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Gluten Free Handout
Why are there many different versions of the gluten-free diet?
When reviewing the following information, it is important to note that there are several coeliac
associations as well as medical groups and universities with different interpretations of a gluten free
diet. The diet also varies from country to country. The major issue is that there are foods which
should be technically free of gluten (eg distilled vinegar); but the possibility of small amounts of
gluten getting through the manufacturing process concerns some of those with coeliac disease. You
may hear many different opinions on oats, vinegar, ketchup and wheat starch. The best advice is to
start with as few processed foods as possible until familiar and comfortable with the diet.
It's important to remember that gluten-sensitivity occurs on a spectrum with coeliac disease being
the most severe presentation. Many more people have non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, which can
cause a range of symptoms both within and outside of the digestive tract.
Foods to Avoid:
NO
Wheat in all forms including spelt, kamut, triticale (a combination of wheat and rye), durum, einkorn,
farina, semolina, cake flour, matzo (or matzah) and couscous. Wheat is found in many bread, cakes,
cereals, cookies, crackers, pretzels, pasta, and pizza crusts, but it can turn up in other products, too. Read
labels to be sure.
Most ingredients with “wheat” in the name including hydrolyzed wheat protein and pregelatinized wheat
protein. Buckwheat, which is gluten free, is an exception.
Barley and malt, which is usually made from barley, including malt syrup, malt extract, malt flavouring
and malt vinegar.
Rye, which is most often found in bread products. It is not typically used to make ingredients.
Breaded or floured meat, poultry, seafood and vegetables, when the breading is made with wheat. Also
meat, poultry and vegetables when they have a sauce or marinade that contains gluten, such as soy and
teriyaki sauces.
Foods that are fried in the same oil as breaded products are not considered to be safe on the gluten free
diet.
Liquorice, which is made with wheat flour, and other candies that contain wheat or barley.
MAYBE
Beer is gluten-free when made from gluten-free grains. Beer made from barley and processed to remove
gluten is not considered to be gluten free.
Dextrin can be made from wheat, which would be noted on the label, and would not be gluten free.
Modified food starch is gluten free, except when wheat is noted on the label, either as “modified wheat
starch,” modified starch (wheat) or if the “Contains” statement at the end of the ingredients list includes
wheat.
Wheat starch is allowed in gluten-free foods if the wheat starch has been processed to remove the gluten
protein. In addition to a gluten-free label, the packaging of any product using safe wheat starch will note
that it has been processed to meet gluten-free standards. Wheat starch in foods that do not also have a
gluten-free label are not safe on the gluten-free diet.
Oats are considered safe on the gluten-free diet if they have been specially processed to prevent crosscontamination by gluten-containing grains. These oats are labelled gluten free. Mainstream oats,
including those commonly used in breakfast cereals, are not considered safe unless they are labelled
gluten free.
Processed cheese (spray cheese, for example) may contain gluten. Real cheese is gluten free.
Seasonings and seasoning mixes can contain gluten. Wheat will be noted on the label as required by law.
Soy sauce is usually fermented from wheat. Only soy sauce made without wheat is gluten free. Look for
soy sauce with a gluten-free label.
Prescription and over-the-counter drugs can contain gluten, although most are gluten free. Check with
the pharmaceutical company, especially if you take the medication on a continuing basis.
Processed cheese (spray cheese, for example) may contain gluten. Real cheese is gluten free.
Seasonings and seasoning mixes can contain gluten. Wheat will be noted on the label as required by law.
Soy sauce is usually fermented from wheat. Only soy sauce made without wheat is gluten free. Look for
soy sauce with a gluten-free label.
What can I eat?
To begin with, there are many foods that you may eat. Fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats and
most dairy foods are gluten-free. Until you are familiar with the diet it is easiest to focus on these
foods and gradually add in gluten-free bakery products and processed foods.
Yes,
to the following-
Fruit
Fruit is free of gluten in its natural state. Be sure to clean all produce thoroughly before using
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Acai
Apples
Apricot
Bananas
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Oranges
Papaya
Passion Fruit
Peaches
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Raspberries
Strawberries
Tamarind
Tangerines
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Blackberries
Blueberries
Cantaloupe
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Pears
Pineapples
Plantains
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Watermelons
Cauliflower
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Garlic
Green Beans
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
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Okra
Onions
Parsley
Peas
Peppers
Potatoes (white and
sweet)
Pumpkins
Radish
Spinach
Squash
Turnips
Watercress
Vegetables
Vegetables are also naturally free of gluten
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Acorn
Agar
Alfalfa
Algae
Arrowroot
Artichoke
Arugula
Asparagus
Avocado
Beans
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
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Meats
Meats are always gluten free unless processed breaded or fried with breadcrumbs unless its gluten free flour
for the batter. Avoid gravy as most gravy has gluten in it.
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Beef
Chicken
Duck
Goat
Goose
Lamb
Pork
Rabbit
Turkey
Quail
Veal
Venison
Eggs and Dairy Products
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Butter (be sure it has no additives)
Casein
Cheese
Cream
Eggs
Milk
Sour Cream
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Yogurt- plain and not flavored
Whey
Flour and grains
This is where you have got to be very careful and really pay attention!
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Almond Flour
Amaranth
Arrowroot
Bean flour
Besan
Brown rice
Brown rice flour
Buckwheat
Cassava
Corn flour
Corn meal
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Corn starch
Cottonseed
Dal
Flaxseed
Millet
Pea Flour
Polenta
Popcorn – without
coating
Potato flour
Quinoa
Other gluten free foods
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Alcohol (most but not beer unless its gluten free)
Baking Soda
Herbs
Honey
Jam
Jelly
Juice
Nuts
Oils
Seeds
Spices (most)
Syrup
Vanilla
Vinegar
Vitamins
Wine
Xanthan Gum
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Rice
Sago
Soy Flour
Tapioca Flour
Taro Flour
Tef
Yeast
Yucca