Download SATURATION REGION GATE VOLTAGE VGS DR A IN V O LTA G E

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts
no text concepts found
Transcript
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
MCC092:LECTURE2TheMOSFETTask#1OperatingregionsTaskonpage3
Then-channelMOSFET
1.2
D
OFFREGION
SATURATIONREGION
DRAINVOLTAGEVDS
SupplyvoltageVDD=1.2V
LINEARREGION
Electrons
move
upwards
G
0
S
A
1.2
VGS=
VDS=
B
1.2
0
0.8
.8
VGS=
VDS=
0.2
7GATEVOLTAGEV
C
0.1
0
GS
D
0.4
1.2
0.1
0.6
VGS=
VDS=
1.2
VGS=
0 VDS=
0
IDS
1.2
I DS =
k
2
(VDD − VX − VT )
2
Whichoperatingregionhere?
VX
OFFREGION
1.2
VDD-VT
VDD
VX
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
GATEVOLTAGEVGS
-0.3
Thep-channelMOSFET
-1.2
0
DRAINVOLTAGEVDS
-1.2
1.2
A
B
1.2
0.8
.8
0
VGS=
VDS=
D
1.2
0
1.1
VGS=
VDS=
1.2
1.2
0.6
0
1.1
VGS=
VDS=
C
1.2
VGS=
VDS=
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
On the two previous pages calculate VGS and VDS for the nMOS transistor and the pMOS
transistor. For each type of transistor mark where the points A-D are located in the transfer
diagram in the upper right corner.
Task#2MOStransistorparameters–equivalentresistanceandcapacitance
In this course we generally use a 65 nm CMOS process. In the name “65 nm” refers to the
minimum transistor length (which actually is 60 nm, a bit strange but that is the way it is).
According to the manufacturer, the maximum currents that these minimum-length MOSFETs
can deliver or sink for a gate voltage equal to VDD, are 600 µA/µm for the n-channel devices,
and 300 µA/µm for the p-channel devices. Furthermore, the gate oxide capacitance, Cox, is 20
fF/µm2 for both pMOS and nMOS transistors. The supply voltage, VDD, is 1.2 V in this
process.
In the nMOS-transistor output diagram shown above, the red line corresponds to an effective
resistance R that can be used to model the capability of the transistor to deliver or sink
current over the entire drain voltage range between the supply voltages (0 V and VDD). (We
will talk more about that when we get to the inverter in lecture 3).
a) Calculate the effective resistances for 1 µm wide nMOS and pMOS transistors.
b) Calculate the gate capacitance, CG, for the same 1 µm wide nMOS and pMOS transistors.
c) Calculate the RC time constants RCG for the two nMOS and pMOS transistors above.
d) What if we double the widths of the nMOS and pMOS transistors to 2 μm? What are the
effects on the effective resistances, gate capacitances, and RC time constants?
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
SOLUTIONS:
Then-channelMOSFET
.
D
Electronsmove
upwardsfrom
sourcetohigher
potentialdrain
S
A
1.2
0
B
0.8
.8
VGS=0.8V
VDS=0.1V
1.2
Modified!
C
LINEARREGION
B
0
1.2
VGS=1.2V
VDS=1.2V
OFFREGION
DRAINVOLTAGEVDS
SATURATIONREGION
G
A
D
1.2
SupplyvoltageVDD=1.2V
0.2
1.2
GATEVOLTAGEV
GS
7
0.1
Modified! 0.4
C
0.1
0.6
0
VGS=0.6V
VDS=0.4V
D
1.2
VGS=0.1V
0 VDS=1.2V
0
IDS
1.2
I DS =
VX
ByincreasingVXslowlytowardsVDD,
theMOSFETturnsitselfgraduallyoff.
k
2
(VDD − VX − VT )
2
OFFREGION
SATURATIONREGION
VX
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
Thep-channelMOSFET
micronwiden-channeldevicecan
deliveramaximumdraincurrentof
-1.2
A
300uA,whichisonlyhalfofwhatan
C
n-channelMOSFETcandeliverdueto
alowerholemobility.
S
Holesmove
downwards
fromsourceto
lowerpotential
drain
G
D
0
DRAINVOLTAGEVDS
InST0.65nmCMOSprocessaone
GATEVOLTAGEVGS
-0.3
B
D -1.2
1.2
1.2
S
A
0
G
D
1.1
VGS=-1.2V
VDS=-0.1V
1.2
1.2
1.2
B
C
D
0.8
.8
0.6
1.2
0
VGS=-0.4V
VDS=-1.2V
0.9
VGS=-0.6V
VDS=-0.3V
0
VGS=0V
VDS=-1.2V
Note!Ititespecially
MCC092MOSFETexercisewsolution2016-09-01
Rev1.1
Task 2
a) From the graph we see that we have 𝑅 =
!!!
!!"#$
. A 1 µm nMOS transistor can deliver
600 µA current and a pMOS transistor 300 µA and VDD is 1.2 V. So we have:
!.! V
!.! V
𝑅! = !"" !A = 2 kΩ and 𝑅! = !"" !A = 4 kΩ.
b) The capactiance is in its simplest form (that is when we neglect edge effects)
𝐶! = 𝑊𝐿𝐶!" . It is the same for pMOS and nMOS transistors. We find 𝐶! =
1 µm × 0.06 µm × 20 fF/µm2 = 1.2 fF.
c) The time constant is 𝑅𝐶! . For the nMOS transitor we find: 𝑅! 𝐶! = 2 kΩ ×
1.2 fF = 2.4 ps and for the pMOS transistor: 𝑅! 𝐶! = 4 kΩ × 1.2 fF = 4.8 ps.
d) If we make the transistors 2 µm wide the effctive resistances will be half as large but
the capacitances will be doubled, so the time constants will remain the same. So these
time contants seem to be fundamental for a particular CMOS process. We will talk
more about that next week.