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Transcript
By: Cari LaMolinare
Molly Breyne
C.J Zuppan
A communicable disease is a disease that
you can "catch" from someone or something
else. They spread by contact with bodily
fluids, through the air from a cough or
sneeze, or by touching an infected surface.
Some people may use the words contagious
or infectious when talking about
communicable diseases.

Common Cold

Gonorrhea

Gastroenteritis

Hepatitis

Strep Throat

Whooping Cough

Pink Eye

Rotavirus

Influenza

HIV/AIDS



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62 million cases of the common cold occur each year.
Infectious disease, such as the cold or flu, which are spread by
germs, accounts for 20 million school days lost annually, and cost
the U.S. $120 billion a year.
On average annually in the US: 10-20% of the population gets the
flu. Over 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications,
and about 23,600 people die from flu-related causes.
About 10 million U.S. adults (ages 18 - 69) were unable to work
during 2002 due to health problems spread by infectious germs.
World Health Report 2000 reports that 14 million deaths (25
percent of all deaths in the world in 1999) resulted from infectious
diseases or their complications.
In high-income countries, infectious diseases accounted for only 6
percent of all deaths, whereas in middle-and low-income countries
they accounted for 28 percent of all deaths.
Children younger than 5, but
especially children younger
than 2 years of age

Fever (although not everyone with flu
has a fever)

Cough
Adults 65 years of age and
older

Sore throat

Pregnant women

Runny or stuffy nose

American Indians/Alaskan
Natives

Body aches

Headache

Chills

Tiredness

Sometimes diarrhea and vomiting




People younger than 19 years
of age who are receiving longterm aspirin therapy
People who have certain
medical conditions
Wash your hands- with soap & water!
After using the bathroom
Before preparing or eating food
After changing a diaper
After blowing your nose or sneezing or coughing
After caring for a sick person
After playing with a pet
Get vaccinated
Avoid close contact
Stay at home when you are sick
Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or
cough
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http://www.livestrong.com/article/162224-communicable-diseases-inkids/#ixzz1d3OwA2H2
hes.ucfsd.org/gclaypo/commdise/commdise.html
http://www.livestrong.com/article/83933-common-communicablediseases
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease
http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/communicable_diseases.aspx
http://www.itsasnap.org/snap/statistics.asp
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/school/guidance.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF3XvCrl75I
http://lysol.com/healthy-families/kidz-zone/healthy-hands