Download diagnostic tests for gastroparesis medicines to treat gastroparesis

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DIAGNOSTIC TESTS FOR GASTROPARESIS
TEST
Gastric Emptying Scan
Gastric Manometry
EXPLANATION
The person eat a meal containing a small, safe amount of radioactive material. The amount of radioactivity in the stomach is monitored to determine
how quickly food leaves the stomach.
A thin tube is inserted through the mouth into the stomach. A wire in the tube
takes measurements of the stomach’s electrical and muscular activity as it
digests food, indicating whether the stomach is contracting in an efficient
manner.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging A body scan is done using a magnetic field and radio waves to take three(MRI)
dimensional pictures of the gastrointestinal tract.
Upper Endoscopy
attached (Gastroscopy)
Barium X-Ray
After sedation, a flexible, lighted instrument with a very small camera
is inserted through the mouth to the stomach and first part of the small intestine. This enables the doctor to see any abnormalities in the esophagus,
stomach, and small intestine. This test can rule out causes of gastroparesis
other than diabetes.
After fasting for 12 hours, the person drinks a shake containing barium, which
makes the stomach visible on x-ray. The stomach is then x-rayed to see if any
food is present.
MEDICINES TO TREAT GASTROPARESIS
MEDICINE
HOW IT WORKS
Cisapride (Propulsid)
Increases the contractions of the gastrointestinal tract. In the United States,
this drug is restricted to people who meet certain eligibility requirements due
to its effects on the heart.
Bethanechol (Urecholine)
Domperidone (Motilium)
Erythromycin
Metaclopramide (Reglan)
Octreotide (Sandostatin)
Tegaserod (Zelnorm)
Increases muscle contractions in the gastrointestinal tract.
Increases stomach contractions, accelerating emptying of solid foods. This
drug also lessens nausea and vomiting. There is a potential undesired effect
on the heart. This drug is only available in Europe, Mexico, and Canada.
Increases stomach contractions, decreasing the amount of time the stomach
needs to empty.
Normalizes contractions of stomach muscles and decreases nausea and
vomiting.
Improves contractions of the gastrointestinal tract. May also enhance effects
of erythromycin.
Decreases stomach emptying time, moving food into the intestine and reducing the chance of bezoar formation.