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B
R O O K D A L E
C
O M M U N I T Y
Biology 213 Syllabus
Microbiology
C
O L L E G E
Syllabus
CODE:
TITLE:
BIOL 213
INSTITUTE: STEM
Microbiology
DEPARTMENT: Biology
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The biology of pathogenic microorganisms will be stressed, emphasizing their microscopic and molecular
aspects. Students will describe, in detail, the relationship existing between the host-parasite complex during the diseased state. They
will also become acquainted with those characteristics which endow certain microbes with a pathogenic nature. Students will be able
to list and characterize various pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic parasites (including fungi, algae, protozoa, and helminths).
Isolation and identification techniques in microbiology will be mastered by the student in the laboratory. The role of chemotherapy,
immunology and serology used to combat pathogens will be examined thoroughly. Finally, the homeostatic defense mechanism of the
body, especially those against invading microorganisms, will be discussed in great detail.
PREREQUISITES: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102 or BIOL 112.
COREQUISITES: None
CREDITS:
4
LECTURE HOURS:
3
LAB HOURS:
3
REQUIRED MATERIALS:
Foundations in Microbiology, Talaro & Chess, 9 th edition, 2014
Laboratory Manual: Microbiology Fundamentals, Obenauf and Finazzo, 2013 (Packaged and available in BCC bookstore – ISBN
1259349179)
Photographic Atlas for Laboratory Applications in Microbiology, Chess, 2012 (Optional and included in above package at no
additional cost)
ADDITIONAL TIME REQUIREMENT:
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Demonstrate knowledge of pathogenic microorganisms.

Apply the scientific method in a laboratory research project in the isolation and identification of unknown microorganisms.

Demonstrate knowledge of how chemotherapy, immunology, and serology are used to combat pathogens.
COURSE CONTENT:
Unit
Unit
Unit
Unit
Unit
Unit
Unit
One:
Two:
Three:
Four:
Five:
Six:
Seven:
Introduction to Microbiology and Taxonomy
General Characteristics and Representative Examples of Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic Organisms, & Viruses
Microbial Metabolism, Ecology, & Growth
Microbial Genetics
Antimicrobial Actions
Microbe-Human Interactions
Survey of Microorganisms of Medical Importance
GRADING STANDARD:
Active and frequent participation in each chapter is required for optimum performance in this course. Students will be assessed based
on their participation and performance in class and laboratory:
Lecture exams and quizzes: 75%
Laboratory assignments, quizzes, technique evaluation, practical exams: 25%
2
Syllabus
A student must have an average of 65% or higher for the classroom component and an average of 65% or higher for the
laboratory component of the course in order to earn a passing grade for the course.
Upon completion of the course, grades will be assigned as follows:
A =
A- =
B+ =
B =
B- =
92 – 100%
89 - 91%
86 – 88%
82 – 85%
79 - 81%
C+ =
C =
D =
F =
76 – 78%
70 – 75%
65 – 69%
<65%
Unit examination results will be reported as the grade assigned by the faculty calculated to the first
decimal place. These grades will be weighed according to course grading policy. In calculating the course
grade, 0.5 will round up to the next numerical grade and 0.4 will round down to the next lower numerical
grade.
A grade of C or higher is required in all prerequisite courses. Career studies courses must have a grade of C or higher to count toward
the Mathematics / Science Program – Biology Option.
Students are permitted to withdraw from the course without penalty until approximately 80% of the semester is complete. Please see
term schedule for the exact deadline.
At the end of the semester, application for an Incomplete may be made if a student with proper documentation needs to complete no
more than one lecture exam and/or one laboratory practical. The granting of an Incomplete is at the discretion of the instructor.
(Please see Instructor’s syllabus for additional Grading Policies.)
DEPARTMENT POLICIES:
Attendance during class and laboratory sessions is strongly recommended for optimum performance in biology courses.
Lecture exams will be given in class.
Laboratory practicals will be given during laboratory sessions, in accordance with schedules provided by the learning assistants.
Exams and practicals must be taken at the times designated by the instructor or learning assistant. A student who misses a lecture
exam or laboratory practical must provide prior notification and proper documentation in order to take the exam or laboratory
practical. The acceptance of said prior notification and proper documentation will be determined by the instructor.
Documentation must be provided within one week of the student’s return to the classroom for a make-up exam or laboratory practical
to be scheduled. A student who is unable to provide proper documentation for a missed exam or laboratory practical will be given a
grade of zero for that exercise. Students may not re-take exams or laboratory practicals on which they perform poorly.
Requirements for the completion of laboratory are listed in the laboratory responsibility sheets for individual courses. Requirements
for course completion are listed in individual instructor syllabi.
COLLEGE POLICIES:
For information regarding:
 Brookdale’s Academic Integrity Code
 Student Conduct Code
 Student Grade Appeal Process
Please refer to the STUDENT HANDBOOK AND BCC CATALOG.
NOTIFICATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
Brookdale Community College offers reasonable accommodations and/or services to persons with disabilities. Students with
disabilities who wish to self-identify, must contact the Disabilities Services Office at 732-224-2730 or 732-842-4211 (TTY), provide
appropriate documentation of the disability, and request specific accommodations or services. If a student qualifies, reasonable
accommodations and/or services, which are appropriate for the college level and are recommended in the documentation, can be
approved.
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT/LABS:
BIOL 213 course and laboratory resources are available in CANVAS, Brookdale’s Learning Management System, available via the
Brookdale website: www.brookdalecc.edu
3
Syllabus
Independent Study Laboratory (Open Lab) – MAS 041 – is available to students enrolled in this biology course. Students use
this lab to review lab materials, and to get help with course materials from lab assistants that staff the lab.
Brookdale Biology Department course and program information is available on the Biology Department
website: https://www.brookdalecc.edu/stem-institute/biology/
4
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 1 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY AND TAXONOMY
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapter 1
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
page 2
1. Define microbiology.
2. Compare and contrast microorganisms: viruses,
bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi and helminths
pages 5-6
3. Describe units of measurement used for microorganisms.
page 7
4. Identify various branches in the field of microbiology.
pages 2, 3, 4, 9
5. Describe the significance of microorganisms:
-medically, environmentally and commercially/economically
pages 8,11
6. Recognize the contributions made by scientists to the field of
of microbiology, to include:
Robert Hooke
Anton van Leeuwenhoek
Francesco Redi
Louis Pasteur
Robert Koch
Joseph Lister
Edward Jenner
Hans Christian Gram
Elie Metchnikoff
pages 11-18
Paul Ehrlich
Alexander Fleming
Ernst Chain & Howard Florey
Selman Waksman
Rebecca Lancefield
Avery, MacLeod & McCarty
James Watson & Frances Crick
Nathans, Smith & Arber
7. Describe the contributions of Carolus Linnaeus (the
“Father of Taxonomy”), Robert Whittaker, and Carl Woese
to the field of taxonomy.
pages 19, 23, 24
8. Describe the current system of classification in biology:
domains
5 kingdoms further categories
pages 19, 22, 23 3
9. Describe the classification of prokaryotes and viruses, to
include the criteria used to classify microorganisms.
pages 110-113, 166-168
10. Describe classification systems of prokaryotic domains in
Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology 2nd ed.
5
pages 110-113
Syllabus
11. Describe the classification of eukaryotic organisms to
include criteria used for each group.
12. Correctly use the universal system of scientific naming of
organisms - binomial nomenclature
13. Demonstrate the ability to use dichotomous keys in the
identification of microorganisms.
6
pages 141-143, 144-148, 152-153
pages 19-21
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 2 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS AND REPRESENTATIVE EXAMPLES OF
PROKARYOTIC AND EUKARYOTIC ORGANISMS, AND VIRUSES
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapters 4, 5, & 6
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Compare properties and cell structures in prokaryotes
and eukaryotes.
pages 89,133, Table 5.2
2. Describe sizes, shapes, and arrangement of prokaryotes.
pages 105-108, 114
3. Describe the following prokaryotic cell structures and their
related functions:
pages 90-105
a. Structures external to cell wall
1. Flagella
2. Axial Filaments (periplasmic flagella)
3. Pili and Fimbriae
4. Glycocalyx
a. capsule
b. slime layer
b. Cell wall
1. Functions
2. Composition & characteristics
3. Gram stain
4. Negative Stain
pages 91-93
page 93-94
pages 94
page 94, 96
pages 72-73, 97-100
c. Structures internal to cell wall
1. Plasma membrane
2. Cytoplasm
3. Nucleoid – chromosome
4. Plasmid
5. Ribosomes
6. Inclusions
7. Endospores
pages 100-105-96
4. Describe biofilms and explain their significance
page 95-96
5. Survey prokaryotic groups with unusual characteristics
pages 113-117
6. Describe the history of eukaryotic cells including the
endosymbiotic hypothesis/theory
pages 123-125
7
Syllabus
7. Review eukaryotic cell structures and their functions.
-external
-internal
pages 125-132
8. Describe the basic characteristics of the Kingdom Fungi
including general types of cells and organisms, structure,
and nutrition; differentiate between yeasts and molds, types
of fungal spores; importance in medicine, nature and industry.
pages 134-143
9. Discuss general characteristics of algae, and importance .
pages 143-150
10. Discuss general characteristics, basic morphology of major
groups of parasitic helminths, life cycles, reproduction
pages 151-153
11. Describe viral origin, history, characteristics, structure,
morphology, and importance.
pages 157-166
12. Describe viral multiplication including
-multiplication of animal viruses (DNA and RNA);
damage to host cell
-bacteriophage multiplication, lysogeny
pages 168-172
pages 173-175
13. Discuss cultivation, detection, and treatment of viruses.
pages 175-179
14. Describe nonviral infectious particles including prions and
viroids.
pages 179-180
8
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
#3 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: MICROBIAL METABOLISM, ECOLOGY, AND GROWTH
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapters 2, 7, & 8
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Review composition, properties, and functions of macromolecules.
pages 41-54
2. Describe major categories of nutritional types among organisms.
pages 187-192
3. Define requirements for microbial growth including
-Micronutrients, macronutrients, essential nutrients
-Physical and Chemical Requirements
Carbon, oxygen, water, phosphate, nitrogen, sulfur
Temperature
Osmotic Pressure
pH
pages 186-202; 39-40
4. Define bacterial growth.
pages 208-209
5. Define generation time or doubling time in prokaryotes
page 208
6. Name and describe the stages in the bacterial growth curve.
pages 210-211
7. Discuss direct and indirect methods of analyzing bacterial population
growth.
pages 211-213
8. Discuss the range of ecological associations among microorganisms
and interrelationships between microbes and humans.
pages 202-206
9. Describe the development and significance of biofilm association.
pages 206-207
10. Define metabolism. Describe the following:
-catabolism and anabolism
-role of ATP
-metabolic pathways
-enzymes and enzyme action
-factors influencing enzymatic activity
-oxidation-reduction reactions
-generation of ATP
pages 218-231
11. Demonstrate an understanding of the following metabolic pathways pages 231-246; Appendix A
In microorganisms:
9
Syllabus
Carbohydrate catabolism
Glycolysis
Aerobic Respiration
Bridge reaction (Transition or Preparatory step)
Krebs Cycle
Electron Transport Chain
Anaerobic Respiration
Fermentation reactions
Lipid and protein catabolism
Anabolic pathways
10
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 4 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: MICROBIAL GENETICS
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapters 2, 9, & 10
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Describe the structure of the nucleic acids – DNA & RNA
pages 52-53, 257, 259
2. Describe the relationships among DNA, gene, genome,
chromosome, genotype, phenotype.
pages 257-258
3. Compare the genome of prokaryotes to that of eukaryotes.
pages 258-259
4. Describe the process of DNA replication in prokaryotes.
pages 259-264
5. Describe the process of RNA replication in prokaryotes.
pages 264-268, 271
6. Describe the process of protein synthesis in prokaryotes.
pages 268-271
7. Explain the operon model of gene expression. Describe
regulation of gene expression in bacteria by
induction and repression.
pages 274--276
8. Define mutation. Describe types of mutations and
categories of mutagens.
pages 277-281
9. Compare the mechanisms of genetic recombination in bacteria. pages 281-286
Differentiate between horizontal and vertical gene transfer.
10. Describe the functions of vectors (plasmids and phages)
and transposons.
pages 102, 257, 285-286, 303-304, 373
11. Compare replication strategies in DNA and RNA viruses.
pages 287-288
12. Describe methods and applications of genetic engineering.
pages 294-298, 300-301, 304-306,
307-308, 309-311, 313-315
11
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 5 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIONS
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapters 11 & 12
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Define and differentiate among the major terms for microbial
control including
 Sterilization
 Disinfection
 Antisepsis
 Sanitation
 Degerming
pages 322-325
2. Identify factors that influence effectiveness of antimicrobial
agents or methods.
pages 322-324
3. Identify the targets of antimicrobial control agents.
pages 327-328
4. Describe the actions and effects of physical and chemical
agents or methods used to control microbial growth.
pages 329-348
5. Describe antimicrobial drugs and distinguish between
antibiotics, synthetics, and semisynthetics
pages 354-356, Table 12.3
6. Identify the primary sources if antibiotics.
pages 354, 356
7. Identify characteristics of ideal antimicrobial drugs.
page 377
8. Describe the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial drugs.
pages 356-360
9. Identify commonly used antibacterial drugs according to mode
of action.
page 357-360
10. Identify the modes of action and representative examples of
major antimicrobial groups including:
 Antibacterial drugs
 Antifungal drugs
 Antiparasitic drugs
 Antiviral drugs
11. Describe the mechanisms of drug resistance
pages 361-371
pages 371-376
12
Syllabus
12. Identify side effects of antimicrobial drug use in humans.
pages 375-378
13. Discuss the effects of combining antimicrobial drugs.
pages 204-205, 354-355, 379
14. Describe tests for microbial susceptibility to antimicrobial
drugs.
pages 380-382
13
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 6 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: MICROBE-HUMAN INTERACTIONS
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapter 13
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Define the terms associated with infectious diseases.
pages 389-390
2. Define normal microbiota. Distinguish between resident and
transient microbiota. Identify sites that harbor normal microbiota
and those that are microbe-free.
pages 389-397
3. Discuss the major factors in the development of an infection
including entry, adhesion, multiplication, effects. Compare
endotoxins and exotoxins.
pages 397-406
4. Describe the clinical stages of disease.
pages 406-407
5. Discuss the patterns of infection and distinguish between
localized and systemic, focal and mixed, primary and
secondary, endogenous and exogenous infections.
pages 399, 407-408
6. Use correct terminology to explain the manifestations (signs
and symptoms) of infections and inflammation.
page 408
7. Describe the transmission of disease by identifying reservoirs
of infection, distinguishing between types of vectors, and types
of carriers. Define zoonoses.
pages 410-412
8. Describe the transmission of disease. Distinguish between
communicable, noncommunicable, and contagious diseases.
pages 413-415
9. Define nosocomial infections and explain their significance.
pages 418-420
10. Define epidemiology and explain the major methods of
tracking infections and diseases in a population.
pages 415-418
11. Differentiate among the patterns of disease outbreaks
according to frequency, number, location, and duration.
pages 407-408, 416-418
12. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of Koch’s Postulates. pages 17, 18, 419
14
Syllabus
BIOL 213
Course No.
Microbiology
Title
# 7 of 7 Units
4
Credits
Name of Unit: SURVEY OF MICROORGANISMS OF MEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition, Chapters 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, & 25
Method of Evaluation: Lecture Exams and Quizzes, Laboratory Practicals, Quizzes, and Project
Objectives
Recommended Learning Experiences
The student will be able to:
Class Discussion
Textbook Readings:
1. Summarize common procedures used for identifying pathogens
and diagnosing infections.
pages 521-538
2. Describe each of the following bacteria to include:
 general characteristics: structure, arrangement, staining
properties
 metabolic and pathogenic properties
 diseases caused in humans and locations in body
A. Gram-Positive cocci
1.) Staphylococcus
2.) Streptococcus
3.) Enterococcus
pages 544-551
pages 552-561
pages 545, 557
B. Gram-Negative cocci
1.) Neisseria
2.) Moraxella
pages 562-568
page 569
C. Gram-Positive endospore forming bacilli
1.) Bacillus
2.) Clostridium
pages 575-578
pages 579-585
D. Gram-Positive Regular Non-spore-forming bacilli
1.) Listeria
pages 586-587
E. Gram-Positive Irregular Non-spore-forming bacilli
1.) Corynebacterium
2.) Propionibacterium
pages 588-589
page 589
F. Mycobacterium: Acid-Fast Bacilli
1.) M. tuberculosis
2.) M. leprae
pages 589-595
pages 595-598
G. Actinomycetes: Filamentous bacilli
1.) Actinomyces
2.) Nocardia
pages 598-599
page 599
15
Syllabus
H. Gram-Negative Aerobic Bacilli
1.) Pseudomonas
2.) Burkholderia, Acinetobacter
3.) Brucella
4.) Francisella
5.) Bordetella
6.) Legionella
pages 600-608
pages 256, 288, 569, 609
page 609
page 610
pages 610-611
pages 612-613
I. Gram-Negative Facultative Anaerobic Bacilli
- Family Enterobacteriaceae
1.) Coliform Enteric Organisms:
E. coli
Serratia
Klebsiella
Enterobacter
Citrobacter
pages 613-626
pages 617-619
2.) Noncoliform Enteric Organisms:
Proteus
Providencia
Morganella
page 620
3.) True Enteric Pathogens:
Salmonella
pages 620-626
Shigella
Yersinia enterocolitica
4.) Nonenteric Organism:
Yesinia pestis
pages 619-621
-Family Pasteurellaceae
1.) Pasteurella
2.) Haemophilus
page 626
pages 627-628
J. The Spirochetes
1.) Treponema
2.) Leptospira
3.) Borrelia
pages 634-642
pages 634-638
pages 639-640
pages 640-642
K. Curviform Gram-Negative Bacteria
1.) Vibrio
2.) Campylobacter
3.) Helicobacter
pages 643-647
pages 643-646
page 646
pages 646-647
L. Order Rickettsiales
1.) Rickettsia
2.) Ehrlichia
3.) Anaplasma
4.) Coxiella
5.) Bartonella
pages 648-653
pages 649-651
pages 651-652
page 651
page 652
pages 652-653
M. Family Chlamydiaciae
1.) Chlamydia
2.) Chlamydophila
pages 653-656
pages 653-655
pages 655-656
16
Syllabus
N. Cell-Wall-Deficient Bacteria
1.) Mycoplasma
pages 656-657
3. Describe Fungi of Medical Importance to include:
 general characteristics
 degree of pathogenicity
 nature of infection (primary or secondary; true or
opportunistic)and infecting form
 habitat and geographic location
 metabolic and pathogenic properties
 organization of fungal diseases (mycoses)
 characteristics of common antifungal drugs
pages 667-672
A. Systemic Fungal Pathogens
1.) Histoplasma
2.) Coccidioides
3.) Blastomyces
pages 143, 668, 673-674, 682
pages 143, 668, 675-676
pages 143, 668, 677-678
B. Subcutaneous Fungal Pathogens
1.) Sporothrix
pages 668. 678-679
C. Cutaneous Fungal Pathogens (Dermatophytes)
1.) Tricophyton
2.) Microsporum
3.) Epidermophyton
pages 143, 668, 680-683
pages 143, 668, 680-683
pages 143, 668, 680-683
D. Opportunistic Fungal Pathogens
1.) Candida
2.) Cryptococcus
3.) Pneumocystis
4.) Aspergillus
pages 143, 366, 668, 684-685
pages 143, 662, 668, 686
pages 593, 668, 686-687
pages 660, 668, 687-688
4. Define terms associated with parasitology
pages 151, 696-697
5. Describe Parasites of Medical Importance to include
pages 696-725
 general characteristics of each group of parasitic pathogens
 portals of entry, habitat, geographic location
 diseases caused in humans and location in the body
 antiparasitic drugs of choice
A. Protozoan Pathogens 1.)
Amoeboid Protozoa
a. Entamoeba
b. Naegleria
pages 149, 150, 697-700
pages 149, 150, 700
2.) Ciliate Protozoan
a. Balantidium coli
pages 148, 149, 700-701
17
Syllabus
3.) Flagellate (Mastigophoran) Protozoa
a. Trichomonas
b. Giardia
c. Trypanosoma
pages 148, 149, 701-702
pages 148, 149, 403,702
pages 148, 149, 403, 702-705
4.) Apicomplexan Protozoa
a. Plasmodium
b. Toxoplasma
c. Cryptosporidium
d. Cyclospora
e. Babesia
pages 148,149, 688, 707-710
pages 148, 149, 710-711
pages 148,149, 150, 678-679, 686, 711-712
pages 148, 149, 151, 712
pages 148, 712
B. Helminthic Pathogens
pages 713-722
1.) Nematodes (Roundworms)
a. Ascaris
b. Trichuris trichiura
b. Enterobius
c. Trichinella
d. Wuchereria
e. Onchocerca
f. Loa loa
g. Necator americanus
h. Dracunculus
pages 713, 714, 717
pages 122, 714, 717
pages 704, 707-708
pages 714, 718
pages 714, 719-720
pages 714, 721
pages 714, 721
pages 714, 721
pages 714, 718-719
pages 714, 722
2.) Trematodes or Flukes (Flatworms)
pages 722-725
a. Schistosoma
b. Fasciola
c. Paragonimus
pages 714, 722-723
pages 714, 723
pages 714, 723
3.) Cestodes or Tapeworms (Flatworms)
pages 714, 705, 714-715
a. Taenia solium, T. saginata
b. Diphyllobothrium
c. Echinococcus
pages 714, 724-725
page 714
page 718
6. Differentiate among the Arthropod vectors of infectious
disease
pages 725-727
7. Describe DNA and RNA Viruses that infect humans. Discuss
 general characteristics, identification, diagnosis,
classification, effects of infection on host cells
 diseases and location in the body
pages 734-793
A. Enveloped Double-stranded DNA Viruses
pages 737-747
1.) Poxviruses (Poxviridae)
a. Variola, Vaccinia
pages 167, 737-739
pages 167, 737-739
18
Syllabus
2.) Herpesviruses (Herpesviridae)
a. Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and HSV-2)
b. Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV)
c. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)
d. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
e. Herpesviruses 6, 7, 8
pages 739-747
pages 167, 735, 739-743
pages 167, 735, 743-744
pages 735, 745-747
pages 167, 735, 745
pages 735, 747
3.) Hepadnaviruses (Hepadnaviridae)
a. Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)
pages 167, 735, 748-751
pages 167, 735, 748-751
B. Nonenveloped Double-stranded DNA Viruses
1.) Papillomaviruses (Papillomaviridae)
a. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
pages 751-753
pages 167, 752-753
pages 167, 752-753
C. Nonenveloped Single-stranded DNA Viruses
1.) Parvoviruses (Parvoviridae)
a. Parvovirus (Erythrovirus)
page 754
pages 167, 754
pages 167, 754
D. Enveloped Segmented Single-stranded RNA Viruses
1.) Orthomyxoviruses (Orthomyxoviridae) (ss-)
a. Influenza virus A, B, C
pages 167, 760-765
pages 167, 760-765
2.) Bunyaviruses (Bunyaviridae) (ss-)
a. Hantavirus
pages 167, 748, 765
pages 167, 761, 765-766
E. Enveloped Nonsegmented Single-stranded RNA Viruses
1.) Paramyxoviruses (Paramyxoviridae) (ss-)
a. Paramyxovirus (parainfluenza virus types 1-5 and
mumps virus)
b. Morbillivirus (measles/rubeola virus) (ss-)
c. Pneumovirus (respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (ss-)
pages 167, 761, 767-768
pages 167, 761,770
pages 167, 761,770
2.) Rhabdoviruses (Rhabdoviridae) (ss-)
a. Lyssavirus (Rabies virus)
pages 168, 770-772
pages 168, 761, 770-772
3.) Filoviruses (Filoviridae) (ss-)
a. Ebola virus
b. Marburg virus
page 167, 748
pages 167, 751, 766
pages 167, 753
4.) Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) (ss+)
a. Coronavirus /Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Virus (SARS) (ss+)
pages 168, 772
5.) Togaviruses (Togaviridae) (ss+)
a. Rubivirus (Rubella/ German Measles))
pages 167, 761, 773-774
pages 167, 478, 761, 773-774
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pages 167, 767
pages 168, 761, 766, 773-774
Syllabus
b. Alphavirus (Yellow Fever, Eastern & Western Equine
Encephalitis, Chikungunya virus)
pages 167, 761
6.) Flaviviruses (Flaviviridae) (ss+)
a. Flavivirus (Dengue Fever virus, West Nile Fever virus,
Hepatitis C virus (HCV))
pages 167, 321, 348, 748, 761, 766, 774
7.) Picornaviruses (Picornaviridae) (ss+)
a. Enterovirus (Poliovirus, Coxsackie virus)
b. Hepatovirus (Hepatitis A virus (HAV))
c. Rhinovirus (Common Cold virus)
pages 167, 772-780
pages 11, 167, 512, 787, 789-790
pages 167, 748, 761, 790
pages 167, 198, 761, 787, 790-791
8.) Caliciviruses (Caliciviridae) (ss+)
a. Calicivirus / Norovirus (Norwalk agent)
pages 167, 786, 791
F. Double-stranded Nonenveloped RNA viruses
1.) Reoviruses (Reoviridae )
a. Rotavirus
pages 165, 167, 791-792
pages 167, 481, 761, 791-792
G. Double-stranded Enveloped RNA viruses produce DNA
using Reverse transcriptase
1.) Retroviruses (Retroviridae)
a. Lentivirus (HIV)
b. Oncornavirus (Human T-Cell Lymphotropic virus I)
(HTLV-1) (Leukemia)
pages 777-786
pages 178, 288, 777-786
pages 166, 168, 777
pages 168, 172, 287, 736-737
8. Define Arbovirus; describe the pathology and mode of
Transmission of arboviruses
pages 774-777
9. Explain the pathogenesis, transmission, and epidemiology
of prion diseases
pages 179-180, 324, 761, 792-793
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