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HAPPY HEARTS
ANDMINDS COOK BOOK
Ever wondered how to make vegetarian food
appealing to friends, family and especially children?
Two mothers faced with just this question, have shared
their secrets on healthy, happy vegetarian dishes for even the fussiest
eaters. With the detailed nutritional information at the beginning of
the book, those who are new to vegetarian eating can ensure that all
daily nutrient needs are met.
There are lots of useful tips, and children will enjoy making their own
creations. All the recipes are easy and simply explained. Have fun!
Compiled and illustrated by Brahma Kumaris Raja Yoga Centre, Hong
Kong, for your enjoyment!
©1995-2012 Brahma Kumaris Raja Yoga Centres Inc. Australia ISBN 0 9587230 4 4
PUBLISHED BY: ETERNITY INK First Floor, 77 Allen Street, Leichhardt NSW 2040 Australia
First printed 1995. Reprinted 1996, 2003. EBook published 2012.
LEGAL INFORMATION TEXT This E-Book is FREE. You have our permission to duplicate,
print and distribute as many copies as deemed necessary. Conditions: You are not
authorised to edit, publish, license or sell this E-Book under any circumstances. Copyright
© 1999, 2002, 2008, 2012 Brahma Kumaris Australia. All rights reserved. All trademarks
are trademarks of their respective owners.This is a copyrighted work and Brahma Kumaris
Australia reserves all rights. Use of this work is subject to the above terms, except as
permitted under all international copyright law and the right to store and retrieve one
copy of the work, you are not authorised to decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer,
modify, create derivative works based upon, sell, publish, license or sub-license the work
or any part of it without the express written consent of Brahma Kumaris Australia. Brahma
Kumaris Australia shall not be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or
omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting thereon. Brahma
Kumaris Australia has no responsibility for the content of any information accessed
through the work. Under no circumstances shall Brahma Kumaris Australia or its
representatives be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, consequential or
similar damages that result from the use of or inability to use the work. This limitation of
liability shall apply to any claim or clause whatsoever whether such claim arises in
contract, tort or otherwise. This publication is designed to provide accurate information
in regard to the subject matter covered. It is offered with the understanding that the
author and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical or psychological services. This
publication is not a substitute for therapy or professional advice. Your right to use the
work may be terminated, if you fail to comply with the aforesaid terms and conditions.
RECIPES TESTED BY KIDS! PAGE 4 HANDY HINTS FOR PARENTS PAGE 5
VEGETARIAN NUTRITION PAGE 6
TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS PAGE 11
CONVERTING RECIPES PAGE 12
OVEN TEMPERATURE GUIDE PAGE 12
RECIPES
SALADS & SALAD DRESSINGS PAGE 13
SANDWICHES, SNACKS & SOUPS PAGE 17
MAIN DISHES PAGE 25
DESSERTS PAGE 40
CAKES & BISCUITS PAGE 46
BREADS PAGE 56
INDEX PAGE 63
CONTENTS
3
4
RECIPES TESTED BY KIDS!
A
few years ago, two of the mothers who practise Raja Yoga meditation in Hong Kong
felt that they had journeyed far enough along the road of vegetarian cooking for
children to begin sharing their experience (and their children’s) with other families.
Both Ann and Jan have taught vegetarian cooking classes in schools, and this book is
largely a response to the many requests from parents of children who participated in those
classes. They liked what their children brought home and wanted to know how it was made!
You’ll find out from this little cook book that vegetarian cooking is very simple. It doesn’t
require any more preparation than the meals you usually cook—often, even less—and is
bound to be a healthy change. This book is not intended to be comprehensive but it will
provide you with samples of vegetarian food that children love to eat. We hope it becomes
an inspiration for your own experiments in the kitchen or will lead you to discover other
vegetarian recipe books.
This book is special. These recipes have been collected with the thought in mind that the
choice of a vegetarian diet is often grounded in matters of both health and spirit. The two
are closely linked, as the title of this cook book suggests.
The quality of the food we eat affects our bodies and also our minds. Raja Yogis have a
lacto vegetarian diet, which incorporates dairy products into a vegetarian regime, but
emphasises the benefits of excluding eggs, onions, garlic and excessively hot spices. The
body, mind and emotions are also greatly affected by the consciousness in which food is
prepared. When this intangible influence is taken into consideration, the job of the cook
extends from creating tasty, nourishing meals to including a spiritual responsibility for those
who will be eating that food. Filling food with “good vibes” means we need to cultivate a
peaceful state of mind and a peaceful atmosphere in the kitchen.
So, vegetarian cooking could start you off to new ways of thinking about food and about
the way we lead our lives. If you want to find out more about the health, environmental and
economic aspects of vegetarianism, your local library, health food store and bookshop would
all be good places to start.
If you want to find out more about creating a peaceful and stable state of mind, contact
your local Brahma Kumaris Raja Yoga Centre (listed on page 64) for information on the free
meditation classes provided there as a community service.
Happy cooking!
5
HANDY HINTS FOR PARENTS
A
fter watching me eat a vegetarian diet for one year, my children, then aged seven
and nine, decided they would like to follow my example and try it for themselves.
The only problem was that they didn’t like vegetables. Only potatoes were
considered edible, so I became expert in cooking them in different ways! I patiently began
introducing other vegetables into their diet and gradually their tastes changed, became
wider, and now, four years later they will eat anything and everything vegetarian and are
always keen to try new dishes.
This book contains an assortment of their favourite foods. All recipes have their seal of
approval! Children are often fussy eaters but I have found that most of the ones I have come
into contact with, even those who “don’t like vegetables”, enjoyed these dishes (and their
parents did too!).
Apart from enjoyment, vegetarian food definitely helps to impart a more peaceful and
serene state of mind. I really noticed a difference in my two daughters’ behaviour once they
changed their diet. Their teachers and friends’ mothers always remark on their maturity,
calmness and happiness. This is not just because of the food but also because, when we
cook, we take care to maintain a spiritual consciousness. Imparting “good vibes” into the
food as we prepare, cook and serve it, definitely affects those who eat it in a positive way.
Most people agree that food cooked with love tastes better!
Children often like to help in the kitchen and a lot of enjoyment can be had by both
parents and children when they co-operate in the preparation of food. Little fingers like to
be kept busy but, of course, safety has to be considered. Most of the recipes in this book are
simple enough for children to cook alone, but it is a good idea for an adult to be present
when they are lighting and using the cooker, using sharp knives and putting in and taking
out dishes from the oven. Make sure that children wear an apron when they are cooking and
wash their hands first. Teach them to wash up as they go along and then it’s easy to keep a
serene atmosphere. If chaos is created in the kitchen, parents are generally not too happy to
let their children cook again!
It may seem a problem to parents when their children want to be vegetarian and the rest
of the family isn’t, but most recipes can easily be adapted for vegetarians—meatless spaghetti
bolognaise, eggless cakes etc. Other foods can be substituted for meat, fish and eggs and are
listed elsewhere in this book. It can be quite a challenge for the cook to adapt in this way
but all it needs is a little flexibility, understanding and patience. I feel that children’s wishes
should always be respected and every co-operation given if they wish to change their diet. If
we get in tune with our bodies and give them the food they require, we will definitely have
good health. The benefits from eating vegetarian food are enormous, not only for ourselves
but for the world. We owe it to our children to guide them to a lifetime of healthy and
happy eating.
Ann Jones
6
VEGETARIAN NUTRITION
WHAT IS A VEGETARIAN?
Vegetarians eat food which is free of any ingredients obtained from the slaughter of animals.
They do not eat meat (eg. lamb, pork, beef), poultry (eg. chicken, turkey), fish (eg. tuna, cod,
plaice) or any other aquatic life (eg. prawns, crab, lobster) or slaughterhouse by-products (eg.
gelatine, animal fat). Vegetarians may or may not consume free-range eggs and dairy
products (eg. milk, cheese, butter, yoghurt).
TYPES OF VEGETARIANS
Lacto Ovo Vegetarians choose to include dairy products and free-range eggs in their diet.
Lacto Vegetarians eat dairy products, but not eggs.
Ovo Vegetarians eat eggs but not dairy products.
Vegans do not eat dairy products or eggs, and avoid all other animal products.
REASONS TO BE VEGETARIAN
Most people become vegetarian because they believe that it is wrong to slaughter animals for
food and because they are against the way farm animals are kept. Some people become
vegetarian because they believe vegetarian food is healthier while others want to help save
the environment and people in developing countries.
BEING A VEGETARIAN
Vegetarians learn to be aware of food sources. They avoid gelatine which is made from the
bones, skin and hooves of cows and pigs. They also avoid lard, suet and other animal fats
except butter, as this is not obtained from the slaughter of animals. Fish oils (eg. found in
some margarines) are also excluded from the diet. Cheese made from cows’ milk is
acceptable but not if it is made with animal rennet because this is derived from calf
stomachs. Vegetarian cheese is made of cows’ milk and vegetable rennet.
A BALANCED DIET
A vegetarian diet is based on the following types of food:
FRUIT There are 20 types of commonly eaten fruit, eg. bananas, oranges, apples, plums, kiwi
fruit, grapes, pears and raspberries.
VEGETABLES There are 40 – 50 different types of commonly eaten vegetables, eg. potatoes,
asparagus, mushrooms, peas, sweet corn, broad beans, brussel sprouts and cauliflower.
PULSES Pulses are the edible seeds of leguminous plants eg. peas, beans and lentils. Baked
beans (haricot beans) are probably the most commonly eaten pulse. There are 24 commonly
eaten varieties of pulses.
DAIRY PRODUCTS (Milk and Milk Products)
Eg. Milk – whole, semi-skimmed and skimmed; vegetarian cheese – made with vegetable
rennet; yoghurt; cream – double, single clotted and whipping.
SOYA PRODUCTS Soya milk, tofu (beancurd), tempeh, textured vegetable protein (TVP) and
soya yoghurt. Soya products are made with soya beans (a pulse) but are classed separately
because of their high nutritional value.
7
NUTS AND SEEDS There are 12 different types of commonly eaten nuts, eg. walnuts,
almonds and brazils. (Peanuts are in fact pulses, not nuts). Seeds, eg. sesame, sunflower,
poppy and pumpkin.
GRAINS (Cereals) There are nine different types of commonly eaten grains, eg. wheat, oats,
barley and rice (whole or as flour).
A healthy, balanced vegetarian diet contains a variety of foods from each of the food groups.
Vegetarians Should Have Each Day:
NO. OF SERVINGS* FOODS
4-5 servings*
Cereals/grains
4-5 servings*
TO PROVIDE
Energy, fibre, B Vitamins,
Calcium, iron, Protein
Fruit and vegetables to Folate, calcium, iron, Vitamin A,
include: dark green leafy Vitamin C, fibre, iron
vegetables, orange
vegetables, fresh fruits,
especially citrus, dried fruits
2-3 servings*
Pulses, nuts or seeds
Protein, energy, fibre, calcium,
other minerals
2 servings*
Milk (soya or cows), Protein, calcium, other minerals
cheese, soya products
Small amount
Vegetable oil, margarine
Energy, Vitamin E, Vitamins A & D
0.3-1.5mg Milk & cheese, fortified
Vitamin B12 (especially if vegan)
(see mg/day/age below) yeast extract or fortified
soya milk, TVP, vegie
burgers, some margarines,
breakfast cereals
(Mg per day intake of B12 for different aged children: 0-6 months – 0.3mg;
7-12 months – 0.4mg; 1-3 years – 0.5mg; 4-6 years – 0.8mg; 7-10 years – 1mg;
11-14 years – 1.2mg; 15+ years – 1.5mg).
* A serving means one soup spoonful for every year of the child’s age (use as a guide only,
as children vary).
8
ENERGY
Foods contain different amounts of fat, protein, carbohydrate, water, vitamins and minerals.
The most important reason for eating is to give us energy. Energy can be obtained from fat,
carbohydrate and protein. Water is also essential but it does not contain any energy.
Vitamins and minerals do not give us any energy but some help the body release energy
from food.
PROTEINS
These are essential for growth, repair and protection against infection. Proteins are made up
of 20 “building blocks” called amino acids which the body requires every day.
Protein Requirements (Grams needed per day)
AGE
11-14
15-18
19-20
MALES
42.1
55.2
55.5
FEMALES
41.2
45.4
45.0
Certain foods can be classed as "complete" proteins as they contain the required amino
acids in the right proportions needed by the body. Milk, cheese, yoghurt, meat and fish are
complete proteins. Soya is almost a complete protein and can be placed in this category.
Other foods such as pulses, cereals and nuts are “incomplete” proteins as they do not
contain all the amino acids in the right proportions needed by the body.
Vegetarians get the correct balance of protein and amino acids by combining different
protein foods. The body has a pool of amino acids and so protein combinations do not have
to take place at each meal. A variety of protein foods eaten in the course of the day will
provide enough.
For example, baked beans on toast provides all the amino acids because the baked beans
(pulse) contain the amino acids which are lacking in the bread (grain) and vice versa. Use
the protein combining chart below as a guide.
Protein Combining Chart
Grains
Pulses
Nuts & Seeds
Dairy
GRAINS no
yes
yes
yes
PULSES
yes
no
sometimes
yes
NUTS & SEEDS
yes
sometimes
no
yes
DAIRY
yes
yes
yes
yes (high in fat)
9
CARBOHYDRATES
Carbohydrates are the main sources of energy in the diet and are supplied by plant foods.
There are three types of carbohydrates:
SUGARS are the most basic of the carbohydrates and are found naturally in foods such as
fruit and milk. Table sugar and the type found in sweets are examples of refined sugar.
STARCHES OR COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATES (CCs), whether they are refined or unrefined,
break down into sugars during digestion. The “building blocks” of starches are sugars.
DIETARY FIBRE is the indigestible part of fruit and vegetable, such as the bran of the cereal
grain. It is an essential part of the diet that enables the digestive system to work properly.
CARBOHYDRATES can be refined or unrefined. Unrefined starches (or wholegrains)
contain fibre and are the healthiest form of carbohydrate. Examples are: wholemeal flour
and bread, brown rice, brown pasta, oats, barley, buckwheat, rye, peas, beans and lentils.
Fruit and vegetables like potatoes, parsnips, bananas and apples are also good sources of
unrefined carbohydrates.
Refined carbohydrate foods, like white bread, white rice and white pasta, should be eaten
in moderation. When foods are refined and processed, they typically lose 80% of their fibre
content and also contain fewer vitamins and minerals than unrefined sources. Vegetarians
have no problem in getting plenty of fibre.
FATS
Fats are made of “building blocks” called fatty acids, just as protein is made of amino acids.
These fatty acids can be saturated or unsaturated. The unsaturated fatty acids include those
that are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Too much fat is unhealthy, but a little is
essential.
SATURATED FATS are found mostly in animal foods, such as meat, butter and cheese. Too
much saturated fat in the diet can lead to a high level of cholesterol in the body which may
lead to heart disease. There are very few vegetable foods that contain much saturated fat;
coconut oil and palm oil are the major exceptions.
Cholesterol is not a fat—it is a type of sterol. It is found in animal foods but is absent from
plant foods. Cholesterol is essential to our body, but we can make all we need without
including it in our diet.
UNSATURATED FATS help to lower cholesterol levels in the blood.
MONOUNSATURATED FAT is found in high amounts in olive oil and peanut oil.
POLYUNSATURATED FAT is found in high amounts in plant oils such as sunflower oil
and soya oil.
VITAMINS AND MINERALS
A well-balanced vegetarian diet will provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals that the
body requires to remain healthy. Vitamins are essential nutrients that the body requires in
small amounts from the diet. Vegetarians can easily obtain all the vitamins needed for
health but need to ensure good sources of B12, calcium, iron and zinc.
B12 Vegans can ensure a good source of vitamin B12 by consuming fortified foods such as
yeast extracts and some soya milk. Vegetarians who include dairy products in their diet
should easily get sufficient amounts of this vitamin. The body needs tiny amounts of
vitamin B12, only 1g or one millionth of a gram per day.
10
CALCIUM is essential for healthy bones and teeth. It is also important for the working of
muscles. Good sources of calcium are milk, yoghurt, cheese, leafy green vegetables, nuts
(particularly almonds), pulses and seeds.
IRON is essential for healthy red blood cells, which transport oxygen to all parts of the body.
Vegetable sources include baked beans, wholemeal bread and green vegetables. A lack of iron
is one of the most common nutritional problems in the Western diet. Vegetarians and
vegans do not suffer from iron deficiency any more than meat eaters do. But vegetarians do
need to make sure that they have a good supply of iron, because iron from vegetable sources
is less well-absorbed than that from animal sources. Vitamin C, however, helps absorption
and the best sources are fresh fruit and vegetables. Dairy foods are a very poor source of iron.
ZINC has many functions in the body and is essential for healing wounds. It is found in
green vegetables, cheese, seeds, lentils and unrefined cereals.
Your parents are right when they say “eat up your greens!” Green vegetables are an excellent
source of iron, calcium, zinc and the B vitamin folate.
HEALTHY EATING
What we eat affects our health. There is a saying, “you are what you eat”.
Expert nutritionists agree that changes are needed in most peoples’ diet.
Their advice is to:
• Eat less saturated fats and have more unsaturated fats.
• Eat more fibre.
• Eat more complex carbohydrates.
• Eat less salt.
• Eat less sugar.
• Eat more fresh fruit and vegetables.
HOW IS A VEGETARIAN DIET HEALTHY?
•
•
•
•
•
•
A vegetarian diet usually contains less fat.
Most saturated fats come from meat and dairy products. Vegetable foods usually contain more unsaturated fat.
Meat, eggs and dairy products contain no fibre. The best sources are brown rice, beans, wholemeal bread, flour and pasta.
The best sources of complex carbohydrates (CCs) are cereal products such as rice, wheat, bread, pasta and also potatoes and pulses.
Vegetarians may eat less sugar and salt if they avoid processed and packaged foods.
Vegetarians usually eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables.
We would like to thank The Vegetarian Society for their kind permission to reprint the
information in this chapter which has been derived from:
Gellately, J. (1992) “Section 2: Vegetarian Health & Nutrition” in Vegetarian Issues – a resource
pack for secondary schools, The Vegetarian Society, Cheshire, UK.
11
TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS
CUPS
1 cup Flour
1 cup Butter (US: 1 stick = 4oz)
1 cup Sugar
1 cup Caster sugar/icing sugar/dried fruit
1 cup Coconut, grated cheese, oats
1 cup Golden syrup, treacle, honey 21/2 cups Liquid
METRIC
112g
224g
224g
168g
84g 340g 568ml
SPOONS
2 tbsp Flour, baking powder, cornflour
28g
2 tbsp Rice, barley, split peas, sago
28g
2 tbsp Dried fruits, chopped nuts 28g
1 tbsp Butter
28g
1 tbsp Golden syrup, honey (rounded tbsp) 56g
1 tbsp Cocoa, custard powder or rice flour
28g
2 tbsp Grated cheese (level tbsp)
28g
4 tbsp Coconut or breadcrumbs
28g
6 tbsp Liquid
142ml
1 tbsp Lemon juice 28g
1 tbsp Peel of one lemon
28g
IMPERIAL
4oz
8oz
8oz
6oz
3oz
12oz
1pint
1oz
1oz
1oz
1oz
2oz
1oz
1oz
1oz
1/4 pint
1oz
1oz
12
CONVERTING RECIPES
You may like to change the low-nutrition ingredients in some of your favourite recipes, with
more healthy ingredients. Here are some suggestions.
OLD RECIPE
White flour
Margarine, lard
Sugar
Jello, gelatine
Cornstarch
Cocoa, chocolate
Meat stock/cubes
Shop salad dressing
Cheese
Eggs
Tinned fruit/vegetables
SUBSTITUTE
Wholemeal flour, oats, rye or rice flour,
barley flour or corn flour
First cold pressed oils (no cholesterol: olive), butter
Honey, molasses, maple syrup, blended dates
Agar agar
Arrowroot
Carob powder
Vegetable stock, miso, tamari
Homemade dressing
Soya cheese
2 tbsp yoghurt/egg replacer/1tsp bi-carb soda and
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
Fresh fruit and vegetables
OVEN TEMPERATURE GUIDE
Slow oven
Moderate oven
Hot oven
Very hot oven
GAS
˚F
300
350
400
450
˚C
150
180
200
230
ELECTRICITY
˚F
˚C
350
180
400
200
450
230
500
250
SALADS & SALAD
DRESSINGS
13
14
EATING HABITS
•
•
•
•
Be simple. Eat food in simple combinations at one meal.
Complete your meal before you feel the sensation of “fullness”.
It’s important to eat a balanced diet. We need not be extravagant or scant.
Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly. Wait in between mouthfuls. Hurried meals can cause indigestion and may cause overeating.
• Eat a substantial amount of fresh, raw foods and avoid over-cooked and processed foods.
• Eat your meal in a quiet, peaceful place with minimal distractions.
SALADS
A salad is not just a lettuce leaf with a slice of tomato. When you begin eating salads, you
will be amazed at the number of vegetables that are just as nice raw as cooked. The secret
lies in the preparation and dressing, if any.
• If you have children helping you, supervise their use of knives closely. Chop with patience, taking care to chop evenly and finely.
• Grate, shred or cut across the grain if you can.
• Gently tear lettuce leaves – cutting with a knife makes the edges go brown after a while.
• You can add to your salads any fresh herbs, caraway seeds, linseeds, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, a mixture of nuts, sultanas, raisins, etc.
• A combination of any fruits can be used for fruit salads, but often fruit salads are extremely delicious if only a few fruits are used in the one salad. Nuts, coconut and dried fruit can also be added, but avoid too much variety.
• Yoghurt used as a dressing for fruit salad is a good substitute for cream.
15
CRUNCHY CABBAGE SALAD
2 cups shredded cabbage
1 medium size carrot, grated
handful mild rennetless cheese, diced or coarsely grated
1 eating apple, peeled and diced
1/3 cup seedless raisins
1.
2.
3.
1 level tsp sugar
1 lemon, juice and grated rind
a little watercress/alfalfa sprouts
potato crisps
Put all ingredients, except watercress and potato crisps, into a polythene bag and
shake to mix.
Turn into a salad bowl.
Top with watercress and arrange potato crisps around the edges of the bowl.
COCONUT, CARROT & RAISIN SALAD
1/3
cup raisins
cup orange juice
1 large carrot (8oz) grated
2/3 cup dessicated coconut
1/2
1. Gently cook raisins in orange juice for 5 minutes to swell them. Cool.
2. Mix together carrot, coconut, raisins and orange juice. Chill.
3. Can be served with Eggless Mayonnaise. (see page 16)
POTATO SALAD
4
2
1
1
large potatoes
sticks celery, chopped
small green pepper, chopped
cup peas, cooked
1.
2.
3.
1 tbsp fresh parsley, diced
1 tsp fresh mint, diced 1/2 cup Eggless Mayonnaise (see page 16)
Dice washed, peeled potatoes. Boil for 5 minutes until just tender. Drain and place in a salad bowl.
Add celery, pepper, peas, parsley and mint. Toss all together.
Mix in mayonnaise and serve.
16
SUNSET SALAD
2 medium carrots
1 large lettuce
1/2 cucumber sliced
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
2 cups grated cheddar cheese
1 heaped tbsp peanut butter (optional)
French Dressing (see below)
Peel the carrots, wash and drain the lettuce, wipe the cucumber and slice thinly.
Grate the carrots on a coarse grater.
Line a salad bowl with lettuce leaves.
Arrange the cheese and carrots in alternate heaps around the bowl, so that each person can take a serving of carrot and cheese with some lettuce.
Use cucumber slices as dividers.
Serve with French Dressing into which 1 heaped tbsp of peanut butter has been
beaten (if liked).
EGGLESS MAYONNAISE
1
1
1
2
(375-400g) can condensed milk
cup cider vinegar
tsp salt
tsp mustard powder
1. Mix all ingredients together until mixture thickens.
2. Let it settle then pour into a screw top jar.
3. Store in the refrigerator.
FRENCH DRESSING
1 cup oil
1/4 cup lemon juice
salt and pepper
1-2 tsp honey
1 tsp water
1. Combine all ingredients in a blender, or shake together in a leak-proof jar.
COTTAGE CHEESE DRESSING
1 cup cottage cheese
1/2 cup milk or soya milk
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4
cup oil
2 tsp honey
pinch salt and paprika
1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and chill.
SANDWICHES
SNACKS & SOUPS
17
18
SANDWICHES
A sandwich can be made from anything. You don’t even have to use bread. Try using lettuce
leaves, red or white cabbage, over-size zucchini slices, fine slices of turnip, or slices of cheese
instead of bread. Kids love toasted sandwiches. Butter slices of bread, and between the
unbuttered sides place any of the suggested fillings. Place in a heated sandwich toaster and
toast. The type of bread used can make a big difference to the sandwich. Sweet or neutral
flavoured breads are best for fruit fillings or sweet spreads. Try using crisp bread or flat bread
for a change. Or make your own bread—the best of all! Try experimenting with different
types of bread for variety—french bread, whole-wheat bread and rolls, rye bread, pita bread,
chapatis, tortillas, tacos, crispbread, etc.
COLD SAVOURY SANDWICH FILLINGS
1. avocado, eggless mayonnaise, tomato, alfalfa sprouts; 2. sliced cucumber, eggless
mayonnaise, alfalfa sprouts/watercress/lettuce, tomato slices; 3. peanut butter, grated
carrots, lettuce/alfalfa sprouts; 4. cottage cheese, chopped watercress; 5. vegemite, peanut
butter, tomato, chopped celery, sprouts, lettuce and a squeeze of lemon juice; 6. cucumber
with cheese and tomato; 7. tahini and alfalfa sprouts/tomato and parsley; 8. cream cheese
and peanut butter, alfalfa sprouts; 9. cottage/cream cheese, vegemite and tomatoes;
10. peanut butter, celery, grated carrot; 11. cottage cheese with dill seeds; 12. cream cheese
with sliced cucumber; 13. tahini and Japanese miso, mixed with a little lemon juice
and water.
SWEET SANDWICH FILLINGS
1. cream cheese/cottage cheese with sultanas/chopped raisins, dates, figs, apricots, prunes;
2. cream cheese, sultanas, banana, apple; 3. cottage cheese, pineapple, dates; 4. banana,
honey, peanut butter/chopped nuts; 5. peanut butter and honey/jam; 6. peanut butter,
chopped dates/raisins, with a squeeze of orange/lemon juice; 7. tahini, honey and chopped
nuts; 8. cream cheese, dates and walnuts; 9. cream cheese/cottage cheese with honey/jam;
10. chocolate spread (made by heating 125g butter, 125g golden syrup and 2 tbsp cocoa
together).
HOT SANDWICH FILLINGS
On buttered toast try: 1. peanut butter topped with cheese—melt under the grill; 2. slice of
eggplant rolled in wheatgerm and browned in a frying pan on both sides, topped with
cheese. When almost done, top with tomato slices. Finish cooking and add alfalfa sprouts;
3. cheese and beans, grilled; 4. cheese and tomatoes/tomato sauce, grilled; 5. melted cheese
topped with salad – celery, cucumber, sprouts; 6. cheese sprinkled with caraway seeds/curry
powder/tomato slices, and basil, mixed herbs, fresh mint, toasted sesame seeds, etc;
7. honey or golden syrup, sprinkled with cinnamon and grilled until bubbly; 8. or spread
pita bread or chapatis with any of the above, roll up and heat in oven.
19
SNACKS
PARTY VEGETABLES AND 2 DIPS
Serves 6
VEGETABLES
1 cucumber
1/2 head cauliflower
12 carrots
2 green/red capsicums
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
1 bunch celery
small head broccoli
corn chips or potato chips (optional)
Peel cucumber, cut into finger length pieces, then cut these rounds into four.
Wash cauliflower and broccoli. Break into florets and steam lightly.
Wash, and chop carrots into sticks.
Cut capsicums in half, wash and remove seeds, slice.
Wash celery, take off the leaves and slice thinly.
Arrange everything on a large, shallow dish.
As a variation, you can add a plate of corn chips and/or potato chips.
1. NUT BUTTER DIP
1/4
cup peanut butter, smooth or crunchy
1/2 cup water
1. Whip peanut butter and water together with fork, until a light, creamy dipping sauce forms (other nut butters can be substituted).
2. HOMMOS DIP
2-3 tbsp olive oil
juice of 1 lemon
1/4 cup tahini
440g can chick peas, drained
1. Put all the ingredients in a blender or food processor and blend until mixture
is creamy.
Variation: These dips can be used as sandwich fillers with the addition of chopped lettuce,
grated carrot, alfalfa sprouts.
20
COCONUT CARROT BALLS
1 cup coconut
1 cup grated carrot
1/2 cup flour
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp fresh parsley
1.
2.
3.
4.
milk or soya milk
oil for shallow frying
For extra nutrional value,
add 1 tbsp soy or chickpea flour and
perhaps a little ground sesame seed.
Mix all ingredients.
Moisten with enough milk to form a soft dough.
Roll into balls.
Shallow fry till golden brown or brush with oil, bake in hot oven 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 4).
CHEESE & TOMATO HERB BREAD
Serves 6
1 tbsp butter
1 tomato, chopped
6 round wholemeal bread rolls
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
2 tbsp fresh tarragon, chopped (or 1 tsp dried)
2 tbsp fresh basil, chopped (or 1 tsp dried)
1 cup grated cheese
Melt butter in a small frying pan, stir in tomato and cook over low heat for 4 minutes.
Remove from heat. Allow to cool.
Cut each bread roll in half vertically, scoop out bread to leave a 1cm thick shell. In a blender process the scooped out bread into breadcrumbs.
Combine the crumbs with tomato, tarragon, basil and cheese in a medium bowl.
Mix well.
Spoon herb mixture into bread shells. Join two shells together and wrap in foil. Heat rolls in a hot oven until heated through and cheese is melted (10-15mins).
PANCAKES
1 cup self-raising flour or pancake flour
pinch salt
1 cup milk (or soya milk)
butter or oil for frying
caster sugar
2 lemons
1. Sift the flour and salt into a mixing bowl.
2. Add half the milk and gradually work in the flour, beating with a wooden spoon, until the batter is smooth. Stir in the remaining milk.
3. Melt a little butter or oil in a frying pan and pour in a thin layer of batter. Tilt the pan so the mixture covers the base thinly and evenly.
4. Fry for about two minutes until set and golden brown on one side. Use a flat slice tool to loosen and turn the pancake over (or toss).
5. Cook on the other side until golden.
21
6.
7.
8.
Put pancake on a warm plate, sprinkle with sugar, cover with foil and keep warm under the grill or in a warm oven while you make the rest, greasing the pan as necessary.
When all the pancakes are cooked, roll each one up and serve with lemon wedges.
You can also serve plain pancakes with fresh strawberries, sliced bananas, syrup or ice cream. For a savoury filling, choose from cream cheese and chopped celery, grated cheese and pickle, sour cream and sliced tomatoes.
POTATO PANCAKES
Especially good with home-made Tomato Soup (see page 24).
3-4 tbsp flour
1 tsp dried mixed herbs (optional)
2 tbsp soya milk
oil for frying
1 tsp salt
few parsley sprigs and tomato wedges
2 large potatoes
1. Peel and coarsley grate the potatoes.
2. Combine flour, salt, milk and potato to make a thick batter.
Add more flour if too runny, and more milk if too thick.
3. Add herbs if liked.
4. Heat oil in a large frying pan and drop in tablespoons of the potato batter one at a time. Flatten each pancake with the back of a spoon to about 10cm in diameter.
5. When golden brown turn and cook the other side.
6. Drain on kitchen paper. Stack on a dish and keep hot.
7. Serve garnished with parsley or cress and serve with tomatoes, cooked vegetables, vegetable soup, or hot pot.
POTATO SCALLOPS
3 large potatoes
2 cups self-raising flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
11/3 cups water
oil for deep frying
extra flour
Mix into a batter the flour, salt, pepper and water.
Peel and wash the potatoes. Cut into thin slices. Dry, then cover with extra flour, shaking off excess flour.
Dip potato slices into the batter, covering well.
Deep fry until just brown. Remove and drain.
Refry until golden brown and crispy.
Sprinkle with salt and serve.
22
SAILING BOATS
Serves 1
1/2 medium cucumber
1/4 french loaf
butter for spreading
1 cup vegetarian cottage cheese or cream cheese
salt and pepper
1. Wash, peel and slice cucumber into rounds (not too thinly).
2. Halve the bread lengthwise and butter both sides.
3. Cover bread with cottage cheese or cream cheese, and add a pinch of salt and pepper.
4. Arrange the cucumber slices in layers on the cheese, partly covering each other, or
put them in upright.
5. Add a colourful sail made from paper and a toothpick.
23
SOUPS
Whether your soup is just the beginning of the meal or a meal in itself, keep in mind they
can be even more delicious and nutritious by simply using your imagination. Experiment
with different herbs and spices to make them more appetising. As soon as you take the soup
off the heat, add a handful of sprouts. To thicken soups add two tablespoons of miso,
semolina, arrowroot (mixed with a little water to make a runny paste) or rolled oats.
FRESH GREEN PEA SOUP
1 cup boiling water
2 cups frozen peas
1/4 cup raw cashews
salt and pepper
up to 3 cups of water
parsley, chopped
pinch of asafoetida/hing powder* (optional)
salt, pepper and yeast powder or extract to taste
1. Add peas to one cup of boiling water.
2. Blend cashews with a little of the 3 cups of water, then add peas and boiling water.
3. Continue to blend, adding enough water to make a creamy and smooth consistency.
4. Place soup in a saucepan and slowly cook with constant stirring until warmed and thickened. Don’t overcook.
5. Add parsely for garnish and season to taste with salt and pepper, hing and yeast powder.
MINESTRONE SOUP
Serves 4-6
3 tbsp cooking oil
2 large tomatoes
1 capsicum
1 potato
1 cup peas
1 celery stick
1 cup wholewheat macaroni
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp asafoetida/hing*
1 tbsp finely chopped parsley
2 cups of water (add more if you like it watery)
2 tsp mixed herbs
salt and pepper to taste
Chop all vegetables into small pieces.
Heat oil in a saucepan. Add herbs and flavourings and sauté for 2-3 minutes.
Add the tomatoes and cook for an extra 2-3 minutes
Add the rest of the vegetables and cook a further 5 minutes.
Add water and macaroni and simmer the soup until the vegetables and macaroni
are tender.
Season with salt and pepper.
Serve sprinkled with the parsely.
*(available in Indian food stores. An Indian spice used in place of onions and garlic)
24
SWEET CORN AND POTATO SOUP
2 large potatoes
400g can creamed corn
4 cups water
salt and pepper
1/2 tsp mixed herbs
1.
2.
3.
4.
Place water in a medium sized saucepan and bring to the boil.
Peel potatoes and cut into small cubes.
Add potatoes, herbs and seasonings to water and boil for approximately ten minutes
until nearly cooked.
Add corn and mix well. Simmer for a further five minutes before serving.
TOMATO SOUP
4
3
3
1
cups peeled and diced ripe tomatoes
cups water
tbsp oil
tbsp honey
1.
2.
3.
4.
1
1
4
1
cup raw cashew nuts
tsp sweet basil
tsp oregano
tsp salt
Blend all the ingredients except the tomatoes in a food processor or blender until
smooth.
Add the tomatoes and blend again.
Pour mixture into a saucepan, bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 2-3 minutes.
Remove from heat and serve.
MAIN DISHES
25
26
HINTS ON COOKING VEGETABLES
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose vegetables as fresh as possible, as they begin to lose their nutritional value as soon as they are picked.
Do not wash vegetables before storing.
Prepare vegetables just prior to cooking. They should be washed well—a stiff brush will remove most surface dirt.
Do not soak vegetables in water for long, as this reduces vitamin and mineral content.
Try to use as much of the vegetable as possible – leaves, stem, seeds.
Use as little water as possible when cooking. Never boil vegetables in a lot of water.
Cook vegetables until just tender or even slightly crunchy, as overcooking destroys vitamins and spoils the shape and colour.
For an appetising appearance and balanced nutrients, try combining different coloured vegetables – e.g. one green, one red and one white vegetable.
When cooking vegetables together, they should be added to the pot at different times according to the length of time they take to cook. Alternatively the size of the vegetables can be cut accordingly, so that all vegetables take the same amount of time to cook.
Baking is the best way of cooking vegetables, as they are cooked in their own juices. The flavour and most nutrition is retained in this way. Most root vegetables can be baked whole in the oven. You can also combine any kind of vegetables in a casserole dish with a small amount of liquid and a little oil, and bake with the lid on.
Stir frying is best done in a wok, or an uncovered pan. Use a little oil and stir the vegetables continuously to avoid overcooking. Stir until vegetables are hot,
but still crisp.
27
BAKED BEANS
11/2 cups cooked beans (kidney, soya, black, adzuki, etc.)
1 tbsp tomato paste
400g can tomato puree
1 stick celery, chopped
1.
2.
3.
1/4
2
2
1
2
cup brown sugar
tbsp molasses
tbsp oil
tsp sweet basil
tsp salt and 1/2 tsp hing
Mix all ingredients well, except basil, and place in casserole dish.
Bake covered for one hour in a moderate oven.
Remove cover and add basil. Stir and continue to bake uncovered until sauce
has thickened.
BAKED POTATOES
4 large potatoes
vegetable oil
1/2 cup butter or margarine
salt and pepper
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1/2
cup cheddar cheese or
cup sour cream or
1/2 cup cream cheese
2 tsp parsley
1/2
Scrub the potatoes and prick them all over with a fork.
Brush them with oil and place them on a baking sheet.
Bake in the oven, pre-heated to 190˚C (375˚F/Mark 5), for 1-11/2 hours until they feel soft when squeezed.
When the potatoes are cooked, remove them from the oven and cut them almost in half lengthways.
Place a knob of butter inside each potato and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Sprinkle grated cheddar cheese onto the cooked potatoes or distribute the sour cream or cream cheese around the potatoes and sprinkle with chopped parsley.
BIRDS NEST
This is a very decorative dish. The 'nest' is made from shredded yam or root vegetables and filled
with any favourite vegetables.
1/2 taro (yam) or potato, shredded
1 stick celery, chopped
1 tbsp cornflour
1 carrot (cut into sticks)
2 tsp salt
4 Chinese dried mushrooms, whole
oil for deep frying
walnuts for garnish
5 button mushrooms
1.
2.
3.
5.
Mix taro with 1 tsp of the salt, cornflour and a little water and form into the
shape of a nest.
Deep fry the nest until lightly browned. Leave aside to cool.
Stir fry vegetables until cooked but still crisp. Add remaining salt. Mix.
Put vegetables in the nest, decorate with walnuts and serve.
28
BUBBLE & SQUEAK
Children like this dish alone or served with baked beans.
2 large potatoes
1 tbsp oil
salt
1/2 white cabbage
1.
2.
3.
4.
Peel, slice and cut potatoes into 21/2cm pieces.
Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok and add potatoes. Sprinkle with salt and saute for about 20 minutes.
Shred cabbage and add to potatoes for the last five minutes of cooking.
Serve before cabbage gets too soft.
CHEESE AND SPINACH TRIANGLES
1 large bunch spinach
2 tbsp butter
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter, extra
2 tbsp flour
pinch of nutmeg
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup fetta cubed or grated cheddar cheese
500g filo pastry
oil
Filling
1. Wash spinach and coarsley chop leaves.
2. Melt the butter in a saucepan and saute the spinach with salt, pepper until cooked.
3. Melt extra butter in another pan, stir in flour and nutmeg. Add milk and stir until sauce boils and thickens.
4. Remove from heat, stir in spinach and cheese. Allow filling to cool.
Pastry
1. Cut each pastry sheet into 8 cm wide strips. Brush with oil. One strip of pastry makes
one triangle.
2. Put a teaspoonful of filling on each end of pastry strip and fold over to form a triangle covering the filling. Continue to fold over and over until you reach the end of the strip.
3. Deep fry, or bake in a moderate oven until light golden brown.
29
CHEESE & TOMATO MACARONI
2 cups macaroni
400g can tomato soup blended with 1/2 tsp asafoetida/hing
1 cup grated cheese
salt and pepper
1.
2.
3.
4.
Cook macaroni in boiling, salted water and drain.
Mix in the tomato soup and then stir in half the grated cheese.
When cheese has melted, put into a serving dish and sprinkle remainder of cheese
on top.
Put under a hot grill to brown.
CHEESEY LIMA BEAN BAKE
3 cups lima beans, cooked
1/4 cup sweet red capsicum, chopped
3 tbsp tomato puree
3 tbsp wholewheat flour
11/2 cups grated cheese
11/2 cups milk
1/2 tsp hing
1. In an oven proof dish, mix a little milk into the flour to make a paste. Slowly add the rest of the milk, then the remaining ingredients, keeping aside 1/2 cup cheese.
2. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top and bake uncovered for 30 minutes in a moderate oven.
CHILLI CON CARNE
1 tbsp vegetable oil
2-3 large potatoes, peeled and cut into 1cm cubes
1 green capsicum, chopped
440g can tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
1 tsp paprika
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1 tsp sugar
2 tsp chilli powder
1 tbsp vinegar
salt and pepper
400g can red kidney or baked beans
Heat oil in pan, add the chopped potatoes and sauté for about 15 minutes, until golden brown and almost cooked.
Add green capsicum and cook for a few minutes.
Add the tomatoes and their juice, the tomato paste, paprika, sugar, chilli powder, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook gently for about 20 minutes.
Open the can of beans (and strain off the juice if using red kidney beans).
Add the beans to the pan and cook for another five minutes.
Serve on its own in bowls, or with rice, or with French Bread and salad.
30
CHINESE FRIED RICE
250g firm tofu cut into 1 cm cubes
1 carrot, diced and parboiled
1/2 cup peas, cooked
4 tbsp oil
1/2
cup water
4 cups cooked rice
1 tbsp soya sauce
salt to taste
1. Heat oil in large pan and stir fry tofu for 2 minutes.
2. Add carrot and fry for a further 2 minutes.
3. Add water and simmer for 5 minutes.
4. Stir in the cooked rice.
5. Add peas and seasonings and stir fry for 3 minutes on high heat.
CORN FRITTERS
1 cup self-raising flour
11/2 cups corn kernels
2 tsp cumin powder
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp mustard powder
1.
2.
3.
pinch of cayenne pepper
salt and pepper
1 tbsp chopped parsley
milk to mix to a thick consistency
Roughly mash the corn in a mixing bowl. Add sieved flour, and then spices, salt, pepper and parsley.
Make into a thick batter by adding milk.
Drop rounded tablespoons of batter into a lightly oiled frying pan. Fry on both sides until golden brown.
CORNISH PASTIES
These are nice served with brown gravy.
2 cups mixed root vegetables
(any combination will do)
1/3 cup frozen peas
salt to taste
1/2 tsp pepper
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
pinch of asafoetida/hing
375g shortcrust pastry or
1 packet of frozen pastry (1 packet
makes 2 large or 3 medium pasties)
Chop the root vegetables into 1cm pieces.
Microwave or steam vegetables until just cooked and drain well.
Add peas after cooking them according to the package.
Add hing, salt and pepper to taste.
Mix together and allow to cool.
continued...
31
6. Roll out the pastry. Cover and let it sit for 30 minutes so that it won’t shrink when cooked.
7. Decide what size you want the pasties to be – dinner plate size or saucer size.
8. Roll the pastry again. Take your plate and place it on the pastry. With a knife cut around the plate until you have cut out the pastry.
9. Spoon the filling into the centre of the pastry. Brush the edges with water and bring the edges together, over and around the filling. Pinch the edges together to seal them. Prick with a fork once or twice on each side.
10.Place on a baking sheet and bake in a hot oven for about 30 minutes until nicely browned.
CREAMY POTATO BAKE
3 large potatoes, peeled and diced into 21/2cm cubes
salt and pepper
1 cup creamed cottage cheese
1/2 cup light cream
1 tbsp butter
paprika
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In a greased casserole dish, mix potatoes, salt and pepper.
Blend cottage cheese, and cream, stir into potatoes and dot with butter.
Cover and bake at 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4) for 45 minutes.
Uncover and bake for 20 minutes longer, or until potatoes are tender.
Let stand for 15 minutes. Sprinkle with paprika and serve.
CRISP VEGETABLES AND PEANUTS
2 tbsp oil
250gm firm tofu, diced into 2cm cubes
1/2 cup salty dried turnip
(available in Chinese food shops)
1/2 cup carrot, diced
1/2
cup beans, cut into 2cm lengths
1 tbsp soya sauce
1/2 cup roasted peanuts
1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a wok or frypan. Stir fry tofu for a few minutes and remove.
Set aside.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil, stir fry dried turnip and remove from pan. Set aside.
3. Place carrot and beans into pan and stir fry for 5-6 minutes until cooked but still crisp.
4. Add tofu and heat through.
5. Mix in soya sauce and turnip. Mix well.
6. Serve sprinkled with peanuts on top. 32
HONEY & SOYA SAUCE RICE NOODLES
500g fresh rice noodles
2 tbsp sesame oil
1-2 tbsp honey
5 tbsp soya sauce
1 tbsp oil (optional)
1 cup tofu, cubed (optional)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
2 red capsicums, sliced
1 carrot, stick slices
2 cups bok choy, chopped
2 tsp grated ginger
a little water
1 cup bean shoots
Slice rice noodles into 1cm thick strips.
Heat oil, honey and soya sauce in wok until hot.
Add noodles and quickly fry until browned and just pulling apart. Remove from wok.
Set aside.
(If using) stir fry tofu in oil until browned on all sides. Remove from wok. Set aside.
Stir fry carrot, capsicum, bok choy and grated ginger for five minutes. Add water.
Mix in noodles, tofu and beanshoots. Toss to combine. Serve.
HUNGARIAN GOULASH
Oil for deep frying
500g firm frozen tofu (see below)
2 pinches hing/asafoetida
400g can tomatoes, roughly chopped
1 tbsp oil
2-3 potatoes cut into 21/2cm cubes
1 litre warm water
paprika (optional)
salt and pepper
Preparing frozen tofu (this process changes the texture of the tofu)
1. Wash the tofu and cut into bite size pieces. Put into a plastic freezer bag and put in the freezer compartment of your refrigerator and freeze for two days before you need to
use it.
continued...
33
2. Take the tofu from the freezer and out of the bag. Run hot water over the tofu until the
pieces separate.
3. Whilst you are doing this, boil a pan of water. Plunge the separated pieces of tofu into the boiling water and let it continue to boil until the tofu pieces float.
4. Take them out of the pan and place in a colander. Run cold water over them, then take each piece and squeeze out the water until the tofu is dry.
Goulash
1. Deep fry the tofu after following the instructions above. When it is brown, remove from the oil and drain on kitchen towel.
2. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large saucepan.
3. When hot, sprinkle in the hing/asafoetida and sauté momentarily, then add tomato pieces, potatoes, the fried tofu, salt and pepper.
4. Pour in the litre of water and raise the heat to full. When it boils, reduce the heat slightly and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft. Serve hot.
INARI SUSHI
This is a favourite Japanese dish
6 aburage* pieces (a type of Japanese tofu bag)
30cm kampyo* (optional)
1 cup dashi* (seasoning)
1/4 cup soya sauce
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
3 tbsp vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
11/2 cups freshly made Sushi Rice (see page 36)
1 tbsp roasted sesame seeds, lightly crushed
Pour boiling water over the aburage pieces and drain, squeezing lightly to remove the excess oil.
Combine the dashi, soya sauce, vinegar and sugar in a small pan.
Stir and bring to a simmer.
Add the aburage pieces and kampyo.
Cover partially and simmer for about eight minutes, spooning the liquid over the aburage every now and then.
Uncover and let the aburage and kampyo cool in the liquid. Remove kampyo.
Mix the sushi rice and the sesame seeds.
Gently pry open the aburage/tofu bags one at a time and stuff each with rice.
Fold each bag just above the area where the rice is. Can be served with salad.
* available in Japanese food stores
34
KEBABS
small can pineapple chunks, drained
2 green capsicums, quartered
vegetable oil
4 pieces pita bread
250g tofu plus oil for deep frying
2 small tomatoes halved
4 large lettuce leaves, shredded
8 button mushrooms
1. Cube tofu into 11/2cm pieces and deep fry in oil. Drain well.
2. Divide the tofu, tomato, mushroom, pineapple and capsicum equally between four skewers or BBQ sticks, and thread them on.
3. Turn on the grill, brush the kebabs with oil and grill them gently for 10-15 minutes, turning them about three times, until they are golden brown all over.
4. Put the pita bread under the grill or in the oven and heat them through.
5. Slit the pita bread along one side, open the pocket and put a little lettuce in each pocket. Use a fork to slide the food off the kebab into the pocket and serve.
LEFTOVERS PIE
This recipe can be adapted using any combination of leftovers
1 cup grated cheese or tofu
11/2 cans (400g) baked beans
1 tbsp soya sauce
1 slice bread, crumbled
1 cup cooked rice
1 tsp mixed herbs
2 large potatoes, mashed
11/2 bok choy or 1/4 cabbage
1 cup cooked rice
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Combine baked beans, bread crumbs, and herbs in a bowl.
Stir fry bok choi or cabbage for a few minutes.
Add rice and fry a few minutes, then add 1 tbsp of soya sauce.
Add beans mixture and combine everything together.
Put into a greased oven-proof dish and cover top with mashed potato.
Put into medium oven for 15-20 minutes until top is browned.
Serve with salad or green vegetables.
LENTIL & HAZELNUT PATTIES
1 cup lentils
4 tbsp oil
1/4 tsp hing/asafoetida
500ml stock
1 bay leaf
salt and pepper
3/4 cup hazelnuts, finely chopped
4 tbsp chopped parsley
1 tbsp thyme
2 fresh sage leaves, chopped (if available)
2 tbsp tomato paste
2 tbsp wholewheat flour, seasoned
oil for shallow frying
continued...
35
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Heat the oil in a heavy saucepan on a low heat. Stir in the hing/asafoetida, add the lentils and cook for two minutes, stirring well.
Pour in the stock and bring to the boil. Season well and add the bay leaf.
Cover and simmer gently for 45 minutes, beating the lentils to a thick puree with a wooden spoon towards the end.
Take the pan from the heat and let the lentils cool, keeping them covered to prevent a hard surface developing.
Beat in the hazelnuts, parsley, thyme, sage and tomato paste.
Form the mixture into round, flat patties and coat in seasoned flour.
Shallow fry on a moderate heat until they are golden brown on both sides.
MALAY COCONUT CURRY
2
3
4
2
tbsp oil
tsp garam masala
potatoes, cut into large pieces
cups coconut milk
1 cup fried tofu pieces
1/2 cabbage
2 tsp salt
1. Heat the oil in a saucepan and fry the garam masala for a few minutes.
2. Add the potatoes and then coconut milk and 2 cups of water. Cook until potatoes
are tender.
3. Add the remaining ingredients and cook another 10 minutes.
4. Serve with rice.
PEANUT BURGERS
2/3
1
1
2
2
cups chopped, roasted peanuts
cup breadcrumbs
tbsp parsley, chopped
tbsp tomato puree
tbsp gram (split pea/dhal) flour
1/2
tsp marjoram
2 tsp soya sauce
1/2 cup water
oil for frying
1. Mix all ingredients together and form into burgers.
2. Fry in oil until golden brown on boths sides.
36
POTATO-VEG PATTIES
1/2 cup corn
4 medium potatoes, cooked and mashed
1/2 cup soya milk
1 tbsp soya sauce
1
1 /4 cups carrots, diced and steamed lightly
salt and pepper
1/2 cup peas
flour, milk and breadcrumbs to coat patties
1. Mix all ingredients. Divide into six or eight portions and shape into 11/2cm thick patties.
2. Coat in flour, dip in milk and coat with breadcrumbs.
3. Shallow fry in oil on each side until golden or bake in oven 190˚C (375˚F/Mark 5) for 15-20 minutes, turning over half way through.
PIZZA
Dough
3 cups self-raising flour
salt and pepper
1 cup hot water
1/2 cup oil
extra water if needed
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Topping
1 green capsicum, sliced
1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup carrot, grated
3 pineapple slices, cut in cubes
1 cup grated cheese
1/2
cup tomato paste
2 tsp oregano
1 tsp basil
salt and pepper
Sift flour and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Make a well in the flour.
Mix hot water and oil together, then add this to the flour, adding more water if necessary. The dough should be soft and spongy.
Place the dough on a clean surface and roll out to fit an 18cm x 28cm baking tray.
Bake in a moderate oven for about 10 minutes, and remove when it is pale golden.
Mix the tomato paste, oregano and basil together. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Spread tomato paste mixture onto half-cooked dough base and layer the vegetables on top adding pineapple last. (You can add other vegetables of your preference). Cover with grated cheese.
Cook in medium oven 30-40 minutes until cheese is melted and turning golden brown. Cut into wedges and serve with salad.
SUSHI RICE
3 tbsp vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
2 cups freshly cooked rice
1. Mix the vinegar, sugar and salt thoroughly in a cup and pour over the rice.
2. Fan rice with one hand while stirring with the other to make rice shiny.
3. Place it in a covered dish so it doesn’t dry out.
37
SPRING ROLLS
1 packet of 20 frozen spring roll skins
11/2 cups fresh bean sprouts
3/4 cup carrots, diced 1 cup white mushrooms
1 large green capsicum 1/2
tsp hing (asafoetida)
6 cups (1.5 litres) oil for deep frying
11/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp light soy sauce
1. Take the spring roll skins out of the packet and leave them to defrost under a damp cloth.
2. Wash and rinse the bean sprouts in a bowl of cold water and discard the husks and other bits that float to the surface. Drain.
3. Cut the carrots, bell capsicum and mushrooms into thin shreds.
4. Heat 3-4 tablespoons oil in a pre-heated wok or frying pan and stir fry all the vegetables for a few seconds. Add the salt, sugar and soya sauce and continue stirring for 1-11/2
minutes. Remove and leave to cool a little.
5. Cut each spring roll skin in half diagonally. Place about 2 tsp of the filling onto the skin, about one third of the way down, with the point of the triangle pointing away from you.
6. Lift the lower edge of the triangle over the filling. Fold both ends inwards, then roll over the width of the filling.
7. Brush the upper edge with a little flour and water paste and roll into a neat package. Repeat until all the filling is used up.
8. Heat oil in a wok or deep fryer until it smokes. Reduce the heat, or even turn it off for a few minutes to cool the oil a little, before adding the spring rolls. Deep-fry 6-8 at a time for 3-4 minutes or until golden and crispy. Increase the heat to high again at the beginning of each batch.
9. As each batch is cooked, remove and drain it on absorbent paper. Serve hot with a dipping sauce.
38
SWEET & SOUR CAULIFLOWER FLORETS
You can also use walnut halves instead of cauliflower
Batter
1 cauliflower
1/4 cup rice flour
1 cup peanut oil
1/4 cup flour
1 green capsicum, seeded
1 tsp baking powder
and cut into small cubes
a dash of salt
1 red capsicum, as above
7 tbsp water
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 small can pineapple pieces
1 carrot, sliced into thin sticks
any other crisp vegetables desired
salt to taste
Sauce
1 tbsp white vinegar
syrup from canned pineapple
2 tbsp tomato sauce
2 tbsp soya sauce
1 tsp sugar
2 tsp cornstarch
water to taste
1. Wash cauliflower and cut into florets.
2. Mix all batter ingredients together till smooth and well blended.
3. Heat oil. Coat cauliflower with batter and deep fry until golden brown (15-20 seconds). Remove and drain well on a paper towel.
4. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a pan and stir fry green and red capsicums, carrot, pineapple pieces and celery for one minute. Season with salt and remove from heat. Set aside.
Sauce
Blend water and cornstarch together. Stir all the sauce ingredients together in a pan over medium heat until thick. Add cauliflower and cooked capsicum mixture. Stir to mix, then serve.
TEMPURA
(Deep fried vegetables in batter)
20 pieces mixed vegetable, sliced thinly
(such as sweet potato, eggplant, carrot or green capsicum)
1 cup plain flour
2/3 cup water
oil for deep frying
1. Make a batter with the flour and water.
2. Dip vegetables in the batter and deep fry.
3. Serve with Tempura Dipping Sauce. (see next page)
39
TEMPURA DIPPING SAUCE
1
4
4
1
2
cup Japanese stock
tbsp Japanese soya sauce
tbsp vinegar
tsp sugar
tbsp peeled fresh ginger, grated to a pulp
Combine all ingredients in a bowl
and serve with tempura
Japanese stock
2 cups soybean sprouts
16 dried shitake mushrooms
1 carrot (peeled and chopped)
6 outer leaves of lettuce
2 tsp soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil
1/2 tsp sugar
8 cups water
Combine all ingredients in a large pot and
simmer to reduce to 5 cups of liquid. Drain off
vegetables and use liquid. It can be frozen for
future use.
TOMATO & ASPARAGUS SAUCE FOR PASTA
1 tbsp oil
1 tbsp chopped parsley
1 tsp brown sugar
a little lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
400g can tomatoes
400g can asparagus, drained
1. Add all ingredients to a pot and simmer for 20 minutes.
2. Serve over macaroni or spaghetti and sprinkle with parmesan cheese.
DESSERTS
40
41
DESSERTS
Although a vegetarian diet is often chosen for its health benefits, it doesn’t mean that we
have to miss out on the yummy things! Many desserts make use of the natural sweetness in
fresh and dried fruits. Kids enjoy making (and eating) sweet things, so cooking sweets and
desserts can be an educational and rewarding time for your children. Here are some pointers
about sugar to keep in mind.
SUGAR
• Refined sugar supplies calories to the body without the vitamins and minerals needed to metabolize them.
• Excessive sugar consumed in starchy non-nutritive junk foods (highly processed food) depletes the vitamins and minerals. Consumption of junk food also reduces the appetite for healthy food at regular meals.
• If refined sugar is consumed, it should be consumed with nutritive food. Sugar is not harmful provided that it represents a small fraction of the total caloric intake and that the diet contains plenty of nutritious foods.
SOME MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT SUGAR IN THE DIET
Honey is healthier than refined sugar. The nutritional value of honey is only better
than that of refined sugar if it is unrefined and unheated.
Brown sugar is better than white sugar. Most of the brown sugar sold is white sugar
coloured by molasses. The only really healthy sources of sugar are fresh fruit, vegetables and
dried fruits. These may be used in many dishes, either along with or to replace refined sugar.
Sweets and candy bars satisfy and give a quick energy boost. Intake of sugar
causes a sudden, but temporary, increase in blood sugar levels because of its rapid absorption
by the body. However, the body’s control mechanisms soon step in, causing the blood sugar
level to drop and making you feel weak and tired. Fluctuations in the blood sugar level
cause appetite and behaviour problems, especially in children, who become hyperactive.
All refined sugars and many food additives are natural, but a substance of natural origin does
not necessarily mean that a product is healthy.
42
APPLE CRUMBLE
4 large cooking apples
juice of 1 lemon
1/3 cup caster sugar
1/3 cup raisins
1/2 cup plain wholemeal flour
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
pinch of salt
2 tbsp butter, cut into small pieces
1 heaped tbsp brown sugar
pinch cinnamon
Peel, core and slice the apples.
Put into a saucepan with the raisins, lemon juice and caster sugar, and heat gently for about 20 minutes until the apples begin to soften.
Put fruit into an ovenproof dish.
Sift flour and salt, add butter and rub in with the fingertips until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
Add brown sugar and cinnamon. Mix well.
Sprinkle the mixture over the apples.
Bake in the centre of a hot oven 200˚C(400˚F, Mark 6) for 10 minutes.
Serve hot or cold with custard or cream.
APPLE POLENTA FLAN
Very rich, very filling, but so delicious!
4 cups milk
3/4 cup caster sugar
2 tbsp butter
3 tbsp grated lemon rind
1 cup medium cornmeal (polenta)
3/4 cup sultanas
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1/3
cup chopped walnuts
cup cream
1 large apple, thinly sliced
11/2 tsp maple syrup
3 tsp caster sugar (extra, optional)
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2
Grease a 20cm cake tin.
Heat milk, sugar, butter and rind in medium pan until sugar dissolves.
Bring to the boil, reduce heat, stir in cornmeal. Cover and cook on a low heat for 5-10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Remove from heat, add sultanas, walnuts and cream. Mix well before spooning into the cake tin.
Top with apples and pour maple syrup over them. Sprinkle on the extra sugar if desired, then sprinkle on the cinnamon.
Bake in a moderate over for 35 minutes, or until apple is tender.
43
BAKED APPLES
4 large cooking apples
3/4 cup mixed dried fruit, raisins, currants or dates
2 level tbsp brown sugar, golden syrup or honey
2 tbsp butter or margarine
4 tbsp water
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Wash the apples and remove the cores with an apple corer.
Cut a shallow slit through the skin around the middle of each apple.
Grease an ovenproof dish and stand the apples in it.
Fill the holes in the middle with the fruit and sugar, or you can use fruit mince or marmalade instead.
Put a knob of butter or margarine on top of each apple, and pour water around them.
Bake in the oven at 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 6) for 45 minutes to 1 hour until just soft.
Serve them with natural yoghurt, cream or ice cream.
BAKED BANANAS
4
2
1
1
2
large ripe bananas
tbsp butter, melted
heaped tbsp demerara (or brown sugar)
tbsp honey
tbsp lemon juice
1. Butter a shallow ovenproof dish. Fill with sliced bananas.
2. Sprinkle sugar on top.
3. Pour the honey and lemon juice over the top.
4. Bake on top shelf of a moderately hot oven for 20-30 minutes.
5. Brown a little under the grill.
6. Serve hot with cream.
44
ICE CREAM
The most votes go to mango ice cream!
2 x 375ml can evaporated milk
1 cup caster sugar
300ml cream, lightly whipped
1 cup water
Any desired flavouring, e.g. mango pulp, melted chocolate, strawberries, banana, etc.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Stir sugar and water over gentle heat until sugar dissolves. Turn heat up, bring to the boil and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.
When cold, stir in evaporated milk, flavouring and cream. Put into a suitable container and freeze till mushy.
Remove from freezer and beat with electric mixer until quite fluffy.
Return to freezer to set.
KNICKERBOCKER GLORY
A glorious mixture of ice cream, jelly and fresh or canned
600ml/85gm packet of red agar agar jelly crystals
1 cup boiling water
1 cup cold water
400gm can peaches, sliced
227gm can pineapple, sliced
1.
2.
3.
4.
fruits.
483gm block ice cream
(check it contains no gelatine or egg)
6 glace cherries
6 tall sundae glasses
6 long handled spoons
Pour boiling water onto the jelly crystals and stir until dissolved. Add cold water to make the jelly up to 600ml. Leave to set.
When the jelly has set, chop it into small pieces. Roughly chop the fruit.
Put some of the chopped peaches and pineapple in the bottom of the glasses. Cover the fruit with a layer of jelly. Put a scoop of ice cream on top.
Repeat these layers and put a cherry on top. You can serve it with your favourite topping.
45
APRICOT & ALMOND PIE
Crumbly Crust
11/4 cup blanched almonds, ground
1 cup coconut
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup butter
Filling
1 cup sour cream
1/4 cup icing sugar
1 tsp orange juice
1 tsp orange rind, grated
400gm can halved apricots, well drained
3/4 cup whipping cream
1/4 cup icing sugar
3 tbsp crumbly crust, toasted
Crust
1. Mix coconut, sugar and ground almonds together. Rub in the butter to make a
crumbly mix.
2. Toast 3 tbsp of the crumbly mix in a small pan, and reserve to sprinkle over the filling.
3. Press the rest of the crumbly mix into a greased pie dish to make crust base.
Filling
4. Mix sour cream, icing sugar, orange juice and orange rind together well.
Pour into the crust.
5. Carefully arrange apricots over the filling.
6. Whip cream with icing sugar and spoon/pipe around the edge. Sprinkle with the toasted crumbly mix. Refrigerate.
PEACH BRULEE
400g can peach halves
1 cup double dairy cream
3/4 cup demerara or brown sugar
1.
2.
3.
4.
Drain peaches and lay in the bottom of an ovenproof dish, keeping one for decoration.
Lightly whip cream and spread over peaches. Chill.
Just before serving, sprinkle over sugar and grill until sugar melts.
Cut remaining peach half in four slices and place the slices on top of the sugar in a star pattern and serve immediately.
CAKES & BISCUITS
46
47
EGG SUBSTITUTES
Eggs serve two purposes: to act as a leavening agent and to act as a binder. The egg-white is
primarily the leavening agent, the yoke primarily the binder. Handy egg substitutes in cakes
and biscuits, if commercial egg replacer is not available, are:
• 1 tablespoon golden syrup (binder) + 1 dessertspoon vinegar (binder) + 1 teaspoon baking powder (leavening) for each egg omitted.
• 4 tablespoons cashew or almond butter + 2 tablespoons lemon juice.
• 1 dessertspoon of vinegar, or 1 tablespoon of lemon juice to replace 2 eggs, adding more liquid accordingly (1 egg = 1/4 cup liquid)
• 1/2 cup evaporated milk + 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda per egg (is not very effective in cakes containing syrup, honey or oil).
HINTS FOR SUCCESSFUL CAKE MAKING
•
•
•
•
Grease tins very well with soft, not melted, butter. Flour them and shake out surplus flour.
After the cake is cooked, cool it for about 10 minutes, then remove from the tin. It will not stick. Cool it on a wire tray, so that the air can circulate underneath.
Do not open the oven door until 5-10 minutes before the cake is done, as it may cause the cake to fall.
Insert a clean toothpick or knife into the centre of the cake. If it is clean and dry, the cake is cooked.
REASONS FOR FAILURES
Doughy cake – too little raising agent; baking time too short.
Heavy cake – too little raising agent; too much flour; mixture not creamed enough; flour
mixed in too vigorously.
Dry cake – too much raising agent; not enough liquid or butter; kept too long in oven.
Sunken cake – too much liquid, raising agent or sugar; too little flour; using self-raising
flour for rich cakes; oven door opened too soon or cake moved during baking.
Badly cracked top – oven too hot; cake tin too small.
Fruit sunk to bottom – fruit not properly dried; cake mixture too thin; too much raising
agent; fruit added before flour.
Crusty, sticky and moist cake – too much sugar used.
Uneven surface – tins too near sides of oven; oven heat uneven; oven shelf not level.
48
BLACK VELVET CAKE
Never fail recipe. This is a favourite birthday/special occasion cake!
21/3 cups plain flour
2 tsp bi-carbonate of soda
11/3 cups caster sugar
1/3 cup oil
2 cups cold water
6 tbsp cocoa
2 tsp baking powder
2 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp vanilla essence
1. Grease a 20cm round cake tin.
Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4)
2. Sift dry ingredients together.
3. Beat oil, vinegar and water together.
Gradually add to dry ingredients.
Mix well and beat for 1 minute
4. Spoon the mixture into the tin.
5. Bake for 1 hour 10 minutes.
6. Allow to cool on a wire rack and when
quite cool, slice through the middle.
7. While the cake is baking, make Chocolate Honey
Cream (page 51).
8. Spread a layer of cream over one half of the cake (you
could also add a layer of cherry jam). Place the other half
of the cake on top.
9. Use the rest of the cream as icing on the top and
sides of the cake.
10. Decorate with any of the following: glacé cherries, kiwi fruit slices or strawberries.
BLISS BALLS
2/3 cup dessicated coconut
500g packet digestive biscuits
400gm can sweetened condensed milk
3 tbsp cocoa
1/4 cup butter melted
1. Melt butter over a low heat.
2. Add the condensed milk and cocoa to melted butter.
3. Crush the biscuits finely and add to the mixture.
4. Take a small quantity of mixture and roll into balls.
5. Roll each in coconut.
6. Store in the refrigerator.
49
BROWNIES
Try them hot with ice cream!
1/3 cup plain chocolate
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup walnuts (optional)
11/2 cups self-raising flour
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
pinch salt
3/4 cup caster sugar
1/2 cup milk or yoghurt
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
Grease a 20cm square cake tin. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Break the chocolate into pieces and put in a small heatproof bowl with the butter.
Stand the bowl over a saucepan of hot water and stir until melted. Remove from heat.
Roughly chop the walnuts and set aside.
Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Stir in the sugar, milk, vanilla essence, walnuts and chocolate mixture. Beat until smooth.
Pour the mixture into the tin and bake in the oven for 30 minutes, until the mixture has risen and begins to leave the sides of the tin.
Leave in the tin to cool, then cut into squares.
CAROB HONEY SQUARES
For health-conscious children and parents!
11/2 cups wholemeal flour
50gm carob powder
2 tsp baking powder
1/3 cup sultanas
1.
2.
3.
4.
3 tbsp oil
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp natural plain yoghurt
milk to mix
Grease and line a 20cm square cake tin. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Put the flour, carob powder, baking powder and sultanas into a large mixing bowl.
Stir in oil, honey and yoghurt with enough milk to make a fairly runny consistency.
Pour mixture into cake tin. Bake for 30 minutes.
When cool, cut into squares.
50
CHOCOLATE HEDGEHOG CAKE
Cake
11/2 cups self-raising flour
11/2 tsp baking powder
3/4 cup softened butter or margarine
2 tbsp cocoa powder
4oz caster sugar
2 tbsp golden syrup
milk, to make mixture a “dropping” consistency
Buttercream Icing
3/4 cup softened butter or margarine
11/2 level tsp cocoa powder
2 cups icing sugar
2/3 cup chocolate coated pretzel sticks or flaked almonds
a few seedless raisins
1. Preheat oven to 170˚C (325˚F/Mark 3).
2. Grease a 23cm round cake tin and line with greased baking paper.
3. To make the cake, put the flour, baking powder, cocoa powder, butter or margarine, caster sugar, milk and golden syrup in a bowl. Beat well with a wooden spoon until light and creamy. Then spoon the mixture into the cake tin.
4. Bake in the oven for about 25 minutes until the cake is risen and firm to the touch.
5. Turn out and leave to cool on a wire rack.
6. Meanwhile, beat the butter or margarine in a basin. Sift in the icing sugar and cocoa powder, and beat together until they form a creamy icing.
7. Place the cold cake flat on a wooden board and cut it down the middle.
8. Place the two halves upright on a serving plate making a half circle shape, sticking the two pieces together with a little buttercream icing.
9. Spread the buttercream icing over the cake to cover it. Shape some of it to form a pointed nose. Stick the pretzels or almonds into the icing to make quills. Use raisins to make eyes, a nose and two front feet.
51
CHOCOLATE HONEY CREAM
Use as icing and as filling for Black Velvet Cake.
3/4 cup sour cream
250gm dark chocolate
1. Melt the chocolate over boiling water in a double saucepan. Remove from heat.
2. Quickly beat in sour cream.
3. Place in refrigerator until cream is thick enough for spreading.
CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
Wonderfully simple, quick recipe.
11/3 cups self-raising flour
1/2 cup butter
2/3 cup caster sugar
1/4 cup (or more!) chocolate chips
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Pre-heated oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Sieve flour. Cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
Mix in flour and chips to form a firm dough.
Make into small balls and place on a greased tray.
Flatten cookies lightly with the prongs of a fork.
Bake for 10-12 minutes.
CHOCOLATE CRUNCHIES
1/4
cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 tsp baking powder
11/2 cups flour
2 tbsp sweetened condensed milk
1/2 cup dark semi-sweet chocolate, broken into small pieces
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Grease an oven tray. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Cream the butter and sugar. Add the flour sifted with the baking powder, alternately with the condensed milk.
Add the chocolate.
Shape the mixture into small balls. Place them on oven trays and flatten the tops.
Bake for 15-20 minutes.
52
COCONUT TARTS
Makes about 20 yummy tarts. Everyone loves them!
250g shortcrust pastry
2 tbsp self-raising flour
11/2 cups dessicated coconut
a few drops of vanilla essence
400gm can condensed milk
blackcurrant jam (optional)
1/2 cup chopped mixed nuts
20 paper party cups
2 tbsp butter
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Roll and cut pastry for tarts. Fit them into paper patty cups.
Cream butter and flour, add vanilla essence and coconut. Mix well until smooth.
Add the chopped nuts and finally the condensed milk.
Place a spoonful into each pastry cup. (to make them extra special place 1/2 tsp of blackcurrant jam in the pastry base before filling).
Bake for 15 minutes or until browned.
FLAPJACKS
100gm butter
3 tbsp golden syrup
1/2 cup brown sugar, lightly packed
21/3 cups oats
Design your own favourite flapjacks using 4 tbsp of any of these, or try a combination:
cocoa, dessicated coconut, raisins, chocolate chips or nuts.
1. Melt the butter, golden syrup and sugar. Stir in the rest of the ingredients. Mix well.
2. Spread into a buttered tin and bake for 30 minutes at 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
GINGER BISCUIT LOG
1 cup whipping cream
200gm ginger biscuits
flaked almonds for decoration
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Put half the cream in a bowl and beat until stiff.
Use it to sandwich the ginger biscuits together in a log shape.
Arrange the log on a serving dish and leave it in the refrigerator overnight.
Next day whip the remaining cream and use it to cover the ginger biscuit log completely.
Decorate the log with flaked almonds.
Cut the log into slices.
53
HAPPY FACES
3/4
cup icing sugar, sifted
1 cup butter or margarine
2 cups plain flour, sifted
1 cup cornflour, sifted
1-2 dtsp water
hundreds and thousands
icing sugar
red food colour
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Grease baking trays, pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Cream butter and icing sugar.
Add sifted flour and cornflour to creamed mixture.
Add 1 dtsp water and work to a smooth dough (if too dry, add 1-2 tsp more water). Chill for 1/2 hour.
Form dough into small balls, and squeeze the balls flat between the palms of the hands. With the thumb and forefinger pinch to form the points of stars.
Put on baking trays and bake for 15-20 minutes, and cool on wire rack.
Make a runny icing from icing sugar and a little water.
Dip one side of the stars into the icing and sprinkle it with hundreds and thousands. Let them dry.
To make happy faces, add some red food colour to the remaining icing and paint eyes and a smiling mouth on the stars.
54
SPICED HONEY LOAF
3
1
3
2
cups self-raising wholemeal flour
level tsp salt
level tsp mixed spice
tbsp butter
3/4 cup brown sugar, lightly packed
1/2 cup clear honey
1/2 cup milk or soya milk
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Line and grease a 900g loaf tin. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Sift together flour, salt and spice. Mix in brown sugar.
Put honey, milk and butter into a saucepan, and warm over low heat until butter is melted.
Blend the dry and wet ingredients together until a smooth dough is formed.
Place in loaf tin and bake for about 11/4 hours.
Turn out and cool on a wire tray.
Serve sliced and spread with butter.
55
ROCK CAKES
2 cups plain flour
1/2 level tsp salt
2 level tsp baking powder
2 tbsp butter
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
1/4
cup sugar
1 cup dried fruit
11/4 tsp ground nutmeg
4 tbsp milk
Grease a flat baking tray. Pre-heat oven to 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 6).
Sieve flour, salt and baking powder together.
Rub butter into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
Stir in sugar, fruit and nutmeg.
Add milk to the flour mixture and mix well with a fork. The mixture should be stiff, but not too sticky, and should leave the sides of the mixing bowl clean.
Divide the mixture into 12 and place on tray. Rough up with a fork.
Bake in oven for 15-20 minutes.
Cool on a wire tray.
TREACLE TART
Pastry
1 cup plain flour
pinch salt
2 tbsp butter
water
Filling
11/3 level cups golden syrup
2/3 cup fresh white breadcrumbs
grated rind of 2 lemons
2 tsp lemon juice
1. Butter a 18cm flan dish and dust with flour. Pre-heat oven to 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 6).
2. Sieve flour and salt into a bowl. Add butter cut into small pieces and rub it into the flour until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
3. Add water and mix to a firm dough.
4. Roll out pastry thinly on a floured table and use to line the flan dish.
5. Re-roll pastry trimmings and cut into 2cm circles. Brush underside of each circle with water and arrange, overlapping, around the edge of the dish.
6. Mix together the golden syrup, breadcrumbs, lemon rind and juice, and spoon into the flan.
7. Place flan dish on a metal baking sheet and bake for about 25 minutes, until the pastry is pale golden. Serve with cream.
BREADS
56
57
Only a small selection of breads are listed here. Perhaps you will be inspired to look for
other recipes to try. Home bread baking can be extremely satisifying for the cook and the
cook’s family!
SOME HINTS
• Plastic surfaces make good kneading surfaces.
• Soft water is ideal. Hard water inhibits fermentation of the yeast. If you live in an area where the water is hard, add a little vinegar to neutralise the alkalinity.
• Use Vitamin C as a flour improver to help in the rising of the dough. Crush a 50g tablet per six cups of flour and sift into the flour.
• Salt inhibits the action of yeast, but it also helps to strengthen the gluten and gives the bread its flavour. Do not use too much or too little salt.
• Kneading until smooth and elastic takes about 10 minutes.
• Poke a finger into the dough, if it comes back to its shape, it’s a good dough. It should be springy.
• Cover rising dough with plastic cling wrap. It stops the dough drying out and helps retain warmth.
• Save 1/4 - 1/2 cup of the measured flour for kneading. Then you avoid heavy and dry loaves.
• When rising bread, don’t rush the rising process. If there is too much heat or insufficient rising time, the bread will be heavy.
• To test when bread is cooked, the bread should feel hollow when tapped on the bottom and no longer smell of yeast.
• If it isn’t cooked, bake it a few more minutes without its tin.
• Dried yeast is twice as strong as fresh yeast. Substitute 1 tablespoon (15g) of dried yeast for 30g of fresh yeast.
• When using bicarbonate of soda or baking powder, cook immediately. Otherwise the bread will not rise.
REASONS FOR FAILURES
Crust too thick – insufficient baking with too low temperature.
Crust cracks or breaks – dough too weak, too much liquid used, or oven too hot.
Texture too open (large holes) – insufficient mixing or failure to punch down.
Loaf too crumbly – slack dough, too much liquid, insufficient kneading, oven
temperature too low, dough left to rise too long.
Bread too chewy – oven temperature too low or insufficient baking.
Bread stales quickly – not enough moisture or first period of rising terminated too soon.
58
APPLE OAT MUFFINS
Good with bean dishes, American style.
1 cup wholewheat flour
3/4 cup oats
1/2 tsp salt
11/2 tsp baking powder
1.
2.
3.
1
3
3
1
cup milk
tbsp oil
tbsp molasses
cup grated apples
Preheat oven to 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 6).
Combine all dry ingredients. Add milk, oil and molasses. Stir until moistened.
Mix in apple.
Spoon into oiled muffin cups and bake for 15-20 minutes.
BEETLE BUNS
1 level tsp sugar
11/4 cups warm water
1 level tbsp dried yeast
4 cups wholemeal bread flour
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
1 level tsp salt
2 tbsp butter or margarine
1/4 cup milk
In a jug, stir the sugar into the water until dissolved. Sprinkle over the yeast and leave in a warm place for about 10 minutes until frothy.
Put the flour and salt into a mixing bowl. Rub in the butter or margarine and add the yeast liquid.
Mix with a wooden spoon to make a firm dough. Add more water if necessary.
Turn the dough onto a floured work surface and knead it for about 10 minutes until it is elastic and smooth.
Grease a baking tray.
Take a piece of dough about the size of an egg and form it into a ball. Place it on the baking tray, then add a small piece for the head, six smaller pieces for legs. Press well into position. Make the eyes by using the end of a teaspoon. With a sharp knife, make three shallow cuts lengthways and widthways to form the beetle’s wing markings. Continue making beetles until all the dough has been used.
Cover with a clean cloth and leave to rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes, until the dough is double in size.
Heat the oven to 230˚C (450˚F/Mark 8). Brush the beetles with milk and bake in the oven for about 15 minutes until they are risen and brown. If they sound hollow when tapped on the bottom with your knuckles, they are cooked.
Leave to cool on a wire rack.
59
CHELSEA BUNS
Filling
4 tbsp butter
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 cup sultanas/currants/raisins mix
1/2 cup chopped glace cherries
1/2 cup mixed peel
1 tsp cinnamon
Dough
3 cups self-raising flour
1/2 tsp salt
3 tbsp butter
1 cup milk (approx)
If time is short, make filling from a can of fruit (e.g. drained black cherries, blueberry pie
filling). Perhaps sprinkle with coconut. Delicious and attractive!
1. Grease a baking tray. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
2. Make the dough by sifting the flour, salt and rubbing in butter. Add milk to make a firm dough. Roll out to a size of approximately 30cm x 20cm.
3. For the first part of the filling cream butter and sugar. Spread over the dough.
4. Cover the creamed butter and sugar with dried fruit, cherries, peel and cinnamon.
5. Roll the dough up lengthways.
6. Cut the roll into 10 pieces and place on tray. Bake for about 25 minutes.
7. Serve with butter.
60
CORNBREAD
2 tbsp honey
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup yoghurt
1 cup yellow cornmeal (polenta)
1 cup self-raising flour
2 tsp baking powder
1.
2.
3.
4.
1/2
tsp bicarbonate of soda
tsp salt
3 tbsp melted butter
1 cup corn kernels
1 red capsicum, finely chopped
11/2
Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4).
Beat together honey, milk and yoghurt.
Combine remaining ingredients, mixing well.
Spread into a greased 20cm square pan. Bake for 20 minutes.
DAMPER
3 cups self-raising flour
11/2 tsp salt
1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup water
1.
2.
3.
4.
Preheat the oven to 200˚C (400˚F/Mark 6).
Sieve flour and salt, rub in butter, and add sufficient milk and water to make a dough. Knead lightly.
Form into 15cm circle and cut a cross into the top. Brush with milk.
Bake on a greased tray in a hot oven for 10 minutes, then reduce temperature to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4) for about 20 minutes until cooked and golden brown.
OATMEAL BREAD
4 cups wholemeal flour
11/4 cup oatmeal
11/2 tsp cream of tartar
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1/2
tsp salt
1 tbsp oil
1-2 cups milk and water mixed (equal parts)
poppy seeds/sesame seeds for topping
Preheat the oven to 230˚C (450˚F/Mark 8).
Sieve flour, cream of tartar, bicarbonate of soda and salt.
Add oil and oatmeal, then mix to a firm dough with milk and water mixture.
Brush with milk and sprinkle the top with seeds.
Cook for 15 minutes, then reduce to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4) until golden brown.
61
SCONES
4
1
2
2
1
cups self-raising flour
tsp salt
tbsp butter
tbsp caster sugar (optional)
cup milk
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Grease baking trays. Preheat a very hot oven to 320˚C (450˚F/Mark 8).
Sift flour and salt into a bowl.
Rub in butter until mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
Add caster sugar and mix to a soft dough with the milk.
Turn on to a lightly floured surface, knead quickly and then roll out to a 2cm thickness.
Cut into 20 rounds with a 6cm cutter.
Place scones on baking trays and brush tops with milk.
Bake in oven for 8-10 minutes.
Cool on a wire tray.
62
WHOLEMEAL BREAD
Makes 3 loaves
1kg wholemeal flour
1/2 kg plain flour
2 x 7g dry yeast sachets
4 tsp salt
1/2
cup milk
cups water
1/2 cup honey
2 tbsp butter (or margarine)
11/2
1. Combine 3 cups of the flour with the yeast and salt in a large bowl.
2. In a saucepan, heat milk, water, honey and butter to lukewarm temperature. Add to dry ingredients.
3. Beat well with an electric mixer for 2-3 minutes. Add another cup of flour and beat at high speed for another 3 minutes.
4. Stir in remaining flour with a wooden spoon to make a soft dough, using more or less flour as needed.
5. Cover and rest for 15 minutes.
6. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic, adding more flour if necessary.
7. Place in a large, greased bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until double in size. This takes approximately 1 hour.
8. Pre-heat oven to 180˚C (350˚F/Mark 4)
9. Punch dough down and divide into three. Shape each piece into a log shape, tuck ends under, place in lightly greased loaf tins, cover and let rise in a warmplace again until doubled in size and the tops have risen above the tin.
10. Bake for 40 minutes until cooked and nicely browned. Turn out and cool on wire racks.
COCONUT STICKS
1 cup enriched flour (white)
1/2 cup soya flour
1/2 cup wholewheat flour
1 cup coconut
1.
2.
3.
4.
1 tsp lemon peel (optional)
3 tbsp brown sugar
1/2 cup oil
2-4 tbsp water
Mix all ingredients together well, except oil and water.
Lightly mix in oil, then add water.
Press into a greased tray 1cm deep.
Bake in a hot oven for 10 minutes until golden brown. Cut into sticks.
63
INDEX
Apple Dishes
Apple Crumble 42
Apple Oat Muffins 58
Apple Polenta Flan 42
Baked Apples 43
Apricot & Almond Pie 45
Baked Bananas 43
Baked Beans 27
Beetle Buns 58
Birds Nest 27
Black Velvet Cake 48
Bliss Balls 48
Brownies 49
Bubble & Squeak 28
Carob Honey Squares 49
Cheese & Spinach Triangles 28
Cheese & Tomato Herb Bread 20
Cheese & Tomato Macaroni 29
Cheesey Lima Bean Bake 29
Chelsea Buns 59
Chilli Con Carne 29
Childrens Favourite Salad 15
Chinese Fried Rice 30
Chocolate Things
Chocolate Chip Cookies 51
Chocolate Crunchies 51
Chocolate Hedgehog Cake 50
Chocolate Honey Cream 51
Coconut Dishes
Coconut Carrot Balls 20
Coconut, Carrot & Raisin Salad 15
Coconut Sticks 62
Coconut Tart 52
Corn Fritters 30
Cornbread 60
Cornish Pasties 30
Cottage Cheese Dressing 15
Crisp Vegetables & Peanuts 31
Damper 60
Eggless Mayonnaise 16
Flapjacks 52
French Dressing 15
Ginger Biscuit Log 52
Green Pea (Fresh) Soup 23
Happy Faces 53
Honey & Soya Sauce Rice Noodles 32
Hommos Dip 19
Hungarian Goulash 32
Ice cream 44
Inari Sushi 33
Kebabs 33
Knickerbocker Glory 44
Leftovers Pie 34
Lentil & Hazelnut Patties 34
Malay Coconut Curry 35
Minestrone Soup 24
Nut Butter Dip 19
Oatmeal Bread 60
Pancakes 20
Party Vegetables & Dips 19
Peach Brulee 45
Peanut Burgers 35
Pizza 36
Potato Dishes
Baked Potatoes 27
Creamy Potato Bake 31
Potato Pancakes 22
Potato Salad 15
Potato Scallops 22
Potato Veg Patties 35
Sweetcorn & Potato Soup 24
Rock Cakes 55
Sailing Boats 22
Sandwiches
Cold Savoury Fillings 18
Hot Sandwich Fillings 18
Sweet Sandwich Fillings 18
Scones 61
Spiced Honey Loaf 54
Spring Rolls 37
Sunset Salad 16
Sushi Rice 36
Sweet & Sour Cauliflower Florets 38
Tempura 38
Tempura Dipping Sauce 39
Tomato & Asparagus Sauce for Pasta 39
Tomato Soup 24
Treacle Tart 55
Wholemeal Bread 62
64
ERNITY INK
T
E
Other meditation CDs and books are available from Eternity Ink,
publisher for the Brahma Kumaris Centres for Spiritual Learning in Australia.
For a catalogue contact us at:
www.eternityink.com.au
T: 02 9550 0543
E: [email protected]
77 Allen Street, Leichhardt,
NSW 2040 Australia
TO FIND A BRAHMA KUMARIS CENTRE where you can attend the
meditation courses and other programs offered by the Brahma Kumaris,
visit our websites:
AUSTRALIA - Sydney: www.bkwsu.org/au
T: (2) 9716 7066 E: [email protected]
WORLDWIDE - London: www.bkwsu.org
T: (20) 8727 3350 E: [email protected]