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Transcript
4
Suddhanshu Bhardwaj et al
sensitivity and re-resistance of isolates and MIC was determined.
Multi drug resistance (MDR) also studied using different combination of
drugs and correlation of the resistance of drugs to enterococci with respect to
infection/colonization was studied.
Results and discussion
A total of 150 isolates were obtained from 9024 clinical samples. Based on
Facklam and Collin (2000) scheme and tellurite reduction test, 2 species of
enterococci viz., 86% E. faecalis (129) and 14% E. feacium (21) were
identified. Based on DDT, enterococcal isolates showing resistance or decreased
susceptibility to various antimicrobials were identified as described in Table 2.
The isolated strains of E. faecalis showed 33.3 % and 37.2% resistant to
Penicillin G and kanamycin, respectively. However, E. faecium resistance
ranged from 52.4 to 100% to various antimicrobials. Vancomycin re-resistance
in E. feacium was not seen whereas, E. faecalis accounted up to 3.9%.
MIC of antimicrobials by agar dilution method[24]
Enterococcal resistance to Penicillin G
The results of the MIC using Penicillin G showed only 1 isolate of
enterococci was sensitive at concentration of ≤12.5 µg/ml which cannot be
correlated with standards of Mendiratta et al.[24]. However, all enterococcal
isolates represented significant relationship with DDT, having MIC ranging
from 25 to ≥ 200 µg/ml. 38 strains of E. faecalis and 10 strains of E.
faecium observed as HLPR (High level penicillin resistance) as per Table 3.
Table 2. Antimicrobial resistance profile of 150 isolates of enterococci by DDT
Antimicrobials
Penicillin
Ampicillin
Gentamycin
Kanamycin
Streptomycin
Vancomycin
NUMBER OF RERESISTANT ISOLATES
E. faecalis (n=129)
E. faecium (n=21)
ReDecreased
Total
ReDecreased
Total
resistant susceptibility (%)
resistant susceptibility (%)
β-lactams
43
0
43
13
0
13 (61.9)
(33.3)
12
0
12 (9.3)
11
0
11 (52.4)
Aminoglycosides
5
0
5 (3.9)
16
1
17 (81.0)
47
1
48
21
0
21 (100)
(37.2)
25
2
27(20.9)
17
1
18 (85.7)
Glycopeptides
1
4
5 (3.9)
0
0
0 (0.0)