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Transcript
ChildCareGroup
Food and Nutrition Program
Food Program Handbook
Table of Contents
PAGE #
INTRODUCTION
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 3
History of ChildCareGroup ................................................................................. 4-5
Description of ChildCareGroup........................................................................... 5-6
Purpose of the Child Care and Adult Care Food Program ..................................... 6
Two-Tiered Reimbursement Structure ................................................................ 7-8
Reimbursement Rates ............................................................................................. 7
Food and Nutrition Program Services ................................................................. 8-9
PLANNING MEALS & MENUS
Meal/Menu Planning ............................................................................................ 11
Menu Planning System .................................................................................... 11-12
Cycle Menus ......................................................................................................... 12
Shopping Tips ....................................................................................................... 13
Vitamin A, C and Iron Requirements ................................................................... 14
CACFP Meal Patterns
Breakfast .................................................................................................... 15
Lunch/Supper ............................................................................................ 15
Snack ......................................................................................................... 16
Addendum to Meal Patterns ...................................................................... 17
Infant Meal Pattern Chart .......................................................................... 18
Addendum to Infant Meal Pattern Chart .............................................. 19-20
Infant Formulas .................................................................................... 20-24
Early Introduction of Solid Food.......................................................... 24-25
Regulations...Parent Acknowledgment of Formula .................................. 25
Regulations Concerning Certain Food Items ................................................... 26-27
OPERATING THE FOOD PROGRAM
Food Service Operations ................................................................................. 29-30
Meal Service Times .............................................................................. 29-30
Allowable Meals........................................................................................ 30
Policy Review .................................................................................................. 30-31
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 1 of 62
Allowed Exceptions to Meal Patterns ....................................................... 31
Contract Between Food Program and FDH Provider ........................................... 32
New Provider Registration Certificate/License .................................................... 32
Changing Locations/Moving ................................................................................ 33
Sponsorship of CACFP ........................................................................................ 33
Nondiscrimination Statement ............................................................................... 34
Mandated Food Program Training ....................................................................... 35
Seriously Deficient Providers Policy ............................................................... 36-37
Appeal Rights of Providers................................................................................... 38
Statement of Appeal Rights and Procedures ........................................ 39-40
ENROLLING AND TRACKING CHILDREN
Enrolling Children ................................................................................................ 41
Information that Must be Given to Parents .......................................................... 42
Provider's Own Children Application Form (Form H1531)............................ 42-43
Attendance/Meal Count Records ..................................................................... 43-44
INTERNET CLAIMS PROCESSING
Internet Claims Processing via Minute Menu Kids .............................................. 45
Child Enrollment Tips for Minute Menu Kids ..................................................... 46
SUBMITTING RECORDS
Procedures for Reimbursement ............................................................................ 47
Monthly Checklist for Submitting Claims............................................................ 48
REVIEWING FDH COMPLIANCE
Monitoring Visits ............................................................................................. 49-51
Timing of Visits......................................................................................... 50
Purpose of the Visit ................................................................................... 50
What to Expect of Us ................................................................................ 50
What We Expect of You ...................................................................... 50-51
Parent Contacts .......................................................................................... 51
APPENDIX A: A GUIDE TO GOOD EATING FOR YOUNG CHILD . 53-59
APPENDIX B: FAMILY DAY CARE, TAXES, AND THE IRS ............. 61-62
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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INTRODUCTION
Thank you for becoming a part of our food program and therefore, our agency. We are obliged
daily to perform our work to the highest standards of excellence. When we join with parents and
providers in the pursuit of excellence, our children are able to accomplish and contribute more.
With this in mind, we encourage you to call us with your questions and concerns regarding your
participation in the ChildCareGroup Food and Nutrition Program.
FOOD PROGRAM PERSONNEL:
Angela Young
Food Program Manager
Phone 214.905.2464
E-mail: [email protected]
Lisa Laclede
Health & Nutrition Coordinator
Phone 214.905.2453
Email: [email protected]
Food and Nutrition Program
ChildCareGroup
1420 W. Mockingbird Lane
Suite 300
Dallas, TX 75247
Website: www.childcaregroup.org
Fax 214.631.1943
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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HISTORY OF CHILDCAREGROUP
Although our roots go back to the late 19th century, ChildCareGroup was first incorporated in
1901 when two philanthropic organizations, the Free Kindergarten Association and the Clara
Chaison Kindergarten, merged to become the Dallas Free Kindergarten and Industrial
Association. The merger provided day care and kindergarten for the children of women who
worked in the cotton mills of Dallas with the stated purpose of providing "support and
maintenance of free kindergartens...in the city of Dallas."
By 1925, our agency had became the Dallas Kindergarten, Nursery and Infants' Welfare
Association after a second merger with the Infants' Welfare and Milk Association, an
organization which improved the health of countless Dallas children by providing free milk as
well as free medical and dental care. An interesting development of this period was that the
SMU School of Education became affiliated with the training school part of the association by
providing education students to serve as teachers in the kindergartens.
During the depression of the 1930's, the Community Chest (forerunner of the United Way) could
not always meet its goals to provide the necessary financial help to the agency. This resulted in
the kindergartens being dropped, and the word "kindergarten" dropped from the name. We
became known as the Dallas Day Nursery and Infants' Welfare Association. Our purpose was to
"support day nurseries and infant welfare stations in the city of Dallas." This name was used
until 1952 when the agency became simply the Dallas Day Nursery Association. In 1970, our
name was changed to Child Care Association of Metropolitan Dallas for Child Care and
Caregiver Education. In 1982 we became Child Care Dallas with the purpose of providing and
promoting high quality child care. In 1991 we changed our name once again to ChildCareGroup
in order to reflect the many facets of our varied programs (see pages 5 - 6 for a description of our
programs). Our final name change in 2002 shortened it to just ChildCareGroup.
ChildCareGroup has a notable history of applying public funding to meet human service needs.
In 1971, we were awarded the purchase of a service contract for child care by the state of Texas.
Five years later, our agency was selected to develop and manage a network of family child care
providers as part of the West Dallas Housing Project. From 1978 to 1980, the agency managed
one of the City of Dallas' most successful employment and training programs, training over 250
individuals for child care jobs. In 1982, Child Care Dallas won a highly competitive grant from
the United States Department of Health and Human Services to develop and demonstrate a
system of family child care providers to serve employees of corporations. From 1986 to 1988,
the agency received funding from the Texas Department of Community Affairs to expand the
Resource and Referral database and to develop materials to help communities increase the
availability of school-age child care.
Through the use of federal and state funds, we were able to add teaching staff, social services,
medical and dental exams and nutrition services to the care we offer children. In the early 70's,
the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recognized our agency as a sponsoring
agency for the USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) enabling us to reimburse
family child care providers for serving nutritious meals and snacks to children in their care.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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In addition to public funding, ChildCareGroup has attracted significant support for its programs
from the United Way, local and national foundations, corporations who contract with the agency
for services to its employees, and private donors.
ChildCareGroup, through several name changes, has had one singular vision throughout the
years, and that is to transform the way America takes care of its youngest children outside the
home. Our mission is to Promote, deliver, and expand the best child care services available
outside the home.
DESCRIPTION OF ChildCareGroup
ChildCareGroup is a Texas non-profit corporation founded in 1901. It has four major
operating units.
•
Center Operations provides Relationship-Centered Child Care (RC3)® to infants,
toddlers, and preschoolers in our child development centers, serving families in Dallas,
Oak Cliff, Irving, and Garland. Funding comes from Head Start of Greater Dallas, Health
and Human Services—Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (Early Head
Start), United Way of Metropolitan Dallas, parent fees, and private donations.
•
Child Care Assistance (CCA) provides services to parents and child care providers,
enabling families working toward self-sufficiency to access child care. Parents who work,
go to school, or participate in an approved employment and training program may be
eligible to receive funding. Our program is funded with federal and state dollars allocated
by the Texas Workforce Commission to WorkSource for Dallas County, with whom we
contract.
•
Food and Nutrition administers a program that serves nearly 400,000 meals a year to
approximately 2000 children in registered and licensed child care homes and
ChildCareGroup’s six child development centers throughout the metroplex. Funding
comes from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Child and Adult Care Food
Program through the Texas Department of Agriculture.
•
Resource and Referral can help you promote and improve your business by offering
free, no obligation referrals to families in Dallas and 41 surrounding counties. Your
business can be included in statewide reporting so your voice can be
heard on the state and national level. As a provider listed in our data
base, your information is included as an average/aggregate in the
Texas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies
(TACCRRA) Child Care Portfolio that includes county-by-county
profiles for the 254 counties in Texas. The Portfolio presents a
snapshot of information on child population, family demographics, early care and
education programs, child care facilities and child care rates. We also offer training and
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 5 of 62
technical assistance in health and safety, child development, and good business practices;
market research and data information on supply and demand for child care in North
Texas to assist you in making sound business decisions. A 24-hour provider warmline is
available so you can update your information (changes to program hours or fees), report
openings, or get answers to your questions. Please call 214-631-2332 or 800-441-7865.
PURPOSE OF THE CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM
As a family child care provider, you play an extremely important role in the children's physical,
intellectual and emotional growth and in the development
of good food habits. By serving the children meals which
meet USDA food group requirements and by following
The purpose of the Child and
Adult Care Food Program is to menu guidelines provided, you can have a very positive
enable you to provide the best impact on each child's physical and mental development.
You will also have a strong influence on the child's
possible nutrition to children
development of taste preferences for healthy, nutritious
in your care and in turn
foods.
receive some reimbursement
for the food served.
You may already be meeting the USDA food program
requirements. The requirements include:
•
Serving a daily combination of reimbursable meals
and snacks, and
•
Providing the children's daily nutritional needs by
serving food from the basic four food groups as
well as foods represented by the new food guide
(My Plate).
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 6 of 62
TWO-TIERED REIMBURSEMENT STRUCTURE
USDA policy mandates that reimbursement for meals is based on a two-tiered rate structure.
Providers receive reimbursement for meals served to enrolled children based on economic need
as determined by:
• The location of the provider;
• The household size and income (or categorical eligibility) of the provider; or
• The household size and income (or categorical eligibility) of each participating child.
The following reimbursement rates will be in effect from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008:
TIER I
TIER II
Breakfast
1.31
.48
Lunch/Supper
2.47
1.49
Snack
.73
.20
Definition of Tier I and Tier II Homes
Tier I Home - A provider (a) whose home is located in a geographic area that is shown to be
low-income by school data or by census data, or (b) who is determined to be low-income based
on household size and income information obtained from the provider.
Tier II Home - A provider who does not qualify as a Tier I home because they are not lowincome or do not live in a low-income area.
The Food and Nutrition Program is responsible for determining whether the homes we sponsor
are Tier I or Tier II. We will use school data provided by the Texas Department of Agriculture,
current census data, or household size and income information provided to us by providers when
making the determinations.
Geographic Qualification
If you live in an area where one or more of your assigned neighborhood schools have 50% or
more of its enrollment qualifying for free or reduced lunches, you are probably eligible to receive
the higher (Tier I) reimbursement rates for all children in your care. (However, your own
resident children will only qualify by your household size and income.) A qualification by school
data is effective for five (5) years.
If you do not live in an area that qualifies geographically by school data, you may qualify by
census data. A qualification by census data is effective until the next census data is released.
Household Income Qualification
If you do not qualify for Tier I reimbursement rates geographically, you may try to qualify by
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 7 of 62
household size and income. Your total household income must be at or lower than 185% of
poverty level to qualify. If household information is used to make a Tier I determination, we
must verify your household income before approving you as a Tier I home. Therefore, the proper
information must be submitted to the Food and Nutrition Program. See our website for a sample
of the Meal Benefit Income Eligibility form which must be completed by the provider and
submitted in order for a Tier I determination to be made on the basis of household income. A
Tier I determination by household size and income will remain in effect for one year, except that
we ask providers to reapply annually on July 1st.
Options for Tier II Providers
Providers who do not qualify for the higher Tier I rates are subject to be reimbursed at the lower,
Tier II rates. However, Tier II providers have the option of having the Food and Nutrition
Program identify income-eligible children in their care. This choice must be indicated on the
Provider Application Day Care Home. A provider who chooses to income audit either all
children in her care or only categorically eligible children will have the option to distribute the
Meal Benefit Income Eligibility to parents of children in her care or to have the Food and
Nutrition Program distribute the form.
Tier II providers who do not wish to identify income-eligible children should indicate such on
the Application and be willing to receive Tier II rates for all children in care.
Confidentiality Statement
Child care providers who do choose to income audit families of children in their care may accept
the application back from the parents or forward to the food program or may instead have the
parents forward the information directly to the Food and Nutrition Program. Providers may only
be informed as to the number of Tier I eligible children in their care, but will not be informed
which children in care are Tier I eligible and which are not.
FOOD AND NUTRITION PROGRAM SERVICES
As a part of our agency, you will be provided the following services offered by ChildCareGroup
operating units:
•
Monthly reimbursement for up to two main meals and one snack (or two snacks and one
main meal) per child per day (Note: USDA offers the same rates to all sponsors for meals
and snacks).
•
Provide you with the ability to submit monthly claims on-line utilizing the Minute Menu
Kids system (at no cost to you);
•
Directly deposit your monthly reimbursement funds into your checking or savings
account;
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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•
Free enrollment in our Resource & Referral system so that parents in need of child care
may be referred to your family day home.
•
Training seminars, conferences and workshops on principles of nutrition, menu planning,
creditability of foods, child development, sanitation and health, food safety, USDA
policies and procedures, and tax preparation. These workshops will assist you in meeting
the continuing education requirements for registration/licensure through the Dept. of
Family and Protective Services (DFPS).
•
Assistance with meal/menu planning.
•
A high quality provider organizer to assist in organizing your business (either a
hard/paper copy or on-line access to an electronic version, or both).
•
Training in your own home in the basic elements of nutrition and record keeping.
•
Self-instructional materials to help you obtain training hours.
•
Resource ideas for CPR and first aid training.
•
Information regarding Child Care Assistance (CCA) for placement of children.
•
Other services available upon request:
*
Nutritional handouts and information.
*
Information concerning liability insurance options.
*
Sample family day care paperwork including sample parent/provider
contracts, accident reports, medication sheets, medical forms, etc.
*
Sample weekly menus.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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MEAL/MENU PLANNING
Advance Planning
•
We suggest that you plan menus two or more weeks in advance of preparation and
service (see Appendix C for sample menu forms). Planning is important for food
purchasing, cost control, and scheduling food preparation. Providers should plan for
variety in food form, size, shape, color, texture, flavor and temperature.
•
If you do choose to plan your menus in advance (i.e., you choose not to record them
daily, but in advance of each day), you will be required to check each component served,
and inital and date your menus each day (See Appendix C for an example).
•
Menus may be posted for review by parents and monitors, given as handouts to parents,
or posted on your day care website…as long as parents know where to access them.
•
Menus should include a rich source of Vitamin C plus Iron daily and a rich source of
Vitamin A three times per week since children's diets often lack these important
nutrients (see p. 14 for a chart of foods high in these nutrients).
MENU PLANNING SYSTEM
With experience you will develop your own menu planning system. Here are some suggestions:
•
Take an inventory of food supplies.
•
Find a quiet time and place to plan or revise your menus.
•
Consider these cost cutting strategies when planning menus:
Serve fresh fruit and vegetables when they are in season.
Serve homemade muffins, cornbread, or other quick breads often.*
Substitute cooked cereals for prepared cereals.
Plan summer meals that need little or no cooking.
*Be sure to use enriched or whole grain flour or bran or germ so that the product will qualify as a Grains/Breads component.
Please note that these products will NOT count towards a fruit/vegetable component in the food program.
•
Collect these menu writing tools:
Menu forms with USDA Meal Requirements.
List of foods in season (see Appendix C).
Standardized recipes/cookbooks.
Food and supply inventory.
Copies of creditable menus previously used from your files.
•
After gathering these tools:
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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Select specific recipes to meet menu needs.
Determine serving sizes and estimate number of meals to prepare.
Adjust recipe to provide necessary servings.
Evaluate menus.
Calculate the amount of food you will need to total the number of meals you will serve.
CYCLE MENUS
A CYCLE MENU IS A SET
OF CAREFULLY PLANNED
MENUS USED AGAIN AND
AGAIN. A CYCLE MENU
SHOULD LAST AT LEAST
THREE WEEKS, BUT NOT
LONGER THAN SIX WEEKS.
•
Consider your first cycle menu a test. At the end
of the first cycle, adjust the menu to reflect the
children’s likes and dislikes, solve production
problems and reduce costs. Eventually your cycle
menu will feature the best you can offer.
•
Adapt cycle menus to include seasonal fruits and
vegetables, holiday meals, and new recipes.
•
Cycle menus will save time when you calculate amounts of foods to purchase because
you can refer to past records. You also save time by having a pre-prepared shopping list
for each week.
•
The cycle does not always have to begin on the first day of the week. Beginning the
menu cycle on Wednesday, Thursday, or any other day is just as acceptable and helps
avoid having the same menu on the same day of the week. (Advanced Menu Planning,
NET Program).
•
Cycle menus are discussed in greater detail in our Menu Planning workshops as well as
in our Off To A Good Start training video (ask your representative for details).
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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SHOPPING TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FOOD DOLLARS COUNT
•
Plan meals before shopping and make a shopping list of foods needed.
•
Look for specials, sales and coupons in newspapers, or listen to radio and television
advertisements. (Remember, coupons only save dollars on products you need and
normally buy.)
•
Try to shop only once a week to avoid impulsive and expensive extras.
•
Compare prices and brands. Store brands or generic brands are usually cheaper than
name brands.
•
Buy in quantity when you need to and can use the product in large quantities. The large
“economy" size is only a bargain if you can use it in a reasonable period of time and/or
have enough space to store it.
•
Try not to shop when you're hungry, tired, or in a hurry.
•
Compare prices for convenience foods with those you prepare from scratch. Sometimes
convenience foods are cheaper, but check the price per serving.
BUYING BREADS AND CEREAL PRODUCTS
•
"Day old" breads are usually available at a greater savings either at supermarkets or at
bakery outlet stores.
•
"Instant" and quick cooking rice costs more than regular, enriched rice. Seasoned and
flavored mixes are much more costly. To save money, add your own favorite herbs and
spices to the rice while it is cooking.
BUYING MEAT
•
The best buys are the cuts and types of meat, fish, poultry that provide the leanest meat
for the money spent.
•
Less expensive lean cuts of meat are just as nutritious as the more expensive cuts. This
type of meat can be marinated or cooked at a lower temperature, using a moist cooking
technique to prevent toughness.
•
Look for specials - buy in a large quantity only if you have the freezer space.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 13 of 62
VITAMINS A and C AND IRON RICH FOODS
The following is a list of Vitamin A, Vitamin C and iron rich foods. Keep in mind that in order
to be sure children are receiving the proper nutrition, one serving of Vitamin C food and one
serving of Iron rich food daily, and one serving of Vitamin A food every other day should be
served to children in your care. Please refer to this list periodically and do not hesitate to call us
if you have questions. It would also be helpful to post a vitamin chart for easy reference (see
Appendix C for a sample vitamin chart to post).
VITAMIN C FOODS
JUICES:
Grapefruit
Orange
Pineapple/Grapefruit
Pineapple/Orange
Tangerine
Apple/Cherry
Tomato
FOODS:
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Green Pepper
Collard Greens
Mustard Greens
Kale
Tomatoes
Cauliflower
Cabbage
Potatoes
(baked/white)
Sweet Potatoes/Yams
Tomato Soup
Turnip Greens
Strawberries
Watermelon
Cantaloupe
Kiwi
Tangerines
Oranges
Grapefruit
Mangos
Nectarines
Okra
Pomegranates
Raspberries
Spinach
Papaya
Kohlrabi
Pineapple
IRON RICH
FOODS
Liver
Beef
Chicken/Turkey
Pork
Shell Fish
Eggs
Apricots (dried)
Peaches (dried)
Peas/Beans (dried)
Asparagus (canned)
Spinach
Mustard Greens
Dandelion Greens
Kale
Prunes (dried)
Prune Juice
Parsley
Brussels Sprouts
Parsnips
Turnip Greens
Beets (canned)
Potatoes (canned)
Tomatoes (canned)
VITAMIN A
FOODS
Broccoli
Carrots
Peas & Carrots (frozen)
Dandelion Greens
Mustard Greens
Turnip Greens
Collard Greens
Kale
Mixed Veg* (frozen)
Swiss Chard
Spinach
Winter Squash
Pumpkin
Swt Potatoes/Yams
Tomatoes
Mangos
Apricots (dried, canned
or fresh)
Cantaloupe
Honey Dew Melon
Peaches (fresh or frozen)
Plums (frozen or canned)
Prunes (dry or cooked)
Asparagus
Cherries, red sour
Papaya
Nectarines
*Japanese and Italian style mixed vegetables are not high sources of Vitamin A.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 14 of 62
CACFP MEAL PATTERNS
The CACFP meal patterns are a guide to well-balanced meals. They are also the format in which
the USDA publishes the regulations for the CACFP. The lunch/supper pattern is designed for
providers to use in order to provide each child with approximately one-third of the child's
recommended dietary allowance (RDA) published by the National Academy of Sciences. The
meal patterns are a flexible framework to allow providers to choose from a wide variety of foods
in planning and serving nutritious meals. Within the meal patterns, providers should consider
religious, cultural, ethnic and vegetarian eating preferences in menu planning.
MEAL PATTERNS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
IN CHILD CARE FOOD PROGRAMS
BREAKFAST
FOOD COMPONENTS
1) Milk, fluid
2) Fruit or Vegetable or Full Strength Juice
3) Bread OR
Cornbread, Biscuits, Rolls,
Muffins, Pancakes, Waffles, Etc. OR
Cold Dry Cereal OR
Cooked Cereal or Pasta
CHILDREN
1 AND 2 YEARS
CHILDREN
3 - 5 YEARS
CHILDREN
6 - 12 YEARS
½ Cup
1/4 Cup
3/4 Cup
½ Cup
1 Cup
½ Cup
½ Slice
½ Serving
½ Slice
½ Serving
1 Slice
1 Serving
1/4 Cup
1/4 Cup
1/3 Cup
1/4 Cup
3/4 Cup
½ Cup
CHILDREN
1 AND 2 YEARS
CHILDREN
3 - 5 YEARS
CHILDREN
6 - 12 YEARS
½ Cup
¼ Cup
½ Slice
½ Serving
¾ Cup
½ Cup
½ Slice
½ Serving
1 Cup
¾ Cup
1 Slice
1 Serving
¼ Cup
1/4 Cup
½ Cup
1 Ounce
1 Ounce
½ Egg (Large)
¼ Cup
2 Tbsp.
½ Ounce
(50%)
4 Ounces (1/2 Cup)
1 1/2 Ounces
11/2 Ounces
¾ Egg (Large)
3/8 Cup
3 Tbsp.
¾ Ounce
(50%)
6 Ounces (3/4 Cup)
2 Ounces
2 Ounces
1 Egg (Large)
½ Cup
4 Tbsp.
1 Ounce
(50%)
8 Ounces (1 Cup)
LUNCH OR SUPPER
FOOD COMPONENTS
1) Milk, fluid
2) Vegetable(s) and/or Fruit(s)**
3) Bread OR
Cornbread, Biscuits, Rolls,
Muffins, Etc. OR
Cooked Pasta/Noodle Products OR
Cereal Grains
4) Lean Meat, Poultry or Fish OR
Cheese OR
Eggs (Large) OR
Cooked Dry Beans/Peas OR
Peanut Butter or Soynut Butter OR
Peanuts, Soynuts or Other Tree
Nuts/Seeds* OR
Yogurt
*When using nuts as a meat alternate, combine with another meat/meat alternate such as cheese, eggs, etc.
**Need two (2) separate servings of fruit(s) and/or vegetable(s) in order to meet the Vegetables/Fruits requirement for lunch or supper.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 15 of 62
SUPPLEMENT (SNACK) Select 2 out of 4 components
FOOD COMPONENTS
1) Milk, fluid
2) Vegetable and/or Fruit or Full
Strength Juice
3) Bread OR
Cornbread, Biscuits, Rolls, Muffins, Etc. OR
Saltine Crackers OR
Graham Crackers OR
Whole-grain Crackers
(Rye or Wheat) OR
Cold Dry Cereal OR
Cooked Cereal OR Pasta
4) Lean Meat, Poultry or Fish OR
Cheese OR
Eggs (Large) OR
Cooked Dry Beans/Peas OR
Peanut Butter, Nut/Seed Butter OR
Peanut, Soynut or Seeds OR
Yogurt (Plain, Sweetened or Flavored)
CHILDREN
1 AND 2 YEARS
CHILDREN
3 - 5 YEARS
CHILDREN
6 - 12 YEARS
½ Cup
½ Cup
1 Cup
½ Cup (Total)
½ Cup (Total)
¾ Cup (Total)
½ Slice
½ Serving
4 Squares
2 Squares
2 Squares
½ Slice
½ Serving
4 Squares
2 Squares
2 Squares
1 Slice
1 Serving
8 Squares
4 Squares
4 Squares
¼ Cup
¼ Cup
1/3 Cup
1/4 Cup
3/4 Cup
½ Cup
½ Ounce
½ Ounce
½ Egg (Large)
1/8 Cup
1 Tbsp.
½ Ounce
2 Ounces (1/4 Cup)
½ Ounce
½ Ounce
½ Egg (Large)
1/8 Cup
1 Tbsp.
½ Ounce
2 Ounces (1/4 Cup)
1 Ounce
1 Ounce
½ Egg (Large)
¼ Cup
2 Tbsp.
1 Ounce
4 Ounces (1/2 Cup)
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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ADDENDUM TO MEAL PATTERNS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN IN
CHILD CARE FOOD PROGRAMS
•
Children older than 1 year (12 months) must be fed requirements from the "Meal Patterns
For Young Children In Child Care Food Programs," (pp. 15-16), and providers must
record food served on the "Weekly Menu Records," (Appendix C) or keep these records
on-line utilizing the C-K Kids system. Infants under 1 year of age must be fed
requirements from the "Infant Meal Pattern Chart," (p. 18) and providers must record
food served on the "Infant Weekly Menu Records," (Appendix C) or keep these records
on-line. At 1 year, infants must be transitioned to the older children's menus.
•
"Cup" means a standard measuring cup (8 ounces).
•
Bread, pasta or noodle products and cereals must be whole grain, enriched or made from
bran or germ. Cereals must be whole grain, enriched, made from bran or germ or fortified
with four specific nutrients. Cornbread, biscuits, rolls, muffins, etc. must be made with
whole grain or enriched meal or flour, or bran or germ.
•
Morning, Afternoon or Evening supplements (snacks) must consist of two of the four
food groups listed on the chart on page 16.
•
Children ages 12 and up may be served adult sized portions based on the greater food
needs of older boys and girls, but shall not be served less than the minimum quantities
specified in this section for children ages 6 - 12.
•
Commercially prepared entrees must have a Child Nutrition (CN) label or contain a
product analysis in order to be creditable as a meat/meat alternate, or providers may add
extra meat or cheese to a purchased entree. If one of these options is chosen, the option
must be specified on the menu (ex: “cheese added” or “CN label” or “HM” for
homemade). See Appendix C for a sample CN label.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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INFANT MEAL PATTERN CHART
The infant meal pattern is the format in which the federal government publishes the regulations
for the infant portion of the CACFP. The following chart shows the minimum amounts of each
meal component providers must make available to each infant (ages 0 - 1 year) to claim
reimbursement for the meal. Providers must prepare different food types and amounts for
infants of different ages.
From Day 1 to the end
of 3 months...
The baby must be fed:
From the day the baby
turns 4 months to the
end of 7 months...
The baby must be fed:
From the day the baby
turns 8 months until the
day the baby turns 1 year...
The baby must be fed:
BREAKFAST
BREAKFAST
BREAKFAST
1) IF Infant Formula (4-6 oz.)
1) IF Infant Formula (4-8 oz.) OR
Breast Milk (4 - 8 oz.)
1) IF Infant Formula (6-8 oz.) OR
Breast Milk (6-8 oz.)
OR
2) Infant Cereal (2-4 T)
Breast Milk (4-6 oz.)
IF Infant Cereal (0-3 T)
3) Fruit and/or Vegetable (1-4 T)
LUNCH/SUPPER
LUNCH/SUPPER
LUNCH/SUPPER
1) IF Infant Formula (4-6 oz.)
1) IF Infant Formula (4-8 oz.)
1) IF Infant Formula (6-8 oz.) OR
Breast Milk (6-8 oz.)
OR
OR
Breast Milk (4-6 oz.)
Breast Milk (4-8 oz.)
2) Fruit and/or Vegetable (1-4 T)
3) Infant Cereal (2-4 T)
IF Infant Cereal (0-3 T)
AND/OR
Fruit and/or Vegetable (0-3 T)
SNACK
SNACK
1) IF Infant Formula (4-6 oz.)
1) IF Infant Formula (4-6 oz.)
OR
OR
Breast Milk (4-6 oz.)
Meat, Fish, Poultry, Egg
Yolk, Cooked Dry Beans/Peas
(1-4 T) OR
Cheese ( -2 oz.)
Cottage Cheese (1-4 oz)
Cheese Food (1-4 oz.)
Cheese Spread (1-4 oz.)
SNACK
1) IF Infant Formula (2-4 oz.) OR
Breast Milk (2-4 oz.) OR
Full Strength Fruit Juice (2-4 oz.)
Breast Milk (4-6 oz.)
Crusty Bread (0-1/2)
OR Crackers (0-2)
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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ADDENDUM TO INFANT MEAL PATTERN CHART
•
Infants may not be fed formula or baby food past one (1) year of age unless a medical
statement is on file with the food program. The medical statement must specify an
alternate or substitute food/formula for the required component. Exception: infants may
be transitioned from formula/breast milk to whole milk between 12 and 13 months of age.
The transition must be complete by 13 months.
•
Infants must be fed either iron fortified infant formula or breast milk. No cow’s milk
(whole, low-fat or skim) or milk from other sources is creditable without a statement
signed by a medical professional.
•
All formula and infant cereal must be iron fortified and it must indicate this on the
product’s container.
•
Infant cereal is defined as any iron-fortified dry cereal specially formulated for and
generally recognized as cereal for infants that is routinely mixed with breast milk or ironfortified infant formula prior to consumption. Therefore, infant cereals in the jars are
NOT reimbursable.
•
Dry infant cereals containing other ingredients such as bananas are not reimbursable.
•
All ounces represent fluid ounces, T = Tablespoon.
•
All bread products, crackers, etc. must be enriched or whole grain.
•
Breast milk may be provided either by the infant’s mother or by a wet nurse.
•
Because breast milk may be available in limited quantities, you may serve less than the
minimum regulatory serving of breast milk to infants who regularly do not consume the
minimum amount of breast milk. However, if an infant is still hungry, you must offer the
infant additional breast milk. You may not serve less than the stipulated minimum
serving of infant formula or other components of the meal pattern under any
circumstances.
•
Breast milk from a mother is designed specially to meet the needs of her baby. Make sure
each bottle is clearly labeled by the parent with the child’s name and the date that the
milk was collected. Never accept an unlabeled bottle from a parent. You must be sure
each child receives only the breast milk supplied by his/her mother. Store expressed
breast milk in the refrigerator or freezer in either sterilized bottles or disposable plastic
nursing bags. Breast milk will keep for up to 48 hours in the refrigerator and up to 3
months in the freezer after it is collected. (While in the freezer, protect the breast milk in
an air tight container). Dispose of all refrigerated breast milk that is not used within 48
hours. Thaw frozen breast milk by holding the container under cool water and then under
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 19 of 62
warm water, followed by gentle shaking to mix the contents. Do not refreeze breast milk.
Do not use a microwave to warm bottles. Always discard any breast milk remaining in
the bottle after a feeding. Dispose of thawed unused breast milk within 24 hours after
thawing.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
If a mother comes to the day home to nurse her infant, the meal is not reimbursable if the
infant is under 4 months of age. At four months, the caregiver may provide at least one
other component and claim the meal (breakfast, lunch or supper only) for reimbursement.
However, a day care home provider who nurses her own infant may claim the meal as
long as she is eligible to claim reimbursement for her own (resident) children.
All juices must be full strength and are only reimbursable at snack for infants 8 - 11
months of age.
Infant meat sticks, or “finger foods” are NOT reimbursable.
All combination foods such as dinners, and desserts (ex: beef & noodle dinners; chicken
and rice; tutti frutti; pineapple custard) are NOT reimbursable.
Commercial baby foods that list water as the first ingredient are NOT reimbursable.
Commercial fish sticks, other commercial breaded or battered fish or seafood products,
canned fish with bones are NOT reimbursable.
Hot dogs and sausages are NOT reimbursable.
Yogurt, or fruit juices containing yogurt are NOT reimbursable.
Nuts, seeds and/or nut seed butters (peanut butter) are NOT reimbursable.
Ready to eat breakfast cereal and cooked cereals will not substitute for iron fortified
infant cereal when required on the infant meal plan.
Whole eggs or egg whites are NOT reimbursable and are not safe for infants.
Honey is not safe for infants and should not be fed to infants.
DEFINITION OF INFANT FORMULA
Infant formula is defined as follows: “any iron-fortified formula, intended for dietary use solely
as a food for normal, healthy infants; excluding those formulas specifically formulated for
infants with inborn errors of metabolism or digestive or absorptive problems. Infant formula, as
served, must be in liquid state at recommended dilution.”
A medical statement is required to serve any infant formulas which do not meet the definition
of infant formulas in the CACFP. Iron-fortified Infant formula is further defined by the Food
and Drug Administration (FDA) as: “a product which contains one (1) milligram or more of iron
per 100 kilocalories of formula when properly prepared according to label directions for infant
consumption.”
A medical statement which includes the recommended formula is required and must be on
file with the Food and Nutrition Program to be reimbursed for infants on the following
formulas:
Low-iron infant formulas. These formulas contain less than one (1) milligram of iron per
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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100 kilocalories. Examples include low-iron versions of Enfamil and Similac. The labels on
these formulas do not indicate that they are fortified with iron.
“Follow-up” formulas served to infants less than a specified age. These formulas are
designed for older infants or toddlers who are consuming solid foods, and are not intended
for dietary use as a sole source of food for infants.
The following formulas do not require medical statements when they are served to infants
four months of age or older. (A medical statement is required if these formulas are served to
infants younger than four months of age.):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mead Johnson Enfamil Next Step Lipil
Mead Johnson Enfamil Prosobee Lipil
Nestle Good Start 2 Essentials
Nestle Good Start 2 Essentials Soy
Nestle Good Start 2 Supreme with Iron and Lipids
Nestle Good Start 2 Supreme Soy with Iron and Lipids
Ross Similac 2 Advance
Ross Similac Isomil 2 Advance
PBM (formerly known as Wyeth)-produced Private Label Store Brand “Follow-on”
Formulas :
o Albertson’s Baby Basics 2 with Lipids
o H-E-B 2 with Lipids
o Hy-Vee Mother’s Choice Follow On with Lipids
o Kroger Comforts 2 with Lipids
o Target 2 with Lipids
o Wal-Mart Parent’s Choice 2 with Lipids
o Wegman’s 2 with Lipids
Exempt infant formulas. These specialty infant formulas are intended for use by infants
who have an inborn error of metabolism or low birth weight or who otherwise have an
unusual medical or dietary problem. Examples include Nutramigen, Pregestimil,
Alimentum, and Lofenalac.
Meal/Supplement Reimbursement
Reimbursement is allowed for a meal or snack served in the CACFP that includes a substituted
food item provided by the parent for medical reasons, such as infant formula, as long as the
provider supplies at least one other required meal component. A medical statement is required
for all infant formulas that do not meet the regulatory definition for infant formula, as noted
above.
Iron-fortified Formulas That Do Not Require a Medical Statement:
Although a medical statement is not required for the following iron-fortified formulas, you
should only provide an infant with the formula recommended to the infant’s parent/guardian by
the infant’s health care provider.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 21 of 62
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Milk-based Infant Formulas (do not require medical note):
Mead Johnson Enfamil with Iron
Mead Johnson Enfamil Gentlease LIPIL
Mead Johnson Enfamil Lipil with Iron
Mead Johnson Enfamil AR Lipil
Mead Johnson Enfamil Lactofree Lipil
Nestle Good Start Essentials
Nestle Good Start Supreme
Nestle Good Start Supreme with DHA & ARA
Nestle Good Start Supreme with DHA & ARA Natural Cultures
Nestle NAN
Nestle NAN with Lipids
Ross Similac with Iron
Ross Similac Advance with Iron
Ross Similac Lactose Free with Iron
Ross Similac Lactose Free Advance with Iron
CG Nutritionals Kirkland Signature with Iron
PBM (formerly known as Wyeth)-produced private label store brand milk-based infant
formulas:
o AAFES (Army Air Force Exchange Supply) Baby’s Choice with Iron
o AAFES Baby’s Choice Infant Formula with Iron and Lipids
o Albertson’s Baby Basics with Iron
o Albertson’s Baby Basics with Iron and Lipids
o Berkley & Jensen with Iron and Lipids
o Bright Beginnings with Lipids
o CVS with Iron
o Eckerd with Iron
o Good Sense with Iron
o H-E-B Baby with Iron
o H-E-B Baby with Iron and Lipids
o Hill Country Fare with Iron
o Home Best with Iron
o Home Best with Lipids and Lipids
o Hy-Vee Mother’s Choice with Iron
o Hy-Vee Mother’s Choice with Iron and Lipids
o Kozy Kids with Iron and Lipids
o Kroger Comforts with Iron
o Kroger Comforts with Iron and Lipids
o Little Ones with Iron
o Market Basket with Iron and Lipids
o Meijer with Iron
o Meijer with Iron and Lipids
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 22 of 62
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Members Mark with Iron and Lipids
Nas Finch Our Family with Iron
Pathmark with Iron
Pathmark with Iron and Lipids
Perfect Choice with Iron
Price Chopper with Iron
Price Chopper with Iron and Lipids
Rite Aid with Iron and Lipids
Safeway Select with Iron
ShopRite with Iron
Target with Iron
Target with Iron and Lipids
Top Care with Iron
Top Care with Iron and Lipids
Wal-Mart Parent’s Choice with Iron
Wal-Mart Parent’s Choice with Lipids
Walgreens with Iron
Walgreens with Iron and Lipids
Wegman’s with Iron
Wegman’s with Iron and Lipids
Weis Markets with Iron
Western Family with Iron
Western Family with Iron and Lipids
Soy-based Infant Formulas (do not require medical note):
Mead Johnson Enfamil ProSobee
Mead Johnson Enfamil ProSobee Lipil
Nestle Good Start Essentials Soy
Nestle Good Start Essentials Soy with Lipids
Ross Similac Isomil Soy with Iron
Ross Similac Isomil Advance Soy with Iron
PBM (formerly known as Wyeth)-produced private label store brand soy-based infant
formulas:
o AAFES Baby’s Choice Soy with Iron
o AAFES Baby’s Choice Soy with Iron and Lipids
o Albertson's Baby Basics Soy with Iron
o Albertson's Baby Basics Soy with Iron and Lipids
o Amway Kozy Kids Soy with Iron
o Bright Beginnings Soy with Iron
o Bright Beginnings Soy with Iron and Lipids
o CVS Soy with Iron
o Good Sense Soy with Iron
o H-E-B Baby Soy with Iron
o H-E-B Baby Soy with Iron and Lipids
o Hill Country Soy with Iron
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 23 of 62
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Home Best Soy with Iron
Home Best Soy with Iron and Lipids
Hy-Vee Mother's Choice Soy with Iron
Hy-Vee Mother's Choice Soy with Iron and Lipids
Kozy Kids Soy with Iron and Lipids
Kroger Comforts Soy with Iron
Kroger Comforts Soy with Iron and Lipids
Little Ones Soy with Iron
Meijer Soy Protein with Iron
Nash Finch Our Family Soy with Iron
Pathmark Soy with Iron
Perfect Choice Soy with Iron
Price Chopper Soy with Iron
Price Chopper Soy with Iron and Lipids
Safeway Select Soy with Iron
ShopRite Soy with Iron
Target Soy with Iron
Target Soy with Iron and Lipids
Top Care Soy with Iron
Top Care Soy with Iron and Lipids
Wal-Mart Parent's Choice Soy with Iron
Wal-Mart Parent's Choice Soy with Lipids
Walgreens Soy with Iron
Walgreens Soy with Iron and Lipids
Wegman’s Soy with Iron
Wegman's Soy with Iron and Lipids
Western Family Soy with Iron
Western Family Soy with Iron and Lipids
INFANT MEAL PATTERN AND EARLY
INTRODUCTION OF SOLID FOOD
A physician’s prescription – approving the addition of solid foods, specifying which solid foods,
and the quantity and consistency of such foods – is required before the addition of other foods to
the meal pattern of an infant younger than 4 months of age. This guidance supports current
policy that any change or substitute to the required meal pattern for any child must be
accompanied by a statement from the child’s physician. This guidance is based on the following
scientific references:
•
“If solid foods are introduced before the infant is ready, these foods may displace breast
milk or formula, resulting in inadequate energy and nutrient intake. In addition, because
the digestive system is not well developed before 4 to 6 months of age, feeding solids can
increase the risk of digestive problems and food allergies.” Bruno, G., Prevention of
atopic disease in high risk babies (long term follow-up), 1993.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 24 of 62
•
By 4 to 5 months of age, the extrusion reflex of early infancy has disappeared and the
ability to swallow non-liquid foods is established.” (American Academy of Pediatrics
Committee on Nutrition Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 3rd ed., 1993.
Implications for providers participating in the CACFP:
Providers should not introduce solid food to infants less than four months. If a parent requests
that his/her infant under four months be fed any solid food, the parent should produce a
statement from the child’s physician that not only approves the addition of solid foods to the
infant, but also specifies the quantity and consistency of such foods.
REGULATIONS CONCERNING PARENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT
OF OFFERED INFANT FORMULA
All day homes that claim infant meals in the food program must:
•
have available and offer at least one infant formula that meets meal pattern and program
requirements (facilities are not required to satisfy the unique formula needs of every
infant);
•
maintain and submit required documentation when a parent declines the offered infant
formula. Required documentation consists of “Parent’s Acknowledgment of Offered
Formula” form (see Appendix C for a sample);
•
maintain and submit required documentation from a physician when a parent provides (or
the child requires) an infant formula that does not comply with the meal pattern
requirements.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 25 of 62
REGULATIONS CONCERNING CERTAIN FOOD ITEMS
RELATING TO THE CHILD CARE FOOD PROGRAM
The following guidelines should assist providers in selection of reimbursable products regarding
the acceptability of some products on the market.
Milk
Definition of Milk: Pasteurized fluid types of unflavored or flavored whole milk, lowfat milk,
skim milk or cultured buttermilk which meet State and local standards for such milk, except that,
in the meal pattern for infants (birth to 1 year of age), milk means breast milk or iron-fortified
infant formula. In addition,
•
it must be served in at least the quantity required for the applicable age in the CACFP;
•
whole milk should contain both Vitamins A and D;
•
low-fat and skim milk must be fortified with vitamins A and D at the levels meeting Food
and Drug Administration requirements; and
•
low-fat (1%), fat free or skim milk must be served to all children above age 1
(beginning at age 2), no exceptions without a note from a medical professional.
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Full-strength juice is any product, fresh, canned, frozen or reconstituted that is labeled "juice,"
"full-strength juice," "single-strength juice," “100% juice,” “juice from concentrate” or
“reconstituted juice". The “Nutrition Labeling Act” requires that the percentage of juice be stated
on the juice container. The following regulations apply to full-strength juice:
•
Water can be the first ingredient, but only if followed by "juice concentrate;” and
•
Full-strength vegetable or fruit juice may meet no more than one-half the total
Vegetables/Fruits requirement for lunch or supper, but may meet the total requirement for
breakfast or snack.
•
Only 100% juice is creditable.
•
Juice should be limited to 6 oz. per day and should not be served at lunch or supper.
A juice drink is a product resembling juice which contains full-strength juice along with added
water and possibly other ingredients such as sweeteners, spices, or flavorings. A juice drink may
be canned, frozen or reconstituted as from a frozen state or a drink base or as an ingredient in a
recipe. Juice drinks are not creditable in the food program.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
Page 26 of 62
Grains and Breads
Whole grain or enriched bread products meet the requirements for Grains/Breads. To meet
regulations, choose products with bran and/or germ, bulgur, corn meal or enriched corn meal,
corn flour, corn* (whole-grain, whole ground, whole germed or stone ground), enriched corn
grits, enriched or whole-grain meal or flour, oats, rice (enriched or whole-grain) and whole
wheat.
*Note: When the type of corn is not specified, you must request a product analysis to verify that
whole grain corn is used.
Refer to Appendix B for a comprehensive listing of Creditable vs. Non-Creditable Foods. Pay
particular attention to the Grains/Breads section and Exhibit A on pages 35 - 37. Call your
representative if you have any questions regarding creditable food items or if you have a favorite
recipe you may want to try but don’t know if it will qualify for reimbursement.
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Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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FOOD SERVICE OPERATIONS
Providers may serve meals either cafeteria (unit) style, or family style. The meal should be
served as a unit meaning that all components (including milk) are served at the same time.
In either type of meal service, the providers must ensure that the minimum quantities (according
to age) of each meal component are available to each child. At lunch or supper, the minimum
quantity of the fruit/vegetable component is the combined amount of each of the two or more
fruit or vegetable items served to meet meal pattern requirements. A minimum of 2 Tbsp. of
fruit or vegetable must be served (to a 1-2 year old) in order to count towards the
Vegetables/Fruits requirements.
In the cafeteria style meal (or unit style), where the food is already on the plate when served to
the child), each child must be served at least the minimum amount of each component per age.
In the family style meal service, a sufficient amount of prepared food must be placed on the
table to provide the full required portions of each of the food components for all children at the
table, and to accommodate adults if they eat with the children. Each child should initially be
offered the full required portion of each meal component. During the course of the meal, it is the
responsibility of the supervising adult to actively encourage each child to accept service of the
full required portion for each food component of the meal pattern. For example, if a child
initially refuses a food component, or initially does not accept the full required portion of a meal
component, the supervising adult should offer the food component to the child again.
Meal Service Times
Providers must ensure that the following meal service times are observed:
•
Three hours must elapse between the beginning of breakfast and the beginning of lunch
when no snack is served between, and four hours must elapse between the beginning of
lunch and the beginning of supper when no snack is served between.
•
Two hours must elapse between the beginning of one main meal and the beginning of a
snack (or between the beginning of a snack and the beginning of a main meal or the
beginning of one snack and the beginning of another snack).
•
Providers are allowed two hours from the contracted start time in order to serve a main
meal.
•
Providers are allowed one hour from the contracted start time in order to serve a snack.
•
Service of supper (evening meal) must begin no earlier than 5:00 p.m. and no later than
7:00 p.m., and must be concluded no later than 8:00 p.m.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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•
Providers may use a different schedule for infants younger than one year of age (i.e.,
infants may be fed on demand with the exception that supper still needs to be after 5:00
p.m.).
Allowable Meals
Facilities may serve any or all of the following:
Days
Monday - Friday
*Saturday
*Sunday
Meals
Breakfast
Lunch
**Supper
Supplements
Morning (A.M.)
Afternoon (P.M.)
**Evening (EVE)
*Reimbursement for weekend meals must be approved in advance and providers must agree to follow the food
program sponsor’s Weekend Policy. Providers must keep weekend children on a very regular basis and the parents
of the children must have work schedules that demand weekend work. Providers must also agree to be at the facility
at contracted meal times on the weekends. Providers who keep only children of family members on the weekends
may not be approved for reimbursement of weekend meals.
**Reimbursement for suppers (after 5:00 pm) and Evening Snack is normally reserved for providers with parents
with work schedules that demand evening work. Feeding children quickly prior to a 5:15 pm pick up may not be
approved for reimbursement of supper.
POLICY REVIEW
Providers may claim reimbursement for two meals and one snack (or one meal and two snacks)
per child, per day, as long as the meals and snacks:
•
meet meal/snack pattern requirements as displayed on meal pattern charts (see Pages 1518 for Meal Pattern Charts).
•
are served to children who are enrolled for child care in the provider's facility AND are
enrolled in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (meaning the provider has submitted
an enrollment form signed by the parent to the Food and Nutrition Program).
•
are not served to children in excess of the facilities' licensed ratio capacity (see pictorial
compliance chart, Appendix C).
•
are prepared and eaten in the facility. Exception: providers may prepare the food at
home and occasionally take the children on a picnic or field trip that relates directly to
the day care activities, but as a general rule, providers may not prepare the food and
transport it to another facility or location to serve. Sack lunches taken off the facility
premises may not be counted for reimbursement.
•
are not served to adults (adults are not claimed for reimbursement).
•
are served to children who meet CACFP age requirements (under 13 years of age).
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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•
consist only of components provided by the facility. Exception: Breast milk or infant
formula may be provided by the child's parent.
•
are not sent by the child's parents (for example, if the parent sends a sack lunch or snack
component).
•
are currently approved by TDA on the provider's application/contract on file with the
Food and Nutrition Program. (Please report any changes in meal service or meal times to
your food program representative in advance of the change.)
•
in the case of suppers, they must be served between 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. and meal
service must be completed by 8:00 p.m.
•
are not served to provider's own children, unless providers are eligible to claim Tier I
reimbursement rates and are also eligible to claim their own children's meals.
•
are not served to the provider's own eligible children unless a nonresident child is present
and participating in the meal service (and is claimed for the same meal).
Allowed Exceptions to Meal Patterns
If a child is unable for medical reasons to eat or drink a required food component, providers may
substitute another food/formula prescribed by a doctor. This includes special formula (i.e., lowiron formula, formula without iron or exempt formulas, see policies regarding formulas on pp.
20-24) or special menu items. Providers must obtain a medical statement, keep a copy on
file in the facility and submit a copy to the Food and Nutrition Program. The medical
statement must specify the formula and/or food that should be substituted. Special menus
must be kept for all children on a special diet who are fed components that differ from the
regular menu.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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CONTRACT BETWEEN FOOD PROGRAM
AND DAY CARE HOME
In order to reimburse a provider, the Food and Nutrition Program must have on file a current
signed/dated copy of Form H1537, "Application Between Sponsoring Organization and Day
Care Home" as well as a current signed/dated copy of Form H1542 "Permanent Agreement
Between Sponsoring Organization and Day Care Home Provider(s)” (see Appendix C for
samples of each).
PROOF OF REGISTRATION/LICENSURE
•
•
In order to be reimbursed, you must be currently registered or licensed with the Texas
Department of Family and Protective Services (TDFPS). The Food and Nutrition
Program must have verification of current registration on file. Proof of current
registration would be a copy of the provider’s registration certificate or license (see
Appendix C for a sample).
If you are trained in CACFP requirements before you become licensed or registered, you
should call your representative as soon as you are registered. This is necessary in order to
process your food program application with the Texas Department of Agriculture (Food
and Nutrition Division). Without a copy of your registration certificate or license, we
will be unable to reimburse you for the meals served.
NEW PROVIDER REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE OR LICENSE
Providers initially signing with the Food and Nutrition Program must submit a copy of their
registration certificate or license from the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services
(TDFPS) to the Food and Nutrition Program by 12:00 p.m. on the 24th day of the first month of
activity. If the 24th falls on a weekend or holiday, the certificate must be received by 12:00 p.m.
on the last working day before the weekend or holiday. This allows the Food and Nutrition
Program to submit the documents to TDA for approval.
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DAY CARE HOMES THAT CHANGE LOCATIONS
A day care home facility that changes locations may continue to operate under their current
registration at their new location. With this in mind, for reimbursement to continue without
interruption after a provider moves, the provider must:
• notify The Food and Nutrition Program immediately of the new address;
• notify DFPS within 15 days of the move;
• forward an updated copy of the amended registration certificate reflecting the new
address to the food program as soon as it is made available from DFPS.
SPONSORSHIP OF THE CACFP
FDH providers are allowed participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program through only
one sponsoring organization at a time. ChildCareGroup is an approved sponsor for the United
States Department of Agriculture. Once a contract is signed between a provider and
ChildCareGroup Food and Nutrition Program, the contract will remain valid until either the
provider signs another contract with another sponsor, the provider is no longer in the child care
business or the contract is terminated by the sponsor for cause or by mutual consent. Providers
who wish to join another sponsor prior to October 1st of each contract year must request and
receive, in writing, authorization to change sponsors from the Area Program manager of Special
Nutrition Programs. Such requests should explain the reasonable cause(s) for the requested
change. All providers are free to change sponsors at the beginning of a new contract year
(October 1st) without cause or authorization in writing.
Written requests to change sponsorship of the CACFP in the middle of a contract year
should be addressed to:
Dallas Fort Worth Community Operations Office Manager
Texas Department of Agriculture
Food and Nutrition (F&N)
1501 Circle Drive, Suite 160
Fort Worth, TX 76119
Phone: 817.321.8100
Fax: 888.223.9037
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NONDISCRIMINATION
Family Day Home providers involved in the CACFP must operate their facility in accordance
with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) policy which prohibits discrimination on the
basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Following is a statement of
nondiscrimination.
Nondiscrimination Statement
In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is
prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.
Any person who believes he/she has been discriminated against in any United States Dept. of
Agriculture (USDA) activity relating to the food program should write a letter within six months
of the date of the discriminatory incident to:
USDA
Director, Office of Civil Rights
1400 Independence Ave.
Washington DC 20250-9410
Or call: (800)795-3272 (VOICE) or (202)720-6382 (TDD)
USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
•
A copy of "Procedures for Filing a Civil Rights Complaint" must be given to parents at
the time providers enroll their children in the food program (see Appendix C for a
sample letter).
•
A statement of nondiscrimination should be posted in the day home facility. Refer to
Appendix C for a sample nondiscrimination CACFP “Justice for All” poster. Laminated
copies of this poster and of the "Procedures for Filing a Civil Rights Complaint" were
given to you at the pre-approval visit to post in your facility.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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MANDATED FOOD PROGRAM TRAINING
ChildCareGroup (CCG) will provide the following training topics to new day care home
providers prior to their participation in the food program:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Program Meal Patterns
Meal Counts
Claims Submission
Review Procedures
Record Keeping Requirements
Reimbursement System
Civil Rights for the Special Nutrition Programs.
Each year thereafter, continuing providers will be required to complete (at a minimum) the
following training topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Program Meal Patterns
Meal Counts
Claims Submission
Review Procedures
Record Keeping Requirements
Reimbursement System
Civil Rights for the Special Nutrition Programs.
The above topics may be completed as a self-instructional or on-line training module or as part
of any workshop attended in person by the provider as long as the training is completed before
the end of the current contract year (September 30th).
A provider who fails to complete the required training by the specified deadline must enter the
Serious Deficiency Process.
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SERIOUSLY DEFICIENT PROVIDERS
ChildCareGroup Food and Nutrition Program is required to terminate and deny program
participation to day care homes that are determined to be seriously deficient in their operation of
the Child and Adult Care Food Program. A serious deficiency is defined as program abuse,
deficient program operation and/or fraudulent activities. Examples of serious deficiencies
include, but are not limited to:
•
Failure to comply with the requirements specified in the Application Between Sponsoring
Organization and Day Care Home (Form H1537) and/or Permanent Agreement Between
Sponsoring Organization and Day Care Home Provider(s) (Form H1542).
•
Submission of false information to ChildCareGroup. Examples may include but are not
limited to:
* meal count records submitted by a provider showing the number of reported children to
be different from the number of children observed and recorded at monitor visits,
and/or
* meal count records submitted by a provider showing the number of reported children to
be inconsistent with parents’ verification of child(ren)s’ enrollment/attendance.
* enrollment forms submitted by provider showing incorrect addresses and phone
numbers for children in care.
•
Provider's failure to attend the required training mandated by the CACFP and The Food
and Nutrition Program during the first year of enrollment into the program and/or any
year thereafter.
•
Failure to return to ChildCareGroup any unearned payments.
•
Failure to maintain adequate records on a consistent basis as observed at monitor visits or
any other time deemed appropriate by food program staff.
•
Submission of claims for reimbursement for meals not served to children participating in
the program or claiming meals for children not enrolled in the CACFP.
•
Service of a significant number of meals that do not contain all required meal
components in the required quantities.
•
Inability of any representative of the Food and Nutrition Program to verify program
participation at an unannounced monitor visit.
•
Non-compliance with the allowed number of children in care as mandated by Child Care
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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Licensing ratio requirements (see Appendix C for a sample pictorial compliance chart).
•
Refusal of a provider to enter into a Corrective Action Plan; failure to abide by the terms
of a Corrective Action Plan or failure to permanent correct any deficiencies required in
the Corrective Action Plan.
If deficiencies are determined based on any reasons including those listed above, providers will
be declared seriously deficient in their operation of the food program and be given a proposed
terminated from the food program, and will be given appeal rights for denial of benefits from
the food program. Should a provider choose to appeal the actions of the Food and Nutrition
Program, he/she should carefully follow the outline on pp. 39-40. Should the action of the Food
and Nutrition Program be upheld by the Board of Appeals, we will request that the provider’s
name be placed on the List of Excluded Providers kept by TDA/FND. Providers included on
this list will not be able to participate in The Child and Adult Care Food Program with any
sponsor until such a time that the provider shows good faith to correct the deficiency in order for
his/her name to be removed from the list. ChildCareGroup may request removal of the
provider's name if the provider shows good faith to correct the deficiency. However,
ChildCareGroup also reserves the right to not pursue removal of the name of the provider from
the list at the discretion of the F&N staff. The decision as whether a provider’s name will be
removed must be made by The Dept. of Texas Department of Agriculture Special Nutrition
Programs. Neither ChildCareGroup nor the provider will have the option to appeal the
TDA/FND decision to retain the day care home on the list of excluded providers.
NEW PROVIDERS AND THE SERIOUSLY DEFICIENT LIST
ChildCareGroup Food and Nutrition Program will reserve the right to immediately terminate any
provider whose name appears on the List of Excluded Providers furnished by the Food and
Nutrition Division of The Texas Department of Agriculture.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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APPEAL RIGHTS OF PROVIDERS
ChildCareGroup (CCG) has adopted a policy and procedures under which day care homes
sponsored by the CCG Food and Nutrition Program may appeal adverse actions taken by the
Food and Nutrition Program. For purposes of this policy, “adverse action” refers to any action
which may deny, suspend or reduce benefits to the day care home or may terminate participation
in the program. For example, day care homes may appeal any decision of the CCG which denies
all or part of a claim for reimbursement, demands repayment of an overpayment made to the day
care home, reduces program benefits, or any other action which affects the day care home’s
participation or claim for reimbursement.
Providers who are denied reimbursement of any meal or snack will be notified via a Notice of
Meal Disallowance letter with their reimbursement checks. Providers who submit claims
electronically will access the disallowance letter electronically as well. If providers are denied
program benefits for any reason other than meal disallowances, they will be notified via a Notice
of Adverse Action letter sent by certified mail (return receipt requested) as well as a copy sent
directly to the providers’ homes by U.S. Mail OR by an overnight delivery service.
Providers wishing to appeal any adverse action taken against them should carefully follow the
procedures outlined on the next page, and should note the specified deadlines when submitting
documents/information to the Review Official
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CHILDCAREGROUP FOOD AND NUTRITION PROGRAM
STATEMENT OF APPEAL RIGHTS OF PROVIDERS
ChildCareGroup (CCG) has adopted a policy and procedures under which day care homes sponsored by the CCG Food and
Nutrition Program may appeal adverse actions taken by the Food and Nutrition Program.
1.
Definition of Adverse Action. For purposes of this policy, "adverse action" refers to any action which may deny, suspend or
reduce benefits to the day care home or may terminate participation in the program. For example, day care homes may appeal
any decision of the CCG which denies all or part of a claim for reimbursement, demands repayment of an overpayment made to
the day care home, reduces program benefits, or any other action which affects the day care home's participation or claim for
reimbursement.
2.
Notice of Adverse Action. If the Food and Nutrition Program of CCG takes adverse action against a day care home, the
provider will be advised in writing of the nature of the adverse action and the grounds for such action. The notification will be
mailed either with the provider's check (in the case of meal disallowance) or certified, return receipt requested (in the case of
adverse action other than meal disallowance). The notice will also advise the provider of the right to appeal the decision.
3.
Time for Appeal. A provider may request an appeal of an adverse action in the manner provided by the Notice of Adverse
Action. The provider must submit the request for appeal in writing, and the request must be received by the Review
Official no later than the 15th calendar day after the receipt of the Notice of Adverse Action or 15 calendar days
from the date of deposit of the reimbursement funds (in the case of meal disallowance), whichever occurs first. In
the event the 15th calendar day falls on a weekend day or holiday, the request for appeal must be received no later
than the last business day before the 15th calendar day. Send request for appeal to Review Official, Texas CACFP
Board of Appeals, P. O. Box 28487, Austin, TX 78755. Failure to submit the request for appeal in a timely manner waives
all rights to challenge the adverse action.
4.
Acknowledgment of Appeal. The Review Official will acknowledge receipt of all timely requests for appeal within 10 calendar
days of the date the request was received. Both the provider and the Food Program Administrator shall receive acknowledgment
of the request for appeal.
5.
Review of Adverse Action. A provider may refute the stated reasons for the adverse action in person and/or in writing.
a.
Written Documentation. A provider may submit written documentation to refute the reasons for the adverse action.
The Food and Nutrition Program may also submit documentation to support its decision. To be considered, any
documentation must be received by the Review Official no later than the 30th calendar day after the date of the
Notice of Adverse Action (in the case of a meal disallowance) or no later than the 30th calendar day after the
receipt of the Notice of Adverse Action (in the case of an adverse action other than meal disallowance).
b.
Appeal Hearing. Upon request, at the option of the day care home provider, the Review Official will hold a hearing
via telephone in lieu of or in addition to the review of written documentation. Hearings will be scheduled to avoid
undue hardship which might interfere with the ability of the provider to attend the hearing. The Review Official will
provide at least 10 calendar days advance written notice of the time of the hearing to the provider and the Food and
Nutrition Program. The day care provider and the Food and Nutrition Program may have a representative speak on
their behalf at the hearing. The representative may present and/or respond to testimony and answer questions posed
by the Review Official. Failure of the day care home or its representative to be available at the hearing constitutes a
waiver of the right to a personal hearing, unless the Review Official agrees, in his or her sole discretion, to reschedule
the hearing.
c.
Availability of Information. Upon request, the Review Official shall make available to the provider all information
upon which the adverse action(s) are based. Such information will be made available from the date on which the
provider is notified of the adverse action.
d.
Determination of Appeal. Appeal hearings will be heard by the Board of Appeals. Decisions of the Board of Appeals
will be based upon all information submitted to the Review Official, and on applicable state and federal policy. A
written Notice of Determination will be mailed to the provider and forwarded to the Food Program Administrator
within 30 calendar days of receipt of request for hearing. The decision of the Board of Appeals is the final
administrative determination available to the day care home.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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6.
Status of Decision Pending Appeal. The adverse decision remains in effect during the appeal process. A provider may
continue to participate during an appeal of a termination of participation, unless the action was based upon an imminent threat to
the health or welfare of program participants. Family day care homes that elect to continue to participate while appealing a
decision to terminate participation may be reimbursed for any valid claims during the appeal. The family day care home will not
be reimbursed for any questionable claims during the appeal period unless the decision is reversed. If the decision is reversed and
it is necessary to file an amended claim with TDA in order to pay the provider, the Food and Nutrition Program will submit the
amended claim to TDA within 15 calendar days of notification of the reversal. The provider will then be paid funds to which
he/she is entitled within 5 workdays of receiving payment from TDA. If the decision is reversed and an amended claim is not
needed, the provider will be paid any funds to which he/she is entitled within 5 calendar days of notification of the reversal. If the
decision to terminate participation is upheld, the effective date of the termination is 30 days after the date on the Notice of Intent
to Terminate.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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ENROLLING CHILDREN
Enrollment forms must be submitted for all children enrolled in your facility (see Appendix
C for samples). Providers must enroll all children in the food program. Providers are not
allowed to deny participation to any non-resident child. (Note that non-participating resident
children should also be enrolled on the correct form). Enrollment forms are provided by the
Food and Nutrition Program or may be downloaded and printed from our website. Providers
who submit claims electronically may print the enrollment forms directly from the Minute
Menu Kids system. In order to enroll a child, the provider must submit an enrollment form
complete with the following information:
• Parent’s/guardian’s name, address, home phone number and work phone number,
• Parent’s/guardian’s email address if applicable,
• child's name (first, MI, Last), and date of birth,
• name of the school the child attends (if the child is at least five years old and
regularly attends formal kindergarten or school),
• enrollment dates (withdrawal date is for office use only),
• days of the week that the child will be in care,
• arrival and departure times for each day the child will be in care,
• meals that the child will be offered while in care,
• parent's/guardian’s signature,
• date of signature.
•
Keep copies of these forms on file in your facility (in the child’s enrollment file) and
submit a copy to The Food and Nutrition Program with your monthly menus (or
immediately upon enrollment if using the Minute Menu Kids system.
•
The enrollment form also contains additional information necessary for statistical
reporting requirements in accordance with Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It is
extremely helpful to have all information included on the form at the time it is submitted.
•
Providers should submit amended enrollment forms for children when any information
changes including names, addresses, phone numbers of parents or days and times in care.
Amended forms should be signed by the parents and submitted immediately.
The food program is required to re-enroll children annually. Providers will be sent reenrollment worksheets in September of each year. All re-enrollments for children still in
care should be updated, signed and dated by the parents and returned A.S.A.P. Any child
not re-enrolled by October 1st will be dropped.
•
•
The Food and Nutrition Program is required to verify enrollment of some of the children
in providers' care. The Food and Nutrition Program also reserves the right to verify
enrollment of children as needed at their discretion. (See Appendix C for a sample parent
verification letter.) It would be helpful to explain this letter to parents at the time you
enroll their child(ren) and encourage them to respond to the Food and Nutrition
Program immediately if and when they receive a verification request.
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INFORMATION THAT MUST BE GIVEN TO PARENTS
The following information must be given to all parents at the time you enroll their child in the
food program:
•
•
•
•
a copy of the Parent Letter
a copy of Procedures for Filing a Civil Rights Complaint
a copy of the Building for the Future flyer
a copy of the WIC information
o note that the WIC flyer will need to be distributed annually when received from the
food program.
PROVIDER'S OWN CHILDREN APPLICATION
•
Meals served to the resident children of day home providers may be claimed for
reimbursement only if the provider qualifies for Tier I reimbursement rates (see pages 7 8 for the definition of a Tier I home), and if the household is income eligible for
reimbursement in the free or reduced-price category.
•
"Provider's own children" includes all children residing in the provider's home as part of
the family’s economic unit. This may include natural or adopted children, foster
children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews who live with a provider, but who have not
been formally declared to be in the guardianship of the provider, but who do share
housing and/or all significant income and expenses.
•
A child may not be counted as one of the provider's own (resident child) if the child's
parent or guardian has a contractual agreement (either formal or informal) with a day care
home provider for residential child care and the child would not be living with the day
care home provider otherwise.
•
A "CACFP Meal Benefit Income Eligibility Form” must be completed and submitted for
EACH resident child to determine eligibility.
•
The application must contain the following information:
o child's name, date of birth and enrollment date into the CACFP,
o child's TANF or Food Stamp case number (if applicable),
o names of all household members*,
o gross monthly income of each household member by source of income*,
o signature of provider, and
o Social Security Number of the person signing the form (provider).
* If TANF or Food Stamp Case number is applicable and listed on the form, this information is not required.
•
This application must be renewed annually on July 1st without exception.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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•
A regular child enrollment form must also be submitted for resident children.
•
If a Tier I provider’s own child is enrolled as an income eligible part in a Head Start or
Even Start Family Literacy program, the provider’s child is automatically eligible for free
meals and may participate in the CACFP. In this case, an application does not need to be
completed, but the provider must obtain a certification from the child’s Head Start
Program (or a letter from the Even Start program) which states that the child is currently
enrolled as a participant in the program, and forward a copy to the Food and Nutrition
Program. Each year thereafter, an updated certification form from Head Start must be
forwarded to the Food and Nutrition Program.
•
At least one nonresidential child must be participating (to be claimed) in any meal service
for which reimbursement will be claimed for a meal served to the provider's own
child(ren).
•
If the provider's own school-aged child(ren) is/are home schooled (and qualify for
reimbursement), the child(ren) may be claimed for meals.
•
In order for a provider to claim his/her own school-age child(ren) who normally attend
school when school is in session, the provider must document such occasions when
his/her own child(ren) is/are ill and claimed for the meal or when school is not in session
(teacher in service days, etc.). This information should be written into the provider’s
comment section on the attendance form (see Appendix C for sample form). Note:
providers on the Minute Menu Kids Internet program should indicate (at least one time
per month) the reason when asked by the system for the reason.
ATTENDANCE/MEAL COUNT FORM
•
Attendance and meal counts must be recorded daily for all children in care in order for
the provider to be reimbursed. Failure to do so on a daily basis will result in denial of
benefits including disallowance of reimbursement.
•
Attendance/meal count forms must be submitted monthly with menu records to The Food
and Nutrition Program in order to receive reimbursement.
•
Use the form provided by the Food and Nutrition Program.
•
Record your name in the space provided for "Name of Provider".
•
Record the month and year of participation in the space provided, and record the day and
date daily in the space provided at the top of each column.
•
Record the names of all children in attendance in the column for "Names of Children"
whether or not they will be claimed on the food program.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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•
Note the ages of the children in the column provided (if less than two (2) years of age,
note the age in months).
•
Place a check mark (√) in the "AT" (attendance) column for all children in attendance
whether or not they will be claimed on the food program. Record which children are
absent in the "AT" column with an (A).
•
Record which children participating in the CACFP are claimed for each meal with a
check mark (√) in the appropriate column.
•
Check (√) the meal columns only for children who are enrolled in the CACFP and for
whom you are claiming reimbursement, but check (√) every child present in the "AT"
column whether or not they are claimed for meals.
•
A school-age child may not be claimed at lunch when school is normally in session
unless the child is ill or is in the provider’s facility for another approved reason. Providers
must document when a school-age child is in attendance during normal school hours in
order to claim the child at lunch. (Use the “Provider Comment” section at the top of the
attendance/meal count form to document illnesses and/or school holidays.)
•
The Food and Nutrition Program reserves the right to verify attendance of children
claimed by providers with the parents. The verification will be either by phone, mail or
email. See Appendix C for a sample parent verification letter.
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CLAIMS PROCESSING VIA MINUTE MENU KIDS
As a provider participating with our food program, you are encouraged to keep your monthly
records electronically and submit them on-line. If you are not already utilizing this option, but
would like to, please contact our office. We would be happy to set an appointment with you to
show you how to use the program.
We will notify you of the website address and issue you a user name and a password in order to
access the web claims system.
Providers are responsible for keeping records on a daily basis on-line. Food program personnel
have the ability to view your records on-line at any time. You are responsible for contacting the
food program when you have trouble with the Minute Menu Kids system, or your computer in
general. All information already entered into the system will be safely stored on a website.
However, you will need to keep manual (paper) records until your system is back up and
running.
Providers may obtain technical assistance and/or information on Minute Menu Kids at
www.minutemenu.com. Should you need specific technical assistance, contact your food
program representative so that a technical support request can be generated on your behalf.
Availability of Records
Your computer records, or hard copy printouts of your food program menus and meal counts
must be accessible at the time of any home visit and available for review by staff of
ChildCareGroup or representatives of either the Texas Department of Agriculture Food and
Nutrition Division or the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.
These monitor visits may be announced or unannounced. If your records (either paper or
electronic copies) are not available at the time of the visit, you will be disallowed all meals for
which you have no records. Please note that the food program staff will attempt to retrieve your
electronic records prior to visiting your program and if so, will bring copies with them to your
facility.
Records Transmission
Please submit your Minute Menu Kids claim no later than the second working day of each
month. If you are unable to submit, call or email us so we can retrieve your claim electronically
for you. Use of Minute Menu Kids is intended to be a benefit to our clients. If at any time you
decide not to use this system to submit your monthly food claim it is your responsibility to notify
our office.
CHILD ENROLLMENT TIPS FOR MINUTE MENU KIDS USERS
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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Since you will be submitting your menus and meal counts (attendance) records via the Internet,
there will only be two forms that you will still need to send to us in the mail, fax or email:
• Child Enrollment Forms for newly enrolled children (or to update information on
currently enrolled children), and
•
Parent’s Acknowledgement of Offered Formula for newly enrolled infants (or to
update information on currently enrolled infants).
Please note that all of the above information may be printed on one form directly from the
Minute Menu Kids system.
Here are a few Child Enrollment tips to speed up the processing of your C-K Kids claims.
1. Mail new Child Enrollment Forms to our office immediately upon completion. Do not
wait until the end of the month. We need to process all new enrollment forms before
you submit your claim.
2. Remember that we cannot pay you for a child’s meals until we receive the Child
Enrollment Form for this child.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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PROCEDURES FOR REIMBURSEMENT
•
Mail menu and meal count records to our offices on the first (1st) day of each month (for
the previous month). Minute Menu Kids users should submit records online on the first or
second day of the new month. Records must be received by the third (3rd) working day
of the month in order to be reimbursed promptly by the Food and Nutrition Program. Late
records will be processed as long as they are received by the monthly deadline (deadline
is determined monthly and depends on when we file the monthly claim with TDA).
Receipt of menus after the monthly claim has been filed with TDA will result in nonpayment of the meals. With this in mind, please inform us if your records will be late
so that proper arrangements can be made.
•
Include enrollment forms for all new children added during the current month along with
your menu records and attendance sheets. Minute Menu Kids users should submit
enrollments immediately upon enrolling the children.
•
Check your records carefully for proper completion at the time of meal service and again
before mailing to the food program. Any meals not meeting the USDA/TDA
requirements will be disallowed for reimbursement.
•
Keep the yellow copies of all forms including your menus, attendance sheets and
enrollment forms. Providers should keep back up copies of all food program forms in
case of the loss of the original forms. We request that providers keep food program
records for one year before discarding. The Food and Nutrition Program provides 2-part
NCR forms for this purpose.
•
Form H1531 must be on file at The Food and Nutrition Program if resident children are
eligible for and are claimed on the food program (Tier I area eligible households only).
This form must be completed and submitted at the time you wish to begin claiming
reimbursement for children residing in your household. A regular child enrollment form
should also be submitted for resident children if they are eligible to be claimed. (See
Appendix C for samples of both forms.)
•
Refer to checklist on p. 48 before mailing monthly records to facilitate full
reimbursement.
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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MONTHLY CHECKLIST FOR SUBMITTING CLAIMS
Gather all records for the current month. A complete set of menu records for the month
should be mailed to the Food and Nutrition Program. Be sure to sign and date at the
bottom of the forms.
Gather all infant menu records (if claiming children under 12 months of age) for the
current month. A complete set of infant menu records should be mailed to the Food and
Nutrition Program. Note that infant records must be completed whether or not a child less
than 1 year of age is on table food. Be sure that the name of formula(s) is specified at the
top of the menu sheet. Also, be sure iron-fortified cereal (IFIC) is checked (√) if
appropriate, and the kind of cereal is identified (rice, mixed, barley, etc). Be sure to sign
and date at the bottom of the forms.
Gather all attendance/meal count records for the current month. Be sure school
holidays and illnesses are noted at the top in the “Provider Comment” section. Be sure to
sign and date at the bottom of the forms.
Gather all enrollment forms for new children added during the current month. Be sure
the correct birth date is recorded for each child. Tier I providers who wish to begin
claiming their own children should include H1531 forms (Application for Provider's Own
Children) as applicable.
If enrolling a new infant who is on formula, be sure to include a Parent’s
Acknowledgment of Offered Formula form that has been completed and signed by both
the provider and the parent.
Submit a medical statement for children with special dietary needs as applicable (i.e.,
child allergic to milk, infant on low-iron formula, etc.). Be sure a copy is retained on-site
at the facility.
Separate the 2-part NCR forms. Insert all originals (white copies) into the self-addressed,
postage paid envelope provided by the Food and Nutrition Program. File yellow copies
on-site in your facility.
After the last meal/snack served on the last day of the current month, or first thing in the
morning of the next day, mail the envelope. It is best to not procrastinate mailing the
envelope (in hopes of delivering it), or to give it to another person to mail. Too often this
results in late records. Minute Menu Kids users should simply “submit” their information
electronically by clicking on the submit function.
Sit back and relax...your reimbursement is only a few days away!
Food and Nutrition Program, 7/14
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MONITORING VISITS
USDA requires the sponsoring agency of the CACFP to perform monitoring visits of each
provider's home. The monitoring visit has a dual purpose:
•
to provide technical assistance in meeting program requirements as well as to share new
ideas and provide nutrition education, and
•
to verify program participation and review day care operation for compliance with the
program regulations.
The Food and Nutrition Program performs unannounced monitor visits to each home (a
minimum of three times a year). Additional visits may be performed for the purpose of training
and/or technical assistance, to validate a block claim, or if additional verification of program
participation is needed at the discretion of the Food and Nutrition Program staff. In order to
verify program participation, the following schedule of attempted visits may be followed.
•
After the first failed attempt to perform an unannounced monitor visit, the provider may be
contacted by phone or email and asked to explain why program participation could not be
verified. A second monitor attempt will be performed within two weeks.
•
After the second failed attempt to perform an unannounced monitor visit within a 12 month
period of time, the provider may be offered a Corrective Action Plan which will be mailed to
them certified, return receipt requested. Providers do not have the option of not entering into
a Corrective Action Plan if they continue to participate in the program. Corrective Action
Plans will be in effect for a minimum of 30 days. A provider who refuses to enter into a
Corrective Action Plan will be declared seriously deficient and notified of proposed
termination from the food program. If this occurs, the provider will be notified of his/her
appeal rights at the same time.
•
After any failed visit or at the discretion of the nutrition staff, we may choose to contact the
parents of children in care to verify enrollment and attendance.
•
If, during a monitor visit, it is determined that the provider is out of compliance in any area
(examples include: ratio, incomplete forms, serving outside of mealtimes, etc.), the provider
will be informed of the non-compliance and may be reported to the Department of Family
and Protective Services (if the non-compliance is in regards to ratio). The provider may then
be offered a Corrective Action Plan and a follow-up visit may be necessary. The Corrective
Action Plan will allow at least 30 days for the provider to correct the non-compliance. Within
the specified corrective action period, a number of unannounced monitor visits may be
performed. If, at the end of the specified period, the provider is still out of compliance, the
provider will be declared seriously deficient and notified of the intent to terminate program
participation. The provider will be notified of his/her appeal rights at the same time.
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Timing of Visits
In order to fulfill TDA monitoring requirements, the monitor will probably arrive early enough
to see the beginning of the meal service. This means the monitor will usually arrive a few
minutes before the scheduled service of the meal or snack to observe the beginning of the meal
service or to allow time for technical assistance. If at the time the monitor arrives, it is
determined that the meal was served outside of the allowable meal service times (before the
scheduled meal service time, or after the allowable meal service time has elapsed), the provider
will be advised that the meal/snack will not be reimbursable. The monitor will then discuss the
provider’s current meal schedule to determine if changes in meal service times need to be made.
If the staff person is consistently unable to perform a monitor visit due to meals being served
outside of the allowable meal service times, the provider will be offered a Corrective Action Plan
for not less than 30 days in order to facilitate correction of the non-compliance. At least one (1)
unannounced monitor visit will be performed during the course of the corrective action period.
Should the non-compliance be corrected during the corrective action period, no further action
will be taken. Should the non-compliance not be corrected within the specified time period, the
provider will be declared seriously deficient and notified of the intent to terminate program
participation. The provider will be notified of his/her appeal rights at the same time.
Purpose of the Visit
The purpose of the monitor review visit is to assess compliance with meal pattern, record
keeping and sanitation requirements, and observe a meal service, as well as to provide technical
assistance on menus, enrollment and attendance records. (For a detailed description, please refer
to the sample Monitor Review Form in Appendix C).
What You Can Expect of the Food Program Staff
A monitoring visit is a time you can ask questions and explain problems you may be having with
the food program. The food program staff member will usually visit with the children while you
are preparing the meal to allow you to concentrate on getting the food ready.
Our staff members understand that any visit from an adult who is not usually in the day home
may be disruptive to children. Children frequently are excited and deviate from their normal
behavior during monitoring visits. The monitor is there to provide technical assistance and to
review compliance with CACFP regulations, not to judge the behavior of children.
What The Food Program Staff Expects of The Provider
•
Providers should proceed with meal preparation as usual and not feel as if the food
program representative should be entertained.
•
Providers should serve meals within their allowed meal service times (check your
agreement or with your representative if you are not sure of your allowable times).
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•
Providers should request help in understanding the meal patterns and/or meeting the
nutrition requirements. The role of the monitor is to make the food program work. To do
this, he/she needs to understand any food program problems you may be encountering.
•
The provider should facilitate the process by allowing the food program representative to
observe all menu and attendance/meal count records for the current month. Should the
menus or meal counts not be available, the monitor will inform the provider that no
reimbursement can be made for meals/snacks claimed prior to the day of the monitor
visit. If menus or attendance/meal count records are not up to date (or are not produced
for review), the provider may be placed on a Corrective Action Plan in order to facilitate
correction of the non-compliance.
•
Remember that your representative is a resource to assist you in making sure the children
in your care receive the nutrition they need.
Parent Contacts
If even one child is absent the day of the monitor visit and especially if that day is the only day
of absences, the food program staff will be required to contact parents to verify program
participation. Providers will not be notified that parental contacts have been initiated.
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A GUIDE TO GOOD EATING FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
Individual eating patterns are formed by experiences, body type and psychological needs.
Personal food preferences are mostly learned and developed at home throughout early childhood.
Children who are fed foods high in salt and sugar early in life often continue to prefer these
foods throughout their life. Food preferences are also influenced by what is available around the
house and how members of the family react to it.
Physical differences also play a major role in the way a particular person's habits vary from other
members of his/her family. The ability to digest properly, food allergies, and rate of metabolism
can all influence what and how much a person eats. Children sometimes use food and eating
habits as a way to assert control. A child may refuse to eat a sandwich that is cut diagonally
because of a need to show independence. Exhaustion, anger, fatigue, happiness and depression
can all influence the way a child eats. Providers and parents should avoid forcing children to eat.
This can have harmful, subtle effects on children's feelings about food. Using food as a reward
or punishment should be forbidden. Over-feeding children can also be harmful to good health
and normal growth.
WHY IS NUTRITION IMPORTANT?
The development of healthy lifelong eating habits begins at childhood. However, growth and
development as well as health and survival depend on nutrients. Nutrients such as protein,
carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals and water are the body's fuel. The lack of any one of
these nutrients in childhood can stunt a child's growth, and at any age can lead to illness.
Following is a brief description of nutrients and other products essential for growth and
development.
Protein
Protein is needed for growth, normal body functioning, and disease prevention. Proteins provide
4 calories/gram. Some of the ways the body uses protein include building new tissues, repairing
and replacing tissues, and making antibodies which help fight infection. The protein found in
animal sources such as milk, eggs and meat is referred to as complete protein. Small quantities
of these will meet daily requirements. The protein found in non-animal sources such as grain,
legumes, nuts and seeds are called incomplete or low-quality proteins. It is possible to improve
the quality of protein from non-animal sources by adding small amounts of high-quality protein
to them. By adding cheese to macaroni, hamburger to spaghetti sauce or beans to rice, the
incomplete proteins are complimented and together, provide a complete protein. More protein
per pound of body weight is needed during infancy than at any other period of life.
Carbohydrates
Carbohydrates (CHO) are necessary in the diet to provide energy. When people eat rich sources
of CHO, such as fruits and vegetables, they obtain energy directly at the rate of 4 calories/gram.
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The digested form of CHO is glucose which is the body's main source of energy. It is a
necessary source of energy for the brain, and is required for nerve tissues and the liver to
function. Food sources of CHO are fruits, vegetables, sugar cane, beets, cereal grains, legumes,
nuts, honey, and milk. Parents must decide if and when sugar should be added to their children's
diets. If children learn to enjoy wholesome foods early in life, sweets might be added
legitimately. In any event, they should never be added as a reward or bribe, since children may
reject other good sources of vitamins, minerals, fiber and protein in place of sweets that are high
in calories and low in nutrients.
Fats
Fats are the most concentrated form of energy. They provide 9 calories per gram. They produce
twice as much energy as protein and CHO. They produce and carry the fat soluble vitamins such
as A, D, E, and K as well as the essential fatty acids. Some sources of fat are butter, margarine,
shortening, oil, salad dressing and meat. Extra protein and carbohydrates not needed by the body
are converted to fat. Parents and providers must learn to read the labels carefully. Fats,
margarines, and salad dressings made from vegetable oils are the best choices. However, not all
vegetable oils are acceptable as good sources of fat. Palm and coconut oils are very high in
saturated fats and therefore, are not healthy choices of fats.
Cholesterol
Cholesterol is found only in animal products including dairy products, egg yolks and red meats.
Three hundred milligrams of cholesterol per day has been recommended as the maximum daily
requirement. Saturated fat and cholesterol in excess can lead to clogged arteries which can cause
heart attacks and strokes. Moderate intakes of cholesterol in babies and toddlers help develop a
normal mechanism for utilization of cholesterol in the body in adulthood. For this reason it is
not advisable to restrict the level of cholesterol for infants. Cholesterol levels of young children
should only be moderately restricted if the cholesterol level of a child is shown to be above
normal. Parents and providers are encouraged to modify the amount of cholesterol in the diet by
following the guidelines indicated:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use olive oil, canola oil (Puritan) or peanut oil instead of butter or margarine.
If you need to use margarine, purchase the kind that is in a tub rather than stick.
Drain the excess fat from meats after cooking. Avoid animal fats, palm or coconut oil,
and fats that are solid at room temperature.
Choose lowfat or skim milk and cheeses (only for children over two years of age).
Trim excess fat from beef or pork; skim the chicken or turkey prior to cooking.
Include fish in your meal plan two to three times each week.
Eat a high fiber diet including whole grains, oats, brans, and fruits and vegetables with
skins.
Calories
The body needs calories to work and operate all its systems. The number of calories infants,
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children, adolescents and adults require daily varies according to a number of factors. These
factors are as follows:
Age:
Size:
Sex:
Health:
Physical Activity:
Pregnancy:
Children need more calories per pound of body weight than adults due
to their rapid rate of growth.
Larger people require more total calories.
Men need more calories than women.
More calories are needed during illness and after surgery.
Exercise requires more calories.
Pregnant and nursing women require additional calories.
Vitamins & Minerals
Vitamins and minerals are organic and inorganic compounds that are found in plants and
animals. Therefore, they can be found in all foods. Only a small amount of vitamins and
minerals are needed to regulate various body functions, and to promote growth and good health.
Vitamins and minerals always work with other foods; they are not a substitute for protein,
carbohydrates or fats. Parents and caregivers should not give infants or children vitamin/mineral
supplements without consulting a pediatrician. Providing children a variety of foods including
the basic four food groups will assure adequate vitamin/mineral supplementation. Steaming is an
excellent way of retaining vitamins in vegetables.
Water
Water contains no calories. It contains fluoride and small amounts of minerals. The human
body cannot survive without water. Eighty-five percent of the body composition of newborns
and 66% of the adult body composition is made up of water. Water transports nutrients in the
blood, and assists in the process of digestion, absorption, and elimination. It also maintains body
temperature. Replacement of water on a daily basis is essential. Parents need to be especially
aware of their children's water consumption on hot days. Also, since fever and diarrhea greatly
increases the need for fluids, parents should provide extra water under those circumstances.
PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER - THE BASIC 4 FOOD GROUPS
Almost all the food and the nutrients in each food can be categorized into four major groups;
Meat, Milk, Grains/Breads, and Vegetables/Fruits. These categories are called the basic four
food groups. (Note: To view a sample of a modified food group guide known as The Food
Guide Pyramid, refer to Appendix C). Following is a general overview of each group and
guidelines of what each group contains:
Meat Group
The foods in this group provide important sources of protein, iron, and other minerals and
vitamins. They include beef, veal, lamb, pork, poultry, fish, shellfish, liver, dry beans and peas,
eggs, seeds and nuts. The food sources in the meat group assist in making red blood cells and
body tissues, maintaining a healthy nervous system, increasing resistance to infections, and
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promoting appetite.
Milk Group
The milk group provides most of the calcium and phosphorus needed by children and adults. It
also provides vitamin A, protein and if fortified, it provides vitamin D. In addition, whole milk
and lowfat milk contribute a certain amount of fat to the diet. Other foods in the milk group
include yogurt, ice cream, ice milk, and cheeses. In the Child and Adult Care Food Program,
the only reimbursable item in the milk group is fluid milk. Yogurt can be served to children as a
meat substitute and hence can be reimbursed for meat.
Foods in the milk group assist in building and maintaining healthy bones and teeth, repairing
body tissues, and helping muscles and nerves to function properly.
Grains and Breads Group
Enriched and whole grain breads and cereals are important sources of the B vitamins, iron, and
fiber. They also provide carbohydrates and some protein in the diet. Food sources include:
whole grain and enriched breads, biscuits, muffins, waffles, pancakes, cooked and ready to eat
cereals, corn meal, flour, grits, macaroni and spaghetti noodles, rice, rolled oats, barley, bulgur,
and corn and flour tortillas. Their function is to provide energy, promote and maintain a healthy
appetite and nervous system.
Vegetables and Fruits Group
The food sources in this group provide carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins, iron and other minerals. It
is important to eat at least one fruit or vegetable high in vitamin C every day; and one fruit or
vegetable high in vitamin A every other day. Most dark green and deep yellow fruits and
vegetables are good sources of vitamins A and C. For a complete list please refer to the handout
"Good Sources of Vitamin A & C" in your manual. The function of fruits and vegetables are to
maintain healthy tissues, increase resistance to infections, strengthen blood vessels, promote
regular bowel movement and to promote a healthy vision.
Other Foods
In addition to the basic four food groups, there are other foods such as fats and oils that are high
in calories and low in nutrients. Foods in this group include butter, margarine, lard, drippings,
mayonnaise, salad dressings, oils, gravies, candy, sugar, jams, jellies, syrups, and soft drinks.
Eliminating fats entirely from the diet stops children's growth and leads to fatty acid deficiency.
However, caution should be taken not to over indulge in fats, as this can cause further
complications in adulthood.
DAILY RECOMMENDED SERVINGS FOR CHILDREN
FROM THE BASIC FOUR FOOD GROUPS
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Milk & Dairy Products:
Meat & Protein Foods:
Fruits & Vegetables:
Breads & Cereals:
2-3 Servings
2-3 Servings
3-9 Servings
6-11 Servings
All the nutrients needed for children's growth and development are found among the foods in the
four groups. The size and number of servings will vary with age.
MEALS FOR CHILDREN
Likenesses of children in terms of foods changes constantly. One week a child may eat an entire
serving of carrots and the next week he will make a face and say, "carrots are 'yucky.'" Many
children refuse to try new foods and some may refuse to eat almost all varieties of the same
family of foods such as green vegetables. Nevertheless, they continue to grow and develop to a
normal rate. Children must have a balanced diet and the most sensible way to plan meals for
children is to use the basic four food guide.
FEEDING INFANTS
Generally, infants double their birth weight in the first four months. On average, babies need 45
- 50 calories for each pound of weight. Infancy is the only time when the basic four food guide
does not apply. For the first 4 - 6 months, all the basic nutrients and calories should come from
breast milk or formula. Many doctors recommend that solid foods be delayed until six months,
especially if the body is adequately gaining weight. Prior to four months infants are not
developmentally ready for solid foods. Generally, iron fortified dry cereals are given as the
baby's first solid food. Parents and providers should introduce only one solid food at a time in
order to detect any food sensitivities. A baby's food should not be seasoned with salt or sugar.
By six or seven months of age, ripe bananas, cooked, soft, fork mashed fruits and vegetables are
introduced to the baby. About eight months after birth, minced foods such as meats, breads,
potatoes, rice, and crackers can be introduced. Babies at this age can start enjoying family meals
with age appropriate consistency.
Between 8 - 12 months babies can be weaned from the breast or bottle and moved to drinking
from a cup. When weaning, the breast or bottle should be eliminated one feeding at a time over
a period of a few weeks. Whole milk should be fed to children until the age of two. For proper
growth and development, children need the fats found in whole milk.
MEALS FOR TODDLERS
Most children triple their weight and double their height by the first year of life. During toddler
years, children have a tendency to eat less since the child's environment occupies more of his/her
interest than food. This makes feeding toddlers a challenging task. Toddlers approach meals as
a contest of dominance and control. Caregivers should offer a variety of foods to toddlers, but
never force them to eat everything that is on the table. Children should be given at least one
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food that they like in addition to other foods that are being offered. Approximately, 1/4 to 1/3 of
adult portions should be given to toddlers.
MEALS FOR PRESCHOOLERS AND SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN
In contrast to toddlers, preschoolers and older children enjoy meals and view the meal time as an
opportunity to sit together with the rest of the family. The basic four food groups with serving
sizes of one tablespoon for each year of life should be used as a guide to feed preschoolers and
school age children. Caregivers should keep in mind that presenting too much food is worse
than not enough. Let children ask for additional servings if they are hungry.
PICKY EATERS
Most children tend to be picky about food. Parents and caregivers should be prepared to deal
with children's refusal to eat certain types of food. They should handle these situations with
encouragement rather than forcefulness. Children, like adults have food preferences.
Parents/caregivers should respect those preferences. There are however, some techniques that
will encourage a child to eat foods that are nourishing and make eating good food easier.
If a child is picky about drinking milk: Different ways of introducing milk to children may be
challenging and may entice children to drink the milk more readily. Letting children pour their
own milk, or the addition of a new mug or a fancy straw may add enough interest to make the
milk more enticing. Hot cereals can be cooked with milk or milk can be poured on top or mixed
in before serving to avoid the routine of drinking out of the same glass.
If a child is picky about eating meats: Mincing, grinding, cutting in bite size pieces, or
choosing easy to chew meats such as chicken and turkey can make eating meats a little easier for
young children. If the child refuses to eat any kind of meat, other sources of protein such as
eggs, milk, cheeses, peanut butter or cooked dry beans and peas should be offered.
If a child is picky about eating breads and cereals: Cooked cereals served warm rather than
hot, may be a welcome change for children who do not care to eat dry cereals. Try adding fresh
or dried fruits such as bananas, raisins, apricots, apples, etc. to cereals to make them more
appealing. Offer bread that is cut into interesting shapes with cookie cutters or try toasting bread
as an alternative if a child is picky about eating bread. Additionally, rice and a variety of pastas
can offer the same vitamins and minerals as bread and cereals.
If a child is picky about eating fruits and/or vegetables: Try introducing fruits in a form of a
shake by adding chopped fresh fruit, fruit juices, ice and milk (or any combination of them).
Most children dislike vegetables especially the green variety. Shredding lettuce, and adding it to
sandwich spreads; chopping celery, carrots, or zucchini and adding it to spaghetti sauce; or
baking them in muffins or quick breads are ways of disguising vegetables in food. Vegetables
that are steamed or stir fried until they are just crunchy and bright in color, will contain more
vitamins and are more welcomed by children.
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GENERAL GUIDELINES
In planning menus, use a variety of colors, textures, and shapes to entice children to eat. Milk or
egg whites can be added to macaroni and cheese or casseroles to increase the level of calcium,
protein, and other nutrients.
If however, the child does not want to try a new food or certain foods, parents should not worry.
It is not going to harm a child's health if the vegetable or the meat is left on the plate for a meal
or two.
If a child rejects a new food, he/she should not expect that his/her favorite food be substituted at
all times. Serving a nutritious, well-balanced diet is likely if parents offer a variety of foods
from the basic four food groups.
In planning meals, providers and parents should use a variety of foods, exercise flexibility, and
provide a happy atmosphere to keep the children well fed and properly nourished.
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FAMILY DAY CARE, TAXES, AND THE IRS
Day care providers, like all other self-employed owners of small businesses, are required by law
to file an income tax return. Many providers often mistakenly believe that filing income tax
returns for their day care businesses means big dollars going to Uncle Sam. This is not so,
especially if a provider keeps accurate records of all her expenses during the course of a given
year.
The most frequently asked question by day care providers about filing taxes on their child care
business is, "What kind of records do I need to keep?"
Providers should keep careful records of all income and all expenses to their day care programs.
Make sure to keep accurate records of all payments made to you by parents of your day care
children as well as reimbursements from The Food and Nutrition Program for food. It helps to
organize your records by maintaining separate income sheets for each family. That way at the
end of the year, you can simply add up the payments to get a total figure of your income, on a
per family basis. This is also helpful to parents claiming dependent care tax credits on their IRS
forms.
Keeping accurate expense records may be tedious, but is absolutely essential to all day care
providers who want to be eligible for maximum tax benefits for operating their home businesses.
The easiest way to keep expense records is to keep a daily log of all expenditures. Make sure
that you record the date, the amount, what the expenditure is for, and from where the purchase
was made. Hold on to all receipts! Income and expense records are not difficult to keep. It's
just a matter of setting up a system for maintaining records and then sticking to it! It will be
helpful to use a high lighter to separate the food purchases for day care from other groceries
bought for your own family.
Helpful Hints:
1.
2.
3.
Keep record of all expenses and income from child care.
Use a separate checking account for your child care business.
Save all receipts. Label and categorize your receipts.
Deductible expenses include but may not be limited to the following:
Business use of your home, depreciation of your home, advertising for new children, business
use of your automobile, day care insurance, supplies (i.e., paper, crayons, markers, etc.),
licensing fees, physical examinations, baby furniture and equipment including toys if used
only in the day care, food costs that exceed the CACFP reimbursement (listing food program
monies on your returns will not result in an audit, but not listing the money will).
For a complete list of deductions, refer to the IRS Publication #529 "Miscellaneous
Deductions." Additional IRS publications of interest to Family Day Home Providers may be
obtained free of charge from the local IRS office. These forms include:
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#334
#529
#535
#587
#917
#534
#533
Tax Guide for Small Business
Miscellaneous Deductions
Business Expense and Operations Losses
Business use of Your Home
Business use of Your Car
Depreciation
Self Employment Tax
You may also wish to refer to the tax resource guide in Appendix E.
For additional information on Family Day Care Taxes, visit the website of the Redleaf National
Institute at www.redleafinstitute.org.
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