph Clouse
Eric Davis
John Dixon
George Edwards
Donna Horgan
Paul Kastner
Jan Perez
Steve Matista
FACILITIES
Russell St. Clair
PRODUCTION
TICKET AGENT
BUILDING ENGINEER
Christopher C. Oca
SENIOR STAGE MANAGER,
VANDERHOEF STUDIO THEATRE
David M. Moon
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LIAISON TO UC DAVIS
DEPARTMENTS
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ENGINEER
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ASSISTANT AUDIO ENGINEER
PROGRAMMING
Jeremy Ganter
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMMING
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Ruth Rosenberg
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COORDINATOR
Lara Downes
CURATOR, YOUNG ARTISTS
PROGRAM
SUPPORT
SERVICES
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SENIOR DIRECTOR OF SUPPORT
SERVICES
Mandy Jarvis
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Russ Postlethwaite
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ADMINISTRATOR AND RENTAL
COORDINATOR
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MEMBERSHIP
MEMBERSHIP RELATIONS
SPECIALIST
API Global Transportation
AUDIENCE SERVICES MANAGER
Jessica Miller
SENIOR DIRECTOR OF
MEMBERSHIP
SPECIAL THANKS
ARTIST SERVICES MANAGER
Ryan Thomas
TICKET OFFICE SUPERVISOR
MONDAVI CENTER GRANTORS
AND ARTS EDUCATION SPONSORS
Jenna Bell
Marlene Freid
DEVELOPMENT
BRONZE
ARTIST SERVICES
Joyce Donaldson
ARTS EDUCATION
COORDINATOR
OFFICE OF CAMPUS
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS
AUDIENCE SERVICES
Jennifer Mast
SILVER
Herb Garman
ARTS EDUCATION
DIRECTOR OF ARTS EDUCATION
GOLD
OPERATIONS
PRODUCTION MANAGER
ASSISTANT PRODUCTION
MANAGER
SENIOR STAGE MANAGER,
JACKSON HALL
APPLICATIONS ADMINISTRATOR
& PCI COMPLIANCE
COORDINATOR
IN THIS ISSU
A MESSAGE
FROM THE
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
ROBERT AND MARGRIT
MONDAVI CENTER
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
DON ROTH, Ph.D.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
March is the single busiest month of the Mondavi Center
season this year, with 21 performances over 31 days.
We begin the month with a long-awaited return
engagement from soprano Renée Fleming and end it
with debut performances by the acclaimed Third Coast
Percussion ensemble. In between, we feature a typically
diverse roster: Serial podcast creators Sarah Koenig and
Julie Snyder on March 7; a St. Patrick’s Day celebration and
beer tasting with Altan, Lúnasa and Tim O’Brien on March
17; and a Just Added performance from Lyle Lovett and
Robert Earl Keen on March 25. Visit our website or grab a
brochure tonight to see the full roster; I encourage you to
try something new during this rich month of programs.
March is also the month that we put the final touches
on our forthcoming season—one that will continue our
tradition of innovation and excellence.
I have a few important notes for our returning subscribers
and those interested in becoming subscribers in the year
ahead. Our renewal period for existing subscribers will
run from the first week of April until the 30th. We’ll take
a short break to get all subscribers seated, and then start
selling new subscriptions in mid-May. Finally, single tickets
will go on sale in early July, a full month earlier than in
recent years. We will have more information both through
the mail and in your email inbox. If you’re not sure you’ve
signed up to be notified, you can do so through our
website or call the ticket office at 866-754-2747.
I look forward to sharing some highlights of the 2016-17
season with you in the next issue of the Program Book. For
now, enjoy the spoils of March!
Sincerely,
Don
6 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
8
Renée Fleming, soprano and
Gerald Martin Moore, piano
11 Benoît Charest & Le Terrible Orchestre
de Belleville / The Triplets of Belleville
14 Academy of St Martin in the Fields
20 Sarah Koenig and Julie Snyder
22 Igudesman & Joo
26 Altan & Lúnasa with Tim O’Brien
34 San Francisco Symphony /
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
39Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins & Anaïs Mitchell
BEFORE THE SHOW
• The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence
during the performance.
• As a courtesy to others, please turn off all electronic devices.
• If you have any hard candy, please unwrap it before the lights dim.
• Please remember that the taking of photographs or the use of any
type of audio or video recording equipment is strictly prohibited.
Violators are subject to removal.
• Please look around and locate the emergency exit nearest you. That
exit may be behind, to the side or in front of you and is indicated
by a lighted green sign. In the unlikely event of a fire alarm or other
emergency, please leave the building through that exit.
• As a courtesy to all our patrons and for your safety, anyone leaving his
or her seat during the performance may be seated in an alternate seat
upon readmission while the performance is in progress. Readmission
is at the discretion of Management.
• Assistive Listening Devices and binoculars are available at the Patron
Services Desk near the lobby elevators. Both items may be checked
out at no charge with a form of ID.
March 2016
Volume 3, No. 4
AN EXCLUSIVE WINE TASTING
EXPERIENCE OF THESE
FEATURED WINERIES FOR
INNER CIRCLE DONORS
Paul Heppner
Publisher
Susan Peterson
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Complimentary wine pours in the Bartholomew Room for Inner Circle
Donors: 7–8PM and during intermission if scheduled.
SEPTEMBER 30
WED
Mavis Staples and Joan Osborne
PRIEST RANCH
OCTOBER 7
WED
Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club
BROMAN CELLARS
NOVEMBER 19
THU
Akram Khan Company
MINER’S LEAP
DECEMBER 12
SAT
Reduced Shakespeare Company
BUCHER WINERY
JANUARY 23
SAT
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
GAUTHIER SELECT VINEYARDS
FEBRUARY 20
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Russian National Orchestra
BOUCHAINE VINEYARDS
MARCH 30
WED
Patty Griffin with Sara Watkins & Anaïs Mitchell
BOEGER WINERY
APRIL 25
MON
Aimee Mann & Billy Collins
V. SATTUI WINERY
MAY 11
WED
Yo-Yo Ma, cello | Kathryn Stott, piano
ROBERT MONDAVI WINERY
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Encore Arts Programs is published monthly by Encore Media
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encoreartsprograms.com 7
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 • 8PM
Jackson Hall
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Barbara K. Jackson
Renée Fleming appears by arrangement with
IMG Artists, 7 West 54th Street, New York, NY
10019.
Ms. Fleming records exclusively for Decca and
Mercury Records (UK).
RENÉE FLEMING,
soprano
GERALD MARTIN MOORE,
piano
PROGRAM
Frauenliebe und leben, Op. 42
Seit ich ihn gesehen
Er, der Herrlichste von allen
Ich kann’s nicht fassen
Du Ring an meinem Finger
Helft mir, ihr Schwestern
Süsser Freund, du blickest
An meinem Herzen
Nun hast du mir den ersten Schmerz getan
Five Songs
O dolga budu ja, Op. 4, No. 3
(“Silence of the Secret Night”)
Ne poy, krasavitsa, pri mne, Op. 4, No. 4
(“Sing to me no more, beautiful maiden”)
Rechnaya lileya, Op. 8, No. 1 (“Water Lily”)
Sumerki, Op. 21, No. 3 (“Twilight”)
Vesenniye void, Op. 14, No. 11 (“Spring Waters”)
Schumann
FRAUENLIEBE UND LEBEN, OP. 42 (1840)
ROBERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856)
Rachmaninoff
INTERMISSION
Five Songs
“Higher”
“Scream”
“Hunger”
“Morpheus”
“You Gotta Go Home”
Five Songs
Das Bachlein, Op. 88, No. 1 (“You Brooklet”)
Ruhe, meine Seele, Op. 21, No. 7 (“Be Still, My Soul”)
Meinem Kinde, Op. 37, No. 3 (“To My Child”)
Allerseelen, Op. 10 (“All Souls’ Day”)
Zueignung (“Dedication”)
8 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
PROGRAM NOTES
Patricia Barber
Strauss
Though not as renowned for his art songs (Lieder, in
German) as his predecessor Franz Schubert—who
wrote over 600—Robert Schumann made significant
contributions to the genre over the course of his 40-year
career. Songs were among Schumann’s first works: he
started writing them at the age of 17, and over half his
compositional output was written for voice.
In 1837, Schumann had proposed marriage to the
young Clara Wieck, the daughter of a prominent pianist
in Leipzig. Schumann had first met Clara as a young
man, when she was a child prodigy concertizing across
Germany. What began as a friendship and mutual
artistic admiration blossomed into passionate romance,
though not all parties approved. Clara’s father thought
Schumann, nine years Clara’s senior and not wellestablished as a composer, would only stand in the way
of his plan to make Clara the foremost woman concert
pianist of her generation. In an attempt to forbid their
union, Wieck forbade all communication between
Robert and Clara and refused his permission to marry.
Robert and Clara ultimately petitioned the courts, which
granted the pair permission to marry in 1840, a day shy
of Clara’s 21st birthday. The year 1840 was a year of great
artistic triumph for Schumann as well; in this one year,
he composed over 130 art songs, including this cycle.
In multiple ways, Schumann’s work closely reflected
the life of its author. Schumann was noted for fixating on
specific genres (e.g. works for solo piano, art songs, and
orchestral works) for long periods of time before sinking
into a state of deep mental fatigue. The composer’s
journals and letters suggest that his general mood also
vacillated wildly between bursts of manic energy and
extreme lethargy. The cycle Frauenliebe und -leben (A
RENÉE FLEMING & GERALD MARTIN MOORE
Woman’s Love and Life), perhaps Schumann’s most famous
and most personal work for voice, came on the heels of
his marriage to Clara. The deep adoration reflected in
Adelbert von Chamisso’s poetry and Schumann’s music
mirror the composer and wife’s devotion to one another
as newlyweds.
The first song in the cycle, “Seit ich ihn gesehen,”
(“Since I Saw Him”) opens hesitantly, the truncated
phrases in the piano suggesting the nervousness and
blind stumbling of the narrator. Blind to all else besides
her beloved, she has lost all joy in things she once
treasured, preferring instead to weep. “Er, der Herrlichste
von allen” (“He, the Most Magnificent of All”) celebrates
the beauty of her beloved in both the music and text,
the woman’s “bright and glorious star in the deep blue
heavens.” Yet in her devotion she languishes, believing
herself far beneath his love.
The third song, “Ich kann’s nicht fassen, nicht glauben,”
(“I Can’t Grasp or Believe It”) marks a turning point in the
cycle, as we learn that the woman’s love is reciprocated.
Schumann’s setting reflects a literal sense of disbelief,
as the piano punctuates the fragmented recitativelike opening with crescendoing staccato chords. As
Schumann has written it, even the woman’s “tears of
unending happiness” are tinged with doubt. In the hymnlike melody of “Du Ring an meinem Finger,” (“Thou Ring
on My Finger”) the woman’s disbelief gives way to joy
as she presses her engagement ring to her lips, at last
physical proof of her betrothed’s love for her. She returns
to the ring in every other stanza, as if only its presence
can reassure her that her dream has come true.
In “Helft mir, ihr Schwestern,” (“Help Me, Ye Sisters”)
both singer and pianist move nearly unceasingly,
depicting the excited bustling of the bride and her sisters
on her wedding day. Upward leaps in the vocal line
express the bride’s irrepressible giddiness, as does her
trill in her voice when referring to her bridegroom. One
of the most passionate songs in the set, “Süsser Freund,
du blickest,” (“Sweet Friend, Thou Gazest”) contrasts
slow, tender intimacy with anxious talk of tears over a
pulsing ostinato. Now married, the wife reveals to her
husband her pregnancy, as blissful pillow talk gives way
to dreaming. “An meinem Herzen, an meiner Brust” (“At
My Heart, at My Breast”) finds the new mother lovingly
holding her baby in her arms, the piano painting a vivid
picture of mother rocking child to sleep.
The final song of the cycle, “Nun hast du mir den
ersten Schmerz getan,” (“Now Thou Hast Given Me, for the
First Time, Pain”) brings about sudden tragedy as we hear
the narrator in low, fragmented phrases, mourn for her
dead husband. Harsh and dissonant, the piano writing in
this song contrasts as sharply with the rest of the cycle as
the life of the child contrasts with the husband’s deathly
sleep. This dissonance remains through the end of the
text, until Schumann repeats the opening bars of the
first song. In this moment of agonizing loss, Schumann
evokes the woman’s first look at her beloved, even as his
body is lowered into the grave. Writing in her marriage
diary, a newlywed Clara Schumann confessed, “The
thought that one day I might lose him causes my mind
to be completely confused—may heaven protect me
from such misfortune, I couldn’t take it.” Tragically, Clara
would lose Robert to disease and mental illness after only
16 years of marriage; she never remarried.
FIVE SONGS (1890-1902)
SERGEI RACHMANINOFF (1873-1943)
For most of the 19th century, German composers and
poetry dominated the art song genre, though other
nations, including Russia, had their own traditions
of song. Russian classical art song (called romans,
after the French romance) sprang largely from music
of the Eastern Orthodox Church and diverse folk
music traditions. While Russian composers such as
Glinka and Dargomyzhsky wrote many great songs
in the first half of the 19th century, and the Mighty
Handful—a group of five nationalistic composers
including Rimsky-Korsakov and Mussorgsky—wrote
more than 500 songs between them, modern
audiences gravitate toward the songs of those great
melodists Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff.
Sergei Rachmaninoff, a fiercely talented pianist
and conservatory-trained composer, penned over
80 songs of varying depth and complexity. His
education and skills as a performer led to small-scale
compositions that were markedly rich in harmony
and texture. He composed his first songs at the age of
17 (like Schumann), and would return to song for the
next 25 years.
“O dolga budu ja” (“Silence of the Secret Night”),
one of Rachmaninoff’s first songs, captures the
nervousness, excitement, and intoxication of new
love from the vantage point of youth. Both buoyant
and introspective, the song grows to a climax as
chromatic, agitated chords clang around a bold and
soaring vocal line. “Ne poy, krasavitsa, pri mne” (“Sing
to me no more, beautiful maiden”), also from Op.
4, also concerns love and memory, though unlike
“O dolga budu ja,” this song is etched in wistful
melancholy. A piano intro evokes the singing of the
titular maiden, which comes to an end as the narrator
pleads, “Oh cease thy singing, maiden fair!” Her songs
from “sorrowful Georgia” remind the singer of a time,
place, and girl from “that other life and distant shores,”
memories too painful to remember or forget.
Rachmaninoff set “Rechnaya lileya” (“Water Lily”), a
Russian translation of famed German poet Heinrich
Heine, in late 1893, after returning to Moscow after a
productive summer in the country. Like the water lily,
the music itself is dainty and whimsical, highlighting
Rachmaninoff’s gift for writing simple compositions
despite his often lush use of the piano.
While all artists need income to survive and hope
to be paid for their work, Rachmaninoff very pointedly
wrote his Op. 21 with a payday in mind. In a letter
to a close friend dated April 1, 1902, Rachmaninoff
revealed a sudden and shocking engagement to his
cousin, Natalya Satina: “… At the end of this month
I am being incautious enough to get married. …
For God’s sake don’t come, I implore you. The fewer
people there the better. … I shall … perhaps go
to the country to write at least 12 songs before the
wedding, so that there is something with which to
pay the priests and to go abroad.” To circumvent the
strict Canon Law of the Russian Orthodox Church
(among other things, first cousins were not permitted
to marry), Sergei and Natalya were wed in an army
barracks where the clergy were decidedly more lax.
The “12 songs” mentioned in the above letter would
become his Opus 21, which he completed in a hotel
near Lucerne while on his honeymoon.
The final song on this set, “Vesenniye vodï,” (“Spring
Waters”), heralds the end of winter and the welcome
arrival of spring. Fast swirls of notes depict the flowing
streams, much like Schubert’s whirling figures in “Die
Forelle.” The ebullient piano accompaniment reaches
orchestral proportions as the waters cry, “Spring is on
the way! Spring is on the way!”
FIVE SONGS (2002-2015)
PATRICIA BARBER (B. 1955)
Jazz has always been a core part of multi-talented
musician Patricia Barber’s roots. Born into a musical
family, Barber grew up listening to her mother, a blues
singer, and her father, jazz saxophonist Floyd “Shim”
Barber, perform in and around Chicago, a city with
deep connections to jazz and the blues. At the turn of
the 20th century, thousands of African Americans fled
the South in search of a better life; over 75,000 settled
in Chicago before the end of the 1920s. Despite these
strong ties to jazz, Barber was reluctant to make it her
career, once saying, “…becoming a jazz woman was
a stupid thing for a smart woman to do.” With a career
spanning decades, over a dozen albums, and the first
Guggenheim Fellowship awarded for non-classical
music composition, Patricia Barber continues to craft
poignant original works and push the boundaries of
genre.
Renée Fleming met Patricia Barber at one of the
latter’s concerts at Chicago’s Green Mill Jazz Club,
Barber’s artistic home for over 20 years. Their mutual
admiration led the two to collaborate on a multicity project, Higher, in 2015. Performing in Chicago,
Washington, D.C., and New York City, Fleming and
Barber blended jazz and classical sensibilities in
a performance of Barber’s music described as a
“profound synthesis” of the two musical languages.
On this evening’s program, Fleming performs songs
from albums recorded over the course of more than
a decade, songs whose topics range from anger and
disaffection to the serenity of letting a loved one go.
Of Barber’s music, Fleming says, “When I was
introduced to her work years ago, I was immediately
struck by her uniquely sophisticated lyrics and her
musical vocabulary, which, though idiomatically
jazz, evokes art songs for me, and the intimacy she
conveys in performance.” Barber responded, “When
Renée sings my music, I am thrilled to discover that
a musical ideal can be realized. She inspires me to
reach higher…. What she brings to the music is her
own beautiful, sterling voice and her own artistic way
of doing it…. Hearing that instrument of hers in my
song was … the realization of an ideal.”
©Andrew McIntyre, 2016
FIVE SONGS (1885-1935)
RICHARD STRAUSS (1864-1949)
In 1933, Strauss was appointed President of the
Reichsmusikkammer (“Music Chamber of the Reich”),
hoping that “through the goodwill of the new
German government … something really good can
be achieved.” One of the first actions he took in his
new position was petitioning Josef Goebbels, the
encoreartsprograms.com 9
RENÉE FLEMING & GERALD MARTIN MOORE
ruthless Nazi minister of propaganda, to extend the
period of copyright for German authors and composers
from thirty to fifty years by having the government
sign the Berne Convention. As inducement, Strauss
composed and dedicated to “Herrn Reichsminister
Josef Goebbels” Das Bächlein (“You Brooklet”), a setting
of a poem — its last line refers to “mein Führer” (simply
“my leader” in German, but a word that had taken on far
more sinister connotations by 1933) — that he thought
was by Goethe but whose author is actually unknown.
He orchestrated the song two years later, but it was not
performed at that time. By 1935, the direction of the
country under the Nazis had become clear, and Strauss
(whose daughter-in-law, and thereby grandchildren,
were Jewish) had become disillusioned with what he
disparaged as “this kind of rubbish” and he resigned
from the Reichsmusikkammer. He refused to allow Das
Bächlein to be included when a complete edition of
his songs was proposed during the war and deleted
the original dedication when it was finally published
in 1951. Despite this freighted history, Das Bächlein is
a delightful song, descriptive, melodious and bright in
mood.
The poet and publisher Karl Friedrich Henckell (18641929) became known for espousing socialist causes
as well as for such introspective verses as Ruhe, meine
Seele (“Be Still, My Soul”), of which Strauss made an
impressive setting in 1894; he used it to open his Op.
27, the set of four songs he wrote as a wedding gift for
his bride, the gifted soprano Pauline von Ahna. When
Strauss revised and orchestrated the song in 1948, at
the end of his life and just three years after Germany’s
defeat in World War II, its closing lines must have had
a deep significance for him: These times are violent,
Endangering heart and mind. Rest, rest, my soul, And forget
what threatens you!
Hermann von Gilm zu Rosenegg (1812-1864) was
an Austrian civil servant who wrote religious polemics
and lyrical poetry as avocations. Strauss’ first published
collection of songs — Op. 10 of 1885 — was the
Acht Gedichte aus “Letzte Blätter” von Hermann Gilm
(“Eight Songs from the ‘Last Leaves’ of Hermann Gilm”),
which included Allerseelen (“All Souls’ Day”), a lover’s
affectionate remembrance on the day set aside every
year (traditionally November 2) to recall the departed.
Strauss’ setting of Meinen Kinde (“To My Child,” Op.
37 No. 3) to a text by the German writer, author of
children’s books and piano teacher Gustav Falke (18531916), was published in 1898.
The opening song of Op. 10, Zueignung
(“Dedication”), on a poem by Rosenegg, helped
established Strauss’ reputation as a Lieder composer
and has remained one of his most frequently
performed vocal pieces.
©Richard Rodda, 2016
RENEÉ FLEMING
Renée Fleming is one of the most acclaimed singers
of our time. In 2013, President Obama awarded her
America’s highest honor for an individual artist, the
National Medal of Arts. Winner of the 2013 Best Classical
Vocal Grammy Award, she has sung at momentous
occasions around the world, from the Nobel Peace Prize
ceremony to performances in Beijing during the 2008
10 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
Olympic Games. In 2014, she became the first classical
singer ever to perform “The Star-Spangled Banner” at
the Super Bowl. In 2012, in another historic first, she
sang on the balcony of Buckingham Palace in the
Diamond Jubilee Concert for HM Queen Elizabeth II.
In 2009, Fleming was featured in the televised We Are
One: The Inaugural Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial
concert for President Obama. She has performed for
the United States Supreme Court, and in 2014, she
celebrated the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin
Wall in a televised concert at the Brandenburg Gate.
Another distinction was bestowed in 2008 when,
breaking a precedent, Fleming became the first
woman in the 125-year history of the Metropolitan
Opera to solo headline an opening night gala.
On New Year’s Eve 2015, Fleming appeared in the
title role in a new production of The Merry Widow
at the Metropolitan Opera. In April, she made her
Broadway theater debut in Living on Love, for which
she was nominated for a Drama League Award.
Fleming won her fourth Grammy Award for her
album Poèmes. Recipient of 14 Grammy nominations
to date, she has recorded everything from complete
operas and song recitals to an album of indie rock
covers, Dark Hope, the jazz album Haunted Heart and
the movie soundtrack of The Lord of the Rings: The
Return of the King. Known for bringing new audiences
to classical music and opera, Fleming has sung not
only with Luciano Pavarotti and Plácido Domingo but
also with Elton John, Sting, Lou Reed, Josh Groban,
Joan Baez and even the Muppets.
With a multimedia profile rare among
contemporary opera singers, Fleming has hosted
a wide variety of television and radio broadcasts,
including the Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD series
for movie theaters and television, and Live from
Lincoln Center on PBS. She was the subject of an HBO
Masterclass documentary, and has been a frequent
guest on Prairie Home Companion on National Public
Radio. In 2013, she joined with the John F. Kennedy
Center for the Performing Arts to present American
Voices, a concert and 3-day festival celebrating the
best American singing in all genres. The festival was
the subject of a Great Performances documentary on
PBS in January.
Her book The Inner Voice was published by Viking
Penguin in 2004, and released in paperback by
Penguin the following year. An intimate account of
her career and creative process, the book is now in
its 12th printing, and it is also published in France, the
United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, and Russia.
Fleming is a champion of new music and has
performed works by a wide range of contemporary
composers, including recent compositions by Anders
Hillborg, Henri Dutilleux, Brad Mehldau, André Previn,
and Wayne Shorter.
In 2010, Fleming was named the first-ever creative
consultant at Lyric Opera of Chicago. She recently
curated the creation of a world-premiere opera
based on the best-seller Bel Canto for Lyric Opera’s
2015-2016 season. She is currently a member of the
Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Hall Corporation,
the Board of Sing for Hope, and the Artistic Advisory
Board of the Polyphony Foundation. Among her
awards are the Fulbright Lifetime Achievement Medal,
the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur, Germany’s Cross
of the Order of Merit, Honorary Membership in the
Royal Academy of Music, Sweden’s Polar Music Prize,
and honorary doctorates from Duke University, Harvard
University, Carnegie Mellon University, the Eastman
School of Music, and The Juilliard School. www.
reneefleming.com
GERALD MARTIN
MOORE
PIANO
Gerald Martin Moore is a
highly sought-after singing teacher and a vocal
consultant. He has worked
closely with Renée Fleming for many years since first
collaborating on the production of Alcina with William
Christie at the Palais Garnier in Paris. He then went
on to work with Fleming on many subsequent roles,
Decca recordings and recitals, and he toured South
America with her in 2012. Other leading artists he has
prepared for roles and recordings include Natalie Dessay, Joyce DiDonato, Marie McLaughlin, Elina Garanca,
and Sarah Connolly. He has worked in such houses as
Covent Garden, La Scala, the Metropolitan Opera, Aixen-Provence, Edinburgh and Glyndebourne Festival,
San Francisco, Opera de Bastille, Champs-Elysees and
Chatelet in Paris.
An authority on vocal technique, Gerald is a regular
broadcaster and was honored with an hour-long
special interview on BBC Radio 3’s Voices, focused
particularly on American singers and child stars. For
OPERA magazine, he interviewed Beverly Sills on the
technique of coloratura singing. Moore may currently
be heard as a regular host of the Metropolitan Opera
Quiz. He is also in demand as a judge for prestigious
vocal competitions, including the Metropolitan Opera
regional auditions.
In addition to voice teaching, Moore has assisted
William Christie and Les Arts Florissants, preparing
the soloists for productions and recordings including
Handel’s Orlando, Semele and Alcina, and Mozart’s Die
Zauberflote, Le Nozze di Figaro and Die Entfuhrung. He
similarly assisted Sir Charles Mackerras at the Edinburgh Festival for Mozart’s Idomeneo and La Clemenza
di Tito, Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda, together with Rossini’s
Zelmira, Adelaide di Borgogna and La Donna del Lago
conducted by Maurizio Benini. As a specialist in ornamentation, Moore has composed countless embellishments for leading singers, notably in his role as vocal
consultant to Opera Rara and Decca. An additional
area of specialty is the neglected French repertoire of
Delibes, Thomas, Gounod, Meyerbeer, and Massenet.
Moore is featured as a vocalist with soprano
Rebecca Caine in a cabaret evening they created and
recorded as an album, celebrating legendary stars of
the British musical stage, entitled Leading Ladies. He is
a frequent recitalist, most notably with Fleming. He has
performed before such dignitaries as President Obama
and the First Lady, President Clinton and Secretary of
State Hilary Clinton, HRH Prince Charles, Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg and UN Secretary General Kofi Annan.
BENOÎT CHAREST & LE TERRIBLE
ORCHESTRE DE BELLEVILLE
The Triplets of Belleville
A Film + Music and Director’s Choice
Event
Friday, March 4, 2016 • 8PM
Jackson Hall
The Triplets of Belleville
A Cine-Concert
Benoît Charest, Composer-Conductor
Featuring
The Triplets of Belleville
a film by Sylvain Chomet
and Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville
with composer Benoît Charest
Dan Thouin keyboard
Michael Emeneau percussion
Morgan Moore bass
Bryan Head drums
Bruno Lamarche saxophone
Maxime St-Pierre trumpet
Sheffer Bruton trombone
Company Manager David Etienne Savoie
The Triplets of Belleville
Rated PG-13 by the MPAA
© 2003 LES ARMATEURS, PRODUCTION CHAMPION,
VIVI FILM, FRANCE 3 CINEMA, RGP FRANCE AND
SYLVAIN CHOMET. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Licensed in the United State through Sony Pictures
Classics.
Exclusive Worldwide Touring Management by:
David Lieberman/Artists Representatives
P.O. Box 10368, Newport Beach, CA 92658
www.dlartists.com
THE FILM
It has been more than a decade since the
release of the Franco-Quebecois animated
movie, The Triplets of Belleville. Many still
remember this film, its resounding success and
incredible soundtrack which was acclaimed
many times at the Oscars, the Genie Awards
and the French Césars.
This much beloved animated film is
screened as composer Benoît Charest leads
Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville in the live
performance of his original score for the film,
including his Academy Award-nominated
best song “Belleville Rendez-vous.” In the spirit
of the film, Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville
immediately transports audiences to the
exciting streets of 1920s Paris and Le Jazz Hot.
The musical ensemble is made up of eight
musicians with wacky instruments, reminiscent
of 1930s France. The terrific Belleville Orchestra
blends live music and cinema, enticing
audiences into their colorful Parisian period
cabaret.
THE STORY
Adopted by his near-sighted grandmother
Madame Souza, Champion is a lonely little
boy. Noticing that the lad is never happier
than on a bicycle, Madame Souza puts him
through a rigorous training process. Years go by
and Champion becomes worthy of his name.
Now he is ready to enter the world-famous
cycling race, the Tour de France. However,
during this cycling contest two mysterious,
square-shouldered henchmen in black kidnap
Champion. Madame Souza and her faithful dog
Bruno set out to rescue him.
Their quest takes them across the ocean
to a giant megalopolis called Belleville where
they meet a trio of eccentric jazz-era divas, the
renowned “Triplets of Belleville.” The three musichall stars decide to take Madame Souza and
Bruno under their wing. The motley sleuths follow
the clues to an underground speakeasy, where
they entertain the crowd. And, thanks to Bruno’s
brilliant sense of smell, the chase is on! But will
they succeed in beating the devilish plans of the
evil French mafia?
SYLVAIN CHOMET
DIRECTOR
Sylvain Chomet was born in 1963 in MaisonsLafitte, France. In 1982, he graduated from high
school specializing in art and in 1987 received a
diploma from the prestigious comic-strip studio
at Angoulême (France). In 1986, he published his
first book-length comic, Secrets of the Dragonfly
(Futuropolis) and drew an adaptation of a Victor
Hugo novel, Bug-Jargal, in collaboration with
Nicolas de Crécy. Moving to London to work as
an animator at the Richard Purdum studio in
September 1988, he established a London-based
freelance practice working on commercials for
clients such as Swissair, Principality, Swinton,
Renault, and more.
In 1991, Chomet started work on his first
animated film project, The Old Lady and the
Pigeons, with backgrounds designed by Nicolas
de Crécy. In 1992, he wrote the script for a comic
entitled The Bridge in Mud (Glénat), a sciencefiction and historical saga, now in its fourth
episode. The following year, he wrote the story
Léon-la-Came, drawn by Nicolas de Crécy and
serialized in A SUIVRE magazine. The book version
encoreartsprograms.com 11
BENOÎT CHAREST & LE TERRIBLE ORCHESTRE DE BELLEVILLE
was published by Casterman in 1995. It won the
René Goscinny Prize in January 1996.
Since 1993, Chomet has been based in Canada.
He spent 1995 and 1996 finishing his short film
The Old Lady and the Pigeons. This film won the
Cartoon d’Or prize, the Grand Prize at the Annecy
Festival, a BAFTA, the Audience Prize and the Jury
Prize at the Angers Premiers Plans Festival and
received nominations for both the French Césars
and for the Oscars.
In early 1997, Chomet published Ugly, poor and
sick, again with Nicolas de Crécy. The book version
(Casterman) won the Alph-Art Best Comic Prize at
the Angoulême Comic Strip Festival in 1997.
BENOÎT CHAREST
COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR (AND GUITARIST)
Benoît “Ben” Charest, the Oscar-nominated
composer from Montreal, has written over 20 film
scores, including 2003’s award-winning Triplets of
Belleville.
Charest studied at McGill and Montreal
universities before learning his trade touring as a
sideman with various bands. A versatile composer
and accomplished jazz guitarist, Charest regularly
performed with some of Montreal’s finest
musicians, and in 1992, he wrote his first score for
a National Film Board of Canada documentary. He
is presently writing music for his jazz organ trio
and touring with Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville.
GUILLAUME BRIAND
SOUND ENGINEER
Guillaume Briand, became a musician when
he discovered his passion for the art of sound.
At age 17, he decided to follow his heart and
began his career working as a sound engineer
at Production Jeun-Est, Foufounes électriques,
le Grand Bambou, Spectra, Cabaret Latulipe
and Cabaret Juste Pour Rire. He has traveled
the world, creating soundscapes and mixing
instrumentation in France, Italy, China, the United
States, Singapore and Germany where he worked
with percussionist and hybrid artist Merlin Ettore.
On tour with the extreme heavy metal group,
Unexpect, out of Montreal, he has performed his
sonic magic in stadiums throughout Europe. He
also performs as a Technical Director for touring
shows, especially the poetic musicalizations
of Queen Ka and cine-concert, The Triplets of
Belleville.
MEMBERS OF THE ORCHESTRE
DAN THOUIN
KEYBOARD
When he first sat behind the family organ Daniel
Thouin was seven. Ten years later he was studying
classical piano. Soon he started flirting with the
jazz scene. Then, he took an interest in electronica
and pop music, collaborating with the likes of
Mara Tremblay, Yann Perreau and Marie-Jo Thério,
12 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
and touring with Jason Bajada and Ghislain
Poirier. In 2002, Thouin assembled the Large
Ensemble, an all-star local group mixing jazz
and rock. Informed by Miles Davis’ late 60s
experiments, Thouin used the band to flex their
improvisational muscles.
MORGAN MOORE
BASS
Morgan Moore received a Juno award for his
work on Ranee Lee’s album Live at Upstairs and
has performed with such notables as Sophie
Milman, Oliver Jones, Nikki Yanofsksy, Rob
Lutes, Kaba Horo, John Day, Ben Charest, James
Gelfand, and Marianne Trudel. Being one of the
first-call Montreal bassists has given him the
opportunity to play with such international
artists as Mark Murphy, Phil Dwyer, Jimmy
Cobb, Nate Smith, Sheila Jordan and many
others.
BRUNO LAMARCHE
SAXOPHONIST
Saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist Bruno
Lamarche has been known in Canada and
Europe for more than 20 years. He has had
the honor of working with luminaries such
as Buddhakick, Félix Stüssi, Ray Anderson,
Bernard Primeau, Joel Miller, Ben Monder, Philip
Catherine, Christine Duncan, Kurt Rosenwinkel,
Don Thompson and of course, Benoît Charest.
His wide ranging career has seen him perform
with Altsys, Dixieband, ONJM, and Jazzlab.
A recognized arranger, Lamarche earned
a Bachelor of Jazz Performance at McGill
University where he also received the Marion
Magor Memorial Scholarship and the James
McGill Award.
MICHAEL EMENEAU
PERCUSSION
Michael Emeneau has worked professionally as
a vibraphonist, producer, re-mixer, and arranger
for 25 years, playing such diverse genres as
jazz, rock, drum & bass, salsa, techno, country,
Hindustani, gospel, baroque and orchestral
music. During this time he has produced 16
albums, recorded on another 150, composed
music for eight films, toured internationally, and
lived on three continents.
As a solo recording artist he has released
a series of highly acclaimed solo CDs on the
boutique record labels, Hearts of Space, Daikini,
and Six Degrees records. Currently he is a
member of Ben Charest’s Orchestre Terrible de
Belleville, and Tur Malka featuring Canadian jazz
vocal legend Karen Young.
MAXIME ST-PIERRE
TRUMPET
As a member of many scholarly music bands
such as Cegep St-Laurent, Montreal University,
Vic Vogel, Dems Christianson and Montreal
Jazz Big Band, Maxime St-Pierre became a solid
trumpeter. He has also worked with many
popular singers and groups, among them
Jean Jean-Pierre Ferland, Daniel Belanger, Jean
Leloup, Michel Legrand, Yannick Rieu, The
Temptations, The Four Tops, Michel Cusson
Wild Unit, Eva! Manigat, La Bande aMagoo and
Kappa.
BRYAN HEAD
DRUMS
Los Angeles-based drummer and percussionist
Bryan Head has performed and recorded
with such varying artists as Roger Hodgson of
Supertramp, Foreigner, surf legend Dick Dale,
Julian Lennon, Shelby Lynne, The Plimsouls,
Abandoned Pools, Peter Case and John Doe
of X.
SHEFFER BRUTON
TROMBONE
Sheffer Bruton is a Los Angeles native who
began playing trombone in high school. Bruton
started his professional career at age 19 playing
acid jazz and funk/rock gigs in Pasadena,
California. He attended Cal State Los Angeles
and then the University of Southern California
where he studied classical music theory, music
history, jazz theory, and performance. He has
performed and/or recorded with artists such as
Bobby Caldwell, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Kinky,
G Love and Special Sauce and Ozomatli as well
as multiple movie and television sound tracks.
He has also appeared in movies and television
as both an actor and performer, most recently
in the movie Whiplash. He currently lives in
Los Angeles and is a freelance studio musician,
teacher, music educator, and loving husband
and father to his wife Maria and their children
Milagro, Tristan, and Alexi.
DAVID-ETIENNE SAVOIE
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Throughout the years, David-Etienne Savoie
has worked as a production manager and main
controller on many international projects, such
as Lhasa de Sela (180 concerts worldwide,
four in the U.S.), Patrick Watson (400 concerts
worldwide, three in the U.S. and 15 with a
symphonic orchestra), Amadou and Mariam
(300 concerts throughout the world, three
in the U.S.), Afrocubism (60 concerts around
the world, two in the U.S.), Omara Portuondo
(20 concerts around the world) and finally
150 concerts with Raul Paz. He has toured
Europe with artists such as Arthur H, The Roots,
Matthew Herbert, Pierre Lapointe, Ariane
Moffat, Champion, Jean-Louis Murat, Bertrand
Belin and many more.
March 13, 2016
Jackson Hall, Mondavi center
7:00 pM
Christian Baldini, conductor
Mozart: Kyrie in D Minor
Mozart: Ave verum corpus
Beethoven: Elegischer Gesang
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (“Choral”)
$10 StuDeNtS & ChilDreN, $20 ADultS | StANDArD SeAtiNg
all tickets are available through the Mondavi center’s ticket office,
www.Mondaviarts.org or via (530) 754-2787.
Joshua Bell, music director and soloist
An Orchestra Series Event
Saturday, March 5, 2016 • 8PM
PROGRAM
SPONSORED BY:
Symphony No. 1 in D Major, Op. 25, “Classical”Prokofiev
Allegro con brio
Larghetto
Gavotte: Non troppo allegro
Finale: Molto vivace
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35Tchaikovsky
Allegro moderato
Canzonetta: Andante
Finale: Allegro vivacissimo
Joshua Bell, violin
Jackson Hall
Hansen Kwok
Joyce and Ken Adamson
INTERMISSION
Violin Concerto, mv. II (codetta by Britten) Joshua Bell, violin
Schumann
Performances are given with the permission of the Britten Estate Ltd.
Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93Beethoven
Allegro vivace e con brio
Allegretto scherzando
Tempo di minuetto
Allegro vivace
The Academy of St Martin in the Fields’ March 2016 US tour is supported by Maria Cardamone and
Paul Matthews together with the American Friends of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
Joshua Bell’s position as Music Director is supported by Klara and Larry A. Silverstein together with the
American Friends of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
14 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
photo: Ian Douglas
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN
IN THE FIELDS
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS
PROGRAM NOTES
SYMPHONY NO. 1 IN D MAJOR, OP. 25,
“CLASSICAL” (1916-1917)
SERGEI PROKOFIEV (1891-1953)
Prokofiev’s penchant for using classical
musical idioms was instilled in him during
the course of his thorough, excellent training.
When he was a little tot, his mother played
Beethoven sonatas to him while he sat under
the piano, he studied with the greatest
Russian musicians of the time — Glière,
Rimsky-Korsakov, Liadov, Glazunov, Tcherepnin
— and he began composing at the Mozartian
age of six. In 1917, Prokofiev based his own
“Classical” Symphony, his first work in the form,
on the Viennese models that had formed the
core of his musical education. The work is in
the four movements customary in Haydn’s
symphonies, though at only fifteen minutes
it hardly runs to half their typical length. The
dapper first movement is a miniature sonata
design that follows the traditional form but
adds some quirks that would have given
Haydn himself a chuckle — the recapitulation,
for example, begins in the “wrong” key (but
soon rights itself ) and occasionally a beat is
left out, as though the music had stubbed its
toe. A graceful, ethereal melody floating high
in the violins is used to open and close the
larghetto, with the pizzicato gentle middle
section reaching a brilliant tutti before quickly
subsiding. The third movement, a gavotte,
comes not from the Viennese symphony but
rather from the tradition of French Baroque
ballet. The brilliant finale calls for remarkable
feats of agility and precise ensemble from the
performers.
VIOLIN CONCERTO IN D MAJOR,
OP. 35 (1878)
PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840-1893)
In the summer of 1877, Tchaikovsky undertook
the disastrous marriage that lasted less than
three weeks and resulted in his emotional
collapse and attempted suicide. He fled
from Moscow to his brother Modeste in St.
Petersburg, where he recovered his wits and
discovered he could find solace in his work.
He spent the late fall and winter completing
his Fourth Symphony and the opera Eugene
Onégin. The brothers decided that travel
outside of Russia would be an additional
balm to the composer’s spirit, and they duly
installed themselves at Clarens on Lake
Geneva in Switzerland soon after the first of
the year.
In Clarens, Tchaikovsky had already begun
work on a piano sonata when he heard the
colorful Symphonie Espagnole by the French
composer Edouard Lalo. He was so excited
by the possibilities of a similar work for solo
violin and orchestra that he set aside the
sonata and immediately began a concerto
of his own. By the end of April, the work was
finished. Tchaikovsky sent the manuscript to
Leopold Auer, a friend who headed the violin
department at the St. Petersburg Conservatory
and who was also Court Violinist to the Czar,
hoping to have him premiere the work. Much
to the composer’s regret, Auer returned the
piece as “unplayable,” and apparently spread
that word with such authority to other
violinists that it was more than three years
before the violin concerto was heard in public.
It was Adolf Brodsky, a former colleague of
Tchaikovsky at the Moscow Conservatory, who
first accepted the challenge of this concerto
when he premiered it with the Vienna
Philharmonic in 1881.
The concerto opens quietly with a tentative
introductory tune. A foretaste of the main
theme soon appears in the violins, around
which a quick crescendo is mounted to usher
in the soloist. After a few unaccompanied
measures, the violin presents the lovely main
theme above a simple string background.
After an elaborated repeat of this melody,
a transition follows that eventually involves
the entire orchestra and gives the soloist the
first opportunity for pyrotechnical display.
The second theme begins a long build-up
leading into the development, launched with
a sweeping presentation of the main theme.
The soloist soon steals back the attention
with breathtaking leaps and double stops.
The sweeping mood returns, giving way to a
flashing cadenza as a link to the recapitulation.
The flute sings the main theme before the
violin it takes over, and all then follows the
order of the exposition.
The andante begins with a chorale for
woodwinds that is heard again at the end of
the movement to serve as a frame around the
musical picture inside. On the canvas of this
picture is displayed a soulful melody for the
violin suggesting a Gypsy fiddler. The finale is
joined to the slow movement without a break.
With the propulsive spirit of a dashing Cossack
Trepak, the finale flies by amid the soloist’s
dizzying show of agility and speed.
VIOLIN CONCERTO, MV. II (CODETTA
BY BRITTEN) (1853, 1957)
ROBERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856)
ARRANGED IN 1957 FROM MOVEMENT II OF
THE VIOLIN CONCERTO (WoO 23) BY BENJAMIN
BRITTEN (1913-1976)
In September 1850, Schumann became music
director for the city of Düsseldorf, where his
duties included conducting the orchestra’s
subscription concerts, leading performances
of church music, giving private music lessons,
organizing a chamber music society and
composing, as time allowed. Things went
well at first and Schumann enjoyed one of
his most creative periods in Düsseldorf, but
before long the situation turned sour. His
fragile mental health, his ineptitude as a
conductor, and his frequent irritability created
a rift with the musicians. The orchestra’s
governing body presented him with the
suggestion that, perhaps, his time would
be better devoted entirely to composition.
Schumann, increasingly unstable though at
first determined to stay, complained to his
wife, Clara, that he was being cruelly treated.
Proceedings were begun by the orchestra
committee to relieve him of his position, but
his resignation in 1853 ended the matter. By
early 1854, Schumann’s reason had completely
given way. On February 27th, he tried to
drown himself in the Rhine, and a week later
he was committed to an asylum in Endenich,
where he lingered with fleeting moments
of sanity for nearly two-and-a-half years. His
faithful Clara was there with him when he died
on July 29, 1856, at the age of 46.
Among the products of Schumann’s last
sad months in Düsseldorf was the Violin
Concerto, composed in just two weeks in late
September 1853. He had expected to perform
the piece in Düsseldorf but his resignation
scotched that plan, so he sent the concerto
for evaluation regarding its technical aspects
to his friend Joseph Joachim, one of the great
virtuosos of his generation (and Schumann’s
hoped-for soloist in the abandoned premiere).
Joachim initially expressed his support for
Schumann’s effort but he never played the
piece publicly and even declared some
passages “dreadful” after the composer’s death
in 1856. Two years later Joachim tried out the
piece privately for Johannes Brahms (who was
to write a magnificent concerto for Joachim
in 1878), and he found it so deficient that he
refused to include it in the collected edition
of Schumann’s works he was then preparing.
The score remained unpublished until German
musicologist Georg Schünemann discovered
it in the Prussian State Library in 1937 and
issued it over the objections of Eugenie,
the Schumanns’ last surviving child. Georg
Kulenkampff gave the premiere with the Berlin
Philharmonic in November that year, but the
work has rarely been heard since.
In 1957, the superb British horn virtuoso
Dennis Brain was killed in a car crash at
age 36. One of Brain’s many musical friends
encoreartsprograms.com 15
was Benjamin Britten — Brain had played
the premiere of Britten’s Serenade for Tenor,
Horn and Strings in 1943. As a memorial to
Brain, Britten arranged the tender second
movement of Schumann’s Violin Concerto for
violin and string orchestra and titled it Elegy.
Cellist Steven Isserlis discovered the score in
the Britten archives a half-century later and
took it to Joshua Bell (who made one of the
few recordings of Schumann’s Concerto, with
the Cleveland Orchestra in 2005), and he
revived the Elegy for the 2015-2016 season of
the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
SYMPHONY NO. 8 IN F MAJOR, OP. 93
(1811-1812)
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770-1827)
In early October 1812, the Linzer Musikzeitung
carried the following announcement: “We
have had the long-wished-for pleasure of
having in our metropolis for several days the
Orpheus and greatest musical poet of our
time....” This “Orpheus” was Beethoven, and he
had descended on Linz as the last stop in a
summer spent taking the waters at Karlsbad,
Franzensbrunn and Töplitz in an attempt to
relieve various physical ailments. His interest in
Linz, however, extended beyond the mineral
baths into the private life of his younger
brother, Johann. It seems that Johann
had acquired a housekeeper, one Therese
Obermeyer, and that her duties extended
to, as the composer’s biographer Thayer
put it, “something more.” Perhaps as much
from jealousy as from moral indignation, the
bachelor Beethoven did not approve of either
the situation or this particular female (he later
FURTHER LISTENING
by Jeff Hudson
JOSHUA BELL AND
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS
With an initial three-year contract, Joshua Bell became the music director of the
Academy of St Martin in the Fields in 2011. In 2013, the Academy released an album
containing two Beethoven symphonies, the Fourth, and the Seventh. And Mondavi
Center audiences saw Bell lead the orchestra in March 2014, a concert that included
the Beethoven Third Symphony. At that time, Bell told this writer he’d like to do more
Beethoven with the orchestra in years to come.
Well, it’s 2016, and Bell and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields are still together.
And they’re back in Jackson Hall with Beethoven’s Eighth Symphony on the program.
Not to speculate (Bell isn’t talking), but Beethoven 3 typically runs about 48 minutes,
and Beethoven 8 typically runs around 24 minutes. Which is just about the right
amount of music to fill a CD. But like I said, I’m not speculating.
Bell also discussed his future plans in a 2015 interview with Final Note magazine:
— The next few years. “My life is planned for me already three years ahead of time, as
far as concerts are concerned. I would like to expand my repertoire with the Academy
of St Martin, record more of the Beethoven Symphonies and commission a few new
works. I would love to spend more time composing — I write a lot of my own cadenzas
and would like to take it a step further.” (He’s been saying this for several years – during
a recital tour in 2011, he told this writer that he’d “like to write a solo violin sonata that
would be good enough for future generations to look at.”)
— His evolving style of leading the orchestra, sometimes playing from the first
violin’s chair, sometimes from the podium. “I’m starting to do more from the podium
and I have some concerts coming up where I will do both. There are advantages to
leading from the violin... things you can show and do with the violin in your hand that
are easier than with the stick — ways of inspiring the orchestra with the instrument.
But I’m discovering that there are things that I can do to be more effective when I don’t
have the violin as well. Leading from the violin is a great way to begin conducting
because I think it’s the most organic and natural way to do it.”
JEFF HUDSON CONTRIBUTES COVERAGE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS TO CAPITAL PUBLIC RADIO,
THE DAVIS ENTERPRISE, AND SACRAMENTO NEWS AND REVIEW.
16 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
dubbed her “Queen of the Night”), and he
took it upon himself, Thayer continued, “to
meddle in the private concerns of his brother,
which he had no more right to do than any
stranger.” He stirred up a terrific row over
this matter, and, after taking his concern to
the local authorities, actually was awarded a
decision to have Therese thrown out of town.
Johann had had about enough by this time,
and the upshot of all of Ludwig’s intrusions
was that his younger brother married the
housekeeper after all.
Beethoven had been installed in an
attractive room in Johann’s house overlooking
the Danube and the surrounding countryside
upon his arrival, and he worked on the Eighth
Symphony throughout all this unnecessary
domestic kerfuffle. Not the slightest hint of
the turmoil crept into the music, however. It is
actually the most humorous and “unbuttoned,”
in the composer’s own description, of all
his symphonies. At that time in his life (he
was 42), Beethoven was immensely fond
of a certain rough fun and practical jokes,
and Sir George Grove believed that “the
Eighth Symphony, perhaps more than any
other of the nine, is a portrait of the author
in his daily life, in his habit as he lived; the
more it is studied and heard, the more will
he be found there in his most natural and
characteristic personality.” Certainly this work
presents a different view of Beethoven than
do its immediate neighbors, and it is this very
contrast that helps to bring the man and his
creations more fully into focus.
The compact sonata form of the first
movement begins without preamble. The
opening theme, dance-like if a bit heavyfooted, appears immediately in vigorous
triple meter; the second theme is built
from short sequentially rising figures. The
development section is concerned with a
quick, octave-skip motive and a rather stormy
treatment of the main theme. The second
movement is a sonatina — a sonata form
without a development section — based on a
ticking theme in the woodwinds (actually an
imitation of the metronome recently invented
by Beethoven’s friend Johann Nepomuk
Mälzel) and an impeccable music-box melody
presented by the violins. The third movement
is in the archaic form of the minuet; its central
trio features horns and clarinets. The finale is
joyous in mood and sonata-allegro in form,
with enough repetitions of the main theme
thrown in to bring it close to a rondo.
©2016 Dr. Richard E. Rodda
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE
FIELDS
The Academy of St Martin in the Fields is one
of the world’s premier chamber orchestras,
renowned for its fresh, brilliant interpretations
of the world’s most-loved classical music.
Formed by Sir Neville Marriner in 1958
from a group of leading London musicians,
the Academy gave its first performance in its
namesake church in November 1959. Through
its live performances and vast recording
output – highlights of which include the
1969 best-seller Vivaldi’s Four Seasons and
the soundtrack to 1985’s Oscar-winning film
Amadeus – the Academy quickly gained
an enviable international reputation for its
distinctive, polished and refined sound.
Today the Academy is led artistically by
Music Director and virtuoso violinist Joshua
Bell, retaining the collegiate spirit and
flexibility of the original small, conductorless ensemble which has become an
Academy hallmark. Each year the Academy
works with some of the most talented
soloists and directors in the classical music
scene, performing symphonic repertoire
and ‘chamber music on a grand scale’ at
prestigious venues throughout the world.
Highlights of the Academy’s 2015/16
season include concerts and international
tours with world-renown soloists, including
cellist Steven Isserlis, violinist Julia Fischer
and trumpeter Håkan Hardenberger. Music
Director Bell leads tours of the U.K., Europe
and the United States, Principal Guest
Conductor Murray Perahia tours Germany and
Europe and Life President Sir Neville Marriner
takes the Academy to Asia with renowned
pianist Angela Hewitt.
In addition to a busy concert and touring
schedule, the Academy continues to reach out
to young people and adult learners through
its learning and participation programs. This
year’s projects include the Academy’s flagship
Create, Cultivate, Orchestrate! workshops
for primary and secondary school children;
professional development partnerships with
Southbank Sinfonia, the Guildhall School of
Music and Drama and the Royal Northern
College of Music; and working with some
of London’s most vulnerable and homeless
adults, creating opportunities for everyone to
connect and create music with the orchestra.
With over 500 recordings to date, the
Academy is one of the most recorded
chamber orchestras in the world. Recent
highlights include the Academy’s first
recording under Bell’s directorship, Beethoven
Symphonies Nos. 4 & 7, which reached No.
1 on the Billboard Classical Albums Chart,
and the critically acclaimed Bach, which had
the distinction of being Bell’s first-ever Bach
concertos recording.
Bell’s position as Music Director is
supported by Klara and Larry A. Silverstein
together with the American Friends of the
Academy of St Martin in the Fields. The
Academy’s March 2016 U.S. tour is supported
by Maria Cardamone and Paul Matthews
together with the American Friends of the
Academy of St Martin in the Fields. The
American Friends was founded in 1998 to
support the work of the Academy around the
world, particularly in the U.S. Find out more at
www.asmf.org
JOSHUA BELL
MUSIC DIRECTOR AND VIOLIN
Joshua Bell is among the most celebrated
violinists of his era, renowned for his passion,
restless curiosity and multifaceted musical
interests. His scope is almost unparalleled, as
he is equally at home as a soloist, chamber
music, recording artist and orchestra leader.
Bell was named the Music Director of the
Academy of St Martin in the Fields in 2011,
becoming the first person to hold this post
since Sir Neville Marriner formed the orchestra
in 1958.
Bell’s 2015 summer performances included
a South American and European tour with
the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, a
tour to South Africa including appearances
with the Johannesburg Philharmonic and
Starlight Classics, performances in New York
and Shanghai with the New York Philharmonic
and summer festivals including Verbier,
Tanglewood, Mostly Mozart and Saratoga.
Bell kicked off the fall season performing
with the Houston, St. Louis and Indianapolis
Symphony orchestras, a U.S. recital tour with
pianist Sam Haywood, a European tour with
the Academy of St Martin in the Fields. Three
concerts as guest soloist with the New York
Philharmonic led by Alan Gilbert both ended
the year and started 2016. The new year
continues with a U.S. recital tour with Sam
Haywood and concerts with the Academy
of St Martin in the Fields. Orchestral dates
include the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s
Centennial season celebration conducted by
Marin Alsop, appearances with the Orchestre
de Paris conducted by Paavo Jarvi, and the
London Symphony Orchestra. Bell then heads
to Asia for a recital tour with Alessio Bax. After
returning to Europe for a recital tour with Sam
Haywood, he is back in the U.S. for a guest
solo date with the Detroit Symphony followed
by a tour of the Middle East with the Israel
Philharmonic led by Michael Stern.
An exclusive Sony Classical artist, Bell has
recorded more than 40 CDs – garnering
Grammy, Mercury, Gramophone and Echo
Klassik awards— since his first LP recording at
age 18 on the Decca Label.
The highly anticipated 2014 release of the
Bach album recorded with the Academy of
St Martin in the Fields coincided with the
October HBO YoungArts documentary special
Joshua Bell: A YoungArts MasterClass. Bell
and the Academy’s previous release of the
Beethoven 4th and 7th symphonies debuted
at #1 on the Billboard charts.
Recent releases include Bell’s holiday CD,
Musical Gifts From Joshua Bell and Friends,
featuring collaborations with Chris Botti, Chick
Corea, Gloria Estefan, Renée Fleming, Plácido
Domingo, Alison Krauss and others. Other
releases include French Impressions with pianist
Jeremy Denk, featuring sonatas by SaintSaëns, Ravel and Franck, At Home With Friends,
Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons with the Academy
of St Martin in the Fields, The Tchaikovsky
Concerto with the Berlin Philharmonic, as
well as The Red Violin Concerto, The Essential
Joshua Bell, Voice of the Violin, and Romance
of the Violin which Billboard named the 2004
Classical CD of the Year, and Bell the Classical
Artist of the Year. Bell received critical acclaim
for his concerto recordings of Sibelius and
Goldmark, Beethoven and Mendelssohn,
and the Grammy Award-winning Nicholas
Maw concerto. His Grammy-nominated
Gershwin Fantasy premiered a new work for
violin and orchestra based on themes from
Porgy and Bess. Its success led to a Grammynominated Leonard Bernstein recording that
included the premiere of the West Side Story
Suite as well as the composer’s Serenade.
Bell appeared on the Grammy-nominated
crossover recording Short Trip Home with
composer and double bass virtuoso Edgar
Meyer, as well as a recording with Meyer of
the Bottesini Gran Duo Concertante. Bell also
collaborated with Wynton Marsalis on the
Grammy-winning spoken word children’s
album Listen to the Storyteller and Béla Fleck’s
Grammy Award-winning recording, Perpetual
Motion. Highlights of the Sony Classical film
soundtracks on which Bell has performed
include The Red Violin which won the Oscar
for Best Original Score, the Classical Britnominated Ladies in Lavender, and the films Iris
and Defiance.
Seeking opportunities to increase violin
repertoire, Bell has premiered new works by
Nicholas Maw, John Corigliano, Aaron Jay
Kernis, Edgar Meyer, Behzad Ranjbaran and
Jay Greenberg. Bell also performs and has
encoreartsprograms.com 17
ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS
recorded his own cadenzas to most of the
major violin concertos.
Perhaps the event that helped most to
transform his reputation from “musician’s
musician” to household name was his
incognito performance in a Washington, D.C.
subway station in 2007. Ever adventurous, Bell
had agreed to participate in the Washington
Post story by Gene Weingarten which
thoughtfully examined art and context. The
story earned Weingarten a Pulitzer Prize
and sparked an international firestorm of
discussion. The conversation continues to this
day, thanks in part to the September, 2013
publication of the illustrated children’s book,
The Man With The Violin by Kathy Stinson
illustrated by Dušan Petričić from Annick Press.
Bell has been embraced by a wide
television audience with appearances ranging
from The Tonight Show, Tavis Smiley, Charlie
Rose, and CBS Sunday Morning to Sesame
Street. In 2012, Bell starred in his sixth Live
From Lincoln Center Presents broadcast titled:
One Singular Sensation: Celebrating Marvin
Hamlisch. Other PBS shows include Joshua
Bell with Friends @ The Penthouse, Great
Performances – Joshua Bell: West Side Story
Suite from Central Park, Memorial Day Concert
performed on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol,
and A&E’s Biography. He has twice performed
on the Grammy Awards telecast, performing
music from Short Trip Home and West Side Story
Suite. He was one of the first classical artists
to have a music video on VH1 and was the
subject of a BBC Omnibus documentary. Bell
has appeared in publications ranging from The
Strad and Gramophone to Time, The New York
Times, People Magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful
People, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, GQ,
Vogue and Reader’s Digest among many more.
Growing up with his two sisters in
Bloomington, Indiana, Bell was an avid
computer game player. He placed fourth in
a national tennis tournament at age 10, and
still keeps his racquet close by. At age 4, he
received his first violin after his parents, both
mental health professionals, noticed him
plucking tunes with rubber bands he had
stretched around his dresser drawer handles.
By 12, he was serious about the instrument,
thanks in large part to the inspiration offered
by Josef Gingold, his beloved teacher and
mentor. Two years later, Bell came to national
attention in his debut with Riccardo Muti and
the Philadelphia Orchestra. His Carnegie Hall
debut, an Avery Fisher Career Grant and a
notable recording contract further confirmed
his presence.
In 1989, Bell received an Artist Diploma in
Violin Performance from Indiana University
18 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
where he currently serves as a senior lecturer
at the Jacobs School of Music. His alma mater
honored him with a Distinguished Alumni
Service Award; he has been named an
“Indiana Living Legend” and is the recipient of
the Indiana Governor’s Arts Award.
Bell has received many accolades: in 2013,
he was honored by the New York Chapter
of The Recording Academy; in 2012, by the
National YoungArts Foundation, in 2011, he
received the Paul Newman Award from Arts
Horizons and the Huberman Award from
Moment Magazine. In 2010, Bell was named
Instrumentalist of the Year by Musical America
and received the Humanitarian Award from
Seton Hall University. In 2009, he was honored
by Education Through Music and received the
Academy of Achievement Award in 2008. He
was awarded the Avery Fisher Prize in 2007
and was inducted into the Hollywood Bowl
Hall of Fame in 2005.
In 2003, Bell was invited to perform at
the World Economic Forum for an audience
of global leaders and was later recognized
by that prestigious organization as a Young
Global Leader.
Convinced of the value of music as both
a diplomatic and educational tool, he has
performed for three U.S. Presidents and the
President of China and he has devoted himself
to several charitable causes, most notably
Education Through Music, which has helped
put instruments in the hands of thousands of
kids in America’s inner cities.
Bell serves on the artist committee of
the Kennedy Center Honors, the New
York Philharmonic Board of Directors, and
Education Through Music.
Bell performs on the 1713 Huberman
Stradivarius violin and uses a late 18th century
French bow by François Tourte.
www.joshuabell.com
We mourn the passing of our
dear friend and supporter
MARTHA DICKMAN
(1923-2016)
THE ORCHESTRA
FIRST VIOLIN
Joshua Bell
Harvey de Souza
Miranda Playfair
Amanda Smith
Mark Butler
Raja Halder
Martin Gwilym-Jones
Clare Hayes
SECOND VIOLIN
Jennifer Godson
Clare Hoffman
Winona Fifield
Rebecca Scott
Alicja Smietana
Richard Milone
VIOLA
Fiona Bonds
Alexandros Koustas
Ruth Gibson
Triona Milne
CELLO
FLUTE
Anna Wolstenhome
Sarah Newbold
OBOE
Christopher Cowie
Max Spiers
CLARINET
Nicholas Carpenter
Emily Meredith
BASSOON
Paul Boyes
Richard Skinner
HORN
Stephen Stirling
Emma Witney
Peter Francrombe
Jo Hensel
TRUMPET
Mark David
Paul Sharp
Stephen Orton
William Schofield
Judith Herbert
Reinoud Ford
Adrian Bending
DOUBLE BASS
John Constable
Lynda Houghton
Ben Russell
TIMPANI
HARPSICHORD
ORCHESTRA
MANAGER
Nigel Barratt
Exclusive Management for the
Academy of St Martin in the Fields:
OPUS 3 ARTISTS
470 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor North,
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Apr 6–7, 9–10
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Apr 26
May 19–22
MTT CONDUCTS MAHLER’S HILARY HAHN
THE SONG OF THE EARTH IN RECITAL
MTT & SUSAN GRAHAM
PRESENT BRAHMS
Michael Tilson Thomas conducts one of Mahler’s
most emotionally complex, intimate works:
the epic The Song of the Earth, featuring soloist
Sasha Cooke “who sings with cut-glass precision
and luminous depth” (San Jose Mercury News).
“America’s favorite mezzo” Susan Graham
(Gramophone) joins Michael Tilson Thomas
and the SF Symphony for a special presentation
of Brahms’s sweeping Alto Rhapsody and more.
Featuring Sasha Cooke
Impetuous and authoritative, brilliant and
beautiful” (The New York Times). Multi Grammy
Award-winning violinist Hilary Hahn performs
a recital of thrilling works from Mozart, Bach,
and more.
Presenting Sponsor
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photo: Elise Bergerson
SARAH KOENIG
and JULIE SNYDER
Binge-Worthy Journalism
Backstage with the Creators of SERIAL
A Downey Brand
Speaker Series Event
Monday, March 7, 2016 • 8PM
Jackson Hall
SPONSORED BY:
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
The Lawrence Shepard Family Fund
PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
Davis Humanities Institute
Question & Answer Session
Following the performance with
Sarah Koenig and Julie Snyder.
20 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
BINGE-WORTHY
JOURNALISM
BACKSTAGE WITH THE CREATORS
OF SERIAL, SARAH KOENIG & JULIE
SNYDER
Launched in 2014, Serial became the fastest
podcast to reach five million downloads in
iTunes history. The first season of the podcast
presented a 12-part series on one legal case,
captivating an audience that downloaded the
episodes more than 100 million times (and
counting).
In their live presentation, co-creators Sarah
Koenig and Julie Snyder take the audience
backstage in this cultural phenomenon, using
some of their favorite tape to narrate personal
stories about the ups and downs of creating a
new form of modern storytelling.
SARAH KOENIG
HOST AND CO-CREATOR OF SERIAL
Sarah Koenig is the host and co-creator of Serial.
Launched in 2014, Serial is credited with bringing
mainstream attention to the podcast format, and
Koenig was named one of Time Magazine’s 2015
“The 100 Most Influential People.” Koenig started
out as a newspaper reporter – her first reporting
job was at her weekly hometown paper. She lived
in Moscow, Russia for several years, where she
worked for The New York Times. She returned to
the U.S. and worked for the Concord Monitor in
New Hampshire. She did stints as a crime reporter
and as a political reporter – the same beats she’d
continue to cover at the Baltimore Sun. In 2015, it
was announced that Serial was awarded a 2014
Peabody Award.
In 2004, she became a producer at the radio
show This American Life (TAL). She’s guest hosted
TAL several times, most memorably for the “No
Coincidence, No Story” show, and she’s produced
and reported some of TAL’s most popular shows,
including “Switched at Birth,” “Dr. Gilmer and
Mr. Hyde” and “Habeas Schmabeas,” a Peabody
Award-winning show about Guantanamo Bay.
JULIE SNYDER
CO-CREATOR OF SERIAL AND SENIOR PRODUCER,
THIS AMERICAN LIFE
Julie Snyder has been the guiding force
behind two of the most successful ventures
in audio broadcasting. She is the co-creator of
the podcast Serial, which debuted in October
2014 and has been downloaded more than
100 million times, the most listened-to
podcast in the history of the form. She is also
the senior producer of the public radio show
This American Life, heard by more than four
million listeners a week.
Snyder began working at This American
Life (TAL) in 1997 – almost from its inception
– and along with host Ira Glass, has set the
editorial agenda for the program, winning
four Peabody awards along the way. She has
produced many of TAL’s most entertaining and
memorable episodes, including “24 Hours at
the Golden Apple,” and “Notes on Camp,” while
also heading up the program’s most ambitious
and topical programs, notably shows covering
the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, health care
reform and urban violence in Chicago.
In 2013, Snyder began talking with her
TAL colleague Sarah Koenig about trying
something new: making a show that doesn’t
follow the usual format of a different story
every week, but instead making a show
where they would cover one story over the
course of an entire season. At the time, smart
phone technology was making podcasts
more accessible for the public and the ondemand nature of podcast listening meant
listeners could follow a story in a serialized
way, following each chapter of the story
as it unfolded week by week. The format
was appealing to both Koenig and Snyder,
because it meant they could use all the tools
of narrative journalism to report an in-depth
story that featured twists, turns, tangents and
suspense along the way.
After a year of reporting, with Koenig as
host/reporter and Snyder as editor, Serial
became an overnight sensation. Slate
headlined a story “Serial is Like Nothing I’ve
Ever Heard or Watched Before.” Buzzfeed wrote
“Serial is the year’s best new crime drama (and
it’s not on TV).” The New Yorker called Serial
“the podcast we’ve been waiting for.” In 2015,
it was announced that Serial was awarded a
2014 Peabody Award.
Currently Snyder and Koenig are hard at
work creating Serial Season Two.
encoreartsprograms.com 21
A Hyatt Place, UC Davis With A Twist
Series Event
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 • 8PM
Jackson Hall
SPONSORED BY:
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COMMUNITY RELATIONS
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Wanda Lee Graves
IGUDESMAN & JOO
And Now Mozart…
AND NOW MOZART...
VIRTUOSOS IN MUSIC AND COMEDY
SHRED THE CLASSICS FOR FUN
If Trey Parker and Matt Stone played the violin
and piano, if Penn and Teller performed music
instead of magic and if Seth MacFarlane had a
twin, they would be the brilliantly outrageous
Igudesman and Joo.
Violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist
Hyung-Ki Joo are the inventive comic duo
whose hilarious mix of music, pop culture and
pure zaniness has won them fans of all ages
and cultures worldwide. As evidence, their
YouTube sketches have attracted close to 40
million viewers.
Highly trained musicians, their inspired
silliness can start with Rachmaninoff or Liszt
and find its way through martial arts, movie
classics, rock, hip hop, folk, heavy metal and
disco, step dancing and Monty Python’s
Ministry of Silly Walks. Igudesman and Joo
share the subversive comedic sensibilities of
such influences as South Park, Saturday Night
Live, Ricky Gervais and the Portlandia team.
“There’s no real definition for what we do,”
22 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
says Igudesman. “It’s a kind of theatrical comic
event that works on multiple levels.”
As an antidote to the stuffiness of most
concerts, Igudesman and Joo transform
the concert stage into a musical Pee-wee’s
Playhouse, where the three Bs can be Bach,
Beethoven and Bond, James Bond. Igudesman
and Joo don’t just play the violin with a
vibrating milk frother or use wood blocks
to tickle the ivories, they do it with dazzling
virtuosity. The result, as Vanity Fair puts it: “the
craziest, most hysterically funny music ever.”
Their comic and musical madness has also
developed a huge celebrity following. Rock
and Roll Hall of Famer Billy Joel jumped on
stage for an encore performance with them
at Carnegie Hall. John Malkovich rocked in
his Bach skit. Terry Jones of Monty Python has
said the duo “brings surrealism to the concert
hall and takes its trousers down.” Literally, as
Igudesman often performs in boxer shorts.
In 2016, they return to the U.S. for a 20-city
tour of their hit show And Now Mozart…
which may or may not include any Mozart.
The concert opens with “Photographer,” a
piece that plays on the annoying disturbances
that can ruin a concert. Of course,
Igudesman and Joo take full advantage
of the interruption. “We revel in the magic
that happens when things get out of hand,”
observes Joo.
In addition to the ingenious musical mashups that have become their concert calling
cards, the show also includes such sketches
as “Music Police,” in which Igudesman accuses
Joo of speeding through Chopin and devolves
into a rapid-fire, tour de force of styles,
composers and techniques, from Tchaikovsky
to Philip Glass.
The pair’s loving but humorous homage
to Gershwin, “Spanish Fly Rhapsody,” features
Igudesman flamenco dancing and a tall tale
about a guy named George. “Violaerobics,” is
a fitness workout for the audience inspired
by Richard Simmons with a leotard-clad Joo
leading the festivities.
The second half highlights the subliminal
random thoughts of a pianist playing
Schubert, from “did I leave the iron on?” to
“why didn’t I practice this difficult piece a lot
more?”. “Navigation,” an ode to Siri and GPS
systems, guides Igudesman through a musical
performance.
Leaving no genre untouched, “Cars &
Fiddles” takes country and western music
for a ride. “Gravity” seems to defy the laws of
physics by removing seemingly essential parts
of the piano and then throws in head banging
heavy metal for good measure. Oh, and about
Mozart, perhaps he will show up in the duo’s
now classic assault on Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will
Survive.”
And, while most of the concert is played
for laughs, Igudesman and Joo do show
off their considerable musical chops with
compositions of their own or from the
classical repertoire. Ironically, if Igudesman
and Joo weren’t such gifted serious musicians
they wouldn’t be quite as funny. Their talent
and extensive musical knowledge give them
the freedom to be reverently irreverent.
The two met as teenagers, training at the
prestigious Yehudi Menuhin School in Surrey,
England. Each has a distinguished solo career,
composing, arranging and performing with
orchestras and chamber groups worldwide, as
well as working on film scores and mentoring
young musicians. The successful collaboration
was born out of a desire to create a concert
that they would actually want to attend.
“Aleksey and I have a ping-pong
relationship,” Joo says. “Ideas get flung back
and forth quickly though it often takes a long
time before a sketch is really ready to present
to an audience. The performances’ seeming
spontaneity is the result of shows crafted with
the utmost precision.”
Ultimately, Igudesman and Joo often
quote the motto they have tattooed on their
biceps. “We are never making fun of music.
We are having fun with music.” All right, they
don’t have the tattoos but they do believe, as
their hero Victor Borge said, ”Laughter is the
shortest distance between two people.” For
Igudesman and Joo, music simply provides
the vehicle.
ALEKSEY IGUDESMAN
VIOLIN
Best known as a violinist and composer,
Aleksey Igudesman has also established
himself as an actor, comedian and filmmaker.
His richly varied violin duets have earned
admiration for capturing the essence of
diverse musical languages in a uniquely clever
and joyful way.
A native of St. Petersburg, Russia,
Igudesman was accepted into the Yehudi
encoreartsprograms.com 23
IGUDESMAN & JOO
thoughtful home remodeling
10
years of beautiful design
and quality building
Menuhin School in Surrey, England, at age
12. There he met Hyung-ki Joo, his comedy
partner-to-be, bonding over a mutual
passion for dead composers and deadpan
humor. Their first joint performance was of
Igudesman’s “Bastard Sonata.”
The violinist continued his studies with
Boris Kuschnir at the Vienna Conservatoire.
He has enjoyed a productive career playing,
composing, and arranging for his string trio
Triology, recording several CDs for BMG,
teaching master classes, and performing
with Bobby McFerrin, Julian Rachlin, Janine
Jansen, Joshua Bell, Gidon Kremer, and John
Malkovich, among others.
A prolific composer, Igudesman has
written pieces performed by ensembles and
orchestras worldwide—including the New
York Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra and the Seattle Symphony
Orchestra—and he often appears with them
as a guest soloist and conductor. For his
zesty mix of Celtic, Eastern European and
Latin American music and poetry “Violins of
the World,” he has teamed with some of the
world’s best-known violin virtuosi as well as Sir
Roger Moore.
Igudesman has frequently collaborated
on movies with Academy Award-winning
composer Hans Zimmer, including Sherlock
Holmes, nominated for an Oscar for Best
Original Score, and Madagascar 3. Together
with Zimmer, he co-wrote the soundtrack
for Jealous of the Birds, which took home the
Grand Prize for Best Original Score at the
Rhode Island International Film Festival.
The violinist also directed, produced and
starred in the feature­-length mockumentary
Noseland, screened at 14 international
festivals. It won the Most Entertaining
Documentary award at the Doc Miami
International Film Festival. Additionally, he
appeared in Everything You Always Wanted to
Know About Classical Music.
Igudesman plays on a 1717 Santo Seraphin
violin, kindly loaned to him by Erste Bank.
His compositions are published by Universal
Editions.
HYUNG-KI JOO
PIANO
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24 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
Pianist and composer Hyung-ki Joo has
appeared as a soloist and in chamber
ensembles worldwide. Praised for their energy,
humor and subtleness, his compositions
(published by Universal Editions), have been
performed by renowned orchestras, including
the New York Philharmonic and London
Philharmonic.
Enrolled at age 10 at the Yehudi Menuhin
School in Surrey, England, Joo studied
composition with Simon Parkin and Malcolm
Singer. It was while attending the music
academy that he and eventual comic partner
violinist Aleksey Igudesman discovered a
shared passion for Mahler and Monty Python,
interests that helped inspire the tandems’
work in concert comedy.
Joo continued his studies at the Manhattan
School of Music in New York, and made his
musical debut at Barbican Hall, with the
Warsaw Sinfonia conducted by Sir Yehudi
Menuhin. The Grand Prize winner of the
Stravinsky International Piano Competition,
Joo has worked with Academy Awardwinning composer Vangelis. Rock legend
Billy Joel chose him to arrange and record
Fantasies and Delusions, a classical album
of Joel solo piano pieces for Columbia/
Sony Classical Records that was No. 1 on
the Billboard charts for 18 solid weeks. More
recently, Shani Diluka recorded Joo’s sonnet
for solo piano, Chandeliers.
He has performed at the White House and
co-founded a piano trio with violinist Rafal
Zambrzycki-Payne and cellist Thomas Carroll.
Their seven years together culminated in a
concert series at Wigmore Hall and winning
the celebrated International Parkhouse
Chamber Music Competition. With cellist
Laurent Cirade, he co-created DUEL, his first
show combining music with comedy and
theater.
He is half of the wickedly inventive
Igudesman & Joo, who use pop culture,
comedy, and slapstick to transform concert
stages into musical funhouses. The pair’s
uproarious sketches have attracted a wide
YouTube following, with some 40 million
views. Joo has appeared in several films
including Pianomania, Noseland, and
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About
Classical Music and performed with such
classical heavyweights as Joshua Bell, Gidon
Kremer and Emanuel Ax and actors Roger
Moore and John Malkovich.
Through his Beyond the Practice Room
workshops, Joo helps fellow musicians explore
less chartered areas of successful performing.
In addition to performing and composing,
Joo plans to devote a significant portion of his
time conducting and working with youth and
student orchestras.
ALTAN & LÚNASA
with TIM O’BRIEN
A World Stage Series Event
Thursday, March 17, 2016 • 7PM
Jackson Hall
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Cliff Popejoy
ALTAN
LÚNASA
Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh lead vocal, fiddle
Seán Smyth fiddles, whistles
Ciarán Curran bouzouki
Kevin Crawford flutes, whistles
Ciaran Tourish fiddle
Trevor Hutchinson bass
Dáithí Sproule guitar, vocals
Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes, whistles
Martin Tourish accordion
Ed Boyd guitar
Mark Kelly guitar
Join us before the show for a beer tasting
event in the Yocha Dehe Lobby. Free
admission (21 and over) with ticket to Altan
& Lúnasa with Tim O’Brien. In partnership
with the Robert Mondavi Institute for Food
& Wine Science.
26 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
TIM O’BRIEN
Fiddle, mandolin, banjo
ALTAN & LÚNASA WITH TIM O’BRIEN
ABOUT ALTAN
With their exquisitely produced awardwinning recordings, ranging from the most
sensitive and touching old Irish songs all the
way to hard hitting reels and jigs, Altan have
moved audiences from Donegal to Tokyo to
Seattle with their heartwarming, dynamic live
performances. Throughout, there has been
the unwavering commitment of the band
to bringing the beauty of traditional music,
particularly that of the Donegal fiddlers and
singers, to contemporary audiences in a way
that brings out all its qualities and destroys
none. In fact, Altan have always believed that
Irish traditional music is a modern music in
every sense.
The seeds of the band lie in the music and
fun of gatherings and sessions in kitchens
and pubs in Donegal where virtuoso music
was heard in an atmosphere of respect and
intimacy – it is here that the band’s heart still
lies, whether they are performing on television
in Australia or jamming with Ricky Skaggs on
the west coast of the United States.
And if those were the seeds, the actual
kernel of the band was the music and
personality of band founders, Belfast fluteplayer, Frankie Kennedy, and Gweedore singer
and fiddler, Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh. Whether
in a large noisy festival session, or in the little
traditional clubs of Dublin and Belfast, as
soon as anyone heard their unique music in
the early 80s, it was immediately apparent
there was a rare power at work. They seemed
to be playing their own repertoire, in fact a
combination of old Donegal fiddle music
(then little known outside Donegal) and of
unusual Northern flute tunes, delivered with
a force and fullness that made it hard to
believe there were only two people playing.
This, combined with Kennedy’s immense wit
and playfulness and Mhaonaigh’s beauty and
down-to-earth charm, made an irresistible
package.
Gradually the duo grew organically into
a band in the mid-1980s, forged in the
bustle and crack of a thousand late-night
sessions and festivals throughout Ireland.
The repertoire gave Altan (the name was
taken from a deep and mysterious lake
behind Errigal Mountain in Donegal) a totally
unique stamp, while there was undoubtedly
inspiration from the great Irish bands such as
the Bothy Band, Planxty and De Danann.
Altan’s commitment to good natured fun
was second only to their commitment to
excellence in all things musical, and so the
band members gathered in were top-notch.
Altan has always been a virtuoso band. The
earliest new member was bouzouki player
Ciarán Curran from County Fermanagh, a
session and festival veteran, nephew of fiddler
Ned Curran. Like all accompanists of the time,
Curran had invented his own style on the
instrument, and his playing lies at the heart of
the Altan sound.
With the addition of guitarist Mark Kelly in
the mid-1980s, Altan truly became a band.
Although all band members have a deep
knowledge and love of other music, as well
as Irish, ranging from rock, blues, jazz and
country to classical, Kelly, more than the
others, had actually played other styles, and
from the start he showed a gift for tastefully
bringing fresh rhythms and chordings to the
band arrangements. Kelly and Curran were
heard on the ’87 album Altan, which, though
not officially a band album, inaugurates the
band’s studio sound.
But it was live work in ’84 -’85 that
marked the turning point for Kennedy and
Mhaonaigh, encouraging them to give up
their teaching jobs and go professional.
Particularly influential were short trips to the
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encoreartsprograms.com 27
ALTAN & LÚNASA WITH TIM O’BRIEN
United States when they played concerts in
New York, Minnesota, Madison, Portland and
Seattle with Derry guitarist, Dáithí Sproule, a
Minnesota resident and, like Curran and Kelly,
an old friend. Sproule had played a big part in
an earlier wave of development in the music,
being one of the very first people to adapt
the guitar to old Gaelic songs (many of which
he learned in the Gaeltacht of Rannafast,
just a few miles from Mhaonaigh’s home
in Gweedore). These U.S. concerts, played
in clubs and sometimes in noisy Irish pubs,
where people were expecting a very different
sort of music, convinced Kennedy and
Mhaonaigh that no-compromise traditional
music played with heart and drive could win
over any audience.
In succeeding years, the band recorded
albums for Green Linnet, all of which won
accolades and awards and appeared in the
Billboard charts – their collaborators on these
albums were of the highest caliber: Donál
Lunny, Brian Masterson and Steve Cooney
in particular made great contributions over
the years. Another friend played with the
band for several years, master fiddler Paul
O’Shaughnessey, a dazzling and fiery player
with a deep knowledge of Donegal music.
The two-fiddle sound stuck, but when Altan
began to tour more widely, O’Shaughnessey
had to leave due to work. His place was taken
by another great young Donegal fiddler,
Ciaran Tourish, a player with a special love for
the weaving of spontaneous harmony and
counterpoint round the melodies of the other
lead players.
Through the years, audiences are
continually struck by the genuine camaraderie
and mutual respect among the members of
Altan, and this has been vitally important to
the band themselves as well as producing a
marked effect on live audiences. When a final
element was added to the sound in the early
1990s, it was another friend the band had
known since he was a boy. Accordion player
Dermot Byrne, another Donegal man, was
weaned on the music of an older generation
of Donegal fiddlers, the Dohertys, the Byrnes
and the Cassidys. While Byrne’s status as a
complete virtuoso had been secure for many
years before he joined the band, it is also part
of his gift that he is able to blend seamlessly
with other musicians.
In the early 1990s, Altan was dealt a
devastating blow when band leader Kennedy,
at the height of his powers as a brilliant
and innovative flute player, was diagnosed
with cancer. The band, at Kennedy’s
insistence, continued to tour and perform
with Kennedy’s participation whenever
28 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
possible. No words can describe the effects of
Kennedy’s illness and loss on the band, but he
continues to be a presence and inspiration in
Altan’s life and music. More than anything else,
Kennedy was a lover of life and perhaps the
deepest message of all music is that life goes
on – no matter what.
Altan’s international status and success
found a very practical recognition when
they were signed in 1996 to Virgin Records,
the first Irish band of their kind to be signed
by a major label. The band gained gold and
platinum albums in Ireland and toured larger
venues throughout the world, in Japan,
Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the U.S.
In spite of a hectic touring and recording
schedule, Altan continue fresh in their vision
of bringing the beauty and joy of traditional
music to audiences everywhere, and have
always promised themselves to continue as
long as it’s fun. Fortunately, it still is.
ALTAN MEMBERS
MAIRÉAD NÍ MHAONAIGH
LEAD VOCAL, FIDDLE
Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh is a native of the
Donegal Gaeltacht of Gaoth Dobhair. Her first
language is Gaelic and she has learned many
of her songs from family and neighbors as
well as sourcing older material from archive
facilities.
She is renowned as one of the leading
experts of Donegal fiddle music and promotes
whenever possible the music she has
inherited from her late father, Francie. She is
a founding member of Cairdeas na bhFidléirí,
which was set up 25 years ago to preserve
and facilitate the development of the Donegal
fiddling tradition for future generations.
Mhaonaigh’s musical inspiration initially
came from her family, neighbors, and her
father, a great fiddle teacher with a wealth
of unusual local tunes, many learned
from his mother, Róise. She also received
inspiration from Buncrana fiddle player Dinny
McLaughlin, who was a frequent visitor to her
home when she was growing up. Mhaonaigh
founded Altan along with her late husband,
Frankie Kennedy. From humble beginnings
they brought their music to the world arena
without compromising the deep musical
tradition they loved.
Along with her work with Altan, Mhaonaigh
is always in demand for solo work or presenting
traditional music programs on radio or
television. Past projects include the classic radio
show The Long Note and the television series
The Pure Drop and The Full Set.
Mhaonaigh has recorded with other
musicians such as Enya, the Chieftains, Dolly
Parton, The String Sisters, T With the Maggies,
and many more. Mhaonaigh’s first solo project,
Imeall, was released in 2009.
CIARÁN CURRAN
BOUZOUKI
Ciarán Curran is a native of Kinawley, County
Fermanagh, an area rich in music, song and
folklore and brings his strong family musical
tradition to bear on an instrument relatively
new to Irish traditional music – the bouzouki.
Curran’s late uncle, Ned Curran, was a great
fiddle player and has given the band many
tunes from his unusual repertoire. Curran was
introduced to a lot of traditional music and
musicians by his friend Cathal McConnell
(founding member of Boys of the Lough) from
whom he learned many tunes.
Curran has also played with County Leitrim
fiddler Ben Lennon, to whom he attributes his
strong backing rhythm and bounce. Curran
has worked with County Antrim singer Len
Graham, Enniskillen singer Gabriel McArdle,
Derrygonnelly fiddler Seamus Quinn, and
Belfast flute player Gary Hastings. With
Lennon, Quinn and McArdle, he recorded the
classic Dog Big Dog Little album, named after
two mountains on the borders of County
Fermanagh and County Leitrim.
Curran produced the critically acclaimed
Slán le Loch Éirne, a duet album from Hastings
and Quinn. Curran has developed a unique,
personal and subtle style on the bouzouki
using counter harmonies and melodies that
let the music breathe and show its most
melodic strengths without conflicting with
the essence of the melody.
CIARAN TOURISH
TIN WHISTLE, FIDDLE
Ciaran Tourish hails from Buncrana in East
County Donegal. Although Tourish started
playing the tin whistle at an early age, he
soon took up the fiddle under the guidance
of local legendary fiddler and teacher Dinny
McLaughlin.
In addition to his mastery of the dance
music tradition, Tourish’s quick ear, love
of harmony and counterpoint have led
to his talent being in demand as a valued
collaborator on non-Altan and even nonIrish music projects with a wide range of
musicians and singers including Paul Brady,
Matt Molloy, Mary Black, Maura O’Connell,
Máirtín O’Connor, Dolores Keane, Dé Danann
and American musicians Jerry Douglas and
Tim O’Brien.
He released his first solo recording Down
the Line in 2005 featuring guest musicians Arty
McGlynn, Brady, O’Connell, O’Brien, Douglas,
and Alison Krauss, among others.
DÁITHÍ SPROULE
GUITAR
Dáithí Sproule of Derry, whose first group was
legendary Skara Brae, has lived for many years
in Minnesota.
Sproule was one of the first guitarists to
develop DADGAD guitar tuning for Irish
music. As well as playing and singing with
Altan, he has performed and recorded with
two highly influential traditional music
trios; Bowhand (with James Kelly and Paddy
O’Brien) and Trian (with Liz Carroll and Billy
McComiskey) and has played on recordings of
Tommy Peoples, Seamus and Manus McGuire,
Peter Ostroushko and many others.
In recent years he has been playing with
another great trio, Fingal, with Randal Bays
and James Keane, and performing locally
in Minnesota with friends such as Laura
MacKenzie and Jode and Kate Dowling.
Sproule’s original compositions have been
recorded by Skara Brae, the Bothy Band, Altan,
Trian, Liz Carroll, Aoife Clancy and others.
In 1995, he released his first solo album A
Heart Made of Glass with songs in English and
Irish. In 2008, he released an instrumental
guitar album The Crow in the Sun, featuring 13
original compositions.
In addition to performing and recording,
Sproule is a teacher and lecturer in subjects
ranging from guitar styles and traditional
songs to Irish language and myth.
MARTIN TOURISH
ACCORDION
Martin Tourish is an accordionist, composer,
producer and musicologist originally from
County Donegal and now based in Dublin.
His ancestors were collectors of dance music
whose manuscripts date from 1896.
Tourish’s debut album Clan Ranald with
bouzouki player Luke Ward was released in
2005 and listed by music critic Earle Hitchner
of the Irish Echo and Wall Street Journal as
being in the top 20 albums of 2005. From the
success of the Clan Ranald album, Tourish is
listed in The Rough Guide to Ireland as a piano
accordionist of note while a track from the
album appears in The Rough Guide to Irish
Folk Vol. 2. In 2008, he became the first piano
accordionist to win Irish public television TG4’s
prestigious Young Musician of the Year’award
which a subsequent article in The Irish Times
regarded as “the Irish Music equivalent of an
Oscar.”
encoreartsprograms.com 29
Copyright © UC Regents, Davis campus, 2015. All rights reserved.
It all comes
down to laser
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Whether in his career as a nuclear engineer or his hobby as a baker, Rick
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medical team paired robotic and traditional surgery to remove the cancer
along with a unique new UC Davis research technology – a laser that may
enhance surgical precision and help revolutionize cancer care. Rick emerged
with minimal side effects, an excellent prognosis – and a reason to smile.
See Rick’s story at
healthierworld.ucdavis.edu
ALTAN & LÚNASA
WITH TIM O’BRIEN
In 2008, Tourish was commissioned by TG4
to compose, produce and perform the music
for their brand television advertisement ‘The
More You Look, The More You See’ which
won many national and international awards
and earned the piece of music national
recognition. In 2010, he composed the
theme to national marathon festival Rith2010
to promote the Irish language. In 2011, he
composed the traditional style variation on
a theme for the nationwide Love Live Music
festival. A song he composed entitled ‘An
Gealóg’ appears on Altan’s latest album The
Poison Glen whilst a virtuosic piece entitled
‘The Seventh Degree’ is being performed by
Triona Marshal on harp during The Chieftain’s
50th anniversary tour.
916-852-5466 ApiLimos.com TCP 31349-A
MARK KELLY
GUITAR
Mark Kelly’s earliest musical inspirations were
rock and jazz. Born and raised in Dublin,
his mother was a jazz singer. Like all other
members of the band, Kelly listens to a wide
range of music, especially Steely Dan, rhythm
and blues and country. Kelly brings more of
those subtle and sometimes adventurous
influences from other traditions to his work on
guitar arrangements for Altan. Not a man to
rest on his laurels, he has turned his attention
to studying classical guitar in recent years.
It was the O’Briens of Coolock, whom Kelly
met on holidays in 1975 in the Connemara
Gaeltacht of Tír an Fhia, who first sparked
Kelly’s interest in Irish traditional music and in
the challenges of bringing what he already
knew to creating new arrangements for the
old music.
ABOUT LÚNASA
Lúnasa have sold more than a quarter
of a million albums in the course of the
band’s career and boast an impressive back
catalogue of seven highly acclaimed and
award-winning studio albums.
The band is internationally acknowledged
as being the finest traditional Irish
instrumental outfit of recent times. They are
renowned for their stunning shows honed by
superb musicianship and a constant touring
cycle. They have performed over 1,500 shows
across 36 countries since the band formed
in 1997. They have appeared at international
venues such as The Hollywood Bowl, National
Concert Hall (Dublin), Sydney Opera House
and Moscow International House of Music.
They have been invited to appear at the White
House.
encoreartsprograms.com 31
ALTAN & LÚNASA WITH TIM O’BRIEN
Their inventive arrangements and bass
driven grooves have steered Irish acoustic
music into surprising new territory. Their
recordings have been hailed as some of the
best and most important world music albums
anywhere, while their blend of intelligence,
innovation, virtuosity, and passion has
brought them to the forefront of Celtic music.
Legendary Irish fiddler Kevin Burke says of
the band, “Maintaining the unique, intimate
qualities of a musical tradition while at the
same time meeting and fulfilling the demands
of the contemporary music world is a difficult
juxtaposition to achieve, yet Lúnasa have
managed to accomplish exactly that.”
With the release of Lúnasa with The RTÉ
Concert Orchestra in 2013, the band continued
to explore new directions in the world of
Irish traditional music. “Thankfully, the huge
melting pot of music that exists within the
Irish tradition allows us to seek out exciting
and unexplored melodies that work for a
band like ourselves,” says Kevin Crawford. “This
combined with the newer self-composed
pieces and strong belief in what we do help
to keep both the band and the tradition very
much alive and kicking.” Referencing the new
CD in particular, Seán Smyth adds: “As for the
future, there are many, many musical journeys
left open to us. For now, we’re going to savor
the orchestral theme and look forward to
recreating these wonderful arrangements
in theatres and with audiences around the
world.”
The individual members are in increasing
demand across the globe for touring and
recording work – Trevor Hutchinson went
on a European tour with his old band mates,
The Waterboys; Cillian Vallely collaborated
with Bruce Springsteen on his 2014 release
High Hopes – the album went straight to #1
on album charts across the world; Crawford
toured with Martin Hayes and John Doyle as
The Teetotalers; Ed Boyd has toured with Flook
and Cara Dillon; Smyth transforms back to
being Dr. Smyth and his medical profession
between Lúnasa tours.
LÚNASA MEMBERS
SEAN SMYTH
FIDDLES, WHISTLES
Lúnasa founder Sean Smyth was born in
Straide, County Mayo. Smyth is an All-Ireland
champion on both fiddle and whistle. His
1993 solo debut, The Blue Fiddle, was named
one of the year’s ten best albums by The Irish
Echo. Smyth appears on several recordings
including Ceol Tigh Neachtain, Music at Matt
Molloy’s, Brendan O’Regan’s A Wind of Change,
Alan Kelly’s Out of the Blue and Mosaic,
and Dónal Lunny’s Coolfin. Smyth is also a
practicing medical doctor.
KEVIN CRAWFORD
FLUTES, WHISTLES
Born in Birmingham, U.K., Kevin Crawford’s
early life was one long journey into Irish music
and County Clare, to where he eventually
moved while in his 20s.
He was a member of Moving Cloud,
the Clare-based band who recorded such
critically-acclaimed albums as Moving Cloud
and Foxglove, and he also recorded with
Grianán, Raise The Rafters, Joe Derrane
and Sean Tyrrell and appears on the 1994
recording The Sanctuary Sessions.
A virtuoso flute player, Crawford has
recorded two solo albums, D’Flute Album and
In Good Company and On Common Ground
with bandmate Cillian Vallely. Crawford also
tours with Martin Hayes and John Doyle as
The Teetotalers.
TREVOR HUTCHINSON
STAND-UP BASS
From Cookstown, County Tyrone, Trevor
Hutchinson played bass with the Waterboys
from 1986 to 1991, recording Fisherman’s Blues
(1988) and Room to Roam (1990), the latter
featuring Sharon Shannon. Later he made
three albums with the Sharon Shannon Band:
1991’s Sharon Shannon, 1994’s Out the Gap,
and 1997’s Each Little Thing.
A much-in-demand musician, Hutchinson
has also recorded with Moving Cloud, Altan’s
Dermot Byrne, Eric Bibb, Máire Breatnach, and
Eileen Ivers of Riverdance fame. Hutchinson
and the original Waterboys reunited in 2013 to
celebrate the 25th anniversary and tour their
legendary album Fisherman’s Blues.
CILLIAN VALLELY
UILLEANN PIPES, WHISTLES
A gifted Armagh uilleann pipes and low
whistle player, Cillian Vallely comes from
a talented musical dynasty. He has spent
32 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
most of the recent past touring in the U.S.,
performing with bands such as New Yorkbased Whirligig, Paddy O’Brien’s Chulrua and
with Clare fiddler Seamus Connolly. Vallely
was featured as uilleann pipes soloist in the
Broadway production of Riverdance and
toured with Tim O’Brien in The Crossing. He
and his brother Niall recorded the album
Callan Bridge. In 2013, Vallely was invited to
guest on Bruce Springsteen’s 2014 album
release, High Hopes.
ED BOYD
GUITAR
Ed Boyd, who permanently joined Lúnasa in
2012, is widely regarded as the finest acoustic
guitarist on the European folk circuit. He is
a founding member of the BBC Folk Awardwinning group Flook and the guitarist of
choice for artists such as Cara Dillon and Kate
Rusby.
ABOUT TIM O’BRIEN
Born in Wheeling, West Virginia on March 16,
1954, Tim O’Brien grew up singing in church
and school, and started playing folk and rock
music on guitar at age 12.
After seeing musician Doc Watson on TV,
he became a lifelong devotee of old time
and bluegrass music. He started making his
living as a musician at age 19 in Chicago and
in Jackson, Wyoming, eventually relocating to
Boulder, Colorado, in the fall of 1974.
O’Brien found work there as a fiddler with
local bluegrass bands and as a member of the
Ophelia Swing, recording with them and with
Pete Wernick in 1977. In those early Colorado
years, he started playing the mandolin, and
studied guitar and music theory with local jazz
great Dale Bruning.
In 1978, O’Brien co-founded the bluegrass
group Hot Rize with Pete Wernick, Charles
Sawtelle, and Nick Forster. Hot Rize and
Western Swing alter-egos Red Knuckles
and the Trailblazers eventually recorded
ten albums and toured the U.S., Europe,
Japan, and Australia. The group was
named Entertainer of the Year 1990 by the
International Bluegrass Music Association,
and their “Colleen Malone” was named IBMA’s
Song of the Year in 1991. O’Brien won IBMA’s
Male Vocalist of the year in 1993, and again in
2005, when he also won song of the year for
“Look Down That Lonesome Road.”
Solo recordings started with 1982’s Hard
Year Blues, and other projects included three
duet albums with his sister Mollie O’Brien.
Folks in Nashville started noticing O’Brien’s
songs, and he had top ten country hits in
1989 and 1990 with Kathy Mattea’s versions of
Hot Rize songs “Walk The Way The Wind Blows”
and “Untold Stories.” Other notable covers by
New Grass Revival, Nickel Creek, Garth Brooks,
and the Dixie Chicks followed. Hot Rize went
dormant in the spring of 1990, after which
O’Brien performed and recorded on his own,
eventually releasing 14 solo recordings, as
well as collaborations with Dirk Powell (Songs
From The Mountain) and with Darrell Scott
(Real Time). Landmark solo releases include
a Grammy-nominated set of bluegrass
Dylan covers – Red On Blonde, the Celtic/
Appalachian fusion of The Crossing, and 2005’s
Grammy-winning Fiddler’s Green.
O’Brien toured and recorded with Steve
Earle’s Bluegrass Dukes in the early 2000s, and
with Mark Knopfler in 2009 and 2010. Other
recent collaborations include another CD
with Darrell Scott (Memories and Moments),
a track with Steve Martin (“Daddy Played
The Banjo”), a family band set of Roger Miller
songs (Reincarnation), and the reunited Hot
Rize’s When I’m Free. A collaboration with Jerry
Douglas, Sean Camp and others -The Earls
Of Leicester - won both a Grammy as well as
IBMA’s Record of the Year in 2015.
O’Brien has produced recordings for Laurie
Lewis, Mollie O’Brien, the Yonder Mountain
String Band, the Infamous Stringdusters,
Cahalen Morrison and Eli West, and Old Man
Luedecke. He has recorded and performed
with The Chieftains, Joan Baez, Dierks Bentley,
Bill Frisell, and the Wheeling Symphony
Orchestra. He contributed to the movie
soundtrack of O Brother, Where Art Thou? as
well as those of Cold Mountain, and The Blob.
He is a former president of the International
Bluegrass Music Association, and currently
serves on the board of the West Virginia Music
Hall of Fame. O’Brien formed his own record
label, Howdy Skies Records, in 1999, and in
2015 launched the digital download label
Short Order Sessions (SOS) with his partner
Jan Fabricius. SOS releases two new tracks
every month. He has two sons, Jackson (33)
and Joel (25), and has lived in Nashville since
1996. Hobbies include cooking, skiing, and
playing traditional Irish music.
O’Brien’s newest CD, Pompadour, came out
in October of 2015. It features six new songs
and four covers, including a banjo driven
version of James Brown’s “Get Up Offa That
Thing.”
indulge
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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Michael Tilson Thomas, Music
Director
Sarah Hicks, conductor
A Steven Spielberg Film
PRODUCTION CREDITS
E.T. THE EXTRA‑TERRESTRIAL (1982)
A Film + Music Event
Thursday, March 24, 2016 • 7PM
Jackson Hall
CAST
E. T. The Extra-Terrestrial—Film with
Orchestra produced by Film Concerts Live!,
a joint venture of IMG Artists, LLC and The
Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency, Inc.
SPONSORED BY
Running time: 115 minutes
Dee Wallace
Peter Coyote
Henry Thomas as Elliot
CREDITS
Producers: Steven A. Linder and Jamie
Richardson
Production Coordinator: Rob Stogsdill
Worldwide Representation: IMG Artists, LLC
Technical Director: Mike Runice
Music composed by John Williams
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY
Music by John Williams
Patti Donlon
Written by Melissa Mathison
Music Preparation: JoAnn Kane Music
Service
Produced by Steven Spielberg and
Kathleen Kennedy
Film Preparation for Concert Performance:
Ramiro Belgardt
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Technical Consultant: Laura Gibson
A Universal Picture
Sound Remixing for Concert Performance:
Chace Audio by Deluxe
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial is a trademark and
copyright of Universal Studios.
Licensed by Universal Studios Licensing LLC.
All Rights Reserved.
E.T. is available on Blu-ray and DVD from
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.
The San Francisco Symphony’s Film Series is
sponsored by the Koret Foundation.
34 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
The score for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial has been
adapted for live concert performance.
With special thanks to: Universal Studios,
Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy, John
Williams, David Newman, Chris Herzberger,
Tamara Woolfork, Adrienne Crew, Darice
Murphy, and Mark Graham.
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
JOHN WILLIAMS AND
E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL
Steven Spielberg’s film E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
has always held a special place in my heart, and
I personally think it’s his masterpiece. In looking
at it today, it’s as fresh and new as when it was
made in 1982. Cars may change, along with
hairstyles and clothes… but the performances,
particularly by the children and by E.T. himself,
are so honest, timeless and true, that the film
absolutely qualifies to be ranked as a classic.
What’s particularly special about tonight’s
concert is that we’ll hear one of our great
symphony orchestras, the San Francisco
Symphony, performing the entire score live,
along with the complete picture, sound effects
and dialogue.
I know I speak for everyone connected
with the making of E.T. in saying that we’re
greatly honored by this event… and I hope
that tonight’s audience will find great joy in
experiencing this magical film.
FURTHER LISTENING
by Jeff Hudson
SYMPHONY AND CINEMA
What’s it like conducting an orchestra during the screening of a landmark film? I posed
that question to Christian Baldini – he’s the conductor of the UC Davis Symphony
Orchestra (and Sacramento’s Camellia Symphony Orchestra), and he’s been a guest
conductor with the San Francisco Symphony on several occasions. Last December,
Baldini flew to Argentina (his homeland) to conduct an orchestra during a screening of
2001: A Space Odyssey at the Teatro Colon.
I asked Baldini whether conducting an orchestra accompanying a film resembled
conducting opera – in both cases, the music must mesh with the visuals. He replied,
“Conducting a film is indeed similar to conducting an opera, but much less flexible.
In opera things are very much alive and they can change a lot from one performance
to the next, even with the very same cast. With a film, the ideal goal is to have all
performances be as close as possible to the original… You have to fit in exactly with the
time code that the film is ‘caged’ in.”
Baldini added, “Having said that, I did find it quite pleasurable to come in and out of
this (cinematic) ‘cage.’ There were many beautiful moments in 2001: A Space Odyssey,
where it was possible to perform with some freedom. 2001 uses several pieces by
Ligeti, Richard Strauss, Khachaturian and of course the famous ‘Blue Danube’ by Johann
Strauss II.”
Baldini also noted the San Francisco Symphony’s new release (on March 11, 2016)
of an album on the SFS Media label featuring the first recordings of several works by
the young Bay Area composer (and club DJ) Mason Bates, who is still in his 30s. The
album, led by Michael Tilson Thomas, includes “The B-Sides,” a piece for orchestra and
electronics that the San Francisco Symphony and Tilson Thomas commissioned (and
performed at the Mondavi Center in 2009). Also on the album are SFS performances
of two other Bates compositions – “Alternative Energy” (commissioned by the Chicago
Symphony in 2011) and “Liquid Interface” (commissioned by the National Symphony in
2007).
Baldini (also in his 30s) recalled “Mason invited me to conduct his sinfonietta ‘The
Rise of Exotic Computing’ last October at San Francisco’s Ruby Skye (a venue with a
dance floor). It was a wonderful experience performing contemporary ‘classical’ music
in a nightclub... There were of course lots of young people. Dancing. Drinking. Enjoying
themselves. Some ‘concertgoers’ high-fived me after a performance, right from the
dance floor – a first for me!”
JEFF HUDSON CONTRIBUTES COVERAGE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS TO CAPITAL PUBLIC RADIO,
THE DAVIS ENTERPRISE, AND SACRAMENTO NEWS AND REVIEW.
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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Michael Tilson Thomas
Music Director and Conductor
Herbert Blomstedt
Conductor Laureate
Donato Cabrera
Resident Conductor
Ragnar Bohlin
Chorus Director
Vance George
Chorus Director Emeritus
FIRST VIOLINS
Alexander Barantschik
Concertmaster
Naoum Blinder Chair
Nadya Tichman
Associate Concertmaster
San Francisco Symphony Foundation Chair
Mark Volkert
Assistant Concertmaster
75th Anniversary Chair
Jeremy Constant
Assistant Concertmaster
Mariko Smiley
Paula & John Gambs
Second Century Chair
Melissa Kleinbart
Katharine Hanrahan Chair
Yun Chu
Sharon Grebanier
Naomi Kazama Hull
In Sun Jang
Yukiko Kurakata
Catherine A. Mueller Chair
Suzanne Leon
Leor Maltinski
Diane Nicholeris
Sarn Oliver
Florin Parvulescu
Victor Romasevich
Catherine Van Hoesen
SECOND VIOLINS
Dan Carlson
Principal
Dinner & Swig Families Chair
Paul Brancato
Acting Associate Principal
Audrey Avis Aasen-Hull Chair
John Chisholm
Acting Assistant Principal
Dan Nobuhiko Smiley
The Eucalyptus Foundation
Second Century Chair
Raushan Akhmedyarova
David Chernyavsky
Cathryn Down
Darlene Gray
Amy Hiraga
Kum Mo Kim
Kelly Leon-Pearce
Elina Lev
Isaac Stern Chair
Chunming Mo
Polina Sedukh
Chen Zhao
Sarah Knutson†
36 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
VIOLAS
Jonathan Vinocour
Principal
Yun Jie Liu
Associate Principal
Katie Kadarauch
Assistant Principal
John Schoening
Joanne E. Harrington & Lorry I. Lokey
Second Century Chair
Nancy Ellis
Gina Cooper
David Gaudry
David Kim
Christina King
Wayne Roden
Nanci Severance
Adam Smyla
Matthew Young
CELLOS
Michael Grebanier
Principal
Philip S. Boone Chair
Peter Wyrick
Associate Principal
Peter & Jacqueline Hoefer Chair
Amos Yang
Assistant Principal
Margaret Tait
Lyman & Carol Casey
Second Century Chair
Barbara Andres
The Stanley S. Langendorf Foundation
Second Century Chair
Barbara Bogatin
Jill Rachuy Brindel
Gary & Kathleen Heidenreich
Second Century Chair
Sébastien Gingras
David Goldblatt
Christine & Pierre Lamond
Second Century Chair
Carolyn McIntosh
Anne Pinsker
BASSES
Scott Pingel*
Principal
Jeremy Kurtz-Harris†
Acting Associate Principal
Stephen Tramontozzi
Assistant Principal
Richard & Rhoda Goldman Chair
S. Mark Wright
Lawrence Metcalf Second Century Chair
Charles Chandler
Lee Ann Crocker
Chris Gilbert
Brian Marcus
William Ritchen
FLUTES
Tim Day
Principal
Caroline H. Hume Chair
Robin McKee
Associate Principal
Catherine & Russell Clark Chair
Linda Lukas
Alfred S. & Dede Wilsey Chair
Catherine Payne
Piccolo
OBOES
Eugene Izotov
Principal
Edo de Waart Chair
Christopher Gaudi†
Acting Associate Principal
Pamela Smith
Dr. William D. Clinite Chair
Russ deLuna
English Horn
Joseph & Pauline Scafidi Chair
CLARINETS
Carey Bell
Principal
William R. & Gretchen B. Kimball Chair
Luis Baez
Associate Principal & E-flat Clarinet
David Neuman
Jerome Simas
Bass Clarinet
BASSOONS
Stephen Paulson
Principal
Steven Dibner
Associate Principal
Rob Weir
Steven Braunstein
Contrabassoon
HORNS
Robert Ward
Principal
Nicole Cash
Associate Principal
Bruce Roberts
Assistant Principal
Jonathan Ring
Jessica Valeri
Kimberly Wright*
TRUMPETS
Mark Inouye
Principal
William G. Irwin Charity Foundation Chair
Mark Grisez†
Acting Associate Principal
Peter Pastreich Chair
Guy Piddington
Ann L. & Charles B. Johnson Chair
Jeff Biancalana
TROMBONES
Timothy Higgins
Principal
Robert L. Samter Chair
Timothy Owner†
Acting Associate Principal
Paul Welcomer
John Engelkes
Bass Trombone
TUBA
Jeffrey Anderson
Principal
James Irvine Chair
HARP
Douglas Rioth
Principal
TIMPANI
Michael Israelievitch†
Acting Principal
Marcia & John Goldman Chair
PERCUSSION
Jacob Nissly
Principal
Raymond Froehlich
Tom Hemphill
James Lee Wyatt III
KEYBOARDS
Robin Sutherland
Jean & Bill Lane Chair
Margo Kieser
Principal Librarian
Nancy & Charles Geschke Chair
John Campbell
Assistant Librarian
Dan Ferreira
Assistant Librarian
*On Leave
†Acting member of the San Francisco
Symphony
The San Francisco Symphony string section
utilizes revolving seating on a systematic basis.
Players listed in alphabetical order change seats
periodically.
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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) gave its
first concerts in 1911 and has grown in acclaim
under a succession of distinguished music
directors: Henry Hadley, Alfred Hertz, Basil
Cameron, Issay Dobrowen, Pierre Monteux,
Enrique Jordá, Josef Krips, Seiji Ozawa, Edo de
Waart, Herbert Blomstedt, and Michael Tilson
Thomas, who assumed his post in 1995. The
SFS has won such recording awards as France’s
Grand Prix du Disque, Britain’s Gramophone
Award, and the United States’ Grammy. Each
year the Symphony offers Adventures in
Music, the longest running education program
among this country’s orchestras, which brings
music to every child in grades 1 through 5 in
San Francisco’s public schools. In 2006, the SFS
launched the multimedia Keeping Score on
PBS-TV and the web. For more information, go
to www.sfsymphony.org.
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SARAH HICKS
CONDUCTOR
Sarah Hicks has served
as Principal Conductor
of the Live at Orchestra
Hall series with the
Minnesota Orchestra
since 2009. In addition to conducting most
pops and special presentations, she has been
instrumental in creating new pops productions
while also heading the innovative series, Inside
the Classics. She concurrently holds the position
of Staff Conductor at the Curtis Institute of
Music. She received her BA in composition
magna cum laude from Harvard University.
She holds an Artists’ Degree in conducting
from the Curtis Institute of Music, where she
studied with Otto-Werner Mueller. Hicks has
previously held positions with the North
Carolina Symphony, Richmond Symphony,
Florida Philharmonic, and the Philadelphia
Singers. She has also served as music director
of the Hawaii Summer Symphony, an ensemble
she founded in 1991 and which she led for
five seasons. Hicks has guest conducted
extensively both in the U.S. and abroad, with
ensembles including the orchestras of San
Francisco, Philadelphia, Chicago, Atlanta,
Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Detroit, Washington,
Indianapolis, and Phoenix; the Boston and
Cincinnati Pops; the Prime Philharmonic of
Seoul, Korea; and the Orchestra of La Fenice.
She led the Los Angeles Philharmonic in
Fourth of July concerts at the Hollywood Bowl
in 2012, 2013, and 2015. Recent highlights
include debuts with the St. Louis, San Diego,
and Edmonton symphonies. Throughout her
career Hicks has collaborated with diverse
soloists, from Jaime Laredo and Hilary Hahn
Proud Sponsor of the
Mondavi Center since 2002
The mission of the The Office of Campus Community Relations
(OCCR) is to ensure the attention to those components of the
campus community that affect community, campus climate,
diversity and inclusiveness.
http://occr.ucdavis.edu
encoreartsprograms.com 37
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
to Josh Groban and Smokey Robinson. She
conducted the final leg of Sting’s Symphonicity
tour and appeared at the 2012 World Economic
Forum in St. Petersburg conducting the St.
Petersburg Philharmonic in concert with
Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Sumi Jo, and Jackie
Evancho. A committed proponent of the
performance of new music, Hicks completed
a Microcommission Project (the first of its
kind) with the Minnesota Orchestra in which a
new work by composer Judd Greenstein was
funded by hundreds of microdonations. Her
recording with the Vermont Symphony, Triple
Doubles, featuring music of Richard Danielpour
and David Ludwig with soloists Jaime Laredo
and Sharon Robinson, was recently released
on the Bridge Label. She has also conducted
performances with Composers in the
Shape of a Pear in Cleveland and the Aspen
Contemporary Ensemble.
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Center for Performing Arts, UC Davis Conference Center, minutes from
downtown Davis, close proximity to the freeway and best of all our
hotel is located on the University of California Davis Campus.
BOOK
JOHN WILLIAMS
COMPOSER
In a career spanning
five decades, John
Williams has become
one of America’s most
accomplished and
successful composers for film and for the
concert stage, and he remains one of our
nation’s most distinguished and contributive
musical voices. He has composed the music
for more than 100 films, including all seven
Star Wars films, the first three Harry Potter
films, Superman, Memoirs of a Geisha, Home
Alone, and The Book Thief. His 40-year artistic
partnership with director Steven Spielberg
has resulted in many of Hollywood’s most
acclaimed and successful films, including
Schindler’s List, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Jaws,
Jurassic Park, Close Encounters of the Third Kind,
the Indiana Jones films, Saving Private Ryan,
and Lincoln. Williams has composed themes
for four Olympic Games. He served as music
director of the Boston Pops Orchestra for 14
seasons and remains their Laureate Conductor.
He has composed numerous works for the
concert stage including two symphonies,
and concertos commissioned by many of
America’s most prominent orchestras. Williams
has received five Academy Awards and 50
Oscar nominations (making him the second
most nominated person in the history of the
Oscars, topped only by Walt Disney’s 59), seven
British Academy Awards, 22 Grammys, four
Golden Globes, and five Emmys. In 2003, he
received the Olympic Order (the International
Olympic Committee’s highest honor) for his
contributions to the Olympic movement. In
2004, he received the Kennedy Center Honor,
and in 2009 he received the National Medal of
Arts, the highest award given to artists by the
U.S. Government.
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38 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
We mourn the passing of our
dear friend and supporter
NANCY DuBOIS
(1923-2016)
USE YOUR VOICE 2016
Featuring: P
ATTY GRIFFIN
SARA WATKINS
& ANAÏS MITCHELL
with David Pulkingham, guitar & vocals
An American Heritage Series Event
Wednesday, March 30, 2015 • 8PM
Jackson Hall
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT FROM
Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew
TOUR STAFF:
Carolyn Rosenfeld Tour Manager
Roy Taylor Technical Director
Jerry Holmes Stage Production
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Columbia Artists Management LLC
Tim Fox / Alison Ahart Williams
1790 Broadway, New York, NY 10019
Produced in association with
Solid Productions, LLC
Chris Goldsmith and Thirty Tigers,
David Macias
USE YOUR VOICE PUTS PATTY GRIFFIN,
SARA WATKINS AND ANAÏS MITCHELL
ON TOUR ON BEHALF OF THE LEAGUE
OF WOMEN VOTERS
Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter
Patty Griffin teams up with Sara Watkins,
acclaimed solo artist and member of the
platinum recording act Nickel Creek, and
critical favorite singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell
on the highly anticipated national tour,
“Use Your Voice”.
The genesis of this tour came from Griffin
wanting to make the world, her country and
her community a better place to be. She asked
two of her friends whom she had previously
toured with to join her to spread the message
that getting informed and participating in
the process was the only way to fight the
despondency and disconnect that many feel
about civic involvement. She says, “I am so
excited about this upcoming tour! It all started
with me looking for a way to participate in
the world as I’ve grown older – you know,
complain a little less, do a little more. I then
came across information that was surprising
to me about voting in the US. I didn’t realize
that single women are an incredibly influential
voting group in the US, and, too many are not
turning out to vote. This is troubling on a lot of
levels, but the most troubling one to me is that
so many in this group, of which I am a member,
find so little to connect with in the workings of
government. So little that we don’t bother. I am
hoping with this tour to bang the drum about
our democracy, about our communities, and
even about our neighbors down the street.”
It was important to Griffin that the message
not be lost in the fog of partisan conversations
that dominate civic discourse. That led her
to seek out a partnership with The League of
Women Voters, whose mission is to expand
participation in the voting process and give
a voice to all Americans, regardless of their
political ideals.
PATTY GRIFFIN
Patty Griffin is a Grammy-Award winning
artist who has achieved great acclaim for her
songwriting as well as her powerful voice. Her
first two albums, Living With Ghosts and Flaming
Red are considered seminal albums in the
singer-songwriter genre, while Children Running
Through won Best Album and led to her being
named Best Artist at the 2007 Americana Music
Awards. She won the Grammy for Downtown
USE YOUR VOICE
Church, her 2010 gospel album. Her songs have
been covered by a myriad of artists including
Emmylou Harris, The Dixie Chicks, Joan Baez and
Bette Midler. She was born in Old Town, Maine
and resides in Austin, Texas.
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Be a part of our community!
SARA WATKINS
Sara Watkins is a singer-songwriter with deep
California roots. She debuted in 1989 as a
founding member of the progressive bluegrass
group Nickel Creek along with her brother
Sean and mandolinist Chris Thile. She has two
solo albums, Sara Watkins and Sun Midnight
Sun on Nonesuch Records and readying a
third solo release for this summer. In 2015, the
Watkins siblings took their variety show, Watkins
Family Hour, on the road and celebrated their
decade-plus Los Angeles residency with a much
heralded release, Watkins Family Hour. The album
featured performances from LA fixtures such
as Fiona Apple, Benmont Tench, Greg Leisz,
Sebastian Steinberg and Don Heffington. If
three projects weren’t enough, Watkins is also a
member of another acclaimed trio, I’m With Her,
with fellow songstresses Sarah Jarosz and Aoife
O’Donovan.
ANAÏS MITCHELL
INDELIBLY DAVIS
A Quarter-Century of UC Davis Stories…and Backstories
by LARRY N. VANDERHOEF
“This lively and highly readable book
is a distinctly different kind of memoir.
Larry Vanderhoef makes UC Davis
and its remarkable people the heart of
his account of 25 years as a provost
and chancellor—a choice that is
beautifully vindicated by the power and insight of
these stories.”
DAVIS
Backstories
LIBLY
Stories…and
INDE
of UC Davis
er-Century
A Quart
—Patricia Pelfrey, UC historian and author
LARRY N.
EF
VANDERHO
“The backstories of decision-making are what make
this an intriguing must-read for all Aggies and truly
for anyone who cares about higher education.”
—Bob Dunning, Davis Enterprise columnist
Available in hard cover ($29.95) at all UC Davis Stores (http://ucdavisstores.com), The
Avid Reader Davis (http://avidreaderbooks.com/) and the Mondavi Center Gift Shop,
and digitally, with video extras, via UC’s eScholarship website (http://escholarship.org/
uc/ucdavischancelloremeritus_books)
40 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
Anaïs Mitchell is a Vermont and Brooklynbased songwriter who comes from the world
of narrative folksong, poetry and balladry. She
recorded for Ani Difranco’s Righteous Babe
Records for several years before founding her
own Wilderland label in 2012. Her recent albums
have found themselves on ‘Year-End Best-Of’
lists including NPR, the Wall Street Journal and
the Guardian. The UK’s Daily Telegraph described
her as “writing material that stands comparison
with the great singer-songwriters of the past few
decades.” The stage production of her folk-opera
album Hadestown will premiere off-Broadway at
New York Theatre Workshop in May.
DAVID PULKINGHAM
David Pulkingham is a guitarist, songwriter,
producer and teacher. Based in Austin, Texas,
he has been a mainstay of the thriving music
scene for the last 23 years. Pulkingham has
released two instrumental albums entitled David
Pulkingham Plays Guitar Volumes 1 and 3, and
in 2015 he released his first singer-songwriter
album entitled Little Pearl. Pulkingham currently
tours with Patty Griffin and has played with her
for the past four years. His mastery of numerous
styles has led him to share the stage and record
with many artists around the world. Famed David
Bowie producer Tony Visconti calls Pulkingham,
“the complete guitarist, one of the best I have
ever worked with.”
THE NIELLO COMPANY,
PROUD PARTNER OF
THE MONDAVI CENTER.
THE ART OF GIVING
The Mondavi Center is deeply grateful for
the generous contributions of our dedicated
patrons whose gifts are a testament to the
value of the performing arts in our lives.
Annual donations to the Mondavi Center
directly support our operating budget and
are an essential source of revenue. Please
join us in thanking our loyal donors whose
philanthropic support ensures our ability
to bring great artists and speakers to our
region and to provide nationally recognized
arts education programs for students and
teachers.
For more information on supporting the Mondavi Center, visit MondaviArts.org or call 530.754.5438.
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42 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
PRODUCER CIRCLE
$3,500 - $6,999
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Ed and Bonnie Green*
Diane Gunsul-Hicks
Charles H. and Ann W. Halsted
John and Regi Hamel
Judith and William Hardardt*
Dee Hartzog
Donine Hedrick and David Studer
Charles and Eva Hess
In Memory of Christopher Horsley*
Clarence and Barbara Kado
Teresa Kaneko*
Brian and Dorothy Landsberg
Edward and Sally Larkin*
Drs. Richard Latchaw and Sheri Albers
Ginger and Jeffrey Leacox
Allan and Claudia Leavitt
Robert and Barbara Leidigh
Yvonne LeMaitre
Nelson Lewallyn and Marion Pace-Lewallyn
David and Ruth Lindgren
Paul and Diane Makley*
In Memory of Allen G. Marr
Judith and Eldridge Moores
Katharine and Dan Morgan
Alice Oi
Miep Palmer
John and Misako Pearson
Roger and Ann Romani*
Hal and Carol Sconyers*
Wilson and Kathryn Smith
Tom and Meg Stallard*
Tom and Judy Stevenson*
Brian Tarkington and Katrina Boratynski
George and Rosemary Tchobanoglous
Ed Telfeyan and Jerilyn Paik-Telfeyan
Ken Verosub and Irina Delusina
Wilbur Vincent and Georgia Paulo
Jeanne Hanna Vogel and Warren G. Roberts
Claudette Von Rusten
John Walker and Marie Lopez
The One and Only Watson
Patrice White
Richard and Judy Wydick
Yin and Elizabeth Yeh
And 5 donors who prefer to remain
anonymous
DIRECTOR CIRCLE
$1,500 - $3,499
The Aboytes Family
Beulah and Ezra Amsterdam
Russell and Elizabeth Austin
Chris and Andie Bandy
Laura and Murry Baria*
Lydia Baskin*
Drs. Noa and David Bell
Don and Kathy Bers*
Jo Anne Boorkman*
Neil and Elizabeth Bowler
Edwin Bradley
Linda Brandenburger
Susie and Jim Burton
Davis and Jan Campbell
Cantor & Company, A Law
Corporation
Randy Cobb
Allison Coudert
Jim and Kathy Coulter*
John and Celeste Cron*
Robert D. and Nancy Nesbit
Crummey
Terry and Jay Davison
Bruce and Marilyn Dewey
Martha C. Dickman*
Dotty Dixon*
DLMC Foundation
Matt Donaldson and Steve
Kyriakis
Wayne and Shari Eckert*
Domenic and Joan Favero
Karl Gerdes and Pamela Rohrich
Erla and David Goller
John and Patty Goss*
Jack and Florence Grosskettler
Dr. Clare Hasler-Lewis and
Cameron Lewis
Tim and Karen Hefler
Sharna and Mike Hoffman
Sarah and Dan Hrdy
Ronald and Lesley Hsu
In Memory of Flint and Ella
Ruth W. Jackson
Martin and JoAnn Joye*
Barbara Katz
Nancy and John Keltner
Charlene R. Kunitz
Spencer Lockson and Thomas
Lange
Mary Jane Large and Marc
Levinson
Francie and Artie Lawyer*
Hyunok Lee and Daniel Sumner
Lin and Peter Lindert
Palma Lower and Sue Cipolla
Richard and Kyoko Luna
Natalie and Malcolm MacKenzie*
Debbie Mah and Brent Felker*
Douglas Mahone and Lisa
Heschong
Dennis H. Mangers and Michael
Sestak
Susan Mann
Judith and Mark Mannis
Marilyn Mansfield
Rosa Marquez and Richard
Breedon
Yvonne L. Marsh
Shirley Maus*
Janet Mayhew*
In Memory of William F. McCoy
Helga and Bob Medearis
Stephen Meyer and Mary Lou Flint
Barbara Moriel
Augustus Morr
R. Mott, J. Persin, D. Verbeck
Robert Ono and Betty Masuoka
John Pascoe and Sue Stover
Bonnie A. Plummer
Prewoznik Foundation
Linda and Lawrence Raber*
Kay Resler*
*Friends of Mondavi Center
Christopher Reynolds and Alessa
Johns
In Memory of Guy E. Richards, Jr.
Tom Roehr
Liisa Russell
Christian Sandrock and Dafna
Gatmon
Ed and Karen Schelegle
Neil and Carrie Schore
Bonnie and Jeff Smith
Edward and Sharon Speegle
Les and Mary Stephens De Wall
Maril R. and Patrick Stratton
Geoffrey and Gretel WandesfordSmith
Dan and Ellie Wendin
Dale and Jane Wierman
Gayle K. Yamada and David H.
Hosley
And 6 donors who prefer to
remain anonymous
ENCORE CIRCLE
$600 - $1,499
Chris Armanini
Michael and Shirley Auman*
Antonio and Alicia Balatbat*
Robert and Susan Benedetti
In Memory of Marie Benisek
Patricia Bissell
Muriel Brandt
Manuel Calderon de la Barca
Sanchez and Karen Zito
Carole Cory and Jan Stevens
Don and Dolores Chakerian
Jack and Gale Chapman
Simon Cherry
Sharon Cuthbertson*
Anne Duffey
John and Cathie Duniway
Robert and Melanie Ferrando
Ron Fisher and Pam Gill-Fisher
Doris Flint
Audrey Fowler
Jennifer D. Franz
E. F. and Paul Goldstene
David and Mae Gundlach
Robin Hansen and Gordon Ulrey
Karen Heald and Casey
McElheney
Paul and Nancy Helman
Leonard and Marilyn Herrmann
John and Katherine Hess
B.J. Hoyt
Patricia Hutchinson*
In Honor of Barbara Jackson
Vince Jacobs and Cecilia Delury
Robert D. and Barbara F. Jones
Louise Kellogg and Douglas
Neuhauser
Paula Kubo
Ruth Lawrence
Michael and Sheila Lewis*
Robert and Betty Liu
Jeffrey and Helen Ma
Gary C. and Jane L. Matteson
Catherine McGuire
Joy Mench and Clive Watson
Roland and Marilyn Meyer
Nancy Michel
Robert and Susan Munn*
Don and Sue Murchison
Bob and Kinzie Murphy
John and Carol Oster
Frank Pajerski
Jacqueline Proett
Evelyn and Otto Raabe
Lawrence and Celia Rabinowitz
J. and K. Redenbaugh
Jack and Judy Reitan
C. Rocke
Heather and Jeep Roemer
Sharon and Elliott Rose*
Barbara and Dr. Alan Roth
Tom and Joan Sallee
Dwight E. and Donna L. Sanders
Michael and Elizabeth Singer
William and Jeannie Spangler*
Howard Spero and Charlene Sailer
Elizabeth St. Goar
Sherman and Hannah Stein
Karen and Edward Street*
Eric and Patricia Stromberg*
Yayoi Takamura and Jeff Erhardt
Lyn Taylor and Mont Hubbard
Cap and Helen Thomson
Roseanna Torretto*
Henry and Lynda Trowbridge*
Helen and Robert Twiss
Louise and Larry Walker
Jack and Rita Weiss
Steven and Andrea Weiss*
Kandi Williams and Dr. Frank
Jahnke
Ardath Wood
Paul Wyman
Karl and Lynn Zender
And 3 donors who prefer to
remain anonymous
ORCHESTRA CIRCLE
$300 - $599
Jose and Elizabeth Abad
Mitzi Aguirre
Drs. Ralph and Teresa Aldredge
Elinor Anklin and George Harsch
Beverly and Clay Ballard
Paul and Linda Baumann
Carol Beckham
Carol Benedetti
Jane D. Bennett
Linda and William Bernheim
Robert and Diane Biggs
Bobbie and Barry Bolden
Elizabeth Bradford
Paul E. Braun
John and Christine Bruhn
Jan Carmikle
Bruce and Mary Alice Carswell*
Carolyn and Brian Chamberlain
Charles and Mary Anne Cooper
Nicholas and Khin Cornes
James Cothern
Marie Coughlin
David and Judy Covin
Kim Uyen Dao*
Larry Dashiell and Peggy Siddons
Daniel and Moira Dykstra
Harvey Edber
Ann M. Evans and David J.
Thompson
Micki and Les Faulkin
Janet Feil
David and Kerstin Feldman
Helen Ford
Edwin and Sevgi Friedrich*
Deborah and Brook Gale
Nancy Gelbard and David Kalb
Marvin and Joyce Goldman
Tom Graham and Lisa Foster
Douglas Gramlow
Robert and Kathleen Grey
June and Paul Gulyassy, M.D.
Darrow and Gwen Haagensen
Wesley and Ida Hackett*
Sharon and Don Hallberg
Marylee Hardie
Roy and Dione Henrickson
Jeannette E Higgs
Michael and Margaret Hoffman
Steve and Nancy Hopkins
Mun Johl
Don and Diane Johnston
Weldon and Colleen Jordan
Mary Ann and Victor Jung
Susan Kauzlarich and Peter Klavins
Peter Kenner
Robert Kingsley and Melissa
Thorme
Ruth A. Kinsella*
Joseph Kiskis and Diana Vodrey
Paul Kramer
Melourd Lagdamen
Darnell Lawrence
Dixie Laws
Carol Ledbetter
Randall Lee and Jane Yeun
Stanley and Donna Levin
Barbara Levine
Robert and Patricia Lufburrow
Bunkie Mangum
Andrea and Kurt McDuffie
William and Nancy Myers
Margaret Neu*
Rebecca Newland
Sally Ozonoff and Tom Richey
Sue and Jack Palmer
John and Barbara Parker
Henri and Dianne Pellissier
Ann Peterson and Marc Hoeschele
Jerry L. Plummer and Gloria
Freeman
C. and C. Powell
Harriet Prato
John and Alice Provost
Fred and Martha Rehrman*
David and Judy Reuben*
Tracy Rodgers and Richard
Budenz
Ron and Morgan Rogers
Tamra Ruxin
Hugh Safford
John and Joyce Schaeuble
David Scheuring
Jerry and Kay Schimke
Shepard Family Philanthropy
Fund
James Smith
Judith Smith
Al and Sandy Sokolow
Carol Spurgeon
Tim and Julie Stephens
Pieter Stroeve, Diane Barrett and
Jodie Stroeve
Tony and Beth Tanke
Stewart and Ann Teal*
Virginia and Butch Thresh
Dennis and Judy Tsuboi
Robert Vassar and Sandra Burgner
Rita Waterman
Charles White and Carrie Schucker
Drs. Elliott Wong and Yvonne Otani
Richard and Sally Yamaichi
Iris Yang and G. Richard Brown
Janet and Wesley Yates
Ronald M. Yoshiyama
Heather M. Young and Peter B.
Quinby
Matthew and Meghan Zavod
Hanni and George Zweifel
And 6 donors who prefer to
remain anonymous
MAINSTAGE CIRCLE
$100 - $299
Leal Abbott
Mary Aften
Matthew and Michelle Agnew
Susan Ahlquist
David and Penny Anderson
Val Anderson
Janice and Alex Ardans
Peter and Margaret Armstrong
Debbie Arrington and Jack Shinar
Maria Balakshin
Charlotte Ballard and Dr. Robert
Zeff
Diane and Charlie Bamforth
Michele Barefoot and Luis PerezGrau
Carole Wolff Barnes
Jonathan Bayless
Lynn Baysinger*
Marion S. Becker
Bee Happy Apiaries
Merry Benard
Marta Beres
Mark Berman and Lynn Simon
Bevowitz Family
Dr. Robert and Sheila Beyer
Elizabeth Bianco
Roy and Joan Bibbens*
Ernst Biberstein
John and Katy Bill
Sharon Billings and Terry
Sandbek*
Lewis and Caroline Bledsoe
Fred and Mary Bliss
Brooke Bourland*
Jill and Mary Bowers
Clyde and Ruth Bowman
Dan and Mildred Braunstein*
Frank Brown, M.D.
Valerie and David Brown
Valerie Brown and Edward Shields
Alan and Beth Brownstein
Martha Bryant*
Mike and Marian Burnham
Dr. Margaret Burns and Dr. Roy W.
Bellhorn
William and Karolee Bush
Robert and Elizabeth Bushnell
Peter and Lorraine Camarco
Lita Campbell
Jean Canary and Glen Erickson
John and Nancy Capitanio
William and Pauline Caple
James and Patty Carey
Michael and Susan Carl
John and Joan Chambers
Dorothy Chikasawa*
Carol Christensen*
Craig Clark and Mary Ann Reihman
Gail Clark
Linda Clevenger and Seth Brunner
James and Linda Cline
Stuart and Denise Cohen
Sheri and Ron Cole
Harold and Marj Collins
Steve and Janet Collins
Terry D. Cook
Craig and Joyce Copelan
Larry and Sandy Corman
Catharine Coupal*
Victor Cozzalio and Lisa HeilmanCozzalio
Crandallicious Clan
Fitz-Roy and Susan Curry
Nita A. Davidson
Judy and David Day
Lynne de Bie*
encoreartsprograms.com 43
THE ART OF GIVING
Esther Delozier*
Kathryn Demakopoulos and
Thomas Pavlakovich
Stephen and Dlorah DeZerega
Joel and Linda Dobris
Audrey Dodds
Gwendolyn Doebbert and Richard
Epstein
Marjorie Dolcini*
James Eastman and Fred Deneke
Jelmer Eerkens and Anastasia
Panagakos
Eliane Eisner
Sidney England and Randy Beaton
Dr. Richard K. Entrikin
Carol Erickson and David Phillips
Nancy and Don Erman
Lynette Ertel*
Wallace Etterbeek
Evelyn Falkenstein
Andrew D. and Eleanor E. Farrand*
Michael and Ophelia Farrell
Cheryl Felsch
Liz and Tim Fenton*
Curt and Sue Finley
Kieran and Marty Fitzpatrick
Dave and Donna Fletcher
Glenn Fortini
Dr. and Mrs. Clifford Fowler
Marion Franck and Robert Lew
Barbara and Ed Frankel
Anthony and Jorgina Freese
Larry Friedman and Susan Orton
Joan M. Futscher
Myra A. Gable
Sean Galloway
Anne Garbeff*
Peggy Gerick
Barbara Gladfelter
Eleanor Glassburner
Marnelle Gleason and Louis Fox*
Pat and Bob Gonzalez*
Victor and Louise Graf
Sandra and Jeffrey Granett
Steve and Jacqueline Gray
Stephen and Deirdre Greenholz
M.C.B. Greenwood
Paul and Carol Grench
Hugh Griffin
John Griffing and Shelley Mydans
Alex and Marilyn Groth
Jane and Jim Hagedorn
Frank Hamilton
Katherine Hammer
William and Sherry Hamre
Mike and Pat Handley
Jim and Laurie Hanschu
Robert and Susan Hansen
Alexander and Kelly Harcourt
Vera Harris
The Hartwig-Lee Family
Sally Harvey*
Miriam and Roy Hatamiya
Cynthia Hearden
Mary A. Helmich
Mary and Rand Herbert
Larry and Elizabeth Hill
Bette Hinton and Robert Caulk
Dr. Calvin Hirsch and Deborah
Francis
Frederick and Tieu-Bich Hodges
J. Hoehn*
Jack Holmes and Cathy Neuhauser
Herb and Jan Hoover
Lorraine J. Hwang
Gordon and Jenny Isakson
Tom and Betsy Jennings
Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Jensen
Karen Jetter
Karen and Gary Johns
Michelle Johnston and Scott Arrants
Warren and Donna Johnston
Jonsson Family
Andrew and Merry Joslin
James Anthony Joye
Shari and Tim Karpin
Anthony and Beth Katsaris
Yasuo Kawamura
Gailen L. Keeling
Susan L. Keen
Patricia Kelleher*
Michael Kent and Karl Jadney
Leonard Keyes
Jeannette Kieffer
Larry Kimble and Louise Bettner
Katy King-Goldberg and Lenny
Goldberg
Roger and Katharine Kingston
Patricia Kite*
Bob and Bobbie Kittredge
Dorothy Klishevich
John and Mary Klisiewicz*
The Krauthoefers
Sandy and Alan Kreeger
Marcia and Kurt Kreith
Kris Kristensen
Sandra Kristensen
C.R. and Elizabeth Kuehner
Leslie Kurtz
Kit and Bonnie Lam*
Marsha M. Lang
Susan and Bruce Larock
Charlie and Joan Learned
Steve and Nancy Lege
ARTISTIC VENTURES FUND
Joel and Jeannette Lerman
Ernest and Mary Ann Lewis
Evelyn Lewis
Barbara Linderholm*
David and Susan Link
Motoko Lobue
Mary Lowry
Henry Luckie
Ariane Lyons
Sue MacDonald
David and Alita Mackill
Karen Majewski
Vartan Malian and Nova Ghermann
Joseph and Mary Alice Marino
Pam Marrone and Mick Rogers
David and Martha Marsh
Dr. Carol Marshall
J. A. Martin
Harry Matthews and Lorraine
Jensen
Leslie Maulhardt
Katherine F. Mawdsley*
Keith and Jeanie McAfee
Harry and Karen McCluskey*
Ben and Edna McCoy
Nora McGuinness*
Thomas and Paula McIlraith
Donna and Dick McIlvaine
Tim and Linda McKenna
Martin A. Medina and Laurie Perry
Barry Melton and Barbara Langer
Sharon Menke
The Merchant Family
Fred and Linda Meyers*
Gerrit Michael
Beryl Michaels and John Bach
Leslie Michaels and Susan Katt
Jean Miller
Lisa Miller
Sue and Rex Miller
Kathy and Steve Miura*
Sybil and Jerry Miyamoto
Kei and Barbara Miyano
Vicki and Paul Moering
Joanne Moldenhauer
Elaine and Ken Moody
Amy Moore
James Morris
The Muller Family
Dr. B.J. Myers
Guity Myers*
Bill and Anna Rita Neuman
Robert Nevraumont and Donna
Curley Nevraumont*
Drs. Bonny Neyhart and Michael
Goodman
Jay and Catherine Norvell
We applaud our Artistic Ventures Fund’s members, whose major gift commitments
support artist engagement fees, innovative artist commissions, artist residencies, and
programs made available free to the public.
Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley
John and Lois Crowe
Patti Donlon
Richard and Joy Dorf
Anne Gray
Barbara K. Jackson
Larry and Rosalie Vanderhoef
Thank you to the following donors for their special program support.
YOUNG ARTISTS COMPETITION AND PROGRAM
John and Lois Crowe
Merrilee and Simon Engel
Mary B. Horton
Barbara K. Jackson
Dana Olson
Jim and Sharon Oltjen
Mary Jo Ormiston*
Bob and Elizabeth Owens
M.B. and Carlene Ozonoff
Michael Pach
Erin Peltzman
Ross and Karen Peters
Jane Plocher
John W. Poulos and Deborah
Nichols Poulos
Jerry and Bernice Pressler
Ed and Jane Rabin
Jan and Anne-Louise Radimsky
Lawrence and Norma Rappaport
Olga Raveling
Sandi Redenbach*
Catherine Reed
Mary C. Reed and Charles D. Kelso
Dr. and Mrs. James W. Reede Jr.
Sandra Erskine Reese
Michael Reinhart and Dorothy Yerxa
Eugene and Elizabeth Renkin
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Resta
Maureen Rice
Ralph and Judy Riggs*
Dr. Ron and Sara Ringen
Louise Robbins and Mark
Buchanan
Jeannette and David Robertson
Maria-lee Rodriguez
John and Carol Rominger
Richard and Evelyne Rominger
Linda Roth
Cynthia Jo Ruff*
Paul and Ida Ruffin
Dagnes/Vernon Ruiz
Laurie and Mike Salter
Dee Samuels and Joel Shawn
Fred and Polly Schack
Patsy Schiff
Leon Schimmel and Annette Cody
Darell J. Schregardus, Ph.D.
Janis J. Schroeder and Carrie L.
Markel
Drs. Julie and Stephen Shacoski
Dan Shadoan and Ann Lincoln
Jill and Jay Shepherd
Jeanie Sherwood
Jo Anne S. Silber
Ronald and Rosie Soohoo*
Roger and Freda Sornsen
Curtis and Judy Spencer
William Stanglin
Alan and Charlene Steen
Harriet Steiner and Miles Stern
Johanna Stek
Judith and Richard Stern
Raymond Stewart
Eugene Stille
Daria and Mark Stoner
James E. Sutton and Melissa A.
Barbour
Fred Taugher and Paula Higashi
Francie F. Teitelbaum
Julie A. Theriault, PA-C
Virginia Thigpen
Ronald and Linda Tochterman
Brian Toole
Robert and Victoria Tousignant
Michael and Heidi Trauner
Rich and Fay Traynham
Allen and Heather Tryon
James E. Turner
Nancy Ulrich*
Ramon and Karen Urbano
Dr. Ann-Catrin Van
Chris and Betsy van Kessel
Diana Varcados
Bart and Barbara Vaughn*
Carol and Larry von Kaenel
Rosemarie Vonusa*
Richard Vorpe and Evelyn Matteucci
Carolyn Waggoner and Rolf Fecht
Jim and Kim Waits
Maxine Wakefield and William
Reichert
Vivian and Andrew Walker
Andy and Judy Warburg
Valerie Boutin Ward
Leo Warmolts
Marny and Rick Wasserman
Douglas West
Kimberly West
Martha West
Robert and Leslie Westergaard*
Edward and Susan Wheeler
Nancy and Richard White*
Mrs. Jane Williams
Janet G. Winterer
Timothy and Vicki Yearnshaw
Jeffrey and Elaine Yee*
Norman and Manda Yeung
Phillip and Iva Yoshimura
Verena Leu Young*
Melanie and Medardo Zavala
Darrel and Phyllis Zerger*
Marlis and Jack Ziegler
Tim and Sonya Zindel
Dr. Mark and Wendy Zlotlow
And 53 donors who prefer to
remain anonymous
*Friends of Mondavi Center
LEGACY CIRCLE
Thank you to our supporters who have remembered the Mondavi Center in their estate plans.
These gifts make a difference for the future of performing arts and we are most grateful.
Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew
Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley
John and Lois Crowe
Dotty Dixon
Anne Gray
Mary B. Horton
Margaret E. Hoyt
Barbara K. Jackson
Yvonne LeMaitre
Jerry and Marguerite Lewis
Robert and Betty Liu
Don McNary
Verne E. Mendel
Kay E. Resler
Hal and Carol Sconyers
Joe and Betty Tupin
Lynn Upchurch
Anonymous
If you have already named the Mondavi Center in your own estate plans, we thank you.
We would love to hear of your giving plans so that we may express our appreciation.
If you are interested in learning about planned giving opportunities, please contact Debbie
Armstrong, Sr. Director of Memberships (530.754.5415 or [email protected]).
We appreciate your support! Note: Please contact the Mondavi Center Development Office at 530.754.5438 to inform us of corrections.
44 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
BOARDS & COMMITTEES
MONDAVI CENTER ADVISORY BOARD
The Mondavi Center
Advisory Board is a support
group of University
Relations whose primary
purpose is to provide
assistance through
fundraising, public
outreach and other support
for the mission of UC Davis
and the Mondavi Center.
2015-16 ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS
Tony Stone, Chair • Jim Bigelow •
John Crowe • Patti Donlon • Phyllis Farver•
Janlynn Fleener • Anne Gray •
Karen Karnopp • Nancy Lawrence •
Garry P. Maisel • Randy Reynoso •
Nancy Roe • Grace Rosenquist •
John Rosenquist • Lor Shepard •
Joan Stone • Joe Tupin • Carol Wall
EX OFFICIO
Linda P.B. Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis
Ralph J. Hexter, Provost & Executive Vice Chancellor,
UC Davis
Susan Kaiser, Dean, Division of Humanities, Arts, &
Cultural Studies, College of Letters & Sciences, UC Davis
Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis
Sharon Knox, Chair, Arts & Lectures Administrative
Advisory Committee
Francie Lawyer, Chair, Friends of the Mondavi Center
THE ARTS & LECTURES ADMINISTRATIVE
ADVISORY COMMITTEE is made up of
interested students, faculty and staff who
attend performances, review programming
opportunities and meet monthly with the
director of the Mondavi Center. They provide
advice and feedback for the Mondavi Center
staff throughout the performance season.
2015–16 ADVISORY BOARD
Sharon Knox, Chair • Trisha Barua • Lauren
Brink • Jochen Ditterich • Yevgeniy Gnedash
• Carol Hess • Petr Janata • Ian Koebner • Kyle
Monhollen • Thomas Patten • Erica Perez • Alina
Pogorelov • Hannah Sada • Sudipta Sen • Su-Lin
Shum • Michelle Wang • Gina Werfel • Amy Yip
THE FRIENDS OF MONDAVI CENTER is an active
donor-based volunteer organization that supports
activities of the Mondavi Center’s presenting
program. Deeply committed to arts education,
Friends volunteer their time and financial support
for learning opportunities related to Mondavi
Center performances. For information on becoming
a Friend of Mondavi Center, email Jennifer Mast at
[email protected] or call 530.754.5431.
2015–16 FRIENDS EXECUTIVE BOARD
Francie Lawyer, President
Leslie Westergaard, Vice President
Jo Ann Joye, Secretary
COMMITTEE CHAIRS:
Wendy Chason, Friends Events
Shirley Auman, Gift Shop
Eunice Adair, Membership
Judy Fleenor, Mondavi Center Tours
Karen Street, School Matinee Support
Lynne de Bie, School Matinee Ushers/
Front of House Liaison
Lynette Ertel, School Outreach
Joyce Donaldson, Director of Arts Education,
Ex-Officio
encoreartsprograms.com 45
POLICIES & INFORMATION
TICKET EXCHANGES
• Tickets must be exchanged over the phone
or in person at least one business day prior
to the performance. (Closed Sundays)
• Returned tickets will not scan valid at the
door.
• A $5 per ticket exchange fee may apply.
• Tickets may not be exchanged or donated
after the performance date.
• For tickets exchanged for a higher priced
ticket, the difference will be charged. The
difference between a higher and lower
priced exchanged ticket is not refundable.
• Gift certificates will not be issued for
returned tickets.
• Event credit may be issued to subscribers
and donors for all Mondavi Center Presenting
Program events and expire June 30 of the
current season. Credit is not transferable.
• All exchanges are subject to availability.
• All ticket sales are final for events presented
by non-UC Davis promoters.
• PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
• NO REFUNDS.
PARKING
You may purchase parking passes for
individual Mondavi Center events for $9 per
event at the parking lot or with your ticket
order. Rates are subject to change. Parking
passes that have been lost or stolen will not
be replaced.
all available tickets. (Continuing education
enrollees are not eligible.)
Proof Requirements: School ID showing
validity for the current academic year and/ or
copy of your transcript/report card/tuition bill
receipt for the current academic year. Student
discounts may not be available for events
presented by non-UC Davis promoters.
YOUTH TICKETS (AGE 17 AND UNDER)
Youth are eligible for a 50% discount on all
available tickets. For events other than the
Children’s Stage series, it is recommended
for the enjoyment of all patrons that children
under the age of 5 not attend. A ticket
is required for admission of all children
regardless of age. Any child attending a
performance should be able to sit quietly
through the performance.
PRIVACY POLICY
The Mondavi Center collects information
from patrons solely for the purpose of
gaining necessary information to conduct
business and serve our patrons efficiently.
We sometimes share names and addresses
with other not-for-profit arts organizations. If
you do not wish to be included in our email
communications or postal mailings, or if you
do not want us to share your name, please
notify us via email, U.S. mail or telephone.
Full Privacy Policy at mondaviarts.org.
GROUP DISCOUNTS
TOURS
Entertain friends, family, classmates or
business associates and save! Groups of
10 or more qualify for a 10% discount
off regular prices. Payment options
with a deposit are available. Please call
530.754.4658.
Group tours of the Mondavi Center are
free, but reservations are required. To
schedule a tour call 530.754.5399 or
email [email protected]
STUDENT TICKETS
The Mondavi Center is proud to be a fully
accessible state-of-the-art public facility that
meets or exceeds all state and federal ADA
requirements. Patrons with special seating
needs should notify the Mondavi Center
Ticket Office at the time of ticket purchase
to receive reasonable accommodation.
The Mondavi Center may not be able to
accommodate special needs brought to
our attention at the performance. Seating
spaces for wheelchair users and their
companions are located at all levels and
UC Davis students are eligible for a 50%
discount on all available tickets.
Proof Requirements: School ID showing
validity for the current academic year.
Student ID numbers may also be used to
verify enrollment.
Non-UC Davis students age 18 and
over, enrolled full-time for the current
academic year at an accredited institution
and matriculating towards a diploma or a
degree are eligible for a 25% discount on
46 MO NDAV IAR T S.O RG
ACCOMMODATIONS FOR
PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES
prices for all performances. Requests for sign
language interpreting, real-time captioning,
Braille programs and other reasonable
accommodations should be made with at
least two weeks’ notice. The Mondavi Center
may not be able to accommodate last-minute
requests. Requests for these accommodations
may be made when purchasing tickets at
530.754.2787 or TDD 530.754.5402.
BINOCULARS
Binoculars are available for Jackson Hall.
They may be checked out at no charge from
the Patron Services Desk near the lobby
elevators. The Mondavi Center requires an
ID be held until the device is returned.
ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES
Assistive Listening Devices are available for
Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio
Theatre. Receivers that can be used with
or without hearing aids may be checked
out at no charge from the Patron Services
Desk near the lobby elevators. The Mondavi
Center requires an ID to be held at the Patron
Services Desk until the device is returned.
ELEVATORS
The Mondavi Center has two passenger
elevators serving all levels. They are located
at the north end of the Yocha Dehe Grand
Lobby, near the restrooms and Patron
Services Desk.
RESTROOMS
All public restrooms are equipped with
accessible sinks, stalls, babychanging
stations and amenities. There are six public
restrooms in the building: two on the
Orchestra level, two on the Orchestra Terrace
level and two on the Grand Tier level.
SERVICE ANIMALS
Mondavi Center welcomes working service
animals that are necessary to assist patrons
with disabilities. Service animals must remain
on a leash or harness at all times. Please contact
the Mondavi Center Ticket Office if you intend
to bring a service animal to an event so that
appropriate seating can be reserved for you.
LOST AND FOUND HOTLINE
530.752.8580
Music touches the heart
From a simple tune to the richest harmony, music expresses emotion in ways
that can resonate with all of us.
We’re proud to salute Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts.
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