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PRICELESS!
Vol 20 No 9
CONCERT LISTINGS | JUNE | JULY | AUGUST 2015
A SUMMER
TO END ALL
SUMMERS
The Green Pages
Summer Music Guide
15
16
Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir
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BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY NO. 9 • BACH CHRISTMAS ORATORIO
GOLDBERG VARIATIONS • VIVALDI L’ESTRO ARMONICO
BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NO. 4 • MOZART SYMPHONY NO. 40
NEW MULTI-MEDIA CONCERT BY ALISON MACKAY
SEASON PRESENTING SPONSOR
NEW SUBSCRIBERS:
Book early for best seating!
Baroque
Summer
Festival
DELIGHTFULLY BAROQUE
Friday June 5, at 8pm
Hear the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and
Chamber Choir at the beautiful Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre
Jeanne Lamon, Director | Ivars Taurins, Director, Vocal/Choral Programme
e
n
u
J
n
i
ts
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FREE C
SUPPORTED BY
junction
Pre
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sented
with
416.964.6337
tafelmusik.org
lmusik
the Tafe
stitute
mmer In
e Su
Baroqu
TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER INSTITUTE GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY
Lynn & James Haight
THANK YOU TO
FAC U LTY O F M U S I C
MUSICAL
INTERLUDE
THE GRAND
FINALE
Walter Hall, University of Toronto
Chamber concert featuring
Tafelmusik musicians
Grace Church on-the-hill
Wed, June 10, at 12:30pm
THE TBSI
ORCHESTRAS
AND CHOIRS
Sun, June 14, at 1pm
Walter Hall, University of Toronto
Wed, June 17, at 7:30pm
*Ticketed event – tickets available
at theTafelmusik Box Office
Thurs June 11 at 10am
Free and general
admission! Visit
tafelmusik.org
for further details.
15th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL EVENTS
Blind Boys of Alabama with special guest Ben Heppner | Coronation of George II,
Theatre of Early Music, Conductor Daniel Taylor | Schafer at Dawn: Music for an Avon
Morning; Schafer at Twilight: The Sacred Music of R. Murray Schafer | Great Opera Arias,
tenor Michael Schade | Mozart’s The Magic Flute | All five Beethoven Piano Concerti
performed by Jan Lisiecki with the Annex Quartet | The World Famous Glenn Miller
Orchestra | The Stratford Six: an afternoon of operatic delights featuring Phillip Addis,
Roger Honeywell, Gary Relyea, Lutzen Riedstra, Drew Santini, and James Westman
CLASSICAL PIANO SERIES
Janina Fialkowska | Paul Lewis
CLASSICAL
MUSIC SPONSOR
CABARETS AT REVIVAL HOUSE
Micah Barnes and Friends | Rebecca Caine and Robert Kortgaard
| Carole Pope | Newfoundland Jazz Ceilidh with Heather Bambrick
MUSICAL BRUNCHES AT THE PRUNE RESTAURANT
Bach Solo Violin Sonatas and Partitas performed by Aisslinn Nosky, Julia Wedman and
Cristina Zacharias
Plus many more concerts, lectures and events.
For more information and to buy tickets please call or visit:
1.866.288.4313
stratfordsummermusic.ca
Volume 20 No 9 | June | July | August 2015
FEATURES
6. The Festival We Are | DAVID PERLMAN
8. Partnership Bears Fruit | DAVID PERLMAN
8. Bethlehem and Beyond | DAVID PERLMAN
10. A Taste of Toronto Summer Music
12. Five Festival Fingerprints| SARA CONSTANT
38. Wendake/Huronia | DAVID PERLMAN
75. We are all Music’s Children | MJ BUELL
BEAT BY BEAT
14. Choral Scene | BENJAMIN STEIN
ACD2 2696
92. Music Lived Here | DAVID JAEGER
16. Classical & Beyond | PAUL ENNIS
22. World View | ANDREW TIMAR
Canadian pianist
Janina Fialkowska
performs a selection of
Grieg’s Lyric Pieces;
peasant and patriotic
marches, dances, songs,
and evocations of the
Norwegian landscape.
24. In with the New | WENDALYN BARTLEY
28. On Opera | CHRISTOPHER HOILE
30. Early Music | DAVID PODGORSKI
32. Art of Song | HANS DE GROOT
33. Jazz Stories | ORI DAGAN
64. Mainly Clubs, Mostly Jazz | BOB BEN
73. Bandstand | JACK MacQUARRIE
G1 - G10.
GREEN PAGES | Summer Music Guide
LISTINGS
41. Summer Festival Listings
53. A | Concerts in the GTA
62. B | Concerts Beyond the GTA
64. C | In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
DISCOVERIES: RECORDINGS REVIEWED
76. Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS
79. Vocal
81. Strings Attached | TERRY ROBBINS
82. Early, Classical & Beyond
85. Modern & Contemporary
86. Something in the Air | KEN WAXMAN
87. Jazz, Eh? | STUART BROOMER
88. Jazz & Improvised
89. Pot Pourri
90. Old Wine, New Bottles | BRUCE SURTEES
MORE
6. Contact Information & Deadlines
ACD2 2730
68. D | The ETCeteras
This album is a live recording of
the concert Women of jazz
which was presented on
May 1, 2014 by the National Jazz
Orchestra under the direction of
Christine Jensen.
The concert featured the
world premiere of
Marianne Trudel’s work.
7. Index of Advertisers
71. Classified Ads
AVAILABLE IN HD AT
ATMACLASSIQUE.COM
CD
STUDIO
MP3
QUALITY
QUALITY
Select ATMA titles now on sale
Cover Photograph Bryson Winchseter
F O R O P E N E R S | DAV I D P E R L M A N
THE FESTIVAL WE ARE
and thoughtful things to say about the role of the arts in making
a city great. It’s a fact, he informed us, that the quality of the arts
in a city has been proven to attract investors. And as if responding
directly to Hawco’s semi-decent proposal, he said (twice) that the arts
community would find in the city under his aegis a partner that was
“steady, reliable and ambitious.”
It’s the “ambitious” part of the utterance that makes me uneasy,
because of another bandwagon the mayor seems to have been on
ever since he visited Austin, Texas, which boasts possibly the world’s
largest music festival (and where people wear T-shirts saying “Keep
Austin Weird”). Tory’s go-to phrase these days is about turning
Toronto into “Music City.”
It’s a laudable thought, so whence the unease? Because it sounds
as if he’s talking about making something from scratch. Absent is any
sense that he realizes what we have, and what we are, already. If, to
borrow a phrase, what he wants to do is turn Hogtown into a musical
silk purse, he should know he already has a live-and-kicking shiny
silk sow – something that the Toronto Arts Foundation (and in its
own way this little publication) has been celebrating for the past 20
years. He should keep in mind that a healthy sow, well cared-for, will
produce lots of musical little piggys. And that’s the way to bring home
the bacon. We are already an astounding musical city, Mayor Tory.
Build on that.
But if the mayor thinks turning Toronto into “Music City” requires
some top-down exercise in reinvention, it’s an exercise that is probably doomed from the start. Consider the upcoming Pan Am Games,
which will be deemed a failure if measured by the attendance by
people who have bought into the rhetoric of “it’s only worthy of our
attention if we’re the very best.” There’s a great risk that Toronto will
The Toronto Mayor’s Arts Lunch took place on May 28 at the
Arcadian Court with almost 400 people in attendance. It’s not
arranged by the Mayor. This annual event is put on by the Toronto
Arts Foundation, the 20-year-old sister organization of the 41-yearold Toronto Arts Council. The event celebrates the annual Toronto
Arts Foundation Awards which are announced and handed out there.
Most of the nominees attend and the range of nominees is always a
lovely portrait of the ever-changing face of the arts in this town – the
old who persevere, the young who are handed (or grab) the torch to
carry it forward, and the rest of us somewhere in between, debating
whether we should have dessert, or should have said no to that second
glass of wine.
Perhaps it’s called the Mayor’s Arts Lunch because the organizers hope that mayors will be more likely to attend if it’s named for
them. Although for the previous four years, one could be forgiven for
thinking it was because the mayor, conspicuous by his absence, was
the event’s main roast.
This year’s host was actor Allan Hawco (of Republic of Doyle
Canadian TV fame), his Newfoundland brogue getting more and more
conspicuous as the event went along. He got things off to a hilariously
irreverent flying start by “proposing marriage, on behalf of the city’s
arts community, to the city’s powers that be: government, corporations and all that.” Make the relationship legit, was the gist of it. After
all, we’re smart, funny, entertaining, sexy, and you’ve got the financial means to keep us in style. You’ve been screwing with us for years,
after all, so why not make an honest community of us?
The biggest difference this year from the past few was that not
only was the new mayor, John Tory , conspicuously present, but he
actually took his turn at the microphone and had some encouraging
The WholeNote™
VOLUME 20 NO 9| JUNE 1, 2015 – SEPTEMBER 7, 2015
Centre for Social Innovation
720 Bathurst St., Suite 503, Toronto ON M5S 2R4
PHONE 416-323-2232 | FAX 416-603-4791
Publisher/Editor In Chief | David Perlman
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Chairman of the Board | Allan Pulker
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EDITORIAL
Managing Editor | Paul Ennis
[email protected]
Recordings Editor | David Olds
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Social Media Editor | Sara Constant
[email protected]
Listings Editor | David Perlman (acting)
[email protected]
Club Listings Editor | Bob Ben
[email protected]
SALES, MARKETING & MEMBERSHIP
Concerts & Events/Membership | Karen Ages
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Website/Systems Support | Kevin King
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Circulation/Subscriptions | Chris Malcolm
[email protected]
THANKS TO THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS
Beat Columnists
Hans de Groot, Jack MacQuarrie, Benjamin Stein,
Paul Ennis, David Olds, David Podgorski,
Ori Dagan, Wendalyn Bartley, Bob Ben
mJ buell, Christopher Hoile, Andrew Timar
Features
Sara Constant, David Jaeger, David Perlman
CD Reviewers
Stuart Broomer, Hans de Groot, Daniel Foley,
Janos Gardonyi, Richard Haskell, Tiina Kiik,
Pamela Margles, Alison Melville, Lesley MitchellClarke, Ivana Popovic, Allan Pulker, Cathy Riches,
Michael Schwartz, Bruce Surtees, Robert Tomas,
Ken Waxman
Proofreading
John Sharpe, Paul Ennis, Sara Constant,
Jennifer Liu, Kevin King
Listings
David Perlman, Bob Ben,
Tilly Kooyman, JennieLea McLeish,
Ruth Atwood, Simone Desilets
Circulation Team
Abram Bergen, Andrew Schaefer, Beth Bartley,
Bob Jerome, Dagmar Sullivan, Dave Taylor,
Garry Page, Gero Hajek, Jack Buell, Jeff Hogben,
Joan Andrews, John Dodington, Lorna Nevison,
Mark Clifford, Micah Herzog, Niamh Malcolm,
Patrick Slimmon, Paul Ennis, Randy Weir, Robert
Faulkner, Sharon Clark, Tiffany Johnson, Tom
Sepp, Vicki Stainton, Wende Bartley
Layout & Design
Bryson Winchester
SUBSCRIPTIONS
$35 per year + HST (9 issues)
6 | June | July | August, 2015
Upcoming Dates & Deadlines
Free Event Listings Deadline
6pm Saturday August 8
Display Ad Reservations Deadline
6pm Saturday August 15
Classifieds Deadline
6pm Friday August 21
Advertising Materials Due
6pm Tuesday August 18
Publication Date
Tuesday September 1 (Online)
Thursday September 3 (Print)
Volume 21 No 1 covers
September 1, 2015 to October 7, 2015
WholeNote Media Inc. accepts no responsibility or
liability for claims made for any product or service
reported on or advertised in this issue.
Printed in Canada
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Circulation Statement
Summer 2015: 30,000 printed & distributed
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COPYRIGHT © 2015 WHOLENOTE MEDIA INC
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thewholenote.com
thewholenote.com
16TH Annual
BLUE
PAGES
SEAN HOWARD
turn its back on the Pan
Am Games as a kind of
second class Olympics.
If only the rhetorical
bar had not been set
so high. If only local
grass roots participation in healthy physical
culture and sports
could manifest ordinary
bums in those worldclass seats. This selfdefeating aspect of our
city’s psyche is at risk of
Toronto Arts Foundation Award Winners. (from left) Chris Eben and Holly
Knowlman from The Working Group, Paul Read, Drex Jancar and Gavin
being perpetuated and
Sheppard from The Remix Project, Emilie LeBel, Scott Miller Berry.
reinforced right in the
very moments when it
To those of you who are summer visitors to our
could all so easily begin to change.
It’s more a question of timing than anything else diverse and welcoming city, and just happened to
pick up this magazine, a hearty hello!! We hope
that Panamania, billed as this summer’s leading
you will be able to use The WholeNote to guide
cultural event, actually has very little presence
you along the main highways plotted out for you
in this edition of our magazine, which covers a
wealth of events from June 1 through September 7. by your hosts, but also along our side streets and
in our neighbourhoods. This great city and its
After all, what we celebrate in every issue of The
environs are truly a crossroads, not just of the
WholeNote is not so much any particular festival
Americas but also of the wider world, expressing
that gets staged, but the ongoing festival that the
city is, year in, year out – an ongoing buzz and roar itself in music and song all year round. Come back
of the human spirit – expressed through music and – any time.
[email protected]
the lively arts, day after day after day.
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
Adelphi Ensemble58
Eliza Pope79
National Youth Orchestra of
Artists Garden Cooperative
Elora Festival 38, 44
Canada 21, 47, 60
Theatre35
32
Esprit Orchestra27
New Horizons Bands73
Tafelmusik 2, 54, 55, 56, 57
Arts Media Project72
HanVoice56
No Strings Theatre 61
TD London Sunfest39
ATMA5
I FURIOSI Baroque
Norm Pulker72
Toronto Centre for the Arts
Beaches International Jazz
Ensemble54
Off Centre Music Salon54
4, 57
Festival35
Jazz Bistro 72
ORGANIX 13
Toronto Centre for the Arts/
Bloor Street United Church
Kindred Spirits Orchestra
Orillia Wind Ensemble68
TSO55
72
57, 59, 71
Orpheus Choir70
Toronto Consort 31
Brookside Music37. 42
King Music Collective58
Pasquale Bros 68
Toronto Jazz Festival 33, 58
Brott Festival 40, 42
Lightwork Hypnosis69
Peter Mahon 26
Toronto Mendelssohn Choir
Canadian Children’s Opera
Lisa Chisholm72
Prince Edward County Jazz
28, 71
Company 70
LizPR 72
Festival49
Toronto Summer Music20,
Canadian Flute Convention
Long & Mcquade68
Prince Edward County
51, 94
42
Lulaworld52
Music Festival 39
Toronto Symphony
Canadian Opera Company Luminato93
Remenyi House of Music23
Orchestra 56, 91
29
Mississauga Symphony
Royal Conservatory 11
Universal Music79
Cathedral Bluffs Symphony
Orchestra18
Royal Conservatory School
Village Voices70
Orchestra18
Mooredale Concerts19
69
Westben 39, 52
Centrediscs76
Music at Metropolitan19
Samantha Chang72
Western University64
Christ Church Deer Park
Music at Metropolitan
Schola Magdalena55
Women’s Musical Club of
Jazz Vespers 34
- Summer Carillon Series
Sound Post The26
Toronto17
Clear Lake Chamber Music
53, 60
St. Olave’s Church62
Yorkminster Park Baptist
Festival43
Music at Port Milford47
St. Philips’ Jazz Vespers35
Church57
Contact Contemporary
Music Gallery25
Steinway Piano Gallery20
Ensemble68
Music Toronto 9
Stratford Summer Music
Dr. Réa Beaumont76
Nagata Shachu25
3, 50, 50
thewholenote.com
Summer Opera Lyric
DON’T
EVER
STOP
MUSIC IS
FOR LIFE
THE BLUE PAGES
A rich resource for
musicians and all lovers of
live music, with detailed
profiles of Southern
Ontario’s live music makers
and their current seasons.
Printed in October’s edition
of The WholeNote and
up-to-date year-round on
our website.
THE CANARY PAGES
The WholeNote’s annual
guide to the extraordinary
choral diversity of Southern
Ontario. Printed in May’s
edition of The WholeNote
and searchable online
year-round.
THE GREEN PAGES
GUIDE TO SUMMER
MUSIC 2015
So much great music to
enjoy! Keep a copy of the
Green Pages at hand and
don’t miss a note. Printed in
this edition with enhanced
coverage online.
Musical guides
online, all the time
thewholenote.com/
resources
June | July | August, 2015 | 7
DISCOVERIES | PREVIEW
and Beyond
Partnership Bears Fruit Bethlehem
In conversation with Daniel Taylor
DAV I D P E R L M A N
BY DAV I D P E R L M A N
“And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?” W.B Yeats
W
ith apologies to W.B. Yeats, “slouching towards Bethlehem”
is a perfect description of me as I walk the 15 minutes down
Bathurst Street from home to the Toronto Island Airport. I
am Newark bound, with my one overstuffed carry-on bag
on my shoulder. It’s 6:30am on a Friday, and I have to be on the bus to
Bethlehem at 10am. So I have not had time for shower, shave or coffee
this balmy May 8 morning.
But I make my Porter flight to Newark with time to spare and find
my bus; my little spring adventure is underway.
Modern-day Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, sits like two halves of a
cracked soup bowl, with the Lehigh River zigzagging through the
crack between, flowing eastward towards Easton, one of Bethlehem’s
two sister cities. Easton is at least as famous for being the headquarters of Crayola as Bethlehem is for being home to the longest running
annual Bach festival in North America. (But Bach, I am happy to say,
yields 151 million google results compared to Crayola’s 15.5 million.)
The Hotel Bethlehem (where I get my shower, but shortly after
noon) is in the northern half of the town, and boasts among its
famous guests, according to the cards in the elevators, the Dalai Lama
and Jack Nicklaus. It was built in the 1920s with steel girders from
the Bethlehem steel mill, now a rusting hulk looming like a spectacular post-modern art installation alongside the river between
the two halves of the town. Looking straight down from my ninth
floor window I can see the original mid-18th-century buildings that
speak to the town’s pre-1776 Moravian settler origins, a heritage that
stretches for block after remarkable block in the old town.
And looking straight out from that same window I can see all the
way over the Lehigh River to the steeper slope of South Bethlehem.
Halfway up that slope is the Packer Church on the campus of Lehigh
University. Church and campus between them will host most of the
performances in this, the second weekend of the 109th iteration of the
Bethlehem Bach Festival. The first week’s program will be repeated in
its entirety for a new group of pilgrims. And as they did the previous
weekend, for the next two days little white shuttle buses will circle
endlessly between the town’s key hotels on the north side of the river
and the festival venues to the south.
Two days later I am Newark bound again, with a head full of the
history of a town I previously had no awareness of, and with a heart
full of the music of Bach, presented in a context that felt less like a
festival than a glorious friendship between a great composer and the
orchetra, conductor and choir at the heart of an extraordinary town.
For decades Canadian performers have been making this
pilgrimage, even if Canadian audiences have not. Take countertenor
Daniel Taylor, for example, one of this year’s stellar Canucks. He’s
been coming here for well over a decade, he tells me.
“I heard first about the festival when Catherine Robbin was getting
ready to retire,” he says. She had been singing at the festival on a
regular basis and encouraged Greg Funfgeld, the festival’s music
director to go and hear Taylor. “He came to hear me at the Met in
1999,” Taylor says. “I was in a show with Brian Asawa, David Daniels,
Stephanie Blythe and Jennifer Larmore.”
“Sounds like Handel’s Caesar,” I say. “Were you the bad guy?”
“No it was a small role, actually,” he says. “What was interesting was
he was specifically looking for a middle voice. So there was Larmore
and Blythe and these two other countertenors who were really at
the top of their game right then, and he called me right after and
asked if I would come and sing some Bach for him.” Taylor met with
Funfgeld in New York and “the next thing you knew I was on the way
to Bethlehem.”
That was in 1999, and Taylor has been at every festival since. “There
C
hristina Petrowska Quilico is no stranger to launch events.
Fancies and Interludes – violin/piano duos by Gary Kulesha,
Raymond Luedecke, Oskar Morawetz and James Rolfe – to be
released by the CMC’s venerable label Centrediscs on June 11 is
her 12th recording on the Centrediscs label and her 37th overall.
For her partner-in-crime on the album, former Toronto Symphony
Orchestra concertmaster Jacques Israelievitch, it’s safe to say the
CMC’s Ontario headquarters on St. Joseph St. is less familiar territory.
This is his first Centrediscs CD, but a natural outgrowth of his involvement with contemporary music and a performing and recording
partnership with Petrowska Quilico which has flowered since he
stepped down as concertmaster of the TSO in 2008. This collaboration began in part because they are colleagues in the Department of
Music at York University and in part, according to Petrowska Quilico,
because of their mutual interest in contemporary music, their shared
love of playing as a duo and their combined ability to embrace a wide
variety of contemporary styles and approaches. (It all started in 1996
during TSO rehearsals for a piano concerto by Larysa Kuzmenko,
which included a short duo.)
Happily, Fancies and Interludes will not be the last fruits of their
collective endeavour. Over the past six years they have enjoyed a
vigorous performing relationship. Some of this arose as part of the
York faculty artist performing program: first with French repertoire, and then Mozart. They began sight-reading the Mozart violin
and piano sonatas, but soon realized they wanted to perform the
complete set, which they presented at Gallery 345 in the spring of
2014 in a marathon of four concerts embracing all of them. Recently
a series of York University faculty concerts of the same repertoire was
recorded by veteran producer David Jaeger and engineer Simon Head.
Combined with additional recording sessions, the result is a complete
recorded collection.
The Mozart sonata project was recorded in 15 sessions over the
past eight months in the Tribute Communities Recital Hall at York
University. According to Jaeger, the performances “are remarkable
for their elegance, clarity and detail, but also for their lively spirit
– revealing the joy that Petrowska Quilico and Israelievitch have in
playing together.”
Of the last recording session in particular (May 2015), Jaeger
says “this session was filled with absolutely beautiful playing and a
compelling sense of the love the artists have for the Mozart sonatas.”
The first disc in this collection is scheduled for release in January 2016.
In connection with the June 11 CMC release Petrowska Quilico says:
“The repertoire was chosen by Jacques and illustrates his longstanding
involvement with contemporary repertoire. Fancies and Interludes
shows the incredible range of styles and techniques in contemporary
duo composition, from classical and romantic, to minimalism and
other advanced approaches.”
D I S C OV E R I E S | C O N T I U N E S O N PA G E 6 8
8 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
44 th Season
201 5 -201 6
SUBSCRIPTION
SERIES
GREAT CHAMBER MUSIC DOWNTOWN
Quartets
Piano
Discovery
Tu. Oct. 13 Benjamin Grosvenor
Daniel Taylor and Greg Funfgeld
Th. Oct. 22 Cuarteto Casals
were times when I have had bookings in Germany where I could only
do one of the two weekends. Greg prefers to have singers who will
do both weekends, but he was very flexible. He is totally loyal to the
singers that he likes.”
“Most wonderful, he is totally approachable, with no airs about
him, and yet his understanding of the music is quite profound. His
demands are quite specific; he knows about the text; and his ears are
very, very keen. So any wrong turn from anywhere in the orchestra
he’s right on it, and in a way that I’d say is less obvious than say
someone like Bernard Labadie – Labadie who’s a great technician.
Greg might seem more casual about it but in fact he has these standards he wants to achieve and he holds onto singers that he feels
understand him and are open to reaching the same goals.”
Another favourite of Funfgeld’s, Taylor tells me, is tenor Charles
Daniels. Taylor had sung a St. John’s Passion with Daniels at
Tafelmusik and made the suggestion to Funfgeld that he invite Daniels
to the Bethlehem Bach Chorus for their recording of the work.
“For that kind of repertoire Charles is probably my favourite singer,”
Taylor says, of working with Daniels during the Tafelmusik St. John.
“He got up night after night just like it was pouring a cup of tea every
night. He did it with such ease, such conviction. I mean, we all did
what we could but the show was about Charles. He’s a remarkable,
he’s, well, a hero.”
“He’s a wonderful storyteller,” I offer. “It’s a rare talent to be able to
get inside the musical story like that.”
“Exactly,” Taylor says. “That’s exactly right. At University of Toronto
that’s what we work on so much at the Faculty of Music. I mean,
students and other performers were given the gifts they have to work
with and we work as hard as we can to maintain that. But its quite
another challenge to teach someone how to tell a story. I’ve been
involved in masterclasses, anywhere in the world where I’ve heard
a really great, great voice and I’ve felt ‘what’s missing here?’ and it’s
usually that. It’s a skill which can also to some extent be taught, but
really you know it’s a question of having to be open to communicating
with people and less self-critical.”
So often, he says, students and some professionals are concerned
above all with developing what they think will be an unfailing technique. “I joke with students when they arrive in the studio, especially
if they’re there to do their master’s; they think you’re going to give
them a key to open the secret area of resonation or secret breathing
technique or whatever that’s going to give them – and all you can
really tell them is ‘it’s a long journey, its a very long journey.’”
Talking to Taylor now, compared to even a few years ago, it’s interesting to see how deeply the commitment to teaching has taken hold,
along with his still astoundingly busy performing and recording
pursuits. And the teaching aspect feeds off the other as he ropes
his duet partners and other performance collaborators into his
teaching work.
“I mean just last week I had Emma Kirkby in at the faculty – I
bring her in every year; I bring in Nancy Argenta as well; I just had
Christopher Purves.”
(Purves is the English baritone, who sang the hair-raisingly chilling
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Th. Nov. 5 Cecilia Quartet
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June | July | August, 2015 | 9
A Taste of Toronto
Summer Music
10 | June | July | August, 2015
BO HUANG
lead role, opposite Barabara Hannigan, in the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra’s recent opera-in-concert production of George Benjamin’s
Written on Skin during this spring’s New Creations Festival.)
“So you saw that show?” I ask. “I did,” he says. “I did and I loved
it. And I didn’t expect to love it. My experience with new music has
been mixed, and I’ve done some of those premieres ... I thought it was
an amazing evening, across the board. And I have one fellow [in the
show] who worked with me, Isaiah Bell, the tenor, and I was just so
pleased; he’s making a name for himself. He was at Tanglewood, he’s
recorded with Nagano ... it’s all beginning to happen for him.”
“So, back to Kirkby,” I prompt. “We were talking about musical
storytelling and you said last week you brought her in ...”
“The thing about Emma,” he says, “Everything about what Emma
does (and I’ve sung with Emma for about ten years, we tour together
every year, we do recitals together and I’ve been very lucky, I mean in
the last 15 years she refers to me as being her duet partner which is an
honour from someone who has been so important not only to early
music but to music today) ... the thing about Emma is that when she
sings, it’s all about honesty, really, and text. She comes in and she’s not
interested really in what noise is happening, it’s all about truth.”
“Ultimately though,” I suggest “Technique still comes into play
when you have to trust your instrument to deliver the truth you’ve
discovered.” “Yes,” he replies. “And if you haven’t done the hard work
at that point then you’re in trouble.”
Taylor’s co-Canadian at Bethlehem this year is Agnes Zsigovics.
I hear them together first on the Friday afternoon in duets from
Cantata BWV 78 – Jesu, der du meine Seele and then Cantata BWV
23 – Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn. Their rapport is striking and
their voices together are pellucid, meshing with a harmonic precision
reminiscent, I suggest to him, of what one hears in his duet work with
his great collaborators – Suzie LeBlanc, Kirkby and Nancy Argenta. “I
have to say,” he replies, “For the work I do, the duet projects when I
go around, I’ve got a few voices, yes, ... you develop a preference for
colours.”
“And Agnes has that?”
“She’s a very special singer” he says. “She is doing her doctorate
now at U of T, but actually I met her at U. Of T. Years ago, when I was a
visiting artist. We were doing some Bach with Helmut Rilling.”
“I was thinking about those encounters with Rilling earlier,” I
remark, “When we were talking about the storytelling aspect. I
remember one Rilling masterclass you were in, with a student, a
soprano, doing a duet – maybe it was even one of these two duets.”
“Yes,” he replies. “That’s Rilling’s teaching model [pairing guest
artist and student]. It’s a wonderful model.”
(In the encounter in question, Rilling had stopped the student to ask
her if she knew who her character was speaking to. After the penny
dropped that the two singers were not singing to an audience but
to each other, the entire performance had transformed in a flash to
something unforgettably compelling.)
“I was lucky,” Taylor says. “Rilling never worked with countertenors
before. He’s now hired me for many years, mostly for Handel. But I
love that recently in an interview someone said ‘but you don’t like
countertenors, right?’ and he said I used not to like countertenors.”
Our conversation drifts on and on, for 45 minutes or so: “I feel I am
now in the middle of my career as a countertenor, and I’m aware of
it, and so I don’t have the advantage of being new ...”. “I haven’t sung
at the Canadian Opera Company now since Richard Bradshaw passed
away.”
“You did Caesar for them I remember, with Ewa Podles?”
“Yes, that was amazing, and in that one I did play ‘the bad guy.’
Richard had asked if I would do Sesto and I said ‘well you know
Richard, Tolomeo is really fun, and I had sung it at Rome ...”
And much more: about male and female alto voices; about Bach on
modern and period instruments; about James Bowman and Michael
Chance and recording for Sony. And fittingly much more about
Funfgeld and the Bethlehem Bach Festival.
All I can do is to promise you “more on the web,” and to promise
myself a return visit next spring, slouching down Bathurst Street to
Bethlehem, once again to be uplifted and amazed.
Douglas McNabney, artistic director of Toronto Summer Music
When Douglas McNabney dropped by The WholeNote office a week
or two ago, it was mainly just to set up a time to sit down later in June
and have a conversation – a filmed [email protected],
for our YouTube series, to be exact – about his vision for this year’s
Toronto Summer Music Festival. However, as often happens in these
kinds of situations, one thing led to another and before we were aware
of it, our conversation had already begun. In this particular case, it
was especially easy to get carried away – this is the tenth anniversary year of Toronto Summer Music and McNabney’s fifth year of his
tenure as the festival’s artistic director. From the look of the programming in place, this festival will have a presence in Toronto’s musical
landscape this summer that will be tough to ignore.
Think of what follows as a taste of a “Conversation” to come, where
McNabney will be catching up with WholeNote publisher David
Perlman to talk about the business of curating a city’s music, brandnew opportunities for amateurs to get involved in the festival scene,
and how to cope – or even take advantage of – the coming Panamania.
Until the time comes, however, here is a little of what has been on
McNabney’s mind, and on ours, as festival season swings into full gear.
WN: For now, let’s get a sense of the festival, and of the shape of it.
DM: The one thing that struck me about putting together this year’s
program – because it’s huge – is that the amount of music that I
wanted to include is totally unmanageable. Usually we’re dealing with
the same body of literature, standard 19th-century chamber music
literature and a little bit of excursions outside of that, and then I take
a focus point in on one particular aspect or country or something
like that. This year because of the Pan Am Games, we said, okay, we
have to do music of the Americas. And instead of focusing in, it’s gone
completely way out of our traditional literature, which has been really
fun. But when you start down that road, it’s a little bit frightening how
far and how many different branches there are.
There are a lot of musicologists at McGill and I think even with
the musicologists nowadays, for the 19th century their minds are
exhausted. Everybody’s done that, it’s as if there’s not much left to
dig for there, and so everyone’s gone on to thinking about what’s
happening in America in the 20th century. Of course there are people
like Taruskin leading this charge that 1,000 years of western music
have actually come to an end and what we have is American popular
culture, and that’s what’s ahead of us now. I don’t necessarily believe
that, but certainly there are aspects of that idea that reach this project.
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...On breaking down musical (theatre) walls:
DM: We’re doing a little bit of jazz at the festival and we’re doing the
quintessential American operatic form, which is the musical.
WN: Which work is that?
DM: It’s The Last Five Years, by Jason Robert Brown, and it’s a
fantastic piece. It’s only two people, it’s a couple that meets, falls in
love, gets married and breaks up, all in five years. It’s told from the
beginning by the man and from the end by the woman; they only
meet in the middle at their wedding and that’s the only time they sing
together. It’s very clever.
Aaron Sheppard is one of the new tenors in the Canadian Opera
Company Ensemble Studio, and he does musical theatre. He and his
girlfriend Vanessa Oude-Reimerink have been singing this musical
together for the last three years, so they know the piece really well.
I’m hoping that through these various connections we can actually
bring our opera audience in to think about the musical on a different
level. To take it more seriously rather than turning up their noses
at a musical, to really think, okay well wait a second, there’s something very interesting happening in this art form, when it’s done well,
performed well. For that matter, there’s a lot of opera that is fluff; you
wouldn’t want to take a lot of opera seriously either.
WN: There’s a sense of breaking down walls with traditional audiences of either kind of genre.
DM: The walls are certainly being broken down. Even at the
Glimmerglass Festival they did Annie Get Your Gun. And I think more
and more we’re going to see opera companies and opera schools
incorporating these works which have been around for basically 100
years now.
T
...On bringing in the star performers:
WN: Have you got some performers coming in this year who you’ve
been chasing since year one or two or three, and you can say, “now
I’ve got it, now this is the theme where I can bring them in”?
DM: Yes. Karita Matilla. But actually, Karita Matilla has nothing to
do with the theme. I’ve been after her for three years. This is the year
it happened.
WN: Not even for the encore?
DM: No, the diva sings what she wants to sing. The same thing with
Garrick Ohlsson. He’s one of my favourite pianists...when I was a
youngster the first year I joined the Quebec Symphony as principal
viola, my first real job out of school, he came and played Prokofiev
Third with the orchestra and I’ll never forget that. He’s been one of
those guys who I’ve always admired. Well, he’s doing Beethoven and
Scriabin. Can’t do anything about that either. But this is the 100th
anniversary of Scriabin and that’s his project for this year. That’s
always the way. The festival theme is there and I try to tie as much as I
can in, but it’s inevitable. It’s inevitable on some levels.
...And on getting geared up for a little unprofessional
music-making:
DM: The other big news for this summer is our new amateur
Community Academy. What I’m really loving is the way that musicians are buying into it too...we’ve really hit a chord. James
Anagnoson’s piano class is oversold already. We just need a few more
voices for the choir and we need a few more string players.
WN: And you’re going to do a breakfast choir?
DM: Absolutely. Everybody will be participating – including the
staff, though they don’t know this yet. Everybody’s got to be there.
Matthias [Maute] is the conductor, and Laura [Pudwell] will be doing
coaching and masterclasses. Everybody all together in the morning,
and have a coffee and a croissant or whatever, and then from 10
o’clock everybody goes into their particular program, but there’s this
one moment where everyone gets together and just makes music.
Sounds like a worthy idea – and sounds like a subject to bookmark
for our next discussion. Until then, thanks to McNabney and to his
colleagues – and here’s to those moments that will make Toronto’s
upcoming summer a musical one.
12 | June | July | August, 2015
S A R A C O N S TA N T
he summer music festival can be a bit of a mystifying concept.
At just the time of year when you would expect most concert
performers to pack up their instrument cases and head to the
cottage, there is, across the country, a sudden eruption of summer
music-making branded as “festival season” – a phenomenon often put
together by people who work throughout the year and around the
clock to make it happen. And yet, despite all the similarities (weekend
getaways, specially-themed concert series, multi-arts celebrations and
educational initiatives), you’d be hard-pressed to find two festivals in any
given summer that appear to be cut from the same cloth.
So what exactly is a summer music festival, and, apart from the
fact that it’s in the summer, what are some of the factors that give
each its unique fingerprint – keeping audiences and organizers alike
coming back for more? Make no mistake – increasingly, music festivals are more than just blips on the regular musical calendar. These
summer events have a particular capacity for going above and beyond
the constraints of the average concert series, offering up an experience that is not only carefully curated but musically unique. And who
better than some of the people who do that curating to talk about the
unique characteristics of the festivals they shepherd into being?
Panamania: As Toronto counts down to the summer’s Pan Am and
Parapan Am Games, Don Shipley has been hard at work as the Games’
creative director of arts and culture, spearheading the accompanying
cultural event christened Panamania. And with over 250 performances and exhibitions featuring music, theatre, dance, art and fashion
between July 10 and August 15, it’s safe to say that Panamania has
been keeping him busy.
Says Shipley: “For me it’s been a wonderful journey because it was
part of my own discovery too, digging into the music of the Americas,
unearthing not only what is best from these countries, but sometimes
their best kept secrets. I think quite honestly that the marquee names
people will know, but the real discoveries sitting at one of our three
venues are those artists they won’t already know.”
Those names include, among hundreds of artists and musicians,
such performers as the Flaming Lips, Jann Arden, Blind Boys of
Alabama, Calle 13, Bomba Estéreo and Lila Downs, as well as the YOA
Orchestra of the Americas – a special youth orchestra project that
will bring together orchestral musicians aged 18 to 30 from across the
Americas. In even this single festival alone, there will be no shortage
of musical celebration in Toronto over the coming summer.
“It’s that whole sense of large public engagement. It’s really about
that whole shared experience,” Shipley explains. “People by nature
just love large gatherings. They love to be together, they love that
communal experience – and I think what we’ve got here is not only a
legacy of introducing great music, but it’s also about that big gathering
of people coming together to celebrate.”
Music at Port Milford: The gathering of people for a musical and
celebratory purpose can of course take many different forms. While
Panamania, as a one-time-only whirlwind, blows through Toronto,
outside the city Music at Port Milford breezes into Prince Edward
County, as it has done every summer for 28 years. Music at Port
Milford is a strikingly different kind of summer festival experience. A
chamber music festival and summer camp program running this year
from July 12 to August 9 for ages 12 to 18, it is founded on the importance of community. “My original vision 28 years ago was to bring
students together in a family-like atmosphere and really make the
program a more holistic experience,” says Meg Hill, who co-founded
the camp on her family farm and now acts as the program’s director.
“We don’t just have teachers coming in and giving classes, the same
people who are coaching you are also playing chess with you, and
playing Bananagrams with you, and eating spaghetti with you – so it’s
very family-like in that sense.”
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Stratford Summer Music artistic producer John Miller
For Hill, seeing the first moments of that family coming together
are part of what makes organizing the festival worthwhile. “I look
forward to and get excited for the first day of each session. We have
students coming from really all over, from Mexico City to Alberta, and
even though it’s only about 40 kids they all come from such different
places. It’s really exciting to see the first meal, just to see all of these
people coming in from all over the place and figure out how we’re
going to create a community,” she recalls. “The students also all sing
together, even though they’re not singers – the first night after our
first meal, they’re in the barn and they’re singing together – and I’m
somewhere out in the field listening, and that’s a wonderful moment
that I look forward to every year.”
Stratford Summer Music: For those willing to venture to venues
beyond the GTA like Prince Edward County, this summer promises
no shortage of unique concertgoing opportunities. In addition to the
output of educational programs like Music at Port Milford, a number
of the province’s now-staple summer festivals not only consistently
have exciting performers and programs on their rosters, but have
a consistent feel to their programming, reflective of the individual
running the show.
Less than a two-hour drive from Toronto in Stratford, Ontario,
Stratford Summer Music’s artistic producer John Miller has put
together an eclectic mix of concerts to commemorate their 15th anniversary year, among them tributes at dawn and dusk to the music
of R. Murray Schafer, brunch shows featuring violinists culled from
Tafelmusik, Ben Heppner in recital with the Blind Boys of Alabama
and a “Classical Tattoo” featuring over 200 young orchestral players
from the YOA Orchestra of the Americas (mentioned previously by
Don Shipley), the National Youth Orchestra and l’Orchestre de la
francophonie. Running this year from July 20 to August 30, the festival’s offerings are well worth the day trip.
continues on page 36
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June | July | August, 2015 | 13
Beat by Beat | Choral Scene
Apocalypsis
Schafer
Avant!
BENJAMIN STEIN
T
he term avant-garde has come to
mean art on the edge – work that is
David Fallis studies the score for Apocalypsis,
provocative and disturbing. Many
which he will be conducting during Luminato.
people are not aware that avant-garde was
originally the military term for soldiers
whose task was to scout terrain ahead of
an advancing army. To be a member of
the avant-garde, therefore, was to be at
a higher risk of first contact and combat
than other members of the force, and like
many that are first over the top in any
combat situation, members of the avantgarde were not expected to have a high
survival rate.
Frequently, the artistic avant-garde
faces a kind of annihilation as well; not
death, thankfully, but the loss of their
cutting-edge relevance. Their innovations
are subsumed into the mainstream, their
work ceases to provoke and the public
moves on to new outrages and diversions.
In artistic terms, what happens to a
member of the avant-garde who has
survived their encounter with a hostile
or receptive public and lived to tell the
tale? Do they become venerated elder
statesmen, losing their indie cred as they
join the establishment, or do they stay on
the cutting edge? Canadian composer
R. Murray Schafer has enjoyed both rebel
But Schafer’s ire was partly a reaction to what he regarded as the
status and critical success, amassing a performance history that many
composers must envy. His work has never been mainstream, but it has ossified concert culture which unfortunately remains with us still.
Schafer’s approach to actual musicians, and the concert audience
extended beyond the small contemporary music audience to which
itself, has been anything but stern and insulting. On the contrary, it
many composers find their work consigned.
has often been playfully generous, notably in his works for children.
Schafer has been credited with inventing the term “soundscape.”
Unlike some avant-garde artists, Schafer’s lack of contempt for the
It may be hard for young musicians and their audiences, accustomed
audience, and his clear desire to connect using musical language that
to opera productions in vodka bars and symphonies on bicycles, to
is accessible as well as challenging, has been in part responsible for
appreciate how revolutionary it was for Schafer to mount his producthe positive response to his work.
tions in forests, lakes and other spaces beyond the concert hall.
And so, despite avant-garde aspects in Schafer’s music, I have
But while there can be a gimmicky quality to some non-traditional
always thought of him as the last Romantic, a Canadian Mahler of
staging, Schafer’s work was always rooted in a simple but profound
the North. While his tonal language uses extended harmonies and
belief that (to paraphrase conductor David Fallis) music changes
non-traditional soundscapes, his music is rooted in the techniques of
depending on how and where it is heard. Schafer’s staging needs, his
graphic scores and sound innovations were a passionate attempt to get earlier eras, including his ability to write a good old-fashioned catchy
melody, the most deceptively simple and undervalued of a composboth performers and audiences to listen with fresh ears.
er’s skills. Schafer’s fascination with nature, and his frequent depicSchafer has been scathing in the past about certain concert music
tion of metaphysical battles between good and evil, connect his work
traditions that he finds stultifying. I read one memorable essay in
to traditions that seem at odds with this era’s self-referential irony and
which he compared the classical piano itself to a prostitute. Whether
arch diffidence. I would urge both those of advanced and conservative
you agree with this or not – I’m not sure that much is achieved by
denigrating keyboard instruments or sex workers, either on their own tastes to give Schafer a listen, if they have not done so before.
This month brings the opportunity to do just that, by attending
or juxtaposed – it certainly made for provocative reading.
14 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
a performance of one of Schafer’s most ambitious works. In June,
Toronto’s Luminato Festival will mount a new production of Schafer’s
Apocalypsis. This is the first time that the work will be heard in its
entirety since its 1980 premiere in London, Ontario.
Apocalypsis is a two-part work. The first half is based on the
Book of Revelation, the Christian text that has contributed so many
images to literature and popular culture – the Four Horsemen of the
Apocalypse, the Seven Seals, the Whore of Babylon, the Beast and
the False Prophet, all of whom are defeated by the forces of good. The
second part, Credo, is an extended chorus that has been performed
several times as a concert work. The text is a translation of writings by
Giordano Bruno, a 16th-century Jesuit priest who was also a philosopher and astronomer. Bruno’s ideas of spirituality, and the place of the
world in the universe, were so disturbing to Catholic authorities that
he was imprisoned and put to death in 1600.
Part of the difficulty in restaging Apocalypsis has been that the
forces that Schafer specifies for performance are enormous, requiring
a muster that evokes the original military meaning of avant-garde.
Toronto conductor David Fallis, who has performed Schafer’s work
in the past, will be leading the advance. Samoan choreographer Lemi
Ponifasio and MAU, his ensemble, will be the central group involved
in the staging. Canadian star performers Brent Carver, Tanya Tagaq,
Denise Fujiwara and Nina Arsenault have solo roles. New Zealand
opera singer Kawiti Waetford will join them, and performance art
legend Laurie Anderson will have a video cameo as well.
Then there are Apocalypsis’ ensemble requirements. The list of
performers constitutes a music festival in its own right. Groups from
all over Ontario are participating – see the list of choirs at the end of
the column, which does not even include the many instrumentalists
involved. There will be close to 1,000 performers – dancers, soloists,
choristers, conductors, brass, strings (including 12 string quartets!),
winds and percussion – in the Sony Centre in three performances
on June 26, 27 and 28, making Apocalypsis a Mahlerian endeavour
indeed.
That the performance of such a large work has been made possible
is a tribute both to the producers of Luminato and the commitment of
Canadian ensembles to indigenous modern composition. Conductor
Fallis speaks with enthusiasm about the conductors and choirs that
he had never worked with, and whose drive and excellence he has
come to admire. Considering that the last complete performance of
Apocalypsis took place 35 years ago, for many this one may well be
a once-in-a-lifetime experience – but hopefully not. It is exciting to
witness many Ontario groups joining together to make arts events
take place, so let’s hope this will be a model for future collaborations,
especially with Canadian works.
For tickets and further information, see luminatofestival.com.
Choirs involved in Apocalypsis:
Bell’Arte Singers
Cantabile Chamber Singers
Cantores Celestes Women’s Choir
City Choir
Concord Vocal Ensemble
Da Capo Chamber Choir
The Element Choir
Exultate Chamber Singers
Grand Philharmonic Choir
Guelph Chamber Choir
Hamilton Children’s Choir
Tallis Choir of Toronto
That Choir
Benjamin Stein is a Toronto tenor and lutenist. He can be contacted at
[email protected] Visit his
website at benjaminstein.ca.
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Toronto Chamber Choir
Toronto Mendelssohn Choir
Oakham House Choir
Ontario Youth Choir Alumni
Orpheus Choir of Toronto
Ottawa Bach Choir
Pax Christi Chorale
Regent Park School of Music
Seraphim Men’s Chorus
St. James Cathedral Choir
Singing Out!
Univox Choir Toronto
June | July | August, 2015 | 15
Beat by Beat | Classical & Beyond
A Feast of
Festivals
Stearns wrote in The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2012: “Compared to
the Emerson Quartet’s famous Bartók marathons at Carnegie Hall
in the 1990s (one of which I attended), Borromeo’s at Field Concert
Hall had musicians, music and audience contained in a smaller room
that, over the three-hour-plus concert, became laudably claustrophobic: the performances never coasted or let you coast. While the
1990s version of the Emerson Quartet used vibrato so unceasingly as
to form a safety curtain between your ears and the music’s intensity,
the Borromeo Quartet is much more judicious about such matters,
PA U L E N N I S
giving performances with more nuanced contrasts of light and shade,
oronto Summer Music Festival celebrates its tenth edition by
paying homage to the Pan Am Games being held in Toronto from as well as more open windows that your ear can’t help but enter. The
music’s mystery, violence and sorrow become absolutely inescapJuly 10 to 26. Festival artistic director Douglas McNabney has
able. Spanning the period from 1908 when the composer was 27 to
focused his fifth season at TSM on an exploration of the culture of the
the eve of World War II in 1939, Bartók’s quartets ask to be performed
Americas in the 20th century. How the musical heritage of waves of
in a single concert not just because they represent one of the highest
European immigrants merged with that of indigenous peoples and
peaks in 20th-century music, but because there’s an easily traceable
Americans of African descent is an ongoing narrative that never gets
progression.”
old. To that end, McNabney has curated several programs that will
TSM also acts as a mentoring academy to 28 young musicians
keep any serious concertgoer’s mind off the noise of the hemispheric
on the threshold of a professional career. Chosen by a jury headed
contests simultaneously raging in the realms of physical culture
by McNabney, 14 fellows in the Chamber Music Institute program
throughout our fair city.
for piano and strings (July 13 to August 8) and 14 in the Art of Song
Soprano Measha Brueggergosman headlines TSM’s July 16 opener,
program for singers and pianists (July 12 to 25) will study under
“Americans in Paris,” spotlighting the music of Gershwin and
violinists Martin Beaver, Jonathan Crow, Mark Fewer, Ernst Kovacic,
Copland, whose careers were elevated by their European experiHarumi Rhodes and Axel Strauss; violists Paul Coletti, Steven Dann
ences. “The Hollywood Connection” and “American Romantic” are
and Eric Nowlin; cellists Henrik Brendstrup, Denise Djokic and Mark
other concerts that promise beautiful music from Barber and Dvořák
Kosower; soprano Soile
to Korngold, Beach and
Isokoski; and pianAntheil. Arts patron
ists Martin Katz, Pedja
Elizabeth Sprague
Muzijevic, John Novacek,
Coolidge was typical
Steven Philcox and Huw
of the classical music
Watkins. The “Mentors
lover of the New
& Fellows” concerts at
World, commissioning
Walter Hall feature artist
works by Prokofiev,
mentors and festival
Poulenc, Britten and
guest artists sharing the
Bloch. McNabney clevstage with TSM Chamber
erly includes a concert
Music Institute fellows
of the fruits of her
at 4pm and 7:30pm on
largesse performed by
July 18, 25, August 1 and
a collection of topnotch
8. These are unparalchamber musicians led
lelled opportunities for
by TSO concertmaster
the aspiring professionals
Jonathan Crow. The
final thematic evening,
to gain invaluable experi“American Avantence making chamber
Garde,” features the
music in front of the
Afiara String Quartet,
public while performing
Pedja Muzijevic, piano,
with seasoned musicians
and Harumi Rhodes,
of the highest calibre.
violin, performing Cage, Ives,
Which makes them fascinating to
Borromeo String Quartet
Feldman and Zorn. This kind of
attend as well.
stimulating programming is part of what makes summer festivals and
In a free TSM preview concert at the Richard Bradshaw Ampitheatre
TSM, in particular, so compelling.
May 28, violist McNabney and violinist Axel Strauss anchored a
Argentinian pianist Ingrid Fliter performs Ravel’s Piano Concerto in hushed, lyrical performance of Dvořák’s tuneful Piano Quintet No.2 in
G Major with the YOA Orchestra of the Americas, conducted by Carlos A Major, Op.81. Pianist fellow Todd Yaniw was a sensitive keyboardist;
Miguel Prieto, in a concert that also includes Mexican composer Carlos cellist fellow Sarah Gans and violinist fellow Aysel Taghi-Zada blended
Chávez’s infectious Symphony No.2 “Sinfonia India” and Dvořák’s
in nicely. The noontime recital proved McNabney’s point (in his introever-fresh Symphony No.9 in E Minor Op.95 “From the New World.”
ductory remarks) that (young) musicians learn how to project their
Panamanian pianist Danilo Pérez brings his considerable jazz skills to
feelings about music by playing in public. In Dvořák they had a most
an all-star Koerner Hall evening July 22.
willing partner. The first and second movements were filled with
Garrick Ohlsson, the first American to win the International Chopin so much melody that if you were on a walk in the woods, dropping
competition (in 1970), and coincidentally, a musical inspiration for
notes like breadcrumbs, you would have no trouble finding your way
the young McNabney, brings his sizable pianism and imposing sixback home.
foot, four-inch frame to a noteworthy program (in Koerner Hall on
Stratford Summer Music: The Liverpool-born pianist Paul Lewis
July 23) of Scriabin – Désir, Op.57 No.1, Sonata No.10, Op.70, Fragilité, discovered classical music by listening to records in his local library as
Op.51, No.1 and Sonata No.5 in F-sharp Major, Op.53 – and Beethoven a child. Curiously, the first pianist he heard was Alfred Brendel, whose
(Sonatas Opp.109 and 110).
affinity for Schubert and Beethoven was echoed in Lewis’ own criticEven more impressive is the Borromeo String Quartet’s complete
ally acclaimed recordings many years later. His WMCT Toronto debut
traversal of Bartók’s six string quartets which will take place August 6
playing Schubert’s last three sonatas in the fall of 2012 still lingers
at 7:30pm in the intimate confines of Walter Hall. As David Patrick
vividly in my mind; his recent Koerner Hall recital with the violinist
T
16 | June | July | August, 2015
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MOLINA VISUALS
Paul Lewis
Lisa Batiashvili was memorable for its Schubert and Beethoven. So it
makes for a kind of cyclic balance that Lewis’ Stratford recital July 29
will consist of Beethoven’s last three sonatas, Opp.109. 110 and 111. His
Harmonia Mundi recording of these pianistic touchstones was named
Gramophone Record of the Year in 2008. This is one of the destination
concerts of the summer; the fact that it follows Garrick Ohlsson’s TSM
recital, which also includes Opp.109 and 110, by a mere six days adds
another layer to its attraction – the opportunity to compare artistic
interpretations.
Another reason to make the trek to Stratford is the chance to hear
budding superstar Jan Lisiecki play all five of Beethoven’s piano
concertos with a string quartet! Having heard his trio of concerts with
the TSO last November when he performed Nos. 3, 4 and 5 under the
baton of Thomas Dausgaard, I can’t wait for the added intimacy the
Annex Quartet and the Revival House venue will provide August 27,
28 and 29.
Another innovative piece of programming finds three Tafelmusik
violinists each performing a Bach unaccompanied sonata and partita
in a “Musical Brunch” on two separate weekends. The series begins
July 25 and 26 with Julia Wedman playing Partita No.2. Aisslinn Nosky
follows with Sonata No.1 August 1 and 2; Christina Zacharias performs
the Sonata No.2 August 8 and 9; Nosky returns with Partita No.3
August 15 and 16; Zacharias follows with Partita No.1 August 22 and
23; Wedman completes the cycle August 29 and 30 with Sonata No.3.
Festival of the Sound: The 36th summer of this long-running
vibrant festival has much to recommend between July 18 and August 9
beginning with “Flute, Harp and Strings” on July 21 when Suzanne
Shulman, Caroline Léonardelli, Gil Sharon, Ron Ephrat and Yegor
Dyachkov perform Debussy, Saint-Saëns and Villa-Lobos among
others. An overview of Brahms promises much over three concerts
July 22, while July 23 features a wealth of chamber music from
Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert to Bruch, Saint-Saëns and Poulenc
culminating in a 7:30pm concert of Beethoven’s Piano Quartet
with André Laplante and Schubert’s seminal Quintet in C. Violinist
Moshe Hammer performs two recitals on July 30; in the later one
his Beethoven Violin Sonata “Spring” is followed by the Penderecki
String Quartet playing the composer’s great String Quartet Op.131.
On August 4, the Afiara String Quartet gives us Beethoven’s final
quartet Op.135. The next day violinists Martin Beaver and Mark Fewer
lead a cast of supporters in Beethoven’s irresistible Septet. August 7
Beaver and Fewer are joined by festival artistic director, clarinetist
James Campbell, the Afiara String Quartet and others for intimate
concerto performances of Haydn’s Violin Concerto in D and Mozart’s
sublime Clarinet Concerto. Earlier in the day, you can hear Stewart
Goodyear’s take on Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations Op.120. Two days
later, Goodyear is joined by Boris Brott and the National Academy
Orchestra for Beethoven’s Piano Concerto Op.73 “Emperor.” A festival
of many sounds.
Music and Beyond: Running from July 4 to 17, this Ottawa classical
music and multi-disciplinary festival highlights the delightful Vienna
Piano Trio (whom I profiled in my March column earlier this year)
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 17
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival: The tenth anniversary of this
August long-weekend festival (July 30 to August 3) under the artistic
direction of pianist Alexander Tselyakov features seven musically rich
concerts, two of which are jazz-oriented. The five classical recitals
are well-programmed and varied, with Tselyakov himself, and his
talented pianist son Daniel, collaborating with violinist Marc Djokic,
hornist Ken McDonald, cellist Simon Fryer and others in music
ranging from Beethoven to Piazzolla, Mendelssohn and Schumann to
Franck, Sarasate and Corigliano, all of which only enhance the natural
beauty of Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, where the festival
takes place.
Ottawa Chamberfest: There is a feast for the ears here from July 23
to August 6. Belgian violinist Augustin Dumay’s July 24 recital of
Brahms, Debussy, Ravel and Beethoven is a chance to hear this patrician musician before his Koerner Hall concert next year. The strong
Haydn component begins July 28 with “Haydnfest I,” the first of two
programs by the kinetic St. Lawrence String Quartet. The Calidore
String Quartet also play two Haydn recitals, as do the Cecilia
and Eybler String Quartets, making a total of eight “Haydnfests.”
The Calidore quartet joins up-and-coming Russian pianist Pavel
Kolesnikov July 28 in a performance of Schnittke’s Piano Quintet
following a selection of Scarlatti sonatas and Beethoven’s Op.109.
Stalwart Canadian pianist André Laplante’s solo recital July 31 includes
Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Beethoven and Liszt. In “Metamorfosi”
soprano Suzie LeBlanc joins the Constantinople Ensemble August 1
in works by 17th-century Italian composers Monteverdi, Kapsberger,
Landi and Strozzi. The celebrated Danish String Quartet perform two
evening programs August 5. Beethoven’s Op.18, No.1, Schnittke’s
String Quartet No.3 and Nielsen’s String Quartet No.1 comprise
the earlier concert; the later one is devoted to Wood Works, their
CD of traditional Nordic folk music. Four days later, the Danes play
the Beethoven and Nielsen as part of their TSM recital, a mustsee for those who cannot be in Ottawa. In the meantime, there are
Alexander Tselyakov
in three concerts July 8, 9 and 10. Then on July 11, the trio’s pianist,
the voluble and charming Stefan Mendl, joins soprano Donna Brown
for an afternoon of “Song and Conversation” with music by Schubert
and Brahms.
18 | June | July | August, 2015
MSO
Masterworks
MSO
Holiday*
MSO
Epic
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Music at Metropolitan
worthwhile musical
moments every day in
this packed festival.
Quick Picks
Tafelmusik Baroque
Summer Festival: This
annual Toronto event
provides an invaluable introduction to our
world-class baroque
orchestra. Even better,
admission is free, on a
first-come basis. Check
the Summer Festivals
listings for details on
programs and venues
for the June 5, 10, 14
and 17 concerts.
Summer Music in the
Garden: July 5 Elinor
Frey, cello; July 19
Shauna Rolston, cello,
and the Cecilia String Quartet play Schubert’s glorious Quintet in C;
July 30 Ton Beau String Quartet; August 13 Blythwood Winds play
Barber and Rossini.
Music Mondays at the Church of the Holy Trinity: June 8 Angela
Park, piano; June 29 Raphael Weinroth-Browne, cello; July 6 Cecilia
Lee, piano; July 20 Mary Kenedi, piano; July 27 Chris James, flute,
Lara Dodds-Eden, piano.
Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music Society: June 24 Pianist Su
Jeon and violinist Andrea Tyniec have included Schubert’s vital Violin
Sonata D574 and his Fantasy in C along with Arvo Pärt’s mesmerizing
and iconic Spiegel im Spiegel in their intelligently designed program;
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Music
at Metropolitan
2015-16 Season Highlights
Friday, October 30 at 9 pm
Phantom of the Organs – our annual
‘spooktacular’– Co-sponsored by the Toronto Centre,
Royal Canadian College of Organists.
Friday, November 6 at 7:30 pm
Stefan Engels, organist, in recital on Canada’s largest
pipe organ. Hear this world renowned German
recitalist, now organ professor at Southern Methodist
University in Dallas.
Student Masterclass on Saturday, Nov. 7 at 10 am
Co-sponsored by the Toronto Centre, Royal Canadian
College of Organists and the University of Toronto
Faculty of Music.
Good Friday, March 25 at 7:30 pm
Music by Bach and Brahms, featuring Brahms’ Alto
Rhapsodie with Laura Pudwell and the Requiem.
Metropolitan Festival Choir, soloists and orchestra.
Other concerts and more information will be available in September
Metropolitan United Church
56 Queen Street East (at Church Street), Toronto
416-363-0331 (ext. 26)
www.metunited.org
June | July | August, 2015 | 19
July 26 pianist Alexander Tselyakov’s program includes Brahms’ Horn
Trio and Beethoven’s Horn Sonata in what is in effect a preview of
his own Clear Lake Festival recital five days later, only with different
musical partners.
Toronto Symphony Orchestra: June 10 and 12 the TSO led by Peter
Oundjian performs Mahler’s essential Symphony No.2 “Resurrection.”
June 26 the TSO performs Holst’s indispensible The Planets in a
Luminato “Late Night” concert. June 28 the TSO’s free Luminato
concert, “A Symphonic Zoo,” runs the gamut from Tchaikovsky’s
Swan Lake and Stravinsky’s Firebird to Rimsky-Korsakov’s Flight
of the Bumblebee, Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, the Bulldog
from Elgar’s Enigma Variations and the Mule from Grofe’s Grand
Canyon Suite. June 17 and 18 HanVoice presents a benefit concert with Scott
St. John and friends, including cellist Roman Borys and pianist Angela
Park, performing Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.3, Mendelssohn’s
Octet and Dvořák’s Piano Quintet.
June 20 and 21 “The Night Dances” presented by Luminato, finds
Charlotte Rampling reading Sylvia Plath and Sonia Wieder-Atherton
playing selections from Britten’s Suites Nos. 2 and 3 for solo cello.
Anthony Tommasini wrote of its American premiere in The New York
Times on April 24, 2015: “During some stretches of ‘The Night Dances,’
music and poetry overlapped. For me, the greatness of Britten’s music
came through with special force when Ms. Wieder-Atherton played
alone and Ms. Rampling just listened, with an acuity as gripping as
her recitations.”
June 23 Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation presents flutist Allan Pulker
in a free lunchtime concert.
July 29 St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican Church presents the
Ton Beau String Quartet in a free midday concert.
Paul Ennis is the managing editor of The WholeNote. he can be
reached at [email protected]
MENTORS & FELLOWS CONCERTS
A TSM Audience Favourite! Artist Mentors share the stage with
TSM Chamber Music Institute Fellows, a collaborative performance
of established musicians and tomorrow’s stars.
Saturday, July 18 at 4:00pm & 7:30pm
Mark Fewer, Axel Strauss, Paul Coletti, Denise Djokic, John Novacek
Saturday, July 25 at 4:00pm & 7:30pm
Huw Watkins, Ernst Kovacic, Jonathan Crow, Steven Dann, Henrik
Brendstrup
JUL 16-AUG 9
Saturday August 1 at 4:00pm & 7:30pm
Martin Beaver, Harumi Rhodes, Pedja Muzijevic, Eric Nowlin, Mark
Kosower
Saturday, August 8 at 4:00pm & 7:30pm
Shane Kim, Aaron Schwebel, Eric Nowlin, Emmanuelle BeaulieuBergeron, Sarah Jeffrey, James Anagnoson
ART OF SONG RECITALS
SPECIAL OFFER FOR
WHOLENOTE READERS!
20% DISCOUNT ON TSM
ACADEMY CONCERTS*
QUOTE CODE: WHOLENOTE
20 | June | July | August, 2015
Friday July 24 at 12:00pm & 4:30pm
Performances by Art of Song Fellows. Mentored by Soile Isokoski,
Martin Katz and Steven Philcox
TORONTOSUMMERMUSIC.COM
416-408-0208
*Offer not available in conjunction with any other offer, all tickets are a final sale and are not exchangeable. Artists
subject to change (Mentors will perform on either the 4pm or 7:30pm performance. Art of Song mentors do not perform
in the Art of Song recitals.
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Beat by Beat | World View
Gilday, a member of the Dene nation, transports the listener through
her northern stories sung in a gutsy voice and open stage presence.
Martha Redbone’s music blends Native American elements with her
deep roots in Appalachian folk and Piedmont blues, plus soul and
funk. On the same day, the “New Canadian Music Series” features two
emerging aboriginal musicians, cellist Cris Derksen and singer-songwriter Binaeshee-Quae. Derksen’s music braids the “traditional and
contemporary in multiple dimensions,” weaving her classical music
training and features embedded in her aboriginal ancestry “with new
school electronics, creating genre-defying music.” Her 2010 debut
ANDREW TIMAR
album The Cusp was nominated for a Western Canadian Music Award
usic in the summer: the very notion evokes a field of pleasant
and won the 2011 Canadian Aboriginal Music Award for Instrumental
images. I’m thinking of concerts in a green and flowerAlbum of the Year. Binaeshee-Quae, from Pic River First Nation,
filled public park or a more intimate garden setting, touring
describes her musical style as “jazzy-alterna-folk mix.” She delivers
groups appearing on festival stages throughout our province, as well
her songs in a full-throated, sometimes quirky yet articulate mezzo.
as Harbourfront Centre’s lakeside venues teeming with casual, lightly
Music curator Andrews has waggishly dubbed Luminato’s June 22
clad crowds out for a good time. People generally appear more relaxed
tribute to Mexico, “Distrito Federal Chilango Power Ska Punk meets
and good-humoured in the summer than in other seasons; smiles
Chiapas Mexico Message Music.” It is a mouthful, but it also serves
seem more common. The other seasons are meant for music encounters indoors. The few months of kind summer weather we are allotted as an accurate genre-inclusive tag. Headliners include the Torontobased troubadour Quique Escamilla, the 2015 Juno Award-winning
make it an ideal time to cross paths – and share outdoor musical
multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter and producer. Active on
discoveries – with families from around the world.
the Canadian music scene since 2007, his
Luminato: The first major Toronto
powerful voice and passionate performsummer series featuring global music is
ances fuse Mexican genres such as ranchera
the Luminato Festival, this year running
and huapango with rock, reggae, ska,
from June 19 to June 28. In order to get a
pop, jazz, cumbia, bolero and other Latin
sense of the direction of the programming
American forms. His incisive song lyrics
of interest to you, dear reader, I spoke with
are often keenly socially and politicveteran music curator Derek Andrews over
ally engaged.
the phone. He pointed out that there will be
Los de Abajo from Mexico City is another
changes this year to the venues, compared
politically committed group (they’re
to recent Luminatos held at David Pecaut
supporters of the Zapatista Army of
Square. “The big stage is gone at The Hub –
National Liberation). Over a 23-year career,
which has a landscaped backyard garden
it has constructed a distinctive fusion of
theme this year. We now will have The
regional Mexican musics. A champion early
Festival Shed, an indoor venue of around
on was David Byrne, in 1999 signing Los
200, plus an expansive outdoor venue with
de Abajo to his Luaka Bop label. The group
a much larger audience capacity called
has gone from strength to strength, touring
The Garden Stage (which the TSO will use
extensively and including yet more influon June 28). It will also host the 35 acts in
ences in its diverse palette: ska, reggae,
my program.”
hip-hop and even echoes of Balkan music.
With numerous individual shows and
Skipping to June 25, “Caribbean Calypso”
several themed concert series spread over
is billed as a musical “exploration of
the ten days, Luminato has much to offer
coastal Caribbean Garifuna culture and
listeners out to explore world music. Many
Trinidadian Roots Reggae Calypso.” Taking
have “Americas” themes, pre-echoing the
Drew Gonsalves
centre stage will be the Canadian group Kobo
Pan Am games about to take over Toronto in
Town. Named after the Port-of-Spain neighbourhood where calypso
July. To my regret, I can’t pretend to cover more than some part of the
was born it was founded by Trinidadian-Canadian songwriter Drew
vast scope of this subsection of the festival. June 20, during the first
Gonsalves. The group mixes Caribbean calypso and reggae using
weekend fete at Luminato, begins with the launch of “The Northacoustic instrumentation along with innovative production, social
South Project,” billed as “a collective work of storytelling authored
commentary and an indie rock attitude. Independence, its debut
by 12 celebrated writers working the breadth of the Americas, from
album, won the International Folk Alliance Award. Another headthe Canadian Arctic to Argentina.” It’s co-curated by Andrews and
liner is Aurelio Martinez. He is not only a star Honduran musician, but
literary and ideas curator Noah Richler. The readings by the authors
also a passionate politician and cultural ambassador for the coastal
are accompanied by several singers articulating lyrics of dissent.
Garifuna people as well. Known by his first name alone, Aurelio
Singer-songwriters Amai Kuda n’ Y Josephine, Drew Gonsalves
and Quique Escamilla will also bring their own unique pan-American possesses a gritty expressive voice with which he performs a compelling musical blend of received Afro-Caribbean cumbia fused with
music to the festival stage.
Latin rhythms.
Among the lineup is Ani Cordero, a founding member and
The Luminato Festival celebrates in style June 27 with a “Brazilian
drummer of the Mexican rock band Pistolera and other groups.
Recordar, her latest solo album, is a tribute to the voices of dissent via Block Party,” billed as a “fun family event featuring day-long animation by strolling artists, craft-making workshops and irresistible
reinterpretations of Latin American protest songs. Another particifood!” Luminato programmers aim to capture the Brazilian tradpating artist, La Yegros, has been a powerful presence on the Buenos
ition of festive gatherings at this all-day public party with food, drink,
Aires underground music scene for years. Her signature voice and
commanding stage presence is imbued with South American flair, but music and dance, all elements embracing “a beloved part of the
Brazilian cultural landscape.”
she also brings with it a globally aware mindset, drawing equally on
The Festival Hub’s Block Party is curated by Toronto’s own Uma
deep regional folk traditions and cutting edge beats.
Nota Culture, programming a “carnival of active cultural jamming.”
On June 21 the solstice, National Aboriginal Day and Father’s Day
That includes an invitation to connect with fellow Torontonians
all fall on the same day. (As a dad, I’m hoping for a lavish BBQ dinner
by dancing to live music – to irresistible forró music from the
hosted by my sons as per family tradition.) Why not celebrate them
Northeast of Brazil, the martial arts-inspired capoeira and the
all at The Hub with performances by four aboriginal women? Leela
One Very Fine
Global Summer
M
PAUL WRIGHT
22 | June | July | August, 2015
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dozens of vendors. That too is
experiencing musicking in the
summer for me.
Summer Music in the Garden:
What more pleasant a reminder
of the evanescent – and thus
even more keenly savoured –
summer in Southern Ontario
than music in a garden? As it
has for 16 years, Harbourfront
Centre is this year again producing a delightful season-long
series titled Summer Music in
the Garden, skillfully curated
by Tamara Bernstein. It’s held
in the pleasantly verdant
surrounds of the Yo-Yo Ma
co-designed public Music
Garden at 235 Queens Quay
West. Cooled by the nearby
waters of Lake Ontario, it’s all
free. Make sure you get there in plenty of time however, to snag a seat
on one of few benches. Also arrive early if you wish to claim a private
pied à terre on the sloping lawn in front of the open air grassy stage
area under the magnificent mature weeping willow. (I think you can
guess I have performed and visited there many times over the years).
My picks? I can’t make up my mind from among the multiple
tempting summer offerings. I invite you to check The WholeNote listings to discover your own old – or perhaps new – favourite. Relaxed,
high-quality music in a garden: how can you lose?
A Celebration: June 14 Darbazi, the choir which was formed in a
Toronto living room (yes, I was there), marks its 20th anniversary
with a concert at St. Andrew by-the-Lake Anglican Church on Ward’s
Island, Toronto. Darbazi is Canada’s first choir dedicated to the music
of the various regions of the Republic of Georgia. Under the direction
of Shalva Makharashvili and founding guest conductor Alan Gasser,
the group hosts local groups Trio Zari and Hereti as guests to mark this
significant occasion. I invite you to join me to celebrate in Georgian
style with song, food and toasts to many more years of music and
warm summer weather in which to enjoy it.
In keeping with my custom, I wish you a gloriously musical
summer and invite you back to revisit me in these pages in
September.
ever-popular samba.
Breabach
Among the notable acts taking
the stage is the Quebec Citybased Flávia Nascimento and
her Smallest Big Band. Hailing
from Recife, Pernambuco,
Mundo Livre S/A is a genredefining manguebeat band
formed in 1984. Mundo Livre’s
founding notion was to connect
the culture of the mangues
(mangroves) of Recife with a
network of global pop genres.
It has released three albums,
the last of which was included
in many best-of-the-year lists.
Aline Morales has built a solid
reputation in Canada as a
percussionist and bandleader.
Her Juno-nominated Flores,
Tambores e Amores also showcased her interpretative, vocal and composer chops. With her project
Forró Nite, Morales taps deeply into her forró music roots.
Among the newest Brazilian drum troupes in town, Tdot Batu is a
diverse, youthful group performing samba reggae, but spun with their
own edge. (Samba reggae became a hit in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil in the
1980s when the group Afro-Blocos mashed Bahian rhythms like ijexa
and samba with Caribbean musical influences.) It sounds like quite
the lively party.
Sunfest ’15, London, Ontario: Now to a festival decidedly outside of
Toronto and sporting a pedigree older than most: TD Sunfest ’15. From
July 9 to 12, downtown London’s Victoria Park is transformed into a
culturally diverse playground where over three dozen world music and
jazz groups entertain audiences on five stages scattered throughout the
park. “Canada’s Premier Celebration of World Cultures” is its byline
and all events are free.
Headliners this year include the venerable Afro-Cuban All Stars,
and the new generation Scottish folk five-piece Breabach. It has been
described as “the new face of Scottish Traditional music.” Paulo
Flores, the distinguished Angolan singer-songwriter and author who
performs in the semba genre, also takes the Sunfest stage. His lyrics
often touch on the politics and hardships of Angolan life, and since
2007 he has served as a UN Goodwill Ambassador in Angola.
When my kids were young we repeatedly visited Sunfest, feasting
on its small-town Ontario feel and diverse ethnic good vibes – but
also on the scrumptious international street food and crafts for sale by
Andrew Timar is a Toronto musician and music writer. He
can be contacted at [email protected]
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June | July | August, 2015 | 23
Beat by Beat | In With the New
Elemental Singing
T
consulted with various composers to get a better sense of which
musical elements this language would need; and she studied different
world music-based singing techniques. This wealth of material was
workshopped with a volunteer choir in the original Somewhere There
space and her own unique language and approach was born. It’s a
language that is shared among the choir members, with new ideas for
W E N D A LY N B A R T L E Y
hand cues often coming from the singers. She also credits Jean Martin,
who is constantly envisioning new ideas and directions for what is
here’s a big show coming to town in June – and it’s all about the
apocalypse. The piece I’m referring to – Apocalypsis by Canadian possible, with playing the strongest advisory role. However, Duncan
adds, years before any of this began, it was Western Front’s DB Boyko
composer R. Murray Schafer – is an epic work divided into two
(in Vancouver) who first introduced her to the idea of conducting
parts, the first being a dramatic retelling of John’s vision from the
biblical Book of Revelation and the second a serene multi-choir Credo a vocal improvising ensemble at one of the WF’s community
block parties.
that leads the listener from chaos into order. The performance of
The Element Choir’s
this monumental work,
reputation and
which runs from June 26
performing schedule
to 28, has been taken on
continues to grow,
by the Luminato Festival
and this summer’s
and involves an interschedule is no excepdisciplinary cast of 1,000.
tion, particularly as part
Originally performed in
of the cultural activities
1980 in London, Ontario,
surrounding the Pan
this version will be vastly
Am Games. After the
different in its staging and
Apocalypsis performartistic vision with all
ance, the choir is right
sorts of gender-bending
back at it with their
happening with the main
involvement in the
characters. What I will
Singing River project,
focus on in my column
an interdisciplinary
is the role of the Element
site-specific piece
Choir and its director
directed by composer
Christine Duncan in this
Juliet Palmer and her
production.
Urbanvessel company.
I sat down with
Running on July 4 and
Christine to talk about
5, the piece is a Pan
Apocalypsis as well as
Am Path event that is
other performances she
Christine Duncan and the Element Choir
all about restoring our
and the choir will be
relationship with the Wonscotonach (Don) River. Both the Element
involved in this summer. Christine defines the Element Choir as “an
Choir and Christine Duncan are part of the core performers’ team,
improvising choir that uses a sonic vocabulary based on a system of
along with the TorQ Percussion Quartet. The choir has played a role
hand cues to create instant compositions.” In Apocalypsis the choir
in developing improv-based material for the piece through a series
will perform the role of The Choir of the Lost which in the 1980
of community-based workshops with members of Native Earth’s
version was performed by drama students. “The choir was a perfect
emerging artists program Animikiig, street artist Roadsworth (who
fit for this text-based role, as they are already very comfortable in
will be creating a stencil installation inspired by the improvisamoving freely in the world of sound texture and non-sung elements,”
tions on the Lower Don cycling path) and the Regent Park School of
Duncan said. Their role functions like a Greek chorus, commenting,
Music Youth Choirs. The project also includes audio installations by
responding and reacting to the main drama. And even though choir
Palmer and sound artist Chris Willes and a vast array of interdiscimembers can utter the text however they like, the structure of both
plinary performers, workshops, talks and guided walks. Check out
the timing and dynamics of their utterances is very specific, with
Urbanvessel’s website for all the details.
word comprehensibility being key. This departs from the usual
The second Pan Am-related performance by the Element Choir is
Element Choir practice which is usually “anything is possible.” Before
with the explosive Tanya Tagaq on August 8 as part of Panamania and
the performance begins however, some members of the choir will be
improvising and babbling bits of biblical texts in multiple languages in the free staged events at Nathan Philips Square. Creating her own
unique style based on the traditional Inuk throat singing she grew
both the lobby and the hall.
up with in Nunavut, Tagaq recently won the Polaris Music Prize for
The story of how the Element Choir came into being is fascinating
her Animism album, stunning audiences with her performance on
and a testament to the creative and innovative spirit of both Duncan
the awards night. And the Element Choir was right there backing her
and her partner, drummer and recording producer Jean Martin. Back
up, along with Jean Martin and violinist Jesse Zubot, who produced
in 2006, Duncan and Martin were creating an album on the Montreal
her album. For Duncan, folding the Element Choir into this sea of
label Ambiances Magnétiques. For the release concert, Martin came
sound created by Tagaq and her two-man band was not too much of
up with the idea of putting together a group of singers to expand
a stretch, as she has performed with Tagaq and knows the arc of her
and support the voices of the CD’s vocal performers – Duncan and
shows with Zubot and Martin. However, in this type of situation, the
DB Boyko. It was a brilliant move, as this more choral element added
choir sounds need to be unified and simple, functioning more like a
possibilities for textural changes and polytonality, giving a countertextural device for dramatic impact. Incidentally, Tagaq will be playing
point to the voices and percussion. Inspired by this experience,
the role of the Old Woman in Schafer’s Apocalypsis.
Duncan pursued her own research on how to develop an articuFor Duncan, the Element Choir project is all about creating and
late vocabulary for an improvising choir. Rather than re-inventing
maintaining relationships, building community and fostering a safe
the wheel, she studied the “conduction” methods used in the London
and supportive environment. It offers a playing field for experimenting
Improvisers Orchestra as developed by Butch Morris, as well as
with a diverse range of sounds and morphing textures, while offering
picking up ideas from John Zorn’s Cobra, Anthony Braxton, Phil
opportunities for choir members to improvise their own solos. She
Minton’s Feral Choir and Sarah Weaver’s Soundpainting system. She
24 | June | July | August, 2015
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has increasingly found an open door of support for her aesthetic sensibilities and approach to the voice as an instrument in educational
environments such as the jazz program at U of T. And at the heart of
it all, she is continuing to cultivate improvisational strategies that are
more refined, intentional and artful.
More Singing Stories: This summer is turning out to be the season
of new dramatic works for the voice in various configurations. Back
in the April edition of The WholeNote, I wrote about singer Fides
Krucker’s role in creating vocal improvisations for the dancers
in Peggy Baker’s locus plot production. This summer, Krucker is
presenting and performing in DIVE, a work of sonic theatre set within
a cabaret-styled environment, running from July 30 to August 9 and
created in collaboration with composer Nik Beeson. DIVE is based
on a play by Richard Sanger, which is in turn derived from Giuseppe
di Lampedusa’s short story The Professor and the Siren. I spoke to
Beeson and Krucker about their collaboration which combines electroacoustic tracks with vocal improvisations. Krucker plays the role
of the Mermaid, a character who is “perfectly divine and wild,” an
elemental force who shifts into a series of different characters and
scenes as she interacts with the two male actors. Her shapeshifting
qualities allow for a variety of musical styles to be used throughout,
including composed music inspired by Greek Rebetiko protest music,
and the Mussolini-era fascist anthem known as the Giovinezza used
in the startling aggressive opening. An intimate setting amongst tables
enables Krucker to travel around the audience, at times singing gently
into their ears while her character’s nonhuman nature embodies such
elemental forces as a storm and the animal spirits of whale and wolf.
Beeson’s electroacoustic score ranges from recorded instrumental
sounds and synthesizer textures to the use of a collection of Harry
Partch-inspired cloud bowls made from glass jugs. DIVE is a story that
juxtaposes the terrifying forces of fascism with those of the wild, raw
and at times equally overwhelming elements of nature, set within a
human story of intimacy, regret and the desire for ecstatic union.
Speaking of storms and political power, How it Storms, an erotic
opera composed by Allen Cole, will be performed on June 17 and 18
featuring the sounds of the Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
along with four operatic singers. The piece is inspired by a story from
the Hindu epic The Mahabharata but set within Canada, with a
female protagonist motivated by her desire to be free from patriarchal
domination.
On June 13, the Music Gallery presents “Fossegrimen,” a multistage event with three main sets that offer various takes on folklore, fairy tales and legend. Included are an opera composed by
Chris Thornborrow based on the Grimm fairy tale The Moon, music
by members of the fusion band Ensemble Polaris and the premiere
of Elliot Cole’s Babinagar, a 20-minute work based on an Afghan
folktale.
The final dramatically inspired new work which caught my eye
in this summer’s season is Wendake/Huronia, composed by John
Beckwith to mark the 400th anniversary of Champlain’s arrival in
the southern Georgian Bay area. The concert on July 30 will feature
the Toronto Consort, the Brookside Festival Chamber Choir and First
Nations singers and drummers.
The Summer Festivals: After a long meandering walk through the
voice-based performances of new works for this summer, it’s time to
take a quick look at what’s happening at the various summer festivals. I promise you, this will be chronological, just to help with your
planning.
Open Ears Festival (Kitchener): June 20 and 21
On June 20, Myaudia, a series of guerilla-styled sound interventions
created by Peter Hatch, will take place in Kitchener’s Victoria Park,
followed by the Open Ears Regatta with multiple musicians ringed
around the civic square for listeners to drift between. On June 21, an
offering of music/dance works with scores by Antoine Bédard, Justin
Rutledge and Rodney Sharman, and improvisations by Lori Freedman.
Music Mondays (Toronto): June through August
A number of new works will be presented in this downtown
Toronto series of lunchtime concerts. Here’s a summary lineup: a
piano work by John Burge (June 8); composer and cellist Raphael
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 25
Fides Krucker
in DIVE
MAKOTO HIRATA
commissioned works by Canadian composers Scott Godin and Isaiah
Ceccarelli performed by Elinor Frey on her five-string cello (July 5);
Toronto’s Ton Beau String Quartet performing Bill Rowson’s String
Quartet No.1 (July 30); and the Blythwood Winds performing new
works by Lau and Estacio (August 13).
Stratford Summer Music: August 7 to 9
R. Murray Schafer’s music is often featured at this festival and
this year, audiences can enjoy three outdoor morning concerts
from August 7 to 9 featuring works from his choral nature-themed
repertoire works. On the evening of August 7, a number of professional choirs will join together to sing some of his more spirituallybased music within a specially choreographed setting at St. James
Anglican Church.
QUICK PICKS
Improvised Music at Array Space:
June 9 and 27: Audiopollination
June 14: Somewhere There/Arraymusic: In Concert
June 19: Evoid Collective
June 28: Toronto Improvisers Orchestra
Canadian Music Centre:
June 4: Opus: Testing Workshop and Concert. Compositions created
using sounds from the NASA Audio Archive.
June 11: Jacques Israelievitch/Christina Petrowska Quilico CD
Launch, with works by Rolfe and Kulesha.
June 13: A Journey Inwards: Iranian-Canadian Composers
of Toronto.
June 24: Elaine Keillor CD Launch. Works by Cardy, Morawetz,
Weinzweig, Louie and E. Miller.
July 6: Gryphon Trio CD Release. Works by Current, Oesterle,
Staniland and Wright.
July 24: Regent Park SongBook Premiere. Works by Gervais, Hamidi,
LeBel and Daniel.
Additional Picks:
June 4, 6 and 7: Toronto Symphony Orchestra – John Adams’ Short
Ride in a Fast Machine.
June 13 and 14: Toronto Symphony Orchestra – Gary
Kulesha’s Torque.
June 17: Opera by Request – Tremblay’s A Chair in Love.
June 20: Rough Idea – Michael Snow and Ken Vandermark.
July 9: Music and Beyond Festival (Ottawa) – Voces8 concert
including works by David Blackwell and John Tavener.
Weinroth-Browne performing his own compositions (June 29); Jean
Coulthard’s Image Astrale (July 6); works by Marjan Mozetich and Jack
Behrens performed by Mary Kenedi (July 20); flute and piano works
by Marchettini, Beaser and Schafer (July 27) and finally, a specially
commissioned work for Music Mondays – Benedicite by PeterAnthony Togni (August 24).
Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival: July/August
Interspersed amongst the festival concerts are the following
premieres and new works: a performance by Dutch cellist, composer
and improviser Ernst Reijseger (July 24); a remount of the mixedmedia piece Illusions from the recent 21C Festival that intermingles
new music by Canadian composers with Charles Ives’ enigmatic
Piano Trio (July 26); a performance of James Rolfe’s contemporary masque Aeneas and Dido (July 27); the premiere of
Andrew Staniland’s The Ocean is Full of its Own Collapse
(July 29); and the performance of Czech composer Sylvie Bodorová’s
Three Sonnets (August 2).
The festival also offers their regular six-concert New Music Now
series on August 3 and 4. Composers represented in these concerts
include Canadians Michael Oesterle, Paul Steenhuisen, Marc Sabat,
Nicole Lizée, and Claude Vivier, along with internationally-based
Nicolaou, Zorn, Rzewski and Birtwistle, among others.
Summer Music in the Garden (Toronto): July/August
Down at Harbourfront’s Music Garden, the outdoor performances include composer Barbara Croall (Odawa) performing a new
commissioned work for pipigwan, a type of cedar flute (July 2); newly
Wendalyn Bartley is a Toronto-based composer and electrovocal sound artist. [email protected]
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26 | June | July | August, 2015
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Beat by Beat | On Opera
Summer’s Bounty
T
CHRISTOPHER HOILE
hanks to the burgeoning interest in opera rarities and especially
in new opera, opera performances in the summer months in
Ontario are no longer the exception but the rule. Ontario does
not as yet have a summer opera festival like the Glimmerglass Festival
in Cooperstown, New York, but so much operatic activity is occurring
that Ontario residents need not feel deprived. June got off to an unusual start with the innovative Against the
Grain Theatre’s presentation of two fully-staged song cycles on June 2
to 5 under the title “Death & Desire.” The two are Franz Schubert’s
Die schöne Müllerin (1824) sung by Stephen Hegedus and Olivier
Messiaen’s Harawi (1945) sung by Krisztina Szabó, most recently seen
as The Woman in the COC production of Schoenberg’s Erwartung.
AtG’s double bill, performed at the Neubacher Shor Contemporary
Gallery, is directed by the company’s artistic director Joel Ivany,
designed by Michael Gianfrancesco and lit by Jason Hand. Christopher
Mokrzewski is the piano accompanist.
In an email, Ivany wrote: “During my time at the University of
Toronto while obtaining my diploma in Opera Directing, I was able
to act as production manager for the Aldeburgh Connection. Seeing
such beautiful concerts put on by Bruce Ubukata and Stephen Ralls
exposed me to a wealth of vocal music outside of opera. Many of these
works received some ‘light’ staging during performance and I was
always intrigued and challenged myself eventually to explore them
further by using the tools that I was skilled in.”
By staging the Schubert and Messiaen cycles, Ivany is thus
extending the implicit idea of song cycles as parlour operas. The 20
songs of Schubert’s cycle follow a clear narrative. A journeyman miller
falls in love with the miller’s daughter, but when he sees that she
favours another, he despairs and drowns himself. Messiaen’s 12-song
cycle in French and Quechua is more abstract, although the title refers
to a genre of Peruvian musical narrative that often ends in the death of
young lovers. As Ivany says: “In discussion with Topher [Mokrzewski],
we both decided that these two song cycles would complement each
other quite well and indeed presented two very unique characters.
Our core of the project is the Schubert, which naturally is more narrative driven and then we’ve interspersed it with the Messiaen to give
voice to the female character, die schöne müllerin … What this has
caused is more of a dialogue between these two characters and a
jarring, but equally fitting auditory experience – something new.”
Luminato: In past years the Luminato Festival has included opera.
This year it nominally does not, although it should be noted that
R. Murray Schafer’s massive oratorio-cum-pageant Apocalypsis
running from June 26 to 28 lists among its creative team the famed
Samoan stage director Lemi Ponifasio. The piece already demands
such a degree of theatricality that it may be difficult to distinguish
from opera.
The text for Part One is based on the Biblical Psalm 148, the Book
of Revelation and on contemporary poetry. The text for Part Two is
an adaptation of one of the Dialogues (1584-85) of Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno (1548-1600), who was burned for his heresies
which included his belief that there were other suns surrounded by
other planets that could support life. Part One of the work requires
six choruses, four instrumental groups, five singers and three sound
poets, plus dancers and mime artists. Part Two uses 12 choirs placed
in a circle around the audience. Among the 1,000 performers will be
performance artist Laurie Anderson (on video), actor Brent Carver
and throat singer Tanya Tagaq.
Semi-Staged Chair: On a much more intimate scale, Opera by
Request presents a semi-staged performance of the absurdist opera
A Chair in Love (2005) by Welsh-Canadian composer John Metcalf
to an English libretto by Quebecois playwright Larry Tremblay. The
story concerns an avant-garde filmmaker who falls in love with a
28 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
Michael Jones and Marion Label in the
production of A Chair In Love, Taliesin
Theatre, Swansea July 13,.2008.
Additionally, the present-day preoccupation with vampires in
popular culture has helped to focus more interest on Marschner’s
opera, which is based on a story by Lord Byron’s doctor, John Polidori
(1795-1821). Polidori wrote his tale “The Vampyre” in 1814, when he
along with Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley and his wife Mary Shelley all
decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror
story. Mary Shelley “won” since the work she wrote was her novel
Frankenstein, first published in 1818. Polidori’s story, however, is
famous in a different way as the first published modern vampire story,
anticipating by decades Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla (1872) and Bram
Stoker’s Dracula (1897). Maria Hwa Yeong Jung will be the pianist and
music director.
As a contrast, on August 1, 5, 7 and 9, SOLT presents the comic
German Romantic opera Martha (1847) by Friedrich von Flotow (181283). The work was such an international hit in its first 100 years that
its two most famous arias are best known in versions not in the original German. The instantly recognizable tenor aria “Ach! so fromm” is
best known in Italian translation as “M’apparì” and the main soprano
aria, the folksong-inspired “Letzte Rose,” is best known as “The
Last Rose of Summer.” Natasha Fransblow will be the pianist and
music director.
The third opera, presented August 1, 4, 6 and 8, is Richard Strauss’
Ariadne auf Naxos (1912), an opera that famously stages a comic and a
tragic plot simultaneously. Narmina Afandiyeva will be the pianist and
music director.
LE CHIEN QUI CHANTE
SARAH BAUMANN
chair, thereby making his dog jealous. The performance will take
place on July 17 at Arraymusic with Michael Robert-Broder as the
filmmaker, Abigail Freeman as the Chair, Gregory Finney as the Dog
and Kim Sartor as the Doctor. William Shookhoff is the pianist and
music director.
Lyrical Summer: In late July and early August, Summer Opera
Lyric Theatre has regularly been a favourite refuge for operagoers
in Toronto. This year, two of the three offerings are rarities from the
German Romantic period. On July 31 and August 2, 5 and 8, SOLT
presents a major rarity in the form of Der Vampyr (1821) by Heinrich
Marschner (1795-1861), a composer who was a major influence on
Wagner, who conducted the work in 1833. After the rise of Wagner’s
operas, Marschner’s fell into obscurity. Now Der Vampyr is recognized
as the link between Carl Maria von Weber’s Der Freischütz (1821) and
Wagner’s Der fliegende Holländer (1843).
Andrew Craig, Nicole Brooks and Weyni Mengesha
from Obeah Opera, a part of Panamania.
Panamania, the cultural sidebar to the Pan American Games in
Toronto in July and August, will include a new production of Nicole
Brooks’ opera, Obeah Opera (2012), running August 4 to 8. The opera,
presented by Nightwood Theatre and Culchahworks Arts Collective,
is sung entirely a cappella by an all-female cast and focusses on the
young Caribbean slave Tituba, the first to be accused of witchcraft in
coc.ca
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Marina Rebeka in La Traviata
(Lyric Opera of Chicago, 2013).
Photo: Todd Rosenberg
June | July | August, 2015 | 29
Beat by Beat | Early Music
Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible (1953) about the Salem Witchcraft
Trials. Tituba has merely been practising her native healing craft,
known as obeah, that the Puritans in their hysteria interpreted as
witchcraft. Andrew Craig conducts and Kim Weild directs.
Stratford to Haliburton: In Stratford, Stratford Summer Music
will present a dinner-opera production of Mozart’s The Magic
Flute on August 14 to 16 at the Revival House (formerly The Church
Restaurant). Peter Tiefenbach is the music director and Brent Krysa is
the adaptor and stage director, with sets and costumes in the style of
Belgian surrealist René Magritte.
In Haliburton the Highlands Opera Studio, whose artistic director
is tenor Richard Margison, will present two operas. One is a fullystaged production of Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro on August 30
and September 1, 2 and 3. The other will be the Ontario premiere of
the Canadian opera The Vinedressers (2001) by B.C. composer Tobin
Stokes on August 19 and 21. The story, based on a First Nations myth,
takes place on the first winery on Pelee Island. Margison is the stage
director and Andrea Grant the pianist. Stokes’ best-known opera
is perhaps Pauline (2014), written to a libretto by Margaret Atwood
about the life of B.C. First Nations poet and performer Pauline Johnson
(1861-1913).
Early Getaways
T
he just-concluding concert season has been an exceptional
year for Toronto musicians in the early music scene. I’ve heard
a lot of music that was very easy to like, whether it was emerging artists on the scene putting together some innovative programs
of interesting musical material and giving us the opportunity to hear
some fascinating music, or concerts from more established artists that
stood out as exceptional. In the former category, I’m thinking specifically of countertenor and baroque guitar player Bud Roach’s concerts
of Giovanni Felice Sances and a couple of stellar concerts from the
Cantemus singers – which let Toronto concertgoers know that there
is a thriving music scene here with many talented young artists who
deserve to be heard.
In the latter category, there were two fantastic multimedia events:
“Paris Confidential,” the Toronto Consort’s program of life in
Renaissance Paris; and Tafelmusik’s wonderful “J.S. Bach, The Circle
of Creation,” both of which proved that established artists are still
pushing their own limits, innovating and willing to try something
new. That wasn’t everything, of course. Opera Atelier gave us some
very fine productions of Gluck and Rameau, Tafelmusik provided
us all something to talk about (or at least write about) with their
ongoing search for a new artistic director, and I’m sure that there’s at
least one stellar performance that I’ve either forgotten or didn’t get a
chance to see.
I’m happy to have witnessed some fantastic concerts this season,
but of course, all good things must come to an end. As this year winds
down, you can be content with the remnants of the artistic seasons
of a few Toronto-based groups as the summer months set in or you
might want to look further afield than the GTA.
If you’re searching for a getaway that includes something more than
a cottage and a lake, there are a few summer festivals that have exceptional entertainment value as well as being a welcome escape from
the city. Musique Royale is a little-known festival that takes place in
multiple cities in Nova Scotia that will give you a chance to hear some
great Canadian artists. While not strictly an early music festival per
se, there are some great renaissance and baroque musicians there,
including the recorder and lute duo La Tour Baroque, the fabulous
baroque flutist Chris Norman, soprano Suzie LeBlanc, the vocal group
Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal (who will also be appearing
at the Ottawa Chamberfest July 25) and baroque fiddler David
Greenberg. Best of all (and somewhat confusingly), these artists will
be playing in multiple cities in June, July, August and September, so if
you’re at all interested in going to Nova Scotia this summer, check out
the website (musiqueroyale.com) to see if there’s a concert in town, or
at least nearby.
Montreal Baroque: If your vacation plans are more along the lines of
a quick weekend getaway than a lengthy road trip, or if you just prefer
the big city to a trip to the countryside, consider travelling to Montreal
over the St. Jean-Baptiste weekend (June 25 to 28) to hear the number
one early music festival in North America, Montreal Baroque. Viola da
gambist Suzie Napper has been running this festival for over a decade,
and it is a singular achievement that she can build an entire long
weekend on concerts, lectures and unusual events centred exclusively
around historically-inspired performance.
This year’s festival returns to the McGill campus in downtown
Montreal and features the Dutch baroque violinist Sigiswald Kuijken,
himself something of a legend in the early music world, leading the
Montreal Baroque Ensemble as well as performing the Bach violin
suites on the violincello da spalla. (Do yourself a favour and Google
image search that one. It’s extremely unlikely you will hear this
instrument performed in Canada again in the next decade.) If an
eccentric pet project from a classical music superstar isn’t enough for
you, Montreal Baroque also features a few local groups, albeit ones
from a crowded, hyper-talented music scene. Ensemble Caprice will
Bicycle Opera co-founders, Nadia Chana and Larissa Koniuk
Bicycle Opera: This summer marks the fourth anniversary of the
innovative Bicycle Opera Project, which aims to bring contemporary Canadian opera to communities across Ontario that might otherwise not have the opportunity to hear it. According to its website:
“The project focuses on operatic repertoire that deals with contemporary issues relevant to all audiences.” The singers and musicians travel
from place to place by bicycle along with two trailers full of props,
costumes and instruments. In so doing they aim to demythologize old
ideas of what opera is, where opera can take place and what opera
singers are like.
Their Ontario itinerary for this summer from August 14 to
September 6 has not yet been announced but last year BOP made
stops in Kingston, Prince Edward County, Belleville, Hamilton,
Bayfield, London, Brantford, Waterloo and Guelph.
BOP’s 2015 repertoire features short operas and opera excerpts.
These include The Auction – Prologue by John Burge; What time is
it now? by Anna Höstman; The Blind Woman by James Rolfe; The
Yellow Wallpaper by Cecilia Livingston; “Dreaming Duet” from The
Bells of Baddeck by Dean Burry and Submission, also by Burry;
Our Lady of Esquimalt Road by Leila Lustig; and, back by popular
demand, Bianchi: A Bicycle Opera by Tobin Stokes which has become
something of a BOP classic.
The company includes Liza Balkan, stage director; Wesley Shen,
music director; Geoffrey Sirett, baritone; Chris Enns, tenor; Stephanie
Tritchew, mezzo; Larissa Koniuk, artistic director and soprano; and
Sonja Rainey, projection artist.
Have an enjoyable summer!
Christopher Hoile is a Toronto-based writer on opera and
theatre. He can be contacted at [email protected]
30 | June | July | August, 2015
DAV I D P O D G O R S K I
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Suzie LeBlanc
A S†L¬R
SEASºN oƒ
EA|lY MUSIC
be performing their signature “gypsy baroque,” Studio de musique
ancienne de Montréal will put on a concert of Palestrina and Benevoli
and Canadian countertenor Michael Taylor will join the viola da
gamba duo Les Voix Humaines and lutenist Nigel North for an allTobias Hume concert. This will be a very busy weekend and well
worth the trip to Montreal.
Of course, there are still a few shows you can catch if you’re in the
city this summer. For one, my group Rezonance will be putting on
“I Giorni di Cane Pazzi,” a concert featuring wild and extravagant
music from 17th-century Italy. The group will be joined by guest artists
Michelle Odorico on violin and Eleanor Verrette on viola to play some
of the more bizarre chamber pieces in the early music repertoire.
The program features Carlos Farina’s Capriccio Stravagante, which
lets the listener hear all manner of the beasts one might encounter
on a walk through 17th-century Mantua depicted in music, as well
as Girolamo Frescobaldi’s Capriccio sopra Il Cucho, a play on the
cuckoo’s song that beats its own idea pretty much to death. You can
catch this performance on July 28 at Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw
St., Suite 202, at 7:30pm. I guarantee you will find no better concert in
the dog days of summer.
Aradia Ensemble: Of course, there are still other options before
prime vacation time. The Aradia Ensemble winds down its concert
season on June 27, with a performance at the acoustically excellent Music Gallery of Purcell’s and Locke’s very fine music for
Shakespeare’s The Tempest. The Tempest, as it was revised in the
composers’ time, began its life as an attempt to introduce opera to
the English theatregoing public. Compared to some other English
stinkers of the same period, it actually did quite well and was revived
numerous times in the 18th century. Early musical adaptations of
Shakespeare such as this one are seldom revisited, but the Purcell/
Locke score is one of music history’s more unique collaborations, and
Aradia should do it justice.
I Furiosi: Of course, if you just can’t wait to hear a concert, consider
checking out the always-entertaining rock-star quartet of early musicians, I Furiosi. In “All About Me,” the quartet will be joined June 6
by tenor Rufus Müller and organist James Johnstone presenting songs
all about narcissism by Handel, Giuseppe Tartini and Juan Bermudo. I
Furiosi are a passionate group who don’t take themselves too seriously,
so if you’re looking for a fun concert this one would certainly fit that
description.
2015-2016 SEASON
DAVID FALLIS, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
The Soul of Naples
November 13 & 14, 2015
Christmas at the Monastery
of Santa Cruz
December 11, 12 & 13
The Way of the Pilgrim
February 12 & 13, 2016
Beowulf
March 11 & 12
Monteverdi Vespers
May 6, 7 & 8
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Call 416-964-6337
David Podgorski is a Toronto-based harpsichordist, music
teacher and a founding member of Rezonance. He can
be contacted at [email protected]
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Beat by Beat | Art of Song
Vocal Treasure in
the City & Beyond
F
HANS DE GROOT
or the last ten years, summer in Toronto has for many lovers of
vocal music revolved around the Toronto Summer Music Festival.
This year, the year of the Pan Am Games, the focus is on the
music of both North and South America. The festival kicks off on
July 16 with a concert featuring the music of Gershwin and Copland,
in which Measha Brueggergosman
will be the soprano soloist. The great
Finnish soprano Karita Mattila will give
a recital on August 7. Both concerts are
in Koerner Hall. Among this year’s Art
of Song fellows (eight singers and four
pianists) are soprano Danika Lorèn,
baritone Samuel Chan, bass-baritone Erik Van Heyningen and collaborative pianists Maria Hwa Yeong
Jung, Jérémie Pelletier and Andrea Van
Pelt. Their mentors are Soile Isokoski,
Martin Katz and Steven Philcox.
The 2015 Art of Song fellows will
perform on July 24 in two afternoon
concerts at Walter Hall.
Elora: the Elora Festival opens with
a performance of Handel’s oratorio
Solomon on July 10; tenor Mark Masri
will sing on July 15; there is a performance of Bach’s B minor Mass on July 17;
and Jackie Richardson will perform
with her trio and the Elora Festival
Singers on July 25. These concerts are
Karita Mattila
all at the Gambrel Barn. St. John’s
Church will be the venue for the July 19
concert by the Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal, conducted
by Christopher Jackson and also for two performances of “Dark Days,
Bright Victory,” a program of the words and music of World War II on
July 18. The vocal octet, Voces8, will sing at Knox Presbyterian Church
on July 16.
Parry Sound: At the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound, Patricia
O’Callaghan will sing in “From Weimar to Vaudeville” on August 4.
On August 8 Leslie Fagan, soprano, Mark DuBois and Keith Klassen,
tenors, and Bruce Kelly, bass, perform in “Love, Laughter, and
Passion.” This concert will also introduce three young singers: Julia
Obermeyer, Emma Mansell and Elisabeth DuBois. Adi Braun sings
songs from the repertoires of Rosemary Clooney, Judy Garland and
Peggy Lee on July 31. Leslie Fagan sings Pergolesi arias on July 28 and
performs in “Songs and Dances of the Americas” on July 29. These
Plein Air
Garden Concerts 15
Join us Wednesday evenings
July and August, in the Garden.
345 Balliol St. Toronto
Seat fee $10 at the door
info. & reservations:
416 487 0705
www.artistsgardencoop.com
32 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
LAURI ERIKSSON
concerts are all at the Charles W. Stuckley Centre.
Huntsville and Leith: The Huntsville Festival of the Arts presents
Buffy Sainte-Marie on July 29 and Molly Johnson on August 1, both at
the Algonquin Theatre.
At the Leith Summer Festival you can hear three singers: Rebecca
Caine in “A Soprano in Hollywood” on July 18, Julie Nesrallah in
“Voyages à Paris” on August 8 and Isabel Bayrakdarian in a program of
Spanish music ranging from classical works to zarzuelas and tangos
on August 22. All concerts are in the Roxy Theatre, Owen Sound.
The Music and Beyond Festival in Ottawa offers several vocal
concerts. Dominique Labelle, soprano, and Daniel Taylor, countertenor, will sing in “Love and Betrayal” on July 5; there will be a coffee
concert featuring the Theatre of Early Music with Rebecca Genge
and Agnes Zsigovics, soprano, and Daniel Taylor, countertenor and
conductor, the morning of July 6. Both concerts are in Christ Church
Cathedral. Two other concerts will be given
in Southminster United Church: a recital by
the mezzo Wallis Giunta on July 9 and one
by the soprano Donna Brown featuring the
music of Schubert and Brahms on July 11.
The soprano Yannick-Muriel Noah sings a
selection of first and last works by various
composers including Richard Strauss (the
Four Last Songs), Bizet, Puccini, Brahms and
Verdi, on July 16 in the Dominion-Chalmers
United Church.
Stratford Summer Music presents Rebecca
Caine on July 25 at Revival House; Daniel
Taylor and the Theatre of Early Music in a
re-enactment of the Coronation of George II
on August 6 at St. James Church; R. Murray
Schafer’s Music for an Avon Morning on
August 7 and 8 on Tom Patterson Island;
a concert of Schafer’s Sacred Music on
August 7 at St. James Church; and Michael
Schade, tenor, in a program of opera arias on
August 9 at St. Andrew’s Church. The 2015
Vocal Academy will be in session during the
week beginning August 10; their work will
culminate in a final concert on August 15 at
St. Andrew’s Church. Mozart’s Magic Flute
will be performed on August 15 and 16 at Revival House.
Westben: At the Westben Arts Festival in Campbellford, the soprano
Marie-Josée Lord will sing spirituals, opera arias by Puccini and
Gershwin as well as music by Bernstein and Cole Porter on July 18.
Other Events:
June 5 Ann Monoyios, soprano, and Peter Harvey, baritone, will be
the soloists in a free concert by Tafelmusik, at Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre.
June 7 the Off Centre Music Salon will celebrate its 20th
Anniversary with a concert which will feature a whole array of singers
ranging (alphabetically) from Isabel Bayrakdarian to Ilana Zarankin at
Glenn Gould Studio.
June 8 the soprano Sara Swietlicki will sing songs by Stenhammar,
Rangström and Sibelius as well as arias by Mozart and Puccini at
Heliconian Hall.
June 20 medieval songs connected with the pilgrimage to Santiago
de Compostela will be performed by Linda Falvy and Mary Enid
Haines, sopranos, and Catherine McCormack, alto, at the Church of
St. Mary Magdalene.
June 22 Maria Soulis will sing classical and folk music from Turkey,
Greece and Spain at the Church of the Holy Trinity.
June 27 at the Aradia Ensemble Baroque Ensemble concert, mezzo
Marion Newman will sing in the new composition Thunderbird by
Dustin Peters, based on a legend popular among the native peoples of
the Pacific Northwest and sung in Kwakwala. The concert at the Music
Gallery will also include pieces by Purcell and Locke.
July 16 Summer Music in the Garden at the Harbourfront Centre
presents Michael Taylor, countertenor, in a concert of music by Handel
and others.
Beat by Beat | Jazz Notes
FIJM Honours
Galloway
MARTINA PIPPRICH
L
Hans de Groot is a concertgoer and active listener
who also sings and plays the recorder. He can be
contacted at [email protected]
thewholenote.com
ORI DAGAN
ocals are fiercely proud of
the Festival International
de Jazz de Montréal, and
who could blame them? Now in
its 36th year, FIJM is ranked as
the largest festival in the world
by the Guinness World Records,
presenting 1,000 concerts over
10 days in 15 concert halls and
10 outdoor stages. Roughly twothirds of the concerts are free,
and a major part of the downtown core is closed to traffic for
the entire run of the festival,
resulting in random intoxications
and increased revenue. Uniquely,
even the souvenirs are memorable. T-shirts, candles, umbrellas,
magnets and toys are all adorned
with the festival’s jazz cat logo.
And then there’s the music!
Attracting so many jazz greats
over the years that it would seem
pointless to list them, FIJM also
Jim Galloway
presents annual awards – honours
usually bestowed upon artists that are on the bill. The awards are
named after the genre’s most iconic figures, from Miles Davis to Ella
Fitzgerald, Antônio Carlos Jobim to Oscar Peterson, the latter of which
this year is being given posthumously to Jim Galloway. To quote the
FIJM website: “One of the world’s premiere soprano saxophonists,
Jim Galloway built his reputation with a joyous, lyrical style and his
love of swing, along with a gift for dissolving the boundaries between
traditional and modern jazz. He was co-founder of the du Maurier
June | July | August, 2015 | 33
ORI DAGAN
August 3 Monique
McDonald and Irina
Rindzuner, sopranos,
and Ricardo Rosa, baritone, all soloists from
the CUI International
Music Festival, will sing
in a program featuring
works by Schumann,
Wagner and Gershwin
at the Church of the
Holy Trinity.
Looking back: I don’t
normally go to two
concerts on the same day
but I could not resist the
Countertenor
Michael Taylor
double attraction of the
as Rinaldo in
Off Centre concert and the
Pallavicino’s “La
recital by Meredith Hall
Gerusalemme
and Brahm Goldhamer on
Liberata”
April 26. The main item
on the Off Centre program
was Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, which was brilliantly performed.
It dates from 1912 but, a century later, it remains a difficult and I don’t
think altogether successful work. The program was rounded off with
arias and ensembles by Mozart. I was particularly impressed with the
baritone Jesse Clark and the soprano Maeve Palmer.
Hall’s superb recital that evening included Haydn’s cantata Arianna
a Naxos as well as parts of the Pyramus and Thisbe cantatas by Hasse
and Rauzzini. Here too Mozart rounded off the recital. A particular
delight was to hear Jean Edwards join Hall in the letter duet from
The Marriage of Figaro. Edwards is now 88, but her voice is as
pure and as fresh as it was when she was the soprano soloist in the
Toronto Consort.
And looking ahead: Soundstreams will begin its 2015/16 season
with performances by soprano Adrienne Pieczonka and mezzo
Krisztina Szabó of music by George Crumb, Kurt Weill (in Luciano
Berio’s arrangements) as well as Lennon and McCartney on
September 29.
SETH CASHMAN
Downtown Jazz Festival (today the TD Toronto Jazz Festival). Thanks
to his many collaborations with the greatest names in jazz and his
globetrotting travel, Jim was a fantastic artistic director of the Festival
from 1987 until his retirement in 2009.” (They didn’t mention that he
was a treasured contributor for The WholeNote for 17 years, but we’ll
forgive them).
Toronto Jazz: The richly deserved honour for Galloway will come
at the same time as a special salute to Peterson himself at the Toronto
Jazz Festival, which kicks off with “Oscar Peterson’s 90th Birthday
Celebration” at Jane Mallett Theatre, Thursday June 18 at 8pm.
Narrated by Peterson’s daughter Celine, the concert will feature two
original members of the pianist’s illustrious quartet: Swedish guitarist
Ulf Wakenius and Bronx-born drummer Alvin Queen, joined by one
ORI DAGAN
difficult time for live music
venues and the music industry
in general. As the famous
Duke Ellington blues goes,
“Things Ain’t What They Used
to Be” and you better believe it.
Not to be missed at the
Toronto Jazz Festival this year:
Renee Rosnes at Jazz Bistro
June 18 to 20; Ahmed Mitchel
Group at Poetry Jazz Café
June 21; Al Jarreau at Nathan
Phillips Square June 22; Kurt
Elling at Koerner Hall June 23;
Suzie Vinnick at the Distillery
June 24; Eli Bennett Quartet at
the Rex June 25; Charles Lloyd
at Jane Mallett on June 26;
Jackie Richardson and Micah
Barnes at the Old Mill’s Home
Smith Bar on June 27; Brian
Barlow’s Big Band featuring
Heather Bambrick performing
Duke Ellington’s sacred music
at Christ Church Deer Park on
June 28; and Jamie Cullum at
Koerner Hall on June 29.
One very new and welcome
addition to Toronto’s festival
is the addition of an official
jam session, which has been
missing for a few years now.
Bria Skonberg
Exclaims Grossman:
“Hooray! One of the most regular pieces of feedback I’ve been given
over the past six years is “we need a jam session”! We’re excited to be
running a jam six out of ten nights this year at the Jazz Bistro. Jam
sessions are always a great opportunity to meet and greet some of the
artists performing at the festival and, for local musicians, a chance to
share the stage with out-of-town guests. Primarily under the direction of Chris Gale and Morgan Childs, this year’s official festival jam is
going to be a lively, welcoming affair. I hope to be attending as much
as possible, so do come and say hello.
Full festival listings are available at torontojazz.com.
Beaches’ Bill King: On more than one occasion I have told someone
that I’m performing at the Toronto Jazz festival and they asked if it
was in the Beaches! The popular Beaches International Jazz Festival
embarks on its 27th season this summer. Aside from being a festival
popular amongst Toronto residents, it is one that players love to play,
and not merely because they get paid. All the shows are free, so it’s
easy to get people to come out and more often than not they buy CDs
after an enjoyable performance. I asked artistic director Bill King what
the curating process is like and what artists should know if they wish
to be considered.
“A lot has changed in the make-up of this city and surrounding area
these past 27 years since we first mounted BIJF,” says King. “We are a
Mark McLean (left), Josh Grossman and Kellylee Evans
at last year’s TD Toronto Downtown Jazz Festival
of the world’s premier bassists, Christian McBride, and Toronto’s
pride, Hungarian-Canadian pianist Robi Botos. VIP ticket holders will
be treated to a post-concert reception with the opportunity to meet
these fantastic musicians.
Josh Grossman: Following Jim Galloway’s retirement as the Toronto
Jazz Festival’s artistic director in 2009, Josh Grossman had some big
shoes to fill. Curious about the curating process, I asked him what it’s
like on the other side of the inbox, especially as the festival becomes
more inclusive genre-wise:
“We always start with quality: we’re seeking to put the best
local, national and international musicians on our stages,” says
Grossman. “From there we aim to present a wide variety of jazz, music
which has been influenced by jazz and music which has influenced
– or is influencing – the development of jazz. Although it’s impossible to satisfy the tastes of every jazz fan, our goal is to have, as much
as is possible, something for everyone. We also work towards a great
mix of free and ticketed shows; this year our audiences can experience outstanding local and out-of-town talent on a variety of free
stages. Challenges abound. While we bring extensive wish lists to the
programming table each year, artist availability and fee requests can
sometimes whittle down the lists quickly. That said, when we land an
artist we’ve been trying to book for years – or a newer artist who has
us particularly excited – it’s difficult to contain our euphoria.”
The festival’s hub is at Nathan Phillips Square, which features free
programming just about every day of the festival. Additional free
stages are at locations across town: the Distillery District and Shops at
Don Mills. The rest of the venues consist mostly of clubs, restaurants
and hotels that feature live music, often all year round but sometimes
only temporarily. New this year are the Shangri-La Hotel at University
and Adelaide, Burdock at Bloor and Pauline and the Baka Gallery Café
at Bloor and Beresford. Supporting these venues during the festival
will increase the likelihood of continued live music, so please do your
best, dear reader! The same goes for all the shows really – this is a
34 | June | July | August, 2015
Featuring some of Toronto’s best jazz musicians
with a brief reflection by Jazz Vespers Clergy
June 7, 4:30 pm - CANADIAN JAZZ QUARTET
Frank Wright (vibes), Ted Quinlan (guitar)
Pat Collins (bass), Don Vickery (drums)
June 28 at 4:30 pm
BRIAN BARLOW BIG BAND, featuring the Sacred Music of
Duke Ellington with Vocalist Heather Bambrick.
Jazz Vespers will return Sunday September 20th at 4:30pm.
We wish everyone a very blessed summer.
Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St.
416-920-5211
(north of St. Clair at Heath St.)
www.thereslifehere.org
Admission is free; donations are welcome.
thewholenote.com
different place with broader music tastes, an ever-growing
ethnic community and a young music populace crossing
all boundaries. We have hundreds of young people, most
from university music programs, playing in street and main
stage bands. Many have backgrounds in jazz, classical and
pop. They come from York, U of T, Humber and beyond and
band together and play what they want to play. We provide
a forum for them and don’t interfere. (There’s no rock
unless by accident!) I’m alerted about these bands – I may
find them on YouTube or they may ‘arrive’ via email, and
I investigate. If I see the bands are serious, developed and
committed – I will find them a performance spot.”
There will be three weekends this year, with one added to
coincide with the Pan Am games. Says King:
“Woodbine Park is in Pan Am games territory. We wanted
to make sure we could play a part in the proceedings by
giving those crowding the Lakeshore a place to chill and
enjoy food, music and the good life. All they have to do is
cross the highway and join the festivities. We programmed
that first weekend to be responsive to the type of music you
would expect from countries in warm, tropical climates.”
Some of the hot artists to watch at Beaches this year
include the Melbourne Ska Orchestra on July 11; Andria
Simone on July 12; God Made Me Funky on July 17; Parc X
Trio on July 18, to name a few. Full details are at
beachesjazz.com.
Finally, I’d like to give a nod to a few concerts worth
catching if you can, starting with the sensational Bria
Skonberg at the Ottawa Jazz Festival on June 21. Skonberg
(briaskonberg.com) is a trumpeter and vocalist of the
highest calibre. Originally from Chilliwack B.C., she is
currently based in New York and taking a bite out of the big
apple with her considerably impressive chops!
The iconic David Clayton-Thomas of Blood, Sweat & Tears fame
recently released Combo, an album of standards which finds him in
the superb company of Mark Kieswetter on piano, George Koller on
bass, Ben Riley on drums, Ted Quinlan on guitar and Colleen Allen on
saxes. The recording is a throwback to the singer’s roots on the Yonge
Street Strip in the 1960s. Now in his 70s, Clayton-Thomas (davidclaytonthomas.com) delivers ballads with smooth tenderness and can still
wail the blues like nobody’s business. Don’t miss him at the Huntsville
Festival of the Arts on July 30.
Touring the country from coast to coast will be JUNO darling
Christine Jensen (christinejensenmusic.com) and her 19-piece jazz
orchestra featuring Ingrid Jensen on trumpet. The music is as dark,
bold, complex and energizing as black coffee of the highest order!
Stops include a free lunchtime show at the Toronto Jazz Fest on
June 25 and an evening concert at the Ottawa Jazz Fest on June 28.
When you do discover your new favourite artist, buy the CD and get
it signed while you still can – they haven’t figured out how to autograph digital downloads just yet. Happy Summertime and here’s
hoping yours is full of live music!
SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE
AND RESEARCH CENTRE
Guillermo Silva-Marin, General Director
Toronto’s own mini summer opera festival!
MARTHA
Sat Aug 1, Wed Aug 5, Fri Aug 7 at 8 pm | Sun Aug 9 at 2 pm
DeR VAMpyR
(The Vampire) by Heinrich Marschner
Ori Dagan is a Toronto-based jazz musician, writer and
educator who can be reached at oridagan.com.
(in German
with English
surtitles)
Fri Jul 31 & Sat Aug 8 at 8 pm | Sun Aug 2 & Wed Aug 5 at 2 pm
ARIADNe AUF NAXOS
St. Philip’s Anglican Church
by Richard Strauss
Sunday, June 14, 4:00 PM | Jazz Vespers
Colleen Allen Trio with Colleen Allen (saxophone),
(in German with English surtitles)
Sat Aug 1 & Sat Aug 8 at 2 pm | Tue Aug 4 & Thur Aug 6 at 8 pm
Adrean Farrugia (piano) and Peter Telford (bass)
ROBERT GILL THEATRE
Sunday, June 28, 4:00 PM | Jazz Vespers
Peter Togni Trio with Peter Togni (piano),
University of Toronto, 214 College Street (at St. George)
Subscription: 3 operas for the price
Call now to reserve the best seats.
Mike Murley (saxophone) and Jim Vivian (bass)
Thanks for your support. Great jazz returns in September!
of 2!!
For tickets and subscriptions call the St. Lawrence Centre Box Office:
St. Philip’s Anglican Church | Etobicoke
416-366-7723
25 St. Phillips Road (near Royal York + Dixon)
416-247-5181 • stphilips.net • free will offering
thewholenote.com
(in English)
or The Market at Richmond by Friedrich von Flotow
or visit:
www.stlc.com
For more information visit www.solt.ca or call 416-922-2912.
June | July | August, 2015 | 35
Festival Fingerprints
continued from page 13
Miller explains that this year’s programming is in part a culmination of years of experimentation. “What makes this year special for
us is that there are a number of performers and ensembles who are
coming back from the first 14 years, but presenting new programs that
are quite unique ... like the Stratford Festival that at one point only did
Shakespearean plays, but now presents a variety from Greek works to
new Canadian works, we try to hit a variety of tastes in music – and I
think that too is somewhat different with the extent of the variety that
we have at our festival.”
Music and Beyond: Varied and unique programming that grows
out of past successes is a point of focus, it seems, for summer festival
directors right across the province. At Music and Beyond, a slightly
younger festival celebrating its sixth summer in Ottawa this July,
artistic and executive director Julian Armour has built this year’s
schedule on his vision for a festival experience that goes above and
beyond the traditional concert setting.
“We really see this season coming up as a progression from what’s
happened before,” Armour explains. “We’re trying to do really two
things. Number one is just making sure that we’re putting on really
fantastic concerts of the highest possible level. The second goal is to
keep exploring links between music and all other kinds of art forms
and disciplines. We keep pushing the boundaries of ‘beyond’ in a lot
of different directions, and I’m very happy with what we’ve got this
year from that point of view.”
The bilingual festival, which in French is titled Musique et autres
mondes – “Music and Other Worlds” – lives up to its name in both
languages, bringing together otherwise disparate cultural spheres to
create an immersive concertgoing experience. Notable on this year’s
calendar, in addition to a number of concerts organized in a more
traditional style, are a Music and Circus gala in collaboration with
Montreal’s Cirque Fantastic; a concert that explores the links between
music and law, interspersed with anecdotes of the legal problems
of famous (and infamous) composers; and a tango soirée of music,
dance, film, art, food and wine, billed as “the ultimate tango party.”
By pairing classical works with other forms of art and craft, Armour
hopes to introduce audiences to new music and other media, in a way
that enriches their experience of both. “There’s no need to add any
beyond to really great music,” he clarifies, “but at the same time I’m
trying to add elements that people can get excited about.”
One of the most exciting of those pairings is a “National Gallery
Soirée” the evening of July 8, where musicians will be seizing control
of Ottawa’s National Gallery of Canada. “We’re filling the gallery with
about 200 mini-concerts, so that in every gallery we’ll have a short
performance that matches the art in that room,” says Armour. “In
the 16th-century gallery we’ll have English madrigals sung in front of
an English painting that’s there; for modern paintings there will be
modern music that really matches them; in the Italian baroque gallery
we will have an early music ensemble playing Italian baroque music;
and so on ... so people can wander around and just explore. And it’s
really that feeling of exploration that I’m trying to create.”
Finding a Festival Sound: This summer will also be one of continued
musical experimentation for Parry Sound’s Festival of the Sound,
which has scheduled its 36th season for July 18 to August 9. Clarinetist
James Campbell, who has been the festival’s artistic director since
1985, reflects on the festival’s long history as a useful starting point for
finding its sound and its niche. “I think every festival has its own identity, and over the past 36 years we’ve come upon ours,” Campbell says.
“The festival is not just a collection of concerts, it is an integral whole.
And each concert contributes to that whole, and that whole makes up
the personality of the festival.”
For a series with a 36-year history, maintaining and sometimes
reinventing a festival identity can be a continual process of discovery.
This year, Campbell has looked to their audiences for inspiration. “One
thing that will play a large part in the festival this year and next year,
is that last summer I asked our audience to list their top ten chamber
music works. We got a huge response - and not always the answers
that you might expect, either. That response has formed one of the
36 | June | July | August, 2015
“We’re very proud of our concert hall, the Charles W. Stockey
Centre ... it’s flexible but chamber music there really comes to
life” - James Campbell, artistic director, Festival of the Sound
bases of the programming ... I’m looking forward to how that evolves.”
When asked about his personal festival highlight, Campbell touches
upon the type of attachment to place and community that live music
can produce, and that makes it all worthwhile.
“We’re very proud of our concert hall, the Charles W. Stockey
Centre. It’s our 13th year in there and it’s built for chamber music –
it’s flexible but chamber music there really comes to life,” he explains.
“What I kind of feel that we – all my colleagues at the other festivals,
too – are really all about is that moment when someone is playing
onstage and there is this wonderful, magical quiet that comes when
you feel that everybody is listening. When those moments happen
you can feel the real connection that goes on. That’s when everything comes together – the performance, the listeners, the hall, all the
work that’s been done ... it’s at those moments that absolutely everything comes together and for me, that’s why I’m still doing it after so
many years.”
Perhaps it is the chameleon-like nature of the summer music
festival and the way that it defies definition that make it so open to
becoming whatever you make of it – and so well-suited to capturing
extraordinary musical moments.
For more details on all of these festivals, as well as dozens of others
happening across the country this summer, look to our Green Pages
in this issue, where you’ll find profiles of festivals and special events
happening all summer long. Regardless of whether or not you choose
to explore this year’s festival scene, here’s hoping that music will help
make your summer to come a season to remember.
Sara Constant is social media editor at The WholeNote and studies
music at U of T. She can be reached at [email protected]
thewholenote.com
BrooksideMusic.com
www.
Midland and Meaford
July 2nd to August 29th
July 2nd - Midland Cultural Centre  July 4th - Meaford Hall
Toronto All Star Big Band
July 9th - Midland Cultural Centre
The Judgement of Paris
July 10th - *Midland - Lot 102  July 11th - Meaford Hall
Adam Crossley
July16th - Midland Cultural Centre  July 17th - Meaford Hall
Mauro Bertoli & Wolfgang David
July 21st - Midland Cultural Centre
New Zealand String Quartet & James Campbell
July 23rd - Midland Cultural Centre
Leopoldo Erice - Bach’s Goldberg Variations
July 30th - St. Paul’s United Church  August 1st - Meaford Hall
Wendake/Huronia featuring the Toronto Consort
August 4th - Midland Cultural Centre
Festival Ensemble - from the Festival Of The Sound
PHOTO BY
BRUNO SCHRECKERB
11
August 7th - St Paul’s United Church  August 8th - Meaford Hall
Jackie Richardson & Joe Sealy - Africville
August 13th - Midland Cultural Centre
Sinfonia Toronto & Mauro Bertoli
Aug 14th - Meaford Hall  Aug 15 - Midland St. Paul’s United Church
Susan Aglukark
August 20th - Midland Cultural Centre
Ted Baerg & John French
August 22nd - Midland Cultural Centre
Bicycle Opera
August 28th - *Midland Lot 102  August 29th - Meaford Hall
Sultans of String
* Dinner Package available at these locations
in Midland only.
BACKGROUND PHOTO BY
MARJ DUBEAU
Tickets Available at the Box Office in:
Midland Cultural Centre
705-527-4420
Meaford Hall Arts & Cultural Centre
1-877-538-0463
or online at:
an Ontario government agency
un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario
BrooksideMusic.com
www.
Wendake/Huronia
Beckwith
at Brookside
DAV I D P E R L M A N
I
Stewart Goodyear
Black Umfolosi
VOCES8
TorQ Percussion Quartet
Mark Masri
David Baskeyfield
Studio de musique ancienne
de Montréal
Jackie Richardson
David Jalbert
Nota Bene Baroque Players
with INNERchamber
38 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
DANIEL FOLEY
reconciliation between the two cultures.
It will be presented in a tour of Georgian
Bay communities including Midland, Parry
Sound (as part of the Festival of the Sound),
Barrie and Meaford and potentially others.”
In the upcoming Notations piece,
Beckwith describes his reasons, sociopolitical and musical, for taking on the
project. “I had encountered Champlain’s
history 25 years before, in preparing Les
Premiers hivernements (First Winterings),
a work for two voices and chamber
ensemble commissioned by the Toronto
Consort, that concerned Champlain’s
earlier voyages in what is now Nova
Scotia. … The new proposal immediately
intrigued me, and has occupied much
of my composing energy for over a year.
My paternal forebears were New England
immigrants who came about a decade
after Champlain’s venture. I imagined
Europeans in that era [planting] … a
flag and [announcing], ‘This land now
belongs to the King of Spain (or France,
England, or Holland).’ Ownership of land
was not part of the indigenous way of
thinking. The Wendats, inhabitants of Huronia for several generations (without feeling they “owned” it) were ready to share with the
n an article that will be featured in
the forthcoming summer issue of the
Canadian Music Centre’s digital magazine, Notations, composer John Beckwith
writes about how, late in 2013, John French,
director of the Brookside Music Association
in Midland, invited him to compose a piece
to be performed in July 2015, marking “the
400th anniversary of the voyage of Samuel
de Champlain and a few fellow adventurers
from France to the ‘Mer douce’ or ‘Freshwater sea’—today’s Lake Huron. I said yes,”
says Beckwith. The Ontario Arts Council
approved the commission, and, effectively,
that’s where the story of Wendake/Huronia,
as the work is titled, begins.
Brookside’s John French first described
the undertaking to me back in April: “The
new work will be performed by a chamber
choir, the Brookside Festival Chorus,
comprised of members of regional choirs,
a pair of First Nations drummers, Shirley
Hay and Marilyn George, Laura Pudwell,
alto, and Theodore Baerg, narrator, accomJohn Beckwith
panied by the Toronto Consort under the
direction of David Fallis. It’s a 30-minute
work in six movements, reflecting on the Wendat culture from preEuropean contact to the present day and ending with a prayer for
French newcomers: native canoes and native paddlers had brought
Champlain to the territory.”
Champlain’s arrival led to profound changes: “By mid-century,
the Wendat villages were abandoned,” Beckwith writes, “and the
survivors dispersed, some to a reserve near Quebec City and others to
the Midwest, where the name survives as ‘Wyandot.’”
“This is a truly unique work for several reasons,” says John French.
“From the outset the composer and commissioner were sensitive to the First Nations attitude toward the events being planned to
commemorate Champlain. The Huronia Museum is working with a
firm to design and install a new gallery devoted to the First Nations.
The opening of the new gallery is coincident with the tour of this
composition and both will highlight the fact that the Wendat people
are an extant culture. As revealed by Kathryn LaBelle in her recent
book, they were dispersed but not destroyed. The museum will
be providing a travelling exhibit to accompany the tour. Also, the
composer has worked closely with Georges Sioui, head of Aboriginal
Studies at the University of Ottawa, for advice and content for the
piece. Professor Sioui, himself of Wendat heritage, has embraced this
project and his poetry will provide the text for some of the movements. He will also be working with the choir on pronunciation of
the Wendat language. The composition will be sung in French and
Wendat.”
Reconciliation is, as French stated earlier, an overall goal of this
undertaking. It is also explicitly the theme of the work’s final movement. But truth of necessity comes first in the phrase “truth and
reconciliation,” so the work’s first five movements have a large chunk
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Celebrating New Traditions
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Celebrating the ultimate master of chamber music –
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Gryphon Trio, New Orford String Quartet, Arion
Baroque Orchestra, Patricia O’Callaghan and others...
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705-653-5508 1-877-883-5777
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thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 39
Champlain among
the Hurons.
Now entering our 28th season,
the Brott Music Festival is the largest
not-for-profit orchestral festival in Canada
and the only festival with a full-time
professional orchestra-in-residence –
The National Academy Orchestra.
of truth to tell first, in a very short work that cannot resort, as historians can, to ponderous didacticism. Beckwith’s solution as composer
has been to provide what he calls an “impressionistic summary of the
Wendat experience, before and after Champlain.”
“For a prologue suggesting ‘pre-contact’ I chose a feature that the
French visitors found novel and remarkable: snowshoes. Against
percussion imitating the sound of this mode of travel, individual
voices shout out, as in a roll-call, the names of various Wendat clans.”
The second movement, set in a European-sounding contrapuntal
choral style, revolves around a “poetic epigraph written by a fan” at the
front of the second edition (1632) of Champlain’s published account
of his travels. “It employs the then-brand-new terms Canada and La
Nouvelle France and elaborately extols Champlain, his ventures and
his writings,” Beckwith says.
The third and fourth panels evoke, respectively, canoeing and the
Wendat “Feast of Souls.” “Once a decade or so, villagers would disinter
their deceased and transport their remains to an agreed central place
where in a week-long ceremony of dancing and chanting they would
rebury them in a common plot, with furs, food, ceramics and other
artifacts. The early French observers all mention this festival.”
The fifth movement “an angry lament” is based on a paper George
Sioui gave at Laval University in 1992 on the 500th anniversary of
another famous voyage, that of Columbus, and recalls the life-patterns
of Wendats in the years 992, 1492, and 1642. “His picture of the state
of Huronia a century and a half after Columbus affected me deeply,”
Beckwith writes. “He imagines a young Wendat, having lived through
the crisis of European ‘takeover,’ calling on the Great Spirit to restore
his people to their former dignity. When I interviewed Sioui in Ottawa,
he generously gave me permission to set this ‘lament’ as my fifth
panel.”
But Sioui also advised Beckwith not to end there. “He thought the
angry lament should be followed by more optimistic sentiments,
reflecting today’s efforts towards reconciliation.”
The involvement of indefatigable David Fallis as conductor and the
Toronto Consort as musicians completes the picture for this fascinating project. “Among the Consort’s available instruments, I chose
those most suited to a 17th-century Canadian setting: recorders,
lute, mandolin, viola da gamba, chamber organ and (a first in my
composing experience) hurdy-gurdy,” Beckwith states. On the percussion side he opts mainly for drums, rattles, sticks and scrapers. “I
felt I should avoid metal percussion,” he says. “But on learning that
small bells were favoured at that time as trade items I allowed myself
a hand-bell. Shirley Hay, one of the First Nations drummers, sang me,
to her own drum-beat, a traditional Ojibwe ‘mourning song,’ and gave
me permission to quote it as a coda to the Feast of Souls movement.
She will sing it in the premiere, with phrases repeated by the choir, as
if she is teaching it to them.”
All in all it sounds like a carefully thought through, lovingly crafted,
deeply felt endeavour that will bring a truthful resonance to this
summer’s planned 400-year celebrations of Huronia that might otherwise serve only to add discordant insult to historical injury.
Boris Brott, Artistic Director
National Academy
Orchestra of Canada
Our 15 concerts for 2015 feature world
class guest soloists, our exuberant young
orchestra and an eclectic mix of orchestral,
chamber, opera, jazz & pop concerts at
venues across southern Ontario.
June 18 - August 13
For concert details or to purchase
tickets call the box office at
905-525-7664 or visit
BROTTMUSIC.COM
David Perlman can be reached at [email protected]
40 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
GREEN PAGES
11th Annual Summer Musical Guide
GREEN PAGES
AGC PLEIN AIR GARDEN CONCERT SERIES
➤ July 1 to August 26
SUMMER MUSIC GUIDE
Toronto, ON
For over a decade the Artists’ Garden Cooperative (AGC) has been offering a
venue to acoustic musicians and spoken word performers. In a relaxing, natural
atmosphere, small audiences enjoy a wide variety of music styles, from jazz to
Welcome to The WholeNote’s 11th annual
where festival information will be updated
classical, roots to blues. Plein Air garden concerts run each Wednesday evening
Green Pages, an overview of summer
over the course of the summer.
in July and August, from 7:30pm to 9pm. Light refreshments are available. The
festivals and events across the musical
map – classical, jazz, opera, folk, world
community is invited to experience the garden and hear sample performances by
We wish you a summer to remember!
music and much more – in unique and
Plein Air performers at the AGC Annual Launch Party, a free event, on Tuesday,
June 23, from 4:30pm to 8pm. Concert tickets, at $10, are available at the door,
beautiful locations across the country!
on Eventbrite.com or on our website.
THE 2015 GREEN PAGES TEAM
416-487-0705
Here you’ll find the profiles of 46 widely
PROJECT COORDINATOR Karen Ages
www.artistsgardencoop.com
diverse summer festivals, provided by
PROJECT EDITOR Sara Constant
the festivals themselves. Detailed festival
LAYOUT & DESIGN Susan Sinclair
listings can be found within our regular
DIRECTORY SERVICES Adrienne Surtees
listings sections and our special summer
PROOFREADING Kevin King
Port Hope, ON
listings section following these profiles.
WEBSITE/COVER ART
Google “Canadian Jazz” and you’ll find this three-day outdoor festival near the
Visit our online, searchable version
Bryson Winchester
top of the list. The All-Canadian Jazz Festival was born 14 years ago to cele-
of this guide at www.thewholenote.
ALL-CANADIAN JAZZ, PORT HOPE
➤ September 11 to September 13
brate and support the burgeoning Canadian jazz scene and every year this is
com/green, where festivals have
For more information on our Green Pages,
accomplished with a uniquely Canadian performance lineup. There’s a Free
supplemented their profiles with photos,
contact [email protected] or
Friday Night Concert starring Shakura S’Aida and Saturday evening’s head-
videos, links to social media and more, and
phone Karen at 416-230-3272 x26.
liner is 2015 JUNO Award winner Jane Bunnett and Maqueque. Stellar afternoon lineups include Robi Botos, Elizabeth Shepherd, the Souljazz Orchestra,
Brownman Electryc Trio, Barbra Lica, Union Duke, 2ish, Heavyweights Brass
Band, Big Rude Jake and Michael Occhipinti.
1-855-713-9310
www.allcanadianjazz.ca
27TH BEACHES INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ July 10 to 26
Toronto, ON
A massive three-week celebration of music with over 10 stages, a StreetFest and
approximately 1 million in attendance. Features include a dynamic musical roster,
exciting activities and an enticing lineup of gourmet food trucks. The festival
will showcase the sensational musical talents of both established and emerging
artists, from jazz, blues, Latin, swing, global, world beat, big band, Dixieland,
Afro-Cuban, funk, R&B, ska to soul and more. Featured events include musical
performances at Woodbine Park, StreetFest, Taste of Jazz, Pan Am Celebration, Beaches Tune Up Jazz Run and The Farmers Market Jazz Series. All of
this is taking place at the 27th International Beaches Jazz Festival, June 10 to
26. Free for all ages. For a full schedule please visit www.beachesjazz.com/
complete-concert-schedule.
416-698-2152
www.beachesjazz.com
Beaches International Jazz Festival
Toronto, ON
G2 | Summer 2015
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BELFOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ July 30 to August 9
Belfountain, Caledon, ON
The second annual Belfountain Music Festival will feature eight chamber music
concerts and five student recitals. Performers include Arco Violini, the Ton Beau
String Quartet, the Accolade Trio, the Glenellen String Quartet, Zachary Ebin,
Julie Ranti, Maria Dolnycky, Alex McLeod, Jeannine Maloney and more. All
concerts will take place at the historic Melville White Church, just around the
corner from the Belfountain Conservation Area, Forks of the Credit Provincial
Park and the Elora Cataract Trailway. Admission is $20 for adults and $5 for
children; student recitals are free admission.
647-706-0554
www.belfountainmusic.com
BROOKSIDE MUSIC ASSOCIATION
“FESTIVAL OF THE BAY”
➤ July 2 to August 29
Midland and Meaford, ON
Canadian Open Old Time Fiddle Championship
Shelburne, ON
Now in its fifth year, Brookside Music Association presents “Festival of the
Bay” in Midland and Meaford between July 2 and August 29, bringing world-
CANADIAN FLUTE CONVENTION
class music – from classical to jazz, from piano to brass – to the shores of Geor-
➤ June 18 to June 21
gian Bay in the heart of Ontario’s cottage country. Highlights include the world
Toronto, ON
premiere of Wendake/Huronia, a new work by Canadian composer John Beck-
The 2nd Biannual Canadian Flute Convention, affectionately known as Flutestock
with, commissioned by Brookside to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the
No. 2, will be taking place at the University of St. Michael’s College in the Univer-
arrival of Champlain to the region – featuring the renowned Toronto Consort,
sity of Toronto from Thursday, June 18 to Sunday, June 21, 2015. The 2015
the Brookside Festival Chamber Choir and First Nations singers and drummers.
Canadian Flute Convention is packed with over 100 events and activities, including
Other artists include Mauro Bertoli, Wolfgang David, Jackie Richardson and
concerts, lecture recitals, workshops, seminars, movement classes, reading sessions
Joe Sealy, Leopoldo Erice, Susan Aglukark, the New Zealand String Quartet
and a bustling flute market. Artists and delegates will gather from all over Canada
and Sinfonia Toronto.
and abroad to take part in the four-day festivities. Flutestock No. 2 promises to
705-528-0521
be a memorable event filled with music, laughter and surprises! We cordially
www.brooksidemusic.com
invite you to join us this June in the heart of downtown Toronto for the 2015
Canadian Flute Convention.
BROTT MUSIC FESTIVAL
416-293-1302
➤ June 18 to August 13
www.canadaflute.com
Greater Hamilton Area, ON
Now entering its 28th season, the Brott Music Festival (est. 1988) is the largest
CANADIAN OPEN OLD TIME FIDDLE CHAMPIONSHIP
non-profit orchestral music festival in Canada, and the only festival with a full-
➤ August 5 to August 9
time, professional orchestra-in-residence. The Brott Music Festival is renowned
Shelburne, ON
for its extremely high artistic standard, its world-class soloists, its exuberant young
The 65th Canadian Open Old Time Fiddle Championship takes place August 5
orchestra and its eclectic mix of orchestral, chamber, jazz, pops and education
to 9 in Shelburne, Ontario. Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Shelburne, the event
concerts at various venues across Southern Ontario. We have attracted world-
features Canada’s top fiddlers in competition for thousands of dollars in prizes!
class soloists and other artists/personalities to Hamilton, including James Ehnes,
Community events in conjunction with the Championship include camping, a
Anton Kuerti, Pinchas Zukerman, Marc Garneau, Karen Kain, Valerie Tryon,
giant fiddle parade, an open air market, Kelli Trottier fiddle and stepdance show,
former Prime Minister Kim Campbell, Mordecai Richler, Roberta Bondar and
fiddle jam sessions, a concert by the Beckett Family featuring Linsey and Tyler
Michael Ondaatje, to name only a few.
Beckett, a non-denominational church service and a community pork BBQ. Barn
905-525-7664
dance and jamboree on August 5. Proceeds to support the charitable work of the
www.brottmusic.com
Rotary Club and other community groups.
519-925-8620
www.shelburnefiddlecontest.com
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Summer 2015 | G3
GREEN PAGES
CUI INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ August 1 to August 9
Toronto, ON
The Cui International Music Festival will gather artists from around the world in
a celebration of classical music. Based at York University, talented pianists and
singers will engage audiences of all ages in educational programs, masterclasses
and performances. Concerts will include world-recognized faculty and guest artists
from Europe, Hong Kong, China and the USA. The public is invited to masterclasses and performances hosted at Grace Church on-the-Hill, the Church of the
Holy Trinity (Music Mondays) and other wonderful Toronto venues. Programs
are free to the public. For a listing of our distinguished faculty, guest artists and
full program schedules, visit our website.
212-567-5834
www.cuimusicfest.com
ELORA FESTIVAL
Elora Festival Elora and Fergus, ON
➤ July 10 to July 26
Elora and Fergus, ON
Experience world-class music in intimate settings this July at the Elora Festival!
CITY OF TORONTO HISTORIC SITES
From choral and classical to folk, jazz and blues – the Elora Festival has some-
➤ All summer
thing for everyone! Featuring Mark Masri, VOCES8, Studio de musique ancienne
Toronto, ON
de Montréal, Black Umfolosi, Stewart Goodyear and more! Twenty-two perform-
The summer is full of music at the City of Toronto Historic Sites! Spadina Museum
ances, five intimate venues, one world-class festival. Come celebrate with us
kicks it all off with Music in the Orchard, an annual series of one-hour, outdoor
July 10 to 26. Find out more at www.elorafestival.ca.
Sunday afternoon concerts. The lineup is June 7: Michael Franklin and Amir
519-846-0331
Samimi; June 14: VentElation; and June 21: Dan Fortin and Michael Davidson.
www.elorafestival.ca
June 18 to June 21, Fort York hosts the Indigenous Arts Festival and Na-Me-Res
Traditional Outdoor Pow Wow, featuring a great roster of new and traditional
FESTIVAL DU LOUP
music, dance and theatrical performances. Arrive in 1920s style for Spadina
➤ July 16 to 19
Museum’s Gatsby Garden Party on June 28. Enjoy live jazz music, dancing and
Lafontaine, ON
croquet on the lawns, period refreshments and more. Bookmark our website for
Du 16 au 19 juillet 2015, le Festival du Loup commémore 400 ans de présence
details on these and other great upcoming events!
francophone en Ontario. Cette année, l’événement sera transporté dans le temps
Call 311
vers le XVIIe siècle. Au menu : des contes, de la musique, de la nourriture locale,
www.toronto.ca/museum-events
des kiosques, un encan de loups, le concours de hurlement et beaucoup de plaisir
pour toute la famille.
CLEAR LAKE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
From July 16 to 19, 2015, le Festival du Loup will commemorate 400 years of
➤ July 30 to August 3
francophone presence in Ontario. Guests will be transported back in time to the
Riding Mountain National Park, MB
17th century. The festival’s program will include French stories and music, local
The 10th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival, under the artistic direction of
food, artisans, a painted wolf art auction, a howling contest and lots of fun for
one of Canada’s leading concert pianists, Alexander Tselyakov, has become
the whole family.
an important part of Canada’s cultural calendar. The most exciting and first of
705-543-1535
its kind that Manitoba has to offer, this festival is a celebration of summer with
www.festivalduloup.on.ca
classical music, jazz and outstanding musicians in the natural beauty of Riding
Mountain National Park, Manitoba. The festival will take place this August long
FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND
weekend, from July 30 to August 3. For tickets or more information contact us
➤ July 18 to August 9
by phone or email. See directions on our website.
Parry Sound, ON
204-571-6547 or 204-727-9631
In its 36-year history, the Festival of the Sound has become a go-to destination
www.clearlakefestival.ca
for musicians and music lovers alike. It’s Canada’s premier summer classical/
jazz music event, at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for Performing Arts, on
the beautiful shores of Georgian Bay. It’s where the world’s greatest musicians
come to play. So come join us, from July 18 to August 9, and celebrate 36 years
of great classical music.
1-866-364-0061 / 705-746-2410
www.festivalofthesound.ca
G4 | Summer 2015
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THE FOREST FESTIVAL
➤ August 12 to August 16
Haliburton, ON
Fabulous performing artists in a spectacular wilderness setting – this is the Forest
Festival. This five-day annual festival of concerts that link nature and music is
held at two venues in Haliburton Forest & Wild Life Reserve – the stunning, lakeside amphitheatre that overlooks a floating stage on serene and isolated Bone
Lake and the historic Logging Museum at the Forest Base Camp. We invite you
to experience majestic forests, sparkling lakes, breathtaking sunsets, star-studded
night skies and, of course, truly great music.
705-754-2198
www.theforestfestival.com
HIGHLANDS OPERA STUDIO
➤ July 30 to September 3
Haliburton, ON
Love great singing? Need to escape the city? Hear the best young professional
voices Canada has to offer in the beauty of the Haliburton Highlands, only two
Highlands Summer Festival Haliburton, ON
and a half hours northeast of the GTA. Established in 2007 by internationallyacclaimed Canadian tenor Richard Margison and stage director Valerie Kuinka,
the long weekend in August, the Huntsville Jazz Festival returns for its sixth
the Highlands Opera Studio is an advanced intensive training and professional
season, featuring David Clayton Thomas, the Toronto All Star Big Band and
networking program for emerging opera professionals. Chosen from approxi-
Molly Johnson paying tribute to the late Billie Holiday.
mately 200 applicants from across Canada through competitive auditions, the
705-789-4975
2015 vocal participants can be heard throughout the month of August and into
www.huntsvillefestival.on.ca
September in public masterclasses, concerts and two fully staged operas. For
more information and to purchase tickets, please visit our website at www.high-
INDIAN RIVER FESTIVAL
landsoperastudio.com.
➤ June 20 to September 18
1-855-457-9933
Indian River, PE
www.highlandsoperastudio.com
The Indian River Festival offers a summer-long series of concerts in a magnificent heritage church, set within sight of beautiful Malpeque Bay, Prince Edward
HIGHLANDS SUMMER FESTIVAL
Island. Discover excellence in classical, jazz, Maritime, world and contemporary
➤ June 29 to August 7
music by the finest artists from across Canada, all in the world-class acoustical
Haliburton, ON
setting of St. Mary’s Church.
Join us for six weeks of live theatre and music presentations. This season features
1-866-856-3733
Lend Me a Tenor, a farce in which an opera appearance goes terribly wrong; One
www.indianriverfestival.com
Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, lots of laughs and pathos with a touching conclusion;
Nunsensations, where the Nuns take their song and dance show to Las Vegas;
KINCARDINE SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL
Wingfield Lost and Found, where Walt Wingfield continues his misadventures in
➤ May 15 to August 14
rural Ontario; and Ralph + Lina, a charming tale of love lost and found during the
Kincardine, ON
Second World War. It all takes place in the heart of Ontario’s Cottage Country
NEW: KSMF Summer Divas Concert Series, with concerts from May to August,
with great accommodation options and fine dining in a community alive with
featuring brilliant vocalists and wonderful instrumentalists. June 30: Robin Banks;
the arts. See our website for times and to purchase tickets.
July 17: Carol McCartney; August 1: Suzie Vinnick and Rick Fines; August 2:
705-457-9933 / 1-855-457-9933
Carole Warren; August 8: Molly Johnson. Don’t miss the fabulous KSMF Evening
www.highlandssummerfestival.on.ca
Concert Series August 7 to 14, featuring 2014 JUNO award-winner the Mike
Downes Trio; Shoshana Telner, concert pianist; Quartetto Gelato; David Szanto,
HUNTSVILLE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS
organ; the Toronto Brass Quintet; Madison Violet; and a Singer/Songwriters
➤ July 2 to August 19
evening, plus the popular FREE 4 O’Clock in the Park concerts August 2 to 14.
Huntsville, ON
From August 10 to 14 there are daily music classes for all levels, from beginners
An eclectic mix of national- and international-calibre artists presented at the
to experienced players, age 7 to adult. Guitar, strings and bands – a fun time for
intimate 400-seat Algonquin Theatre in downtown Huntsville. In addition
all and great for families!
to mainstage presentations, there are free concerts at venues throughout the
519-396-9716
community, including Nuit Blanche North, an evening of interactive art instal-
www.ksmf.ca
lations happening on July 11. This summer’s lineup includes Buffy Sainte-Marie,
Jim Cuddy, Lunch at Allen’s, Corb Lund, Pavlo, Dala and so much more! Over
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Summer 2015 | G5
GREEN PAGES
514-845-7171
www.montrealbaroque.com
MUSIC AND BEYOND
➤ July 4 to July 17
Ottawa, ON
Music and Beyond is a classical music and multi-disciplinary arts festival that
has been active on the cultural scene since July 2010. It is known for its “beyond”
elements as a music festival, exploring links between music, art forms and cultural
disciplines including visual art, drama, poetry, dance, comedy, circus, math and
magic, as well as food and wine. Coming to our festival for the first time are
GRAMMY award-winning guitarist Jason Vieaux, genre-defying pianist Chilly
Gonzales, choral music legend Morten Lauridsen, early music ensemble Fuoco
E Cenere and the British vocal octet VOCES8. Returning are the Vienna Piano
Trio, the Auryn Quartet, Daniel Taylor, Donna Brown, the Hannaford Street
Silver Band, the National Arts Centre Orchestra and Thirteen Strings.
Indian River Festival Indian River, PE
613-241-0777
www.musicandbeyond.ca
LEITH SUMMER FESTIVAL
MUSIC MONDAYS
➤ July 4 to August 22
➤ May 4 to August 31
Leith, ON (near Owen Sound, ON)
Downtown Toronto, ON
Leith Summer Festival offers five outstanding concerts in July and August in
Music Mondays is a summer lunchtime concert series held in the historic Church
the Historic Leith Church. The venue is noted for its marvelous acoustics and
of the Holy Trinity in downtown Toronto, beside the Eaton Centre. A launching
intimate setting. This summer’s artists include: the Gryphon Trio, Rebecca Caine
pad for emerging talent since its inception in 1992, we’re proud to announce our
and Robert Kortgaard, David Macfarlane and Douglas John Cameron, Julie
continuing partnership with the series CBC Music Young Artist. Be part of the
Nesrallah and Caroline Leonardelli, Isabel Bayrakdarian and Serouj Kradjian.
broadcast audience for recitals by violinist Emily Kruspe and the Altius Guitar
Ten kilometres from Owen Sound, Ontario, on Georgian Bay.
Duo. Witness the intersection of Chinese, Flamenco and Jewish music with
519-371-2833
Vancouver’s Lalun Ensemble. Hear the world premiere of an inspiring work
www.leithfestival.ca
by Peter-Anthony Togni, commissioned to celebrate Holy Trinity Church. Our
concerts are PWYC with a suggested donation of $5. Bring your lunch – and a
LUMINATO FESTIVAL
friend – every Monday at 12:15pm from May through the end of August.
➤ June 19 to June 28
416-598-4521 x223
Toronto, ON
www.musicmondays.ca
Luminato Festival is Toronto’s international multi-arts festival for people open to
having art change their outlook on the world. For ten days each June, Luminato
MUSIC AT PORT MILFORD
transforms Toronto’s theatres, parks and public spaces with hundreds of events
➤ July 12 to August 9
celebrating theatre, dance, music, literature, food, visual arts, magic, film and
Prince Edward County, ON
more. This year’s festival runs June 19 to 28.
2015 marks Music at Port Milford’s 29th year of bringing internationally-renowned
416-368-3100
artist faculty members and students with a passion for chamber music together
www.luminatofestival.com
to create an inspiring summer music experience. Throughout July and August,
this experience is proudly shared with Prince Edward County, as the students
MONTREAL BAROQUE FESTIVAL
and faculty bring the highest caliber of chamber music to Ontario. 2015 Faculty
➤ June 25 to June 28
Artists include the Afiara and Tokai String Quartets from Canada, the Pialli
Montreal, QC
Quartet, based out of Mexico City, and select members of the Canadian Opera
Earth to ether, alcohol to flames, tobacco to smoke and terrestrial to celestial –
Company, Toronto Symphony Orchestra and National Ballet of Canada.
transformations will inspire the 2015 Montreal Baroque Festival! Ascending to
613-476-7735
Parnassus with legendary violinist Sigiswald Kuijken, sipping cognac with Louis
www.mpmcamp.org
XIV’s chef, smoking a pipe with the eccentric, mercenary soldier and fashionable fop Tobias Hume, dancing with gypsies, singing of ascensions, challenging
with new music, waking to the ethereal nyckelharpa or joining the marathon;
the 2015 Festival offers a colourful cornucopia of musical inspirations designed
to entertain, elevate and enlighten! Concerts, masterclasses, lectures, musical
marathon, free outdoor concerts, a musical instruments exhibition and more...
G6 | Summer 2015
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MUSIQUE ROYALE
➤ May 15 to September 12
Venues throughout Nova Scotia; office in Lunenburg, NS
Musique Royale is a summertime celebration of Nova Scotia’s musical heritage.
Now in its 30th season, Musique Royale brings performances of early and traditional music to settings of historic and cultural significance in communities
throughout the province. Artists this year include the Capella Regalis Men and
Boys Choir, the Aeolian Singers with guest Laura Smith, harpsichordist Hank
Knox, Best of Boxwood, Music from the 45th Parallel North with Suzie LeBlanc,
Ensemble Polaris, Studio de Musique Ancienne de Montréal, the Nova Scotia
Youth Orchestra, organist Robert Quinney and the Rhapsody Quintet. Concerts
are also held year-round in Lunenburg.
902-634-9994
www.musiqueroyale.com/index.html
NO STRINGS THEATRE MUSIC
THEATRE CONCERT SERIES
➤ June 5 to June 6 and August 7 to August 9
2015 NYO Canada Concert Tour Multiple Locations
Toronto, ON
This season, No Strings Theatre presents Putnam County’s 25th Annual Spelling Bee.
the Grand River and origami boats in the Civic Square fountain and hear them
This hilarious musical features our emerging professional artists, and will run from
in a dreamworld collage of coincident busking, and we’ll see sound traced in
June 5 to 6 at the Wychwood Theatre. We are also presenting Into the Woods at
wondrous choreographies from our most creative minds, performed by our
the Studio Theatre in the Toronto Centre for the Arts. This will be performed by
amazing artists. Featuring Dylan Bell, Jeremy Bell, Marc Boivin, Marie-Josée
our youth summer music theatre intensive from August 7 to 9. There is still time
Chartier, Lori Freedman, James Harley, Kathryn Ladano, Andrea Nann, Suba
to register for the summer music theatre intensive (ages 10 to 21). Check out our
Sankaran, Joe Sorbara, Brendan Wyatt and more.
website for more details, at www.nostringstheatre.com/playbill. See you there!
416-551-2093
519-579-8564 / 1-888-363-3591
www.openears.ca
www.nostringstheatre.com
2015 NYO CANADA CONCERT TOUR
OTTAWA INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ July 23 to August 6
➤ July 26 to August 10
Ottawa, ON
Multiple Locations
Every generation listens differently. Every generation has its own sound. For the
We are excited to announce the 2015 NYO tour, featuring the acclaimed conductor
2015 edition of the Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival, we present
maestro Michael Francis and our 100-strong orchestra in some of the best halls
bold departures and original readings that have shaped, and continue to define,
this country has to offer! The 2015 tour will be making stops at Toronto’s Koerner
chamber music as a living art.
Hall (July 27), Ottawa’s National Arts Centre (July 29), Montreal’s Maison
613-234-6306
Symphonique (August 3), Vancouver’s Chan Centre (August 6), Calgary’s Jack
www.chamberfest.com
Singer Hall (August 9) and Edmonton’s Winspear Centre (August 10). For over
50 years, NYO Canada has enjoyed a reputation as Canada’s orchestral finishing
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY JAZZ FESTIVAL
school, providing a comprehensive training program for young musicians. Come
➤ August 11 to August 16
out and enjoy an evening of amazing performances of works such as Rachman-
Picton, ON
inoff ’s Symphonic Dances, Holst’s The Planets and Strauss’s Don Quixote. Visit our
The music of Miles Davis and Billie Holiday – Oliver Jones, Guido Basso, Shakura
website at www.nyoc.org.
S’Aida, Brian Barlow’s Big Band and “the best of the best.” The little festival that
416-532-4470
has grown into one of Canada’s most respected celebrations of jazz is 15 years
www.nyoc.org
old this summer. A 2015 lineup of mainstage shows features an array of A-list
artists, pouring out a wide range of jazz that live music-lovers will simply not
OPEN EARS FESTIVAL OF MUSIC &
SOUND: BETWEEN THE EARS 2015
want to miss. As usual, the festival will showcase some of the world’s best musi-
➤ June 20 to June 21
can also savour great jazz, great food and great wine at many of the 30 satellite
Kitchener, ON
venues nestled throughout the “County” all week long.
cians from Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver and south of the border. Festival-goers
Sly and his family told us to “dance to the music” as if it were possible not to,
613-476-8767
but our bodies know better. Intrinsically linked, sound and dance are waves
pecjazz.org
moving through space and time and occasionally bumping into things. Between
the Ears 2015 is about these travels – we’ll float our sounds on canoes down
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Summer 2015 | G7
GREEN PAGES
STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC
➤ July 20 to August 30
Stratford, ON
Stratford Summer Music celebrates 15 years this summer with 100+ events,
including classical, opera and world music in venues throughout downtown Stratford. Experience an evening to remember with the Blind Boys of Alabama and
special guest Ben Heppner. Enjoy R. Murray Schafer’s new work entitled Music
for an Avon Morning and “The Sacred Music of R.Murray Schafer,” a tribute to
Gordie Tapp by Whiskey Jack, the World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra and
Jan Lisiecki performing all five Beethoven concertos with the Annex Quartet.
This year’s Classical Piano Series includes the UK’s Paul Lewis and Saturday
Photo: Brian Medina
night cabarets at Revival House (formerly the Church Restaurant) welcome
Rebecca Caine, Micah Barnes and Carole Pope, as well as Heather Bambrick
and the Newfoundland Jazz Ceilidh.
1-866-288-4313
www.stratfordsummermusic.ca
Summer Music in the Garden Toronto, ON
SUMMER MUSIC IN THE GARDEN
➤ July 2 to September 13
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY MUSIC FESTIVAL
Toronto, ON
➤ September 18 to September 27
Returning this year is Harbourfront Centre’s annual Summer Music in the Garden
Picton, ON
concert series, presented by TD Bank Group. Experience the best classical music
For two weeks in September we present chamber music and solo recitals in the
from around the world in the wonderfully serene Toronto Music Garden, most
intimate setting and splendid acoustic of the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in
Thursdays at 7pm and Sundays at 4pm. This summer’s lineup includes Elinor
Picton. For this, the 12th season, artistic director Stéphane Lemelin has brought
Frey, Calum Graham, Michael Taylor and the Monsoon Trio, among many
together some of Canada’s premier artists: the Gryphon Trio, the New Orford
other notable artists. Concerts are free to the public. Guided tours of the Toronto
String Quartet, the Arion Baroque Orchestra and Patricia O’Callaghan, to name a
Music Garden are available on Wednesdays at 11am and before the concerts on
few. Johannes Brahms will be a recurring theme this year, with two concerts dedi-
Thursdays at 5:30pm. Reservations are not required. Alternatively, you can take
cated to this great master of chamber music as well as composers connected to him.
a self-guided tour with one of our audio players for $6.
613-393-3798
416-973-4000
www.pecmusicfestival.com
www.harbourfrontcentre.com
SCARBOROUGH TOWN JAZZ FESTIVAL
SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE
➤ August 6 to August 9
➤ July 31 to August 9
Albert Campbell Square, Scarborough Civic Centre
Toronto, ON
Burrows Hall Community Park, Chinese Cultural Centre
This is a mini opera festival at the Robert Gill Theatre – conveniently located in
Scarborough, ON
the heart of the city. Summer Opera Lyric Theatre presents to you the stars of
This year from August 6 to 9, the Scarborough Town Jazz Festival will deliver a
tomorrow, as our young artists advance toward careers at the national and inter-
top-notch lineup of artists never before seen in its five-year history. Jam-packed
national levels. Spending the summer in their quest is sensible if the time is right
with tantalizing options, this annual event will feature JUNO award-winner
and you are available. There is more – the SOLT 2015 Opera Workshop aims
Jane Bunnett and Maqueque, Molly Johnson, JUNO award-winner Quique
its super objectives at three great works for the stage: Martha, Der Vampyr and
Escamilla, Buenavista Social Club legend Eliades Ochoa, Liberty Silver and
Ariadne auf Naxos. These productions provide a diversity of roles and an amazing
many more. Artistic director Joaquin Nunez Hidalgo and his team have put
variety of style, both vocal and dramatic. Come and visit with us this summer!
together a delightful mix of music, instruments and new combinations designed
416-922-2912
to thrill the vibrant, multicultural audience as they celebrate the fifth anniver-
www.solt.ca
sary in grand style. Music workshops will be held by some of our well-known
performers such as Hilario Durán and Cuban master percussionist Joaquin
Nunez Hidalgo, as well as arts and crafts, international cuisine, dances, prizes,
fresh farm produce, games for young children and corporate exhibits. Come and
enjoy this cultural experience.
647-427-1403
www.scarboroughtownjazzfestival.com
G8 | Summer 2015
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SUN LIFE FINANCIAL UPTOWN
WATERLOO JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ July 17 to July 19
Waterloo, ON
The Sun Life Financial UpTown Waterloo Jazz Festival is an annual 3-day FREE
music festival held in Waterloo, Ontario, encouraging all genres of jazz. This year,
in our 23rd season, we proudly present the Yellow Jackets, Oakland Stroke, KC
Roberts & the Live Revolution, Joni NehRita, Tim Louis and more! We invite
you to UpTown Waterloo for one of the country’s most anticipated jazz festivals. Visit our website for a full lineup and more details.
519-885-1921
www.uptownwaterloojazz.ca
SWEETWATER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ September 18 to September 20
Owen Sound and Leith, ON
Artistic director Mark Fewer has once again crafted a superb concert experience,
blending outstanding chamber performances by internationally-acclaimed musicians
TD-Newmarket jazz+ Festival Newmarket, ON
with a variety of education and outreach initiatives which include masterclasses, artist
talks, and a “classical jam” session incorporating local and guest musicians. This year
TD-NEWMARKET JAZZ+ FESTIVAL
SweetWater welcomes Adrian Butterfield, Kenneth Slowik, Rachel Brown, Edwin
➤ July 31 to August 3
Huizinga, Myron Lutzke, Drew Jurecka, Nadina Mackie Jackson and Daniel Taylor to
Newmarket, ON
its stages, among many other celebrated musicians. 2015 highlights include a “world’s
TD-Newmarket jazz+ Festival: a vibrant celebration of arts and culture offering
smallest choir” performance of Bach’s B Minor Mass, as well as a new work from David
many genres of music on multiple stages with a jazz-backbone, including pop,
Braid. The repertoire spans from the Early Baroque era to new music, within the clas-
jazz, Motown, blues, R&B, big band, funk, Caribbean and steel drums, as well
sical and jazz genres. Venues: Leith Church and Georgian Shores United Church.
as a Visual Art Exhibition and live art demonstrations, dance, foods, characters,
519-794-2083
face-painters, water balls, music workshops and beer/wine gardens with craft
www.sweetwatermusic.ca
beers. Creative Zone inside Lions Hall offers entertainment, food and activities
for kids, teens and families. Location: Riverwalk Commons, Newmarket, a five-
TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER FESTIVAL
minute walk to Heritage Main Street and Fairy Lake. Enjoy a four-day getaway
➤ June 5 to June 17
at the TD Newmarket jazz+ Festival. Festival July 31 to August 3. Accommo-
Toronto, ON
dates everyone – seniors, families, teens, wheelchairs, strollers and even well-
Musicians from around the world gather in Toronto for the annual Tafelmusik
mannered family dogs! Advance tickets are discounted until July 1.
Baroque Summer Institute. An intensive 14-day residency in instrumental and
905-841-6893
vocal baroque performance, the institute features four free concerts open to the
www.newmarketjazzfestival.com
public. See our website or call for more details.
416-964-9562 x241
www.tafelmusik.org/tbsf
TD SUNFEST ‘15: “CANADA’S PREMIER
CELEBRATION OF WORLD CULTURES”
➤ July 9 to July 12
TD MARKHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL
London, ON
➤ August 13 to August 16
Celebrate the enchantment of summer with Canada’s premier FREE-admission
Unionville, ON
festival of the global arts, now in its 21st year. Voted one of the Top 100 Destin-
The TD Markham Jazz Festival is an exciting and vibrant four-day event featuring
ations in North America (the American Bus Association), TD Sunfest transfig-
well-known jazz musicians of all genres, performing at venues on beautiful Main
ures Downtown London’s Victoria Park into a culturally diverse jewel where 35+
Street Unionville in Markham. The TD Markham Jazz Festival kicks things off on
top world music and jazz groups representing almost every region of the planet
Thursday, August 13 with a ticketed event followed by a reception and silent auction
entertain on five stages. This summer’s headliners range from legendary Cuban
at the Varley Art Gallery. From August 14 to 16, music lovers will enjoy over 25 free
band Afro-Cuban All Stars to luminaries Breabach (Scotland), Spiro (England)
performances during the day and under the stars on three outdoor stages. Highlighted
and Paulo Flores (Angola). NEW this year is “Pan American Journey 2015”
talent includes acclaimed Canadian and international artists performing all styles of
(supported by Celebrate Ontario). And with over 300 Park exhibitors, TD Sunfest
jazz, from standards to Gospel to sizzling Latin! This will be complemented by street
‘15 will whet festivalgoers’ appetites for scrumptious international cuisine and
performances, and several restaurants along Main Street will present their own jazz
unique crafts and visual art.
combos. Come and enjoy all Main Street Unionville has to offer!
905-471-5299
519-672-1522
www.sunfest.on.ca
www.markhamjazzfestival.com
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Summer 2015 | G9
GREEN PAGES
WESTBEN ARTS FESTIVAL THEATRE
➤ June 6 to August 2
Campbellford, ON
Westben Arts Festival Theatre is where the best of music and nature spring to
life in your company! Nestled amongst the peaceful hills of Northumberland
County, 90 minutes east of Toronto, three kilometres north of Campbellford,
Westben’s primary performance venue is a custom-built, timber-frame barn. The
Barn seats 400 and combines state-of-the-art acoustics with a rustic yet sophisticated atmosphere. Westben’s 16th season includes Marie-Josée Lord, Stewart
Goodyear, Jane Bunnett & Maqueque, La traviata, Fiddler on the Roof, Mary Lou
Fallis, Shauna Rolston, The Good Lovelies, Kings on Broadway, Le studio de
musique ancienne de Montreal, MAZ, Kelli Trottier & the Mushy Peas, the Brian
Barlow Big Band, Valérie Milot, the Improv All-Stars and others. Ask about our
getaway packages and gourmet picnic baskets.
Westben Arts Festival Theatre Campbellford, ON
877-883-5777
www.westben.ca
TD TORONTO JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ June 18 to June 29
Toronto, ON
Discover the sounds of jazz as over 1,500 musicians entertain more than half a
million fans when the TD Toronto Jazz Festival returns from June 18 to June 29,
2015. This 12-day showcase of music features the best in local, national and
international talent playing a diverse range of genres. With over 350 concerts
across more than 40 locations, the Festival is the place to be for any music lover
this June! Feature performers include the Oscar Peterson 90th Birthday Celebration, the Legendary Count Basie Orchestra, Branford Marsalis, Al Di Meola
and much more!
1-888-655-9090
www.torontojazz.com
TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ July 16 to August 9
Toronto, ON
The 10th Anniversary Festival celebrates music of the New World. We feature
the great composers of the Americas (Gershwin, Villa-Lobos, Copland), the
European composers inspired by it (Bartók, Dvor̀´ák, Rachmaninoff) and new
genres invented in the new world (jazz, the musical). Not to be missed performances by the Danish String Quartet, jazzman Danilo Perez, the great Finnish
soprano Karita Mattila, the YOA Orchestra of the Americas with Ingrid Fliter,
Garrick Ohlsson, Measha Brueggergosman and a production of the musical
The Last Five Years.
416-408-0208
www.torontosummermusic.com
Thank you for taking a look at this year’s Green Pages! If you are looking for a
specific form of summer festivities, visit us online at thewholenote.com/green,
where you can do more browsing or conduct a more focused search.
G10 | Summer 2015
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Summer Festivals
AGC Plein Air Garden Concert Series
July 1 to August 26
416-487-0705
artistsgardencoop.com
AG – Artists’ Garden, 345 Balliol St., Toronto,
ON M4S 1E1
June 23 4:30 AGC Launch Party ’15. (AG).
June 25 5:30 Garden Carousel Health and
Beauty Garden Party (AG)
July 1 7:30 AGC Plein Air Garden Concert.
Every Wed through Aug 26. $10 (AG). Light
refreshments.
Aug 26 7:30 Adventures in Film-making
With Film Maker Peter Rowe. $10 (AG). Light
refreshments.
Festival Listings
Welcome to the Special Festival Listings section. The
information presented here is in alphabetical order by
name of the festival.
AGC Plein Air Garden Concert Series
All-Canadian Jazz, Port Hope
Beaches International Jazz Festival
Bells of Baddeck
Brookside Music Association “Festival of the Bay”
Brott Music Festival
Canadian Flute Convention
Canadian Open Old Time Fiddle Championship
City of Toronto Historic Sites
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival
Cui International Music Festival
Elora Festival
Festival du Loup
Festival of the Sound
Forest Festival
Franco-Fête
Highlands Opera Studio
Huntsville Festival of the Arts
Indian River Festival
Luminato Festival
Markham Jazz Festival
Montreal Baroque Festival
Music and Beyond
Music at Port Milford
Musique Royale
National Youth Orchestra
No Strings Music Theatre Theatre Concert Series
Open Ears Festival of Music & Sound: Between
the Ears 2015
Ottawa Chamberfest
Panamania – Arts and Culture Celebration 2015
Prince Edward County Jazz Festival
Stratford Summer Music
Summer Music in the Garden
Summer Opera Lyric Theatre
Sun Life Financial Uptown Waterloo Jazz Festival
Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
TD Toronto Jazz Festival
Toronto Summer Music
Westben Arts Festival Theatre
All-Canadian Jazz, Port Hope
September 11 to 13
Memorial Park, 56 Queen St., Port Hope, ON
L1A 2Y8
1-855-713-9310
allcanadianjazz.ca
Weekend pass: $90/$60(before August 31);
$10(st)
Sep 11 7:00 Union Duke. Free. 8:00: Shakura
S’Aida and her 10 piece Band. Free.
Sep 12 12:15: Heavyweights Brass Band.
$24/$20(adv); $10(st). 1:15: Robi Botos
Quartet. $24/$20(adv); $10(st). 2:15:
Elizabeth Shepherd. $24/$20(adv); $10(st).
3:15: TD Canada Trust Young Jazz Showcase.
$24/$20(adv); $10(st). 4:15: Souljazz
Orchestra. $24/$20(adv); $10(st). 7:00: 2ish.
$45/$35(adv); $10(st). 8:00: Jane Bunnett
and Maqueque. $45/$35(adv); $10(st).
Sep 13 12:30: TD Canada Trust Young Jazz
Showcase. $24/$20(adv); $10(st). 1:30: Big
Rude Jake. $24/$20(adv); $10(st). 2:30:
Barbra Lica. $24/$20(adv); $10(st). 3:30:
Brownman Electryc Trio. 4:30: Michael
Occhipinti & Shine On: The Universe of John
Lennon. $24/$20(adv); $10(st).
Beaches International Jazz Festival
July 10 to 26
Woodbine Park, Coxwell Ave. and Lakeshore
Blvd. E., Toronto, ON M1P 4N7
BB – Big Band Stage
LS – Latin Square Stage
OL – OLG Main Stage
PI – Pan Am Indie Stage
PM – Pan Am Main Stage
PS – Party Island Stage
PY – Ports Toronto Youth Stage
TD – TD Main Stage
WB – Kew Beach World Beat Stage, Parking
lot, Beach United Church, 140 Wineva Ave.,
Toronto, ON M4E 2T4
WS – [workshops] Mennonite New Life
Centre, 1774 Queen St. E. Toronto, ON M4L 1G7
416-698-2152
beachesjazz.com
Free Admission
Jul 10 4:00: Sam Taylor’s East End Love. (PI).
7:00: Arsenal. (PM). 9:00: KC Roberts & the
Live Revolution (PM).
Jul 11 12:00: Faye Blais (PI). 1:30: Joy Lapps
(PM). 2:00: Sarah Burton (PI). 3:00: Frankie
Foo & the Yoyo Smugglers (PM). 4:00:
Saishubi (PI). 4:30: Dr. Draw. 6:00: CaneFire
(PM). 7:30: La Gran Colombia Orchestra
(PM). 9:30: Melbourne Ska Orchestra (PM).
Jul 12 12:00: Vivia (PI). 12:00: Imbayakunas
(PM). 1:30: Johannes Linstead (PM).
2:00: Sultans of String (PI). 3:00: Andria
For other information please consult the Green Pages
section (starting after page 40) as well as the regular
sections, such as GTA, Beyond the GTA, In the Clubs,
starting on page 53.
thewholenote.com
Simone (PM). 4:00: Unbuttoned (PI). 4:30:
Bustamento (PM). 6:30: Lula All Stars (PM).
Jul 17 4:00-7:00: Discovery Through the Arts
Combos (PY). 5:30: Mark Mosca Band (PS).
7:00: Joaquin Nunez Hidalgo & Son de Cuba
(TD). 9:00: God Made Me Funky (TD).
Jul 18 11:00am-5:00: Discovery Through the
Arts Combos (PY). 12:00 & 1:30: Just Friends
(PS). 1:30: Justin Bacchus (TD). 3:00: Parc
X Trio (TD). 3:00 & 5:00: Eddie Bullen Band
(PS). 4:30: Michael Schatte (TD). 6:00: Alysha
Brilla (TD). 7:30: Blackburn Brothers (TD).
9:00: Chris Thomas King (TD).
Jul 19 11:00am-5:00: Discovery Through the
Arts Combos (PY). 12:00: & 1:30: Ossie Gurley
& the Truth (PS). 1:00: Chloe Charles (TD).
2:30: Jayme Stone & the Other Side of the Air
(TD). 3:00 & 5:00: Eddie Bullen Band (PS).
4:00: Mark McLean (TD). 5:30: Kirby Sewell
Band (TD). 7:00: Ogguere (TD).
Jul 20 7:00-9:00: [workshop] Vocal Stylings:
Jazz and Cabaret. Heather Bambrick and
Dian Leah (WS, main level). New Orleans Style
Brass Workshop. Christopher Butcher and
John Pitt (WS, lower level).
Jul 21 7:00-9:00: [workshop]: Piano, Up Close
and Personal. Robi Botos (WS, main level).
Turning Pop and World Roots Music into Jazz.
Michael Occhipinti (WS, lower level).
Jul 22 7:00-9:00: [workshop] Ukulele
Jam. Steve McNie (WS, main level). Latin
Percussion. Joaquin Nunez Hidalgo (WS,
lower level).
Jul 23 6:00: Perpetual Peace Project (WB).
7:00-11:00: Streetfest (Queen St. E.).
Jul 24 12:00: Imbaynakunas (WB). 3:00: Jazz
Connection Big Band (BB). 4:00: Max Senitt
(LS). 5:00: Rumberosdrums. Featuring St.
Michael’s College School Rumba Squad and
Natalie Castro (PY). 5:30: DJ Rumba Buena
(LS). 6:00: Pauly & the Good Fellas (WB).
6:30: La Gran Colombia Orchestra (LS). 7:00:
CaneFire (OL). 7:00-11:00: Streetfest (Queen
St. E.). 9:00: Larry McCray (OL).
Jul 25 11:00am-5:00: Youth Jazz Canada
Combos (PY). 12:00: Gruvoria (WB). 12:00:
Bees Knees Dance Demo (BB). 12:15: Max
Senitt (LS). 12:30: George Lake Big Band (BB).
1:30: Chris Whitley & Diana Braithwaite (OL).
2:00: DJ Walter & Lo Mio Es Salsa (LS). 2:30:
Our Thing with Miko Sobreira. Dance class
(LS). 3:00: Swing Shift Big Band (BB). 3:30:
Walkervilles (OL). 3:30: Queen of Bachata.
Natalie Castro (LS). 4:00: Henry Flow
Merengue Urbano (LS). 4:30: DJ Gury Gury
& DJ Walter (LS). 5:30: Dawn Tyler Watson
& Ben Racine Band (OL). 5:45: Vegas North
Orchestra (BB). 6:00: Pauly & the Good
Fellas (WB). 6:00 & 7:00: La Gran Colombia
Orchestra (LS). 7:00-11:00: Streetfest (Queen
St. E.). 7:30: Lost Fingers featuring John
Jorgenson (OL). 9:30: Boom Booms (OL).
Jul 26 10:00am: Jazz Worship (WB).
11:00am-5:00: Youth Jazz Canada Combos
(PY). 12:00: DJ Manyoma (LS). 12:00: Toronto
All Star Big Band (WB). 12:00: Bees Knees
Dance Demo (BB). 12:30: Los Hijos de Tuta
(LS). 12:30: Bob Cary Orchestra (BB). 1:00:
Heavyweights Brass Band (OL). 2:00: Our
Thing with Miko Sobreira. Dance Class (LS).
2:45: Michelle Willson & the Evil Gal Festival
Orchestra (OL). 3:00: Jazz Mechanics (BB).
3:00 & 4:15: La Gran Colombia Orchestra
(LS). 4:30: Bill King’s Rhythm Express (OL).
6:30: Lula All Stars (OL).
June | July | August, 2015 | 41
Summer Festivals
Bells of Baddeck
July 3 to August 2
Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site
of Canada, 559 Chebucto St., Baddeck, NS
B0E 1B0
1-888-790-1477
bellsofbaddeck.com
Tickets: $32; $28(seniors/students); Free(5
and under)
Jul 3 7:30: Bells of Baddeck. Music drama
about Alexander Graham Bell and his wife,
featuring an all-Canadian cast. Music by Dean
Burry; song arrangements by Lydia Adams;
creation and libretto by Lorna MacDonald.
Allison Angelo, soprano (Mabel Hubbard Bell);
Geoffrey Sirett, baritone (Alexander Graham
Bell); Christopher Enns, tenor (Lieutenant
Thomas Selfridge), Giles Tomkins, bassbaritone (Gardiner Hubbard); Robyn Cathcart
(Casey Baldwin); Stephanie Higgins, soprano
(Elsie Bell Grosvenor); Stephanie Tritchew,
mezzo (Gertrude Hubbard); Larissa Koniuk,
soprano (Marian “Daisy” Bell Fairchild);
Johnathan Kirby, baritone (J.A.D. McCurdy);
12 Cape Breton children; Stuart Calvert,
music director; Mimi Mekler, stage director.
Also Jul 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 22, 24, 25,
28, 29, 31, Aug 1, 2.
Brookside Music Association
“Festival of the Bay”
July 2 to August 29
MC – Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King St.,
Midland, ON L4R 4K4
MH – Meaford Hall, 12 Nelson St. E., Meaford,
ON N4L 1N6
ML – Midland Lot 102, 837 King St., Midland,
ON L4R 0B7
SP – St. Paul’s United Church, 308 King St,
Midland, ON L4R 3M6
705-527-4429
brooksidemusic.com/festival-of-the-bay
Performances individually priced; all
concerts: Midland students $10; Meaford
students $15; children under 13 free
July 23rd
Leopoldo Erice
Bach’s Goldberg
Variations
Spanish pianist Leopoldo Erice will begin with
an informal talk about Bach’s monumental
keyboard work, The Goldberg Variations. Considered one of the great masterpieces for the
keyboard, it was his recording of The Goldberg
Variations in 1956 that skyrocketed Glenn
Gould to international acclaim.
Please Visit
www.BrooksideMusic.com
Jul 2 7:30: Toronto All Star Big Band. MC; $30.
Jul 4 7:30: Toronto All Star Big Band. MH;
$35.
Jul 9 7:30: Judgement of Paris. Mix of
cabaret, history and storytelling with music
by Debussy, Ravel and original songs by the
42 | June | July | August, 2015
Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound, ON
P2A 1S3
FM – Fieldcote Memorial Park, 64 Sulphur
Springs Rd., Ancaster, ON L96 1L8
LS – Liuna Station, 360 James St., N.,
Hamilton, ON L8L 1H5
MC – Mohawk College, McIntyre Performing
Arts Centre, 135 Fennel Ave., W. Hamilton,
ON L9C 1E9
RB – Royal Botanical Gardens, 680 Plains Rd.,
W. Burlington, ON L7T 4H4
SJ – St. John’s Anglican Church, 272 Wilson
St., E., Ancaster, ON L9G 2B9
905- 525-7664
brottmusic.com
See website for various package discounts
Ticket prices do not include HST or service
charge
Jun 18 7:30: Two Greatest Masterpieces
Celebrate Summer. Bruckner Symphony
No.4; Mozart: Violin Concerto “The Turkish;”
Olivier Thouin, violin. BP; $32; $27(sr); $15(st).
Jun 25: 7:30: Viva L’Italia. Mendelssohn:
Italian Symphony; Tchaikovsky: Cappriccio
Italien; Alexandre Da Costa, violin. BP; $32;
$27(sr); $15(st).
Jul 2 7:30: Evening in Vienna. Works by Lehar
and Strauss. Leslie Fagan, soprano; Adam
Luther, tenor. LS; $32; $27(sr); $15(st).
Jul 10 7:30: Romantic Fantastic. Berlioz:
Symphonie Fantastique; Rachmaninoff: Piano
Concerto No.1. Valerie Tryon, piano. MC; $32;
$27(sr); $15(st).
Jul 12 3:00: High Tea with Giampiero.
Mozart: Clarinet Concerto; Rossini: Theme
and Variations; Schumann: Symphony No.4.
Giampiero Sobrino, clarinet. RB; $43; $39(sr);
$25(st).
Jul 16 7:30: PopOpera. Works by Rossini,
Verdi, Saint-Saëns, Gounod, Mascagni and
Mozart. MC; $35; $30(sr); $15(st).
Jul 17 7:30: Adi Braun Presents an Evening of
Hot Smokey Jazz. BC; $28; $24(sr); $15(st).
Jul 19 7:00: Chiarelli Returns! Rita Chiarelli,
jazz vocals. FM; Free or donation.
performers. MC; $30.
Jul 10 6:00: Adam Crossley. Nashville-based
singer-songwriter. ML; $50/$25(st), dinner
included; $35/$10(st), show only.
Jul 11 7:30: Adam Crossley. Nashville-based
singer-songwriter. MH; $30.
Jul 16 7:30: Mauro Bertoli and Wolfgang
David. Works for violin and piano. MC; $30.
Jul 17 8:00: Mauro Bertoli and Wolfgang
David. Works for violin and piano. MH; $35.
Jul 21: 7:30: New Zealand String Quartet and
James Campbell, clarinet. MC; $30.
Jul 23 7:30: Leopoldo Erice: Bach’s Goldberg
Variations. MC; $30.
World Premiere
Wendake/Huronia
featuring the
Toronto Consort
Featuring the renowned Toronto Consort,
the Brookside Festival Chamber Choir and
First Nations singers and drummers, the
program will include “Wendake/Huronia”,
a new work by Canadian composer John
Beckwith, commissioned by Brookside
Music Association. July 30 - Aug 1
Please Visit
www.BrooksideMusic.com
Jul 30 7:30: Wendake/Huronia. Beckwith
premiere. Commemorating the 400th
anniversary of the arrival of Champlain in the
region. Toronto Consort; Brookside Festival
Choir; First Nations singers and drummers.
SP; $30.
Aug 4 7:30: Festival Ensemble from the
Festival of the Sound. Schubert: Octet in F
MC; $30.
Aug 7 7:30: Africville: Jackie Richardson and
Joe Sealy. Homage to forgotten Nova Scotia
community destroyed in the 1960s. SP; $30.
Aug 8 7:30: Africville: Jackie Richardson and
Joe Sealy. Homage to forgotten Nova Scotia
community destroyed in the 1960s. MH; $35.
Aug 13 7:30: Sinfonia Toronto and Mauro
Bertoli. Mozart: Piano Concerto No.12 in a
K414. MC; $30.
Aug 14 7:30: Susan Aglukark. Inuk singersongwriter from Arviat, Nunavut. MH; $45.
Aug 15 7:30: Susan Aglukark. Inuk singersongwriter from Arviat, Nunavut. SP; $40.
Aug 20 7:30: Theodore Baerg and John
French. Vocal concert. MC; $25.
Aug 22 7:30: Bicycle Opera. MC; $15.
Aug 28 6:00: Sultans of String. World
music. ML; $60/$45(st), dinner included;
$35/$10(st), show only.
Aug 29 7:30: Sultans of String. World music.
MH; $40.
Jul 30 7:30: Music of the Americas. Salute
to the Pan Am Games. Lindsay Deutch, violin.
MC; $32; $27(sr); $15(st).
Aug 6 7:30: Cirque du Festival. Aerial Silk
Performers. MC; $33; $28(sr); $15(st).
Aug 9 2:30: Festival of the Sound: Beethoven
and the New World. Beethoven: Piano
Concerto No.5 “Emperor;” Dvořák: New
World Symphony; Stewart Goodyear, piano;
National Academy Orchestra. CS; $35-$45.
Aug 13 7:30: Our Grand Finale Choral
Spectacular: Chichester Psalms, Carmina
Burana. Leslie Fagan, soprano; Bud Roach,
tenor; Cairan Ryan, baritone; Brott Festival
Chorus; Arcady Singers. MC; $33; $28(sr);
$15(st).
Canadian Flute Convention
June 18 to 21
University of St. Michael’s College, University
of Toronto, 81 St. Mary St., Toronto, ON M5S
1J4
BH – Brennan Hall Lounge
CL – Charbonnel Lounge
FM – Father Madden Hall
SS – Sam Sorbara Auditorium
416-293-1302
canadaflute.com
Full Convention Pass: $260; $150(students)
Single Daytime Event Ticket: $20;
$10(students)
Exhibit Hall Single Day Pass: $25;
$15(students)
Non-Flutist Children (under age 8): Free
(badge required)
For guest pass, day pass and evening ticket
pricing, consult festival website.
The Barber
of Seville
July 23, 7:30pm
Mohawk College McIntyre
Performing Arts Centre
$38 Adults, $34 Seniors,
$15 Students
BROTTMUSIC.COM
Jul 23 7:30: Barber of Seville. Christopher
Dunham, baritone (Figaro); Charlotte
Burrage, mezzo (Rosina); David Menzies,
tenor (Count Almaviva/Lindoro); Jeremy
Ludwig, baritone (Bartolo); Keith Lam, bass
(Basilio). MC; $38; $34(sr); $25(st).
Jul 26 3:00: High Tea: Celtic Serenade. Ruth
Sutherland, harp. SJ; $43; $39(sr); $25(st).
Brott Music Festival
June 18 to August 13
BC – Bay City Music Hall, 50 Leander Dr.,
Hamilton, ON L8l 8L1
BF – Burlington Performing Arts Centre, 440
Locust St., Burlington, ON L7S 1T7
CS – Charles W. Stockey Centre for the
Jun 18 2:00: Arabesque in Memoriam: 20th
and 21st Century Works for Flute and Piano.
Jeffrey Beyer, flute; Sharon Sweet, piano.
(FM) 2:00: Danses Générales. Arrangements
of all time favourite flute works. Kaili
Maimets, Tristan Durie, Sarah Yunji Moon,
Laura Chambers and Terry Lim, flutes (CL).
2:30: Ai Goldsmith in Recital. Ai Goldsmith,
flute; Richard Shaw, piano (FM). 3:00: Rare
Treats: Double Concertos for Two Flutes
and Strings. Combining the diversity of
Flautas del Fuego with music from Mexico,
Hungary and their shared country, Canada.
Alhelí Pimienta, flute; Izabella Budai, flute;
Constantine Caravassilis, conductor (SS).
4:00: Flute Music from the 21st Century in
thewholenote.com
the Romantic Tradition. Kathleen Rudolph
and Casey Granofsky, flutes; Ben Smith,
piano (FM). 7:00: Nicole Esposito in Recital.
Nicole Esposito, flute; Anne Marshall, piano
(FM). 7:00: High and the Low: solos and duos
for piccolo and alto flute. Milica MilojevićBogdanović, piccolo; Carla Rees, alto flute
(CL). 7:30: Scenes from the Southwest.
Timothy Hagen, flute; Anne Marshall, piano
(FM).
Jun 19 9:30am: A sampling of repertoire
for intermediate piccoloists. Nan Raphael,
piccolo; Richard Shaw, piano (FM). 9:30am:
Liselyn Adams and Beverley Johnston: flute
and percussion. Modern and contemporary
works, including an improvisation-based collaborative composition. (SS). 11:30am: New
Works for Flute and Cello: A Journey from
Classical Music to Rock and Roll. Michelle
Stanley, flute; Yoriko Morita, cello (FM).
11:30am: New Works for Flute/Clarinet Duo
based on Poetry. Joanna Cowan White, flute;
Kennen White, clarinet and bass clarinet
(CL). 11:30: Flute Chamber Music by Michael
Kallstrom. Heidi Álvarez and Tammy Evans
Yonce, flutes; Mark Berry, percussion; Donald
Speer, piano; Michael Kallstrom, composer
and bass voice (SS). 1:30: Solo Flute. Patricia
Dydnansky, flute (CL). 2:00: Multiple
Personalities. Meg Griffith; Megan Lanz
and Rik Noyce, flutes; Anne Marshall, piano
(FM). 2:00: Works for Glissando Flute and
Electronics. Tammy Evans Yonce, flute (SS).
2:30: Electroacoustic Flute. Jen McLachlen,
flute (SS). 3:30: Works by Ernst von Dohnányi
and Béla Bartók for flute and piano. Szabolcs
Szilágyi, flute; Richard Shaw, piano (CL).
4:00: Jazz-Inspired Works for Flute. Karen
Large, flute; Amanda Arrington, piano (FM).
5:00: Flute and Narrator, Atarah Ben-Tovim
MBE. Everyone is asked to bring flutes to
join in an improvised story with narration
and Festive Flutes. (SS). 7:00: Celebrating
Flutes Both Great and Small. Flute Street,
flute choir; Nancy Nourse, conductor (SS).
7:30: Swiss Touch. Swiss repertoire from the
20th and 21st centuries. Carole Reuge, flute;
Aydin Arslan, piano (FM). 7:30: Between the
Full Moon and Rising Sun. Niall O’Riordan,
flute; Anne Marshall, piano (CL). 7:30: My
Voice in the World of New Flute Music. Iwona
Glinka, flute (BH). 8:00: Around the World
with Viviana Guzman. Viviana Guzman, flute;
Anne Marshall, piano (CL). 8:30: Fly the
Music. Wissam Boustany, flute; Aleksander
Szram, piano (SS). 9:00: Contemporary Latin
American flute and guitar music. Duo Nuevo:
Alhelí Pimienta, flute; Mario Quintanilla,
guitar (BH).
Jun 20 9:30am: From Our Backyard:
Exploring Canadian Flute Music by Canadian
Composers. Giancarlo Mincone, flute (FM).
9:30am: [lecture recital] Philippe Gaubert:
The “Renoir” of the Flute. Patrick Williams,
flute; Richard Shaw, piano (CL). 10:00am:
Works of Master Composers. Sarah Gieck,
flute; Anne Marshall, piano (FM). 11:00am:
“Ontario – Yours to Discover” Flute Works
from Across the Lake: A Musical Road
Trip through Ontario. Solos to octets.
Dianne Aitken, Les Allt, Laura Chambers,
Amy Hamilton, Kaili Maimets, flutes; and
others (CL). 11:30am: The Voice of Now:
Contemporary Chamber Music for Flute,
Cello, Piano. Michelle Cheramy, flute; Nathan
Cook, cello; Philip Roberts; piano (FM). 1:30:
Music by Canadian Women Composers.
thewholenote.com
Liesel Deppe, flute; Miriam Stewart-Kroeker,
cello; Diane Dumlavwalla, piano (CL). 2:00:
Panorama of Hungarian Music: Classical,
Contemporary and Folk Music. Márk Fülep,
flute; Erik Gero, piano; Flautas del Fuego:
Izabella Budai and Alhelí Pimienta (FM).
2:00: Whistlestop! A tour of the British Isles
with Festive Flutes. Joss Campbell, Sarah
Murphy, Carla Rees and Elizabeth Walker,
flutes (SS). 3:30: Rarely heard Flute Sonatas
of the 20th Century. Stephen Tam, flute; Anne
Marshall, piano (CL). 4:00: Gary Schocker in
Recital. (FM). 4:00: Tuneful and Rhythmic: the
Funtemporary Flute. Yunji Moon, flute; Anne
Marshall, piano (CL). 4:00: Head First: a visual
album by Rozalind MacPhail. Flute and electronics to silent film. Joss Campbell, Sarah
Murphy, Carla Rees and Rozalind MacPhail,
flutes (SS). 7:00: Moyse Ensemble in Recital.
Roderick Seed, Unji Chung, Kiyoka Ohara,
flutes; Anne Marshall, piano (SS). 7:30: This
ain’t no flute recital. Christopher Lee, flute;
Richard Shaw, piano (FM). 7:30: 500 Years
of Music, 10 Flutes, 1 Interpreter. Hernando
Leal, historical and modern flutes (CL). 8:00:
Transcending Collaborations. Christine
Erlander Beard and Christopher Lee, flutes;
Richard Shaw, piano (FM). 8:30: Michel
Bellavance in Recital. Michel Bellavance, flute;
Anne Marshall, piano (SS).
Jun 21 9:30am: Flûtes en Vacances. Judy
Diez d’Aux, Annie Thibault, Sylvie Ouellette,
Catherine Audet, Maude LangevinCharlebois, Sylvie Tremblay and Nancy
Nourse, flutes (FM). 9:30am: [lecture recital]
“Sophisticated Laddie:” 18th Century Scottish
Flute Music and a Stylistic Continuum.
Laurel Swinden, flute (CL). 11:30am: A New
Programme of Songs for Flute and Piano.
Elizabeth Walker, flute; Richard Shaw, piano
(FM). 11:30: Melusina’s Dream: A Recital of
Innovative Flute Works. Angus McPherson,
flute (CL). 2:00: Bolling on Sunday. Samantha
Chang, flute; Mark Camilleri, piano; Jon
Maharaj, bass; Mark Inneo, drums (FM).
2:00: Musical Storytelling for Flute, Piano and
Narrator. Kathy Blocki, flute; Sarah Blocki,
piano; Martin Blocki, narrator (SS). 3:30:
Sarah Jackson in Recital. Sarah Jackson,
flute; Richard Shaw, piano (CL). 3:30: New
Music for Flute and Guitar. Leanna Keith,
flutes; Zachary Larson, guitar (BH). 4:00:
North American Lyricism. Rik Noyce, and
Megan Lanz, flutes; Anne Marshall, piano
(FM). 4:00: Flutes en Route! Concert with
a World Music perspective accompanied
by a series of projected video and striking
images. Douglas Miller, flute; Laura Thomas,
percussion; Blair Salter, piano; Eric Mahar,
guitar; Gordon Cleland, cello; Brian Baty,
bass (SS). 7:00: Doulce Memoire: Golden Age
of the Renaissance flute. Mika Putterman,
Geneviève Blanchard, Kimberly Reine, renaissance flutes (FM). 7:00: Nora Shulman and
Camille Watts in Recital. Nora Shulman and
Camille Watts, flutes; Anne Marshall, piano
(CL). 7:00: Wails, Whispers, and Whistle
Tones: New Music for Electroacoustic Flute.
Lindsey Goodman, flute, voice, and electronics (BH). 8:00: Canadian Flute Convention
Closing Ceremony. Nicole Esposito and Sara
Hahn, flutes; Anne Marshall and Richard
Shaw, piano (SS).
Canadian Open Old Time
Fiddle Championship
August 5 to 9
Centre Dufferin Recreation Complex, 200
Fiddle Park Lane, Shelburne, ON L0N 1S0
519-925-8620 or 519-925-3037
shelburnefiddlecontest.com/tickets
Event package: $50; $22(youth 12 and under)
Aug 5 7:00: Barn Dance and Jamboree. $7.
Aug 6 7:30: Beckett Family. Featuring Linsey
and Tyler Beckett. $25; $10(youth).
Aug 7 9:30am: Fiddle Jam; Free. 1:00 & 7:00:
Competition Playdowns. $10; $3(youth).
Aug 8 1:00: Fiddle Parade. Downtown.
Free. 3:15: Fiddle and Stepdance Show. Kelli
Trottier, Andy Thompson and Jerry Clancy. $7;
Free(youth). 6:00: Fiddle Championship with
Kelli Trottier. $25; $10(youth).
Aug 9 10:00am: Non-Denominational Church
Service. Torchman Quartet; Shelburne
Fiddlers; Jamboree Band.
City of Toronto Historic Sites
All summer
Toronto, ON
Call 311
toronto.ca/museum-events
June 7 1:30 Music in the Orchard! Fruit
of the Turquoise Vine. Spadina Museum,
285 Spadina Rd.
June 14 1:30 Music in the Orchard! VentElation. Eight wind players present music from
Mozart to the present.
June 20 12_noon Eco-Art-Fest. Public art,
family activities and musical performances.
Todmorden Mills Heritage Site. Bottom of Pottery Rd., E. of Bayview Ave., W. of Broadviewe
Ave. Fri, Sat and Sun through Sept 13.
June 21 1:30 Music in the Orchard! Dan Fortin and Michael Davidson. Improvised music
inspired by contemporary classical music,
electronic music, modern jazz and rock.
Spadina Museum, 285 Spadina Rd.
July 2 7:00 Fret Not Ukulele Night. Chris Wilson provides ukulele instruction. Bring your
own ukulele. Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas
St. W. $15. Also Aug 6.
For information see Green Pages listings.
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival
July 30 to August 3
EL – Erickson Lutheran Church, 30 3rd St.
SW., Erickson, MB R0J 0P0
LW – Lorne Watson Recital Hall, Brandon
University, 270-18th St., Brandon, MB R7A 6A9
MM – “The Martise” at the Marina, Main
Beach, Wasagaming (Clear Lake), Riding
Mountain National Park MB R0J 1N0
204-571-6547 or 204-727-9631
clearlakefestival.ca
Festival Pass: $80; $55(students)
All concerts (except Jazz Cruise):
$25/$20(advance); $15(students)
Jul 30 7:30: Daniel Tselyakov in Recital.
Schumann: Fantasie in C Op.17; Haydn: Sonata
in C Hob.XVI:50; Rachmaninoff: Sonata No.2
in b-flat Op.36. Daniel Tselyakov, piano (LW).
Jul 31 7:30: Fabulous Contrasts. Beethoven:
Horn Sonata Op.17; Corigliano: Sonata for
violin and piano; Brahms: Horn Trio Op.40.
Marc Djokic, violin; Ken McDonald, horn;
Daniel Tselyakov and Alexander Tselyakov,
piano (EL).
Aug 1 10:30am: Coffee Concert: Serious Fun!
Works by Piazzolla, Elgar, Beatles, Schoenfield
and Lavignac. Marc Djokic, violin; Simon
Daniel Tselyakov, piano
Thursday, July 30, 7:30 pm
Lorne Watson Recital Hall
Brandon Manitoba
clearlakefestival.ca
Fryer, cello; Alla Turbanova, Daniel Tselyakov
and Alexander Tselyakov, piano (EL). 3:00:
Classic Meets Jazz. A. Gilliand: Three Faces
of Ebony; K. Nichols: Jazz compositions. Marc
Djokic and Sandra Smith, violin; Simon Fryer,
cello; Colin Mehmel, clarinet; Greg Gatien,
saxophone, Shannon Chapman, vocals
and saxophone; Eric Platz, percussion; Alla
Turbanova, Daniel Tselyakov and Alexander
Tselyakov, piano; guest: Gervan Fearon,
saxophone (EL).
Aug 2 3:00: Appear & Inspire Afternoon.
Beethoven: Romance No.2 in F Op.50; Weber:
Grand Duo Concertante; Mendelssohn: Song
without Words Op.109; Arnold: Sonatina;
Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen. Marc Djokic, violin; Simon Fryer, cello; Colin Mehmel, clarinet;
Daniel Tselyakov and Alexander Tselyakov,
piano; Collette Simonot, host (EL). 8:30: Jazz
Cruise Concert. Scenic evening tour of the
peaceful waters of Clear Lake. Greg Gatien,
saxophone; Shannon Chapman, vocals and
saxophone, Eric Platz, percussion. MM; $35;
$30(st).
Aug 3 3:00: Festival Grand Finale. Franck:
Sonata for violin and piano; Carrabré: Clear
Quartet (premiere); Hummel: Piano Quintet
Op.87. Marc Djokic and Sandra Smith, violin;
Heather Wilson, viola; Simon Fryer, cello; Colin
Mehmel, clarinet; Chrystal Tait, double bass;
Daniel Tselyakov and Alexander Tselyakov,
piano (EL).
Cui International Music Festival
August 1 to 9
cuimusicfest.com
Aug 1 5:00 Opening Concert. Grace Church
on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd.
Aug 3 12_noon Music Mondays. Church of the
Holy Trinity. 10 Trinity Sq.
Aug 2 3:00 Classical Music Concerts at York
University. Also Aug 3 and 4.
Aug 4 12_noon Public Masterclasses at York
University. Also at 3:00 and on Aug 5, 6 and 7.
Aug 5 3:00 Piano Artist Competition. Also
Aug 6 and 7
Aug 8 3:00 Finals and the Awards Ceremony.
York University
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
Elora Festival
July 10 to 26
EP – Elora Public School, 288 Mill St. E., Elora,
June | July | August, 2015 | 43
Summer Festivals
ON N0B 1S0
GB – Gambrel Barn, Wellington County Rd. 21
and 7, Elora, ON N0B 1S0
HB – Heritage Barn, Museum & Archives, 536
Wellington Rd. 18, Elora, ON N1M 2W3
KP – Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church
St., Elora, ON N0B 1S0
SJ – St. John’s Church, 36 Henderson St.,
Elora, ON N0B 1S0
WC – Wellington County Library, Elora
Branch, 144 Geddes St., Elora, ON N0B 1S0
519-846-0331 or 1-888-747-7550
elorafestival.ca
Festival Pass: 20% discount on all events
(excluding Starlight and Roundtable events)
Flex Package: save the tax on at least 4 events
(excluding Kids, Starlight and Roundtable
events)
All concerts: $20(university/college students); $5(high school students)
Ticket prices do not include HST or service
charge
705-746-2410 or 1-866-364-0061
festivalofthesound.ca
Jul 17 5:30: Classics by Candlelight. Russell
Braun, baritone; Carolyn Maule, piano; Guy
Few, trumpet; James Campbell, clarinet;
Anagnoson & Kinton, piano duo; Gryphon
Trio. Fundraising dinner and concert (CS;
$150).
Jul 18 1:30: Strings Across the Sky. Kids
Show (CS; Free). 7:30: Canadian Brass (CS;
$40-$50).
Jul 19 2:30: Charles W. Stockey Memorial
Concert. Haydn: String Quartet in C Op.54,
No.2, Hob.lll:57; Tchaikovsky: Andante
Cantabile; Mozart: Clarinet Quintet in A K581.
James Campbell, clarinet; New Zealand
String Quartet (CS; $25-$30). 7:30: Joyful
Sounds: A Tribute to Elmer Iseler. Bach: Jesu,
Joy of Man’s Desiring; Schutz: Psalm 100,
Make a Joyful Noise; Praetorius: Ein Kindelein
so Iobelich; Schutz: Cantate Domino, Sing to
the Lord; Daley: Requiem. Canadian Brass;
Elmer Iseler Singers; Lydia Adams, conductor
(CS; $40-$50).
Jul 20 1:00: Film: A Late Quartet (CS; $10).
7:00: Dixieland Cruise. Music and cruise (IQ:
$40).
Jul 21 3:30: Flute, Harp, and Strings. Debussy:
Sonata for flute, viola and harp; SaintSaens: Fantaisie for violin and harp, Op.124
Saint-Saëns: The Swan from Carnival of the
Animals; Villa Lobos: Song of the Black Swan;
Grandjany: Rhapsodie; Godefroid: Etude de
concert for solo harp. Caroline Léonardelli,
harp; Suzanne Shulman, flute; Gil Sharon,
violin; Ron Ephrat, viola; Yegor Dyachkov,
cello (CS; $17-$25). 7:30: Four Seasons for
Four Harps. Vivaldi: The Four Seasons, Op.8
(arr. for harp quartet); Lecuona: Malaguena
from Spanish Suite Andalucia (arr. Sparnon);
Mozart: Quartet in B-flat K589 (trans.
Lizotte). Four Seasons Harp Quartet (CS;
$32-$40).
Jul 22 1:30: Brahms: The Young Composer.
Brahms: Scherzo from FAE Sonata; Joachim:
Hebrew Melodies Op.9; Brahms: Piano Trio
No.1 in B Op.8. Peter Longworth, piano; Gil
Sharon, violin; Helene Pohl, violin; Ron Ephrat,
viola; Yegor Dyachkov, cello (CS; $17-$25).
3:30: Brahms: The Middle Years. Brahms:
Cello Sonata No.2 in F Op.99; Brahms: Viola
Quintet in G Op.111. Peter Longworth, piano;
Ron Ephrat, viola; Yegor Dyachkov, cello; New
Zealand String Quartet (CS; $17-$25). 7:30:
Brahms: The Master. Brahms: Six Pieces
for Piano Op.118; Brahms: Clarinet Quintet
in b Op.115. Peter Longworth, piano; James
Campbell, clarinet; New Zealand String
Quartet (CS; $32-$40).
Jul 23 1:30: Music for Friends. Haydn: London
Trio No.1 in C Hob.IV:1; Beethoven: Duo WoO32
“Eyeglasses;” Bruch: Pieces Op.83; SaintSaens: Tarantella in a Op.6; Poulenc: Sonata
for flute and piano. Suzanne Shulman, flute;
James Campbell, clarinet; Ron Ephrat, viola;
Gillian Ansell, viola; Rolf Gjelsten, cello; Peter
Longworth, piano (CS; $17-$25). 3:30: Cecilia
String Quartet. Haydn: String Quartet in c
Op.17 No.4 Hob.III:28; Mendelssohn: String
Quartet No. 4 in e Op.44 No.2 (CS; $17-$25).
7:30: Beethoven and Schubert. Beethoven:
Piano Quartet in E-flat Op.16; Schubert: Cello
Quintet in C D956. André Laplante, piano;
Gil Sharon, violin; Rolf Gjelste, cello; Doug
Beilman, violin; Ron Ephrat, viola; Yegor
Dyachkov, cello (CS; $35-$45).
Jul 24 3:30: Sinfonia Concertante. Haydn/
their children. GB; $90(family); $45. 9:30:
Starlight Series 2: Frog & Henry. HB; $25.
Jul 19 2:00: David Jalbert, piano. Works by
Satie, Poulenc and Stravinsky. SJ; $35. 4:00:
Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal.
Renaissance and Baroque vocal music. SJ;
$35.
Jul 22 4:30: [lecture] Roundtable with Rick
Phillips 2: Making Music Festivals Work WC;
$60; includes dinner at Cork Restaurant.
7:30: David Baskeyfield, organ. Works by
Bach, Mozart, Franck and Saint-Saëns. SJ;
$30.
Jul 23 8:00: Choral Mystics. Elora Festival
Singers. Works by Tavener, Pärt, Hawes and
Morlock. SJ; $35.
Jul 24 7:30: TorQ Percussion Quartet. GB;
$40.
Jul 25 3:00: Ships in the Night. Nota Bene
Baroque Players; INNERchamber; Agnes
Zsigovics, soprano SJ; $35. 7:30: Jackie
Richardson Trio. Gospel, jazz and blues. GB;
$40. 9:30: Starlight Series 3: Glenn Buhr &
the Button Factory Band. HB; $25.
Jul 26 2:30: Nine Lessons and Carols for
Summer. Elora Festival Singers. SJ; $35.
Festival du Loup
Arvo Pärt
Jocelyn Morlock
Patrick Hawes
John Tavener
Thursday, July 23rd
Jul 10 7:30: Opening Night Gala: Solomon.
Handel. Elora Festival Singers; Mendelssohn
Choir; Festival Orchestra. Followed by
fireworks and buffet. 6:45: Pre-concert talk.
GB; $75(preferred seating); $60.
Jul 11 3:00: Orphea and the Golden
Harp. Adaptation of Monteverdi’s Orfeo.
Marionettes, singers, baroque musicians.
SJ; $35. 7:30: Black Umfolosi. A capella and
dance group from Zimbabwe. GB; $45. 9:30:
Starlight Series 1: Mike Janzen Trio. HB; $25.
Jul 12 2:00: Glory of Vivaldi. Elora Festival
Singers; chamber ensemble. SJ; $35. 4:00:
Stewart Goodyear, piano. Works by Scriabin.
SJ; $35.
Jul 15 4:30: [lecture] Roundtable with Rick
Phillips 1: Discovering Bach’s B Minor Mass.
WC; $60; includes dinner at Cork Restaurant.
7:30: Mark Masri, tenor. GB; $45.
Jul 16 8:00: VOCES8. English vocal ensemble.
Madrigals and opera to Peggy Lee. KP; $40.
Jul 17 4:00: Elora Festival Kids Camp: Pirates:
The Sequel. EP; $12; $6(child). 7:30: Bach: B
Minor Mass. Elora Festival Singers; VOCES8;
Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal
6:45: Pre-concert talk. GB; $45.
Jul 18 2:00 & 4:00: Dark Days, Bright Victory.
Canada’s WWII in words, images and song.
SJ; $35. 7:30: Next Generation Leahy. Celtic
song and dance. Doug and Jennifer Leahy and
44 | June | July | August, 2015
July 16 to 19
LH – Lafontaine Parish Hall, 331 Lafontaine Rd.
W., Tiny, ON L9M 0H1
LP – Lafontaine Park, 342 Lafontaine Rd. W.
Tiny, ON L9M 0H1
PC – Paroisse Sainte Croix, 327 Lafontaine Rd.
W., Tiny, ON L9M 0H1
RR – Robert Robitaille Pavillion, Lafontaine
Park, 342 Lafontaine Rd. W. Tiny ON L9M 0H1
festivalduloup.on.ca
705-543-1535
Weekend Pass: $40
Jul 16: Lafontaine Storytelling.
Commemoration of the 400 years of francophone presence in Ontario. Louis Racine,
storyteller; Micheline Marchand and Daniel
Marchildon, writers and historians (PH; $10).
Jul 17: L’Ordre du bon temps de Champlain.
Joëlle Roy with Jean Poulin and Bobby
Lalonde. Robert Paquette, folk singersongwriter (RR; $15).
Jul 18: Festival Day. Music by a variety of local
artists; Site animation by Echo d’un people;
Troupe Corpus. Community supper; Local
artisans, local food, beer garden, silent wolf
art auction and kid’s corner (LP; $2). Evening:
The Great Howling. Wolf howling contest;
Coureurs des bois; Bon Débarras, house band
jam (RR; $20).
Jul 19: Folk Mass. Brunch with music by Noisy
Locomotive; New World of Champlain concert
(LH; $10; includes brunch).
Festival of the Sound
July 17 to August 9
CS – Charles W. Stockey Centre for the
Performing Arts, 2 Bay St, Parry Sound, ON
P2A 1S3
CP – Chippewa lll, Seguin River Parkette,
Parry Sound, ON P2A 1S4
FS – Festival Station Gallery, 1 Avenue Road,
Parry Sound, ON P2A 2A6
IQ – Island Queen Cruise Ship, 9 Bay St, Parry
Sound, ON P2A 1S4
SA – Saint Andrews Presbyterian Church, 58
Seguin St., Parry Sound, ON P2A 1B6
SV – Seguin Valley Golf Club, 144 Badger Rd.,
Seguin, ON P2A 2W8
Rechman: Sinfonia Concertante Hob.I:105;
Mozart: Grande Sestetto Concertante after
K364. Gil Sharon, violin; Helene Pohl, violin;
Doug Beilman, violin; Ron Ephrat, viola; Gillian
Answell, viola; Yegor Dyachkov, cello; Rolf
Gjelsten: cello (CS; $17-$25). 7:30: André
Laplante in Recital. Bach/Busoni: Adagio in
a from BWV 564; Mozart: Sonata in B-flat
K281; Schubert: Six moments musicaux,
D780 No.1-3; Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.26
in E-flat Op.81a; Liszt: Piano Sonata in b S178
(CS; $35-$45).
Jul 25 7:30: In Full Swing: The Music of Artie
Shaw & Benny Goodman. Bob DeAngelis,
clarinet; James Campbell, clarinet; Gene
DiNovi, piano; Dave Young, bass (CS; $60).
Jul 26 2:30: Canadian Pride. Mussorgsky/
Howarth: Pictures at an Exhibition; Copland:
El Salon México; Gabrieli: Canzoni; Canadian
National Brass Project; James Sommerville,
conductor (CS; $32-$40).
Jul 27 11:00am: [masterclass] Stockey Piano
Masterclass. Glen Montgomery, piano (CS;
Free).
Jul 28 10:00am: Thirty Two Short Films
About Glenn Gould (CS; $10).1:15: [lecture]
Goldberg Variations. Bach: Goldberg
Variations BWV988. Leo Erice, piano (CS;
$17-$25). 3:30: Music for Flute and Guitar.
Telemann: Sonata for flute and guitar;
Bach: Sonata for flute; Scarlatti: Sonata
for guitar. Suzanne Shulman, flute; Daniel
Bolshoy, guitar (CS; $22-$25).7:30: Festival
Baroque. Vivaldi: Sinfonia alla rustica
RV151; Stravinsky: Suite Italienne; Handel:
Concerto in g HWV287; Pergolesi: Arias;
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.2, BWV1047.
Leslie Fagan, soprano; James Mason, oboe;
Guy Few, trumpet; Julie Baumgartel, violin;
Moshe Hammer, violin; Cynthia Hiebert,
harpsichord; Penderecki String Quartet; Glen
Montgomery, piano (CS; $32-$40).
Jul 29 11:00am: Concert at Café
Zimmermann. Telemann: Sinfonia in D
TWV44:1; Bach: Arias from the Coffee Cantata
BWV211; Bach: Concerto in c BWV1060.
Leslie Fagan, soprano; James Mason, oboe;
Guy Few, trumpet; Julie Baumgartel, violin;
Penderecki String Quartet; Cynthia Hiebert,
harpsichord (CS; $30). 3:30: Cheng²Duo.
Francoeur: Sonata in E; Franck: Sonata in
A; Fauré: Après un reve; Sicilienne; Elegie
(CS; $17-$25). 7:30: Songs and Dance of the
Americas. Leo Erice, piano; Leslie Fagan,
soprano; Suzanne Shulman, flute; James
Campbell, clarinet; Guy Few, trumpet; Moshe
Hammer, violin; Daniel Bolshoy, guitar;
Penderecki String Quartet; Cheng²Duo; Annie
Zhou, piano; Glen Montgomery, piano (CS;
$32-40).
Jul 30 1:30: Chopin Recital. Chopin: Ballade
No.4 in f Op.52; Mazurkas Op.56, Nos.1-3;
Sonata No. 3 in b Op.58. Annie Zhou, piano
(CS; $17-$25). 3:30: Moshe’s Favorites. Bach:
Violin Concerto in a BWV1041; Mozart: Sonata
in e K304; Schubert: Sonatina in g D408.
Moshe Hammer, violin; Glen Montgomery,
piano (CS; $17-$25). 7:30: Seasons of
Beethoven. Beethoven: Violin Sonata in F
Op.24 “Spring;” Beethoven: String Quartet
in c-sharp Op.131. Moshe Hammer, violin;
Glen Montgomery, piano; Penderecki String
Quartet (CS; $32-$40).
Jul 31 11:00am: [masterclass] Stockey Piano
Masterclass. Glen Montgomery and Annie
Zhou, piano (CS; Free). 1:30: Wendake/
Huronia. Toronto Consort; Aboriginal
thewholenote.com
Drummers (CS; $17-$25). 7:30: Roise, Judy,
and Peggy. Adi Braun, vocals; David Restivo,
piano; Pat Collins, bass; Daniel Barnes, drums
(CS; $32-40).
Aug 1: 11:00am: Jazz for Open Ears. Graham
Campbell. Words Around the Waist (CS;
Free). 7:30: Jazz Canada. Dave Restivo, piano;
Robi Botos, piano; Gary Williamson, piano;
David Young, bass; Terry Clarke, drums (CS:
$17-$25).
Aug 2 10:30am: Coffee & Jazz on the
Chippewa. Graham Campbell. Words Around
the Waist (CP; $60). 2:45: David Braid and
Sinfonia UK. Jazz (CS; $25-$30). 7:30:
Toronto All-Star Big Band (CS: $35-$45).
Aug 3 1:00: Bird. Film (CS; $10). 7:00: Jazz
Canada Cruise. Michael Dunston, vocals
Drew Jurecka, violin; David Young, bass; Terry
Clarke, drums; Robi Botos, piano (IQ; $40).
Aug 4 3:30: Afiara at St.Andrews; Haydn:
String Quartet in b Hob.lll:68; Beethoven:
String Quartet in F Op.135. Afiara String
Quartet (SA: $22-$25). 7:30: From Weimar
to Vauldeville. Tom Allen, narrator and trombone; Patrica O’Callaghan, soprano; Bryce
Kulak, vocals and piano; Kevin Fox, vocalist,
cello and guitar; Lori Gemmell, harp; Peter
Gemmell, winds (CS; $32-$40).
Aug 5 1:30: Three Centuries. Novacek: Elegy
for bass and piano; Sherwin: A Nightingale
Sang in Berkeley Square; Dohnanyi: Piano
Quintet No.1 in c Op.1. John Novacek, piano;
Joel Quarrington; bass; Afiara String Quartet;
guest: Adrian Fung (CS; $17-$25). 3:30:
Classical Giants. Mozart: Violin Sonata No.18
in G K301; Beethoven: Septet in E-flat Op.20.
Martin Beaver, violin; Mark Fewer, violin;
Graham Oppenheimer, viola; Carole Sirois,
cello; Joel Quarrington, double bass; James
Campbell, clarinet; Ken MacDonald, horn;
James McKay, bassoon; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano (CS; $17-$25). 6:45: [lecture] “Large”
Chamber Music. Jeffrey Stokes (CS; Free).
7:30: Baritone, Strings, and Winds. Spohr:
Songs for baritone, violin and piano; Estacio:
Away and Awake in the Night; Schubert:
Octet in F D803. Russell Braun, baritone;
Carolyn Maule, piano; Mark Fewer, violin;
Martin Beaver, violin; Graham Oppenheimer,
viola; Carole Sirois, cello; Joel Quarrington,
double bass; James Campbell, clarinet; Ken
MacDonald, horns; James McKay, bassoon
(CS; $32-$40).
Aug 6 12:30: [lecture] DiNovi talks to DiNovi
(CS; Free). 1:15: The Red Violin. Film (CS; $10).
4:00: From 1789 to 2004. Bach: Chaconne
in d BWV1004; Prokofiev: Sonata in C Op.56;
Chausson: Poème for violin and piano Op.25;
Moszkowski: Suite in g Op.71. Mark Fewer, violin; Martin Beaver, violin; John Novacek; piano
(CS; $17-$25). 7:30: Movie Night. Schubert:
Andante from Trio in B-flat (12 Years a Slave);
Barber: Adagio Op.11 (Platoon); Novacek:
Short clips from Chaplin; DiNovi: Tarantella;
Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No.2 in c Op.66.
John Novacek, piano; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano; Afiara String Quartet; guest: Adrian
Fung (CS: $32-40).
Aug 7 2:15: [lecture] The Other 50 Diabelli
Variations. Jeffery Stokes (CS; Free). 3:30:
Goodyear Plays Beethoven. Beethoven:
Diabelli Variations Op.120. Stewart Goodyear,
piano (CS; $17-$25). 7:30: The Intimate
Concerto. Haydn: Violin Concerto in C Hob.
Vlla:1; Mozart: Clarinet Concerto in A K622;
Chausson: Concerto in D Op.21. Martin
Beaver, violin; Mark Fewer, violin; James
thewholenote.com
Campbell, clarinet; Stéphane Lemelin, piano;
Afiara String Quartet; Carole Sirois, cello;
Joel Quarrington, double bass (CS; $35-$45).
Aug 8 7:30: Love, Laughter, and Passion.
Opera. Leslie Fagan, soprano; Mark DuBois,
tenor; Keith Klassen, tenor; Bruce Kelly, bass;
John Novacek, piano; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano (CS: $35-$45).
Aug 9 2:30: Rising Stars. Beethoven:
Piano Concerto Op.73 “Emperor;” Dvorak:
Symphony in e From the New World; A. Brott:
Overture. Stewart Goodyear, piano; National
Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott,
conductor (CS; $35-$45).
Participants in the Highland Opera Studio
present works from opera and musical stage.
Different program for each concert. MU;
$32.50.
Aug 17 8:00: Celebrations! Commemorating
the 50th Anniversary of the Sound of Music,
along with other selections from film and
stage. SG; $32.50.
Aug 19 8:00: Vinedressers. Canadian opera
by Tobin Stokes. Based on a First Nations
myth and another ancient tale. Ellen Wieser,
soprano (Helena); Jillian Yemen, mezzo (Mrs.
Stewart); Kevin Myers, tenor (Christian);
Christopher Dunham, baritone (Norimo); and
others. NL; $37.50.
Aug 21 8:00: Vinedressers. See Aug 19.
Aug 30 2:00: Le Nozze di Figaro. Mozart.
Opera buffa in four acts. Nathan Keoughan,
bass (Figaro); Eliza Johnson, soprano
(Susanna); Michael Nyby, bass (Count);
Brigitte O’Halloran, soprano (Countess);
Jillian Yemen, mezzo (Marcellina); Dann
Mitton, bass (Bartolo); Valerie Kuinka, stage
director; Daniel Lipton conductor. NL; $37.50.
Sep 1 7:30: Le Nozze di Figaro. Mozart. Opera
buffa in four acts. Jan Vaculik, bass (Figaro);
Jessica Scarlato, soprano (Susanna); Cairan
Ryan, bass (Count); Chantale Nurse, soprano
(Countess); Jillian Yemen, mezzo (Marcellina);
Dann Mitton, bass (Bartolo); Valerie Kuinka,
stage director; Daniel Lipton conductor. NL;
$37.50.
Sep 2 7:30: Le Nozze di Figaro. Mozart. See
Aug 30.
Sep 3 7:30: Le Nozze di Figaro. Mozart. See
Sep 1.
Forest Festival
August 12 to 16
Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve, 1095
Redkin Rd., Haliburton, ON K0M 1S0
BL – Bone Lake Amphitheatre
LM – Logging Museum
705-754-2198
theforestfestival.com
Aug 12 8:00: Whitehorse. Futuristic roots
music duo. LM; $51.
Aug 13 8:00: Shine On: The Universe of John
Lennon. Genre-crossing collective. LM; $36.
Aug 14 8:00: Sarah Harmer. Canadian
singer-songwriter. BL; $36.
Aug 15 2:00: Red Hot Ramble. Jazz and blues.
LM; $36.
Aug 16 11:00am: James Funnyhat. Children’s
musician and storyteller. LM; $10. 2:00:
Melissa Bel. Singer-songwriter. LM; $36.
8:00: Alan Doyle Trio. Acoustic band. BL; $51.
Franco-Fête
Huntsville Festival of the Arts
July 10 to 24
Yonge-Dundas Square
franco-fete.ca
July 2 to August 23
AT – Algonquin Theatre, 37 Main St. E.,
Huntsville, ON P1H 1A1
CH – Chaffey Hall Theatre, 24 Chaffey
Township Rd., Huntsville, ON P1H 1C8
DH – Downtown Huntsville, ON P1H 1A1
705-789-4975
huntsvillefestival.on.ca
Jul 2 8:00: Oh Canada Leisa Way. Hits by
Canadian stars, from Gordon Lightfoot to
Celine Dion and Leonard Cohen. Leisa Way,
vocals; Wayward Wind Band. AT; $35; $32(sr);
$20(st).
Jul 4 8:00: Peter Longworth, piano. Works by
Schubert, Franck and Kreisler. Sheila Jaffe,
violin and viola. AT; $32; $29(sr); $20(st).
Jul 8 8:00: Hot Rocks. Rolling Stones tribute.
Bob Wotherspoon, lead vocals. AT; $32;
$29(sr); $20(st).
Jul 9 8:00: Corb Lund and the Hurtin’
Albertans. Sound ranging from rockabilly to
Western swing, cowboy balladry to country
rock. AT; $38; $35(sr); $20(st).
Jul 10 8:00: Zacada: Zero Gravity Circus.
Cirque style artists, acrobats, contortionists
and jugglers. AT; $90(family); $30; $20(st).
Jul 11 8:00: Nuit Blanche North. Music,
dance, interactive art and light installations
take over the streets of downtown Huntsville.
Adults only midnight cabaret. DH; Free.
Jul 15 8:00: Vishten: Trio of francophone
singers and multi-instrumentalists fuse
Acadian and Celtic genres with rock and
indie-folk influence. AT; $32; $29(sr); $20(st).
Jul 16 8:00: Stand By Me: Music of the Brill
Building. Classic 60s hits of the Brill Building.
Save the Last Dance for Me; On Broadway;
Up on the Roof; and other hits. Micah Barnes,
Billy Newton Davis, Gavin Hope and Tyrone
Highlands Opera Studio
July 30 to September 3
AG – Abbey Gardens, 1012 Garden Gate Dr.,
Haliburton ON K0M 1S0
MU – Minden United Church, 21 Newcastle St.,
Minden, ON K0M 2A1
NL – Northern Lights Performing Arts
Pavillion, 5358 County Rd. 21, Haliburton, ON
K0M 1S0
SG – St. George’s Anglican Church, 617
Mountain St., Haliburton, ON K0M 1S0
705-457-9933 or 1-855-457-9933
highlandsoperastudio.com
June 15 6:00: Love & Marriage. Fundraising
event. Gala dinner, concert and silent auction.
Featuring performances by Russell Braun,
Richard Margison and Lauren Margison. First
Canadian Place, 100 King St. W. 68th floor,
Toronto M5X 1A9. 1-800-838-3006. $250.
July 30-Aug 1: 7:00 [masterclasses] Richard
Margison. Meet the singers of Highland
Opera Studio and hear them work with a
Canadian international opera star. SG; $15.
Aug 4: 8:00: The Art of Song. Song repertoire
from around the world and through the ages.
SG; $32.50.
Aug 8 7:30: Gala in the Gardens. Fundraising
event. Popular arias and ensembles from the
operatic repertoire under the big tent. 6:00:
Pre-performance reception. AG: $50.
Aug 11 8:00: From Opera to Broadway.
Participants in the Highland Opera Studio
present works from opera and musical
stage. Different program for each concert.
SG; $32.50.
Aug 13 8:00: From Opera to Broadway.
Gabriel. AT; $38; $35(sr); $20(st).
Jul 18 8:00: Good Lovelies. All-female
Canadian folk music trio. AT; $32; $29(sr);
$20(st).
Jul 22 8:00: Be My Guest: [interview]
Writer-entertainer Peter Jennings and
guest Debi Pratt, a pioneer of Canada’s wine
industry, present stories about the building
of Inniskillin Winery. Wine tasting included.
AT; $20.
Jul 23 8:00: Jim Cuddy. Singer-songwriter
and lead singer of Blue Rodeo performs
songs and stories with his band. $48; $45(sr);
$30(st).
Jul 25 8:00: Leahys in Song. Celtic, traditional
and roots music. $38; $35(sr); $20(st).
Jul 29 8:00: Buffy Sainte Marie. Composer
and social activist, presents songs on themes
of love, war, religion, mysticism and injustice.
$45: $42(sr); $20(st).
Jul 30 8:00: David Clayton Thomas. Lead
singer of Blood Sweat & Tears. AT; $58;
$55(sr); $30(st).
Aug 1 8:00: Molly Johnson: Because of Billie.
Jazz and pop singer presents tribute to Billie
Holiday. AT; $38; $35(sr); $20(st).
Aug 6 8:00: Pavlo. Mediterranean sound and
world influences, fused with pop sensibilities.
Pavlo Simtikidis, guitar. AT; $38; $35(sr);
$20(st).
Aug 8 8:00: Amy Wallace: An evening
featuring local talent. Amy Wallace, soprano;
Alec Gibson, violin; Gregory Gibson, piano;
Kyung-A Lee, piano. $20; $10(st).
Aug 6-8 8:00: Ralph & Lina. Story of two
Italian lovers and their struggles to stay
together in the face of World War II, immigration and old age. Acrobatic comedy in the vein
of early Fellini. Dan Watson; Christine Serra.
CH; $20.
Aug 12 8:00: Dala: Acoustic folk group.
Amanda Walther; Sheila Carabine. AT; $32;
$29(sr); $20(st).
Aug 13 8:00: Lunch at Allens. Humour,
stories, familiar hits and new songs. Murray
McLauchlan, Marc Jordan, Cindy Church and
Ian Thomas. AT; $38; $35(sr); $20(st).
Aug 20-23 7:30: Velocity of Autumn. Story
about Alexandra, a 79-year-old artist, in a
showdown with her family over where she’ll
spend her remaining years. CH; $20.
Indian River Festival
June 20 to August 30
St. Mary’s Church, 1374 Hamilton Road, Route
104, Indian River, PE C0B 1M0
902-836-3733 or 1-866-856-3733
indianriverfestival.com
Festival Package: 6 admissions $135
Gold Package: 10 admissions $215
Season Pass: $375 and 20% off additional
tickets purchased (ticket prices do not include HST and additional service charge)
Jun 20 7:00: Centre Stage Series: Special
Opener with The Barra MacNeils. Canadian
Celtic singers open the 20th season. $34;
$32(sr/st); $15(child).
Jun 27 3:00: Classical Series: Youth Legacy
Celebration. Featuring top winners of the
provincial music festival; Confederation
Centre of the Arts Youth Chorus; Andrew
Son, piano. $15; $12(sr/st); $7.50(child).
Jun 28, 3:00: Vocal Series: Sung from the
Heart. Choral groups from around the island.
$12; $10(sr/st); $6(child).
Jul 3 7:30: Vocal Series: Island Girls. Tracy
Cantin & Meaghan Blanchard, singers;
June | July | August, 2015 | 45
Summer Festivals
Robert Kortgaard, piano; Sirens, choir. $26;
$24(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 5 7:30: Centre Stage Series: David Myles.
Modern and vintage pop, folk and soul. $30;
$28(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 10 7:30: Centre Stage Series: Sarah
Harmer. Canadian singer-songwriter. $34;
$32(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 12 3:00: Vocal Series: Voyages à Paris.
Works by Debussy and Ravel. Julie Nesrallah,
mezzo; Caroline Leonardelli, harp. $26;
$24(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 17 7:30: Centre Stage Series: Matt Dusk
and Eleanor McCain. Canadian jazz musicians. $30; $28(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 18 11:00am-4:00: [special event] Summer
House Tour. In support of the festival.
$30(with lunch); $20.
Jul 19 7:30: Classical Series: Wolak-Donnelly
Duo. Crossover renditions of jazz and classical pieces. Kornel Wolak, clarinet; Chris
Donnelly, piano. $26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 23 7:30: [special event] Maud of
Leaskdale. One-woman play performed by
Jennifer Carroll on the life of Lucy Maud
Montgomery. $20; $18(sr/st); $10(child).
Jul 24 7:30: Songwriter’s Circle: Gordie
MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys. Celtic,
roots and bluegrass music. $26; $24(sr/st);
$15(child).
Jul 25 3:00: [special event] Maud of
Leaskdale. One-woman play performed by
Jennifer Carroll on the life of Lucy Maud
Montgomery. $20; $18(sr/st); $10(child).
Jul 26 7:30: Classical Series: Cecilia String
Quartet. Works by Haydn, Webern and
Mendelssohn. $26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Jul 31 7:30: Vocal Series: Silver Screen to
Broadway Lights. Rebecca Caine, soprano.
$26: $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 1 7:30: Vocal Series: Magic Flute. Semistaged adaptation. Rebecca Caine, soprano;
cast of young performers; Peter Tiefenbach,
musical director; Brent Krysa, stage director.
$26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 2 3:00: Vocal Series: Magic Flute. Semistaged adaptation. Rebecca Caine, soprano;
cast of young performers; Peter Tiefenbach,
musical director; Brent Krysa, stage director.
$20; free(under 12 when accompanied by
adult).
Aug 7 7:30: Songwriters Circle: Thom Swift
and Erin Costelo. Nova Scotian artists make
their festival debut in an evening of blues and
soul music. $26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 9 7:30: Classical Series: A Northern
Sea Celebration: Maritime Music from
Scandinavia, Scotland and Canada. Music
from Nordic countries, presented by
Ensemble Polaris. $26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 16 7:30: Centre Stage Series: Viva
España. Classical Spanish songs, zarzuela and
tango. Isabel Bayrakdarian, soprano; Serouj
Kradjian, piano. $30: $28(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 21 7:30: Vocal Series: Sandra Le
Couteur. Acadian songstress. $20; $18(sr/
st); $10(child).
Aug 23 7:30: Vocal Series: Music from the
Sistine Chapel. Canadian a capella choir
Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal.
$26; $24(sr/st); $15(child).
Aug 28 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: Amelia
Curran. Contemporary songstress from
Newfoundland. $26; $24(sr/st); $15.
46 | June | July | August, 2015
explore the 371 harmonizations of chorales
by Bach. LA; Free. 11:00am: Cantatas, Ether
Or? New music for voice, flute and viola da
gamba. DuBerger: new works using poetry
of Claude Gauvreau and Tina Biello. TS; $20.
12:30: [lecture] Alchemy at Meissen, Or
How China Became China (and Europe
Transmuted the World). Ben Schmidt. TS;
Free. 2:00: Mysteries. A cappella repertoire
with performers singing and moving to
envision a dialogue between the human voice
and the human body in space. Ensemble
Alkemia. RH; $30; $25(sr); $20(st). 4:00:
Heavenly Bach 3. Bach: Cello Suites; Little
Book for Anna Magdalena. Sigiswald Kuijken,
violoncello da spalla; Suzie LeBlanc, soprano;
Gilles Cantagrel, lecturer. RH; $30; $25(sr);
$20(st). 5:30: [lecture] Happy Hour Lecture.
Sigiswald Kuijken. LA; Free. 7:00: Angelic
Virgin. Works by Palestrina and Benevoli.
Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal. RH;
$35; $30(sr); $25(st). 9:00: Tobacco! Tobacco
will be smoked in honour of the eccentric,
fashionable fop and mercenary soldier, Tobias
Hume. Michael Taylor, countertenor; Nigel
North, lute; Les Voix Humaines. RH; $30;
$25(sr); $20(st).
Jul 28 8:00am: Des Vents Orfevres aux
Entrailles de la Montagne. Baroque and
Scandinavian music combining creativity and
poetry. Jean-François Bélanger, nyckelharpa.
TB; Free. 11:00am: Etere E Terra. Boccherini:
Quintet in C G439; Beethoven: Kreutzer String
Quintet in A. Ensemble Per Sonare. Lobby, TS;
$20. 12:30: [lecture] Coin, candle, china, skull:
Objects of conversion. Paul Yachnin, Julie
Cummings, Ben Schmidt and others. TS; Free.
2:00: Ethereal Harmony: Music in Colour.
Telemann’s music takes on a new dimension
with live painting, inspired by eighteenthcentury theories of the ethereal connections
between music and colour. Sylvia Chan, artist;
Ensemble Infusion Baroque. TS; $20. 3:30:
Mireille Lagacé in Concert. Mireille Lagacé
celebrates her 80th birthday in an organ recital. Works by J.S. Bach and Byrd. BO; Free;
donations welcome. 4:00: Fiorè e aria Fleur
et air Flower and air. Works from recently
emerged manuscript of Angelo Maria Fiorè.
Suzie LeBlanc, soprano; Elinor Frey, cello;
Esteban La Rotta, theorbo. RH; $30; $25(sr);
$20(st). 5:30: [lecture] Resveillez vous:
chantons l’air, featuring Alexis Risler and Zoey
Cochran. Jane Daphne Hatter. TS; Free. 7:00:
Propitia Sydera: Lucky Stars. Corelli: early
concerti; Couperin: Apothéose de Corelli. La
Bande Montréal Baroque; Sigiswald Kuijken,
director. RH; $40; $35(sr); $20(st).
Aug 30 3:00: Centre Stage Series: Men of
the Deeps. Choir of coal miners from Cape
Breton Island sings songs from mining
communities around the world. $34; $32(sr/
st); $15(child).
Luminato Festival
June 19 to 28
Toronto, ON
416-368-3100
luminatofestival.com
June 19 to 28 Daily events at The Hub, David
Pecaut Square, 215 King St. W. For details see
luminatofestival.com/
June 20 6 8:00 7 Monologues: The Night
Dances. Fleck Dance Theatre. Also June 21
(4:00). For details see GTA listings.
June 26 8:00 Apocalypsis. Sony Centre. Also
June 27 and 28 (2:00). For details see GTA
listings.
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
Markham Jazz Festival
August 13 to 16
markhamjazzfestival.com
Aug 13 8 pm Opening Night Concert featuring Diana Panton (Juno winner for Best
Vocal Jazz Album 2015). Varley Art Gallery,
216 Main St, Unionville, Unionville. $50. Free
concerts on Aug 14, 15 and 16 at the Millennium Bandstand and other venues. For
further information see www.markhamjazzfestival.com
Montreal Baroque Festival
June 25 to 28
BO – Basilica of the Oratoire Saint-Joseph,
3800 Chemin Queen Mary, Montreal, QC
H3V 1H6
LA – Lobby, Arts Building, McGill University,
853 Sherbrooke St. E., Montreal, QC H3A 0G5
RH – Redpath Hall, McGill University, 3461
McTavish St., Montreal, QC H3A 2K6
TB – Three Bares Place, McGill University, 859
Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC H3A 0C4
TS – Tanna Schulich Hall McGill University, 555
Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC H3A 1E3
514 845-7171
montrealbaroque.com
Jun 25 7:00: Vivaldi and the Gypsies.
Ensemble Caprice. RH; $30; $25(sr); $20(st).
9:00: Heavenly Bach 1. Bach: Cello Suites;
Little Book for Anna Magdalena. Sigiswald
Kuijken, violoncello da spalla; Suzie LeBlanc,
soprano; Gilles Cantagrel, lecturer RH; $30;
$25(sr); $20(st).
Jun 26 5:00: Heavenly Bach 2. Bach: Cello
Suites; Little Book for Anna Magdalena.
Sigiswald Kuijken, violoncello da spalla;
Suzie LeBlanc, soprano; Gilles Cantagrel,
lecturer. TBA; $30; $25(sr); $20(st). 7:00:
Complètement Toqué. Theatrical performance of a party prince, chef and Margoton
with early music ensemble from Paris.
Ensemble Fuoco e Cenere. RH; $35; $30(sr);
$25(st). 9:00: From Earth to Ether. Concert
based on silly writings about Cyrano de
Bergerac. Les Boréades de Montréal. TS; $30;
$25(sr); $20(st).
Jun 27 9:00am: Le Joyeux Bal de la Quinte
Essence. Renaissance music for flute
consort. Ensemble Discantvs. LA; $20.
11:00am-5:00: In Bach’s Orbit. Marathon
performance by amateur musicians.
Recorder and viola de gamba enthusiasts
Music and Beyond
July 4 to 17
AS – All Saints’ Anglican Church, Westboro,
347 Richmond Rd., Ottawa, ON K2A 0E7
BC – ByTowne Cinema, 325 Rideau St., Ottawa,
ON K1N 5Y4
CA – Canada Aviation and Space Museum, 11
Aviation Parkway, Ottawa, ON K1K 2X5
CC – Christ Church Cathedral, 439 Queen St.,
Ottawa, ON K1R 5A6
DC – Dominion-Chalmers United Church, 355
Cooper St., Ottawa, ON K2P 0G8
FB – First Baptist Church, 140 Laurier Ave. W.,
Ottawa, ON K1P 5J4
FH – Freiman Hall, 610 Cumberland St.,
Ottawa, ON K1N 1A2
NG – National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex
Dr., Ottawa, ON K1N 9N4
ND – Notre Dame Cathedral Basilica, 385
Sussex Dr., Ottawa, ON K1N 1J9
SB – St. Barnabas Church, 70 James St.,
Ottawa, ON K1R 5M3
SC – Shaw Centre, Parliament Foyer, 55
Colonel By Dr., Ottawa, ON K1N 9J2
SF – Saunders Farm, 7893 Bleeks Rd.,
Munster, ON K0A 3P0
SJ – St. Joseph’s Church, 151 Laurier Ave. E.,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N8
SM – St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, 217 First
Ave., Ottawa, ON K1S 2G5
SR – Santé Restaurant, 45 Rideau St., 2nd
floor, Ottawa, ON K1N 5W8
SU – Southminster United Church, 15 Aylmer
Ave., Ottawa, ON K1S 3X1
TH – Tabaret Hall, 550 Cumberland St.,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N8
UO – University of Ottawa, 75 Laurier Ave. E.,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5
WC – Wakefield Centre, 38 Valley Dr.,
Wakefield, QC, J0X 3G0
613-241-0777
musicandbeyond.ca
3-Day any day pass: $120; $60(student over
15); $30(youth 3-15)
3-Day consecutive day pass: $80; $40(student); $20(youth)
Diamond pass to all events: $500/$475(before July 3)
Festival pass to all events except Festival-plus
events: $175; $80(student); $50(youth)
Early Bird Festival pass (before July 3): $150;
$70(student); $40(youth)
Individual tickets: $50(reserved); $30(general); $20(student); $10(youth)
Family package for 4 (2 adults and 2 student/
youth): $65
Family package for 5 (2 adults and 3 student/
youth): $70
Jul 4 5:00: Bells around the City. Bells from
a number of downtown churches, the City
Hall chimes, and handbells and tubular bells
welcome audiences and visiting artists to
the festival. 7:30: Opening Gala. Marie-Eve
Munger, soprano; Jens Lindemann, trumpet;
Daniel Clarke Bouchard, piano; Auryn String
Quartet; trumpets from the Band of the
Ceremonial Guard (DC).
Jul 5 10:00am-3:00: Ottawa Family Music
Expo. Over 100 musicians, dancers and artists. performing music indoors and throughout the campus of the University of Ottawa
(UO; Free). 2:00: Auryn Quartet. Works by
Haydn, Ravel and Mendelssohn (SM). 5:00:
Kerson Leong, violin: Encore! Philip Chiu,
piano (FB). 7:00: Learn to Tango. Martin de
Zuviria and Anne Troise present a tango class
as a prelude to Tango Soirée on July 7 (TH;
Free). 7:30: National Arts Centre Orchestra
and Boris Brott. Beethoven: Overture to
Prometheus; A. Brott: Profundum praedictum; Cradle Song; Mozart: Symphony No.35.
Joanna G’froerer, flute; Karen Donnelly,
trumpet; Anna Petersen, English horn; Joel
Quarrington, double bass (DC). 7:30: Love and
Betrayal. Dominique Labelle, soprano; Daniel
Taylor, countertenor; Adrian Butterfield,
violin; Theatre of Early Music (CC).
Jul 6 10:00am: Coffee Concert: A morning
with the Theatre of Early Music. Rebecca
Genge, soprano; Agnes Zsigovics, soprano;
Daniel Taylor, countertenor; Adrian
Butterfield, violin (CC). 12:00: Quartom. Vocal
quartet from Quebec (SJ). 2:00: Music of
India: Magical Moments with Irshad Khan,
sitar. Irshad Khan Ensemble (DC). 4:00: Tous
thewholenote.com
les Matins du Monde. Film on the theme of
music, based on the early life of Marin Marais.
Short live performance by French early music
ensemble Fuoco E Cenere. (BC). 4:00-6:00:
Music on the Canal. Rousing pirate music
sung on a barge, travelling up the Rideau
Canal, from Dow’s Lake to the National Arts
Centre and back (Free). 7:30: Auryn Quartet
II. Mozart: Quartet in G KV387; Mendelssohn:
Capriccio Op.81 No.3; Beethoven: Quartet in F
Op.59 No.1 (DC). 8:00: Music, Food and Wine:
Complètement Toqué. Theatrical performance in homage to French gastronomy by
early music ensemble from France. Fuoco E
Cenere (WC; Festival-plus ticket).
Jul 7 2:00: Baroque Violin. Adrian Butterfield,
violin; Theatre of Early Music (CC). 7:00:
Tango Soirée. Music, dance, film, art, food,
wine and the opportunity to dance. Music
by Piazzolla, Gardel, Troilo and others.
Quartango; Roxana and Fabian, dancers;
Martin de Zuviria, guitar (SC; Festivalplus ticket).7:30: Music and Marionettes:
Pulcinella. Marionettes and music of
Pergolesi. Bruno Leone, puppeteer; Fuoco E
Cenere. (SB). 7:30: Jason Vieaux, classical
guitar (DC).
Jul 8 10:00am: Coffee Concert: Two Harps.
Ravel: Mother Goose Suite; Lizotte: Raga;
Grandjany: Aria in Classic Style; Andrès: Le
Jardin des Paons et Parvis. Robin Best and
Caroline Léonardelli, harps (DC).12:00: Music
of Versailles. Works by Lully, Charpentier,
Marais, Clérambault, Dornel and others.
Fuoco E Cenere; Julie Fioretti, soprano;
Patricia Lavail, recorder; Mike Fentross,
theorbo; Justin Taylor, harpsichord; Jay
Bernfeld, viola da gamba and direction (SB).
2:00: Vienna Piano Trio. Mozart: Trio in G
K564; Schumann: Fantasiestücke Op.88;
Brahms: Trio in B Op.8 (DC). 6:30: National
Gallery Soirée. Over 100 musicians and 150
short musical performances, all matching the
art themes of the individual galleries (NG).
Jul 9 12:00: Two Pianos. Dutilleux: Figures
de résonances; Stravinsky: Scènes du ballet
Petrouchka; Gougeon: Andante Sostenuto;
Adams: Hallelujah Junction; Brigitte Poulin
and Jean Marchand, pianos (TH). 2:00:
VOCES8: Eventide. Works by Tallis, Byrd,
Praetorius, Monteverdi, Purcell and others.
British a cappella octet (SJ). 4:30: Vienna
Piano Trio II. Haydn: Trio in E-flat HobXV
No.30; Mendelssohn: Trio in d Op.49 (DC).
7:30: Wallis Giunta: Ladies and Gentlemen.
Works by Strauss, Schubert, Montsalvatge,
Barber, Vaughan Williams and others. Wallis
Giunta, mezzo; Peter Dugan, piano; Marley
Giunta, guitar (SU). 8:00: Music and Law.
Anecdotes of legal problems of composers
throughout history. Hosted by The Right
Honourable Beverley McLachlin, P.C., Chief
Justice of Canada; Marie Bérard, violin; Julian
Armour, cello; Andrew Tunis, piano; Marie
Bouchard, harpsichord (DC).
Jul 10 12:00: Trio Fibonacci (DC). 2:00:
Film: Shining Night: A Portrait of Composer
Morten Lauridsen (FH). 5:00: Ottawa
Wind Ensemble. Works by Sparke, Cable,
Whitacre and Bernstein. Mark Rocheleau,
conductor (TH; Free). 7:30: Vienna Piano Trio
III. Mozart: Trio in C K548; Turina: Trio No.1
in D; Saint-Saëns: Trio No.2 in e Op.92 (DC).
7:30: VOCES8: Eventide. Works by Tallis, Byrd,
Praetorius, Monteverdi, Purcell and others.
British a cappella octet (SM).
Jul 11 10:00am: [workshop] Choral
thewholenote.com
Workshop with Morten Lauridsen (DC).1:00:
[workshop] Choral Workshop with Morten
Lauridsen (DC). 2:00: An Afternoon of Song
and Conversation. Schubert::Die Vögel; Im
Frühling; Frühlingsglaube; Im Abendrot;
Suleika I; Die Forelle; Brahms: O kühler
Wald; O wüsst ich doch den Weg zurück;
Lerchengesang. Donna Brown, soprano;
Stefan Mendl, piano (SU). 5:00: Film: Shining
Night: A Portrait of Composer Morten
Lauridsen (FH). 7:30: Hannaford Street Silver
Band. Works by Lau, Cable, Ballantine, Irvine
and others. Raymond Tizzard, conductor
(DC).
Jul 12 3:00: Music and Health: A musician
and her surgeon. A moving show about
Anne Robert’s battle with cancer. Anne
Robert, violin; Dr. Alain Gagnon, piano and
surgeon; Claudine Chatel and René Gagnon,
actors (AS).2:00: Band of the Ceremonial
Guard (CA). 7:30: Chilly Gonzales, piano (SU;
Festival-plus ticket). 7:30: Tribute to Morten
Lauridsen. Six different choirs will perform
Lauridsen’s music. Musicians from Music
and Beyond; Morten Lauridsen, piano and
conductor; Matthew Larkin, organ, piano and
conductor; Jamie Loback, conductor (DC).
Jul 13 12:00: Celebration of Canadian
Composers I: Music for Flute, Viola and Harp.
Joanna G’froerer, flute; Jethro Marks, viola;
Michelle Gott, harp (FB). 2:00: Celebration
of Canadian Composers II: Jean Desmarais’
50th Birthday Celebration. Jean Desmarais,
piano (TH). 4:30: Celebration of Canadian
Composers III: Music of Jan Järvlepp (DC).
7:30: Celebration of Canadian Composers
IV. Capital Chamber Choir; Jamie Loback,
conductor; Thirteen Strings; Kevin Mallon,
conductor; Mike Murley, saxophone (DC).
Jul 14 1:00: 1915-2015: Lost in the Wars. Music
and poetry by composers and writers who
perished in the two world wars (DC). 4:00:
Culture and Intolerance: Remembering the
Holocaust. Eva Olsson, speaker (DC). 6:00:
Music and Dining: Italia! (SR; Festival-plus
ticket). 7:30: Music of the Holocaust. Kleztory;
Musicians from Music and Beyond (DC).
7:30: Music and Literature: Us Conductors.
Sean Michaels, host; Thorwald Jørgensen,
theremin; Musicians from Music and Beyond
(SU).
Jul 15 12:00: Kleztory (FB). 2:00: Daniel
Bolshoy, guitar (SB). 7:30: Thirteen Strings:
Travels in Russia. Shostakovich: Concerto
No.1 for Trumpet, Piano and String Orchestra;
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings. Karen
Donnelly, trumpet; Jean Desmarais, piano;
Junior Thirteen Strings; Thirteen Strings;
Kevin Mallon, conductor (DC).
Jul 16 2:00: Voyage à Paris. Organ repertoire
spanning four centuries. Jennifer Loveless,
organ (ND). 5:30: Music and Dining: Farm
to Table. Duo Rendezvous: Jasper Wood,
violin; Daniel Bolshoy, guitar (SF). 7:30:
Yannick-Muriel Noah: Firsts, Lasts and
Onlys. Selection of composers’ first and/
or final works. R. Straus: Four Last Songs;
works by Bizet, Puccini, Brahms, Verdi and
others. Yannick-Muriel Noah, soprano; Jean
Desmarais, piano (DC).
Jul 17 7:30: Closing Gala: Music and Circus.
Musicians from Music and Beyond; Cirque
Fantastic (DC).
Music at Port Milford
July 12 to August 9
Prince Edward County, ON
613-476-7735
mpmcamp.org
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
Musique Royale
May 15 to Sept 12
Venues throughout Nova Scotia. Office in
Lunenburg, NS
902-634-9994
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
National Youth Orchestra
2015 TD National Tour
July 22 to August 10
Jul 22 7:00: Classical Tattoo of the Americas.
The National Youth Orchestra of Canada
performs with Youth Orchestra of the
Americas in partnership with L’Orchestre de
la Francophonie. Stratford Summer Music.
J. Strauss Sr.: Radetzky March, Op. 228;
Chavez: Symphonie India; Holst: Excerpts
from The Planets; Prokofiev: Excerpts from
Romeo and Juliet; Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture.
Carlos Miguel Prieto, Mark Skazinetsky,
Jean-Philippe Tremblay, conductors; Lloyd
Robertson, host. William Allman
Memorial Arena, 15 Morenz Dr., Stratford.
stratfordsummermusic.ca. PWYC.
Jul 27 7:30: LeBel: monograph of bird’s eye
views; Strauss: Oboe Concerto; Holst: The
Planets. Hugo Lee, oboe; Michael Francis,
conductor. Koerner Hall, Royal Conservatory
of Music, 273 Bloor St. W., Toronto. 416-4080208. tickets.rcmusic.ca/public. $25-$45.
Jul 29 7:00: LeBel: monograph of bird’s eye
views; Strauss: Oboe Concerto; Holst: The
Planets. Hugo Lee, oboe; Michael Francis,
conductor. Southam Hall, National Arts
Centre, 53 Elgin St., Ottawa. 1-888-243-1132.
chamberfest.com/tickets. $20.
Jul 30 3:00: “What Makes it Great”. Ottawa
Chamberfest. Mozart: Symphony No.40
in g, K550. Rob Kapilow, commentator;
Michael Francis, conductor. National
Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex Dr., Ottawa.
1-888-243-1132. chamberfest.com/tickets.
$30.
Aug 3 7:30: Strauss: Don Quixote; Santa
Ana: OCASO; Rachmaninov: Symphonic
Dances. Michael Francis, conductor. Maison
Symphonique, 1600 Rue Saint-Urbain,
Montréal. 514-842-9951.
Aug 6 7:30: Strauss: Don Quixote; Santa Ana:
OCASO; Rachmaninov: Symphonic Dances.
Michael Francis, conductor. The Chan Centre,
6265 Crescent Rd., Vancouver. 604-822-2697.
General admission ($15 donation suggested,
free CD with donation over $20).
Aug 9 7:30: LeBel: monograph of bird’s eye
views; Strauss: Oboe Concerto; Holst: The
Planets. Michael Francis, conductor. Jack
Singer Concert Hall, Arts Commons, 205 8th
Ave. S.E., Calgary. 403-294-9494.
Aug 10 7:30: Strauss: Don Quixote; Santa Ana:
OCASO; Rachmaninov: Symphonic Dances.
Michael Francis, conductor. Enmax Hall,
Winspear Centre, 4 Sir Winston Churchill Sq.
NW, Edmonton. (780) 428-1414. http://www.
edmontonsymphony.com/concerts-tickets.
Entry by donation ($15 suggested, free CD
with donation over $20).
Music at Port Milford
Chamber Music Festival & Summer School
Prince Edward County, Ontario
Afiara String Quartet
Saturday, July 18, 8:00 pm
Pialli Ensemble
Saturday, July 25, 8:00 pm
Tokai String Quartet
Saturday, August 1, 8:00 pm
Port Milford Faculty Artists
Saturday, August 8, 8:00 pm
Featuring select members of
the Canadian Opera Company
St. Mary Magdalene, 335 Main Street, Picton, ON
Details at mpmcamp.org, 613-476-7735
Celebrating
29 Years
of Creating an
Inspiring
Summer Music
Experience
Tickets sold at door & www.mpmcamp.org
June | July | August, 2015 | 47
Summer Festivals
No Strings Theatre Music
Theatre Concert Series
June 5 to 6 and August 7 to 9
Toronto, ON
416-551-2093
nostringstheatre.com
For further information see GTA listings.
Open Ears Festival of Music & Sound:
Between the Ears 2015
June 20 to 21
Kitchener, ON
519-579-8564 / 1-888-363-3591
openears.ca
For further information see Beyond the GTA
listings.
Ottawa Chamberfest
July 23 to August 6
AC – National Arts Centre, 53 Elgin St.,
Ottawa, ON K1P 5W1
BC – Beechwood National Cemetery of
Canada, 280 Beechwood Ave., Ottawa, ON
K1M 8E2
DC – Dominion-Chalmers United Church, 355
Cooper St., Ottawa, ON K2P 0G8
DO – Downtown Ottawa (check Facebook for
location updates)
ES – École secondaire publique De La Salle,
501 Old St Patrick St., Ottawa, ON K1N 8R3
NG – National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex
Dr., Ottawa, ON K1N 9N4
OC – Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Ave. W.,
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1
SB – St. Brigid’s Centre for the Arts, 310 St.
Patrick St., Ottawa, ON K1N 5K5
TH – Tabaret Hall, University of Ottawa, 550
Cumberland St., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N8
613-234-6306 or 1-888-243-1132
chamberfest.com
Passport: $150 (excluding Festival Galas and
Theatrical Events)
Festival Galas (July 24, 27, 31): $78-$127
Jul 23 7:00: Siskind Series: Canadian National
Brass Project. Principal brass players from
major orchestras across Canada. James
Sommerville, conductor (DC; $35). 10:00:
Freedom, Flight, and Frailty: The Last Curlew.
Tom Allen, narrator and trombone; Lori
Gemmell, harp; Julia Aplin, dancer; Barbara
Croall, composer and pipigwan (ST; $30).
Jul 24 12:00: Music at Noon: Ernst Reijseger:
A Cello Possessed. Jazz, improvised and
contemporary music. Ernst Reijseger and
Roman Borys, cello; James Parker, piano
(DC; $30). 3:00: Music at the Gallery: Trio
Céleste. Works by Haydn, Schoenfield and
Mendelssohn. Iryna Krechkovsky, violin;
Ross Gasworth, cello; Kevin Kwan Loucks,
piano (NG; $30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots:
Inti-Illimani. Instrumental and vocal Latin
American ensemble from Chile (DC; Free).
7:00: Festival Gala. Augustin Dumay. Brahms:
Violin Sonata No.3 in d Op.108; Debussy: Violin
Sonata in g; Ravel: Tzigane; Beethoven: Violin
Sonata No.7 in c Op.30 No.2. Augustin Dumay,
violin; Jean-Claude Vanden Eynden, piano
(DC; $29-$47). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Drew
Jurecka Trio. Jazz music. Drew Jurecka, violin; Mark Kieswetter, piano; Clark Johnston,
double bass (SB; $30).
Jul 25 12:00: Music at Noon: Studio de
musique ancienne de Montréal. Works by
Palestrina, des Prez, Marenzio, de Victoria,
Allegri and Giorgi. Christopher Jackson,
48 | June | July | August, 2015
(DC; $30). 3:00: Music at the Gallery. Sextets
by Haydn, Strauss and Brahms. Gil Sharon,
violin; Jessica Linnebach, violin; David
Thies-Thompson, viola; Ron Ephrat, viola;
Rachel Mercer, cello; Yegor Dyachkov, cello
(NG; $30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots: National
Youth Orchestra of Canada. NYOC concerto
competition winner (DC; Free). 7:00: Next
Generation. Schnittke: Piano Quintet; piano
sonatas by Scarlatti and Beethoven. Pavel
Kolesnikov, piano; Calidore String Quartet
(DC; $35). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Ljova and
the Kontraband. Eastern European and gypsy
melodies, Latin rhythms and jazz-inspired
improvisations. Lev Zhurbin (Ljova), fadolin
and viola; Inna Barmash, vocals; Patrick
Farrell, accordion; Mathias Kunzli, percussion; Jordan Morton, double bass (SB; $30).
Jul 29 12:00: Music at Noon: Queen’s Delights.
Hume: Poeticall Musicke. Les voix humaines
(DC; $30). 1:00: Bring the Kids: Hip Hop
Haydn. Afiara String Quartet (OC; Free). 3:00:
Music at the Gallery. Staniland: Ocean Ranger
(premiere); works by Haydn, Dallapiccola
and Schubert. Duo Concertante; Evelyn Hart,
dancer and narrator (NG; $30). 5:45: Siskind
Snapshots: National Youth Orchestra of
Canada. NYOC chamber ensembles; Stephen
Sitarski, violin and commentator (AC; Free).
7:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
LeBel: new work; R. Strauss: Oboe Concerto
in D; Holst: Planets. Michael Francis, conductor (AC; $20). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Azmeh
and Wijeratne. Improvisations inspired by
music from the Middle East to Bartók. Kinan
Azmeh, clarinet; Dinuk Wijeratne, piano (SB;
$30).
Jul 30 10:00am: Haydnfest III: Haydn in the
Morning. String Quartet Nos. 11, 26 and 55.
St. Lawrence String Quartet (DC; $30). 12:00:
Haydnfest IV: Haydn at Noon. String Quartet
Nos. 37, 49 and 65. Afiara String Quartet
(DC; $30). 1:00: Bring the Kids: Music from
the Hart. Duo Concertante; Evelyn Hart,
dancer and narrator (OC; Free). 5:45: Siskind
Snapshots: Quatuor Danel (DC; Free). 7:00:
St. Lawrence String Quartet. Pal: String
Quartet (world premiere); Haydn: String
Quartet Nos. 23 and 65 “Emperor” (DC; $35).
10:00: Chamberfringe: Playlist. Improvised
set list from Schumann to Reich to hip-hop
and spoken word played without pause.
Afiara String Quartet (SB; $30).
Jul 31 11:00am: Chamberfest in the City.
Boxcar Boys: John Williams, clarinet and
harmonica; Kelsey McNulty, accordion;
Nicolas Buligan, trumpet and tuba; Karl
Silveira, trombone; Justin Ruppel, washboard; Emilyn Stam, violin and accordion
(DO; Free). 12:00: Sound of Change within
the Shadow of War. Stephen Sitarski, violin;
Roman Borys, cello; Hinrich Alpers, piano (DC;
$30). 3:00: Quatuor Danel. String Quartets by
Shostakovich, Beethoven and Weinberg (DC;
$30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots: Nufonia Must
Fall, Live! Kid Koala (Eric San), DJ; Corinne
Merrell, designer (DC; Free). 7:00: Festival
Gala: André Laplante in Recital. Bach: Adagio
from Sonata in C; Mozart: Piano Sonata No.3
in B-flat K281; Schubert: Six moments musicaux D789 Op.94; Beethoven: Sonata No.26 in
E-flat Op.81a; Liszt: Sonata in b (DC; $29-$47).
10:00: Theatrical Events: Kid Koala’s Nufonia
Must Fall, Live! Puppets, live video, scratch
DJ and a string quartet. Kid Koala (Eric San),
DJ and turntables; Afiara String Quartet (ES;
$35).
conductor (DC; $30). 1:00: Alfresco Concerts
I: Drew Jurecka Trio. Jazz music. Drew
Jurecka, violin; Mark Kieswetter, piano; Clark
Johnston, double bass (NG; Free). 3:00:
Alfresco Concerts II: Christine Tassan et
les Imposteurs. Gypsy-style jazz. Christine
Tassan, lead guitar and vocals; Martine
Gaumond, violin and vocals; Lise-Anne Ross,
guitar and vocals; Blanche Baillargeon,
double bass and vocals (NG; Free). 5:45:
Siskind Snapshots: English Orpheus.
Baroque vocal works. Charles Daniels,
tenor; Alexander Weimann, harpsichord
(DC; Free). 7:00: Inti-Illimani. Andean folk
music, Argentinian tango, Brazilian samba
and old Spanish influences (DC; $35). 10:00:
Chamberfringe: Stewart, Mott, and Reijseger.
New jazz to classical and improvisation. Ernst
Reijseger, cello; David Mott, baritone saxophone; Jesse Stewart, percussion (SB; $30).
Jul 26 11:00am: Sacred Spaces: Seven Last
Words. Music by Haydn. St. Lawrence String
Quartet; Colin McFarland, narrator (BC; Free).
1:00: Alfresco Concerts III: Inti-Illimani.
Instrumental and vocal Latin American
ensemble from Chile (NG; Free). 2:00: Rising
Stars. Young performers are adjudicated for
scholarship opportunities (SB; $20). 3:00:
Music at the Gallery: A Stradivarius at the
Opera. Opera highlights for solo violin and
string quartet. Works by Wagner, Puccini,
Tchaikovsky, R. Strauss and others. Alexandre
Da Costa, violin; Amélie Benoit-Bastien,
violin; Ana Drobac, violin; Valérie Arsenault,
viola; Julie Trudeau, cello (NG; $30). 3:00:
Alfresco Concerts IV: Christine Tassan et
les Imposteurs. Gypsy-style jazz. Christine
Tassan, lead guitar and vocals; Martine
Gaumond, violin and vocals; Lise-Anne Ross,
guitar and vocals; Blanche Baillargeon,
double bass and vocals (NG; Free). 7:00:
Theatrical Events: Illusions. Multimedia tour
de force reminiscent of early 20th-century
burlesque and American carnival. Vincent
Ranallo, baritone; Leslie Newman, flute;
James Campbell, clarinet; Ernst Reijseger,
cello; Gryphon Trio; Ensemble Contemporain
de Montréal; Véronique Lacroix, conductor.
Co-production of Ottawa Chamber Music
Society (ES; $35). 10:00: Chamberfringe:
Kings of Swing. James Campbell, clarinet;
Bob DeAngelis, clarinet; Gene DiNovi, piano;
Mike Downes, double bass; Glenn Anderson,
drums (SB; $30).
Jul 27 12:00: Music at Noon: Dyachkov and
Saulnier. Bach: Sonata for Viola da Gamba
and Harpsichord in g BWV1029; Hatzis:
Atonement; Shostakovich: Cello Sonata in d
Op.40. Yegor Dyachkov, cello; Jean Saulnier,
piano (DC; $30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots.
European classical and romantic works.
Gil Sharon, violin; Ron Ephrat, viola (DC;
Free). 7:00: Festival Gala: Dido and Aeneas.
Purcell’s English baroque opera paired
with a Canadian contemporary masque.
Rolfe: Aeneas and Dido. Les Voix Baroques.
Alexander Weimann, conductor (DC; $27$47). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Braid ‘n Strings.
David Braid, jazz compositions and piano;
Sinfonia UK; Lee Tsang, conductor (SB; $30).
Jul 28 10:00am: Haydnfest I: Haydn in the
Morning. String Quartet Nos. 28, 30 “The
Joke” and 25. St. Lawrence String Quartet
(DC: $30). 12:00: Haydnfest II: Haydn at
Noon. String Quartet Nos. 53 “The Lark,” 32
“The Bird” and 43. Calidore String Quartet
Aug 1 10:00am: Haydnfest V: Haydn in the
Morning. String Quartet Nos. 19, 41 “The
Frog” and 67. Cecilia String Quartet (DC; $30).
11:00am: Chamberfest in the City. Boxcar
Boys: John Williams, clarinet and harmonica;
Kelsey McNulty, accordion; Nicolas Buligan,
trumpet and tuba; Karl Silveira, trombone;
Justin Ruppel, washboard; Emilyn Stam, violin
and accordion (DO; Free). 12:00: Haydnfest
VI: Haydn at Noon. String Quartet Nos. 1, 42
and 63 “The Sunrise.” Quatuor Danel (DC;
$30). 3:00: Theatrical Events: Kid Koala’s
Nufonia Must Fall Live! Puppets, live video,
scratch DJ and a string quartet. Kid Koala
(Eric San), DJ and turntables; Afiara String
Quartet (ES; $35). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots:
Against the Grain Theatre. Joel Ivany, stage
director (DC; Free). 7:00: Metamorfosi.
Works by Monteverdi, Kapsberger, Landi,
Rossi Strozzi and Tarquinio. Suzie LeBlanc,
soprano; Constantinople Ensemble (DC;
$35). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Pilar and the
Sicilian Jazz Project. Cross-cultural fusion.
Pilar (Ilaria Patassini), vocals; Michael
Occhipinti, guitar; Don Byron, clarinet; Mark
Kelso, drums; Louis Simão, accordion; Roman
Borys, cello; Annalee Patipatanakoon, violin
(SB; $30).
Aug 2 11:00: Sacred Spaces: Impressions de
France. Works by Grandjany, Saint-Saëns,
Roussel, Hahn, Debussy and Büsser. Julie
Nesrallah, mezzo; Caroline Léonardelli,
harp (BC; Free). 3:00: Music at the Gallery:
Latitude 41. Works by Saint-Saëns, Haydn and
Bodorová. Livia Sohn, violin; Luigi Piovano,
cello; Bernadene Blaha, piano (NG; $30).
5:45: Siskind Snapshots: Microtonal music.
Marc Sabat, composer; Jack Quartet (NG;
$30). 7:00: Beethoven, the Man Within. Eric
Friesen, host; Julie Nesrallah, mezzo; Hinrich
Alpers, piano; Gryphon Trio; Afiara String
Quartet (DC; $34). 10:00: Chamberfringe:
My Turquoise Gaze (Nazar-i Turkwaz).
Adaptations of music from the Middle East,
Turkey, Greece and the Balkans. Maryem
Tollar, Sophia Grigoriadis, Jayne Brown and
Brenna MacCrimmon (SB; $30).
Aug 3 12:00: New Music Now I. Oesterle:
Therefore; Sweat and Mirror notwithstanding; Carter: Two Thoughts About the Piano.
Carla Huhtannen, soprano; Claudia Chan,
piano; Cecilia String Quartet (ES; $30).
1:30: New Music Now II. Nicolaou: Five
Etudes for piano; Steenhuisen: Library on
Fire; Smallwood: Surface Tension; Shaw
Ritornello 2.sq.2.j. Lori Freedman, clarinet;
David Schotzko, percussion; Frédéric Lacroix,
piano; Claudia Chan, piano, Jack String
Quartet (SE; $30). 3:00: New Music Now
III. Sabat: Euler Lattice Spirals; Zorn: The
Alchemist. Gryphon Trio; Jack Quartet (SE;
$30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots. Shary Boyle,
visual artist; Christine Fellows, vocals and
piano (DC; Free). 7:00: Nexus Percussion
and Sepideh Raissadat. Hardin: Moondog
Suite (arr. Hartenberger); Ghassemi: Persion
Songs (arr. Hartenberger); Schickele:
Percussion Sonata No.3. Sepideh Raissadat,
vocals and setar: Dave Young, double bass;
Mark Kieswetter, piano, Nexus (DC; $35).
7:00: Theatrical Events: #UncleJohn.
Mozart’s Don Giovanni reimagined for the 21st
century. Cameron McPhail, baritone (Uncle
John); John Neil Craighead, bass-baritone
(Leporello); Miriam Khalil, soprano (Elvira);
Betty Waynne Allison, soprano (Anna); Sean
Clark, tenor (Ottavio); Against the Grain
thewholenote.com
Theatre; Cecilia String Quartet (TH; $35).
10:00: Chamberfringe: Brothers Creeggan.
Alternative rock/jazz and experimental
music. Jim and Andy Creeggan, multiple
instruments; Ian McLauchland, percussion
(SB; $30).
Aug 4 12:00: New Music Now IV. Sciarrino:
Let me die before I wake; Birtwistle: Ring
a Dumb Carillon; Rzewski: To the Earth;
Zorn: Remedy of Fortune. Carla Huhtannen,
soprano; David Schotzko, percussion; Lori
Freedman, clarinet; Jack Quartet (ES; $30).
1:00: Bring the Kids: Story of Babar. Poulenc:
Story of Babar the Little Elephant. Annie
Lefebvre, narrator; Sarah Hopkin, dancer;
Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano (OC; Free).
1:30: New Music Now V. Eckhardt: Ascension;
Smith: Invisible Cities; Piano Quintet; Barrett:
Interference; Sabat: Automat; Silvestrov:
Hommage à J.S.B. Lori Freedman, clarinet;
Carissa Klopoushak, violin; David Schotzko,
percussion; Frédéric Lacroix, piano; Gryphon
Trio; Jack Quartet (SE; $30). 3:00: New Music
Now VI: Sabat: Jean-Philippe Rameau; Vivier:
Piece for Violin and Piano; Oesterle: Emmy
Noether; Lizée: Sculptress; Silvestrov: Violin
Sonata; Carissa Klopoushak, violin; Frédéric
Lacroix, piano; Jack Quartet, Standing
Wave (ES; $30). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots.
Eybler String Quartet (DC; Free). 7:00:
Israeli Chamber Project. Khachaturian: Trio;
Schumann: Drei Fantasiestücke; Bartók;
Contrasts; Schubert: Violin Sonata in a
D385. Tibi Cziger, clarinet; Itamar Zorman,
violin; Assaff Weisman, piano (DC; 35). 7:00:
Theatrical Events: #UncleJohn. Mozart’s
Don Giovanni reimagined for the 21st
century. Cameron McPhail, baritone (Uncle
John); John Neil Craighead, bass-baritone
(Leporello); Miriam Khalil, soprano (Elvira);
Betty Waynne Allison, soprano (Anna); Sean
Clark, tenor (Ottavio); Against the Grain
Theatre; Cecilia String Quartet (TH; $35).
10:00: Chamberfringe: Caine and Kortgaard.
Favourite songs of musical theatre leading
ladies. Music by Gershwin, Sondheim,
Webber and Schönberg. Rebecca Caine,
soprano; Robert Kortgaard, piano (SB; $30).
Aug 5: 10:00am: Haydnfest VII: Haydn in
the Morning. String Quartet Nos. 34 and
29; Quartet in F from 6 String Quartets.
Eybler String Quartet (DC; $30). 12:00
Haydnfest VIII: Haydn at Noon. String Quartet
Nos. 66 and 3; Quartet in C from 6 String
Quartets. Eybler String Quartet (DC; $30).
3:00: Theatrical Events: Spell to Bring Lost
Creatures Home. Series of vignettes tell stories that reconnect us with a sense of shared
history and common humanity. Shary Boyle,
visual artist; Christine Fellows, vocals and
piano; Gryphon Trio (AC; $35). 5:45: Siskind
Snapshots. Against the Grain Theatre (DC;
Free). 7:00: Danish String Quartet. Romantic
repertoire and Scandinavian folk music (DC;
$35). 10:00: Chamberfringe: Wood Works.
Repertoire from quartet’s recording of traditional Nordic arrangements. Danish String
Quartet (SB; $30).
Aug 6 12:00: Music at Noon: Charles RichardHamelin, piano (DC; $30). 3:00: Theatrical
Events: #UncleJohn. Mozart’s Don Giovanni
reimagined for the 21st century. Cameron
McPhail, baritone (Uncle John); John Neil
Craighead, bass-baritone (Leporello); Miriam
Khalil, soprano (Elvira); Betty Waynne Allison,
soprano (Anna); Sean Clark, tenor (Ottavio);
Against the Grain Theatre; Cecilia String
thewholenote.com
Quartet (TH; $35). 5:45: Siskind Snapshots.
Montreal Guitar Trio; California Guitar Trio
(DC; Free). 7:00: Montreal Guitar Trio and
California Guitar Trio. Two renowned guitar
trios perform together representing artists
from four countries. Festival closes with
original works, arrangements of progressive
rock, world, jazz and classical music (DC;
$35).
trumpet; Jodi Proznick, bass; David Restivo,
piano; Eli Bennett, tenor saxophone; Ian
Wright, drums (RT; $38). 10:00: TBA (SM).
10:30: Robi Botos Trio (TB; reservations:
613-654-9996).
Aug 14 1:00-4:00: Hannah Barstow Trio (HE).
2:00: [lecture] “Where are the Women in
Jazz?” Talk by Jodi Proznick (BC; Free). 4:00:
Rising Young Star Performance (SA; Free).
5:00-7:00: Hannah Barstow, solo piano (WH).
7:30: TD Young Jazz Series. Thorn Mason Trio
(WH). 8:00: Guido Basso and Shakura S’Aida.
Neil Swainson, bass; Robi Botos, piano; Brian
Barlow, drums (RT; $38). 10:00: Mike Francis
Duo (SM; reservations: 613-399-2498).
10:30: Robi Botos Trio (TB; reservations:
613-654-9996).
Aug 15 10:00am: TBC (GC; Free). 12:00: TD
Young Jazz Series. Alec Trent 2 Tenor Quartet
(SA; Free). 11:30: Jazz Van. Dixie Demons on
van travel to different locations (WF; Free).
1:00: Jazz Van (BU; Free). 2:00: Jazz Van (RR;
Free). 3:00: Jazz Van (HE; Free). 1:00-4:00:
Mike Francis Duo (HE). 1:00-5:00: Harry
Ellis Trio (RV). 1:30-4:00: Starpainters (TD).
1:30-4:30: Ian Wright & James Hill (SV).
2:00: Remembering Billie Holiday. Marika
Galea Quartet (MM; $25). 5:00-7:00: Hannah
Barstow, solo piano (WH). 7:30: TD Young
Jazz Series. Kalya Ramu Quartet (WH). 8:00:
Oliver Jones with the Doxas Brothers (RT;
$38). 10:00: Mike Francis Duo (SM; reservations: 613-399-2498). 10:30: Robi Botos Trio
(TB; reservations: 613-654-9996).
Aug 16 10:30am: Jazz Mass with the Brian
Barlow Quartet. Robi Botos, piano; Jodi
Proznick, bass; Chet Doxas, saxophone (MM).
12:00-3:00: Starpainters (HW). 1:00-4:00:
Canadian Jazz Quartet (HE). 1:00-4:00:
Dan Bone Trio (CC). 2:00: TD Young Jazz
Series. Chris Platt Guitar Trio (SA; Free).
5:00-7:00: Hannah Barstow, solo piano (WH).
8:00: ‘Best of the Best’ – Brian Barlow Big
Band. Featuring Bob DeAngelis, clarinet and
Guido Basso, trumpet. Music of Goodman,
Gershwin, McConnell, Ellington and Basie
(RT; $38).
Panamania – Arts and
Culture Celebration 2015
July 10 to 26 and Aug 7 to 15
toronto2015.org/panamania
PANAMANIA is comprised of four major
programs:
July 10 to August 15 – PANAMANIA Presentations featuring national and international
performances and exhibitions, including 28
commissioned world premieres, presented
across Toronto
July 11 to 26 and August 7 to 12 – PANAMANIA
Live @ Nathan Phillips Square
July 11 to 25 – CIBC Pan Am Park
July 11 to 25 – PANAMANIA Live @ The Distillery District
Prince Edward County Jazz Festival
August 11- August 16
BC – Books and Company, 289 Main St.,
Picton, ON K0K 2T0
BU – Bloomfield United Church, 272 Main St.,
Bloomfield, ON K0K 1G0
CC – County Cider Company, 657 Bongards X
Rd., Waupoos, ON K0K 2T0
GC – Glenwood Chapel, 47 Ferguson St.,
Picton, ON K0K 2T0
HE – Huff Estates Winery, 2274 County Rd 1,
Bloomfield, ON K0K 1G0
HW – Harwood Estate Winery, 18908 Loyalist
Pkwy, Hillier, ON K0K 2J0
MM – St. Mary Magdalene Church, 335 Main
St., Picton, ON K0K 2T0
RR – Rosehall Run Vineyards, 1243 Greer Rd.,
Wellington, ON K0K 3L0
RT – Regent Theatre 224 Main St., Picton, ON
K0K 1G0
RV – Redtail Vineyard, 422 Partridge Hollow
Road, Consecon, ON K0K 2J0
SA – St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 31
King St., Picton, ON K0K 2T0
SM – Stache on Main, 287 Main St.,
Wellington, ON K0K 3L0
SV – Sugarbush Vineyards, 1286 Wilson Rd.,
Hillier, ON K0K 2J0
TB – The Beck & Call, 252 Main St., Picton, ON
K0K 2T0
TD – Three Dog Winery, 1920 Fish Lake Rd.,
Picton, ON K0K 2T0
WF – Wellington Farmers’ Market, 245 Main
St., Wellington, ON K0K 3L0
WH – Waring House, 395 Sandy Hook Rd.,
Picton, ON K0K 2T0
613-476-8416 x28 or 1-877-411-4761
pecjazz.org
Aug 11 7:00: Miles Davis: the making of ‘Kind
of Blue’. Talk and film presentation with Brian
Barlow (BC; Free).
Aug 12 6:00: Jazz Dinner with Bob DeAngelis
Quartet. Bob DeAngelis, clarinet; John
MacLeod, cornet; Robi Botos, piano; Jodi
Proznick, bass; Brian Barlow, drums. 6:00:
Dinner 8:00: Concert. (HE; $75 reservation
required).
Aug 13 1:00-4:00: Dan Bone Trio (HW).
8:00: ‘Kind of Blue’ – Music of Miles Davis.
Remi Bolduc, alto saxophone; Steve McDade,
Stratford Summer Music
July 20 to August 30
AP – Arden Park Hotel, 552 Ontario St.,
Stratford, ON N5A 3J3
DT – Downtown Stratford
KC – Knox Church, 142 Ontario St., Stratford,
ON N5A 3H2
LQ – Lower Queen’s Park, Lakeside Dr.,
between Front & Queen St.’s, Stratford
MB – MusicBarge, Avon River at York St.,
Stratford
PR – The Prune Restaurant, 151 Albert St.,
Stratford, ON N5A 3K5
RC – Royal Canadian Legion, 207 St. Patrick
St., Stratford, ON N5A 1B2
RH – Revival House Restaurant, 70 Brunswick
St., Stratford, ON N5A 3L9
SA – St. Andrew’s Church, 25 St. Andrew St.,
Stratford, ON N5A 1A2
SJ – St. James Church, 41 Mornington St.,
Stratford, ON N5A 5E7
SC – Stratford Cinema, 551 Huron St.,
Stratford, ON N5A 5T9
TP – Tom Patterson Island, Avon River,
Stratford
UW – University of Waterloo, Stratford
Campus, 125 St. Patrick St., Stratford, ON
N5A 0C1
WA – William Allman Arena, 15 Morenz Dr.,
Stratford, ON N5A 4B7
1-866-288-4313
stratfordsummermusic.ca
Live at Revival House Cabaret Series: 4
cabarets $140
Illustrated Musical Lecture Series: 4 lectures
$60
Classical Piano Series: 3 different recitals $99
All Concerts: University/College Students
$10; EyeGO Secondary Students $5
Jul 20 9:30pm: Season Launch: Fireworks to
Music for a Midsummer’s Night (LQ; Free).
Jul 22 7:00: Classical Tattoo of the Americas.
National Youth Orchestra and Youth
Orchestra of the Americas in partnership
with L’Orchestre de la Francophonie (WA;
PWYC).
Jul 23 7:00: Blind Boys of Alabama. Ben
Heppner (KC; $40).
Jul 25 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo
Violin Partitas. Partita No.2 in d BWV1002.
Julia Wedman, violin (PR; $49.50; includes
brunch). 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret:
Rebecca Caine with Robert Kortgaard, piano
(RH; $40).
supported by major local spon
REGENT THEATRE
PICTON, ONTARIO
Box office
613-476-8416 ext 28
orpecjazz.org
1-877-411-4761
real jazz, real excitement
AUGUST 12
AUGUST 13
AUGUST 14
AUGUST 15
Jazz Dinner – Bob DeAngelis Quintet
Kind of Blue – the music of Miles Davis
Guido Basso & Shakura S’Aida
St. Mary
• Tribute to Billie Holiday at
Magdelene
• Oliver Jones Quartet
AUGUST 16 The Brian Barlow Big Band
Best of the Best – the music of Basie,
Gershwin, Ellington & Goodman
June | July | August, 2015 | 49
Summer Festivals
Jul 26 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo
Violin Partitas. Partita No.2 in d BWV1002.
Julia Wedman, violin (PR; $49.50; includes
brunch).
Jul 27-28: 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson
Island turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP;
Free).
Jul 29 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson Island
turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP; Free).
11:15am: [lecture] Illustrated Musical Lecture
No.1 with Robert Harris: Music of Rodgers &
Hammerstein and the Sound of Music (UW;
$20). 2:00pm: International Piano Series:
Paul Lewis (SA; $40).
Jul 30 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson Island
turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP; Free).
12:30: Sultans of String (MB; Free).
Jul 31 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson Island
turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP; Free).
12:30: Sultans of String (MB; Free).
Aug 1: 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson Island
turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP; Free).
10:00am: Sing-a-long Sound of Music (SC;
$15). 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo
Violin Sonatas. Sonata No.1 in g BWV1001.
Aisslinn Nosky, violin (PR; $49.50; includes
brunch). 12:30 & 3:00: Sultans of String (MB;
Free). 7:00: Whiskey Jack Salutes Canadian
Country Legend Gordie Tapp (RC; $30).
Aug 2 9:00am-5:00: Tom Patterson Island
turns into Tom Percussion Island (TP; Free).
11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo Violin
Sonatas. Sonata No.1 in g BWV1001. Aisslinn
Nosky, violin (PR; $49.50; includes brunch).
12:30 & 3:00: Sultans of String (MB; Free).
Aug. 3-4 8:00: World Famous Glenn Miller
Orchestra. (AP; $45).
Aug. 5 11:15am: [lecture] Illustrated Musical
Lecture No.2 with Robert Harris: The Music
of R. Murray Schafer (UW; $20).
Aug. 6 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Heavyweights Brass
Band. (MB; Free). 7:00: Coronation of George
II. Theatre of Early Music. Daniel Taylor,
conductor (SJ; $40).
Aug 7 7:00am: Schafer at Dawn: Music for
an Avon Morning (TP; Free). 10:00am: Play
Me I’m Yours. Street Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30:
Heavyweights Brass Band (MB; Free). 10:00:
Schafer at Twilight: The Sacred Music of R.
Murray Schafer (SJ; $40).
Aug 8 7:00am: Schafer at Dawn: Music
for an Avon Morning (TP; Free). 10:00am:
50 | June | July | August, 2015
performance (RH; $99; includes brunch).
Aug 17 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 7:00: Great Lake Swimmers
with Trent Severn Opening (KC, $30).
Aug 18 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free).
Aug 19 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours.
Street Pianos (DT; Free). 11:15am: [lecture]
Illustrated Musical Lecture No.4 with Robert
Harris: Bach’s Partitas and Sonatas (UW;
$20). 7:00: International Piano Series: Janina
Fialkowska (SA; $40).
Aug 20 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:00: Tivoli on Parade.
Downtown march (DT; Free). 12:30: Tivoli
Boys Guard Band. Denmark (MB; Free).
Aug 21 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Ontario Youth Choir.
(MB; Free).
Aug 22 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Partitas. Partita No.1 in b
BWV1006. Cristina Zacharias, violin (PR;
$49.50; includes brunch). 12:00: Tivoli on
Parade. Downtown march (DT; Free). 12:30 &
3:00: Tivoli Boys Guard Band. Denmark (MB;
Free). 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret:
Newfoundland Jazz Celidh with Heather
Bambrick (RH; $40).
Aug 23 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Partitas. Partita No.1 in b
BWV1006. Cristina Zacharias, violin (PR;
$49.50; includes brunch). 12:00: Tivoli on
Parade. Downtown march (DT; Free) 12:30
& 3:00: Tivoli Boys Guard Band. Denmark
(MB; Free).
Aug 24 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free).
Aug 27 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Langley Ukulele
Ensemble (MB; Free) 7:00: Jan Lisiecki,
piano with Annex Quartet. Beethoven: Piano
Concerto No.1 in C & No.3 in c (SA; $40).
Aug 28 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Langley Ukulele
Ensemble (MB; Free) 7:00: Jan Lisiecki,
piano with Annex Quartet. Beethoven: Piano
Concerto No.2 in B-flat & No.4 in G (SA; $40).
Aug 29 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Sonatas. Sonata No.3
in C BWV1005. Julia Wedman, violin (PR;
$49.50; includes brunch). 12:30 & 3:00:
Langley Ukulele Ensemble (MB; Free). 7:00:
Jan Lisiecki, piano with Annex Quartet.
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.5 in E-flat
“Emperor” (SA; $40). 9:00: Live at Revival
House Cabaret: Micah Barnes and Friends
(RH; $40).
Aug 30 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Sonatas. Sonata No.3 in C
BWV1005. Julia Wedman, violin (PR; $49.50;
includes brunch). 12:30: Pipes & Drums of
Stratford Police Service (MB; Free). 2:00:
The Stratford Six: An Afternoon of Operatic
Delights. Philip Addis, Roger Honeywell, Gary
Relyea, Lutzen Riedstra, Drew Santini and
James Westman. (SA; $40). 4:00: Play Me I’m
Yours closes (DT; Free).
Play Me I’m Yours. Street Pianos (DT; Free).
11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo Violin
Sonatas. Sonata No. 2 in a BWV1003. Cristina
Zacharias, violin (PR; $49.50; includes
brunch). 12:30 & 3:00: Heavyweights Brass
Band (MB; Free). 9:00: Live at Revival House
Cabaret: Carole Pope (RH; $40).
Aug 9 7:00am: Schafer at Dawn: Music
for an Avon Morning (TP; Free). 10:00am:
Play Me I’m Yours. Street Pianos (DT; Free).
11:00am: Musical Brunch: Bach Solo Violin
Sonatas. Sonata No. 2 in a BWV1003. Cristina
Zacharias, violin (PR; $49.50; includes
brunch). 12:30 & 3:00: Heavyweights Brass
Band (MB; Free). 2:00: Great Opera Arias.
Michael Schade, tenor. (SA; $40).
Aug 10-11 10:00am: [workshop] Vocal
Academy (SA). 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours.
Street Pianos (DT; Free).
Aug 12 10:00am: [workshop] Vocal Academy
(SA). 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:15am: [lecture]
Illustrated Musical Lecture No. 3 with Robert
Harris: Mozart’s Magic Flute (UW; $20). 2:00:
[lecture] Harry Somers Forum: Opera at
the Movies. Guest Speaker: Barbara Willis
Sweete (UW; Free).
Aug 13 10:00am: [workshop] Vocal Academy
(SA). 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Dan Stacey and the
Black Swans (MB; Free).
Aug 14 10:00am: [workshop] Vocal Academy
(SA). 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 12:30: Dan Stacey and
the Black Swans (MB; Free). 6:30: Magic
Flute. Mozart. Opera sung in English. Dinner
performance (RH; $99; includes dinner).
Aug 15 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours. Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Partitas. Partita No.3 in E
BWV1004. Aisslinn Nosky, violin (PR; $49.50;
includes brunch). 12:30: Dan Stacey and the
Black Swans (MB; Free). 2:00: Vocal Academy
Final Concert (SA; PWYC). 6:30: Magic
Flute. Mozart. Opera sung in English. Dinner
performance (RH; $99; includes dinner).
Aug 16 10:00am: Play Me I’m Yours, Street
Pianos (DT; Free). 11:00am: Musical Brunch:
Bach Solo Violin Partitas. Partita No.3 in E
BWV1004. Aisslinn Nosky, violin (PR; $49.50;
includes brunch). 12:30 & 3:00: Dan Stacey
and the Black Swans (MB; Free). 12:00: Magic
Flute. Mozart. Opera sung in English. Brunch
Summer Music in the Garden
July 2 to September 13
Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W.,
Toronto, ON M5V 3G3
416-973-4000
harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic
All concerts: Free
Jul 2 7:00: Dewe’igan: Two-Spirited First
Nations Women and the Drum. Inter-tribal
gathering of Two-Spirited First Nations
women. Songs celebrating life and the heartbeat of Mother Earth. Barbara Croall: new
work for pipigwan (cedar flute).
Jul 5 4:00: Guided by Voices. J.S. Bach: Suite 6
for solo cello; transcriptions of violin music by
Telemann and Benda; new Canadian works by
Godin and Ceccarelli. Elinor Frey, cello.
Jul 9 7:00: An Evening with Calum Graham.
Guitar and original songs.
Jul 12 4:00: Colourful Clouds Eating the
Moon. Musical tapestry of Chinese, Flamenco,
Galician and Jewish traditions. Liron Man,
hand pans and flamenco guitar; Lan Tung, erhu
and vocals; Jonathan Bernard, percussion.
Jul 16 7:00: Covent Garden in the Music
Garden. Music by Handel and his rivals, originally heard 300 years ago at London’s Covent
Garden Opera House. Elinor Frey, baroque
cello; Borys Medicky, harpsichord.
Jul 19 4:00: Sublime Schubert. String Quintet
in C D956. Shauna Rolston, cello; Cecilia String
Quartet.
Jul 23 7:00: Jayme Stone’s Lomax Project, Part
II. Four roots musicians pay tribute to pioneer
folklorist Alan Lomax. Jayme Stone, banjo;
Margaret Glaspy, voice and guitar; Tatiana
Hargreaves, fiddle and voice; Joe Phillips, bass.
Jul 30 7:00: Impressions. Ravel: String
Quartet in F; Rowson: String Quartet No.1. Ton
Beau String Quartet.
Aug 9 4:00: Choro: Brazilian Soul Music. Tio
Chorinho, Canada’s only choro ensemble.
Aug 13 7:00: Summer Breezes. Rossini:
Overture to Cinderella; Barber: Summer
Music; new Canadian works by Lau and
Estacio. Blythwood Winds.
Aug 16 4:00: Ragas by the Lake. Monsoon
Trio performs classical Hindustani ragas on
modified Western instruments. Jonathan Kay,
tenor saxophone and bansuri; Andrew Kay,
alto saxophone; Justin Gray, bass veena; guest:
Ravi Naimpally, tabla
Aug 20 7:00: There and Back: Roots and
Original Music from Scotland and Appalachia.
Celtic, Old Time, European and original
music with an old and contemporary sound.
Coracree.
Aug 23 4:00: Un Brin de Fantaisie: Italian
Instrumental Music of the Early Baroque.
Works by Castello, Frescobaldi, Kapsberger,
Pittoni Ferrarese and others. Ensemble La
Cigale.
Aug 27 7:00: Ancient Echoes, New Beats.
Nagata Shachu, Japanese taiko drums.
Aug 30 4:00: Silk and Bamboo. Chinese
music from village and court, from the Qing
Dynasty to the recent era. Wen Zhao, pipa and
lute; Ziwen Qin, guzhengand zither; Di Zhang,
yangqin and dulcimer.
Sep 3 7:00: Arrelumbre: Light after Dark.
Music of Mediterranean lands including
Flamenco, Balkan, Sephardic, Turkish and
original works. Tamar Ilana, vocals.
Sep 13 4:00: Grassy Roads, Wandering Feet.
Fusion of Celtic, Bluegrass, Old Time and
Nordic traditions. Bombadils.
thewholenote.com
Summer Opera Lyric Theatre
July 31 to August 9
Toronto, ON
416-922-2912
solt.ca
For further information see Green Pages and
GTA listings.
Sun Life Financial Uptown
Waterloo Jazz Festival
July 17 to 19
Waterloo, ON
519-835-1921
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
TBSI Free Concerts
June 5 to 17
GC – Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale
Rd., Toronto, ON, M4V 1X4
JL – Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s
Centre, 427 Bloor Street W., Toronto, ON,
M5S 1X7
WH – Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,
80 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C5
416-705-4432
tafelmusik.org/tbsf
Free Admission
Jun 5 8:00: Tafelmusik Baroque Summer
Festival: Delightfully Baroque. Tafelmusik
Baroque Orchestra and Chamber
Choir. Works by Purcell, Handel, Bach, Marais
and Telemann. Ann Monoyios, soprano;
Peter Harvey, baritone; Jeanne Lamon &
Ivars Taurins, conductors (JL). First-come,
first-seated. Doors open 15 minutes prior to
concert.
Jun 10 12:30: Tafelmusik Baroque Summer
Festival: Musical Interlude. Tafelmusik
Baroque Orchestra and Chamber
Choir. Members of the TBSI faculty (WH).
First-come, first-seated. Doors open 15
minutes prior to concert.
Jun 14 1:00: Tafelmusik Baroque Summer
Festival: TBSI Orchestras and Choirs.
Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber
Choir. Works by Campra, Locke, Fasch, J.
Christoph, J. S. Bach and others. Jeanne
Lamon, Peter Harvey, and Ivars Taurins,
conductors (WH). First-come, first-seated.
Doors open 15 minutes prior to concert.
Jun 17 7:30: Tafelmusik Baroque Summer
Festival: The Grand Finale. Tafelmusik
Baroque Orchestra and Chamber
Choir. Charpentier: Mass for choir and
orchestra; works by Handel and Rameau.
TBSI Participants & Faculty; Jeanne Lamon
and Ivars Taurins, conductors (GC). Ticket
required, available at Tafelmusik Box Office,
427 Bloor St. W. on June 11 at 10am. Max 2
per person.
(HT; $24.50).
June 23 12:30 Patricia Cano (NP). 6:30
Chelsea McBride’s Socialist Night School
(NP). 23 8:00: Robert Glasper Trio (JM; $40).
8:00: Phil Dwyer Trio (JB; $29). 8:00: Kurt
Elling (KH; $44.50-$52.50). 8:30: Christian
McBride Big Band (NP; $43.50).
June 24 12:30 Ian McDougall 12-tet (NP).
6:30 Ikebe Shakedown (NP). 8:00: An Evening with Branford Marsalis (JM; $65.50).
8:00: Sinal Aberto (JB; $25.50). 8:00: Radio
Deluxe. John Pizzarelli Quartet; Jessica
Molaskey; guest: Alex Pangman (KH; $52.50$57.50). 8:30: Booker T (NP; $34).
June 25 12:30 Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra Feat Ingrid Jensen (NP). 6:30 Hilario
Duran Quintet Feat. Ignacio Berroa (NP).
8:00: Dave Holland, Lionel Loueke, Chris Potter & Eric Harland Quartet (JM; $57.50).
8:00: Duches (JB; $35.50). 8:30: Al Di
Meola Elegant Gypsy & More Electric Tour
(NP; $34.00). 10:00: Garland Jeffreys (HT;
$24.50).
June 26 12:30 Bobby Rice Latin Jazz Big Band
(NP). 6:30 Malika Tirolien (NP). 7:30: Jackie
Richardson & Friends (HS; $34.50). 8:00:
Charles Lloyd featuring Gerald Clayton, Joe
Sanders & Kendrick Scott (JM; $65.50). 8:00
& 10:00: Freddy Cole Quartet (JB; $35.50).
Snarky Puppy (NP; $28). 10:00: Sonny Knight
& the Lakers (HT; $24.50).
June 27 12:30 Youth Jazz Showcase w/North
Pandemic Groove Quartet, George Garzone
& The Berklee Student Ensemble, National
Youth Jazz Combo (NP). 2:00 York University Jazz Orchestra led by Mike Cado Feat.
Kevin Turcotte (NP). 2:45 Jazz FM91 Youth Big
Band (NP). 3:30 Victor Vrankulj Quintet (NP).
6:30 Raoul & The Bigger Time. (NP). 7:30:
Jackie Richardson & Friends (HS; $35.50).
8:00 & 10:30: Freddy Cole Quartet (JB;
$35.50). 8:30: Gary Clark Jr. (NP; $59.50).
Jun 29 8:00: Jamie Cullum (KH;
$69.50-$79.50).
For further information see Green Pages
listings.
TD Toronto Jazz Festival
June 18 to 29
HS – Home Smith Bar at The Old Mill, 21 Old
Mill Rd., Toronto, ON M8X 1G5
HT – Horseshoe Tavern, 370 Queen St. W.,
Toronto, ON M5V 2A2
JB – Jazz Bistro, 251 Victoria St., Toronto, ON
M5B 1T8
JM – Jane Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence
Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E., Toronto,
ON M5E 1B4
KH – Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., Toronto,
ON M5S 1W2
NP – Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto Star
Stage, 100 Queen St. W., Toronto, ON M5H
2N2
1-888-655-9090 or 416-408-0208 (Koerner
Hall)
torontojazz.com
Ticket prices do not include service charge
Jun 18 8:00: Oscar Peterson 90th Birthday
Celebration. Oscar Peterson Quartet; Alvin
Queen; Ulf Wakenius; Robi Botos; guest:
Christian McBride (JM; $52.50-$75). 8:00:
Renee Rosnes Quartet (JB; $35.50).
Jun 19 7:30: Heather Bamrick & Friends (HS;
$35.50). 8:00: Renee Rosnes Quartet (JB;
$35.50).
Jun 20 7:30: Heather Bambrick & Friends
(HS; $35.50). 8:00 & 10:30: Renee Rosnes
Quartet (JB; $35.50). 8:30: Tower of Power
(NP; $49).
June 21 12:30 Toronto Mass Choir (NP).
2:00 RPSM Animates the Square (NP).
6:30 Jivebombers (NP). 8:00: Fred Hersch
Trio (JB; $43.50). 8:30: Legendary Count
Basie Orchestra. Scotty Barnhart, director;
guest: Carmen Bradford, vocals (NP; $43.50).
June 22 12:30 Jim Galloway’s Wee Big Band
under the direction of Martin Loomer (TS).
6:30 Soul Understated Feat. Mavis ‘Swan’
Poole (NP).8:00: Drew Jurecka’s Gypsy
Swing Quartet (JB; $17.00). 8:30: Al Jarreau (NP; $59.50). 10:00: Mike Stern Trio
Toronto Summer Music
“The New World”
July 16 to August 9
IB – Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles St. W.,
Toronto, ON M5S 2C7
KH – Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., Toronto,
ON M5S 1V6
DANISH
STRING
QUARTET
Aug 4 at Koerner Hall
GARRICK
OHLSSON
KARITA
MATTILA
IN RECITAL
July 23
Koerner Hall
Aug 7 at Koerner Hall
thewholenote.com
WH – Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,
80 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C5
416-408-0208
torontosummermusic.com
Festival Pass: $567-$774; $516-$740(over 65)
includes picnic July 22
Flex Pass: 5 to 9 concerts: save 15%; 10 or
more concerts: save 20%
Jul 16 7:30: Americans in Paris. Gershwin:
Rhapsody in Blue; Copland: Appalachian
Spring; Clarinet Concerto. Measha
Brueggergosman, soprano; Yao Guang Zhai,
clarinet; John Novacek, piano; TSM Festival
Ensemble. KH; $32-$79; $20-$69(under 35).
Jul 17 7:30: Hollywood Connection. Dvořák:
String Quartet No.12 Op.96; Barber: Dover
Beach; Antheil: Violin Sonata No.2; Korngold:
Quintet for piano and strings. Mark Fewer,
violin; Axel Strauss, violin; Paul Coletti, viola;
Denise Djokic, cello; John Novacek, piano;
Peter McGillivray, baritone. WH; $47; $42$44(sr); $20(under 35).
Jul 18 4:00 & 7:00: Mentors & Fellows. Artist
mentors share the stage with TSM Chamber
Music Institute Fellows. Mark Fewer, violin;
Axel Strauss, violin; Paul Coletti, viola; Denise
Djokic, cello; John Novacek, piano. WH; $35;
$31(sr); $15(under 35).
Jul 21 7:30: YOA Orchestra of the Americas
with Ingrid Fliter. Ensemble representing
25 countries of the western hemisphere.
Dvořák: New World Symphony; Chávez:
Sinfonia India; Ravel: Piano Concerto in G.
Ingrid Fliter, piano; Carlos Miguel Prieto.
In partnership with Toronto 2015 Pan
Am/Parapan Am Games. KH; $32-$79;
$20-$69(under 35).
Jul 22 6:30: Canadian National Brass Project.
18 brass players from orchestras in Toronto,
Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa, Winnipeg
and Edmonton. Mussorgsky: Pictures at
an Exhibition; Bernstein: Suite from West
Side Story; new commissioned works by
Tovey, Cable and Lizée. James Sommerville,
conductor. WH; $47; $44(sr); $20(under
35). 8:30: Danilo Perez, piano. Works by
Durán, Occhipinti and world premiere of a
new composition by Perez. Co-presented by
PANAMANIA and Lula Music and Arts Centre.
KH; $32-$79; $20-$69(under 35).
Jul 23 7:30: Garrick Ohlsson, piano. Works
by Scriabin and Beethoven. KH; $32-$79;
$20-$69(under 35).
Jul 24 12:00 & 4:30: TSM Academy Art of
THE
LAST
FIVE
YEARS
July 29 & 30
Isabel Bader Theatre
June | July | August, 2015 | 51
Summer Festivals
Song Recitals. Artist mentors share the stage
with Art of Song Fellows. Soile Isokoski,
Martin Katz and Steven Philcox. WH; $35;
$31(sr); $15(under 35). 7:30: Tribute to
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. Music commissioned by American Arts patron. Works by
Prokofiev, Bloch, Britten, and Poulenc. Ernst
Kovacic, violin; Jonathan Crow, violin; Steven
Dann, viola, Henrik Brendstrup, cello, Joanna
G’froerer, flute; Huw Watkins, piano. WH; $47;
$44(sr); $20(under 35).
Jul 25 4:00 & 7:00: Mentors & Fellows. Artist
mentors share the stage with TSM Chamber
Music Institute Fellows. Huw Watkins, piano;
Ernst Kovacic, violin; Jonathan Crow, violin;
Steven Dann, viola; Henrik Brendstrup, cello.
WH; $35; $31(sr); $15(under 35).
Jul 28 7:30: American Avant-Garde. Works
by Ives, Cage, Feldman and Zorn. Harumi
Rhodes, violin; Pedja Muzijevic, piano; Afiara
String Quartet. WH; $47; $44(sr); $20(under
35).
Jul 29 & 30 7:30: Last Five Years. Musical
about two New Yorkers who fall in and out of
love. Music by Jason Robert Brown. Aaron
Sheppard; Vanessa Oude Reimerink. IB; $31$60; $20-$60(under 35).
Jul 31 7:30: American Romantic. Barber:
String Quartet Op. 11; Dvořák: String Quintet
in E-flat; Beach: Piano Quintet in f-sharp.
Martin Beaver, violin; Harumi Rhodes, violin;
Eric Nowlin, viola, Mark Kosower, cello; Pedja
Celebrating New Traditions
Fiddler on the Roof
Stewart Goodyear
La traviata
Valérie Milot
Marie-Josée Lord
The Good Lovelies
and more…
705-653-5508 1-877-883-5777
W W W. W E S T B E N . C A
opening act: Frank Moore. Singer-songwriter.
Music from latest album “No Dark No Light”. TB;
$23; $15(st); $5(youth).
Jun 20 2:00: A Lot of Hot Airs. Concert Band
of Cobourg; Westben Wind Ensembles, Paul
Storms and Nancy Elmhirst, conductors. TB;
$15; $5(st/youth).
Jun 21 1:00: Garden Gala Fundraiser. Heather
Bambrick, jazz singer; Brian Barlow Trio. TG;
$100.
Jul 2 7:00: La traviata. Verdi. Sung in Italian
with English captions. UBC Opera Ensemble;
Westben Festival Chamber Orchestra and
Chorus. 6:00: Pre-concert chat. TB; $59;
$57(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 3 2:00: La traviata. Verdi. Sung in Italian
with English captions. UBC Opera Ensemble;
Westben Festival Chamber Orchestra and
Chorus. 1:00: Pre-concert chat. TB; $59;
$57(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). 7:00: [workshop]
Shooting Artists with Gary: Gary Mulcahey on
photographing artists. Workshop on the art of
photographing musicians using members of the
UBC Opera Ensemble. CT; see website for ticket
packages.
Jul 4 10:00am: [workshop] Shooting Artists
with Gary: Gary Mulcahey on photographing
artists. Workshop on the art of photographing
musicians using members of the UBC Opera
Ensemble. CT; see website for ticket packages.
2:00: La traviata. Verdi. Sung in Italian with
English captions. UBC Opera Ensemble;
Westben Festival Chamber Orchestra and
Chorus. 1:00: Pre-concert chat. TB; $59;
$57(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 5 2:00: La traviata. Verdi. Sung in Italian
with English captions. UBC Opera Ensemble;
Westben Festival Chamber Orchestra and
Chorus. 1:00: Pre-concert chat. TB; $59;
$57(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 9 7:00: Improv All Stars. Linda Kash & TV
Friends. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 10 7:00: The Good Lovelies. Folk music with
humour. Caroline Brooks; Kerri Ough; Sue
Passmore. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 11 11:00am: Cello Mania. Young cellists
around the concessions at the Incredible
Edibles Festival. CT; Free. 2:00: Chopin for a
New Generation. Top three prize-winners of
2014 Canadian Chopin Competition. Alexander
Seredenko, Tony Yike Yang and Victoria Wong.
1:00: pre-concert chat. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 12 2:00: Shauna Rolston & Heather Schmidt.
Cello and piano duo with young cellists from
Shauna Rolston’s studio. de Falla: Suite populaire
espangnole; Chopin Sonata in g; other works by
H. Schmidt. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 16 7:00: Romancing the Harp. Valérie Milot,
Muzijevic, piano. WH; $47; $44(sr); $20(under
35).
Aug 1 4:00 & 7:00: Mentors & Fellows. Artist
mentors share the stage with TSM Chamber
Music Institute Fellows. Martin Beaver, violin;
Harumi Rhodes, violin; Eric Nowlin, viola;
Mark Kosower, cello; Pedja Muzijevic, piano.
WH; $35; $31(sr); $15(under 35).
Aug 4 7:30: Danish String Quartet.
Beethoven: Quartet in F Op.18 No.1; Adès:
Arcadiana; Nielsen: Quartet in g Op.13. KH;
$32-$79; $20-$69(under 35).
Aug 5 7:30: Te Amo Argentina. Combination
of music, dance and projected media. Antonio
Lysy, cello; Borromeo String Quartet; Miriam
Larici and Leonardo Barrionuevo, dancers.
KH; $32-$79; $20-$69(under 35).
Aug 6 7:30: Borromeo String Quartet. Bartók:
Complete String Quartets. WH; $47; $44(sr);
$20(under 35).
Aug 7 7:30: Karita Mattila, soprano. Finnish
opera star. KH; $32-$79; $20-$69(under 35).
Aug 8 4:00 & 7:00: Mentors & Fellows. Artist
mentors share the stage with TSM Chamber
Music Institute Fellows. Aaron Schwebel,
violin; Shane Kim, violin; Eric Nowlin, viola;
Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello; Sarah
Jeffrey, oboe; James Anagnoson, piano. WH;
$35; $31(sr); $15(under 35).
Westben Arts Festival Theatre
June 6 to August 2
CT – Clock Tower Cultural Centre, 36 Front St.,
S., Campbellford, ON K0L 1L0
TB – The Barn, 6698 County Road 30 N.
Campbellford, ON K0L 1L0
TG – The Garden, Private home, Warkworth ON
K0K 3K0
705-653-5508 or 1-877-883-5777
westben.ca
Picnic: $18 or $25 (must be pre-ordered 24
hours in advance)
Jun 6 2:00: Fiddler on the Roof. Book by Joseph
Stein; music by Jerry Bock; lyrics by Sheldon
Harnick. Andrew Tees, baritone (Tvye); Kim
Dafoe, mezzo (Golde); Donna Bennett, soprano
(Fruma Sarah); Westben Chorus; Brian Finley,
conductor. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth).
Jun 7 2:00: Fiddler on the Roof. See Jun 6.
Jun 12: 7:00: Fiddler on the Roof. See Jun 6.
Jun 13 10:00am: [lecture] Fiddling Around
with Luke. Luthier/fiddler Luke Mercier
discusses the creation and restoration of
stringed instruments. CT; see website for ticket
packages. 2:00: Fiddler on the Roof. See Jun 6.
Jun 14 2:00: Fiddler on the Roof. See Jun 6.
Jun 19 7:00: Ken Tizzard and Friends, with
may 27 - june 6
LULAWORLD 2015
harp; Antoine Bareil, violin. TB; $39; $37(sr);
$15(st); $5(youth).
Jul 17 7:00: Primadonna & Friend Strike Back.
Mary Lou Fallis, soprano/comedienne; Peter
Tiefenbach, piano. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 18 2:00: Marie-Josée Lord, soprano. Opera
arias, spirituals and music by Bernstein and Cole
Porter. Brian Finley, piano. $55; $53(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 19 2:00: Stewart Goodyear, piano. Bach:
Goldberg Variations. $55; $53(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 22 2:00: Kings on Broadway. Music from The
King & I and Camelot. Jason Howard, baritone
(King of Siam/King Arthur); Donna Bennett,
soprano (Anna Leonowens/Queen Guinevere);
Samantha Marineau, soprano (Tuptim); Adam
Fisher, tenor (Lun Tha/Lancelot); Kim Dafoe,
mezzo (Lady Thiang/Nimue); Brian Finley, piano.
TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth)
Jul 23 2:00: Kings on Broadway. See July 22.
Jul 24 2:00: Kings on Broadway. See July 22.
7:00: Anna and the King of Siam. 1946 film
based on Margaret Landon novel which also
spurred Rodgers & Hammerstein’s musical The
King & I. TB; $10; $5(st/youth).
Jul 25 2:00: Kings on Broadway. See July 22.
Jul 26 2:00: Music from the Sistine Chapel.
Renaissance a capella choral music from
Palestrina and Allegri to Josquin des Prés.
Le studio de musique ancienne de Montréal;
Christopher Jackson, conductor. 1:00
pre-concert chat. TB; $45; $43(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 30 7:00: Maz. Electronic Gypsy jazz meets
les Québécois! TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Jul 31 7:00: Kelli Trottier & The Mushy Peas.
Celtic, contemporary country folk, bluegrass
and western swing. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth).
Aug 1 2:00: Jane Bunnett & Friends present
Maqueque. Afro Cuban jazz. Chelsey Bennett,
singer-songwriter. TB; $39; $37(sr); $15(st);
$5(youth). 5:00: Jazz Desserts. Jazz musicians
move from The Barn to local eateries in Trent
Hills (reservations recommended). 8:00: Jazz
Jam. Chelsey Bennett Quartet. Bring your
instrument and sit in with musicians. CT. 10:00:
Fireworks. Campbellford Waterfront Festival
ends with fireworks over the Trent Canal.
Aug 2 10:00am: Jazz, the Morning After.
Brunch with jazz musicians at local eateries
(reservations recommended). 2:00: Sunny
Day & Sinatra. Donna Bennett and Dean Hollin,
vocals; Brian Barlow Big Band. $55; $53(sr);
$15(st); $5(youth).
1585 DUNDAS W
416-588-0307
LULA.CA
LULAWORLD.CA
CELEBRATING THE MUSIC AND DANCE OF THE AMERICAS
52 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
A. Concerts in the GTA
LISTINGS
IN THIS ISSUE: Aurora, Brampton, King Township, Markham,
Mississauga, Oakville, Richmond Hill, Thornhill
The WholeNote listings are arranged in four sections:
A.
B.
C.
D.
Monday June 1
GTA (GREATER TORONTO AREA) covers all of Toronto
plus Halton, Peel, York and Durham regions.
●●12:15: Music Mondays. Luke Welch, piano.
Schumann: Kinderszenen, Op.15; Morawetz:
Scherzo; Schubert: Sonata in a D784. Church
of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521
x223. PWYC(suggested $5).
●●12:30: Massey Hall. Lunchtime Live!: DATU.
Modern Filipino tribal music crew. YongeDundas Square, 1 Dundas St. E. 416-8724255. Free.
●●7:30: Associates of the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra. From Trio to Tango. Beethoven:
Serenade; Piazzolla: Histoire du Tango; Shinohara: Kassouga; Caliendo: Sincerita; Fauré:
Après un rêve; works by Debussy and Golijov.
Csaba Koczó, violin; Theresa Rudolph, viola;
Kathleen Rudolph: flute; John Rudolph, percussion. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-282-6636. $20; $17(sr/st).
●●7:30: Brampton Chamber Music Concert
Series. Ensembles from The Rose Orchestra.
Northern Lights Quartet; Greg James, clarinet; Koichi Inoue, piano; and others. St. Paul’s
United Church (Brampton), 30 Main St. S.,
Brampton. 905-450-9220. PWYC.
BEYOND THE GTA covers many areas of Southern
Ontario outside Toronto and the GTA. Starts on page 62.
IN THE CLUBS (MOSTLY JAZZ)
is organized alphabetically by club.
Starts on page 64.
THE ETCETERAS is for galas, fundraisers, competitions,
screenings, lectures, symposia, masterclasses, workshops, singalongs and other music-related events (except
performances) which may be of interest to our readers.
Starts on page 68.
A GENERAL WORD OF CAUTION. A phone number is provided
with every listing in The WholeNote — in fact, we won’t publish
a listing without one. Concerts are sometimes cancelled or postponed; artists or venues may change after listings are published.
Please check before you go out to a concert.
HOW TO LIST. Listings in The WholeNote in the four sections above
are a free service available, at our discretion, to eligible presenters.
If you have an event, send us your information no later than the
8th of the month prior to the issue or issues in which your listing is
eligible to appear.
Tuesday June 2
●●12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Chamber Music Series: In Praise of Women
- Music for Violin and Piano. Works for violin and piano by Schmidt, Farrenc, Schumann, Jacquet de La Guerre and others.
Véronique Mathieu, violin; Stephanie Chua,
piano. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four
Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,
145 Queen St. W. 416-363-8231. Free. Firstcome, first-served. Concertgoers are encouraged to arrive early.
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Joshua Wood, French
horn; Aaron James, piano. Yorkminster Park
Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298.
Free; donations welcomed.
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs; organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free; donations
welcomed.
●●7:30: Univox Choir. Creo Animam. Multimedia concert with works by Whitacre, Powell and Hogan. Ryan Kelln, curator; Dallas
Bergen, conductor. Ada Slaight Hall, Daniels
Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E. 647-678-0859.
PWYC ($20 suggested).
●●8:00: Against The Grain Theatre.
Death&Desire. Schubert: Die schöne Müllerin; Olivier Messiaen: Harawi. Krisztina
Szabó, mezzo; Stephen Hegedus, bass-baritone; Topher Mokrzewski, piano; Joel Ivany,
stage director. Neubacher Shor Contemporary, 5 Brock Ave. 416-546-3683. $35–$70.
Also Jun 3, 4, 5.
●●8:00: Arraymusic. Array Session #32.
An evening of improvisation. Array Space,
155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. PWYC.
●●8:00: Resa’s Pieces String Ensemble. 5th
Gala Concert. Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro; Led
Zeppelin: Kashmir; Jenkins: Palladio (Mvt.1);
Reznicow: Jubilant Overture; Badelt: Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black
Pearl; other works. Guests: Resa’s Pieces
LISTINGS DEADLINE. The next issue covers the period from
September 1 to October 7, 2015. All listings must be received by
Saturday August 8.
LISTINGS can be sent by e-mail to [email protected] or
by fax to 416-603-4791 or by regular mail to the address on page 6.
We do not receive listings by phone, but you can call 416-323-2232
x27 for further information.
LISTINGS ZONE MAP. Visit our website to see a detailed version
of this map: thewholenote.com.
Georgian
Bay
Lake
Huron
8
7
6
3 4
2
1 City of Toronto
Lake Ontario
5
Lake Erie
thewholenote.com
Symphony Orchestra; Ian Medley, conductor. Lawrence Park Community Church,
2180 Bayview Ave. 416-765-1818. $20.
Wednesday June 3
●●12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Jazz Series: Instruments Are for Surgeons.
Cadence a cappella vocal ensemble. Richard
Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.
416-363-8231. Free. First-come, first-served.
Concertgoers are encouraged to arrive early.
●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
John Palmer, CSV, organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416922-1167. Free.
●●12:35: Church of St. Stephen-in-the-Fields.
Concerts at Midday: Thomas Gonder, organ.
103 Bellevue Avenue. 437-344-3890 or 416921-6350. Free; donations welcomed.
Music
at Metropolitan
Summer Carillon
Recital Series
The historic 54-bell carillon at
Metropolitan United Church is
North America’s first tuned carillon.
June 3, 7:30 pm Gerald
Martindale, carillon and organ
July 9, 7 pm Amy Johansen,
carillon; Robert Ampt, organ
Metropolitan United Church
56 Queen Street E.,Toronto
416-363-0331 (ext. 26)
www.metunited.org
●●7:30: Metropolitan United Church. Sum-
mer Carillon Recital Series. Gerald Martindale, carillon & organ. 56 Queen St. E.
416-363-0331. Free.
●●8:00: Against The Grain Theatre.
Death&Desire. Schubert: Die schöne Müllerin; Olivier Messiaen: Harawi. Krisztina
Szabó, mezzo; Stephen Hegedus, bass-baritone; Topher Mokrzewski, piano; Joel Ivany,
stage director. Neubacher Shor Contemporary, 5 Brock Ave. 416-546-3683. $35–$70.
Also Jun 2, 4, 5.
●●8:00: Humber Valley United Church. Let It
Shine. Gospel. Joni Henson, soprano; Valerie
Mero-Smith, mezzo; Alan Reid, tenor; Sung
Chung, baritone; Zoran Mrkovic, percussion;
and others. 76 Anglesey Blvd., Etobicoke.
416-937-8576 or 416-239-5427. $15; free(12
and under).
●●8:00: MNjcc Community Choir. Feel The
Choir Spirit! Harriet Wichin, conductor. Al
Green Theatre, 750 Spadina Ave. 416-9246211 x0. $10. Also Jun 4.
●●8:00: Musideum. Brian Katz, guitar. Jazz,
classical, world. Suite 133 (main floor),
401 Richmond St. W. 416-419-2248. $20.
June | July | August, 2015 | 53
A. Concerts in the GTA
Thursday June 4
●●12:00 noon: Encore Symphonic Concert
Band. In Concert: Classics and Jazz. John
Edward Liddle, conductor. Wilmar Heights
Centre, 963 Pharmacy Ave., Scarborough.
416-346-3910. $10. Incl. coffee and snack.
●●12:15: Music at Metropolitan. Noon at Met:
Sarah Svendsen, organ. Metropolitan United
Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26.
Free.
●●2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. All American. Adams: Short Ride in
a Fast Machine; Barber: Symphony No.1;
Previn: Double Concerto for Violin and
Violoncello(Canadian première/TSO co-commission); Gershwin: An American in Paris.
Jaime Laredo, violin; Sharon Robinson, cello;
Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29–$105.
Also Jun 6(eve), 7(George Weston Recital
Hall, mat).
●●7:30: Canadian Music Centre/Musica
Reflecta. Opus: Testing Workshop and Concert. NASA Remixed–Repurposing the NASA
Audio Archive. New music. SlowPitchSound.
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph St. 416961-6601 x201. PWYC.
●●8:00: Against The Grain Theatre.
Death&Desire. Schubert: Die schöne Müllerin; Olivier Messiaen: Harawi. Krisztina
Szabó, mezzo; Stephen Hegedus, bass-baritone; Topher Mokrzewski, piano; Joel Ivany,
stage director. Neubacher Shor Contemporary, 5 Brock Ave. 416-546-3683. $35–$70.
Also Jun 2, 3, 5.
●●8:00: MNjcc Community Choir. Feel The
Choir Spirit! Harriet Wichin, conductor. Al
Green Theatre, 750 Spadina Ave. 416-9246211 x0. $10. Also Jun 3.
●●8:00: Musideum. Gerri Trimble, jazz
vocalist. Jazz. With Kevin Barrett, guitar;
George Koller, bass. Suite 133 (main floor),
401 Richmond St. W. 416-419-2248. $10.
Friday June 5
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Featuring classics, opera, operetta,
musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. TrinitySt. Paul’s United Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre. 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Wychwood Theatre, 601 Christie St. 416-537-4191. $25;
$20(sr/st); $15(child).
●●7:30: ORGANIX 15. In Concert. Aaron
Tan, organ. St. Cuthbert’s Anglican Church,
1541 Oakhill Dr., Oakville. 416-769-3893. $25;
$20(sr); $15(undergrad).
●●7:30: Toronto Catholic District School
Board Staff Arts. Urinetown. Greg Kotis,
music and lyrics; Mark Hollman, book and
lyrics; John Zachar, director. Cardinal Carter
Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416222-8282 x2787. $25. Also June 6, 11-13. Recommended for over 12.
●●8:00: Aga Khan Museum. Ventanas. Flamenco united with the music of Morocco,
Macedonia, Greece, and the Middle East. Aga
Khan Museum Auditorium, 77 Wynford Dr.
416-646-4677. $35; $30(sr/st). CD launch.
●●8:00: Against The Grain Theatre.
Death&Desire. Schubert: Die schöne Müllerin; Olivier Messiaen: Harawi. Krisztina Szabó, mezzo; Stephen Hegedus,
54 | June | July | August, 2015
Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. 416788-8482. $20; $15(sr/st).
●●7:00: Scola Cantorum. Spring Concert:
Choral Extravaganza. Works by Mendelssohn,
Bruckner, Kodaly, Vierne, Fauré and Franck.
Hungarian St Elizabeth Scola Cantorum. St.
Elizabeth of Hungary Roman Catholic Church,
432 Sheppard Ave. E. 416-300-9305. $20;
$10(st). Post-concert reception.
●●7:30: Etobicoke Centennial Choir. Songs of
Hope, Songs of Inspiration. Halley: Freedom
Trilogy; Barber: Sure on This Shining Night;
Thompson: Choose Something Like a Star;
Berlin: Blue Skies; and other works. Henry
Renglich, conductor; Carl Steinhauser, piano.
Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesey
Blvd., Etobicoke. 416-769-9271. $25.
●●7:30: Jubilate Singers. Soundscapes.
Works by Raminsh, Chatman, Paranjoti, Piazzolla, Schafer, Robinovitch and Bellaviti.
St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church,
525 Bloor St. E. 416-485-1988. $25; $20(sr);
$15(st).
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre. 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Wychwood Theatre,
601 Christie St. 416-537-4191. $25; $20(sr/st);
$15(child). Also at 1:30.
●●7:30: Ontario Cross-Cultural Music Society Youth Symphony Orchestra. The Circus
Act: OCMS-YSO 16th Annual Concert. Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake Suite; Beethoven: Symphony No.1; Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No.2;
Debussy: Clair de lune; Rosas: Sobre las Olas;
other works. Samantha Chang and Brian
Truong, conductors; Harp Sinfonia (Andrew
Chan, conductor). Milliken Wesleyan Methodist Church, 3 Clayton Dr., Markham. 416293-1302. $15.
●●7:30: Singing Out. Showstopper: Tribute to Broadway. Highlights from Broadway
musicals. Jody Malone, conductor, Beth Hanson, piano. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St.
W. 416-205-5551. $25; $20(st); $15(child).
Also 3:00.
●●7:30: The Toronto Oratory. In Concert.
Music of Vivaldi, Bach, Couperin, Handel,
Campra, and others. Oratory Children’s Choir
& Kingsway Chamber Strings; Valerie Gordon, conductor; Philip Fournier, conductor.
The Oratory, Holy Family Church, 1372 King St.
W. 416-532-2879. Donations.
●●7:30: Toronto Catholic District School
Board Staff Arts. Urinetown. Greg Kotis,
music and lyrics; Mark Hollman, book and
lyrics; John Zachar, director. Cardinal Carter
Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416222-8282 x2787. $25. Also June 5, 11-13. Recommended for over 12.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. All American. Adams: Short Ride in
a Fast Machine; Barber: Symphony No.1;
Previn: Double Concerto for Violin and
Violoncello(Canadian première/TSO co-commission); Gershwin: An American in Paris.
Jaime Laredo, violin; Sharon Robinson, cello;
Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29–$105.
Also Jun 4(mat), 7(George Weston Recital
Hall, mat).
●●8:00: Acoustic Harvest. Laura Smith. St.
Nicholas Anglican Church, 1512 Kingston Rd.
416-691-0449. $22(adv); $25(door). Doors
open 7:30.
●●8:00: I FURIOSI Baroque Ensemble. All
About Me. Works by Handel, Tartini, Bermudo and others. Guests: Rufus Müller, tenor;
James Johnstone, organ. Calvin Presbyterian
bass-baritone; Topher Mokrzewski, piano;
Joel Ivany, stage director. Neubacher Shor
Contemporary, 5 Brock Ave. 416-546-3683.
$35–$70. Also Jun 2, 3, 4.
●●8:00: Musideum. East Meets West. World/
chamber. Shahriyar Jamshidi, kamanche;
Raphael Weinroth-Browne, cello. Suite 133
(main floor), 401 Richmond St. W. 416-4192248. $20; $15(st).
Baroque
Summer
Festival
oncert
C
E
E
FR
June 5 at 8pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
●●8:00: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and
Chamber Choir. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival: Delightfully Baroque. Works by
Purcell, Handel, Bach, Marais and Telemann.
Ann Monoyios, soprano; Peter Harvey, baritone; Jeanne Lamon & Ivars Taurins, conductors. Trinity St. Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon
Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-964-6337. Free.
First-come, first-seated. Doors open 15 minutes prior to concert.
Saturday June 6
●●1:30: No Strings Theatre. 25th Annual Put-
nam County Spelling Bee. Wychwood Theatre, 601 Christie St. 416-537-4191. $25;
$20(sr/st); $15(child). Also at 7:30.
●●2:00: Paskke String Quartet. In Concert.
Rossini: Sonata for Strings; Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.3; Mozart: Adagio and
Fugue K546; Elgar: Serenade for Strings
Op.20. Guest: Eric Hudspith, bass. Brevik Hall, Aurora Cultural Centre, 22 Church
St., Aurora. 905-713-1818. $15; $10(sr/st);
free(under 6).
●●3:00: Neapolitan Connection. Musical
Matinée at Montgomery’s Inn: To Budapest
& Back! Lemon Bucket Orkestra. Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St. W. 416-231-0006.
$37.99; $15(sr/st). Museum tour at 2:00.
●●3:00: Singing Out. Showstopper: Tribute to
Broadway. Highlights from Broadway musicals. Beth Hanson, piano; Jody Malone, conductor. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W.
416-205-5551. $25; $20(st); $15(child). Also
7:30.
●●4:00: Canadian League of Composers. New
Music in an Inter-Arts Dialogue: A Multidisciplinary Discussion. Canadian Music Centre,
20 St. Joseph St. 1-877-964-1364. Free. Reservation required. Wine & cheese reception.
●●6:30: VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto.
Sumer Is Icumen. Guests: Toronto Consort.
I FURIOSI
Baroque Ensemble
ALL ABOUT
ME
Saturday
June 6, 8pm
ALL ABOUT
WITH GUESTS:
Rufus Müller, tenor
James Johnstone, organ
www.ifuriosi.com
Church, 26 Delisle Ave. 416-536-2943. $20;
$10(sr/st).
●●8:00: Musideum. Dorothy Stone. Classical/crossover. Suite 133 (main floor),
401 Richmond St. W. 416-419-2248. $20.
●●8:00: North York Concert Orchestra. In
Concert. Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture;
Wagner: Der Engel and Träume from Wesendonck Lieder; Fauré: Sicilienne from Pelléas
et Mélisande; Mozart: Oh smania! Oh furie!
from Idomeneo; Ivanovici: Anniversary Waltz
“Waves of the Danube”; Dvořák: Symphony
No. 9 “New World”. Rafael Luz, guest conductor; Gwenna Fairchild-Taylor, soprano.
Yorkminster Citadel, 1 Lord Seaton Rd., North
York. 416-628-9195. $25; $20(sr); $10(st).
●●8:00: Voices Chamber Choir. Brother
Sun, Sister Moon. Lauridsen: Nocturnes; Willan: Magnificat; Nunc Dimittis. John Stephenson, piano; Ron Ka Ming Cheung,
conductor. Church of St. Martin-in-theFields, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-0528. $20;
$15(sr/st).
Sunday June 7
20TH ANNIVERSARY
GALA
JUNE 7, 2015 AT 2 PM
GLENN GOULD STUDIO
WWW.OFFCENTREMUSIC.COM
●●2:00: Off Centre Music Salon. 20th Anni-
versary Gala. Isabel Bayrakdarian, Russell Braun, Krisztina Szabó, Nathalie Paulin,
Norine Burgess and others; David Goldbloom,
Master of Ceremonies. Glenn Gould Studio,
thewholenote.com
250 Front St. W. 416-466-1870. $75; $50(sr);
$25(13-25); $15(under 13). Includes champagne reception.
●●2:00: Scarborough Civic Centre. Juan
Tomas Show Band In Concert. Light jazz, soft
rock, classical and flamenco guitar. Juan
Tomas Show Band; Marylou Malicdem, vocals.
150 Borough Dr., Scarborough. 416-4852056. Free.
W. 416-419-2248. $20.
Monday June 8
Baroque
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Summer
Festival
Mondays. A River Runs Through It. Works
by Chopin, Brahms, Liszt and John Burge.
Angela Park, piano. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-5984521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
●●12:30: Massey Hall. Lunchtime Live!: kLoX.
Classical tabla and violin plus computer performance technology. Yonge-Dundas Square,
1 Dundas St. E. 416-872-4255. Free.
●●7:00: Swedish Women’s Educational Association Toronto. Jenny Lind Concert. Songs
by Stenhammar, Rangström and Jean Sibelius; arias by Mozart and Puccini. Sara Swietlicki, soprano; Markus Kvint, piano. Heliconian
Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. 905-727-9837. $17. Postconcert refreshments.
●●7:30: Beatrice Carpino. Columbus Community Choir Summer Concert. Columbus
Community Choir; Beatrice Carpino, conductor & soprano; Adolfo De Santis, piano.
Columbus Centre, 901 Lawrence Ave. W. .
PWYC. Rotunda. Proceeds to charity.
oncert
C
E
E
FR
June 10 at 12:30pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
Free. First-come, first-seated. Doors open 15
minutes prior to concert.
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Richard Herriott, piano. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: JL Entertainment. Cape Breton Fire
Benefit Concert. For Inverness Community
Leadership Centre in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Philip Glass, Ashley MacIsaac and Basia
Bulat. Massey Hall, 178 Victoria St. 416-8724255. $35.50-$79.50. CANCELLED.
●●8:00: Arraymusic. Dimitar Pentchev:
Gleams. Dimitar Pentchev, piano. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $30.
Also Jun 11, 13.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Mahler Resurrection Symphony. Mahler: Symphony No.2 “Resurrection”. Peter Oundjian,
conductor; Erin Wall, soprano; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-598-3375. $33-$145. Also Jun 12 at
7:30.
Tuesday June 9
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
●●3:00: Toronto Symphony Orches-
tra. All American. Adams: Short Ride in
a Fast Machine; Barber: Symphony No.1;
Previn: Double Concerto for Violin and
Violoncello(Canadian première/TSO co-commission); Gershwin: An American in Paris.
Jaime Laredo, violin; Sharon Robinson, cello;
Peter Oundjian, conductor. George Weston
Recital Hall, 5040 Yonge St. 416-598-3375.
$29–$105. Also Jun 4, 6(Roy Thomson Hall,
mat and eve).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Simon Walker; organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free; donations
welcomed.
●●4:00: Church of St. Mary Magdalene.
Organ Fireworks. Andrew Adair, organ.
477 Manning Ave. 416-531-7955. Free.
●●4:00: St. Olave’s Anglican Church. Classical Gas. Choral Evensong followed by
Williams: Classical Gas; Hollywood classics; other works. Doug Hibovski, guitar.
360 Windermere Ave. 416-769-5686. Donations appreciated.
●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Canadian
Jazz Quartet. Frank Wright, vibes; Ted Quinlan, guitar; Pat Collins; bass; Don Vickery,
drums. 1570 Yonge St. 416-920-5211. Freewill offering.
●●5:00: Toronto Children’s Chorus Chamber Choir. On Wings of Song. Tour send-off
concert and reception. Works by Russian,
Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish and Canadian composers. Michel Ross, piano; Elise Bradley and
Matthew Otto, conductors. Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Ave. 416-932-8666
x231. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(child 5-12).
●●7:30: Penthelia Singers. Music of the Americas. Hatfield: Las Amarillas, La Lluvia; and
other works. O Susanna, Northwest Passsage
and others. Rosedale Presbyterian Church,
129 Mt. Pleasant Rd. 647-248-5079. $20.
●●8:00: Musideum. Jocelyn Barth. Classical/
crossover. Dave Restivo, piano; George Koller,
bass. Suite 133 (main floor), 401 Richmond St.
thewholenote.com
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Andréa Tyniec, violin; Su Jeon, piano. Yorkminster Park Baptist
Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298. Free;
donations welcomed.
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Sarah Svendsen, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. .
●●7:00: Metropolitan United Church. Summer Carillon Recital Series. Amy Johansen,
carillon; Robert Ampt, organ. 56 Queen St. E.
416-363-0331. Free.
●●7:30: Canadian Friends of Israel Guide
Dog Center for the Blind. Randy Bachman.
Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. 1-855-985-2787.
$55–$180.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Falling in Love Again.
Lili Marlene; Youkali; Just a Gigolo and other
works. Margaret Bardos; vocalist. Casa
Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. Free.
●●8:00: Arraymusic/Somewhere There.
Audiopollination 31.1. Pamela Palmer and
Glen Hall; Neil D Retke (an Eel) and Dominque
Banoun; Michael Kaler, Mike Daley, Arnd Jurgensen and Martin Loomer. Array Space,
155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. PWYC.
●●8:00: Resa’s Pieces Singers. 2nd Gala Concert. The Water Is Wide; Some Nights; You
Raise Me Up; Lean on Me; For Good from the
musical “Wicked”; and other works. Robert
Graham, conductor. Grace Church on-theHill, 300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-765-1818. $20.
Thursday June 11
●●10:00am: Kingsway Conservatory of
Music. Music with Markus! Children’s Cushion Concert. Snappy songs and fun stories for
young children and their parents/caregivers.
2848 Bloor Street W., Etobicoke. 416-2340121. $5. Great Room.
●●2:00: Orchardviewers. Master Class Players. Toronto Public Library, Northern District,
40 Orchard View Blvd. 416-393-7610. Free.
●●5:00: Canadian Music Centre. CD Launch:
Fancies and Interludes. Works by Rolfe and
Kulesha. Jacques Israelievitch, violin; Christina Petrowska Quilico, piano. 20 St. Joseph
St. 416-961-6601 x201. Free.
●●7:30: St. John’s Catholic Church Choir.
Annual Concert. Sacred music and show
tunes. Monica Parisi, soprano; Eric Walker,
conductor. St. John’s Catholic Church,
794 Kingston Rd. 416-699-2518. Freewill
donations. Post-concert refreshments.
●●7:30: Toronto Catholic District School
Board Staff Arts. Urinetown. Greg Kotis,
music and lyrics; Mark Hollman, book and
lyrics; John Zachar, director. Cardinal Carter
Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416222-8282 x2787. $25. Also June 5, 6, 12, 13.
Recommended for over 12.
●●8:00: Arraymusic. Dimitar Pentchev:
Gleams. Dimitar Pentchev, piano. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $30.
Also Jun 10, 13.
Friday June 12
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Featuring classics, opera, operetta,
musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity
St. Paul’s United Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●7:30: Brampton Chamber Music Concert
Series. Jarred Dunn, piano. St. Paul’s United
Church (Brampton), 30 Main St. S., Brampton. 905-450-9220. PWYC.
●●7:30: Toronto Catholic District School
Board Staff Arts. Urinetown. Greg Kotis,
music and lyrics; Mark Hollman, book and
lyrics; John Zachar, director. Cardinal Carter
Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416222-8282 x2787. $25. Also June 5, 6, 11, 13.
Recommended for over 12.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Band. In Concert.
Works by Camille Saint-Saëns, Alfred Reed,
Eric Whitacre and Robert Smith. Les Dobbin
& Ken Hazlett, conductors. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W. 647-479-2941. $15.
In Praise of Holier Women
Wednesday June 10
●●12:00 noon: Windermere United Church.
Spirit. Works by Marcello, Bach, Buxtehude
and Corelli. Paulina Derbez, violin; Nancy Sicsic, piano. 356 Windermere Ave. 416-7695611. Freewill donation. Benefits Windermere
music programs.
●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
Eric Robertson, organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416922-1167. Free.
●●12:30: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and
Chamber Choir. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival: Musical Interlude. Members of
the TBSI faculty. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337.
Schola Magdalena celebrates female saints
Friday, June 12, 2015, 8:15 pm
Come as you are; pay what you can
Church of Saint Mary Magdalene
477 Manning Ave, Toronto
www.scholamagdalena.ca
June | July | August, 2015 | 55
A. Concerts in the GTA
R
M A H L ER
ECTION
R
RESU ONY
S Y M P H , CONDUCTOR
UNDJIAN
PETER O
& 12 |
JUNE 10
TSO.CA
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Mah-
ler Resurrection Symphony. Mahler: Symphony No.2 “Resurrection”. Peter Oundjian,
conductor; Erin Wall, soprano; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-598-3375. $33-$145. Also Jun 10 at
8:00.
●●8:00: Thin Edge New Music Collective/
Arraymusic. Premieres IV. Works by Hall;
Hsieh; Labadie; Dupuis and Beck. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $20;
$15(sr/st/arts).
●●8:15: Schola Magdalena. In Praise of Holier
Women. Motets and chant honouring ancient
and modern female saints. Works by H. von
Bingen, Bridget of Sweden, G. de Machaut,
S. Martin and E. Walker. Church of St. Mary
Magdalene, 477 Manning Ave. 416-531-7955.
PWYC.
Saturday June 13
●●3:00: Musicians’ Dream Aid. Musicians’
Dream Aid Concert. Victoria College Chapel,
91 Charles St. W. 647-774-8423. $18; $12(sr/
st). Proceeds to support education and
Piazzolla: Oblivion; Copland: Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo; John Williams: Overture
to The Cowboys; Miguel del Aguila: Concierto
en Tango; Moncayo: Huapango. Earl Lee, conductor; Joseph Johnson, cello. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $33-$93.
Also Jun 14 at 3:00.
●●7:30: Toronto Catholic District School
Board Staff Arts. Urinetown. Greg Kotis,
music and lyrics; Mark Hollman, book and
lyrics; John Zachar, director. Cardinal Carter
Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416222-8282 x2787. $25. Also June 5, 6, 11, 12.
Recommended for over 12.
●●7:30: Vocal Horizons Chamber Choir. Symphony of Voices. Sacred and secular works
including world premieres of film soundtracks arranged by Vincent Cheng. Vincent
Cheng, conductor; Joshua Tamayo, piano.
St. Luke’s Catholic Church, 39 Green Lane,
Thornhill. 416-358-2274. Freewill offering. “Name that Flick” contest (the choir will
sing clips of soundtracks for the audience to
guess). Prizes.
●●8:00: Arraymusic. Dimitar Pentchev:
Gleams. Dimitar Pentchev, piano. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $30.
Also Jun 10, 11.
●●8:00: Music Gallery. Fossegrimen. Thornborrow: The Moon; Cole: Babinagar; and
other works. Ensemble Polaris and others. St.
George the Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416204-1080. $30/$20(adv); $10(st); $15(mem).
7:00: doors open. Multi-stage, interactive
performances. Family-friendly.
careers of young musicians.
●●5:30: Canadian Music Centre. A Journey
Inwards: Iranian-Canadian Composers of
Toronto. New works. 20 St. Joseph St. 416961-6601 x20. $20/$15(adv).
●●7:30: Chinese Artists Society of Toronto
Youth Orchestra. Classic Themes and Tunes:
CASTYO 22nd Annual Concert. Themes
from Fiddler on the Roof, The King and I, and
Superman Returns; Gypsy Airs; Shenandoah;
and other tunes. Chunjie Wang, dizi; Lydia
Cheng, violin; Richard Poon, harmonica; Samantha Chang, assistant conductor; Tony Fan,
conductor. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St.
W. 416-293-1302. $20.
●●7:30: St. Thomas’s Anglican Church.
Emma Vachon-Tweney and Christopher
Burton in Recital. Music for violin/viola and
piano. Works by Brahms, Bloch, and compositions by Emma Vachon-Tweney. Emma
Vachon-Tweney, violin/viola; Christopher Burton, piano. 383 Huron St. 416-462-9601. $20;
$15(sr/st); Free (under 16). Proceeds to benefit St. Thomas’s Friday Food Ministry.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. PanAmerican Rhythms. Gary Kulesha: Torque;
Sunday June 14
Baroque
Summer
Festival
RICAN
PAN AMES
RHYTHHM
LLO
NSON, CE
cert
n
o
C
E
FRE
JOSEPH JO 14 | TSO.CA
E 13 &
JUN
June 14 at 1pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Concert
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
with Scott St. John & Friends
●●1:00: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and
Including members of Gryphon Trio,
Cecilia String Quartet, Ensemble
Made in Canada and many more!
Chamber Choir. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival: TBSI Orchestras and Choirs.
Works by Campra, Locke, Fasch, J. Christoph, J. S. Bach and others. Jeanne Lamon,
Peter Harvey, and Ivars Taurins, conductors. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,
80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337. Free. Firstcome, first-seated. Doors open 15 minutes
prior to concert.
●●2:30: Darbazi. 20th Anniversary Concert.
Folk music from various regions of Georgia. Guests: Trio Zari, and Hereti; Alan Gasser and Shalva Makharashvili, conductors.
St. Andrew by-the-Lake Anglican Church,
102 Lakeshore Ave., Ward’s Island. 416-5888183. PWYC.
London
June 18, 7:30pm
Paul Davenport Theatre
Western University
Tickets start at $20
www.hanvoice.ca
HanVoice is Canada’s leading not-for-profit
on North Korean human rights and refugees.
56 | June | July | August, 2015
Matinée at Montgomery’s Inn: Let’s Rock
to Bach! Ensemble SOL. Montgomery’s Inn,
4709 Dundas St. W. 416-231-0006. $37.99;
$15(sr/st). Tea, historical tour, cookies
included. Museum tour at 2:00.
●●3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. PanAmerican Rhythms. Gary Kulesha: Torque;
Piazzolla: Oblivion; Copland: Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo; John Williams: Overture
to The Cowboys; Miguel del Aguila: Concierto
en Tango; Moncayo: Huapango. Earl Lee, conductor; Joseph Johnson, cello. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $33-$93.
Also Jun 13 at 7:30.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. .
●●4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church. Jazz
Vespers: Colleen Allen Trio. 25 St. Phillips
Rd., Etobicoke. 416-247-5181. Freewill offering. Religious.
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic. In
Concert. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416532-3019. Cover $10; PWYC.
Monday June 15
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Seven Continents in 50 Minutes.
William O’Meara, organ. 10 Trinity Sq. 416598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
●●12:30: Massey Hall. Lunchtime Live!: Cris
Derkson. Traditional, classical and contemporary music. Cris Derkson, cello. YongeDundas Square, 1 Dundas St. E. 416-872-4255.
Free.
Tuesday June 16
HanVoice
in
Toronto
June 17, 7:30pm
Walter Hall
University of Toronto
●●3:00: Neapolitan Connection. Musical
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Benjamin Smith, piano.
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge
St. 416-241-1298. Free; donations welcomed.
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. .
●●7:00: Metropolitan United Church. Summer Carillon Recital Series. Koen Cosaert,
carillon. 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331. Free.
●●7:00: Toronto Downtown Jazz Festival. Tara Davidson Trio. North York Central
Library Auditorium, 5120 Yonge St. 416-3955639. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Belle Voci. Excerpts
from works by Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and
Puccini. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416923-1171. Free.
●●8:00: Resa’s Pieces Concert Band. 16th
Gala Performance. Manilow: Copacabana; A
Tribute to Marvin Hamlisch; The Big Picture;
Lara: Solamente Una Vez; Richard Rodgers
in Concert; and other works. Toronto Centre
for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St., North York. 416765-1818. $25.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
The Wizard & I: Broadway Hits. Music of
GRAMMY®-Award and Oscar–winning composer Stephen Schwartz, including songs
from Godspell, Wicked, and Pippin. Steven
Reineke, conductor; Carrie Manolakos, Julia
Murney, Jeremy Jordan, Christopher Johnstone, vocalists; Amabile Choirs of London.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-5983375. $29-$110. Also Jun 17 (2:00 & 8:00).
thewholenote.com
Wednesday June 17
p i a n o R e c i ta l
Helena
Bowkun
‘Chopin 14
Waltzes Plus’
June 17, 2015 - 7:30pm
Yorkminster Park.com
●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
Nicholas Schmelter, organ. 1585 Yonge St.
416-922-1167. Free.
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican Church. Concerts at Midday. Duo Primo:
Ronée Boyce, piano; Gwendeline Lumaret,
cello. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or 416-­
921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
The Wizard & I: Broadway Hits. Music of
GRAMMY®-Award and Oscar–winning composer Stephen Schwartz, including songs
from Godspell, Wicked, and Pippin. Steven Reineke, conductor; Carrie Manolakos,
Julia Murney, Jeremy Jordan, Christopher
Johnstone, vocalists; Amabile Choirs of London. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416598-3375. $29-$110. Also Jun 16 (8:00) & 17
(8:00).
●●7:30: HanVoice. HanVoice in Concert with
Scott St. John & Friends. Mendelssohn: Octet;
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings; Dvořák:
Piano Quintet; Bach: Brandenburg No.3;
Seung Jae Chung: Arirang Fantasy for clarinet quintet. Scott St. John, violin; Sharon
Wei, viola; Min Jeong Koh, violin; Angela Park,
piano; Roman Borys, cello; and others. Walter
June 16
resaspieces.org
thewholenote.com
Hall, Edward Johnson Building, 80 Queen’s
Park. 416-820-1007. $35/$30(adv);
$25(st)/$20(adv). Also June 18 (Western U,
London). In support of North Korean human
rights and refugee crisis.
●●7:30: Opera by Request. Tremblay: A Chair
in Love. Abigail Freeman, soprano(A Chair);
Michael Robert-Broder, baritone(Truman);
Kim Sartor, mezzo-soprano(Doctor); Gregory
Finney, bass-baritone(Dog); William Shookhoff, piano. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416455-2365. $20.
●●7:30: Red Line Communications. Jewish
Radio Hour. Theresa Tova, Harvey Atkin, David
Gale, Aviva Chernick, Moish Kanatkin and
others; Fern Lindzon, music director; Theresa
Tova, writer and director. Richmond Hill Centre for the Performing Arts, 10268 Yonge St.,
Richmond Hill. 905-787-8811. $36.
composer Stephen Schwartz, including songs
from Godspell, Wicked, and Pippin. Steven
Reineke, conductor; Carrie Manolakos, Julia
Murney, Jeremy Jordan, Christopher Johnstone, vocalists; Amabile Choirs of London.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-5983375. $29-$110. Also Jun 16(8:00) & 17(2:00).
Thursday June 18
●●5:30: Canadian Music Centre. Fantasio-
mania. Telemann: 12 Fantaisies à Travers
Pour Flute sans Basse; works by Canadian,
Greek and Polish composers. Dr. Beata Iwona
Glinka, flute. 20 St. Joseph St. 416-961-6601
x20. $20/$15(adv).
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Jazz Piano
Series. Bartosz Trio with Rich Brown and
Mark Kelso. Pauper’s Pub Upstairs Piano Bar,
539 Bloor St. W. 416-530-1331. $10 cover.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Concert
Under the Stars. Big band, show tunes, swing
music, and others. John Edward Liddle, conductor. Mel Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge St.
416-802-6819. Free.
●●8:00: Evergreen Club Contemporary
Gamelan/Arraymusic. How It Storms: An
Opera for Gamelan & Voices. Allan Cole,
composer; Maristella Rocca, libretto. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $15.
Also June 17.
Baroque
Summer
Festival
oncert
C
E
E
FR
Friday June 19
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Featuring classics, opera, operetta,
musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity
St. Paul’s United Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
June 17 at 7:30pm
Ticketed event—
visit online for details
tafelmusik.org
●●6:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Jazz Piano
Series. Bernie Senensky Duo with Steve Wallace, bass. Pauper’s Pub Upstairs Piano Bar,
539 Bloor St. W. 416-530-1331. $15 cover.
●●7:00: Evoid/Array. Dance to the e-Void Collective. e-Void Collective Orchestra. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. Sign up
for membership. All ages welcome.
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Le nozze di Figaro. Mozart. Concert performance after 12-day workshop for young
singers. Local talent and singers from USA.
St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church,
525 Bloor St. E. 416-923-8714. Freewill donation. With surtitles. Also Jun 20, 21.
●●7:00: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. Student Recital. St. George the
Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416-598-3444
x243/244. Free. Also Jun 20(noon & 2:00).
●●7:30: Opera by Request. Mozart: Le Nozze
di Figaro. Gene Wu, baritone(Figaro); Amanda
Pereira, soprano(Susanna); Bradley Hoover,
baritone(Count Almaviva); Hannah Coleman,
soprano(Countess Almaviva); and others; William Shookhoff, piano. College Street United
Church, 452 College St. 416-455-2365. $20.
●●8:00: group of 27. Build Your Own Symphony. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-323-1292. PWYC.
●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Hypnotic
Passion. Bartók: Music for strings, percussion and celesta; Shostakovich: Concerto No.1
for piano, trumpet and strings. Lisa Hartl,
trumpet; Michael Berkovsky, piano; Kristian Alexander, conductor. Cornell Recital
Hall, 3201 Bur Oak Ave., Markham. 905-6048339. $10.
●●8:00: Adelphi Ensemble. Songs of Farewell
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
●●7:30: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and
Chamber Choir. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival: The Grand Finale. Charpentier:
Mass for choir and orchestra; works by Handel and Rameau. TBSI Participants & Faculty;
Jeanne Lamon and Ivars Taurins, conductors.
Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd.
416-964-6337. Free; ticket required. Tickets
available at Tafelmusik Box Office, 427 Bloor
St. W. on June 11 at 10am. Max 2 per person.
●●7:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
Chopin and More. Chopin: Nocturne
Op.62 No.1; 14 Waltzes; Schumann-Liszt:
Widmung. Helena Bowkun, piano. 1585 Yonge
St. 416-922-1167. $20 cash at the door. Proceeds to the Yorkminster Park Benevolent
Fund.
●●8:00: Evergreen Club Contemporary
Gamelan/Arraymusic. How It Storms: An
Opera for Gamelan & Voices. Allan Cole,
composer; Maristella Rocca, libretto. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $15.
Also June 18.
●●8:00: Iana Komarnytska. The Art of Improvisation. Arabic and Persian music and dance
inspired by audience members. George Sawa,
qanun; Mehdi Rezania, santour; Bamdad
Fotouhi, tombak; Pedro Bonatto, doumbek;
Iana Komarnytska, dancer. Musideum, Suite
133 (main floor), 401 Richmond St. W. 416599-7323. $20.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The Wizard & I: Broadway Hits. Music
of GRAMMY®-Award and Oscar–winning
June | July | August, 2015 | 57
A. Concerts in the GTA
●●8:00: Luminato Festival. 7 Monologues:
The Night Dances. Music by Benjamin Britten and poetry by Sylvia Plath. Britten: Cello
Suites. Charlotte Rampling, actor; Sonia
Wieder-Atherton, cello. Fleck Dance Theatre,
Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W.
416-368-4849. $29; $25(arts); $19(st & below
18). Also Jun 21.
●●8:00: Rough Idea. Michael Snow and Ken
Vandermark In Concert. Michael Snow,
piano & CAT synth; Ken Vandermark, multireeds. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-5323019. $20.
●●8:00: Vocem Resurgentis. The Road to
Santiago: Further Explorations of the Medieval Pilgrim’s Journey. Works from the Codex
Calixtinus, Codex Las Huelgas, Llibre Vermell and Cantigas de Santa Maria. Linda
Falvy and Mary Enid Haines, sopranos; Catherine McCormack, alto. Church of St. Mary
Magdalene, 477 Manning Ave. 416-890-1710.
Admission by donation.
●●9:00: Mezzetta Restaurant. TD Toronto
Jazz Festival. Rebecca Enkin, vocals; Mark
Kieswetter, piano. 681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416658-5687. $12. Also 10:15. Reservations
recommended.
●●10:15: Mezzetta Restaurant. TD Toronto
Jazz Festival. Rebecca Enkin, vocals; Mark
Kieswetter, piano. 681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416658-5687. $12. Also 9:00. Reservations
recommended.
King Music Collective
presents
Joe Sealy &
Paul Novotny
Sat. June 20, 2pm
Schomberg, Ontario
brownpapertickets.com/
event/1626487
and Joy. Bach: Motet-“Jesu, joy and treasure”;
Parry: “Songs of Farewell” and “I was glad”.
Adelphi Vocal Ensemble; Peter Bishop, conductor; Andrew Adair, organ. St. Vincent de
Paul Church. 263 Roncesvalles Ave. 416-5355119. Free. $20 donation suggested.
Saturday June 20
●●12:00 noon: No. 9: Contemporary Art &
the Environment/City of Toronto Historic
Sites. Eco-Art-Fest at Todmorden Mills. Public art installations by Canadian artists, art
activities for families and all ages, guided
art tours, and musical performances in a
licensed outdoor space. Todmorden Mills,
67 Pottery Road. 416-396-2819. Free. Fri/Sat
(12:00noon-10:00); Sun (12:00noon-5:00).
From Jun 20-Aug 30.
●●12:00 noon: University Settlement Music
and Arts School. Student Recital. St. George
the Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416-5983444 x243/244. Free. Also 2:00; June 19(eve).
●●2:00: King Music Collective. In Concert:
Joe Sealy and Paul Novotny. Joe Sealy, piano;
Paul Novotny, bass. Home of Michele Mele
and Luciano Tauro, 15785 8th Concession,
King Township. 1-800-838-3006. $30;
$15(st). Includes light snack and beverage.
●●2:00: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. Student Recital. St. George the
Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416-598-3444
x243/244. Free. Also noon; June 19(eve).
●●3:00: Neapolitan Connection. Musical
Matinée at Montgomery’s Inn: Russian Voyages. Jonathan Tortolano, cello; Ronée Boyce,
piano. Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St.
W. 416-231-0006. $37.99; $15(sr/st). Tea, historical tour, cookies included. Museum tour
at 2:00.
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Singer’s
Jazz Series: Songs by Johnny Mercer. Julie
McGregor, Laura Marks, Sam Boverman, Matt
Newton, Jesse Dietsche and others. Pauper’s
Pub Upstairs Piano Bar, 539 Bloor St. W. 416530-1331. $20/$15(adv).
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Le nozze di Figaro. Mozart. Concert performance after 12-day workshop for young
singers. Local talent and singers from USA.
St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church,
525 Bloor St. E. 416-923-8714. Freewill donation. With surtitles. Also June 19, 21.
Sunday June 21
●●2:30: Toronto Early Music Centre. Music-
ally Speaking: Love and Regretz. Works by
Josquin, Susato, Dowland and Jenkins. Cardinal Consort: Sheila Smyth, treble viol; Linda
Deshman, tenor viol; Sara Blake, and Valerie Sylvester, bass viol. St. David’s Anglican Church, 49 Donlands Ave. 416-464-7610.
PWYC.
●●4:00: Luminato Festival. 7 Monologues:
The Night Dances. Music by Benjamin Britten and poetry by Sylvia Plath. Britten: Cello
Suites. Charlotte Rampling, actor; Sonia
Wieder-Atherton, cello. Fleck Dance Theatre,
Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W.
416-368-4849. $29; $25(arts); $19(st & below
18). Also Jun 20.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. .
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Father’s
Day with Alex Bellegarde and Ori Dagan. Pauper’s Pub Upstairs Piano Bar, 539 Bloor St. W.
416-530-1331. $15 cover.
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Le nozze di Figaro. Mozart. Concert performance after 12-day workshop for young
singers. Local talent and singers from USA.
St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church,
525 Bloor St. E. 416-923-8714. Freewill donation. With surtitles. Also June 19, 20.
Monday June 22
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. From Greece to Granada. Classical
and folk music from Turkey, Greece and Spain
by De Falla, Lorca and Theodorakis. Maria
Soulis, soprano; Michael Kolk, guitar; Julian Knight, violin. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521
x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
●●7:00: Luminato Festival. Contemporary
Color. David Byrne; Nelly Furtado; How to
Dress Well; Devonté Hynes; Kelis; and others
with 10 colour guard teams from across
58 | June | July | August, 2015
North America. Air Canada Centre, 40 Bay St.
416-348-4849. $38-$129. Doors open 6:00.
Also on June 23.
●●7:30: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Comedy
Night: Helza-be-boppin’. Jason Gracey, Darryl
Orr and others. Pauper’s Pub Upstairs Piano
Bar, 539 Bloor St. W. 416-530-1331. PWYC.
●●8:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Chris Botti, trumpet. Contemporary jazz. Toronto Symphony
Orchestra; Steven Reineke, conductor.
60 Simcoe St. 416-872-4255. $59.50–$149.50.
Tuesday June 23
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Allan Pulker & Jamie
Thompson, flutes. Yorkminster Park Baptist
Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298. Free;
donations welcomed.
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Sarah Svendsen, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●4:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. AGC
Launch Party ‘15. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705.
Free. RSVP.
●●7:00: Espresso Manifesto. Salone di Cultura: Citta’ Aperta (Open City). Daniela Nardi,
Mary Wiens, Lina Allemano, Massimo Bruno
and others. Bata Shoe Museum, 327 Bloor St.
W. 416-979-7799. $75(advance only). Includes
apertivo.
●●7:00: Luminato Festival. Contemporary
Color. David Byrne; Nelly Furtado; How to
Dress Well; Devonté Hynes; Kelis; and others
with 10 colour guard teams from across
North America. Air Canada Centre, 40 Bay St.
416-348-4849. $38-$129. Doors open 6:00.
Also on Jun 22.
●●7:00: Metropolitan United Chrurch.
Summer Carillon Recital Series. Margaret
Pan, carillon. Metropolitan United Church,
56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Piaf Encore. La vie en
rose; Sous le ciel de Paris; Milord; Hymn à
l’amour. Pandora Topp, vocalist. Casa Loma,
1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. Free.
●●8:00: TD Toronto Downtown Jazz. Kurt
Elling. Koerner Hall. See Summer Festival
Listings for details.
Wednesday June 24
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Pei-­Chen Chen,
piano. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or 416-­
921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●5:00: Canadian Music Centre. CD Launch:
Poetic Sketches. Works by Cardy, Morawetz,
Weinzweig, Louie and E. Miller. Elaine Keillor, piano. 20 St. Joseph St. 416-961-6601x20.
Free. Reservation required.
●●7:00: Ailsa McCreary & Coleman Tinsley. Old Friends. Jazz standards and Brazilian
favourites. Ailsa McCreary, vocalist; Coleman Tinsley, vocalist; David Restivo, piano;
Alheli Pimienta, flute. Musideum, Suite 133
(main floor), 401 Richmond St. W. 416-5997323. $20.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert
Band. Summer Concerts in the Park. Pop,
broadway, swing, musical theatre and other
genres. Applewood/The Shaver House,
450 The West Mall, Etobicoke. 416-245-1983.
Free. Also Jul 8 and 22.
Thursday June 25
●●2:00: Orchardviewers. Lawrence Pitchko,
thewholenote.com
piano. Toronto Public Library, Northern District, 40 Orchard View Blvd. 416-393-7610.
Free.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/East Coast Music
Week. Live on the Patio: Ten Strings and a
Goatskin. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●5:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. A Garden Carousel Health and Beauty Garden
Party. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. Free. Tickets required.
●●7:00: North York Central Library. Introduction to Aboriginal Music. Brian WrightMcLeod, host. North York Central Library
Auditorium, 5120 Yonge St. 416-395-5639.
Free.
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Blues Piano
Night: Gary Gray and Friends. Pauper’s Pub
Upstairs Piano Bar, 539 Bloor St. W. 416-5301331. $5 or PWYC.
●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Phoenix
Ascending. Beethoven: Overture to The Ruins
of Athens Op.113; Schmidt: Concerto for piano
and orchestra No.4 “Phoenix Ascending”;
Copland: Fanfare for the Common Man;
Shostakovich: Symphony No.1. Christina
Petrowska-Quilico, piano; Alexa Petrenko,
host; Kristian Alexander, conductor. Flato
Markham Theatre, 171 Town Centre Blvd.,
Markham. 905-305-7469. $15-$35.
●●8:00: Whole Musician. Whole Musician
Participants in Concert. Anna Coe, Brooke
David and Marchel’le Hayes, flutes; Anne Marshall, piano. Madden Auditorium at Carr Hall,
St. Michael’s College, UofT, 100 St. Joseph St.
416-294-4259. $10.
Friday June 26
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Featuring classics, opera, operetta,
musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity
St. Paul’s United Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/East Coast Music
Week. Live on the Patio: Gypsophilia. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Singer’s Series: Songs Sung by Peggy Lee. Julie
McGregor, Emilie & Bob Mover, Bernie
Senensky and Steve Wallace. Pauper’s Pub
Upstairs Piano Bar, 539 Bloor St. W. 416-5301331. $20/$16(adv). Also Jun 27.
●●8:00: Luminato Festival. Apocalypsis.
A journey from chaos to order. R. Murray
Schafer: John’s Vision and Credo. Nina Arsenault; Brent Carver; Denise Fujiwara; Tanya
Tagaq; Kawiti Waetford. Sony Centre, 1 Front
St. E. 416-368-4849. $149.16, $115.26, $81.36,
$58.76. Also Jun 27(8pm) & 28(2pm).
●●10:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
The Planets - Late Night. Holst: The Planets.
Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $25-$45.
Saturday June 27
●●7:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Sing-
er’s Series: Songs Sung by Peggy Lee.
Julie McGregor, Emilie & Bob Mover, Bernie Senensky and Artie Roth. Pauper’s Pub
Upstairs Piano Bar, 539 Bloor St. W. 416-5301331. $20/$16(adv). Also Jun 26.
●●7:30: Aradia Baroque Ensemble. Thunderbird. By Dustin Peter. Purcell and Locke:
Music for Shakespeare’s Tempest. Marion
Newman, voice. Music Gallery, 197 John St.
thewholenote.com
647-960-6650. $35; $20(sr/under 30).
●●8:00: Luminato Festival. Apocalypsis.
A journey from chaos to order. R. Murray
Schafer: John’s Vision and Credo. Nina Arsenault; Brent Carver; Denise Fujiwara; Tanya
Tagaq; Kawiti Waetford. Sony Centre, 1 Front
St. E. 416-368-4849. $149.16, $115.26, $81.36,
$58.76. Also Jun 26(8pm), 28 (2pm).
●●8:00: Nagata Shachu/Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre. Chikiri with Nagata
Shachu. Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre,
6 Garamond Ct. 416-441-2345. $30; $25(JCCC
members); $20(sr/st).
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Audiopollination 31.2. Michael Lynn, double
bass; Kathryn Ladano, performer. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $10 or
PWYC. All ages welcome.
●●8:00: Whole Musician. Whole Musician
Participants in Concert. Samantha Kurihara, Vincenzo Volpe and Ryan Walker, flutes;
Anne Marshall, piano. Madden Auditorium at
Carr Hall, St. Michael’s College, UofT, 100 St.
Joseph St. 416-294-4259. $10.
Wednesday July 1
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Mikhai Verara,
soprano. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Thursday July 2
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Canadian Reggae
World. Live on the Patio: Tasha T. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free.
Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Dewe’igan. Two-Spirited
First Nations women drum and sing songs.
Barbara Croall (Odawa), pipigwan (cedar
flute). 235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000.
Free.
Friday July 3
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Featuring classics, opera, operetta,
musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity
St. Paul’s United Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Canadian Reggae World. Live on the Patio: Taj Weekes. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
Sunday June 28
●●2:00: Luminato Festival. Apocalypsis.
A journey from chaos to order. R. Murray
Schafer: John’s Vision and Credo. Nina Arsenault; Brent Carver; Denise Fujiwara; Tanya
Tagaq; Kawiti Waetford. Sony Centre, 1 Front
St. E. 416-368-4849. $149.16, $115.26, $81.36,
$58.76. Also Jun 26 (8pm) & 27(8pm).
●●2:00: Toronto Improvisers Orchestra/
Arraymusic. Toronto Improvisers Orchestra.
Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019.
Free. All ages welcome.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Andrew Adair, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church. Jazz
Vespers: Peter Togni Trio. 25 St. Phillips Rd.,
Etobicoke. 416-247-5181. Freewill offering.
Religious.
●●4:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Luminato Festival: Symphonic Zoo. Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake; Stravinsky: Firebird; RimskyKorsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee; Prokofiev:
Peter and the Wolf; other works inspired by
animals. Peter Oundjian and Earl Lee, conductors. David Pecaut Square, 55 John St.
416-598-3375. Free.
●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz Vespers: The Sacred Music of Duke Ellington.
Brian Barlow Big Band; Heather Bambrick,
vocalist. 1570 Yonge St. 416-920-5211. Freewill offering.
Sunday July 5
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Guided by Voices. Bach:
Sixth Suite for solo cello; works by Telemann,
Benda, Godin and Ceccarelli. Elinor Frey,
cello. 235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000.
Free.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Tom Fitches, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●5:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Audiopollination. Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-532-3019. $10 or PWYC. All ages
welcome.
Monday July 6
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Time’s Journey. Beethoven: Pathétique Sonata; Jean Coulthard: Image Astrale;
works by Bach, Chopin, Albeniz. Cecilia Lee,
piano. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223.
PWYC; suggested donation $5.
●●8:00: Canadian Music Centre/Naxos of
Canada. Elements Eternal: Naxos Canadian
Classics CD Release. Music by Current, Oesterle, Staniland and Wright. Gryphon Trio.
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph St. 416961-6601 x20. Free. Reservation required.
Tuesday July 7
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Viva Delgado! Music
of Mexico and Spain. Romulo Delgado, tenor.
Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171.
Free.
●●8:00: Ron Korb. Asia Beauty CD Release.
Music from China for flute, piano, and erhu.
Ron Korb, world flutes; and others. Musideum, Suite 133 (main floor), 401 Richmond
Monday June 29
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Chaconne Cellist. Britten: Third
Suite for Solo Cello, Op.87; Bach: Chaconne
in D minor for Solo Violin (arr. Brian Yoon);
and a new work by the performer. Raphael
Weinroth-Browne, solo cello. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
Tuesday June 30
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Sarah Svendsen, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Mozart’s Genius. Symphony No.29; March in C; Violin Concerto
No.4. Sharon Lee, violin. Casa Loma, 1 Austin
Terrace. 416-923-1171. Free.
June | July | August, 2015 | 59
A. Concerts in the GTA
St. W. 416-599-7323. $20. CD available for
sale.
Wednesday July 8
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Angli-
can Church. Concerts at Midday. Edward
Moroney, organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­
3890 or 416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations
welcome.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert
Band. Summer Concerts in the Park. Pop,
broadway, swing, musical theatre and other
genres. Applewood/The Shaver House,
450 The West Mall, Etobicoke. 416-245-1983.
Free. Also Jun 24 and Jul 22.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Thursday July 9
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Breabach. 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free.
Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: An Evening with Calum
Graham. Calum Graham, singer/songwriter,
guitar. 235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000.
Free.
●●7:30: Hart House Singers. Let The Games
Begin! Salute to the PanAm Games. Works
by Bernstein, Satie, Lavigne and others. Jeff
Vidov, piano; David Arnot-Johnston, conductor. Great Hall, Hart House, 7 Hart House
Circle. 416-978-2452. Free. Food donations for
food banks welcome.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Concert
Under the Stars. Band music, show tunes,
swing music, and other music. John Edward
Liddle, conductor. Mel Lastman Square,
5100 Yonge St. 416-802-6819. Free. Also July
28 (Earl Bales Park), 30.
●●5:30: Music From Scratch. Concert. Chris-
tien Ledroit, composer; Contact Ensemble.
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph St.
416-961-6601 x207. Free. See ETC listings for
workshops.
Tuesday July 14
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens. Beethoven: Symphony
No.7 in A; Mendelssohn: Octet for Strings.
Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171.
$24; $18(sr/st); $14(4-13); Free (under 4).
●●8:00: Michael Lynn/Somewhere There/
Arraymusic. Audiopollination. Michael Lynn,
double bass; Neil Wiernik, laptops; Lara Solnicki, voice and text; Heidi Chan, flutes; Alec
Brody, electronics; other artists. Array Space,
155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. $10 or PYWC.
Sunday July 19
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Sublime Schubert.
Schubert: String Quintet in C D956. Cecilia String Quartet; Shauna Rolston, cello.
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
Monday July 20
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Wednesday July 15
Mondays. Bartók and Beyond. Works by
Bartók, Kodály, Marjan Mozetich and Jack
Behrens. Mary Kenedi, piano. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
●●12:30: Organix Concerts. In Concert. Gor-
don Mansell, organ. St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church, 921 Flagship Dr., Mississauga. 905270-2301. Freewill offering.
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Eric Osborne,
organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Tuesday July 21
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Enchanted Garden.
Ravel: Ma mère l’oye; works by Saint-Saëns
and Fauré. Andrew Chan, harp; Kaili Maimets,
flute. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416923-1171. Free. $24; $18(sr/st); $14(4-13);
Free(under 4).
Thursday July 16
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Bonsound. Live on
the Patio: Random Recipe. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food &
drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Covent Garden in the
Music Garden. Works by Handel and others.
Michael Taylor, countertenor; Elinor Frey,
baroque cello; Borys Medicky, harpsichord.
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
Church. Concerts at Midday. John Gardham,
organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert
Band. Summer Concerts in the Park. Pop,
broadway, swing, musical theatre and other
genres. Guests: 32nd. Service Battalion Pipes
& Drums. Applewood/The Shaver House,
450 The West Mall, Etobicoke. 416-245-1983.
Free. Also Jun 24 and Jul 8.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
●●7:30: Summer Singers. In Concert. Choral
works including light classical, folk, jazz and
popular standards. Linda Eyman, conductor.
Toronto Singing Studio, Bloor St. United
Church, 300 Bloor St. W. 416-924-7439. $5
donation welcomed.
Spiro. 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free.
Food & drinks available.
Music in the Garden: Colourful Clouds Eating the Moon. Chinese, Flamenco, Galician,
and Jewish traditions. Lalun (Liron Man,
hand pans & flamenco guitar; Lan Tung, erhu
and vocals; Jonathan Bernard, percussion).
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●4:00: Organix Concerts. French Boys Choir
- Maîtrise des Hauts de France. Our Lady Of
Sorrows Catholic Church, 3055 Bloor St. W.
416-231-6016. Freewill offering.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Tom Fitches, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Creative Music. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
416-532-3019. $10 cover or PWYC.
Monday July 13
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Lalun. Original compositions and
traditional music from Europe, Asia, and the
Middle East influenced by Chinese, Flamenco,
Galician and Jewish music. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
60 | June | July | August, 2015
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Andrew Adair, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
Monday July 27
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Contemporary Blockbusters
for Flute. Paolo Marchettini: Sibilo; Robert
Beaser: Variations for flute & piano; R. Murray Schafer: Aubade from The Wolf Project.
Chris James, flute; Lara Dodds-Eden, piano.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
Wednesday July 22
Friday July 10
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Sunday July 26
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Music
Sunday July 12
Festival. Live on the Patio: Hanggai. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
●●6:00: Canadian Music Centre. Regent
Park SongBook Premiere. New vocal works
by Regent Park community members; works
by Gervais, Hamidi, LeBel and Daniel. 20 St.
Joseph St. 416-961-6601 x20. Free.
●●7:00: Evoid/Array. Dance to the e-Void Collective. e-Void Collective Orchestra. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. Sign up
for membership. All ages welcome.
at Metropolitan
Summer Carillon
Recital Series
The historic 54-bell carillon at
Metropolitan United Church is
North America’s first tuned carillon.
July 16, 7 pm
Koen Cosaert, carillon
Thursday July 23
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Hillside Summer
July 23, 7 pm
Margaret Pan, carillon
Festival. Live on the Patio: Tamikrest. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Jayme Stone’s Lomax
Project, Part II. Revival of pioneer folklorist
Alan Lomax’s field recordings. Jayme Stone,
banjo; Margaret Glaspy, vocals/guitar; Tatiana
Hargreaves, fiddle/vocals; Joe Phillips, bass.
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:00: Music at Metropolitan. Summer
Carillon Concerts: Margaret Pan, Carillon.
Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E.
416-363-0331. Free.
Metropolitan United Church
56 Queen Street E.,Toronto
416-363-0331 (ext. 26)
www.metunited.org
●●7:00: Music at Metropolitan. Summer
Carillon Concerts: Koen Cosaert, Carillon.
Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E.
416-363-0331. Free.
Friday July 17
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Bonsound. Live
on the Patio: Pierre Kwenders. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food
& drinks available.
Friday July 24
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Hillside Summer
●●7:30: Koerner Hall. National Youth Orches-
tra of Canada. LeBel: monograph of bird’s
eye views; R. Strauss: Oboe Concerto; Holst:
The Planets. 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.
$25-$45.
Tuesday July 28
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Andrew Ager, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●7:00: North York Concert Band. Concert
Under the Stars. Band music, show tunes,
swing music, other music. John Edward Liddle, conductor. Earl Bales Park Community
Centre, 4169 Bathurst St. 416-802-6819. Free.
Also July 9, 30(Mel Lastman Square). Concert
will be indoors in case of rain.
●●7:30: Rezonance Baroque Ensemble. I
Giorni di Cane Pazzi. Farina: Capriccio stravagante; Frescobaldi: Capriccio sopra Il Cucho;
other works from 17th-century Italy. Rezonance Baroque Ensemble; Michelle Odorico,
violin; Eleanor Verrette, viola. Artscape
Youngplace, 180 Shaw St. 416-530-2787. TBA.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Sax and Violins. Villa
thewholenote.com
Lobos: Saxophone Concerto; Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings; and other works.
Marc Funkenhauser, saxophone. Casa Loma,
1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $24; $18(sr/st);
$14(4-13); Free(less than 4).
Wednesday July 29
●●12:30: Organix Concerts. In Concert.
Simon Walker, organ. St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church, 921 Flagship Dr., Mississauga. 905270-2301. Freewill offering.
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Ton Beau String
Quartet. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Thursday July 30
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Classic Albums
Live. Live on the Patio: Classic Albums Live
Band. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Impressions. Ravel:
String Quartet in F; Rowson: String Quartet
No.1. Ton Beau String Quartet. 235 Queens
Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Concert
under the stars. Band music, show tunes,
swing music, and other music. John Edward
Liddle, conductor. Mel Lastman Square,
5100 Yonge St. 416-802-6819. Free. Also July
9, 28 (Earl Bales Park).
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE Preview Performance. Electroacoustic music
theatre salon and sound installation. Fides
Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko (The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The Young Journalist).
Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-568-8324.
$55. Also Jul 31, August 1, 2, 4-9.
Friday July 31
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Classic Albums
Live. Live on the Patio: Classic Albums Live
Band. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Steinway Piano Gallery Toronto. An
Evening with Ron Korb and Chris Donnelly.
Featuring music from Asia Beauty by Ron
Korb. Ron Korb, world flutes; Chris Donnelly,
piano. Steinway Hall, 2651 John St., Markham. 905-948-5937. Free.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, August
1, 2, 4-9.
Saturday August 1
●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Ari-
adne auf Naxos. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723.
TBA. Also Aug 4, 6, 8.
●●5:00: Cui International Music Festival.
Opening Concert. Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-488-7884. .
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Martha. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto,
214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA. Also
Aug 5, 7, 9.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
thewholenote.com
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 2, 4-9.
Thursday August 6
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
The St. Royals. 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
Sunday August 2
●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Der
Vampyr. Robert Gill Theatre, University of
Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA.
Also Jul 31, Aug 5, 8.
●●2:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 4-9.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Andrew Adair, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
presents
Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA.
Also Jul 31, Aug 2, 5.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 2, 4-7, 9.
Sunday August 9
●●2:00: No Strings Theatre’s Young Com-
music and lyrics by
Stephen Sondheim
Monday August 3
Studio Theatre
Toronto Centre
for the Arts
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Soloists of the Cui International
Music Festival. Wagner: Dich, teure Halle
from Tannhäuser; Gershwin: Summertime
from Porgy and Bess; Schumann (arr. Liszt):
Liebeslied; other works. Monique McDonald,
soprano; Irina Rindzuner, soprano; Ricardo
Rosa, baritone; Gulchekhra Inoyatova, piano;
others. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223.
PWYC; suggested donation $5.
August 6-9
ticketmaster.ca
nostringstheatre.com
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre’s Young Com-
pany. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim.
Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge
St. 1-855-985-2787. $30; $22.50 (sr/st);
$15(under 12). Also on Aug 7, 8, and 9.
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Ariadne auf Naxos. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723.
TBA. Also Aug 1, 4, 8.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE Gala
Performance. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound installation. Fides
Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko (The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The Young Journalist).
Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-568-8324.
$55. Gala includes a cocktail reception and
talk-back. Also Jul 30, 31, August 1, 2, 4, 5, 7-9.
Tuesday August 4
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: My Way. A selection
of Frank Sinatra’s greatest hits. Dan Lauzon,
vocalist; Grand Salon, guest artists. Casa
Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $24;
$18(sr/st); $14(4-13); Free(under 4).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Ariadne auf Naxos. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723.
TBA. Also Aug 1, 6, 8.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 2, 5-9.
Friday August 7
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre’s Young Com-
pany. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim.
Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge
St. 1-855-985-2787. $30; $22.50 (sr/st);
$15(under 12). Also on Aug 6, 8, and 9.
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Martha. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto,
214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA. Also on
Aug 1, 5, 9.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 2, 4-6, 8, 9.
Wednesday August 5
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Matthew Whitfield, organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890
or 416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Der
Vampyr. Robert Gill Theatre, University of
Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA.
Also Jul 31, Aug 2, 8.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
The St. Royals. 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 2, 4, 6-9.
Saturday August 8
●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Ari-
adne auf Naxos. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723.
TBA. Also Aug 1, 4, 6.
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre’s Young Company. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim.
Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge
St. 1-855-985-2787. $30; $22.50 (sr/st);
$15(under 12). Also on Aug 6, 7, and 9.
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Der
Vampyr. Robert Gill Theatre, University of
pany. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim.
Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge
St. 1-855-985-2787. $30; $22.50 (sr/st);
$15(under 12). Also on Aug 6, 7, and 8.
●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Martha. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto,
214 College St. 416-366-7723. TBA. Also on
Aug 1, 5, 7.
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Choro -- Brazilian
Soul Music. Tio Chorinho Choro Ensemble.
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Andrew Adair, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Creative Music. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
416-532-3019. $10 or PWYC.
●●8:00: The Mermaid Collective. DIVE. Electroacoustic music theatre salon and sound
installation. Fides Krucker, vocals; Earl Pastko
(The Old Professor); Michael Gouveia (The
Young Journalist). Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-568-8324. $55. Also Jul 30, 31,
August 1, 2, 4-8.
Monday August 10
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. From Baroque to Brazil - Music
for two guitars from Couperin to Chopin and
Gismonti. Altius Guitar Duo: Adam Batstone
and Chad Yacobucci, guitars. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
Tuesday August 11
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:00: Evoid/Array. Dance to the e-Void Collective. e-Void Collective Orchestra. Array
Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. Sign up
for membership. All ages welcome.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Puttin’ on the Ritz.
Works by Gershwin, Porter, Kern and others.
Grand Salon. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace.
416-923-1171. $24; $18(sr/st); $14(4-13);
Free(under 4).
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Audiopollination. Michael Lynn, double bass.
Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019.
$10 or PWYC.
Wednesday August 12
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday. Edmee Nataprawira, piano/cello and John Gardham,
organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Thursday August 13
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
June | July | August, 2015 | 61
A. Concerts in the GTA
Music Society. Live on the Patio: Quique
Escamilla. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Summer Breezes. Rossini: Overture to Cinderella; Barber: Summer
Music; new works by Lau and Estacio. Blythwood Winds. 235 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000. Free.
Friday August 14
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
Music Society. Live on the Patio: TBA. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food & drinks available.
Sunday August 16
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Ragas by the Lake. Classical Hindustani ragas. Monsoon Trio (Jonathan Kay, tenor saxophone/bansuri; Andrew
Kay, alto saxophone; Justin Gray, bass veena).
Guest: Ravi Naimpally, tabla. 235 Queens Quay
W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Choral Recital.
Diocesan Girls’ Choir. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
Monday August 17
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: The Romantic Character Piece.
Chopin: Ballade No.4 in f, Op.52; Schumann:
Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op.
15; other works. William Aide, piano. 10 Trinity
Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested
donation $5.
Tuesday August 18
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Thomas Gonder, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: The Glorious 100.
Choral works by Handel, Elgar and others.
Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171.
$24; $18(sr/st); $14(4-13); Free(under 4).
Wednesday August 19
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Angli-
can Church. Concerts at Midday. Euba, tuba
quartet. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. Free.
Thursday August 20
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
Music Society. Live on the Patio: Emma-Lee.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-5934822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: There and Back. Roots
and Original Music from Scotland and Appalachia. Coracree. 235 Queens Quay W. 416973-4000. Free.
Friday August 21
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
Music Society. Live on the Patio: The Slocan
Ramblers. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
Saturday August 22
●●8:00: Arraymusic. The Triana Project: Fla-
menco Dance. Flamenco musicians, singers,
62 | June | July | August, 2015
Tuesday September 1
and dancers. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
416-532-3019. TBA.
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
Sunday August 23
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Wednesday September 2
Music in the Garden: Un Brin de Fantaisie
-- Italian Instrumental Music of the Early
Baroque. Works by Castello, Frescobaldi,
Kapsberger, Pittoni Ferrarese and others.
Ensemble La Cigale. 235 Queens Quay W. 416973-4000. Free.
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Lula Music and
Arts Centre. Live on the Patio: Mar Aberto
SoundSystem. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food & drinks
available.
recent era. Silk String Trio (Wen Zhao, pipa/
lute; Ziwen Qin, guzheng/zither; Di Zhang,
yangqin/dulcimer). 235 Queens Quay W. 416973-4000. Free.
The Toronto Cornish Association
& St. Olave’s Anglican Church
proudly present the
TRELAWNY MALE CHOIR
Thursday September 3
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Lula Music and
Monday August 24
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Blackwood. Togni: Benedicite
(world premiere). Peter-Anthony Togni,
organ and piano; Jeff Reilly, bass clarinet.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
Tuesday August 25
●●1:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
Tues., Sept. 8, 2015, 7 p.m.
Sunday September 6
To get yours call
416 698-0336 or 416 769-5686
●●4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Stage and Screen.
Music from Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost
Ark, West Wide Story, Phantom of the Opera,
Les Misérables, and other Hollywood and
Broadway hits. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $24; $18(sr/st); $14(4-13);
Free(under 4).
Direct from Cornwall, England
Arts Centre. Live on the Patio: Lula All Stars.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-5934822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Arrelumbre -- Light
after Dark. Flamenco, Balkan, Sephardic,
Turkish and original music. Ventanas; Tamar
Ilana, vocals. 235 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000. Free.
Music in the Garden: Silk and Bamboo. Chinese music from the Qing Dynasty to the
at St. Olave’s Anglican Church
360 Windermere Ave., Toronto
(south of Bloor, between
Runnymede and Jane).
Chairlift available.
Tickets: $20 before Aug. 28;
$25 after Aug. 28 and at door.
For more info go to stolaves.ca
or torontocornishassociation.org
B. Concerts Beyond the GTA
IN THIS ISSUE: Ancaster, Barrie, Brantford, Cambridge,
Campbellford, Dundas, Hamilton, Kingston, London,
Midland, Pefferlaw, Peterborough, Stratford, Waterloo.
Wednesday August 26
●●12:35: St. Stephen’s in-the-Fields Anglican
Tuesday June 2
Church. Concerts at Midday. Simon Walker,
organ. 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-­344-­3890 or
416-­921­-6350. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative.
Plein Air Garden Concert. Adventures in
filmmaking with filmmaker Peter Rowe.
345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. Free.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest 2015 No 2: Penderecki
String Quartet with Pamela Highbaugh-Aloni,
cello. Beethoven: Quartet in c-sharp, Op.131;
Schubert: Quintet in C, D956. KWCMS Music
Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-8861673. $50; $30(st).
Thursday August 27
Wednesday June 3
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
The Massey Hall Band. 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
●●7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer
Music in the Garden: Ancient Echoes, New
Beats. Nagata Shachu Taiko Drum Ensemble.
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru.
Sandra Ruttan and Dean Perry. Works by
Debussy, Meyerbeer and Sondheim. Sandra
Ruttan, piano and vocals; Dean Perry, piano.
Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N.,
Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5; free(st).
Friday August 28
Friday June 5
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
●●7:30: Cambridge Symphony Orchestra.
The Massey Hall Band. 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food & drinks available.
Tenors Times Three. Selection of works from
the world of opera, Neapolitan and Spanish songs, and more. Romulo Delgado, tenor;
Ernesto Ramírez, tenor; Stanislas Vitort,
tenor. Forward Church, 455 Myers Rd, Cambridge. 519-239-0710. PWYC.
●●8:00: Acoustic Muse Concerts. Annual
Smales Pace / Change of Pace Folk Reunion.
Laura Smith; David Bradstreet; James Gordon; Paul Mills; Bill Garrett and Sue Lothrop;
and others. Aeolian Hall, 795 Dundas St.
E., London. 519-672-7950 or 519-319-5847.
$35/$30(adv). Silent and live auction to benefit the Ken Palmer Bursary Fund.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest 2015 No 3: Lafayette
Quartet with the PSQ’s Christine Vlajk, viola.
M. Haydn: String Quintet in C, P108; Shostakovich: Quartet No.13; Enescu: Octet, Op.7.
Sunday August 30
●●4:00: St. James Cathedral. Organ Recital.
David Briggs, organ. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●8:00: Somewhere There/Arraymusic.
Audiopollination. Array Space, 155 Walnut
Ave. 416-532-3019. $10 or PWYC.
Monday August 31
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. R. Strauss: Vier Lieder, Op.27;
Dvořák: Symphony No.8 in G, Op.88, B.163.
Rachel Krehm, soprano; Canzona Chamber
Players; Evan Mitchell, conductor. 10 Trinity
Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC; suggested donation $5.
Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery, 25 Caroline
St N, Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $35; $20(st).
Saturday June 6
●●2:00: Westben. Fiddler on the Roof. Book
by Joseph Stein, music by Jerry Boch, lyrics
by Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Sholem Aleichem. Andrew Tees (Tevye); Kimberly
Dafoe (Golda); Donna Bennett (Fruma Sarah);
Westben Festival Chorus & Friends; Edward
Franko, director. The Barn, 6698 County
Rd. 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777. $39;
$37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). Also Jun 7, 13,
14(mat); Jun 12 (eve).
●●7:30: Barrie Concert Band. Let’s Celebrate
Barrie! Multimedia concert celebrating Barrie’s history. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church,
50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-481-1607. $20;
$15(sr/st); free(under 5).
●●7:30: Grand River Chorus. Concert 4: AllA-Sea. W. Ross McDonald School Auditorium,
350 Brant Ave., Brantford. 519-841-9708.
$25; $15(child).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest 2015 No 4: QuartetFest
Young Artists. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $15; $10(st).
●●8:00: Peterborough Symphony. Summer
in Vienna. Beethoven: Symphony No.7; Mozart: Piano Concerto No.26. Jan Lisiecki, piano.
Showplace Performance Centre, 290 George
St. N., Peterborough. 705-742-7469. $36.50;
$15(rush); $5(eyeGO).
Sunday June 7
●●2:00: Westben. Fiddler on the Roof. Book
by Joseph Stein, music by Jerry Boch, lyrics
by Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Sholem Aleichem. Andrew Tees (Tevye); Kimberly
thewholenote.com
Dafoe (Golda); Donna Bennett (Fruma Sarah);
Westben Festival Chorus & Friends; Edward
Franko, director. The Barn, 6698 County
Rd. 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777. $39;
$37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). Also June 6, 13,
14(mat); June 12 (eve).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest 2015 No 4: QuartetFest Young Artists, Winner of the Penderecki
Quartet Prize. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $15; $10(st).
Thursday June 11
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Matthew Larkin, organ.
270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. The series runs every Thurs
through Aug 27.
Friday June 12
●●7:00: Westben. Fiddler on the Roof. Book
by Joseph Stein, music by Jerry Boch, lyrics
by Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Sholem Aleichem. Andrew Tees (Tevye); Kimberly
Dafoe (Golda); Donna Bennett (Fruma Sarah);
Westben Festival Chorus & Friends; Edward
Franko, director. The Barn, 6698 County
Rd. 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777. $39;
$37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). Also June 6, 7, 13,
14(mat).
●●7:30: Arcady. Voices of Summer. Beckett: New Works. Ronald Beckett, conductor.
Central Presbyterian Church (Brantford),
97 Wellington St., Brantford. 519-428 3185.
$10-$22.
Saturday June 13
●●2:00: Westben. Fiddler on the Roof. Book
by Joseph Stein, music by Jerry Boch, lyrics
by Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Sholem Aleichem. Andrew Tees (Tevye); Kimberly
Dafoe (Golda); Donna Bennett (Fruma Sarah);
Westben Festival Chorus & Friends; Edward
Franko, director. The Barn, 6698 County
Rd. 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777. $39;
$37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). Also Jun 6, 7,
14(mat); Jun 12 (eve).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Maxim Lando, Piano. Chopin: Ballade
No.1 in g, Op.23; Kalliwoda: Morceau de Salon
for Clarinet and Piano; Tchaikovsky: Dumka,
Op.59; Liszt: La Leggierezza; Bach: Prelude
and Fugue in E WTC 1 No.9; other works.
Guests: Vadim Lando, clarinet; Pippa Borisy,
piano. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $25; $15(st).
Sunday June 14
●●2:00: Westben. Fiddler on the Roof. Book
by Joseph Stein, music by Jerry Boch, lyrics
by Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Sholem Aleichem. Andrew Tees (Tevye); Kimberly
Dafoe (Golda); Donna Bennett (Fruma Sarah);
Westben Festival Chorus & Friends; Edward
Franko, director. The Barn, 6698 County
Rd. 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777. $39;
$37(sr); $15(st); $5(youth). Also June 6, 7,
13(mat); June 12 (eve).
Tuesday June 16
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Community Orchestra Ensembles.
Finzi: Five Bagetelles; Delibes: Flower Duet
from Lakmé (flutes/piano); Mozart: Flute
Quartet; Shostakovich: Elegy in F-sharp (violin/piano); Corelli: Concerto Grosso Op.6,
thewholenote.com
No.10; other works. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$15; $8(st).
Wednesday June 24
Saturday July 11
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
●●7:30: Brookside Music: Festival of the Bay.
Society. Su Jeon, Piano and Andrea Tyniec,
Violin. Schubert: Violin Sonata in A, D574;
Mozetich: L’esprit chantant; Szymanowski:
Nocturne e Tarentella; Pärt: Fratres; Spiegel
im Spiegel; Schubert: Fantasy in C. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $30; $20(st).
Thursday June 18
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Ioulia Blinova and Ruby Jin,
Piano Duo. Works by Brahms and Piazzolla.
270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. The series runs every Thurs
through Aug 27.
●●7:30: HanVoice. HanVoice in Concert with
Scott St. John & Friends. Mendelssohn: Octet;
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings; Dvořák:
Piano Quintet; Bach: Brandenburg No.3;
Seung Jae Chung: Arirang Fantasy for clarinet quintet. Scott St. John, violin; Sharon
Wei, viola; Min Jeong Koh, violin; Angela Park,
piano; Roman Borys, cello; and others. Paul
Davenport Theatre, Talbot College, Western University, Lambton Dr, London. 416-8201007. $35/$30(adv); $25(st)/$20(adv). Also
June 17(U of T). In support of North Korean
human rights and refugee crisis.
Thursday June 25
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Gabriel’s Oboe. Morricone
(arr. Palmer). Barbara Bolte, Anke Carrington
and Julie Paul. 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613548-4617. Freewill offering. Series runs every
Thurs through Aug 27.
●●7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.
HPO Indie Series. Hamilton Philharmonic
Orchestra Chamber Ensemble; Illitry;
Christien Ledroit, composer. Park Street
Gasworks, 141 Park St. N, Hamilton. 905-5267756. $15.
Saturday June 27
Saturday June 20
●●8:00: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano
●●11:00am: Open Ears Festival of Music
Soirée. A Tribute to the Music of Sigmund
Romberg (arr. G. Murray). Romberg: Will You
Remember? (from Maytime), The Desert
Song & One Alone (from The Desert Song), I
Bring a Song of Love. Gordon Murray, piano.
St. Paul’s United Church, 29 Park St. W., Dundas. 416-631-4300. $15; $10(st).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Peter Vinograde, piano. Bach: Partitas No.1 in B-flat, BWV 825; No.4 in D, BWV
828; Shostakovich: Preludes and Fugues
No.8 and No.15; Rachmaninov: Prelude in d;
Albeniz: Rondeña (from Iberia); Liszt: Fantasia and Fugue on the B-A-C-H Theme. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $30; $20(st).
and Sound. Open Ears Regatta & Dreamworld Jukebox. Kathryn Ladano and Michael
Borkovic Duo; Ben Grossman, hurdy gurdy;
Jason White, jazz piano; Freeplay Duo. Carl
Zehr Square - Kitchener City Hall, 200 King
St. W., Kitchener. 1-888-363-3591. Free.
●●12:00 noon: Open Ears Festival of Music
and Sound/Kitchener-Waterloo Multicultural Festival. Sirens of Victoria Park. Peter
Hatch: MyAudia: Guerilla Sound Events. Peter
Hatch, composer; Lori Freedman and Kathryn Ladano, clarinets; MyAudia Ensemble.
Victoria Park, 57 Devon St., Kitchener. 1-888363-3591. Free.
●●7:00: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Ivey Handbell Ensemble. Performing on 6 octaves of handbells and hand
chimes. Trevor Cook, conductor. 270 King St.
E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering.
The series runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Sunday June 28
●●2:30: Kingston Chamber Ensemble. In Con-
cert. Mozart: Piano Quartet in E-flat; Brahms:
Piano Quartet No.2 in A. Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts, 390 King St. W.,
Kingston. 613-532-8927. $30; $20(st).
Sunday June 21
●●7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. The Dovetail
Trio. Jamie Roberts, voice/guitar; Rosie Hood,
voice; Matt Quinn, melodeon/mandolin/fiddle.
Chaucer’s Pub, 122 Carling St., London. 519473-2099. $18/$15(adv).
●●7:30: Open Ears Festival of Music and
Sound. Soundgliding. Antoine Bedard & Justin Rutledge: A Crazy Kind of Hope (Sarah
Chase, choreographer); Supercollider; Rodney Sharman: Study for a Crouching Figure.
Sarah Chase, choreographer; Andrea Nann,
Lori Freedman, Marc Boivin, James Harley,
Jeremy Bell, Gregory Oh, Leslie Ting, performers; and others. The Registry Theatre,
122 Frederick St, Kitchener. 1-888-363-3591.
$25(adv)/$30(door); $15/$20(st); $5(eyeGO).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Dmitri Kotranakis, Classical Guitar.
Ourkouzounov: Toryanse Tales; Assad: Fantasia Carioca; Domeniconi: A Step to Paradise;
Toccata in Blue; Drozd: Adagio (Omaggio a J.
S. Bach) Op.44; Piazzolla: Souite Troilean (arr.
D. Bisso); other works. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$30; $20(st).
Thursday July 2
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Harmonious Pigs Reed
Ensemble. Works from the 18th to 20th centuries, from France, Germany, Brazil, U.S.A
and other countries. Shauna McDonald, clarinet; Susan Morris, oboe; Benjamin Glossop,
bassoon. 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-5484617. Freewill offering. Series runs every
Thurs through Aug 27.
Thursday July 9
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Ali Berkok, Piano. Works by
Ligeti, Porter, Esso and Berkok. 270 King St.
E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering.
Series runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Friday July 10
●●6:00: Brookside Music: Festival of the Bay.
Adam Crossley. Music by Debussy and Ravel.
Adam Crossley, singer/songwriter. Lot 102,
837 King St., Midland. 705-527-4420. Dinner
& show: $50; $35(st); Show only: $25; $10(st).
Adam Crossley. Adam Crossley, singer/songwriter. Meaford Hall, 12 Nelson St. E., Meaford. 1-877-538-0463. $35; $15(st).
●●9:30: TD Sunfest 2015. Afro-Cuban All
Stars. Victoria Park, 509 Clarence St., London. 519-672-1522. Free. TD Bandshell.
Sunday July 12
●●7:00: Music at Fieldcote. Karen Thorn-
ton in Concert. Fieldcote Memorial Park and
Museum, 64 Sulphur Springs, Ancaster. 905648-8144. Free.
Tuesday July 14
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Lalun. Liron Man, hand pans/guitar;
Lan Dung, erhu; Jonathan Bernard, percussion. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $25; $15(st).
Thursday July 16
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Classic Delights Ensemble. Catherine Redsell, horn; William Egnatoff, flute; Joan Egnatoff, piano. 270 King St.
E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering.
Series runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Friday July 17
●●7:30: Brookside Music: Festival of the Bay.
Mauro Bertoli and Wolfgang David. Mauro
Bertoli, piano; Wolfgang David, violin. Meaford
Hall, 12 Nelson St. E., Meaford. 1-877-5380463. $35; $15(st).
Saturday July 18
●●7:00: Conrad Grebel University College.
The World Beloved: Bluegrass & Beyond. University of Waterloo Department of Music, University Choir. The Cedars, 543 Beechwood
Dr., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24256. $10;
$5(st/sr).
Sunday July 19
●●7:00: Music at Fieldcote. Boris Brott & Rita
Chiarelli in Concert. Fieldcote Memorial Park
and Museum, 64 Sulphur Springs, Ancaster.
905-648-8144. Free.
Tuesday July 21
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Lucy Zhang, Violin, Tiffany Yang Tian
and Victor Cheng, Pianos. Beethoven: Violin Sonata No.8; Bach: Sonata for Solo Violin No.1; Kevin Lau: The Water of Life; Enescu:
Violin Sonata No.3. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$15; $10(st).
Wednesday July 22
●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. National
Youth Orchestra/Youth Orchestra of the
Americas. J. Strauss Sr.: Radetzky March, Op.
228; Chavez: Symphonie India; Holst: Excerpts
from The Planets; Prokofiev: Excerpts from
Romeo and Juliet; Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture.
William Allman Memorial Arena, 15 Morenz
Dr, Stratford. 1-888-532-4470 x223. PWYC.
Thursday July 23
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Sum-
mer Concert Series: Cranberry Dixie Band.
Traditional New Orleans and Chicago style
Dixieland music and Swing. 270 King St. E.,
June | July | August, 2015 | 63
B. Concerts Beyond the GTA
Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering.
Series runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Musicians of [email protected]
Beethoven: Septet; works by Piazzolla; Fauré:
Sonata No.1. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $20; $10(st).
Sunday July 26
●●7:00: Conrad Grebel University College. In
Concert. Chamber ensemble music including works by Bach and Mozart. University of
Waterloo Department of Music Instrumental Chamber Ensembles. 140 Westmount Rd.
N., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24256. Free.
Reception after.
●●7:00: Music at Fieldcote. Music of Cole
Porter. David Warrack, conductor. Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum, 64 Sulphur
Springs, Ancaster. 905-648-8144. Free.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Alexander Tselyakov, Piano; Joyce
Lai, Violin; Chris Gongos, Horn. Beethoven:
Horn Sonata; Romance No.1 (violin/piano);
Brahms: Horn Trio; Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen for violin, piano. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$15; $10(st).
Thursday July 30
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Michael Leopold, Lute and
Ann Marie Morgan, Viola da Gamba. 270 King
St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. Series runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Wednesday August 5
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Marko Paganovic, Piano. Bach: Partita No.1, BWV 825; Beethoven: Sonata Op.28;
Mozart: Fantasie in c, K475; Chopin: Polonaise-Fantasie, Op.61; Tchaikovsky: Dumka,
Op.59. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $20; $10(st).
Thursday August 6
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Deborah Schuurmans, Piano.
270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. Series runs every Thurs through
Beat by Beat | Mainly Clubs, Mostly Jazz!
Heavies From Away
Aug 27.
Saturday August 8
●●11:00am: Eaglewood Folk Festival. All-Day
Event. Folk, roots, blues music performed
in open-air concert. Shred Kelly, Birds of
Chicago, Leaf Rapids, Brock Zeman, Cécile
Doo-Kingué and others. Living Landscapes,
7130 Old Homestead Rd., Pefferlaw. 905-7229569. $60(advance only).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. HMM Trio. Tentative program:
Beethoven: “Ghost” Op.70 No.1; Tchaikovsky:
Trio in a. Heidi Wall, piano; Marcus Scholtes,
violin; Miriam Stewart-Kroeker, cello. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $25; $15(st).
BOB BEN
Thursday August 13
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Kyoko Ogoda, Marimba and
Japanese Taiko Drum. 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. Series
runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Ari Hoenig
I
t’s here, it’s here, the Toronto Jazz Festival is here! On the Old Mill
Inn website, where they list the jazz concerts happening at the
Home Smith Bar, they refer to their lineup as a “year-round jazz
festival.” I like that. But I would object that the term describes not just
that venue, but the whole city. The festival never stops. There’s jazz
happening every day and night of the year, and it’s not too hard to find
the really top-shelf players. So in terms of local talent, the week of the
TJF isn’t much different from the rest of the year: Toronto heavies just
being heavy in Toronto.
What is different is that the Jazz Festival brings us some of the best
international talent.
Ari Hoenig: Born in Philly but based in New York, Ari Hoenig,
the monstrous, melody-playing, time-bending drummer, will be
coming back to Toronto for more. Last time Hoenig was here in town,
he brought his own ensemble (but not his own cymbals – he used
mine, which is perhaps a story for another time and place), playing
Thursday August 20
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Melinda Raymond, Violin;
Gauvin Bailey, Cello; and Clare Gordon, Piano.
270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. Series runs every Thurs through
Aug 27.
Thursday August 27
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer
Concert Series: Antonia Mahon, Flute and
Tracy Stuchbery, Piano. 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill offering. Series
runs every Thurs through Aug 27.
Saturday August 29
●●7:30: Shoreline Chorus. The Shepherd and
The Lamb. Shoreline Chorus with guests The
Leith Quartet; Ann-Marie MacDairmid, conductor. Handel: Selected choruses from Messiah; Goodall: The Lord Is My Shepherd (from
the Vicar of Dibley); Barber: Agnus Dei, Barber; Dett: Listen to the Lambs; other works.
Meaford United Church, 7 Boucher St. E.,
Meaford. 519-599-2710. $20.
C. In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
120 Diner
120 Church St. 416-792-7725
120diner.com (full schedule)
Jun 18 6pm Broadsway $20(adv)/$25(door).
Jun 19 6pm Dana Jean Phoenix
$10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 20 6pm Brad Cormier & Adam Weinmann $10(adv)/$15(door).
Jun 21 6pm Gabs Sings Babs: Gabi
Epstein Sings Music of Barbra Streisand
$10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 22 6pm Jeremy
Walmsley Trio $10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 23
6pm Jennifer Ryan & Jordan O’Connor
$10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 24 6pm Sam
Broverman: “The Life & Music of Johnny
Mercer” $10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 25 6pm
Laura Hubert $10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 26
6pm Shannon Butcher & Ross MacIntyre
$10(adv)/$15(door). Jun 27 6pm Ori Dagan &
Kat Langdon $10(adv)/$15(door).
80 Gladstone
July 6-10, 2015
London, Ontario
80 Gladstone Ave. 416-516-7199
80gladstone.com (full schedule)
Jun 29 7pm Rob Mosher’s Polebridge $10.
www.percshop.uwo.ca
Alleycatz
2409 Yonge St. 416-481-6865
alleycatz.ca
All shows: 9pm unless otherwise indicated.
Call for cover charge info.
64 | June | July | August, 2015
Every Mon 8pm Salsa Night w/ Frank Bischun and free lessons. Every Tue 8:30pm
Bachata Night w/ DJ Frank Bischun and
free lessons. Every Wed 8:30pm Carlo
Berardinucci Band. No cover. Jun 5, 19,
20 Lady Kane. Jun 6 Jamesking. Jun 12,
13 Taxi. Jun 26 Orangeman. Jun 27 Soular.
Annette Studios
566 Annette St. 647-880-8378
annettestudios.com
Every Mon 9:30pm Jazz Jam w/Jared Goldman Quintet. Suggested donation $12/$9(st).
Artword Artbar
15 Colbourne St., Hamilton. 905-543-8512
artword.net (full schedule)
Jun 6 9pm Thom Mason, Adrean Farrugia,
Pat Collins $8/$5(st). Jun 12 8pm Art Crawl:
Jazz with the Aubrey Wilson Quartet PWYC.
Jun 17 8pm The Jason Jones Unit $5. Jun 24
8pm The Brenda Brown Quartet $10. Jun 25
8pm Scott Taplay Trio feat. Adrean Farrugia $5-$10.
Blakbird, The
812b Bloor St. W. 647-344-7225
theblakbird.com (full schedule)
Bloom
2315 Bloor St. W. 416-767-1315
thewholenote.com
I say they used to have a modest
fan base, because that base has since
exploded and become anything but
modest. It may have been simply
word of mouth, but more likely it had
something to do with that Grammy
they won. Since then, The Rex has
become way too small for the gigantic
audience they would inevitably draw
– they started playing bigger venues,
like Lee’s Palace and Adelaide Hall.
Sometimes, they’d do a surprise
late night set at The Rex, which,
despite the short notice, would still
end up packed. Snarky Puppy’s
studio recordings and videos show
their music being represented by a gigantic ensemble, practically an
orchestra, including a string section, too many keyboards, and just
enough grandeur. But when they play live, at least in Toronto, they
bring a condensed version of the ensemble which sounds not worse,
not better, but different. There’s a certain rawness and aggression
present in their live shows that is softened in their studio recordings.
To say the least, it’s worth checking out, if only once.
For a survey of what this group is all about, listen to three songs:
Skate U, Binky and Lingus. All appear on different albums and all
can be found online. Snarky Puppy will be crowding the Toronto Star
stage at Nathan Phillips Square for the festival on June 26. As someone
who’s seen them live at least 12 times and never got tired of it, I can
confidently say you’ll have fun.
Other out-of-towners gracing Toronto stages for the TJF include:
Branford Marsalis, Dan Weiss Trio, Phil Dwyer Trio, Robert Glasper,
Tower of Power, Kurt Elling and a supergroup featuring Dave Holland,
Chris Potter, Lionel Loueke and Eric Harland. A lot of these groups
(and others not mentioned!) are appearing on the main stages, which
haven’t been listed in the Clubs section, so make sure to go to
torontojazz.com for all the details you need to plan your festival week,
and pick up paper guides at any of the main stages.
Are you ready? Let’s do this thing.
his original music, which is consistently both rhythmically intricate, as
you would expect from a drummer,
and harmonically sophisticated, which
you might not. Hoenig’s original
music is something else, and it must
be heard. But if there’s one recording
that I think captures the group at
their best, it’s a rendition of a song by
another composer: their take on Bobby
Timmons’ Moanin’ from the album
Lines of Oppression is pure gold. The
recording begins with Hoenig demonstrating what he’s at least partially
known for, which is his ability to play
coherent, discernible, tonal melodies
on the drums, capturing the notes of a given chord with the drums’
open tunings, and achieving in-between notes and bending pitches
with his hands and elbows. He plays the melody, but the solos are
done with all the instruments in their traditional roles. Over a dirty
jazz shuffle that swings hard and pushes everything forward, his
bandmates do Moanin’ justice, to say the least. Honourable mention
goes to Tigran Hamasyan’s piano solo which is dripping with attitude
on that track.
Hoenig will be coming to The Rex for two nights to play with Alex
Goodman’s trio – Alex is a U of T alum who did his master’s degree
in music at the Manhattan School and settled in the Big Apple. Rick
Rosalo, the bassist in the trio, incidentally, is also a jazz musician of
Canadian origin who was drawn to NYC like a moth to the flame.
Sensing a pattern here?
Snarky Puppy used to have a modest fan base in Toronto. A base
of which I was a part. Around 2011 to 2013, I attended every single
concert they played in Toronto. If they played two nights, more often
than not, I went to both. I wasn’t alone in being such a dedicated fan
– the band regularly sold out The Rex, leaving behind a handful of
people who were naive enough to think they had a chance of getting
in without coming early. I remember one snowy night in 2012; I was
one of those naive kids. I waited 90 minutes outside in the freezing
cold, but was eventually let in and caught a set and a half. It was
worth it.
bloomrestaurant.com
All shows: 19+. Call for reservations.
Jun 14 7pm Suba Sankaran Autorickshaws
$50 (with dinner). Jun 25 7pm Patricia Cano
Trio $45 (with dinner).
Blue Goose Tavern, The
1 Blue Goose St., Mimico. 416-255-2442
thebluegoosetavern.com (full schedule)
Jun 7 4pm Blues at the Goose Jam Session
with The BG Rhythm Section: Gary Kendall
(bass), Mike Fitzpatrick (drums), feat. Robin
Bank$ & Teddy Leonard. Jun 14 4pm Blues at
the Goose Jam Session with The BG Rhythm
Section: Gary Kendall (bass), Mike Fitzpatrick (drums), feat. Johnny Max & Steve Grisbrook. Jun 21 4pm Blues at the Goose Jam
Session with The BG Rhythm Section: Gary
Kendall (bass), Mike Fitzpatrick (drums), feat.
Paul Reddick & Greg Cockerill. Jun 28 4pm
Blues at the Goose Jam Session with The BG
Rhythm Section: Gary Kendall (bass), Mike
Fitzpatrick (drums), feat. Jerome Godboo &
Eric Schenkman.
Castro’s Lounge
2116e Queen St. E. 416-699-8272
castroslounge.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover/PWYC.
Every Wed 6pm The Mediterranean Stars.
thewholenote.com
Snarky Puppy
Bob Ben is The WholeNote’s jazz listings editor. He
can be reached at [email protected]
Every Sat 4:30pm Big Rude Jake.
Brunch hosted by Anthony Abbatangeli No
cover.
C’est What
Dominion on Queen
67 Front St. E (416) 867-9499
cestwhat.com (full schedule)
Jun 13, 27 3pm The Hot Five Jazzmakers No
cover/PWYC.
500 Queen St. E. 416-368-6893
dominiononqueen.com (full schedule)
Call for cover charge info.
Chalkers Pub, Billiards & Bistro
Emmet Ray, The
247 Marlee Ave. 416-789-2531
chalkerspub.com (full schedule)
Every Wed 8pm Girls Night Out Jazz Jam w/
host Lisa Particelli PWYC. Jun 6 6pm Fern
Lindzon (piano, voice) Trio with Ross MacIntyre (bass), Ethan Ardelli (drums) $15. Jun 13
6pm Brian Dickinson (piano) Trio with Dan
Fortin (bass), Ethan Ardelli (drums) $15.
Jun 14 7pm Marito Marques $15. Jun 20 6pm
Don Thompson (piano) & Reg Schwager
(guitar) $15. Jun 21 7pm Lisa Particelli’s
Girls Night Out JAZZ All-Star Vocal Showcase $20. Jun 26 7pm The Ault Sisters $10.
Jun 27 6pm Lorne Lofsky (guitar)Trio with
Kieran Overs (bass), Barry Romberg (drums)
$20(adv)/$25(door).
924 College St. 416-792-4497
theemmetray.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover/PWYC.
Jun 4 9pm John-Wayne Swingtet: Wayne
Nakamura (guitar), Abbey Sholzberg (bass),
John Farrell (guitar). Jun 14 5pm Monk’s
Music; 7:30pm Harley Card Trio. Jun 15
9:30pm Rebecca Hennesey’s Fog. Jun 21
5pm Harrison Vetro; 7:30pm Jeff LaRochelle
Quartet.
Fat City Blues
890 College St. 647-345-8282
fatcityblues.com (full schedule)
Jun 18 9:30pm Tyler Yarema No cover.
Jun 19 9:30pm Patrick Tevlin No cover. Jun 21
9:30pm John Lennard No cover.
DeSotos
Flying Beaver Pubaret, The
1079 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-651-2109
desotos.ca (full schedule)
Every Sun 11am-2pm Sunday Live Jazz
488 Parliament St. 647-347-6567
pubaret.com (full schedule)
Free Times Cafe
320 College St. 416-967-1078
freetimescafe.com (full schedule)
Garage @ CSI Annex, The
720 Bathurst St. 416-619-4621
livefromtheannex.com
Jun 2 ‘Live From the Annex’ monthly Cabaret $15(adv).
Gate 403
403 Roncesvalles Ave. 416-588-2930
gate403.com
All shows: PWYC.
Jun 1 5pm Mike Daley Jazz Trio; 9pm Bruce
Chapman Blues Duo with feature guests.
Jun 2 5pm Howard Willett Blues Duo; 9pm
Nick Morgan Jazz Trio. Jun 3 5pm Evan
Desaulnier Jazz Trio; 9pm Julian Fauth
Blues Night. Jun 4 5pm Joanne Morra & the
France St. Jazz Ensemble; 9pm Mélanie Brûlée’s Band. Jun 5 5pm Sarah Kennedy and
Matt Pines Jazz Duo; 9pm Fraser Melvin
Blues Band. Jun 6 5pm Bill Heffernan and His
Friends; 9pm Six Points Jazz Orchestra. Jun 7
5pm Anything Goes Jazz Band; 9pm Bartosz
Hadala Group. Jun 8 5pm Clela Errington
Root Music Duo; 9pm Chris Staig Trio. Jun 9
5pm Thom Mason Jazz Trio; 9pm Lisa Patterson’s Roam Original Roma Roots Trio. Jun 10
June | July | August, 2015 | 65
D. In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
5pm Michelle Rumball with friend; 9pm Julian Fauth Blues Night. Jun 11 5pm Jacqueline Brown Jazz Band; 9pm Kevin Laliberté
Jazz & Flamenco Trio. Jun 12 5pm Ken Taylor: Fixin’s Jazz Trio; 9pm The Sleaper Group.
Jun 13 5pm Bill Heffernan and His Friends;
9pm John Deehan Jazz Band. Jun 14 5pm
Carter Brodkorb Jazz Quintet; 9pm Johnny
Cox and the Magnetic Line. Jun 15 5pm Clair
Lee Jazz Trio; 9pm Blues and Troubles. Jun 16
5pm Sarah Kennedy and Matt Pines Jazz Duo;
9pm Nomad’s Groove Latin Jazz Duo. Jun 17
5pm Concord Jazz Quintet; 9pm Julian Fauth
Blues Night.Jun 18 5pm Roger Chong Jazz
Band; 9pm Annie Bonsignore Jazz Duo or
Trio. Jun 19 5pm Sam Broverman Jazz Duo;
9pm Denielle Bassels Jazz Band. Jun 20 5pm
Bill Heffernan and His Friends; 9pm Sweet
Derrick Blues Band. Jun 21 5pm Jeff Taylor
and the SLT; 9pm Brownman Akoustic Trio.
Jun 22 5pm Mike Daley Jazz Trio; 9pm Fraser Melvin Blues Band. Jun 23 5pm Concord
Jazz Quintet; 9pm Tiffany Hanus Jazz Band.
Jun 24 5pm G Street Jazz Trio; 9pm Julian
Fauth Blues Night. Jun 25 5pm The Kathleen
Gorman Group; 9pm Whitney Ross-Barris
Jazz Band. Jun 26 5pm Cyndi Carleton: At
Ease Music; 9pm Lisa Hutchinson Blues Quartet. Jun 27 5pm Joanne Morra & the France
St. Jazz Ensemble; 9pm Melissa Boyce Jazz
& Blues Band. Jun 28 5pm Cheryl White Rhythym & Blues Band; 9pm Anthony Fung Jazz
Trio. Jun 29 5pm Dan Pitt Jazz Duo; 9pm
Kalya Ramu Jazz Band. Jun 30 5pm Michael
Bell and Rob Phillip Jazz Duo; 9pm James
Byron Band.
Grano
2035 Yonge St. 416-440-1986
grano.com (full schedule)
Every Wed 7pm June with Gene (DiNovi)
$15/$35(with dinner).
Grossman’s Tavern
379 Spadina Ave. 416-977-7000
grossmanstavern.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover unless otherwise noted.
Jun 1 10pm The Band Called ‘No Band
Required’. Jun 2, 23 9:30pm Django Gypsy
Jam. Jun 3, 24 10pm Bruce Domoney. Jun 9
8pm The 4th Annual Amy Louie Grossman’s
Music Scholarship Fundraiser Concert.
Jun 18 9:30pm Ms. Debbie & the Don Valley Stompers. Jun 19 9:30pm Paul Wiggins
Jazz Combo. Jun 20 4:30pm Happy Pals.
Jun 21 4:30pm New Orleans Connection All
Stars; 10pm Brian Cober. Jun 25 10pm Laura
Hubert. Jun 26 10pm Frankie Foo. Jun 27
4:30pm Happy Pals; 10pm Caution Jam.
Habits Gastropub
928 College St. 416-533-7272
habitsgastropub.com (full schedule)
Jun 5 9pm Victor Monsiváis (guitar, voice)
Quartet with John Farrell (guitar), Abbey
Sholzberg (bass), Federico Monsiváis (drums,
percussion). Jun 6 9pm David Rubel (sax)
with Malcolm Connor (bass) and Ethan
Ardelli (drums). Jun 12 9pm Laura Fernandez Jazz Trio $10. Jun 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26 Arlene Paculan & the Cool Ones with featured guests. $10
Harlem Restaurant
Jun 22 8pm Drew Jurecka’s Gypsy Swing
Quartet $17(adv). Jun 23 8pm Phil Dwyer
Trio $29(adv). Jun 24 8pm Sinal Aberto
$25.50(adv). Jun 25 8pm Duchess
$35.50(adv). Jun 26, 27 8pm Freddy Cole
Quartet $35.50(adv).
All shows: 7:30-11pm unless otherwise noted.
Call for cover charge info.
Jun 5 Dirty Jazz. Jun 6 Liz Loughrey & Adrian
X. Jun 12, 19, 26 Dave Hutchison Jazz & Blues
Band. Jun 13 Kristin Fung. Jun 20Mike Field.
Jun 27 Zimzum.
Jazz Room, The
Hirut Cafe and Restaurant
Located in the Huether Hotel, 59 King St. N.,
Waterloo. 226-476-1565
kwjazzroom.com (full schedule)
All shows: 8:30pm-11:30pm unless otherwise
indicated. Attendees must be 19+.
Jun 5 Andy Klaehn Quintet – A Tribute to the
Great Jazz Clarinetists – Goodman, Questa,
Shaw and more $15. Jun 6 Phil Dwyer Quartet (BC) $20. Jun 12 Carey West Quartet
$15. Jun 13 Bernie Senensky Quartet $18.
Jun 19 Pram Trio $16. Jun 20 Kirk McDonald
Quartet $18. Jun 26 Rebecca Binnendyk Band
$20. Jun 27 Guido Basso Quintet $30/$15(st).
Hirut Cafe and Restaurant
2050 Danforth Ave. 416-551-7560
Every Sun 3pm Open mic with Nicola
Vaughan: folk/country/jazz/world/R&B.
Jun 2, 16 8pm Fingerstyle Guitar Association PWYC. Jun 5 8pm Chris Wallace Jazz
Trio PWYC/$10. Jun 6 7:30pm Open Mic
Brigade hosted by Robbie Patterson and
Mathieu Alepin PWYC. Jun 11 8pm Jazz
People PWYC/$5. Jun 12 8pm Summer Wonderland w/ Arlene Paculan PWYC/$10.
Jun 13 Jazzforia PWYC/$10. Jun 19 8pm
Arlene Paculan and Wonder Women
PWYC/$10. Jun 26 9pm Hirut Hoot Cabaret $5
Joe Mama’s
317 King St. W 416-340-6469
joemamas.ca
Every Tue 6pm Jeff Eager. Every Wed 6pm
Thomas Reynolds & Geoff Torrn. Every Thurs
9pm Blackburn. Every Fri 10pm The Grind.
Every Sat 10pm Shugga. Every Sun 6:30pm
Organic: Nathan Hiltz (guitar); Bernie
Senensky (organ); Ryan Oliver (sax), Morgan
Childs (drums).
Home Smith Bar – See Old Mill, The
Hugh’s Room
2261 Dundas St. W. 416-531-6604
hughsroom.com
All shows: 8:30pm unless otherwise noted.
Jun 2 10am Toronto Ravel $15.
Jun 3 Anne Lindsay – CD Release –
Soloworks $20(adv)/$22.50(door). Jun 4, 5,
6 Skydiggers $29(adv)/$32(door) (Thurs),
$32(adv)/$35(door) (Fri, Sat). Jun 10 Le Vent
Du Nord – CD Release $22.50(adv)/$25(door).
Jun 11 Mary Gauthier$27.50(adv)/$30(door).
Jun 12 China Crisis $27.50(adv)/$30(door).
Jun 13 Women of Blues at Hugh’s
$25(adv)/$28(door). Jun 14 Fraser & Girard
– CD Release $22.50(adv)/$25(door).
Jun 15 The HillBenders – CD Release –
Tommy $20(adv)/$22.50(door). Jun 16
6:45pm Kristina Minchopoulos Music Studio Recital $15(adv)/$20(door) (adults),
$12(adv)/$15(door) (children under 10).
Jun 18 Red Dirt Skinners with Alfie Smith
& Nicole Christian $20(adv)/$22.50(door).
Jun 19 A Man called Wrycraft presents “Send
Lawyers, Guns & Money” A Live Concert Tribute to Warren Zevon $25(adv)/$30(door).
Jun 20 Dar Williams – CD Release – Emerald $32.50(adv)/$35(door). Jun 21 Kenny
Werner Trio $28.50(adv)/$30(door).
Jun 22 Michael Occhipinti & The Sicilian
Jazz Project with Special Guests Pilar &
Don Byron $25(adv)/$27.50(door). Jun 24
7pm Studio 675 presents Hear My Song! A
Vocal Showcase $22.50(adv)/$25(door).
Jun 25 Kevin Breit – CD Release – Ernesto &
Delilah $22.50(adv)/$25(door). Jun 26 Halie
Loren – Canadian Release of Butterfly Blue
$20(adv)/$22.50(door). Jun 27 Glendale One
& the B-Town Horns $18(adv)/$20(door).
KAMA
214 King St. W. 416-599-5262
kamaindia.com (full schedule)
All shows: 5pm-8pm.
Jun 4 Canadian Jazz Quartet: Frank Wright
(vibes), Ted Quinlan (guitar), Pat Collins (bass), Don Vickery (drums) feat.
Steve McDade (trumpet, flugelhorn).
Jun 11 Canadian Jazz Quartet: Frank Wright
(vibes), Ted Quinlan (guitar), Pat Collins
(bass), Don Vickery (drums) feat. Michael
Stuart (sax). Jun 18 ‘The Two Tenors’: Alex
Dean & Perry White. Jun 25 Ian McDougall
(trombone) with Neil Swainson (bass).
La Revolucion
2848 Dundas St. W 416-766-0746
restaurantlarevolucion.com (full schedule)
All shows: PWYC ($10 suggested)
Jun 18 7:30pm Julian Fauth & Kenny
Yoshioka; 9:30pm Michael Keith hosts Tinderbox Thursdays Open Jam. Jun 19, 26 8pm Les
Petits Nouveaux. Jun 20 8pm Chris Bartos
Trio. Jun 21 8pm Perlhaze. Jun 23 8pm
Denielle Bassels Trio. Jun 24 8pm Ori Dagan.
Jun 25 7:30pm Sugar Brown; 9:30pm Michael
Keith hosts Tinderbox Thursdays Open Jam.
Jun 27 7pm Jozsef Botos Trio; 10:30pm Fraser Melvin Band.
Local Gest, The
424 Parliament St. 416-961-9425 (call for concert schedule)
Jazz Sundays 4:30pm-7:30pm. No cover.
Jun 7 Lazersuzan. Jun 21 Zimzum.
Jazz Bistro, The
251 Victoria St. 416-363-5299
jazzbistro.ca
Jun 3 9pm Gillian Margot (voice) with Geoffrey Keezer (piano), Richie Goods (bass),
Billy Kilson (drums) $25. Jun 18, 19, 20
8pm Renee Rosnes Quartet $35.50(adv).
Jun 21 8pm Fred Hersch Trio $35.50(adv).
Lula Lounge
1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307
lula.ca (full schedule)
Jun 3 8pm Amai Kuda & Y Josephine $12(adv)/$15(door); 9:30pm Ogguere $12(adv)/$15(door). Jun 4 7pm Jorge
and Yuri López, Rubén Vazquez, Laura
Fernández, Valeria Matzner, Eliana
67 Richmond St. E. 416-368-1920
harlemrestaurant.com (full schedule)
66 | June | July | August, 2015
Cuevas, Alec Dempster, Kali Niño, Rosy
Cervantes, Pablosky Rosales and Irene
Torres $12(adv)/$15(door); 9:30pm
Heavyweights Brass Band, Jay Douglas
$12(adv)/$15(door). Jun 5 10:30pm Jesus
Alemany, La Reunion $15(adv)/$20(door).
Jun 6 10:30pm Herman Olivera and the Lula
All Stars $15(adv)/$20(door). Jun 7 11am
Jorge Maza $15 (with buffet). Jun 9 7pm Di
Meshugeles No cover. Jun 10 8pm Rob Teehan $16(adv)/$20(door). Jun 11 8pm Erner
& Moguilevsky $15(adv)/$20(door). Jun 12
10:30pm Roberto Linares Brown’s Havana
Norte $15, free for women before 10pm.
Jun 13 10:30pm Ricky Franco $15. Jun 14,
21 11am Jorge Maza Duo $15 (with buffet). Jun 16 8pm Whitney Ross-Barris with
Nathan Hiltz $10. Jun 17 8pm Tash Lorayne
$10. Jun 19 7:30pm Yoser Rodriguez Free
before 8pm, $15 after 8pm; 10:30pm Changui
Havana $15, free for women before 10pm.
Jun 20 10:30pm The Lula All Stars $15. Jun 23
7:30pm Laura Solnicki $10(adv)/$15(door).
Jun 24 7:30pm Diane Roblin $10; 9:30pm
Alexander Brown $10. Jun 25 7:30pm
Zeynep Ozbilen $20; 9:30pm Yasgurs Farm
$10. Jun 26 7:30pm Eliana Cuevas Free
before 8pm $15 after 8pm; 10:30pm Café
Cubano $15, free for women before 10pm.
Jun 27 10:30pm Conjunto Lacalu $15. Jun 28
11am Jorge Maza duo $15 (includes buffet);
7:30pm Sunnie Paxson, Lyne Tremblay, Laura
Robinson, Rich Brown, Steve Heathcote
$25(adv)/$30(door).
Manhattans Pizza Bistro & Music Club
951 Gordon St., Guelph 519-767-2440
manhattans.ca (full schedule)
All shows: PWYC.
Jun 2, 16, 30 Brad Halls. Jun 3, 7 John Zadro.
Jun 4 Adrean Farrugia. Jun 5 Heather Katz
& Ben Jokela. Jun 6 Mary Panacci Duo.
Jun 9, 23 Thomas Hammerton. Jun 10,
24 Jokela & Vogan (24: with Charlie Cooley).
Jun 11 Joni Nehrita Duo. Jun 12, 21, 26 Paul
Taylor. Jun 14, 28 Stan Chang. Jun 17 Accent
Trio. Jun 25 Mary-Catherine Mcninch Pazzano Trio.
Mezzetta Restaurant
681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687
mezzettarestaurant.com (full schedule)
All shows: 9pm, $12 unless otherwise noted.
Jun 19 Lorne Lofsky & Rob Piltch.
Jun 20 Rebecca Enkin & Mark Kieswetter. Jun 21 Jordana Talsky with Adrean Farrugia & Pat Collins. Jun 22 Bill McBirnie &
Louis Simao. Jun 23 Klezmology. Jun 24 Ron
Davis & Ross MacIntyre. Jun 25 Brian Katz.
Jun 26 11am Luanda Jones & Reg Schwager.
Jun 27 Don Thompson, Reg Schwager, & Neil
Swainson.
Monarch Tavern
12 Clinton St. 416-531-5833
themonarchtavern.com (full schedule)
Jun 8 7:30pm Martin Loomer & His Orange
Devils Orchestra $10.
Monarchs Pub
At the Eaton Chelsea Hotel
33 Gerrard St. W. 416-585-4352
monarchspub.ca (full schedule)
All shows: 8pm-midnight unless otherwise
noted. No cover.
Jun 3 7pm Sean Meredith-Jones. Jun 4 The
thewholenote.com
Jerome Godboo Band. Jun 10 7pm The Ault
Sisters. Jun 11 Harpdog Brown. Jun 17 7pm
Snaggle. Jun 18 Wild T & The Spirit. Jun 19
9pm The Ori Dagan Trio. Jun 24 7pm Brownman & Arecibo. Jun 25 The Gary Kendall
Band. Jun 26 9pm Carlos Bastidas Trio.
Morgans on the Danforth
1282 Danforth Ave. 416-461-3020
morgansonthedanforth.com (full schedule)
All shows: 2pm-5pm. No cover.
Jun 21 Carin Redman feat. Mark Keiswetter &
Ross MacIntyre; 6:30pm Bill McBirnie & Stephen Gardner.
Motel Bar
1235 Queen St. W. 647-381-6246
Every Mon 10:30pm Richard Herriot (solo
piano); Every Other Tuesday 10:30pm
Lawrence Cotton (vocals/guitar); Every
Thu 10:30pm Nathan Hiltz (solo guitar)
Jun 7 7pm Laura Hubert.
Musideum
401 Richmond St. W., Main Floor
416-599-7323
musideum.com (full schedule)
Jun 3 8pm Brian Katz $20. Jun 4 8pm Gerry
Trimble $10. Jun 19 7pm Gary Diggins $20;
9:30pm Yvette Tollar, Dave Restivo & Alexander Brown $20. Jun 20 7pm Dave Restivo $20; 9:30pm John Alcorn, Meryn Cadell
& Friends $20. Jun 21 5pm Vocal Jazz Workshop w/ Yvette Tollar & Dave Restivo $30(par
ticipants)/$15(auditors); 7pm Christopher
Simmons $20; 9:30 Sharon McLeod. Jun 22
4pm Brownman +1 $20; 7pm Joy Lapps Trio
$20; 9:30 Mark Kieswetter $20. Jun 23 7pm
Annie Bonsignore; 9:30pm Rita DiGhent $20.
Jun 24 7pm Ailsa McCreary & Coleman Tinsley; 9:30pm Waleed Abdulhamid. Jun 25 7pm
Reg Schwager $20; 9:30pm The Jessica Stuart Few. Jun 26 7pm Nick Fraser & Lina Allemano; 9:30 Ugly Beauties; 11:30 Beverly Taft
& Tania Gill. Jun 27 7pm The Henrys $20;
9:30pm Ben Monder $20.
Nawlins Jazz Bar & Dining
299 King St. W. 416-595-1958
nawlins.ca
All shows: No cover/PWYC.
Every Tue 6:30pm Stacie McGregor. Every
Wed 7pm Jim Heineman Trio. Every Thu 8pm
Nothin’ But the Blues w/ guest vocalists.
Every Fri 8:30pm All Star Bourbon St. Band.
Every Sat 6:30pm Sam Heinman; 9pm All
Star Bourbon St. Band. Every Sun 7pm
Brooke Blackburn.
Nice Bistro, The
117 Brock St. N., Whitby. 905-668-8839
nicebistro.com (full schedule)
Old Mill, The
21 Old Mill Rd. 416-236-2641
oldmilltoronto.com
The Home Smith Bar: No reservations. No
cover unless otherwise noted. $20 food/drink
minimum. All shows: 7:30pm-10:30pm
Jun 4 Geievieve Marentette (voice) Trio with
Bernie Senensky (piano), Ross MacIntyre
(bass). Jun 5 Danny McErlain (piano) Trio
with Reg Schwager (guitar), Neil Swainson
(bass). Jun 6 Lorne Lofsky (guitar) Trio with
Kieran Overs (bass), Barry Romberg (drums).
Jun 11 Laura Fernandez (vocal) Trio with
Don Naduriak (piano), Colleen Allen (sax).
thewholenote.com
Jun 12 Kim Ratcliffe (guitar) Quartet with Alex
Dean (sax) Pat Collins (bass), Ted Warren
(drums). Jun 13 Ross Wooldridge (clarinet,
sax) Trio with Reg Schwager (guitar), Neil
Swainson (bass). Jun 18 Irene Atman (voice)
Trio with Mark Kieswetter (piano), Ross MacIntyre (bass). Jun 19 Amy Cervini (voice)
with Russ Little (trombone), Tom Szczesniak
(piano), Scott Alexander (bass), Brian Barlow
(drums) $35.50(adv). Jun 20 Amy McConnell
(voice) with Russ Little (trombone), Tom
Szczesniak (piano), Scott Alexander (bass),
Brian Barlow (drums) $35.50(adv). Jun 26
‘The Girls’: Colina Phillips & Sharon Lee Williams (voice) with Russ Little (trombone),
Tom Szczesniak (piano), Scott Alexander
(bass), Brian Barlow (drums) $35.50(adv).
Jun 27 Micah Barnes (voice) with Russ Little (trombone), Tom Szczesniak (piano), Scott
Alexander (bass), Brian Barlow (drums)
$35.50(adv).
Reposado Bar & Lounge
136 Ossington Ave. 416-532-6474
reposadobar.com (full schedule)
Every Wed 9:30pm Spy vs. Sly vs. Spy. Every
Thurs, Every Fri 10pm Reposadists Quartet. Jun 20 10pm Terra Hazelton & Her Easy
Answers $8. Jun 27 10pm Parc X Trio $8.
Reservoir Lounge, The
52 Wellington St. E. 416-955-0887
reservoirlounge.com (full schedule)
Every Tue, Every Sat 9:45pm Tyler Yarema
and his Rhythm. Every Wed 9:45pm Bradley
and the Bouncers. Every Thu 9:45pm Mary
McKay. Every Fri 9:45pm Dee Dee and the
Dirty Martinis. Jun 24 8:45pm Robin Banks.
Only Café, The
972 Danforth Ave. 416-463-7843
theonlycafe.com (full schedule)
Jun 10, 24 8pm Lazersuzan.
Paintbox Bistro
555 Dundas St. E. 647-748-0555
paintboxbistro.ca (Full schedule)
Pilot Tavern, The
22 Cumberland Ave. 416-923-5716
thepilot.ca
All shows: 3:30pm. No cover.
Jun 6 Landen Vieira (sax) Quartet with Ethan
Ardelli (drums), Jon Maharaj (bass), Adrean
Farrugia (piano). Jun 13 Perry White Quartet. Jun 20 David Rubel (sax) Quartet with
Winston Matsushita (piano), Malcolm Connor
(bass), Morgan Childs (drums).
Poetry Jazz Café
224 Augusta Ave. 416-599-5299
poetryjazzcafe.com (full schedule)
All shows: $10 cover charge.
Jun 18 9pm Shafton Thomas Group. Jun 19
9pm Brownman & Cruzao. Jun 20 9pm Rob
Cappelletto Group. Jun 21 8:30pm Ahmed
Mitchel Group. Jun 24 8pm Zaynab Wilson &
Mozayic. Jun 25, 26 9pm Thompson EgboEgbo. Jun 27 9:30pm Ori Dagan Group.
Relish Bar & Grill
2152 Danforth Ave. 416-425-4664
relishbarandgrill.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover/PWYC.
Jun 1, 22 8pm Mediterranean Stars. Jun 2
8pm Bossa Tres. Jun 3, 24 7:30pm BTBs.
Jun 4 7pm Karaoke with Shayne Taylor; 10pm
Roots and Branches Live. Jun 6 9:30pm New
Music Night with The James Clark Institute. Jun 9 7:30pm Clela Live. Jun 18 7pm
Liane Fainsinger Quartet. Jun 19 9:30pm
Pearl Motel. Jun 20 7pm Evan Deslaunier
Trio; 9:30pm Red Brick. Jun 21 11:30am Jazz
Brunch with Brickhouse Trio. Jun 23 8pm
Jazz Moustache. Jun 25 7:30pm Joanne
Morra. Jun 26 7:30pm Lilly Mason; 9:30pm
Sam Taylor and the East End Love. Jun 27
7:30pm Monica Chapman Trio; 9:30pm
Bentroots.
Syncopators; 5pm Tara Kannangara Group;
8pm NYC’s Chris Tarry Group; 11:30pm Robi
Botos Trio with Snarky Puppy’s Mike League
& Larnell Lewis. Jun 27 12pm The Sinners
Choir; 3:30pm Laura Hubert Group; 8pm Pat
LaBarbera; 10pm NYC’s Chris Tarry Group.
Jun 28 12pm Humber Community Music Student Jazz Recitals; 7pm NYC’s Northern Spy;
9:30pm Double Bill: Radiohead Jazz Project
with The T.J.O., & Idioteque. Jun 29 6:30pm
Jake Koffman Group; 9:30pm NYC’s Banda
Magda. Jun 30 6:30pm Julia Cleveland Quintet; 9:30pm David Diao hosts Classic Rex Jam.
Salty Dog Bar & Grill, The
1980 Queen St. E. 416-849-5064 (full
schedule)
Rex Hotel Jazz & Blues Bar, The
Sauce on the Danforth
194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475
therex.ca (full schedule)
Call for cover charge info.
Jun 1 6:30pm Jake Koffman Group; 9:30pm
Laura Crema (Vancouver). Jun 2 3:30pm
Freeway Dixieland Band; 6:30pm Julia Cleveland Quintet. Jun 3 6:30pm Brian de Lima’s
Bud Powell Tribute; 9:30pm Leyland Gordon
Group. Jun 4 6:30pm Kevin Quain; 9:30pm
Kevin Crabb Quartet (Los Angeles). Jun 5
4pm Hogtown Syncopators; 6:30pm The Jive
Bombers; 9:45pm Galloway & Fair. Jun 6
12pm Danny Marks and Friends; 3:30pm Chris
Hunt Tentet; 7:30pm Nick Teehan Group;
9:45pm Ross Wooldridge’s Benny Goodman
Tribute. Jun 7 12pm Excelsior Dixieland Jazz
Band; 3:30pm Club Django; 7pm Frank Rooney
Group; 9:30pm Jacob’s Cattle. Jun 8 6:30pm
Jake Koffman Group; 9:30pm Mike Malone &
The Writers Jazz Orchestra. Jun 9 6:30pm
Julia Cleveland Quintet; 9:30pm Mike Pelletier’s Jazz at the Rex. Jun 10 6:30pm Brian
de Lima’s Bud Powell Tribute; 9:45pm Kirk
Macdonald Jazz Orchestra. Jun 11 6:30pm
Chris Gale Trio; 9:45pm Kirk Macdonald Jazz
Orchestra. Jun 12 4pm Hogtown Syncopators; 6:30pm The Jive Bombers; 9:45pm Kirk
Macdonald Jazz Orchestra. Jun 13 12pm
Danny Marks and Friends; 3:30pm Jerome
Godboo; 7:30pm Nick Teehan Group; 9:45pm
The Vipers. Jun 14 12pm Excelsior Dixieland
Jazz Band; 3:30pm Red Hot Ramble; 7pm
Frank Rooney Group; 9:30pm Scott Marshall Group. Jun 15 6:30pm Jake Koffman
Group; 9:30pm John Cheesman Jazz Orchestra. Jun 16 6:30pm Julia Cleveland Quintet; 9:30pm Classic Rex Jam hosted by Chris
Gale. Jun 17 6:30pm Brian de Lima’s Bud Powell Tribute. Jun 18 5pm Morgan Childs Quartet; 8pm Mike Murley Septet; 10pm Ari Hoenig
Trio (NYC). Jun 19 3pm Hogtown Syncopators; 5pm Ari Hoenig Trio (NYC); 8pm Adrean
Farrugia Group; 10pm Ohio’s Pete Mills w/
NYC’s Pete McCann. Jun 20 12pm Danny
Marks and Friends; 3:30pm Swing Shift Big
Band; 8pm Kevin Turcotte; 10pm Brooklyn’s
Huntertones. Jun 21 12pm Excelsior Dixieland Jazz Band; 3:30pm Freeway Dixieland
Band; 7pm Joe Bowden Septet; 9:30pm Rich
Brown’s The Abeng. Jun 22 5pm U of T’s Hannah Barstow; 8:30pm John MacLeod’s Rex
Hotel Orchestra. Jun 23 6:30pm Worst Pop
Band Ever; 9:30pm Classic Rex Jam hosted by
Chris Gale. Jun 24 5pm Michael Occhipinti’s
Creation Dream; 8pm Kirk Macdonald; 10pm
NYC’s Dan Weiss Trio. Jun 25 5pm Pram Trio;
8pm Vancouver’s Eli Bennett Quartet; 10pm
NYC’s Dan Weiss Trio. Jun 26 3pm Hogtown
1376 Danforth Ave. 647-748-1376
sauceondanforth.com
All shows: No cover.
Every Mon 9pm The Out Of Towners: Dirty
Organ Jazz. Every Tue 6pm Julian Fauth.
Jun 20 4pm Matt Morgan. Jun 24 6pm Ewan
Farncombe.
Se ven44
(Formerly Chick n’ Deli/The People’s Chicken)
744 Mount Pleasant Rd. 416-489-7931
seven44.com (full schedule)
Jun 1 7:30pm Advocats Big Band No cover.
Jun 8 7:30pm Bob Cary Big Band No cover.
Jun 15 7:30pm George Lake Big Band No
cover. Jun 22 Vincent Wolfe & the Vegas
North Orchestra Cover charge. Jun 29
7:30pm Mega City Swing Band No cover.
Stori Aperitivo
95 King St. E 416-361-0404
stori.ca (full schedule)
Stori Aperitivo
Every Thurs 7pm Terra Hazelton & Her Easy
Answers No cover.
Toni Bulloni
156 Cumberland St. 416-967-7676
tonibulloni.com (full schedule)
No cover. Saturday shows: 9pm. $30 food/
drink minimum. Sunday shows: 6pm. $25
food/drink minimum.
Tranzac
292 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137
tranzac.org (full schedule)
3-4 shows daily, various styles. Mostly PWYC.
Every Mon 10pm Open Mic Mondays. Every
Thurs 7:30pm Bluegrass Thursdays: Houndstooth. Every Fri 5pm The Foolish Things
(folk). This month’s shows include: Jun 2
10pm Peripheral Vision. Jun 7, 21 5pm Monk’s
Music. Jun 9 7:30pm Aurochs; 10pm Bedroom. Jun 12 7:30pm The Ben Walker Project. Jun 14 10pm The Lina Allemano Four.
Jun 16 7:30pm Dan Pitt and guests; 10pm
The Ken McDonald Quartet. Jun 19 7:30 Dust:
The Quietest Big Band in the Known World.
Jun 21 7:30pm Diane Roblin Presents. Jun 26
10pmThe Ryan Driver Sextet. Jun 30 10pm
Nick Fraser Presents.
June | July | August, 2015 | 67
D. The ETCeteras
Galas and Fundraisers
●●June 06 5:00: Canadian Orpheus Male
Choir. Spaghetti Dinner & Variety Show.
Includes salad, bread, and dessert; Variety
Show featuring humorous musical acts by
COMC members and guests; cash bar. St.
Christopher’s Anglican Church, 662 Guelph
Line, Burlington. 289-812-9827. $15. Proceeds
to the COMC’s upcoming Ireland Tour fund.
●●June 06 6:00: Ermanno Mauro Masterclass. Annual Gala Dinner and Concert: “Les
Belles Voce.” Concert includes renowned
arias for sopranos, tenors, baritones and
bass. Performers include tenor Ermanno
Mauro and a sampling of Canadian operatic
talent, with accompanist, Nicole Bellamy. The
Columbus Centre Rotunda, 901 Lawrence
Ave. W. [email protected]
com $125 or $1000 for a table of 8.
●●June 07 3:00 – 6:00: Toronto Early Music
Players Organization. Annual Fundraising Tea and Silent Auction. Live music, free
food and beverages, CD’s, books, and sheet
music for sale. Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-537-3733. Admission by
tax-deductible donation.
●●June 18 8:00: Canadian Flute Convention.
Welcome Party. Opening ceremony of the
second national flute convention, welcoming over one hundred artists from Canada
and abroad. Sam Sorbara Auditorium, U of
St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $50 or convention passes available.
●●June 20 6:00 – 9:00: Aradia Ensemble.
Wine Tasting Fundraiser. Short wine tasting tutorial presented by Sommelier Sara
D’Amato, followed by a tasting of several
hand-selected red and white wines; hors
d’oeuvres prepared by Chef Michael Tong of
Sublime Catering; silent auction and music.
Our host for the evening is Aradia’s own Paul
Jenkins who is opening his
●●one-of-a-kind studio and home for the evening. Cocktail attire requested. 15 Central Hospital Lane. www.eventbrite.ca $100.
●●June 22 7:30: Toronto Alliance for the
Performing Arts (TAPA). 36th Annual
Dora Mavor Moore Awards. Hosted by
PASQUALE B
PASQUALE
BROTHERS
ROTHERS
multi-award-winning comedian and actor
Gavin Crawford. 5:00 – 7:00: Pre-Show VIP
Reception at Lakeside Terrace; 7:30: Awards
Show at WestJet Stage; 10:30pm: After-Party
Under the Stars beside the lake. Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000; www.tapa.ca; harbourfrontcentre.
com $175 VIP tickets (includes Pre-show VIP
Reception, Dora Awards Show, After-Party);
$75.00 general admission (includes Dora
Awards Show & After-Party); $15 After-Party
Only (tickets can be purchased only onsite at
the event beginning at 10:30pm). Nominees
will be announced at a press conference the
morning of Monday, June 1 at 10:00am at the
Sony Centre for the Performing Arts.
Competitions and Contests
●●June 19 9:30am: Canadian Flute Conven-
tion. Competition: Convention Open Class
(unaccompanied). For aspiring young flutists who are ready to compete at the most
senior level. Music: Aitken: Icicle; Hétu: Fantaisie sur le nom de Bach. Adjudicators: Meg
Griffith, Megan Lanz, Rik Noyce, Christopher
Lee, Niall O’Riordan. Classroom D, U of St.
Michael’s College, 100 St. Joseph St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●Musicworks Magazine. 2015 Contests for
Electronic Music Composition and “Sonic
Geography” Writing. Cash prizes and winners
published. Submit a 10-minute composition
in one of the following genres: electroacoustic, acousmatic, glitch, turntable art, or video
music; OR submit a 500-word essay describing how sound influences place and shapes
your experience. Deadline to apply: June 30.
For details: www.musicworks.ca/contest
Festivals, Fairs, Festivities
●●June 19, 20, 21 10:00am – 5:00: Canadian
Flute Convention. Flute Market. Exhibitors
and Convention Partners including Brannen
Brothers, Alry Publications, Long & McQuade,
Verne Q. Powell, and Guo Musical Instruments. The COOP, U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.
canadaflute.com $25 or convention passes
available.
C O N TA C T C O N T E M P O R A RY M U S I C
in partnership with
The Canadian Music Centre
MUSICFROMSCRATCH
PURVEYORS OF FINE FOOD
CATERING
(416) 364-7397 WWW.PASQUALEBROS.COM
Orillia Wind Ensemble
FREE MUSIC CREATION WORKSHOP FOR YOUTH AGES 18-25
July 13 to 17, 2015
The OWE, a community band
in Orillia, Ontario is accepting
applications for the paid position
of Music Director starting in our
2016/17 season.
with Contact and guest composer Christien Ledroit
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Please submit applications by Aug. 15, 2015 to
Hugh Coleman, President Orillia Wind Ensemble
Box 2416, Orillia, On L3V 7A3
For more info on this job offering please visit
For more information and to register contact Matthew Fava
[email protected] 416-961-6601 x207
www.contactcontemporarymusic.ca
www.orilliawindensemble.com
68 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
●●Registration is now open for 2015 Culture
Days. It’s time to start thinking about your
2015 Culture Days activity! Register early and
get a head start on planning a successful Culture Days event in your community. Connect
with community, develop new skills, reach
new audiences and collaborate with others.
Culture Days take place on September 25, 26
and 27, 2015. culturedays.ca
Lectures, Salons, Symposia
●●June 12 7:00: Soundstreams Salon 21.
Terry Riley at 80. Celebrate the 80th birthday of pioneering minimalist composer
Terry Riley with an all-star large ensemble of Soundstreams artists performing an
extended version of Riley’s seminal work In C.
Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park. 416-5041282. Free, PWYC reserved seating and gallery preludes available.
●●June 20 9:30am: Canadian Flute Convention. Lecture Recital: Philippe Gaubert: The
“Renoir” of the Flute. Discussion of Gaubert’s
all-round musical prowess and talk about
some of the episodes of his life which surely
influenced his work. Patrick Williams, flute;
Richard Shaw, piano. Charbonnel Lounge, U
of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416293-1302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●June 21 9:30am: Canadian Flute Convention. Lecture Recital: “Sophisticated Laddie:”
18th Century Scottish Flute Music and a Stylistic Continuum. Works by Charles McLean,
William McGibbon, Alexander Munro,
James Oswald, and General John Reid.
Laurel Swinden, flute. Charbonnel Lounge,
U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St.
thewholenote.com
Partitas & Sonatas. Lecture by Robert Harris. University of Waterloo, 125 St. Patrick St.,
Stratford. 519-271-2101 or 1-866-288-4313;
stratfordsummermusic.ca $20; series of 4
lectures: $60.
416-293-1302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or
convention passes available.
●●June 21 11:00am: Canadian Flute Convention. Panel Discussion: This Land is Your
Land – Flute Education In Canada. Dianne Aitken, moderator. Brennan Hall Lounge, U of
St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●July 29 11:15am: Stratford Summer Music.
Illustrated Musical Lecture #1: The Music of
Rodgers & Hammerstein. Lecture by Robert
Harris. University of Waterloo, 125 St. Patrick
St., Stratford. 519-271-2101 or 1-866-2884313; stratfordsummermusic.ca $20; series
of 4 lectures: $60.
●●Aug 05 11:15am: Stratford Summer Music.
Illustrated Musical Lecture #2: The Music of
R. Murray Schafer. Lecture by Robert Harris. University of Waterloo, 125 St. Patrick St.,
Stratford. 519-271-2101 or 1-866-288-4313;
stratfordsummermusic.ca $20; series of 4
lectures: $60.
●●Aug 12 11:15am: Stratford Summer Music.
Illustrated Musical Lecture #3: Mozart’s
Magic Flute. Lecture by Robert Harris. University of Waterloo, 125 St. Patrick St., Stratford. 519-271-2101 or 1-866-288-4313;
stratfordsummermusic.ca $20; series of 4
lectures: $60.
●●Aug 12 2:00: Stratford Summer Music.
Harry Somers Forum – Opera at the Movies. Guest speaker: Barbara Willis Sweete.
University of Waterloo, 125 St. Patrick St.,
Stratford. 519-271-2101 or 1-866-288-4313;
stratfordsummermusic.ca Free.
●●Aug 19 11:15am: Stratford Summer Music.
Illustrated Musical Lecture #4: Bach’s
Masterclasses
●●June 19 1:30: Canadian Flute Convention.
Atarah’s Orchestral Extracts Masterclass.
Advanced players on flutes, piccolos, altos
and basses are invited to join in arrangements of THE very well-known major flute
solos, to be played with flute choir as accompaniment. Bring your flutes! Led by Atarah
Ben‐Tovim MBE (ex-principal flute of RLPO).
Brennan Hall Lounge, U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.
canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes
available.
●●June 19 3:30: Canadian Flute Convention.
Masterclass: Telemann Fantasias with Elizabeth Walker. Bring your flutes! Brennan Hall
Lounge, U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary
St. 416-293-1302; www.canadaflute.com $20
or convention passes available.
●●June 20 1:30: Canadian Flute Convention.
Masterclass: Advancing the First Round of
an Orchestral Audition. Led by Sara Hahn.
Brennan Hall Lounge, U of St. Michael’s
College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.
canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes
available.
●●June 20 3:30: Canadian Flute Convention.
Piccolo Masterclass with Sarah Jackson (piccolo, LA Phil). Brennan Hall Lounge, U of St.
Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●June 21 1:30: Canadian Flute Convention.
Masterclass with Swiss-Canadian flutist
Michel Bellavance. Charbonnel Lounge, U of
St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
Screenings
●●June 07 4:00 & 7:30: Toronto Jewish Film
Society/Yiddish Vinkl Toronto. Presenting
two films: Joseph Seiden’s long-lost Kol Nidre
offers an unparalleled glimpse into the diversity of life, culture and language of Yiddish
New York in the 1930s. Part musical and part
melodrama, the film is delightful, comically
dark, and unforgettable. 70 Hester Street is
director Nozkowski’s heartfelt tribute to his
childhood home, a former Lower East Side
synagogue. Guest speaker: author Shirley
Kumove. Miles Nadal JCC, 750 Spadina Ave.
June | July | August, 2015 | 69
D. The ETCeteras
416-924-6211 x606. $15; $10 (young adults
18-35).
●●June 28 time tba: Bloor Cinema Hot Docs.
Brecht/Weill: Rise and Fall of the City of
Mahagonny. Featuring mezzo-soprano Anne
Sofie von Otter. 506 Bloor St. W. 416-6373123; bloorcinema.com $15; member rates
available.
●●July 26 time tba: Bloor Cinema Hot Docs.
Puccini: La Bohème. John Copley, director.
506 Bloor St. W. 416-637-3123; bloorcinema.
com $15; member rates available.
●●August 30 time tba: Bloor Cinema Hot
Docs. Rossini: Guillaume Tell. Antonio Pappano, conductor. 506 Bloor St. W. 416-6373123; bloorcinema.com $15; member rates
available.
Singalongs, Jams
●●June 20 9:00pm: Canadian Flute Conven-
tion. Jam Session: Traditional Irish Music.
Led by Andra Bohnet. Bring your flutes, whistles and anything else appropriate. Open to
players of any ability and experience level.
Brennan Hall Lounge, U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.
canadaflute.com $25 or convention passes
available.
Tours
●●June 3, June 17, July 15, July 29, August
5, August 19, September 9 – all at 6:30pm:
Heritage Toronto. Music on the Yonge St.
Strip. Discover the music history of Toronto’s
Yonge Street, beginning in the 1950s. Visit the
sites of famous clubs like The Colonial, Friar,
and Le Coq D’Or, and concert venues such as
Massey Hall and the Eaton Auditorium. Hear
stories about Oscar Peterson, Ronnie Hawkins, Glenn Gould and many more. Leader:
music journalist Nicholas Jennings. Length:
approx. 1 1/2 hours; focus: cultural, historical,
architectural; difficulty: flat pavement, busy
street. Note: This is an exterior tour only.
Location details available upon registration.
To register: heritagetoronto.org Free.
Sing With
Workshops
Orpheus!
Seeking a vibrant
and welcoming choral
community?
Want to sing with
an outstanding choral
conductor?
Looking for a choral
experience with a
difference?
●●June 02 4:45 – 6:30: Guelph Youth Sing-
ers. Bring-A-Friend to Rehearsal. Recital
MUSIC DIRECTOR
Robert Cooper, Artistic Director
2015-16 Highlights Include:
1925 cinematic horror classic,
Phantom of the Opera, with live
choral soundtrack
Christmas with jazz legend
Jackie Richardson and the
Hannaford Street Silver Band
Bach’s majestic Mass in B
Minor alongside German
filmmaker Bastian Clevé’s
The Sound of Eternity
Shakespeare in words, music
and song starring Stratford
Festival’s Geraint Wyn Davies
Our music director Joan Andrews is retiring. We seek a creative
and supportive conductor who will continue to offer artistic
challenges while respecting the 26 year history of the choir and
the varying musical backgrounds of our choir members.
Village Voices is a 60-voice community choir based in Markham
that performs a wide variety of choral music, classic, sacred and
secular. Two major concerts and additional local community
performances are presented annually.
Rehearsals: 7 p.m. Tuesdays
at Yorkminster Park Baptist Church
1585 Yonge Street
Interested? For auditions
contact: Helen Coxon at
[email protected]
or call 416-420-9660
www.orpheuschoirtoronto.com
70 | June | July | August, 2015
Hall, Guelph Youth Music Centre, 75 Cardigan
St.,
Guelph. 519-821-8574; guelphyouthsingers.com
●●June 03 7:00: Soundstreams Salon 21.
Squeezebox. The accordion is not simply a
dusty instrument in the back of your grandparents’ closet. Its music evokes earlier eras,
from German beer halls to late-night Italian cafés and Argentine dance halls. Accordion wunderkind Michael Bridge takes us
on a musical journey of this remarkable
instrument that is capable of great musical
range and virtuosity. Malvern Public Library,
30 Sewells Rd. 416-396-8969. Free.
●●June 18 Canadian Flute Convention. 3:30:
Workshop: Having it All: Teaching Expression with Technique. Explore ideas through
inquiry-based teaching techniques and original etudes composed for this purpose.
Bring your flutes. Led by Timothy Hagen;
5:00: Workshop/Lecture/ Demonstration: The Magic of Moyse: A Living Legacy.
Designed to share practical concepts from
the teaching of Marcel Moyse that flutists can
incorporate into their daily practice, performance and teaching. Bring your flutes. Led by
Cate Hummel. U of St. Michael’s College, 81 St.
Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.canadaflute.com
$20 or convention passes available.
●●June 19 Canadian Flute Convention.
9:30am: Workshop: A Musical Approach to
Marcel Moyse’s 24 Melodic Studies. Enjoyable and informative class, especially useful for pre-college students and teachers.
Bring your flutes! Led by flutists Roderick
Seed, Unji Chung and Kyoka Ohara; 9:30am:
Body Awareness Workshop: Awaken Your
Body/Awaken Your Mind: Eight Essential
Standing Exercises of Qigong. Led by Leslie Marrs and Nancy Schneeloch-Bingham;
10:30am: Workshop: Low Flutes Hints and
Tips. Informal session with low flutes specialist Carla Rees, answering your questions
on playing alto, bass and contrabass flutes.
Bring your flutes!; 10:30am: Workshop: A
Lyrical Beginning: A Simple Approach to
Introducing Nuance and Musicality to Beginning Flutists. Led by Ai Goldsmith. Bring your
flutes; 11:00am: Body Awareness Workshop:
Meditation for Performers. Led by Viviana
For a full job description, with qualifications needed and details
of how to submit an application,
visit villagevoices.ca Click on Director Search
or email [email protected]
Markham’s Community Choir
thewholenote.com
Workshops - continued
Guzman; 11:30am: Workshop: The Memory
Map for Music: A Practice Strategy for Confident, Memorized Performance. Interactive
session; bring your flutes! Led by Melissa Colgin Abeln; 2:00: Workshop: College Auditions with Christine Erlander Beard. Bring
questions and your flutes; 2:00: Workshop:
Irish Flute for the Classical Flutist. Bring your
flute! Led by Andra Bohnet; 3:00: Workshop:
Learning Jazz Improvisation: A Systematic
Guaranteed Approach. Led by Andrea Brachfeld; 4:00: Workshop: Opera Without Words:
Character Development in Mozart Flute Concerti. Led by Rachel Geier; 4:00: Workshop:
Classical to Jazz – Making the Transition.
Bring your flutes! Led by Bill McBirnie. U of St.
Michael’s College, 100 St. Joseph St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●June 20 Canadian Flute Convention.
9:30am: Warmup with Festive Flutes! Bring
your flutes! Led by Joss Campbell, Sarah Murphy, Carla Rees, Elizabeth Walker; 9:30am:
Workshop: Body Awareness: Body Balance and Resonance. Led by Meg Griffith;
10:30am: Workshop: Great Beginnings for
New Flutists. Come and learn exciting new
methods for teaching new flutists. Bring your
flutes! Led by Kathy Blocki; 11:00am: Body
Awareness: Explore Self-Study of the Alexander Technique. Led by Melissa King; 11:30am:
Reading Session: British Flute Choir Music
with Atarah. All sizes of flutes needed. Music
by Elgar, Holst, Britten, Rutter. Led by Atarah
Ben-Tovim; 11:30am: Workshop: Vocal Techniques for Tone Enhancement. Led by Megan
Lanz; 11:30am: Workshop: Introduction to
Circular Breathing. Led by Angus McPherson. 2:00: Workshop: Great Expectations:
Tools for Creating Compelling Performances
(*with a little help from cognitive science).
Led by Michelle Cheramy; 2:00: Workshop:
Curing Focal Dystonia: A Personal Success
Story. Led by Andrea Brachfeld; 3:00: Workshop/Discussion: A Method Called Love. Led
by Wissam Boustany; 3:00: Workshop: Life
Coaching for the Performing Artist. Led by
Rik Noyce; 4:00: Workshop: Beyond Trills and
Twiddles: Exploring Baroque Ornamentation.
thewholenote.com
Classified Advertising | [email protected]
Led by baroque specialist Alison Melville.
Bring your flutes; 4:00: Flute Basics Workshop. Led by TSO principal Nora Shulman.
Topics include tone production, breathing,
phrasing, technique and practice strategies.
Bring your flutes and your questions. U of St.
Michael’s College, 100 St. Joseph St. 416-2931302; www.canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes available.
●●June 21 Canadian Flute Convention.
9:30am: Body Awareness Workshop: Feldenkrais Method – Awareness Through
Movement Freeing the Shoulders, Neck and
Breath. Led by Niall O’Riordan; 10:30am:
Workshop: Flûte Alors!: Flute Music from
Baroque France. Led by Alison Melville. This
hands-on workshop will introduce you to
the sonatas and suites of Jacques-Martin
Hotteterre, the Philidor family, Dornel and
Couperin. Bring your flutes; 10:30am: Workshop: About Our Careers: There’s Room For
All Of Us In The World. Touching on networking, attitude, perception, presentation, ability, confidence, the Peter Principle and more.
Questions and general discussion among participants is encouraged. Led by Christopher
Lee; 11:30am: Workshop: Five Ways YouTube
Will Change Your (Flute) Life. Dr. Karen Large
will present YouTube strategies that you can
use today; 2:00: Workshop on Bartók’s Suite
Paysanne Hongrois with Hungarian flute
player Izabella Budai. A practical workshop
– bring your flutes; 2:00: Workshop: Don’t
Practice Mistakes – How Musicians Can Use
Recent Developments in Neuroscience and
Psychology to Practice Smarter. Led by Sarah
Yunji Moon; 3:00: Workshop: Intro to Beatbox Flute! Led by Viviana Guzman. Bring your
flutes; 3:00: Workshop: Learn how to Loop
Your Flute. Led by Rozalind MacPhail. Bring
your flute – all levels welcome; 4:00: Piccolo
Workshop with LA Phil piccolo, Sarah Jackson. Bring your piccolos. U of St. Michael’s
College, 81 St. Mary St. 416-293-1302; www.
canadaflute.com $20 or convention passes
available.
AUDITIONS & OPPORTUNITIES
AUDITIONS FOR ASSOCIATE CONDUCTOR
AND FOR ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR with
the KINDRED SPIRITS ORCHESTRA. For
more information visit www.KSOrchestra.
ca and e-mail Jobert Sevilleno at
[email protected]
AVAILABLE PRO BONO POSITIONS WITH
THE KINDRED SPIRITS ORCHESTRA: 2nd
Clarinet, 3rd Horn, 2nd trumpet, 2nd (tenor)
Trombone, 3rd (bass) Trombone, sectional
Violins, Violas, Cellos and Contrabasses. The
KSO is an auditioned-based civic orchestra
in residence at Flato Markham Theatre.
Weekly rehearsals are held on Tuesday
evening at the state-of-the-art Cornell
Recital Hall (HWY 407 ETR and 9th Ln). For
more information visit
www.KSOrchestra.ca and e-mail Jobert
Sevilleno at [email protected]
CHORISTERS WANTED (SATB) for St.
Michael & All Angels Choir, at one of the
most beautiful Anglican churches in GTA (St
Clair Ave/Wychwood). Contact-Herb Ciceri
416-738-1480 [email protected]
COUNTERPOINT COMMUNITY
ORCHESTRA (www.ccorchestra.org)
welcomes volunteer musicians for
Monday evening rehearsals, downtown
Toronto. We’re especially looking for
trombones and strings. Email [email protected]
HARMONY SINGERS OF ETOBICOKE, a
dynamic thirty-voice women’s chorus, is
looking for new members. We welcome
women who love to sing music ranging
from John Lennon to John Rutter. Auditions
are easy and membership fees are low.
We work hard but have fun along the way.
If this sounds good to you, get in touch
with Conductor Harvey Patterson. (416)
239-5821. [email protected]
JOHN LAING SINGERS: We are inviting new
voices to join us for our 2015-2016 concert
WholeNote
CLASSIFIEDS
really deliver!
Sing out and reach
the right audience.
Starting at just $24.
Discounts for multiple
insertions. Deadline for our
September issue: August 21.
[email protected]
season particularly tenors and basses. For
audition information and to learn more about
us, please visit www.johnlaingsingers.com
OR [email protected]
MUSIC DIRECTOR NEEDED Village Voices
current director Joan Andrews is retiring.
We seek a creative and supportive conductor
who will continue to offer artistic challenges
while respecting the 26 year history of the
choir and the varying musical backgrounds
of our choir members. Village Voices is
a 60-voice community choir based in
Markham that performs a wide variety
of choral music. Two major concerts and
additional local community performances are
presented annually. For a full job description,
qualifications needed and application details,
visit villagevoices.ca Click on Director Search
or email [email protected]
Introducing
BUSINESS
CLASSIFIEDS!
Ideal for ongoing promotion
of your services and products
to the WholeNote’s musically
engaged readership, in print and on-line.
Book by August 15th for September!
[email protected]
June | July | August, 2015 | 71
Classified Advertising | [email protected]
AUDITIONS & OPPORTUNITIES (cont’d)
MUSIKAY HAS PAID POSITION OPENINGS
for choristers and for alto/countertenor and
bass soloists. Visit musikay.ca to schedule
an audition.
OASIS VOCAL JAZZ, Toronto’s longest
running close harmony group, is looking
for a new director to take us into our 30th
anniversary. Director should have several
years vocal jazz directing experience, be
able to teach jazz pedagogy, have good
interpersonal skills, a willingness to prepare
and direct two concerts yearly, and be
available Wednesday evenings for a two-hour
rehearsal. Requesting a minimum two-year
commitment. Season runs September to May.
Competitive salary offered. For more info,
visit http://www.oasisvocaljazz.com. Contact:
[email protected]
ORCHESTRA OPPORTUNITIES FOR
STUDENTS! AUDITIONS JUNE 13,
OR BY APPOINTMENT: The Kingsway
Conservatory of Music provides a vibrant
environment for musical discovery,
and its THREE orchestras each offer
exciting performance opportunities while
challenging a continuum of skill levels, from
early learners to advanced string players.
Kingsway Children’s Orchestra: RCM Grade
2-4 / Suzuki Book 2-3. Kingsway Chamber
Strings: RCM Grade 5-7 / Suzuki Book 4-6.
Kingsway Chamber Orchestra: RCM Grade
8-10. Kingsway Conservatory of Music,
2848 Bloor Street West, Toronto
www.kingswayconservatory.ca 416-2340121 [email protected]
INSPIRED LEARNING
SHOW CHOIR PIANIST NEEDED:
Yorkminstrels Show Choir seeks
accomplished accompanist for Wednesday
night rehearsals in North York, plus
community concerts (e.g. seniors homes).
September – June. Reply to Lorraine:
905-881-1465 or [email protected]/
Website: www.yorkminstrels.com.
SOPRANO SECTION LEAD for an eclectic
music program at Leaside United Church,
822 Millwood Road, Toronto. Thursday
evening rehearsals and Sunday morning
Worship. Contact Sharon Beckstead,
Music Director at 416-696-6051, Sharon.
[email protected] for more
information.
PRIVATE VOICE/PIANO/THEORY
LESSONS: Experienced, BFA Certified
Teacher located at Christ Church Deer
Park (Yonge & St. Clair). Prepares you or
your child for RCM exams, competitions &
auditions. Contact Jessika: [email protected] (647) 214-2827.
SUMMERSING & SENSIBLE VOCAL
TRAINING! Develop and advance your vocal
abilities by joining the SummerSing Vocal
Gym! Embrace an intensive (and intensively
fun) program of individual voice training.
Special rates apply now through August.
Beginner? No worries. We build from
scratch! Let’s get this party started!!! Phone
Pattie at (905) 271-6896.
ST. MICHAEL’S CHOIR SCHOOL AUDITIONS
Limited places are available for boys in
Grades 7-12 at St. Michael’s Choir School for
September 2015. Please visit
http://www.smcs.on.ca/admissions/ to see if
St. Michael’s Choir School is for you. To set up
an audition, please call 416-397-6367.
VIVA! Youth Singers Of Toronto
(www.vivayouthsingers.com) welcomes
children and youth (ages 4 to young adults)
to audition for the 2015/16 season. Email
- [email protected] - now for
a September 1 audition time. Inclusion
program invites singers of all abilities to
audition
FOR SALE / WANTED
CLASSICAL RECORD AND CD COLLECTIONS
WANTED. Minimum 350 units. Call, text or
e-mail Aaron 416-471-8169 or [email protected]
OUT OF THE CLOSET THIS SUMMER! Band
days just a hazy memory? Someone out
there would love to give your nice old guitar,
flute, tuba (etc) a new life. Sell your unused
instruments or donate them to an educational
charity with a WholeNote classified ad!
Contact [email protected]
THE WYCHWOOD CLARINET CHOIR
(www.wychwoodclarinetchoir.com)
welcomes enthusiastic clarinet players to
audition for a place in our group. All ages
welcome. Tuesdays 7:30-10 PM.
INSTRUCTION & COURSES
STOLEN FROM CAR – Lorée OBOE
& ENGLISH HORN: $700 reward for
information leading to return. Serial #’s:
oboe TA 78, English horn HV 25. Please call
Karen 416-656-4312 or 416-323-2232 x.26
CHILDREN’S PIANO LESSONS: Friendly,
approachable - and strict! Contact Liz
Parker at 416-544-1803 or [email protected] Queen and Bathurst
area, Toronto.
FUN & SYSTEMATIC LESSONS WITH
EXPERIENCED TEACHERS. Piano, Violin,
Cello. Beginner to Advanced. Suzuki, RCM,
Auditions & Competitions. 647.668.6697
www.musicscope.ca.
MUSICIANS AVAILABLE
HITCH’em & PITCH’em! Do you play in a
party band? If you provide live music for
wedding & wakes, roasts & retirements, and
all kinds of occasions, you can advertise your
ensemble right here for as little as $24 plus
tax!! Contact [email protected] by
August 24 to book your ad for the September
edition!
PIANO LESSONS: personalized instruction
by experienced teacher, concert pianist EVE
EGOYAN (M. Mus., L.R.A.M., F.R.S.C.).
All ages and levels. Downtown location.
[email protected] or 416- 603-4640.
Share the love and earn a little
money! Join The WholeNote’s
circulation team: 9 times a year,
GTA and well beyond. Interested?
Contact:
[email protected]
Master your mind.
Press kits,
image consulting,
& social media
for performers
www.lizpr.com
Mental Skills for
Performing Artists
corporate functions | private
events | birthday parties |
product launches
416-363-5299| jazzbistro.ca
72 | June | July | August, 2015
GRANT FUNDING AVAILABLE if you submit
a quality proposal. Freelance grantwriter
with fifteen years of successful CC and OAC
funding. [email protected]
VENUES AVAILABLE / WANTED
BEAUTIFUL, PRIVATE TEACHING STUDIO
(Harbord/Spadina) for rent in shared space.
$510/mo, TTC, window, cafe, internet,
washroom, [email protected]
416-975-9035.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE FOR RENT
in bright 180 sq. foot space at Eglinton
St. George’s United Church. Near Yonge/
Eglinton. Call 416-481-1141 x210
PERFORMANCE / REHEARSAL / STUDIO
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SPACES AVAILABLE FOR RENT - sizes range
from 220 to 1600 square feet, at Hillcrest
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Vaughan Rd at Bathurst, 1 block south of
St. Clair. TTC Bus & subway accessible.
Rehearsal/Concert space, main floor
meeting room with kitchenette. Lower
level meeting rooms with kitchen. Contact
416-654-0311 or by email
[email protected]
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FLUTE, PIANO,
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Our 3rd Floor
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ARE YOU PLANNING A
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Looking for a venue?
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United Church
300 Bloor Street West, Toronto.
416-924-7439 x22
[email protected]
thewholenote.com
Beat by Beat | Bandstand
I
Those Vanished
Local Tattoos
countries performing for ten days in a packed arena, this event is a far
cry from the local amateur tattoos referred to earlier. Even these largescale events are increasingly few and far between. I have not heard of
single such event in Ontario for some years. While we are not able to
participate in this year’s NABBSS, I am sure that it will be as rewarding
as last year’s was. The school will run from June 26 to July 8. When I
last checked, there were still openings. Inquiries should be addressed
to [email protected]
Further Reminiscences: For years a major attraction at the CNE was
the featured guest band at the main bandshell. For a few summers I
had the pleasure of operating the sound system on that main bandshell. In particular, I had the privilege of working for two weeks with
Major F. Vivian Dunn, later Sir Vivian Dunn. Prior to every concert of
the Band of the Royal Marines Plymouth Division, he would discuss all
of the music to be performed and just which instruments were to be
given proper microphone pickup.
By a somewhat strangely routed train of thought (but bear with me),
this reminds me of a famous but rarely seen ceremony, called Beat
the Retreat, the origins of which date back to the reign of James II of
England (James VII of Scotland) in the late 1600s, a time when drums
were a major means of communicating with troops. It was a time
when wars were mostly carried out in daylight hours, and the beating
of drums was the signal to retreat at the end of a day’s fighting. Over
time, beating the retreat became a more elaborate ceremony, where
the Captain of the Main Guard would have his drummers beat the
signal which would then be repeated by drummers of each regiment.
Many years later, of course, armies obtained more sophisticated means
of communicating, but by then Beating the Retreat had been established as an important ceremonial event.
The Royal Marines in particular have retained the ceremony, along
with saluting their ceremonial head who is bestowed with the title
of Captain General. Most recently that has been His Royal Highness
Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh. Every three years the Massed Bands
of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines, with some 200 musicians on parade,
perform their Beat the Retreat ceremony at London’s Horse Guards
Parade in celebration of the birthday of their Captain General.
That is where Major Dunn comes in again! The year after he and his
band performed at the CNE bandshell, he wrote The Captain General
march to honour then Captain General, His Majesty King George VI.
Three years ago I had the pleasure of reviewing Saeculum Aureum, a
2CD set, performed by The Band of The Royal Regiment of Canada. The
Captain General, a stirring march with amazing counter-melodies,
was one of the finest selections on that recording.
JACK MACQUARRIE
t would appear that, after a few false starts, summer may have
arrived. As we view the news of band activities for the next few
months, there are all manner of concerts planned by bands
throughout Southern Ontario, but they are almost without exception
by individual bands.
This is in stark contrast to when I first started in boys’ bands. Our
summer was filled with parades and many local multiple-band tattoos
in surrounding communities. Outdoor band festivals are now few and
far between in this part of the world. The most recent such event that
I can recall in this part of the country was the Great Canadian Town
Band Festival which was held for a number of years, ten years ago
or more, in the small town of Orono. Throughout its existence, I was
active in this festival. Its demise was not due to lack of interest on the
part of participants or audiences. Rather, after a few years the organization and operation became too much for the small cadre of volunteers. Although there was consideration given to moving the festival
to another larger community, this never materialized. Whether they
are called band tattoos or band festivals, these kinds of outdoor events
involving a number of community bands haven’t even been relegated
to history books. They just seem to have passed into oblivion.
Not only were there tattoos in former days, but there was a wide
variety of other outdoor band events, both amateur and professional.
I can still remember the fascination of a circus band with a diverse
array of performers parading down a city’s main street. In fact, for a
time, one of my boyhood ambitions was to play in a circus band. It
seems that the only large outdoor events with bands to be seen now
are those overwhelming halftime shows of American football games
with all of the extra non-musical hoopla.
NABBSS: You may recall that at this time last year our household
was gearing up for a trip to Halifax and participation in the very first
North American Brass Band Summer School (NABBSS). As part of
this summer school we were also participants in the 35th Royal Nova
Scotia International Tattoo. With many hundreds of professional-level
participants from Canada, the United States and several European
The "It's Nev� T� Late!" Band
*dust off that old horn or
start from scratch
*healthy, educational,
and fun!
*New Classes begin in September
www.newhorizonsbandtoronto.ca
647-201-8780
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 73
NEW CONTEST!
Who is
SEPTEMBER’s Child?
Too young
for scotch,
JOHN DE FUSCA
already hungry for
words, and music
not far behind.
Mario Canonico dancing with his wife Delfina.
Cookies make the
best things
even better, four
times a year.
Mario Canonico: The community band world has lost another of
its most dedicated members. Mario Canonico, a longtime member of
the Newmarket Citizens Band, passed away May 16. Born in the Aosta
Valley in the northwestern part of Italy, Mario started his musical
adventure on violin at the age of nine. He began playing saxophone
in his early 20s and soon added the clarinet. From Italy the family
moved to Ecuador for a few years before coming to Canada in 1967.
Settling in Montreal, he worked as a barber during the week and spent
his weekends as a jobbing musician playing a wide variety of events
including weddings and bar mitzvahs. Moving to Newmarket in 2000,
he soon had a regular spot in the clarinet section of the Newmarket
band. Until about three months ago he was playing regularly in three
other musical groups besides the Newmarket band, including a small
ensemble called North of Dixie. In addition to music and family he
had a passion for cycling, averaging 50km per day. His last bicycle ride
was on a warm sunny day last October at age 82. Just a few weeks ago
the members of North of Dixie went to his house to entertain him.
Although gravely ill, Mario danced up a storm with his wife, Delfina,
and with his daughter and granddaughter. This photograph was taken
on that day by John De Fusco.
Coming Concerts:
June 4 at noon the Encore Symphonic Concert Band will present
“In Concert: Classics and Jazz” at the Wilmar Heights Centre, 963
Pharmacy Ave., Scarborough.
June 6 at 7:30 the Barrie Concert Band will present “Let’s Celebrate
Barrie!” a multimedia concert celebrating Barrie’s history at Hi-Way
Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie.
June 12: A few months ago I had the pleasure of attending the
premiere concert of the Toronto Concert Band. To wind up their
inaugural season they will be returning to the excellent performance venue of the Glenn Gould Studio on Friday, June 12, at 7:30pm.
Since their very first rehearsal less than nine months ago, founding
conductors Ken Hazlett and Les Dobbin have set a high standard.
This season-ending concert will feature an eclectic mix, from Camille
Saint-Saëns’ Carnival of the Animals to Warren Barker’s Selections
from Les Miserables with many challenging numbers filling out the
program. The band’s tag line “We Love to Play!” should be spelled out
musically at this concert.
June 14 at 7pm the Strings Attached Orchestra will be presenting
their year-end concert at the George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire
Place (just southwest of Koerner Hall). Among other things, they will
be performing the orchestral premiere of Montreal a short work by
former OECD head and Pierre Trudeau-era cabinet minister Donald
Johnston. Also on the program will be Vivaldi’s Concerto Grosso Op. 3
No.11 with soloists from within the group.
These are a few community ensemble events where we received
some program details. There are too many more than can be
mentioned here. Please see the listings section for the times and locations of these many other events.
Definition Department
This month’s lesser known musical term is: rubato: a cross between
a rhubarb and a tomato. We invite submissions from readers. Let’s
hear your daffynitions.
Saguenay, Quebec, mid-1950s
Know our Mystery Child’s name? WIN PRIZES!
Send your best guess by August 24, to
[email protected]
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS!
HERE’S WHAT THEY WON
Robi Botos’ fourth recording
Movin’ Forward, with
Seamus Blake – saxophones,
Robert Leslie Hurst III –
acoustic bass and Jeff ‘Tain’
Watts – drums, features
ten original compositions
and two covers. “This
album represents a lot of
my musical sides – from
Hungarian Romani (Gypsy)
music to straight ahead jazz
to funk … ” Movin’ Forward
was released on the label A440 ENTERTANMENT in March
at the Jazz Bistro. Copies of this CD
will be going out to John Brooker,
Barbara Thomson, S. Gisele Kulak,
and Ross W. Reid.
We Are ALL Music’s Children gratefully acknowledges Lajos and
Piroska, Ori, Scott, Thom, Kay and Peter.
ROBI BOTOS UPCOMING
“…I’m very excited about my first Canadian tour as a leader (June 17
to July 19). I’m looking forward to bringing my own music to people. …
Hoping to channel good to people through my music.”
If you want to hear Robi Botos at the Jane Mallet Theatre performing
in the June 18 Oscar Peterson 90th Birthday Celebration you’ll need to
book your ticket quickly, because it’s sure to sell out. He’s also playing
as part of the Late Night Trio at The Rex Jazz and Blues Bar on June 26.
Both events are part of the TD Toronto Jazz Festival.
Other southern Ontario appearances include:
June 23 – Ottawa Jazz Festival; June 24 – The Jazz Room, Waterloo;
July 21 – Beaches Jazz Festival workshop “Robi Botos – Piano, Up Close
and Personal,” Toronto; August 3 – Festival of the Sound, Parry Sound;
August 12 – Prince Edward County Jazz Festival; Sept 12 – All-Canadian
Jazz, Port Hope.
Jack MacQuarrie plays several brass instruments and
has performed in many community ensembles. He can
be contacted at [email protected]
74 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
WE ARE ALL MUSIC’S CHILDREN
June’s Child Robi Botos
MJ BUELL
J
Other musicians in
azz pianist Robi Botos was born in October 1978, in Nyiregyhaza,
your childhood family?
Hungary. He was about four years old when his family moved to
Both my father and
Budapest where he grew up. By the time he left high school he
brothers and most cousins
was already jamming/rehearsing and gigging full-time.
are musicians. My dad and
In 1988 Botos came to Canada as a refugee with his wife and young
my middle brother can also
children, seeking a place to raise his family where Romani people are
sing. I sing too, but not like
free from persecution and discrimination. He spoke no English but
Stevie Wonder! My mom is
with music as his fluent first language he made a name for himself
not a musician but comes
quickly and was readily welcomed by the jazz community, starting
from a musical family.
with his friend David Braid who first took Botos to sessions at The
Where did hearing music,
Rex and introduced him to the local scene. Two years later without
warning Botos and his pregnant wife were informed that their refugee formal and informal, fit
claim had been rejected. It was the jazz community, and its extended
into your life as a child?
family, who circled their wagons around this valued young musiRadio, records and live music
cian offering support and advocacy for an intense and eventually
– at home, school, concerts, festivals etc.
successful campaign to have the rejection overturned. In a 2014 TVO
First memory of yourself making music? Playing drums on a real
Doc Studio appearance, Botos comments that “jazz and persecution
kit, and on the school desk, and on pretty much every other object
and discrimination have a very strong connection.” While his story is
… Still play drums – I look at it as my first love. My dad and oldest
a modern-world example of this, the response of the jazz community
brother played drums, so it was around. I started the piano when I
is proof that they own their collective history.
was seven. My dad bought one. He wanted us kids to play as a band.
A first big break came when Botos won the Montreux Jazz Festival
I leaned towards drums but to form a band I had to play piano. And
Piano Competition in 2004 – the winner is invited to return the
then I fell in love with it.
following year to open for a celebrated performer. Botos opened for
Earliest music-making with other people? We had a constant jam
Oscar Peterson and the two became friends.
session at home all the time with the family, relaPeterson mentored Botos, who in turn taught
tives and friends.
piano to Peterson’s daughter, Celine.
First important teachers or mentors? Since I
Botos plays with local and international jazz
had so many people playing at our home, I picked
luminaries too numerous to list here, has won
up a lot of things from older musicians. And then
several prestigious awards and has just released
jamming with other kids/adults and watching jazz
his fourth recording. He recently composed
videos was life changing. I always knew I wanted
music for Aaron Yeger’s award-winning docuto play music forever.
mentary A People Uncounted: The Untold Story
When and how did teaching/mentoring enter
of The Roma. This summer Botos has a busy schedule with a tour to
the picture?
promote his new CD and a number of festival engagements, both as a
I always recall how much it meant to me to learn from others, so I
soloist and as part of several collaborations.
want to pass it on. These days I teach at Humber College (Lakeshore)
Biographical information about Botos is widely available and he
which I enjoy a lot – a piano masterclass, some private piano lessons
has given a number of engaging interviews. Of particular interest is
and improv.
Identities: The Documentary Series, a six-part series commissioned
Did you ever think you would do something else? I always loved
by the Maytree Foundation,
martial arts … boxing … But
written and produced by Alan
music helped me express
Lysaght and Paul McGrath.
myself the best, and helped me
Ross Porter of JAZZ.FM91
through many challenges. I was
was the creator and execuable to say things I couldn’t in
tive producer of this series,
words. (Although … nowadays
which celebrates the stories
maybe I wish I did real estate!)
and accomplishments of seven
Music in your family life
musicians who immigrated to,
today? I don’t play much at
or sought refuge in, Canada.
home at all, but I sit down from
Narrated by acclaimed singer
time to time when I’m inspired,
and actor Jackie Richardson,
or when I have to practise some
Episode 1 is about Robi Botos.
music. I always listen to music
(www.jazz.fm/identities).
though. We all do. My kids play
Your absolute earliest
music but they do many other
musical memory? Live
things and I’m not forcing it on
music played by my relatives:
them. I’d love them to play but
Hungarian Romani music, and
if they don’t want to make it a
the recordings we had at home
priority, it’s good with me. No
– Oscar Peterson, Branford
parents want to see their chilRobi Botos lives in the Bathurst/St. Clair neighbourhood
Marsalis, Keith Jarrett, Horace Silver,
dren
struggle!
If full-time music is
with his wife, two children and a dog. When he’s not making
Miles Davis, Pat Metheny, Jaco
what makes them happy and they’re
music? “I drive my family around! When I have free time I love
Pastorius and more.
absolutely crazy about playing all the
fishing, and play Fifa on PS4, and soccer in real life too.”
time, I will support it 100 percent.
TRACEY NOLAN
“jazz and persecution
and discrimination
have a very strong
connection.”
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 75
DISCOVERIES | RECORDINGS REVIEWED
Jacques Israelievitch and
Christina Petrowska Quilico
FANCIES AND INTERLUDES
DAV I D O L D S
(CMCCD 21315)
Summer Pop
Lyrical, jazzy and
complex, Fancies
and Interludes is
a collection of
contrasts – works by
Oskar Morawetz,
James Rolfe,
Raymond Luedeke
and Gary Kulesha.
I’ve spoken before in these pages about
artistic epiphanies I’ve had in this life –
rounding a corner in the National Gallery in
Washington and beholding Dali’s The Last
Supper, hearing Paul Dolden’s The Melting
Voice Through Mazes Running at the CBC
Young Composers’ Competition – and a disc
that came my way this month has brought to
mind another such enlightening experience.
When I was a teenager my ears were opened wide to the alternative
music scene by a late-night AM radio show on CKFH called The Open
Lid. There were several hosts over the years, but it was during Keith
Elshaw’s tenure that I really got hooked and it was then that I first
heard the music of Fraser and Debolt, a Canadian folk duo who would
have a lasting influence on me. Their first album Fraser and Debolt
with Ian Guenther was totally acoustic with just two guitars, two
intense voices and Guenther’s violin. When I heard Pure Spring Water
and its atonal “breakdown” segue to their version of the Beatles’ Don’t
Let Me Down I was intrigued and captivated. I didn’t sleep much that
night and the next day right after school I headed down to the local
Sam the Record Man in search of the disc. Of course it turned out that
Elshaw was playing an advance copy of the album and I would have
to wait for the official release. I didn’t sleep much for the rest of that
week either.
Allan Fraser and Daisy Debolt worked together for five years,
parting ways in 1974, but their songs – two albums’ worth – have
been an integral part of my own repertoire for the past four decades.
Debolt fronted a number of projects over the years – I remember one
show at Harbourfront in particular where her band included three or
four accordions – and was active until her death from cancer in 2011.
As far as I know Fraser kept a lower profile, although I confess I have
not been following the folk scene much in recent years. That being
said, when I received the press release for an upcoming disc by Fraser
& Girard (FG001 fraserandgirard.com) my heart raced a bit. Thank
goodness I’m now in the position to receive advance copies of things!
It seems that Allan Fraser has found a new kindred musical spirit
in Marianne Girard, and although comparisons to the original pairing
are inevitable this new duo has developed a voice of its own. Girard’s
husky contralto doesn’t have the shrill edginess of Debolt’s high range,
but it blends well with Fraser’s sometimes gravelly low tenor and I
love it when their harmonies are reversed as he takes the high line.
The instrumentation is fairly sparse, with the duo’s guitars mostly
supplemented by acoustic bass and drums with occasional additional guitar, fiddle and pedal steel. The eponymous release is shared
about equally between songs by each partner, including Fraser (and
Debolt)’s classic Dance Hall Girls and Girard’s particularly moving My
Name is Carol. Concert note: I know where I’ll be on Sunday June 14 –
at Hugh’s Room for the launch of Fraser & Girard.
Some months ago I stumbled on the HBO
presentation of Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways,
an eight-part documentary directed by Foo
front man Dave Grohl, and I have spent countless hours over the past few weeks revisiting
the series on four RCA DVDs recently released
by Sony Music (8887506014-9). Each time I
go back to one of the episodes I am enthralled
once again; it’s surprising how compelling
they are. The premise is that the rock band
travels to different American cities to explore
the musical history of each place, meet some of the legends who have
AVAILABLE JUNE 11
from the Canadian Music Centre
www.musiccentre.ca.
LAUNCH: Thursday, June 11, 5pm
at the Canadian Music Centre,
20 St. Joseph St., Toronto. The artists will give
a short performance of some of the featured music.
Free Admission, but a reservation is required:
416-961-6601 ext. 201
or [email protected]
76 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
respond by creating yet a third iteration with new material added to
the mix. Although the composers are all relatively conservative in
their approach and the original works are quite tonal, by the time the
re-mix and responses have been added there is an intriguing depth
and complexity to the final creations which cross a variety of cultural
and aesthetic borders. For those of you who missed the May 23 event,
the concert also served as the launch for a double CD of the works
(Centrediscs CMCCD 21215 musiccentre.ca) that is also available
on iTunes.
Grieg – Lyric Pieces (ATMA ACD2 2696)
is the latest from Canadian pianist Janina
Fialkowska and it seems a bit of a departure
from her usual Austro-Hungarian repertoire
(from Mozart to Liszt) and the Polish music
of her own heritage (Chopin, Moszkowski,
Padereski and Szymanowski). Fialkowska
seems very much at home on this northern
excursion however, her deft touch perfectly
suited to bringing these idiomatic Norwegian sketches to life. Edvard
Grieg (1843-1907) wrote his Lyric Pieces, ten books of them over
the span of his career, beginning in 1867 upon his return to Norway
after studies in Germany. The first book proved so successful that
his publisher requested more and more, so many in fact that in 1901
Grieg finished the last set with Remembrances, which took him full
circle back to the first Arietta and he called a halt saying that “they are
surrounding me like lice and fleas…”
Fialkowska has made an effective selection of 25 of the pieces,
charming vignettes such as Berceuse, Butterfly, Sylph and of course
the familiar Wedding Day at Troldhaugen with each of the volumes
represented. There is very little virtuosity on display here, with most
of the selections pastoral, but the selection is varied enough to keep
our attention throughout – a quiet day in the country, with moments
of exuberance such as the Norwegian Dance with its suggestion of
Hardanger-style fiddling and hints of dread such as March of the
Trolls and Evening in the Mountains. Fialkowska will get to experience all of this first-hand in mid-June when she is off to Tromsö,
Norway as a jury member for the Top of the World International Piano
Competition.
15 for Piano (Centrediscs CMCCD 21115)
features music by Alberta-based composer
Howard Bashaw performed by Roger Admiral
and it has the distinction of being the first
CD recorded in the Canadian Music Centre’s
concert space at 20 St. Joseph St. on their
Steingraeber & Söhne piano. Both the instrument and recording engineer John S. Gray,
not to mention the pianist himself, have their
mettle tested by the vast dynamic range and physicality of the music,
and all pass with flying colours. I sometimes kid that to me piano
recitals are ultimately “just so much banging” but in this instance
I cannot get enough. Admiral can bang with the best of them and
Bashaw has a way of making relentless percussive density extremely
exciting and musical. This is not to say that the 40-minute-plus 2012
title piece is without respite. There are beautiful moments when the
tension relaxes and we are drawn into a very different world where
time is suspended and we are able to catch a breath. And even some of
the ostinato passages are quiet and gentle, belying the furious activity
happening in miniature.
Admiral is also featured in a 2010 reworking of Bashaw’s Form
Archimage, an older work originally performed and recorded by Marc
Couroux. Once again the piece is a study in contrasts, with manic
extended movements – Toccata, Counterpoint: where fractals meet
Alberti, Celestarium II, Reverbatory and Barn Burner with Jacob’s
Ladder – interspersed without pause among brief quiet sections. This
latter was recorded in Convocation Hall at the University of Alberta,
where both pianist and composer teach. As with the CMC recording,
the sound here is immaculate. Future concert note: Howard Bashaw is
currently writing an extended work for quadruple quartet, piano and
percussion for New Music Concerts which will be performed in the
spring of 2016.
contributed to this history and then record a song written by Grohl,
inspired by the time spent there in one of its iconic studios.
The odyssey begins in Chicago where we meet blues icon Buddy
Guy and Cheap Trick guitarist Rick Nielson as Grohl explores the
various genres that have flourished in the Windy City over the past
half-century. Washington D.C. is the next stop where the early punk
scene (Bad Brains, Black Flag) is juxtaposed with the Go-Go scene
(Trouble Funk). In Nashville we visit the Grand Ole Opry and meet
Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Tony Joe White and Zac Brown and
learn about the songwriting industry before heading off to Austin for
an in-depth look at the 40-year history of the seminal TV show Austin
City Limits with its vast range of musical styles and a visit with Willie
Nelson. Joe Walsh gives us the lowdown on Hotel California in the L.A.
edition, which also features Joan Jett, and we spend some quality time
in the desert around Joshua Tree at the Rancho de la Luna studio. Each
of the episodes focuses on a historically significant recording venue
and in New Orleans the Foo Fighters set up in Preservation Hall and
meet Doctor John, Alain Toussaint and one of the Neville Brothers,
among a host of others. The Seattle segment is particularly poignant
with its focus on the grunge scene epitomized by Kurt Cobain and
Nirvana (although lead singer and guitarist for the Foo Fighters, Grohl
was the drummer for Nirvana), the Sub Pop label and Heart. The final
episode takes place in America’s musical Mecca, New York City, with
its myriad cultures and histories. We meet Woody Guthrie’s daughter,
Gene Simmons and Chuck D to name just a few, visit the Brill
Building, CBGB – did you know that stood for Country, Blue-Grass and
Blues? Quite a misnomer for the breeding ground of punk and new
wave! – Electric Lady studio and the Magic Shop on a whirlwind tour
that has left my head spinning. The above-mentioned names are just
a sampling of the dozens of luminaries who appear throughout the
series, with special mention going to Steve Earle who turns up time
and again with a plethora of insights. A wealth of archival footage is
seamlessly blended into the production, adding historical credence to
the documentary.
One of the press quotes from the DVD package states “Skillfully
directed and packed with decades-spanning trivia” (Entertainment
Weekly). I find this to be almost a travesty in the way it trivializes the
concept and content of the series. The history of American popular
music (in some of its edgiest forms) is so well presented in such depth
here that I would not hesitate to recommend it to anyone curious
about life in the U.S.A. in the past half century. My wife says I can
quote her, but I will paraphrase: Even if you’re not interested in the
music per se, the series is compelling and illuminating.
The only regret I have is that Grohl and company did not make it to
Detroit for a taste of Motown Soul. I hope that if there is a sequel the
sonic highway will lead to the Motor City.
This Just In
As this issue of The WholeNote spans the three summer months I
want to devote the rest of this column to a few titles that fell through
the cracks over the past year and a number of very worthy new
releases that arrived too late to receive full reviews but which I think
you should know about sooner rather than later (i.e. September). First
the new ones…
At time of writing, the second annual
21C Festival is about to get underway at the
Royal Conservatory and as an example of the
growing interest generated by the festival – in
part sparked by last month’s WholeNote cover
art – comes the surprising news that the Spin
Cycle event, originally slated for Mazzoleni
Hall, has been moved into the much larger
Koerner Hall due to the high demand for
tickets. This project brings together the Afiara Quartet, DJ Skratch
Bastid and four young Toronto composers, Dinuk Wijeratne, Laura
Silberberg, Rob Teehan and Kevin Lau. Each of the composers has
written short, multi-movement acoustic string quartets which have
been recorded by Afiara and are then subjected to the multi-layered
treatments for which the award-winning DJ is renowned. One could
be forgiven for thinking the experiment might end there, but not
so, gentle reader. The composers were offered the opportunity to
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 77
their intended pitch. One intriguing aspect of the keyboard used
here is a “stop” heard in the final movement of Carl Friedrich Abel’s
Sonata in G Major which makes it sound like a hackbrett (hammereddulcimer). I had understood that the prepared piano had been
invented by American Henry Cowell in the early 20th century and
further developed by John Cage in the 40s, but it seems that pianomaker Gottfried Silbermann (1783-1853) beat them to the punch a
century earlier. He developed a technique for replicating the sound on
his keyboard instruments with a device he called the pantaleone in
honour of the hackbrett virtuoso Pantaleone Hebenstreit.
Catching up
The first of the discs overlooked at the time
of their release that I want to bring to your
attention is a 2014 realization of The Rite of
Spring in a surprising orchestration for piano,
string bass and drum kit by the jazz combo The
Bad Plus (Sony Masterworks
88843 02405 2), primarily known for their
avant-garde approach to jazz, tinged with hints
of rock and pop. I was particularly impressed
with their convincing recreation of Stravinsky’s score using only the
minimal tools of their trio. Comprised of Ethan Iverson (piano), Reid
Anderson (bass and electronics, mostly involving treatments and
layerings of the piano part in the introductory section of the piece)
and David King (drums), the group developed this project during a
year-long residency at Duke University in 2010-2011. The result has
to be heard to be believed. With the exception of the addition of a
brief and unnecessary percussive coda following Stravinsky’s final
chord, the trio stays true to the original score and gives a remarkable
performance using only limited resources. Highly recommended!
Streamlined Stravinsky is also a feature of a
disc by the Zodiac Trio (Blue Griffin BGR257
bluegriffin.com) although in this instance
the reduction is the work of the composer
himself. L’Histoire du Soldat was originally
written as a theatrical piece for three speakers
– soldier, devil and narrator – dancer and
seven instruments based on a Russian folk tale.
The sponsor of the piece, Werner Reinhart,
was an excellent amateur clarinetist and the year after its 1918 theatrical debut in Lausanne Stravinsky made a suite of five movements
for clarinet, violin and piano. Stripped to the bare bones, this already
skeletal work – said to be a reflection of the depleted supply of musicians as a result of the Great War – is still very effective, as Zodiac’s
dedicated performance proves.
The group – Kliment Krylovsky (clarinet), Vanessa Mollard (violin)
and Riko Higuma (piano) – was formed at the Manhattan School of
Music in 2006 and its goal is “to etch this instrumentation into the
ranks of chamber music’s dominant combinations.” To this end they
commission works and tour extensively. Their 2010 debut recording
featured original works but this latest draws on existing repertoire.
The Stravinsky Suite notwithstanding it is Bartók’s Contrasts, written
for Benny Goodman and Joseph Szigeti, which is generally considered
to have launched this genre. Zodiac gives Contrasts an exuberant and
idiomatic performance, confirming its place at the head of the table.
The disc also includes the world premiere recording of the somewhat
anachronistic A Smiling Suite by French composer Nicolas Bacri, and
a moving (and haunting) early work by Shostakovich protégé Galina
Ustvolskaya.
We welcome your feedback and invite submissions. CDs and
comments should be sent to: DISCoveries, WholeNote Media Inc.,
The Centre for Social Innovation, 503 – 720 Bathurst St. Toronto
ON M5S 2R4. We also encourage you to visit our website thewholenote.com where you can find added features including direct links
to performers, composers and record labels, “buy buttons” for online
shopping and additional, expanded and archival reviews.
Also coming next spring, Soundstreams is
celebrating Steve Reich’s 80th birthday with a
concert featuring three of his seminal works.
Clapping Music, Tehillim and the iconic Music
for 18 Musicians will be performed at Massey
Hall on April 14, 2016. There is a new recording
of Music for 18 Musicians featuring New York’s
Ensemble Signal under the direction of Brad
Lubman (Harmonia Mundi 907608) and if you
are not familiar with this classic minimalist
work for four pianos, three marimbas, two xylophones, vibraphone,
two clarinets, violin, cello and four voices, I would recommend this
recording. As Steve Reich himself says, “Signal has made an extraordinary recording of Music for 18 Musicians. Fast moving, spot on
and emotionally charged.” With top rank Toronto musicians engaged
for the Massey Hall performance I am sure we can expect nothing less
from Soundstreams.
Speaking of iconic works of contemporary
music, the London Philharmonic Orchestra
has just released Des Canyons Aux Étoiles
by Olivier Messiaen under the direction of
Christoph Eschenbach (LPO – 0083). At 100
minutes in length, From the Canyons to the
Stars (1971-74) draws extensively on Messiaen’s
signature birdsong transcriptions for much of
its musical material. As always it is also a paean
to the glory of God, this time in the context of the natural beauty of
Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, which Messiaen visited in 1972 in
conjunction with this commission from an American philanthropist.
The full forces of the modern symphony orchestra are supplemented
with four soloists: Tzimon Barto (piano), John Ryan (horn), Andrew
Barclay (xylorimba) and Erika Öhman (glockenspiel), all of whom rise
to the occasion. Highly recommended.
Canada’s triple threat Triple Forte – Jasper
Wood, violin; Yegor Dyachov, cello; David
Jalbert, piano – have a new recording of
Dvořák Piano Trios (ATMA ACD2 2691) and
as one would expect it is a treasure. Founded
in 2003 this trio comprises three top soloists who work together as a finely oiled
machine. Their debut disc in 2012 of music
by Ravel, Shostakovich and Ives showed them
to be at home in 20th-century idioms. This proves no less true of the
preceding century with these captivating performances of two of the
pinnacles of Romantic chamber repertoire, the Trio in F Minor, Op.65
and the “Dumky” Trio in E Minor, Op.90, Dvořák’s third and fourth
ventures into this genre. Although the opus numbers suggest a larger
gap, the two works were written within a span of seven years, in 1883
and 1890. The first is set in the usual four-movement form, opening
with a majestic and expansive Allegro ma non troppo replete with
melodies reminiscent of Schumann and Mendelssohn. The “Dumky,”
dating from the height of the composer’s Slavic period, is a set of
six contrasting movements all based on the Ukrainian Dumka folksong form. In both works the strength (i.e. forte) of each of the players
is allowed to shine while goading the others on to new heights in
performances that exemplify the group’s name.
Berlin Sonatas (Passacaille 1006
passacaille.be) features 18th-century works by
Abel, J.C.F. and C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Kirnberger
and Graun performed by Elinor Frey on
five-string cello and Lorenzo Ghielmi on a
Silbermann fortepiano (known at the time
as a “Cembalo con il forte e piano” due to its
ability to produce sounds both loudly and
softly, unlike the harpsichord with its limited
dynamic range). Frey provides an extended essay to explain why she
feels a five-string cello is appropriate, and likely originally intended,
for this repertoire. She makes a strong case for the instrument, not
only in her writing but more particularly in her performance, especially in two violin solo works by Benda, here heard one octave below
78 | June | July | August, 2015
David Olds, DISCoveries Editor
[email protected]
thewholenote.com
!!An opera by a
VOCAL
Emilio de Cavalieri – Rappresentatione di
Anima e di Corpo
Soloists; Staatsopernchor Berlin;
Akademie fur Alte Musik Berlin; René
Jacobs
harmonia mundi 902200.01
!!Cavalieri’s
Rappresentatione
di Anima e di Corpo
(1600) dramatizes how
the Body and the Soul
both reject the blandishments of Pleasure
and of Worldly Life
and choose Eternal Life over Damnation.
Such a summary makes the work seem very
dreary but it can hold the attention of a
modern audience, as was demonstrated by
the Canadian Opera Company in its 1983/84
season. Although the Rappresentatione is not,
in my view, an opera, it undoubtedly influenced that newly emerging genre through its
staging and through its use of solo singing
with chordal accompaniment.
Both the singing and the instrumental
playing on this CD are very fine. The performance is based on that of a production at the
Schiller Theater in Berlin in 2012. Although
the work’s first publication provided the
melody and the bass line, a performance
can only be realized by enriching the chords
needed and by adding further melodic and
contrapuntal lines. There is a great deal of
instrumental variety on this recording. Of
particular interest is the arch-cittern or
ceterone (which bears a similar relationship
to the cittern as the theorbo does to the lute).
The instrument used here was built for the
Musée de la Musique in Paris on the basis of
an original preserved in Florence.
Hans de Groot
Purcell – Dido & Aeneas
Le Poème Harmonique; Vincent Dumestre;
Choeur Accentus; Opera de Rouen
Haute-Normandie;
Alpha 706
Gluck – Alceste
Angela Denoke; Paul Groves; Willard
White; Teatro Real; Ivor Bolton
EuroArts 3074978
decreed that Admetus,
King of Pherae, must
die unless another
is willing to take
his place. Euripides
makes a great deal of
the cowardice of the
king’s subjects, especially that of his aging
parents, who do not
have that long to live
anyway. Admetus’
wife, Alcestis, then offers herself up and the
most interesting issue in the play is why the
King is willing to accept her sacrifice.
The Admète in the opera is made of sterner
stuff. When he is told that someone has
been found who is willing to take his place,
it takes him a long time to realize that the
someone is his own wife. Once he has realized it, he refuses to accept the offer. Alceste
did not think life was worth living without
her husband; he does not think life is worth
living without his wife. It is Hercule, who
resolves the impasse by descending into the
Underworld and rescuing Alceste.
This DVD gives us a production of the opera
from the Teatro Real in Madrid, directed by
Krzysztof Warlikowski, who has chosen to
superimpose the story of Princess Diana. Here
Alceste chooses death not because she loves
her husband so much but because it offers
her a way out of a loveless marriage. When
Hercule snatches her from the Underworld,
she is deprived of what she most wishes.
One of the dangers with Gluck is that
his music may sound marmoreal. That is
certainly not the case with this production,
which is full-blooded and passionate. There
is fine singing from Angela Denoke (Alceste),
Paul Groves (Admète) and Willard White (in
the twin roles of the High Priest of Apollon
and Thanatos). It is clear, however, that the
whole point of the opera has been subverted.
Hans de Groot
!!Gluck’s Alceste was first performed, in
Italian, in 1767; a French version followed in
1776. It is the French version that we see and
hear on this DVD. The source for the opera
is a play by Euripides, in which it has been
Rossini in Wildbad – Guillaume Tell
Festival Wildbad: Various Vocalists;
Camerata Bach Choir; Virtuosi Brunensis;
Antonino Fogliani
Bongiovani AB 20029
composer described
as the English
Orpheus and selected
by a French music
company? And one
which has never paid
homage to an English
composer before?
Musical director
Vincent Dumestre
gives his reasons. First, there is Purcell’s pure
genius – he could not have been more than
25 when he composed Dido and Aeneas.
What is more, he combined the melancholy of
composers such as Dowland with the vitality
of earlier English masques and the genius of
contemporary composer Lully.
Purcell’s operas did not stint on the elaborate nature of their stage productions,
although this production differs in terms of
its ingenuity in stage construction, its lack
of complexity and certain demands on the
performers. Marc Mauillon’s sorceress/sailor
roles exploit his gymnastic and trapeze skills,
and the first witch and other sorceresses
perform with agility on ropes – when they are
not scaring the audience!
Vivica Genaux is a magnificent Dido, fully
conveying the anguish of her isolation. Her
rendition of When I am laid in earth, always a
test for singers of all ranges and backgrounds,
is accomplished with a haunting quality of
which Purcell would no doubt be proud. In
addition, Caroline Meng’s first witch leaves no
doubt as to the character’s evil intent.
All in all, a highly original performance but
one that still brings home Purcell’s compassionate treatment of a tragic love story.
Michael Schwartz
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thewholenote.com
Tim Berne’s dynamic band Sankeoil,
adds guitarist Ryan Ferreira, adding
textural allure.
With Made in Chicago, Jack
DeJohnette celebrates a reunion
with old friends.
With Call Me A Fool, young
Toronto songstress Eliza Pope
arrives on the scene with an
astonishingly assured (and anything
but foolish) debut record.
June | July | August, 2015 | 79
!!Still not yet 40 and
the Gods.”
full of his creative
powers, Rossini
certainly went out
with a bang, creating
something original
and big for the
wealthy Paris audiences of the Second
Empire. With a cast
of thousands William
Tell easily became
very long, even overblown, so Rossini’s
biggest problem was how to cut back and
tighten the reins. For posterity the opera was
very successful even in its excised form, but
for the Wildbad Festival in Germany, 2013, it
was decided, wisely (or unwisely) to perform
the entire score for the first time in its history.
If authenticity is a guiding principle it will
certainly please musicologists and completists
and assorted people with good intentions, but
we all know where good intentions tend to
lead… Much could be written on the updated
staging that carries an inevitable political
message, rather explicitly of oppressors vs.
the oppressed, unfortunately neglecting the
gorgeous Swiss scenery that’s omnipresent in
Rossini’s score.
In purely musical terms the festival did
gather optimum forces. First and foremost,
conductor Antonino Fogliani (who is beginning to look like Rossini himself) has this
music in his blood and moves it with a sparkling upbeat tempo, finesse and humour,
having a great old time doing it. The soloists
are all of high quality. Six topnotch singers are
required to cope with the enormous demands
of the work. American heroic tenor Michael
Spyres as Arnold carries the Olympic torch in
one of the most gruelling tenor roles and he
is undoubtedly best in show. Highest credit
must also go to the chorus, the Camerata Bach
Choir that sings and even dances the many
ensembles this opera is famous for. And a
resounding yes to the fully complete ballet no
French opera would do without (even if it’s
written by an Italian). My fondest memory
however will always be the “sublime second
act” (Berlioz) that even another bel canto
genius, Donizetti, admitted was “written by
Janos Gardonyi
Berg – Lulu
Mojca Erdmann; Deborah Polaski; Michael
Volle; Thomas Piffka; Stephan Rugamer;
Staatskapelle Berlin; Daniel Barenboim
Deutsche Grammophon 0440073 4934
!!After Alban Berg’s
death in 1935, his
great opera Lulu
remained incomplete
– until Friedrich Cerha
orchestrated the final
act in 1979. For this
production from the
Berlin Staatsoper in
2012, a new version
of all three acts has
been created. Berg’s
sardonic Prologue
has been replaced by an actor lying on the
floor reciting Kierkegaard. Instead of Berg’s
precisely described silent movie, we now
see Lulu’s blinking eyes projected on the
windshield of one of the cars that litter the
stage. The first scene of Act III has been cut
altogether.
What remains of the third act has been
newly orchestrated by David Robert Coleman,
using noticeably leaner textures than Berg
and Cerha and some non-Bergian instruments like steel drums and marimba. His
completion doesn’t fit in, but it brings out
Berg’s expressionist lines.
Director Andrea Breth’s staging fails to
reveal how exciting the plot of Lulu is. The
single set – with wrecked cars piled up on
one side, and what appear to be cages or
prison bars erected on the other – is relentlessly grim, especially when watched through
camerawork so close that we rarely see the
whole stage.
Breth’s Lulu is a victim, as affectless as a
puppet. But the Lulu created by Berg and
playwright Frank Wedekind is an amoral,
willful seductress. Mojca Erdmann makes
a lovely, alluring Lulu, but can’t convey the
spine-tingling danger that the great Lulus,
from Evelyn Lear and Teresa Stratas to
Christine Schäfer and Barbara Hannigan,
present. Michael Volle makes a powerful
Dr. Schön and Jack the Ripper and Deborah
Polaski is moving as the doomed Countess.
But the most enthralling moments come from
Daniel Barenboim’s amazing Staatskapelle
orchestra.
Pamela Margles
Aribert Reimann – Lear
Bo Skovhus; Staatsoper Hamburg;
Simone Young
ArtHaus Musik 109063
!!Shakespeare’s King
Lear was an obsession
with Berlioz and even
more so with Verdi
who, as the legend
goes, threw his halfwritten score into the
fire in a fit of selfdisgust. It took 100
years and two world
war disasters before
German composer
Aribert Reimann
actually succeeded in turning it into an opera
at the suggestion of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau,
who sang the title role in Munich in 1978.
Since then it has enjoyed a moderate success
around the world, but in 2012 the Hamburg
Opera, now under the leadership of Simone
Young, very much devoted to the avant-garde,
revived it with this inspired, completely
original staging by Karoline Gruber.
Apart from being brutal and gruesome,
Lear is the hardest hitting tragedy of the Bard
because it hits so close to home. Everyone will
sooner or later become old and will sympathize with Lear’s predicament. The tragic
fault that causes his downfall is self-deception and an over-inflated ego that make him
subject to flattery and an easy victim to his
avaricious daughters. Reimann uses the entire
play as his libretto, a play that moves on many
different levels – personal, familial, political, psychological and philosophical (one of
the most often quoted of all Shakespeare) –
and must have been horrendously difficult to
come to grips with. Reimann’s expressionist,
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Previously uploaded to
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RED CHAMBER’S GATHERING
For more information
Thom McKercher at
[email protected]
Available at
ASZA.com & iTunes
80 | June | July | August, 2015
Philippe Lauzier (bass cl. / so. sax)
Éric Normand (e-bass)
Limited sandwich bag edition CD
“This performance of “Four
Last Songs” is beautifully and
sensitively sung ... “
Record Review / December
2014
thewholenote.com
TERRY ROBBINS
movements where – as with Shaham – a judicial use of rubato helps
to shape the phrases. For the two discs, Enders divides the suites into
what he sees as light and dark colours, although he doesn’t really
elucidate: Suites 5, 2 and 4 (in C minor, D minor and E flat major) on
CD1 bring out the interval of a rising second, while Suites 3, 1 and 6
(in C, G and D major) on CD2 are keys in the circle of fifths. Whether
or not that sequence contributes to the overall effect is irrelevant; all
that matters is that, like the Shaham, this is a set that can more than
hold its own against strong competition, and it’s as enjoyable a cello
performance of these Suites as I have heard.
If you’re interested in contemporary cello
music then you’ll certainly want to check
out Crossings: New Music for Cello, a new
CD featuring the American cellist Kate
Dillingham and pianist Amir Khosrowpour
(furious artisans FACD 6815). Expenses for
the recording, which Dillingham calls a CD
of cutting-edge contemporary compositions,
were raised through the online crowdfunding
platform RocketHub. Dillingham’s description of the music will give
you a good idea of what to expect: “The musical expression varies
widely: from driving rhythms to expansive, contemplative phrases;
long, lyrical lines to in-your-face badass riffs; simple musical statements to bow hair-shredding technical challenges!”
American composers represented here are Gilbert Galindo, David
Fetherolf, Gabriela Lena Frank, B. Allen Schulz and Jonathan Pieslak,
although the four composers born outside the U.S.A. – Jorge Muñiz,
Yuan-Chen Li, Federico Garcia-De Castro and Wang Jie – are all
currently active in the American music scene.
The CD booklet includes bios of all the composers, but unfortunately not a word about the music – when and how it came to
be written, for instance – although it’s clear from Dillingham’s
comments on the RocketHub site that she works closely with most
of the composers represented here, particularly those belonging to
the composer collectives in New York (Random Access Music) and
Pittsburgh (Alia Musica).
Four of the pieces are for solo cello and five for cello and piano. It’s
difficult to make any meaningful comments about such a variety of
recent pieces, but they are all clearly quite strong, colourful compositions that make an immediate impact; no single work here seems out
of place. Both performers are more than up to the challenges – and
believe me, there are quite a few!
With a playing time of almost 80 minutes it’s a fascinating portrait
of contemporary American cello music. Watch the eight-minute
Crossings Documentary on YouTube for background information on
the making of the CD; there are also short clips of Gilbert Galindo and
Federico Garcia-De Castro discussing their compositions.
Myth, the latest CD from the young Dutch
violinist Rosanne Philippens, features the
music of Polish composer Karol Szymanowski
and it’s outstanding (Channel Classics CCS
SA 36715). The main work here is the Violin
Concerto No.1 Op.35 from 1916, with Xian
Zhang conducting the NJO (the National
Youth Orchestra of the Netherlands). It’s a
beautifully lyrical work in one movement
with a glorious rhapsodic main theme, and was written for the Polish
violinist Pawel Kochański, who contributed significantly to the solo
part and also wrote the cadenza. A good deal of the violin part is up
in the stratosphere and requires not only a brilliant, shimmering tone
but a rock-solid technical assurance. Philippens has both in abundance. She also clearly has a feel for Szymanowski’s music, having
been introduced to the three-movement Myths, Op.30 a few years ago
Gil Shaham has long been one of my
favourite violinists, the grace, intelligence
and warmth of his playing never failing to
produce performances of the highest quality.
I opened his latest release, a 2CD set of
the Bach Sonatas and Partitas on his own
Canary Classics label (CC14), expecting great
things, and I wasn’t disappointed. Because
of the great challenges they present, many
players are in no rush to commit the Bach solo works to disc; in
Shaham’s case he didn’t even start performing them in public until
about ten years ago. His continuing exploration of the music led him
to experiment with wound gut strings and a baroque-style bridge
and bow in an effort to more closely reproduce the sound of Bach’s
own violin. For this current recording Shaham started with a more
modern set-up, tried both approaches and eventually settled for the
baroque option; it’s a great choice, with the warm, bright sound a
perfect match for his style, and the lighter baroque bow in particular
allowing for much cleaner passagework in Shaham’s decidedly faster
tempos. There’s never a sense of rushing, though; the multiple stopping is always clean, the melodic line always clear, and Shaham
often uses a brief rubato to allow the music to breathe or to highlight
phrase peaks. His approach to the sometimes thorny issue of vibrato
in baroque music is a decidedly sensible compromise: “I use some
vibrato, but I try to err on the side of not using too much.”
It doesn’t always happen that you can put on a CD of the Sonatas
and Partitas and just let it play; quite often there’s a gravity or
seriousness to the performance that makes playing right through all
six works quite demanding listening. Not with Shaham, though; he
creates a world of warmth and light, and each of the two CDs just flies
past. The playing here is light and brilliant without ever being superficial; fast without ever losing the sense of phrase; joyous and spontaneous without ever losing a sense of emotional depth; gentle but
never weak; and strong but never strident.
There’s a great deal of competition in recordings of the Bach solo
works, of course, with a wide range of styles and approaches to choose
from, but you’ll go a long way before you find a more beautiful and
satisfying set than this.
There’s another outstanding set of Bach solo
works this month, this time the Cello Suites
featuring the German cellist Isang Enders
(Berlin Classics 0300552BC). The similarities
with the Shaham set are quite striking: the
28-year-old Enders says that Bach has been
in his life since early childhood, and that the
challenges presented by the Cello Suites made
him constantly doubt his abilities when it came to recording them.
Then, after his first attempt had gone through the final production
stages, he rejected it and returned to the studio to do justice not only
to his own developing thoughts about the music but also “to do justice
to Bach himself.”
Above all, he addresses the discussion about “historically informed,”
as opposed to historical, performance practices that has been
ever-present for players of his generation; his quoting of Nikolaus
Harnoncourt in this regard (“words that say it all for me”) is worth
repeating: “We naturally need to acquaint ourselves with performance practice, but let us not retreat into false purism, into false objectivity, into misinterpreted fidelity to the original. So I beg of you: do
not be afraid of vibrato, liveliness or subjectivity, but do be very afraid
of coldness, purism, ‘objectivity’ and barren historicism.”
Not only could that be a perfect guide for Shaham’s approach, but
Enders also certainly takes this to heart: there is warmth and brightness to his playing and a real liveliness, especially in the dance
thewholenote.com
June | July | August, 2015 | 81
atonal music is, however, so well suited to his
subject and so well integrated with it that the
power of the play reverberates even stronger
than in the prose version.
At the head of the young, energetic and
dedicated cast Danish baritone Bo Skovhus
is one of today’s most exciting and original
artists who simply towers over this production, but Andrew Watts’ heartrending
portrayal of “poor boy Tom” Edgar cannot
easily be forgotten. With conductor Simone
Young’s supreme command over the score
(especially in the haunting Intermezzo with
its bass flute solo) this awesome set is much
recommended.
Janos Gardonyi
compositional idiom, he reached for a much
more melodic approach for Lear. Indeed,
you’d be forgiven for thinking that this is
a long-forgotten verismo opera sung in
Finnish, not a composition created in the
year 2000. Says Sallinen: “An opera must
be a servant to its libretto.” That is how this
postmodern composer arrived at an almost
conventional opera, with arias and duets and
leitmotifs lyrically representing the characters. Somewhere up there, Giuseppe Verdi
is smiling.
Robert Tomas
Aulis Sallinen – King Lear
Matti Salminen; Finnish National Opera;
Okko Kamu
Ondine ODV 4010
Pieces from the Gdańsk Lute Tablature
4022
Magdalena Tomsińska
Dux DUX 1150 (dux.pl)
!!King Lear is, for
me, the most tragic
of Shakespeare’s
tragedies – which
obviously, makes it a
perfect opera libretto.
Erroneous judgement,
betrayal, devious plots,
poison, enucleation…
all the raw elements
of an opera are here.
Yet Verdi struggled for
most of his composing
career with Il Re Lear and finally gave up
without completing the opera. It was up to
the contemporary Finnish composer Aulis
Sallinen to give us a full musical account of
the cursed king’s story. Just as the dramatic
King Lear comes to us in many versions,
Sallinen, who also wrote the libretto, chose
to blind the Earl of Gloucester, leaving King
Lear with his eyesight intact, yet emotionally
blinded to the true nature of each of his three
daughters.
Sallinen, who himself eschewed opera
as not a “pure” musical form (until 1973),
changed his mind when he created his
first opera The Horseman, which is still
performed. Despite his highly modern
!!The collapse of
EARLY, CLASSICAL AND BEYOND
the Berlin Wall led
to the discovery of
a lute tablature of
Gdańsk dated 1620. It
emerged in the East
Berlin library service,
having been believed
lost for 45 years. Some of the 222 pieces in
the tablature had their titles and composers
literally trimmed off by zealous officials; their
attribution has, however, been deduced by
Magdalena Tomsińska herself, who scoured
many more lute collections to identify several
of the pieces played here. The key composer
is Frenchman Robert Ballard; some of his
courantes and balletti are featured on the CD.
And so to Tomsińska’s choices (32 tracks
in 58 minutes). Her balletti are played with
a skill and clarity worthy of any concert hall
recital. Note, indeed, Balletto Polachos 3, 4
and 30 both for their vigour and the pleasure
which the performer imparts.
By far the majority of Tomsińska’s choices
are anonymous and one gets the impression they were taken from street fairs and
theatres and transcribed directly for lute.
This must surely be true of the boisterous
Ungaro and Be Merry, which Tomsińska takes
in her stride. Her choice also extends to the
English dancing tune Nutmegs and Ginger
– reflecting the pan-European nature of the
original tablature.
By contrast, there are eight pieces for whom
composers are attributed, five to Robert
Ballard and one each to Alessandro Piccinini,
John Sturt and Gregory Huwet. These are
played with a certain solemnity compared
to the more popular anonymous pieces but
Tomsińska puts her heart into all of them, as
she does with the longest piece, Monycha.
This is demanding but, once again, Tomsińska
shows with her inspired playing why her
anthology deserves to be bought – and not
just by early-music enthusiasts. Buy it if it is
the only lute recital you buy this year.
Michael Schwartz
Mozart – Piano Sonatas
Marc-André Hamelin
Hyperion CDA68029
!!Following his
acclaimed Haydn
piano sonata recordings, prolific pianist
Marc-André Hamelin
outperforms even
himself in this twodisc release featuring
eight Mozart piano
sonatas along with some other Mozart solo
piano treats. Hamelin is thorough in his
attention to detail, rhythm and separation
of lines in both hands when tackling the
complex technical and musical intricacies in
Mozart’s solo piano compositions.
Here are some highlights. Not all the works
are technically challenging. His performance
of the famous student “little sonata for beginners” Piano Sonata in C Major K545 raises the
musical bar for any student of any aptitude.
Hamelin is lyrical in the infamous opening
Allegro first movement. And his concluding
chords of the third movement Rondo are
loud yet not banged, resulting in a formidable sensitive ending to an inspirational
performance. In contrast, Piano Sonata in F
Major K332 is a challenging work. The first
movement Allegro is performed with tonal
What if you could
listen in?
Now you can!
Previously uploaded to
the Listening Room
TheWholeNote.com/Listening
For more information
Thom McKercher at
[email protected]
82 | June | July | August, 2015
A celebration of the music of
Billie Holiday performed by
renowned Canadian multigenre chanteuse Molly Johnson!
“Johnson infuses Because Of
Billie with her idol’s spirit!”
Known for her daring concerto
couplings, Hilary Hahn matches
Mozart’s beloved Concerto in A
with the virtuosic romanticism
of Vieuxtemp,s 4th.
Literal Lateral is the latest
release from Halifax’s Crofts/
Adams/Pearse Trio with
special guest Gerry Hemingway.
Music from the deep wells and
frayed edges.
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setting of poems by Leonard Cohen; their enjoying working together
led to the writing of the Partita for Fain in 2011.
Three short works complete the CD. Knee 2 from the opera Einstein
on the Beach is more what you might expect from Glass – a helterskelter perpetuum mobile with slight shifts and changes in the
patterns and accents. Book of Longing is the solo mentioned above;
the contemplative Interludes from the Violin Concerto No.2 bring a
marvellous CD to a close.
Fratres is the new CD from ATMA celebrating 30 years of the
Quebec chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy, founded in 1984 by
conductor Bernard Labadie (ACD2 3015).
Over the years the group has released close to
30 CDs, mostly on the Dorian, Virgin Classics,
Naïve, Hyperion, Erato and Analekta labels;
since 2004 there have been eight CDs on the
Quebec ATMA label, and it is from that catalogue that this self-styled compilation sampler
has been put together. Sampler CDs, with
their mixture of single extracted movements
and short complete pieces, can tend to be less than satisfying in some
respects, but the very high performance standards here together with
the lovely recording quality and the choice of titles makes this a very
attractive release.
The title track is a previously unreleased 2008 recording of the
Arvo Pärt composition, featuring violinist Pascale Giguère. There’s a
beautiful performance of the Mozart concert aria Chi’ omi scordi di
te? by soprano Karina Gauvin, who is also featured in a performance
of Britten’s Now sleeps the crimson petal and – along with countertenor Daniel Taylor – in an extract from Bach’s Tilge, Hochster, meine
Sünden. There’s a movement from Bartók’s Divertimento, Gluck’s
Ballet des Ombres heureuses, Mozart’s Overture to Lucio Silla,
Handel’s Arrival of the Queen of Sheba, a brief Rameau piece and
Astor Piazzolla’s Milonga del Angel. Oh – and the Pachelbel Canon.
Bet you weren’t expecting that. Labadie conducts most of the tracks;
Jean-Marie Zeitouni conducts all but one of the remaining five.
Also from ATMA, the third and final volume
of the outstanding complete cycle of the
Beethoven String Quartets by the Quatuor
Alcan has just been released (ATMA ACD2
2493). It’s another 3CD set, and features the
wonderful late quartets: Opp.127, 130, 131,
132, 133 (Grosse Fuge) and 135. The entire
cycle was recorded between May 2008 and
December 2012 but, as noted earlier, the fact that all the recordings
were made in the excellent acoustics of the Salle Françoys-Bernier
at Le Domaine Forget in Saint-Irénée, Quebec means that there is no
discernable difference in the recorded sound. There is also no discernable difference in the uniformly high standard of the performances. It
really is a terrific set from a terrific ensemble, and a fitting celebration
of their 25th anniversary.
Stradivari’s Gift, for Narrator, Violin and
String Orchestra, is one of two story-andmusic CDs (Amati’s Dream is the other) that
will take young listeners on a journey to the
violin workshops of 17th-century Cremona
(Atlantic Crossing Records ACR 0001). The
story and music are by the American author
and composer Kim Maerkl, who founded
Atlantic Crossing Records, and the violin soloist is her husband
Key-Thomas Maerkl; the English actor Sir Roger Moore is the narrator.
The Maerkls hope that the CDs will inspire children to further
explore classical music, and their creation here is first class, in much
the same style as the well-known Classical Kids series of storyand-music CDs and DVDs. The story is simple, the music clear and
uncomplicated but quite beautiful, and the performance of the violin
solo part is simply stunning.
Readers wanting to know more about this disc can find a slightly
expanded version of this column online.
by the pianist Julien Quentin, who joins her for the rest of the CD.
Myths, from 1915, was also written for Kochański, and has a distinctly
Impressionist feel to it.
Other Szymanowski works presented here are the beautiful Chant
de Roxane (an arrangement of an aria from the opera Krol Roger), and
the Nocturne and Tarantella Op.28, also from 1915. Again, Philippens
displays a brilliant tone and flawless technique in some really difficult
music. Szymanowski was influenced by the music of Igor Stravinsky,
who was exerting his own influence on the musical world in the years
before the Great War, and three short works by the latter complete the
CD. Stravinsky’s Firebird was a particular favourite of Szymanowski,
and Philippens extends the “Myth” concept to include the Berceuse
and Scherzo from the ballet, as well as the later Chanson Russe.
This really is an outstanding CD, full of dazzling playing from a
violinist with a strong musical intellect. If you haven’t heard Rosanne
Philippens yet, don’t worry – it won’t be long before you do.
The Romanian George Enescu, who died in 1955, was arguably the
last of the great violinist/composers. Volume 2
of his Complete Works for Violin and Piano
has just been released by Naxos (8.572692),
and like Volume 1 (Naxos 8.572691) features
the terrific German violinist Axel Strauss
and the Russian pianist Ilya Poletaev, both
of whom are currently on the faculty at the
Schulich School of Music at McGill University.
The Violin Sonata No.1 was written in 1897
when Enescu was only 16 years old, and although it leans heavily on
the German sonata tradition – especially Brahms – it is a very strong
work that draws some outstanding playing from both performers.
Two shorter pieces pre-date the sonata: the Ballade Op.4a was originally for violin and orchestra; and the unpublished Tarantella provides
ample evidence of Enescu’s technical ability in his teenage years. The
Aubade is a 1903 violin and piano version of a short piece written
for string trio in 1899. The Hora Unirii from 1917 and the relatively
late Andantino malinconico from 1951 complete the selection of
effective and attractive shorter pieces. But the real gem on this CD is
the Impressions d’enfance Op.28 from 1940, an astonishing suite-like
work of ten short movements, played mostly without a break, which
traces the day in the life of a child. There’s a folk fiddler, a stream in
the garden, a caged bird and a cuckoo clock, a chirping cricket, the
moon shining through the window, the howling of the wind in the
chimney (a ghostly 23 seconds of scratchy violin solo) and a distant
thunder storm at night. In the booklet notes, Poletaev calls the work
“…a stupendous compositional tour-de-force… a musical fabric of
extraordinary sophistication and richness.” It certainly is, and it’s
worth the price of an exceptional CD on its own.
I didn’t know exactly what to expect from Partita for Solo Violin:
Tim Fain Plays Philip Glass (Orange Mountain Music OMM 0050), but
what I heard was a revelation. Glass, recently
named as laureate of the Glenn Gould Prize,
has been a prolific and immensely influential composer for the past 50 years or so, with
a far greater range of compositions than the
familiar description of him as a “minimalist”
would suggest; Glass himself has always
disliked that term, feeling that he moved
away from the style years ago, and now considers himself a “classicist.” Even so, I wasn’t prepared for such an incredibly strong, idiomatic solo violin work in a very traditional style (Opening; Morning
Song; Dance 1; Chaconne Part 1; Dance 2; Evening Song; Chaconne
Part 2) which quite clearly pays homage to the Bach Sonatas &
Partitas; it’s a towering and powerful composition, strongly tonal and
with a wide emotional, technical and dynamic range.
Tim Fain’s outstanding performance is definitive; the Partita is
the central work in the recitals that Fain and Glass regularly perform
together. There is no CD booklet, so no information on the work’s
genesis, but Fain has been collaborating closely with Glass since 2008,
when he had a short featured solo in the Book of Longing, Glass’s
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June | July | August, 2015 | 83
surprises in its orchestra-emulating scoring.
The second movement features Hamelin at
his very best. This is a touching, lyrical rendition. The bending and stretching of lines leads
to a melody played with so much musicality
and feeling that words escape me. Gigue
in G Major is a robust contrapuntal dance.
Clocking in at slightly over one minute,
Hamelin plays energetically with imaginative
splashes of Mozart-inspired musical humour.
High production quality and thorough
liner notes complete this perfect package.
Hamelin’s exquisite Mozart makes this the
go-to music of the summer!
Tiina Kiik
Berlioz – Intrata to Rob-Roy; Reverie et
Caprice; Harold en Italie
James Ehnes; Melbourne Symphony
Orchestra; Sir Andrew Davis
Chandos CHSA 5155
!!The Intrata
to Rob-Roy was
written as an introduction to Rob-Roy
but was so badly
received in the first
and only performance in 1833 that
Berlioz burned the
score after the concert. Fortunately there was
another copy, but Berlioz had also used two of
the melodies in a new work, Harold in Italy,
the following year. The two themes are easily
recognized and it is rather pleasant to hear
them in their earlier setting, particularly as
they are given to the winds whose playing is
quite angelic. The Reverie et Caprice (1841) is
Berlioz’s only work for solo violin and owes
its existence to the initial failure of Benvenuto
Cellini. It was a soprano aria that was
replaced before the first performance. Clever
Berlioz transcribed it for violin and orchestra
which he then gave to his concertmaster in a
longer concert format.
A lifetime addiction to Harold in Italy gives
me some license to be critical of any performance and it gave me great pleasure to realize
from the opening pages that this orchestra
has the texture for Harold. In the first movement, as the melancholy Harold, inspired by
Byron’s Childe Harold (the viola), wanders
in the mountains, Sir Andrew Davis is not
simply beating time but moving the episodes
along. The Pilgrims’ March has a comfortable swagger with the viola weaving comfortably through the procession. The Serenade is
an appropriately jaunty scene of an Abruzzo
and his amore. The last movement, Orgy of
the Brigands, should describe just that, with
fond memories of the previous episodes.
These are not an unruly bunch but take their
brigandizing seriously in an orderly, professional manner.
The viola (Harold) is not intended to be part
of any event but is merely a wanderer, which
is possibly why Paganini, who commissioned the work, found it not to his taste (at
84 | June | July | August, 2015
the time). James Ehnes’ take on this role is
ideal, imparting quiet enjoyment at the events
around him. Quite perfect. British conductors
have an established tradition as great Berlioz
interpreters and Davis may soon join them.
The sound is extraordinarily fine, impressive as a CD but if you have the multi-channel
equipment, the SACD layer is encoded with
five-channel surround sound.
Bruce Surtees
Chopin Volume 4 – Waltzes; Nocturnes
Louis Lortie
Chandos CHAN 10852
!!The early waltzes
that Chopin composed
were meant to be
small personal gifts
and tributes – most of
them were not even
intended for publication. That changed
somewhat after the
composer’s visit to Vienna in 1831. The precocious 21-year-old reported back to Warsaw
with breathless astonishment: “Waltzes are
regarded as works here!” By “works” he
meant recognized musical pieces, worthy
of publication. That he could have doubted
that astonishes us equally – these are not
throwaway ditties, despite their slender size.
Somehow, Chopin managed to squeeze into
a space of three to four minutes compositions with their own mutable rhythms and
containing micro-movements within their
minute frames.
To master Chopin’s waltzes, one needs
an equally mutable, mercurial talent.
Louis Lortie, the incredibly accomplished
Montrealer now residing in Berlin, possesses
such talent. For many of us, Lortie is not the
first name that comes to mind when you
think of master pianists. Yet it is enough to
start listening to him play these waltzes to
realize the magnitude of his gift. They virtually cascade from his fingers, simultaneously
inviting us into a reverie whilst invoking a
desire to dance along. Only on a couple of
occasions does Lortie rush the tempi, perhaps
as if he could not believe that the impulsive,
romantic Chopin had really marked them as
“moderato.”
Robert Tomas
Mahler – Symphony No.2 “Resurrection”
Catherine Wyn-Rogers; Ailish Tynan; Royal
Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra; Gerard
Schwarz
Artek AR-0061-2
I must admit
to a certain leeriness when I first laid
eyes on the hideous
artwork that adorns
this recording. Gerard
Schwarz and Gustav
Mahler facing off,
mano a mano, in some sort of grudge match?
Has the conductor noted for his advocacy
of neglected American music turned a new
leaf? As it turns out, the provenance of this
live recording is misleading. Though bearing
a 2015 copyright, it is actually unreleased
material from a Mahler cycle intended for
the RLPO Live label, an enterprise launched
shortly before Schwarz’s five-year reign
in Liverpool that began in 2001. A sponsorship has now brought these tapes back
to life. And what of the interpretation? A
decent first movement, distinguished only
by the unusually broad tempo afforded
the secondary theme, followed by a so-so
Menuetto. Suddenly from the Scherzo onward
the orchestra rallies and everything thereafter
is admirably compelling. When we finally
arrive at the finale the rafters are shaking!
The sonic quality captured in Liverpool’s
Philharmonic Hall is most impressive (courtesy of David Pigott, a member of the horn
section) and the contribution of the choir
is simply outstanding. There remain a few
anomalies: the second disc contains only the
finale, though the fourth movement vocal solo
is designated to be followed without a break
by the finale. Usually the break between
discs (if needed) occurs after the first movement, where Mahler specifically asks for an
extended silence. The editing of the booklet is
also frustrating. Schwarz’s accomplishments
receive a four-page paean, while the generic
description of Mahler’s work rates a mere
two, with the remainder devoted to dreary
accounts of the secondary roles the singers
have appeared in over the years and a page’s
worth of white space. Judicious pruning
would have easily made room for the pithy,
indispensable lyrics for the vocal sections of
the work. Recommended nonetheless.
Daniel Foley
Rachmaninov – Piano Concertos 2 & 3
Stewart Goodyear; Czech National
Symphony; Heiko Mathias Förster
Steinway & Sons 30047
!!Rachmaninov’s
Piano Concerto
No.2 owes its existence to a renowned
neurologist by the
name of Dr. Nikolai
Dahl. At the time,
the young composer
was despondent
over the failure of his first symphony in
1897. But under the good doctor’s guidance, he regained his confidence and
creative urge – and the result was the most
famous of his four piano concertos. To many
people’s ears, the piece has almost become
too well known since its premiere in 1901.
But this fact certainly didn’t deter Canadian
pianist Stewart Goodyear on this Steinway
recording featuring both the second and third
concertos performed with the Czech National
Symphony, with Heiko Mathias Förster
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conducting.
Since concluding his studies at the Curtis
Institute and the Juilliard School, this
Toronto-born artist has earned an international reputation, and this CD provides
ample proof. From the opening measures, his
approach to the familiar repertoire is bold but
elegant, demonstrating a flawless technique
that never succumbs to empty virtuosity.
Absent too, is any trace of overt sentimentality, something that is all too easy to do
with Rachmaninov. The poignant and wistful
Adagio and buoyant finale also prove to be a
perfect pairing of artist and orchestra, with
the CNS performing with a confident assurance under Förster’s baton.
In many ways, the Concerto No.3 from
1909 is an extension of the second, but even
more so – larger in scope and perhaps even
more technically demanding. Nevertheless,
Goodyear and the CNS rise to the occasion
with a polished performance certainly equalling – but not necessarily surpassing – established recordings by Argerich and Ashkenazy.
Again, soloist and orchestra produce a
warmly romantic sound, particularly in the
second movement Intermezzo where the delicate interplay between strings and soloist is
particularly admirable.
These are fine performances all around –
kudos to Goodyear, Förster and the musicians from Prague for tackling this familiar
music and for doing it justice in a very
compelling way.
Richard Haskell
Great Ballets from the Bolshoi –
The Nutcracker; Sleeping Beauty; Giselle;
The Flames of Paris
Bolshoi Ballet
BelAir Classics 306103
!!The scores of the
two Tchaikovsky
ballets, particularly The Nutcracker,
should be familiar
to ballet enthusiasts
and Adam’s Giselle
to a lesser degree.
The choreographer
in all three is Yuri
Grigorovich, a name
that may be familiar to patrons of the “Live
from the Bolshoi” ballets shown as special
events at the Cineplex theatres that show the
“The Met: Live in HD” operas.
However, The Flames of Paris, Stalin’s
favourite ballet, may be known of in name
only. It was “a classical ballet with music by
musicologist and composer Boris Asafyev
based on songs of the French Revolution, and
originally choreographed by Vasili Vainonen.”
It was premiered in November 1932 by the
Kirov Ballet and the Bolshoi mounted it in
July of 1933. Its original agitprop elements
were communist propaganda showing in no
uncertain terms the decadence of capitalism
leading inevitably to chaos. Of course, the
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revolutionaries slaughter the aristocrats and
there is general rejoicing. In 2008, the original
choreography and staging were reconstructed
for the Bolshoi by Alexei Ratmansky, who
added a love story and expanded the choreography with his own. The company has very
recently toured with it to much acclaim, from
Hong Kong to London. The 2010 live production is seen here.
The Russians’ astronomical standards of
ballet are on full display in every piece. Not
only is every dancer in perfect form but each
is also of uniform size, which is visually
impressive in itself. All the dispositions and
angles achieved by the ensemble, once seen,
cannot be imagined being done differently.
Not only are the visual elements stunning; the
sets, the choreography, the costumes and the
orchestral renditions all exceed every expectation. There are four different conductors
with possible variations in the orchestral
personnel, always producing a very Russian
sound which could easily and comfortably
compete with the best studio productions
from elsewhere. The power and authority of
the playing is constantly thrilling. The sound
is stunning, and in terms of musical reproduction supremely satisfying to even the most
critical and jaded ears.
So you don’t care to watch ballet? Then
don’t watch and simply listen. You will
never hear finer interpretations and productions of this music anywhere in the recorded
repertoire.
Bruce Surtees
MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY
20th-Century Women Composers
Trio des Alpes; Lorna Windsor
Dynamic DCS 7717
!!This is inspired
programming, with
the works on this disc
thoroughly complementing each other.
All three composers
represented here were
born within a quartercentury of each other.
They each write in an expressive style that
marks the transition from romanticism to
modernism. None are musical innovators. But
as women, they are rightly regarded as pioneers today.
Amy Beach, who was born in Boston in
1867, is the most well-known composer
here. Her Trio for violin, cello and piano is
a complex, virtuosic work, which ends with
a memorable flourish. Swiss soprano Lorna
Windsor’s performance of four art songs are
engaging enough to make me want to explore
more of Beach’s enormous song repertoire.
English composer and violist Rebecca
Clarke enjoyed what she called her “one whiff
of success” when she introduced her Viola
Sonata in 1919, and then, soon after, this
lovely Trio. Flamboyant, intense, driven, this
is an exciting work, especially as performed
by the Swiss-based Trio des Alpes.
The youngest composer here,
Frenchwoman Lili Boulanger (sister of the
influential teacher and composer Nadia), was
only 25 when she died in 1918. The Trio des
Alpes brings out the moody expressivity of
her two contrasting pieces for piano trio, the
first, D’un soir triste, plaintive, the second,
D’un matin de printemps, exuberant.
These fine pieces are too rarely heard,
making this thoroughly enjoyable disc
particularly significant.
Pamela Margles
Shostakovich – Piano Quintet;
String Quartet No.2
Takács Quartet; Marc-André Hamelin
Hyperion CDA67987
!!This recording
of Shostakovich’s
chamber works is
an absolute delight –
hauntingly beautiful,
insightful and,
above all, highly
sentient to the mix of
turmoil and soaring
of Shostakovich’s life as expressed through
his music. Chamber music was perceived as
an act of bourgeois elitism in Stalin’s Soviet
Union, even though it was precisely the form
that allowed the most intimate connections
between composer, musicians and their audience. So it is no surprise that Shostakovich
composed eight symphonies before his
second string quartet was premiered in 1944.
Interestingly enough, 13 more string quartets
followed in rapid succession.
String Quartet No.2 in A Major shows little
connection to the stormy events of the Second
World War (as opposed to his symphonies),
appearing to be much more personal. It was
composed in a mere 19 days and includes
wonderful folk melodies, syncopated rhythms
and minor modes of Gypsy/Jewish inflections.
The Takács Quartet’s playing is robust and
energetic in the first movement and deeply
touching in the Recitative, where violin
improvisatory lamentations are supported by
the rest of the ensemble playing soft seventh
chords. Outstanding solos are intercepted
with close-knit ensemble sound in the third
and fourth movements, which end majestically yet uncharacteristically in the minor key.
The Piano Quintet in G Minor premiered
in 1940, becoming one of the most beloved
piano quintets of all time. It contains five
movements, with the emotional tension
peaking in the ethereal Intermezzo and
ending with a cleverly innocent Finale.
Pianist Marc-André Hamelin is dominantly
powerful in percussive sections while adding
sublime textures to the ensemble sound in
contemplative parts. Highly recommended.
Ivana Popovic
June | July | August, 2015 | 85
UK DK
Michala Petri; Mahan Esfahani
OUR Recordings 6.220611
!!Another offering
from Danish recorder
player Michala Petri’s
own label, this disc
serves up a smorgasbord of modern-era
music from Denmark
and Britain, played by
Petri and Tehran-born, London-based harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani. It’s to be much
appreciated that Petri remains so committed
to the commissioning, performance and
recording of new works for the recorder.
Off the top, Malcolm Arnold’s Sonatina
reveals the interpretive unity and precise
ensemble which make this such a successful
duo, and the six little movements of Benjamin
Britten’s Alpine Suite receive the best
performance they’ve probably ever had.
Gordon Jacob’s Sonatina and Encore are quite
beautiful, but marred a little by some pungent
tuning on the alto recorder. (That said, when
Petri plays at blistering speed or sings a
counter melody along with herself, she’s right
on the Cleartune money.)
Given the title of Henning Christiansen’s
piece – It’s Spring – one might expect the
recorder to be typecast in its centuries-old
role of bird imitator par excellence; and
indeed it is, with the addition of some harpsichord bumblebee imitation. The aleatoric, post-modern angst of Daniel Kidane’s
Tourbillon and Axel Børup-Jørgensen’s
Fantasia provide a different mood and
are very welcome here. Along with Vagn
Holmboe’s Sonata, they also strike a more
equal musical partnership between the two
instruments than much of the other music.
Mahan Esfahani’s playing is a real delight and
I find it a little sad that the harpsichord parts
here don’t all make better use of him.
Alison Melville
George Rochberg – Complete Flute Music 1
Christina Jennings; Lura Johnson;
June Han
Naxos 8.559776
Something in the Air
Canadian Exposure for Out-of-the-Country
Out-of-the-Ordinary Improvisers
J
KEN WAXMAN
ust as international
improvisers sometimes find a more
welcoming atmosphere for their
sound experiments in Canada than at home, so too have
Canadian record labels become a vehicle to
release notable free music sessions. Attesting
to this openness, two of the most recent discs
by British saxophone master Evan Parker are
on Canadian imprints. But each arrived by a
different route. One of the triumphs of 2014’s
Festival International de Musique Actuelle
de Victoriaville in Quebec, this performance
of Seven by Parker’s ElectroAcoustic Septet
(Victo 127 victo.qc.ca) is available on Victo,
FIMAV’s affiliated imprint. Consisting of one
massive and one shorter instant composition,
Seven literally delineates the electro-acoustic
divide. Trumpeter Peter Evans, reedist Ned
Rothenberg, cellist Okkyung Lee and Parker
make up the acoustic side, while varied laptop
processes are operated by Ikue Mori and Sam
Pluta, with George Lewis switching between
laptop and trombone, with his huffing
brass tone making a particular impression
during a contrapuntal face-off with Parker’s
soprano saxophone during Seven-2. At nearly
46 minutes, Seven-1 is the defining work,
attaining several musical crests during its
ghostly, meandering near-time suspension.
86 | June | July | August, 2015
Allowing for full expression of instrumental virtuosity, dynamic flutters, flanges
and processes, the laptoppists accompany,
comment upon or challenge the acoustic
instruments. Alternately wave form loops and
echoes cause the instrumentalists to forge
their reposes. Plenty of sonic surprises arise
during the sequences. Undefined processedsounding bee-buzzing motifs, for example,
are revealed as mouth and lip modulations from Evans’ piccolo trumpet or aviary
trills from Rothenberg’s clarinet. In contrast
the electronics’ crackles and static are often
boosted into mellower affiliations that sound
purely acoustic. Eventually both aspects meld
into a climax of bubbly consistency with any
background-foreground, electro or acoustic
displays satisfactorily melded. More percussive Seven-2 has a climax involving fragmented electronics pulsating steadily as first
Evans, then Rothenberg and finally Parker
spill out timbres that confirm formalism as
much as freedom.
While Seven’s
domestic release
seems almost mandatory, Montreal-based
Red Toucan’s decision
to release UK-recorded
Extremes (RT 9349
symaptico.ca/cactus.
red) demonstrates its commitment to this
music. Parker on tenor saxophone, alongside
Paul Dunmall, another intense British tenor
!!The WholeNote’s
20th season has
brought symmetry:
in the September
issue I reviewed
Marina Piccinini’s
marvellous CD
of Paganini’s 24
Caprices; in this last
issue the recording of George Rochberg’s flute
music includes 20 of his 51 Caprice Variations
(on Paganini’s Caprice No. 24 in A Minor), a
significant addition not only to the already
long list of compositions based on this work
but also to the flute repertoire.
Like the original Caprices, Rochberg’s variations were written for the violin. Jennings
has adapted “…those best suited to the flute
while representing the enormous stylistic
range of [the] whole set.” It is to her credit
both that the Caprice Variations sounds as
if it was written for the flute and that her
formidable technique is up to its prodigious
technical demands.
The common thread binding the other two
compositions, Between Two Worlds and The
specialist, plus American drummer Tony
Bianco, offer a three-track masterclass in
free-form improvisation. With the drummer
keeping up a constant barrage of smacks,
whacks, ruffs and pops in the propulsive
Elvin Jones tradition, the saxophonists dig
into every variation and shading of reed and
metal tones like an updated John Coltrane
and Pharoah Sanders. Unlike the maelstrom
of bedlam-like expression in which some
sound explorers operate, however, Dunmall
and Parker play with relaxed intensity. This
isn’t a cutting contest either, but a demonstration of how saxophonists can function
as separate parts of a single entity. With the
final Horus especially adding affirming motes
to the jazz tradition via glossolalia and faint
echoes of Sonny Rollins’ East Broadway
Rundown, each player maintains his individuality no matter how many harsh snorts
or siren-pitched expressions are unleashed.
Parker’s tone is distinguished by lighter vibrations and swifter split tones while Dunmall’s
timbres are darker and grittier. With intuitive
timing the tenors attain concluding connection, showcasing rowdy theme variations on
the 30-minute-plus title track and polyphonic
expressiveness on Horus. Overall, the result is
head expanding, not head banging.
To read how Portuguese trio Earnear,
plus the American ensembles of Harris
Eisenstadt and Anthony Braxton, took
advantage of Canadian record companies’
welcoming support, see the continuation of
this column at thewholenote.com.
thewholenote.com
STUART BROOMER
C
algary-raised, Toronto-educated and
now based in New York, pianist/
composer Kris Davis has built a
substantial reputation at the cutting edge
where jazz blends freely with classical and
improvised inspirations. However, Save
Your Breath (Cleanfeed CF 322 CD, cleanfeed-records.com), by her new ensemble
Infrasound, is her most exciting work to
date. What might draw a composer to create an octet combining the
chordal density of piano, organ and guitar with the inchoate depths of
four bass clarinets? The answer is apparent everywhere here in thick,
welling music that moves from haunted opera house to the real depths
provided by shaking low frequencies, all of it combined in ways both
masterful and mysterious to create a music that you definitely haven’t
heard before. Among the cast of bass clarinetists, Ben Goldberg
is profound on Always Leave Them (Wanting More) and Joachim
Badenhorst incendiary on Whirly Swirly.
Ottawa trumpeter Craig Pedersen’s Quartet
has just released its third CD, Ghosts (cpm006, craigpedersen.com), as remarkable for
its concentration as its brevity. Less than 18
minutes long, the five-part work suggests roots
in the 1960s avant-garde – the braying, villageband dirges of Albert Ayler (Ghosts, though, is
Pedersen’s, not Ayler’s) and the linked suites
of Don Cherry – but Pedersen has his own
voice. His compositions can reduce and repeat melody, insisting on its
essence in Something to Like, or hint at musical travels: a Latin beat,
a Middle-Eastern mode, the wail of flamenco. Within the intensely
collective enterprise, each individual voice presses forward, whether
it’s alto saxophonist Linsey Wellman and bassist Joel Kerr on Sung
Song or drummer Eric Thibodeau on Clothesline. At the work’s
conclusion, the highly vocal trumpet and saxophone give way to
actual chanting.
Chantal de Villiers emphasizes the connection between jazz and soul music on Funky
Princess (Independent CDV 052014, chantaldevilliers.com) and lives up to the billing
by delivering the kind of rich tenor saxophone sound – think Gene Ammons to Grover
Washington – that saturates a melody as much
as it articulates it. The emphasis is definitely
on fundamentals, with strong rhythmic grooves provided by some
of Montreal’s finest, bassist Fraser Hollins and the drummers Rich
Irwin or Dave Laing. The Shadow of Your Smile and Dexter Gordon’s
Panther supply further touchstones, but de Villiers is adept at fashioning her own anthems, like the opening Groovy Step, a slice of
solid jazz funk. Alto saxophonist Rémi Bolduc
appears, adding a lighter touch, while Burt
De Villiers contributes further heft with
Hammond B3 organ.
Cory Weeds closed his Cellar Jazz Club in
Vancouver at the end of February 2014, but it
hasn’t hampered his career as a saxophonist
or his vigorous Cellar Live record label, which
thewholenote.com
continues to release sessions from the club and further afield. Weeds’
musical ideal is hard bop: hard-edged, blues-inflected, modern jazz
as defined in New York in the late 50s and early 60s. It’s much in
evidence in several recent releases.
Weeds marks the label’s 100th release with his own Condition Blue,
The Music Of Jackie McLean (Cellar Live CL111214, cellarlive.com),
paying tribute to the great alto saxophonist. Weeds brings his own
alto sound to this – no one should try to duplicate McLean’s unique,
acid-toned, slightly sharp delivery – touching on aspects of McLean’s
style from the drum-like phrasing of the title track to the abstract
Capuchin Swing and the serpentine coil of Jacknife. The back-up is
an organ trio, with Mike LeDonne, guitarist
Peter Bernstein and drummer Joe Farnsworth
bringing a gentler, burbling, almost dreamlike ambience to McLean’s visceral art.
Drummer Curtis Nowosad made his
recording debut two years ago. A recent
graduate of the University of Winnipeg’s Jazz
Studies Program, he led a band made up of
his teachers, mixing a hard bop approach
with material sourced from Pink Floyd to Tupac Shakur. Nowosad is
currently living and studying in New York, but he reassembled the
same band for Dialectics (Cellar Live CL010115), including the stellar
saxophonist Jimmy Greene. The repertoire is much more conventional,
mostly Nowosad originals that frankly reference works by hard bop
masters like Horace Silver and Duke Pearson.
It’s consistently lively work, and Nowosad
stands out on his Afro-Cuban arrangement of
Monk’s Bye-Ya.
Louis Hayes and the Cannonball Adderley
Legacy Band Live at Cory Weeds’ Cellar Jazz
Club (Cellar Live CL120513) was recorded in
December 2013, shortly before the club closed.
Though the presence of Canadian musicians
is limited to Weeds sitting in on Sack of Woe, he fits right in, no small
accomplishment. Hayes was 76 at the time, as precise as when he
was propelling Adderley and Horace Silver in his 20s. With alto saxophonist Vincent Herring and trumpeter Jeremy Pelt in the front line,
the band plays the soulful bop and blues of
Adderley’s repertoire (Dat Dere stands out)
with as much élan as any contemporary group
might manage.
The highpoint of Weeds’ current crop is
by an expatriate Torontonian, tenor saxophonist Grant Stewart who established
himself in New York 25 years ago. His Trio
(Cellar Live CL111014) is boiled down to just
tenor, bass and drums, but while it’s reminiscent of Sonny Rollins’
great orations, the resemblance takes nothing away from Stewart’s
achievement. It’s spontaneous dialogue at the highest level, with the
saxophonist at once as meaty and abstract as his model, whether
cascading through chord changes or in intimate rhythmic dialogue
with bassist Paul Sikivie and drummer (and brother) Phil Stewart. The
trio spins particularly memorable variations on Everything’s Coming
up Roses.
June | July | August, 2015 | 87
Fires of Autumn, could be considered to be
the obsession of 20th-century composers
with finding a new musical language. I can
hear the composer’s voice in the atonal
language of the first and the adopted Japanese
idiom of the other if I consider them explorations, part of this search; but, Rochberg’s
language and his voice seem most convincingly related in the Caprice Variations,
which are so deeply rooted in the western
musical tradition. Perhaps T.S. Eliot was right:
“…the end of all our exploring will be to arrive
where we started and know the place for the
first time.”
Allan Pulker
Morton Feldman: Two Pianos and other
pieces 1953-1969
John Tilbury; Philip Thomas
Another Timbre at81x2
(anothertimbre.com)
!!Along with John
Cage and Christian
Wolff, Morton
Feldman was a key
figure in the midcentury development
of indeterminacy
as a component in
composition, creating
works that emerge anew in each performance. This 2CD set focuses on a crucial period
in his development and includes pieces for
two pianos as well as pieces for three and four
pianos and piano in various small ensembles. While the earliest, Intermission 6 (1953),
presents the performers with various bits
of notation and the direction to play in any
order, the other pieces employ sequential
notation that plays with time, whether using
notes without rhythmic values or instructing
musicians to sound a note when the decay of
the previous one has begun.
In his extensive notes (available through
anothertimbre.com), Philip Thomas emphasizes Feldman’s preoccupations with sound
and time: they’re key to the way this special
world ultimately involves us. While these
works are designed to develop great structural complexity, the focus on sounds and
their incremental evolution draws us ever
further into the instant of the work’s coming
into being, its evolving architecture stretching
to erase its own boundaries. These works lead
directly to Feldman’s later massive essays in
time without being overshadowed by them.
Here John Tilbury and Philip Thomas
bracket their program with two performances
of Two Pianos (1957), each subtly distinct
from the other. The complexity expands on
the later Two Pieces for Three Pianos (1966)
and the ensemble piece, False Relationships
and the Extended Ending (1968). Tilbury may
be Feldman’s most incisive interpreter (he
first performed one of his works in 1960);
his collaborators here share his attention to
sonic nuance.
Stuart Broomer
88 | June | July | August, 2015
JAZZ AND IMPROVISED MUSIC
New York Stories
Micah Barnes
LoudBoy ODCD02
(micahbarnes3.bandzoogle.com)
!!Micah Barnes
has long established
himself as one of
the most engaging
vocal performers and
contemporary, jazzinfused tunesmiths
on the scene today.
Perhaps best known as a member of the
iconic vocal group The Nylons, Barnes has also
crafted a serious solo career by employing his
considerable skills as a musician/keyboardist
in conjunction with his sumptuous baritone
voice, quirky narrative humour, showmanship and innate ability for direct emotional
(and artistic) communication.
Barnes’ new recording is the result of
many live performances that were focused on
perfecting his original material prior to ever
stepping into the recording studio – and the
highly personal songs (of which three were
co-written with J.P. Saxe and one with Russ
Boswell) easily bring the rapt listener along
for the wild ride. Barnes has surrounded
himself here with a fine ensemble, including
Michael Shand on keyboards, talented brother
Daniel Barnes on drums and voice, the above
mentioned Boswell on bass and voice and
Saxe on vocals.
Top tracks include New York Story – a
nostalgia-saturated valentine to the great
city itself and the clever After the Romance
(The Rent) – a character song in search of
a Broadway show. Barnes’ voice has never
been richer and more laden with experience, and his vocal control has never been
more succinct, as illustrated by the bluesy
standout Starting Tomorrow and the funky
cool Harlem Moon. The heart-rending Some
Other Man clearly establishes Barnes as a fine
contemporary songwriter and the closing
track, I’ve Been Awake Too Long evokes
incredible, bittersweet longing.
Lesley Mitchell-Clarke
Made in Chicago
Jack DeJohnette
ECM 2392 (ecmrecords.com)
!!Jack DeJohnette
first came to prominence in the late 1960s
as the drummer
in Charles Lloyd’s
quartet and later
Miles Davis’ pioneering fusion bands.
He’s since cemented his fame with his own
groups and his three-decade membership in the Standards Trio with Keith Jarrett.
His roots, however, reach back to Chicago’s
Wilson Junior College where in 1962 he began
jamming with classmates and saxophonists Roscoe Mitchell and Henry Threadgill.
Soon they were playing in pianist Muhal
Richard Abrams’ Experimental Band and
were present at the 1965 formation of The
Association for the Advancement of Creative
Musicians (AACM), a dramatic assertion
of African-American musical freedom and
self-sufficiency.
The title Made in Chicago is multi-dimensional: it commemorates the reunion of
DeJohnette, Mitchell, Threadgill and Abrams
(joined by the younger Larry Gray on bass
and cello); it celebrates the diversity of AACM
music; and it marks its literal venue, the
2013 Chicago Jazz Festival. It is, simply, a
great band, evident from the first composition, Mitchell’s Chant, a work that places the
repeating patterns of American minimalism
in a kind of pan-African setting, from
circular-breathing saxophone stretched
beyond the tempered scale to DeJohnette’s
dense, sonically rich drumming.
Each work that follows is similarly an exercise in shaping, its raw materials examined
and extended into forceful musical statement, like the emotion-drenched invocation of Abrams’ multi-faceted Jack 5 and
DeJohnette’s own Museum of Time. Mitchell’s
This presses toward chamber music, with
its Bartók-like harmonic language and the
lighter textures of flutes and arco cello.
Throughout, there’s a sense of spacious
invention and collective mastery, the
music growing from a kind of spontaneous
deliberation.
Stuart Broomer
Begin
Alister Spence; Joe Williamson;
Christopher Cantillo
Alister Spence Music ASM 003
(alisterspence.com)
!!What world music
really should be, this
high-quality session
involves the talents
of multi-stylistic
Australian pianist
Alister Spence,
subtle Swedish
drummer Christopher Cantillo and authoritative Canadian bassist Joe Williamson.
Now Stockholm-based, Vancouver native
Williamson is part of this trio whose reference points are musically broad while lacking
any affectation.
Constantly pushing each of the tracks
forward, the pianist’s world view is as wide
as the Australian outback, emphasizing attention to cultivated detail that melds Keith
Jarrett’s exploratory feints, dynamic jabs à la
Cecil Taylor and the bouncy playfulness of
Paul Bley, usually simultaneously. Hear this
at work on Place, where after probing piano
innards and hammering the keys, Spence
unexpectedly bursts out with a textbook
thewholenote.com
definition of jazz swing. Consistently a group
effort, though – even when Spence’s playing
is at its most jaunty – his pointed improvising on Tip for instance is sympathetically
extended with tap-dance-like clacks from
Cantillo and Williamson’s bowed continuum.
Knowingly attuned to one another’s strategies and willing to mix up the performances
to make them new, Williamson, for example,
often uses a resolutely steady bass line to
second the pianist’s widely spaced spikes and
winnowing plucks on Fetch before Spence
cunningly recaps his intro. Elsewhere, as on
Allow, each rhythm partner uses static drum
buzz or string pulls to create edginess on this
warm balladic track. Other times as cymbals
swirl and drum tops are scrubbed, Spence
and Williamson expose nearly identical
timbres, balancing inside-piano string strums
and unforced bass string plucks.
With even more unexpected approaches
they can utilize on this disc’s lucky 13 tracks,
the hope is that this trio didn’t just Begin
but will continue to make CDs like this for a
long time.
Ken Waxman
You’ve Been Watching Me
Tim Berne’s Snakeoil
ECM Records ECM 2443 CD
(ecmrecords.com)
!!Augmenting the
already well-balanced
sound of his Snakeoil
quartet, alto saxophonist Tim Berne
introduces guitarist
Ryan Ferreira’s chordshredding distortions to the seven
Berne originals here, creating a fuller but no
less memorable program than the quartet
offered at April’s SRO appearance in Toronto.
Added to the alternately luminous fluidity
or strained grunting from Oscar Noreiga’s
clarinet or bass clarinet are Matt Mitchell’s
poised linear piano style and discriminating
accents from Ches Smith’s drums, vibes,
timpani and percussion; the re-imagined
ensemble easily negotiates the compositions’
intricacies.
Cunningly arranged so that each voice is
heard clearly while the polyphonic nature
of the tunes is emphasized, the final False
Impressions is a fine example of this. As the
guitarist’s angled flanges attempt to disrupt
the proceedings, the theme is driven steadily
forward by the pianist’s arpeggio-laden
power. Perhaps the track is so named because
the piece is finally resolved as a thoroughgoing swing line. Further manoeuvres are
expressed in the manner of a magician only
fleetingly letting you peek at his strategies,
as on Semi-Self-Detached where a balanced
block of patterning piano and blended
horns is followed, after a dramatic pause,
by a triple-tongued solo from Berne, whose
alto sounds as if it’s reaching for humanly
thewholenote.com
unattainable notes. In contrast, Embraceable
Me, which has no obvious resemblance to
the standard Embraceable You, goes through
several distinct sequences that present
bouncy music-box-like emphasis from
Mitchell, broken-chord slamming from the
guitarist and the clarinetist’s tremolo precision before a crescendo of united horns and
piano timbres are roughly buzzed away by
the altoist.
At 18 minutes long, the extended Small
World in a Small Town is the CD’s centrepiece. Possibly composed as a concerto for
himself, Berne spins out intense reed variations that range from swift laughing bites
to sombre, near-ecclesiastical drones, as the
sparse accompaniment is limited to infrequent piano or vibe voicing. With Noriega’s
near-Oriental tone providing an intermezzo,
backed by brief piano pumps, Berne returns
thickening his subsequent lines with intense
multiphonics, until craftily, but not unexpectedly, the initial theme is recapped as a convincing summation by sax and piano.
Creating more memorable releases each
time out, Snakeoil is no nostrum but an elixir
whose salutary qualities improve each time
it’s sampled.
Ken Waxman
POT POURRI
Call Me a Fool
Eliza Pope
Independent (elizapope.com)
!!Talented vocalist
and songwriter Eliza
Pope’s debut CD is a
delightful potpourri
of re-conceptualized Broadway show
tunes, jazz standards and original
compositions. The project was co-produced
by Pope and yeoman keyboardist/arranger
Mark Kieswetter, who also performs magnificently on the CD. To say the least, this
recording is an auspicious opening salvo for
an emerging artist.
Included is a soulful take on Harold Arlen
and Yip Harburg’s 1939 Oscar-winner Over
the Rainbow. Kieswetter’s contemporary
chord substitutions are the perfect complement to Pope’s tasty vocal line. With facile use
of her head voice, Pope soars delicately over,
around and above the well-known melody,
pushing it right into 2015. Also of note is the
jaunty Depression-era original Where Will I
Find Love, which evokes a historical mode
without becoming derivative of it – no easy
task! Eric St. Laurent’s well-placed acoustic
guitar work is exceptional on this track,
calling to mind a young Charlie Christian.
Another fine original is Try, which explores a
more pop-oriented aspect of Pope’s versatile
vocal and writing style.
A standout is Feeling Good, penned by
Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse for
their hit Broadway show, The Roar of the
Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd. Pope
makes wonderful use of her lower register
here, and resists the temptation to convert
this tune into an overwrought cabaret
anthem. Pope also displays her ability to
swing, with a thoroughly delightful rendition of Fats Waller’s Crazy ’Bout My Baby.
Noted bassist Ross MacIntyre provides the
necessary backbone here, and truly shines
on this groovy cooker. Of particular beauty is
the gorgeous ballad Little Girl Blue, written
by Rogers and Hart for the 1935 Broadway
musical Jumbo and rendered by Pope with
the full intent of the genius composers
firmly in place.
Lesley Mitchell-Clarke
Evolve
Andria Simone
Independent GKM 1018
(andriasimone.com)
There’s been a
major resurgence
of R&B/soul singers
in the last several
years, led by the
fabulous and tragic
Amy Winehouse.
Many singers have
tried to imitate Winehouse’s singing style and
production
techniques and, as a result, most blue-eyed
soul records released lately sound very similar
and, frankly, tired. So it’s a real pleasure to
hear a relatively new singer who is treading
her own path. With the aptly named Evolve,
Toronto-based singer Andria Simone is developing a style all her own. That said, there are
influences apparent in her big, gutsy voice,
but how can you be a blues and soul singer
and not have greats like Janis Joplin and
Aretha Franklin show up?
Evolve establishes Simone not only as a
singer to be reckoned with, but as a songwriter of note too. The majority of the tracks
are co-written by her and producer Greg
Kavanaugh and there are touches of a variety
of styles in the mix, but all are hard-driving.
The one cover, Sunshine of Your Love, burns
with the heat of a thousand suns. Simone’s
backing band – and I hesitate to call them a
backing band since they contribute so much
to the overall musicality and funkiness of
the record that they’re more like collaborators – consists of bassist Mark Wilson,
guitarist Dave Kirby, saxophonist Brian Dhari,
drummer George Nikolov and keyboardist
Anthony Brancati. Evolve doesn’t break brand
new ground, but it delivers solid groove
and energy.
Cathy Riches
June | July | August, 2015 | 89
Old Wine, New Bottles
Fine Old Recordings Re-Released
BRUCE SURTEES
The late Finnish
conductor Paavo
Berglund was
renowned for his
performances
of Sibelius and
Nielsen, although
he conducted works
of other composers
including Shostakovich. Berglund conducted
in Toronto at the invitation of Jukka-Pekka
Saraste in 1994 and was well received. He
was one of but two conductors that I have
seen conducting with their left hand, the
other being Elmer Bernstein in London
with the LSO on July 4, 1976. A release
from Testament finds Berglund in front of
the Berlin Philharmonic on May 18, 2001
playing the Shostakovich Eighth Symphony
and the Stravinsky Piano Concerto with Olli
Mustonen (Testament SBT2 1500, 2 CDs).
Arguably, this is the Shostakovich Eighth to
end all Shostakovich Eighths. The formative
specifics of Shostakovich’s Stalinist experience that are heard in Russian performances are here revealed to apply to a universal
human condition. The events at the core are
allowed to unfold with a natural weight and
clarity and a sometimes deliberate pace that
allows the music to have an impact without
piling up the events. In other performances,
even the great ones, sometimes these masses
become so dense and obstructive that it is
“impossible to see the trees for the forest.”
This is not simply a very good performance.
It is monumental! The expansive, unencumbered sound allows every nuance to be heard
in the correct perspective. The Stravinsky
Piano Concerto also benefits from this clear
approach where the clarity of the sound in
the Philharmonie supports the attitude of
soloist and conductor. This was an evening
when nothing could go wrong.
Last fall Arthaus
Musik published a
superb and I believe
essential documentary entitled
Richard Strauss
and his Heroines
(102181, DVD). This
film by Thomas von
Steinaecker featured
such luminaries as
Brigitte Fassbaender,
Renée Fleming, Dame
Gwyneth Jones, Christa Ludwig and Franz
Welser-Möst; also the composer’s grandson
Christian Strauss. There was the love-hate
relationship between Strauss and his wife
90 | June | July | August, 2015
Pauline, who was a year older than he when
he was hired to teach her as an upcoming
soprano. Her father was wealthy and well
known whereas Strauss was the son of a
brewery industry family. His father was also
one of Germany’s best-known horn players
who had played in Munich at the premiere
of Tristan and Isolde. Here is a revealing
and fascinating recounting and exploration
of Strauss’ portrayal of women in Salome,
Elektra, Die Frau ohne Schatten, Ariadne auf
Naxos, Die Liebe der Danae and of course
Der Rosenkavalier and finally the Four
Last Songs.
A further documentary, Richard
Strauss at the End
of the Rainbow
(Cmajor 729908 DVD
and 730004 Blu-Ray)
sees Strauss as the
last great composer
of the era (the end of
the rainbow), the true
successor to Wagner
and debatably the
greatest composer
of the 20th century. This production by Eric
Shultz delves deeply into Strauss’ works and
their interpretations, including parts of a oneon-one lesson on elucidation given by Brigitte
Fassbaender to a winning young soprano,
Emma Moore from Wollongong. Musicians
and Strauss scholars are interviewed
and there is an abundance of previously
unreleased footage of Strauss conducting and
going about everyday life. Most enlightening
is the charismatic pianist Stefan Mickisch
who delves into many well-known works. In
sum, this is a unique 97-minute appreciation
of Strauss, his strengths and weaknesses, his
life and works. Learn the one thing he could
do that Wagner could not. A must-have presentation if there ever was one.
A reminder: Last
year Decca issued
a specially priced
collection of their
recordings of the late
Clemens Krauss,
Strauss’s friend
and trusted interpreter, conducting
the Vienna Philharmonic in what truly are
incomparable, definitive performances of
eight Strauss tone poems and a complete
Salome, recorded in the early 1950s in the
very finest sound. (Decca 786493, 5 CDs)
Over the past year we have enjoyed four
volumes containing rare performances of
the young Martha Argerich given in her
early 20s and the series continues with a
release of a joint recital with Ruggiero Ricci
in Leningrad on April 21, 1961 (Doremi
DHR-8040). Ricci, who was some 29 years
her senior, was already established internationally as one of the leading violinists of
all time. It is inevitable from her enthusiasm
displayed here that Argerich would soon be
recognized as one of our finest pianists. The
recital opens with an enthusiastic version of
Beethoven’s Third Violin Sonata Op.12 No.3
played with obviously great delight. Ricci
proves that he is not only the master of pyrotechnics but a genuine classical violinist.
The Prokofiev Sonata for Solo Violin Op.115
is of particular interest because it was Ricci
himself who had premiered the work in
Moscow two years earlier. Two Bartók works,
the Sonatina in D for violin and piano and
the Sonata for solo violin, will keep you on
the edge of your seat as will the Sarasate
Introduction and Tarantella for violin and
piano Op.43. A generous bonus comes from
Baden-Baden on February 4, 1960 with Ernest
Bour conducting Ravel’s Piano Concerto in
G Major. Argerich has made this concerto
her special vehicle and, arguably, this version
is a better collaboration than many of her
commercial recordings. The sound is clear
and vibrant throughout.
An unexpected
visitor in my store
many years ago was
the man who, as I
recall, headed the
Decca team making
videos of performances of their artists.
He had returned
from Eisenstadt where he worked with
Christopher Hogwood. To the surprise of
conductor, orchestra and crew, the sound
that Mr. Hogwood had believed emulated
the sounds of the Haydn orchestra during
Haydn’s time sounded quite wrong there.
Lesson learned. L’Oiseau-Lyre and Hogwood’s
planned Complete Haydn Symphonies
Edition with The Academy of Ancient Music
was well underway when it ended with the
break-up of L’Oiseau-Lyre. Symphonies 1-75,
completed from 1988 to 1995, together with
four later symphonies, mostly recorded
earlier, occupy a new boxed set from Decca
(4806900, 32 CDs). Widely acclaimed at the
time of their original issue, as times and tastes
have changed these performances sound
better and better.
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with the newest works by living composers for a period of just under
30 years. 1978 was also the first year in which the Jules Leger Prize for
New Chamber Music was awarded (coincidentally to Murray Schafer),
and the winning works were always heard across the country on Two
New Hours.
The CBC/Radio-Canada National Radio Competition for Young
Composers was established in 1973, another initiative of John Peter
Lee Roberts, together with Jacques Bertrand, his opposite number at
Radio-Canada. When John left as head of CBC Radio Music and Variety
two years later he handed me the file. This competition began modestly
DAV I D J A E G E R
eople who witness one of the three performances of Luminato’s with a three-person panel of Canadian jurors looking at a few dozen
2015 revival of Murray Schafer’s Apocalypsis this June may read scores submitted by composers who were recent university graduin the program book that the work was commissioned by CBC ates and vying for a purse of $3,000. In its own 30-year lifespan, the
Radio in 1975. This new production of the piece may have a fresh scale of the competition grew to offer $50,000 in prize money, and the
look and presentation, but the score is the same bold Schafer compos- competing works, adjudicated by an international jury, were broadcast
ition, first produced during what John Peter Lee Roberts, then head of live to air across Canada during a gala concert with performances by
CBC Radio Music and the work’s commissioner, called “The Golden Age the CBC Radio Orchestra, the National Arts Centre Orchestra and other
respected ensembles.
of Achievement” at CBC Radio.
The period of time Roberts refers to is 1950
The significance of the coupling of the
National Radio Competition for Young
to 1980, 30 years that correspond closely to
Composers with Two New Hours was that
the span of time that Glenn Gould had his
emerging young Canadian composers such
own professional career, one that was interas Chris Paul Harman (the only teenaged
twined with the development of music at CBC
Grand Prize winner), Brian Current and
Radio. Glenn’s very first recital for CBC Radio
Ana Sokolović suddenly had access to the
was in December of 1950 and despite his enormous labours for an American record company
world’s airwaves. And, of course, radio audibetween 1955 and 1982, the year of his death,
ences immediately became aware of these
he retained a close working relationship with
bright young talents and the fresh sound of
those of us who produced music programs at
their music. As these and many other emerCBC. Of course Glenn was one of thousands
ging talents matured they became inevitable sources for CBC Radio to turn to for
of Canadian artists who made programming
new works: an excellent investment if ever
for CBC, enabled by the Broadcasting Act, a
cornerstone piece of Canadian legislation that
there was one!
remains in force to this day.
Of course, along with all these contentgenerating initiatives, there was the everI joined CBC Radio Music in 1973 and my
present reality of working with rapidly
work with Glenn began in 1974 when we
undertook the celebration of the centennial
changing technology. When Glenn Gould and
of Arnold Schoenberg’s birth. Ten CBC Radio
I assembled our Schoenberg broadcasts in
programs of Schoenberg’s music, written and
1974 we did our editing on quarter-inch wide
presented by Glenn, were broadcast across
analogue tape, using a razor blade and a spliCanada that fall on a series I produced, Music
cing block to make our edits as physical cuts
of Today. Glenn’s own radio documentary,
and then binding it together with splicing
Schoenberg, the First Hundred Years - A
tape. Glenn’s hands were insured by Lloyd’s
Documentary Fantasy for Radio, followed the
of London, so he was forbidden to touch sharp
last of those broadcasts. We both felt, despite
objects. He and I would edit together at the
tape machine – as the tape rolled he would
the admission that Schoenberg was unlikely
Poet-performers bpNichol (left), as John
conduct each edit with several preparatory
ever to become, as Glenn put it, “a household
of Patmos, and Paul Dutton, as Michael the
word,” that our centennial observances had
beats, and then a clear downbeat at the exact
Archangel, in rehearsal for the November 1980
been a success. A friendship grew from this
edit point where I would make the cut. His final
London, Ontario, premiere of Apocalypsis.
work and Glenn was a frequent visitor in our
preparatory beat and downbeat were usually
home, especially when he wished to see, not me, but our dog, Lamb, accompanied by two words, “And…THERE!” I found it was an important
whom he adored.
ritual for him. By 1982 digital audio had become the medium of choice
Our eight-year friendship was, coincidentally, a time of rapid develop- for music production, and the editing was performed using computers.
ment in public broadcasting in general, and in the production of music Despite the recent retro-audio movement which has a growing number
at CBC Radio in particular. Many significant works were commissioned of music enthusiasts returning to their turntables and vinyl collections,
by CBC Radio Music during this period, including Schafer’s Apocalypsis, digital audio remains the foundation of today’s recording industry, for
and others equally ambitious, such as A Lecture on the Weather by John better or worse, depending on your point of view.
Cage, a part of CBC’s celebration of the Bicentennial of the United States
In those eight years that Glenn and I collaborated, we witnessed a
of America. Harry Somers’ massive Kyrie was also commissioned by CBC rapid and profound expansion of both the musicians’ and the broadRadio during those years, as were Jacques Hétu’s Quatuor à cordes no. 1 casters’ creative toolkit. CBC Radio Music was very much in the thick of
this profound period of change, both as a developer of new production
and the iconic String Quartet No. 3 of Murray Schafer.
The program series Music of Today (1964–1977), which had been a one- and broadcast technologies and as a commissioner of ambitious, chalhour weekly program using LP recordings, gave way to a new national lenging new works. Managing the balance of creation and communicanetwork series, Two New Hours, in 1978. This two-hour program had a tion in the context of ever changing technology during this span of time
production budget for recording live concerts of new music from across made for very stimulating work for people in public radio. It’s a chapter
Canada. It also had access to contemporary music concerts in other coun- of history that the people in the 2015 Apocalypsis audience might wish
tries through international program exchanges supported by the Euro- to reflect on.
pean Broadcasting Union. Two New Hours was a network radio series
David Jaeger is a composer, producer and
that would continue to challenge CBC listeners’ definition of music
broadcaster based in Toronto.
92 | June | July | August, 2015
thewholenote.com
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LONDON FREE PRESS COLLECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVES,
WESTERN ARCHIVES, WESTERN UNIVERSITY, LONDON, CANADA. PHOTO: BILL IRONSIDE
P
Canadian Broadcasting
between 1974 and 1982
1000 performers. 1 epic experience.
June 26, 27, 28 Sony Centre
Bill Viola – Tristan’s Ascension (The Sound of a Mountain Under a Waterfall), 2005, detail. Video/sound installation. Photo: Kira Perov
R. Murray Schafer / Directed by Lemi Ponifasio
7 Monologues:
The Night Dances
Ju
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Fle
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20
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Featuring the music of Benjamin Britten
and the poetry of Sylvia Plath performed by
award-winning actress Charlotte Rampling
and cellist Sonia Wieder-Atherton
21
Da n
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The
atr
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A POC A LY PSIS
Presented by
Supported by
Hal Jackman Foundation
Gretchen + Donald Ross
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