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2017
School of Biological Sciences
College of Science
Biological Sciences
Undergraduate
BSc
Majors in Biological Sciences and Biochemistry
Endorsements in Biotechnology, Biosecurity, Ecology and Environmental Science
Cover: Lolohea Ofa, Qituo Ding, Oscar Graham and
Leighton Inglis conduct a research project in the Free
Radical Biochemistry laboratory as part of their course
work for BCHM 381 Biochemical Techniques.
Published September 2016 by the School of Biological
Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800,
Christchurch 8140, New Zealand.
Information is correct as at the time of publication
but is subject to change. The University’s official
regulations and policies are available online at
www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations
Contents
3Welcome
4 Biology at UC
5 Graduate Student Profiles
7 Degree Structure
8 Planning Your BSc in Biology
9 Pathways in Biology
23 Biology Courses
27 Biochemistry Courses
29 School Facilities
30 Field Stations
31 Research Centres
32 Postgraduate Degrees
33 Career Opportunities
34 Contact Information
35Map
Welcome
Biology means the study of
living things. Biologists study
animals, plants and microbes
in many different ways and at
various scales from molecules
and cells to muliticelllular
organisms, populations, and even
ecosystems.
Our courses will help prepare you for a career.
The opportunities for a biologist are far-reaching:
be it in research, teaching, policy, or as a frontline biosecurity officer. You will find our courses
exciting, challenging, and up-to-the minute as
our lecturers are all actively engaged in research
in the Biological Sciences. With two National
Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards and seven
UC Teaching Awards in recent years, we have a
proven track record in excellence in teaching.
We are also host to four Rutherford Discovery
Fellows. The Fellowships support New Zealand’s
most talented early- to mid-career researchers.
It has been suggested that the 21st Century will
belong to the biologist. We now have incredibly
powerful tools available to us - from the
laboratory tools of the molecular biologist to the
computer tools employed by those engaged in
modelling the processes occurring in ecosystems.
This handbook is provided to help you plan
a course of study in Biology. If you have any
questions please contact us.
Welcome to Biology at UC.
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
3
Biology at UC
The Biology major offered at the
undergraduate level provides
a broad-based introduction to
Biology.
Staff and research students in the School are
engaged in research in three areas of biology that
are vital to humankind:
• Biodiversity – defining, sustaining and
rehabilitating the diversity of life contained in
natural and managed ecosystems.
• Biosecurity/Biosafety – protecting our native
biota from threats imposed by invasive
organisms; understanding the potential
impacts of genetic technologies on our
environment
• Biotechnology – the application of biological
understanding to provide products that
benefit society and support sustainable
economic development.
We offer over 40 undergraduate courses in
biology and biochemistry. They are taught
by academic staff with expertise in areas of
biology ranging from genetics, biochemistry
and molecular biology to ecology, conservation
biology and biotechnology. Biology courses also
support multidisciplinary studies such as Health
Studies, Environmental Science, Biosecurity,
Conservation Biology and Management
and Antarctic Studies —Biology at UC offers
something for everyone!
4
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
All our Biology majors will complete the three
100-level core papers: BIOL 111 Cellular Biology
and Biochemistry, BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution
and Conservation and BIOL 113 Diversity of Life.
In addition, Biology majors need to take STAT
101 Statistics 1 as an introduction to statistical
data analysis (unless you have NCEA L3 Maths
achieved with excellence). Finally, all students
that major in biology complete BIOL 209
Introduction to Biological Data Analysis.
Having gained an introduction to the breadth
of Biology, many students start to focus on a
particular area. Such interests are catered for in
the major thematic areas (pathways) described
in pages 9–22. You will see that there is overlap
between the pathways. The overlap is important
– the area of molecular genetics, for example, is
just as important to the study of biodiversity as
it is to the study of animal or plant development!
Entry to Biology
Entry into Biological Sciences is straightforward.
We recommend that you take maths with
statistics at Year 13. The diagram at right shows the
different paths that may be followed to complete
undergraduate and postgraduate studies in
Biology.
Science Pathways at Canterbury
School
Workforce
(Year 13)
BSc
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
excellent
grades
Diploma
Masters
Honours
PGDipSc
1 year
MSc
Part I
BSc(Hons)
1 year
Part II
Doctorate
PhD
3 years
A Career in Biology
Student Profiles
Our undergraduate program is designed to develop your understanding of biological sciences through
theory and practical activities. Our graduates perform diverse jobs all over the world, from remote villages to
capital cities. UC is ranked in the top 3% of universities in the world. A degree from Canterbury is seen by the
world as a quality degree and opens many doors.
‘UC is an excellent choice as ‘The field trips I have been
the courses offered suited
on to the Cass field station
my interests extremely well.’ have definitely enhanced my
appreciation for how
Steve has a clear idea of what he wants to do in
wonderful the environment
his career and has taken on a double degree to
set himself up for it.
of New Zealand is...’
‘My aim is to one day own a company. My
BCom will help me to achieve that, and my BSc
will provide the industry. New Zealand has a
miniature biotechnology scene, so there is plenty
of opportunity for those with the right skills to
help it grow. My dream is to be involved in as
many ventures as I can, specialising in clean
energies and sustainability.’
Steve has long been fascinated by biology, and
after deciding it was an area he wanted to work
in long-term, realised he needed to study the
subject at a higher level.
‘I’m one of those people that will stare at pond
water under the microscope for ages just to
glimpse something weird swim by, or become
awe-struck in a forest by the sheer scale or
biological diversity around me,’ he says.
‘In my Science degree, the labs are definitely the
best part. I have always preferred learning by
discovering things practically. ’
Steve Rowe
Studying towards a Bachelor of Science in
Biotechnology and a Bachelor of Commerce
in Strategy and Entrepreneurship
As she reaches the latter stages of her degree,
Sophie says she has been inspired by her studies
to make science the basis of her future.
‘Every day here I learn new and exciting things
about the wonderful world we live in. Ecology
in particular has become my passion. The field
trips I have been on to the Cass field station have
definitely enhanced my appreciation for how
wonderful the environment of New Zealand is,
and how important it is that we look after it.’
While she was at high school, Sophie was
expecting to study commerce at university, but
was persuaded that her academic strength was
in science. However, by choosing to study at UC,
she was able to do both. ‘Finding out that I could
study Economics in a Bachelor of Science, I was
sold!’ she says. ‘Doing a double major can be very
full-on at times, trying to squeeze everything
into three years, but it is definitely achievable.
Sophie Hale
Studying towards a Bachelor of Science in
Biological Sciences and Economics
‘Biochemistry has a pleasant
mix of molecular biology
and chemistry that lets me
satisfy my curiosity...’
The chemical properties of the health-boosting
enzymes found in the humble kiwifruit are the
focus of Eric’s Master of Science thesis.
‘I am researching the stability and structure of
various bioactive proteins and how different
chemical and physical environments might
affect their activity,’ he explains. ‘I have been
analysing the product processing line to see if
optimisation may be accessible which could
increase the amount of active enzymes present
in the exported product.’
Eric’s project is a collaboration with a
biotechnology company with interests in the
lucrative ‘neutraceuticals’ industry. Thanks to a
Callaghan Innovation scholarship, he is working
in the labs of UC’s Biomolecular Interaction
Centre (BIC) which fosters partnerships between
academic research and industry.
Eric says the real-world uses for such research
make it a fascinating area to work in.
Eric Richards
Recently completed an MSc in Biological
Sciences
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
5
Inspirational Alumni
See more at www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz/inspire/
Shelley has a major role in
the post-earthquake
revitalisation of
Christchurch rivers.
Hugh’s dream of returning
Sara started the ‘Falcon
Hinewai to native bush has
Ambassadors’ programme
been his on-going passion for in New Zealand schools.
nearly 30 years.
Combining her passions for quality science
and clear communication, Shelley started
EOS Ecology—an aquatic science and visual
communication company—soon after graduating
from UC. As Co-director and Principal Scientist,
Shelley is responsible for strategic direction,
managing the science team, maintaining quality,
and undertaking research and commercial work
to identify robust and practical solutions to the
problems facing freshwater and estuary systems
in New Zealand.
Hugh is a world-renowned botanist,
conservationist and cyclist.
Recognised for her expertise in the impacts
of urbanisation on aquatic fauna and the
rehabilitation of aquatic systems, Shelley was
selected as the Ecology Technical Lead for
two key Anchor Projects aimed at revitalising
Christchurch following the earthquakes—Te
Papa Otākaro/Avon River Precinct (ARP) and the
Northern/Eastern Frame. As Ecology and Design
Leader for the ARP in-river works package, Shelley
is also responsible for one of the largest urban
waterway revitalisation programmes in New
Zealand.
Shelley is a member of community groups and
Chairperson of a charitable trust, and regularly
donates her time and her company’s resources to
help the general public on ecology matters.
Shelley McMurtrie
1996 BSc
2001 MSc
6
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
At the age of 5 Hugh began drawing birds and
dreaming of the bush. Following school Hugh
taught in Sarawak with Volunteer Service Abroad
before returning to Christchurch to attend UC,
where he completed degrees in both arts and
science.
Hugh then conducted botanical surveys of the
Aoraki Mount Cook region and then of Stewart
Island / Rakiura, and then. This was followed in
1980s by a five year botanical survey of Banks
Peninsula.
Since 1987 Hugh has managed Hinewai Reserve on
Banks Peninsula, a privately owned nature reserve.
Hugh has written and illustrated over a dozen
books, including the richly illustrated Plant Life on
Banks Peninsula.
He was awarded the Loder Cup in 1987 for his work
with New Zealand flora, followed in 1991 by the
Linnaean Society of London Bloomer Medal for his
contribution to botany. He is a research fellow of
the Koiata Botanical Trust and Landcare Research
- Manaaki Whenua, and a director of the Banks
Peninsula Track Company.
Hugh Wilson
1971 BSc
As a conservation biologist, Sara is interested
in farming landscapes and human-wildlife
conflicts and was also a founding member of the
Marlborough Falcon Conservation Trust.
Her PhD research at UC focused on the efficacy
of reintroducing the threatened New Zealand
falcon (Falco novaeseelandiae) into the vineyards
of Marlborough, New Zealand’s largest wine
region, as both a conservation scheme and as
a source of natural pest control. The research
combined behavioural ecology, ornithology, and
conservation biology to examine the changes
that occurred in the falcons themselves and in
the vineyard ecosystems.
Sara has recently taken up a position at California
State University, Sacramento following her role as
a Post-doctoral Research Scholar at the University
of California Davis where she constructed
predator-prey models to determine whether
barn owls are able to control rodent pests on
Californian farms.
Prior to this Sara was a 2013 David H. Smith
Conservation Research Post-doctoral Fellow at
the University of California Davis and The Nature
Conservancy.
Sara believes that outreach is one of the most
rewarding parts of doing research, and views it as
an important component of her commitment to
conservation.
Dr Sara Kross
2012 PhD
Degree Structure
The Bachelor of Science degree
requires a minimum total of 360
credit points, of which at least
255 points must be from science
courses. The remaining 105 points
can be from science or nonscience courses. The maximum
number of points at 100-level is
135, at least 225 points must be
above 100-level, of which at least
90 must be at 300-level, 60 of
them in a single subject (BIOL)
– this is your major. Students
can take more than 225 points
above 100-level and some choose
to do a double major by taking
two science subjects through to
300-level with 60 points in each.
Biology Endorsements
If you choose so, an endorsement can be added
to your Biology major in recognition of the fact
that your studies have had a particular focus.
There are four endorsements that you can study
towards as a Biology major: the Biotechnology,
Biosecurity, Ecology, and Environmental Sciences
endorsements. All four are also available as
pathways in Biology.
Full regulations for endorsements can be found
at: www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/
bsc_schedule_endorsements.shtml
Biotechnology Endorsement
The Biotechnology endorsement covers
environmental or plant biotechnology.
Environmental biotechnology includes
fundamental research contributing knowledge
about ecological and evolutionary processes;
research underpinning biodiversity and biosecurity
management in New Zealand, and research
directed towards technology development with
dual economic and environmental outcomes.
Biotechnology research has key roles to play in
helping us characterise New Zealand’s indigenous
genetic heritage through biosystematics, to
protect New Zealand’s indigenous genetic
heritage through the provision of tools to identify
biosecurity threats, and, through research, to help
counter the environmental impacts of farming.
Plant biotechnology overlaps with environmental
biotechnology. It is important to recognise
that plant biotechnology goes beyond genetic
Biological Sciences BSc basic degree structure
Biology major courses
Other science courses
Courses from science or other degrees
3 300
Level
300
300
300
300
200
200
2 200
Level
200
200 Biol 209 200
Level
Level
200
200
100
*
1 Biol 111 Biol 112 Biol 113 Stat 101 100
Level
100
100
100
Level
Level
Level
300
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
Level
* Biology majors are strongly recommended to take some chemistry, such as CHEM 114.
The diagrams above show the minimum requirements for a BSc degree with a major in Biology. Many
students take more than 225 points above the 100 level, and most take more than 60 points in their
major. Students must take BIOL 111, BIOL 112, BIOL 113, STAT 101 and BIOL 209 in their degree, and BIOL
309 is strongly recommended, especially for potential postgraduate students. BIOL 309 cannot be used
as part of the minimum 60 points needed at 300 level to major in Biological Sciences.
modification and includes a range of laboratory
based plant tissue culture and plant breeding
techniques. Universities have access to unique
germplasm collections and genomics databases
for research and much research focused on plant
breeding is now regarded as ‘biotechnologyassisted’ and has developed beyond the need to
genetically modify crop plants.
Biosecurity Endorsement
and fauna evolved unique characteristics. The
invasion of New Zealand by humans, and the
organisms that they introduced has drastically
altered its ecology, leading to drastic reductions
in numbers, or even extinctions of the original
animals and plants. In addition, global climate
change is affecting the ecology of New Zealand,
altering the distribution of both native and
introduced organisms. In this rapidly changing
environment it is vital that we continue to train
competent and capable ecologists.
Biosecurity is an emerging issue of both national
and international importance. New Zealand
is particularly well suited for studies related
to biosecurity as it is a small island nation
vulnerable to exotic invasions. Furthermore,
on-going global climate change and its effects
on ecosystems make understanding biosecurity
issues crucial.
Ecology is a major part of the School of
Biological Sciences reflecting its importance
in New Zealand, and indeed in the world. An
endorsement in ecology gives guidance to
our students as they progress through their
undergraduate courses and it sends a clear signal
to potential employers that they have a thorough
grounding in this subject.
The School of Biological Sciences has identified
biosecurity as a major theme in many of its
courses and believes that an endorsement to its
undergraduate major will help students choose
a course of study that will allow flexibility,
but will provide these students with a core
understanding of biosecurity issues. We focus
on two key pathways of biosecurity – molecular/
genetics and ecological/applied.
Ecology Endorsement
Ecology is a broad topic encompassing studies on
individuals, species, populations, communities
and ecosystems, and including behaviour,
evolution, physiology and increasingly, molecular
biology.
Environmental Science Endorsement
Well-educated people with strong technical and
communication skills are needed to help identify,
to monitor and to contribute to solving a variety
of problems associated with the environment
and with the use and allocation of resources and
sustainability.
Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary
approach to the study of the environment,
incorporating its structure and functioning, and
human interactions with the environment. At UC
it is taught across the science departments to
ensure graduates develop a valuable set of skills
that are transferable to a range of careers.
In New Zealand, the study of ecology is especially
important. As a small group of islands separated
from larger land masses, the New Zealand flora
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
7
Planning Your BSc in Biology
Biological Sciences Major
The Bachelor of Science, or BSc degree, is a
three-year undergraduate degree requiring 360
points. The School offers undergraduate majors
in Biological Sciences (BIOL) and Biochemistry
(BCHM). Our three core 100 level courses (BIOL
111, BIOL 112, BIOL 113) provide a comprehensive
overview of Biology and our 200- and 300-level
courses provide advanced training in specialised
areas. We believe that this broad approach in
curriculum delivery is of great benefit to student
learning.
To major in BIOL, students must pass STAT
101, BIOL 111, BIOL 112, BIOL 113 and BIOL 209 (or
equivalent background, e.g. STAT 201 or PSYC 206).
To gain a pass a student must do satisfactory
practical work in laboratory classes and in field
courses as well as performing satisfactorily
in written tests and examinations. Students
who have not taken Chemistry to Year 13 or
Scholarship level are recommended to take 15
points of CHEM (e.g. CHEM 114) before enrolling in
200 level courses. Students who have not taken
Maths (with Calculus) to Year 13 or Scholarship
level should strongly consider taking 15 points
of MATH (e.g. MATH 101) before enrolling in
200 level courses. BIOL 309 cannot be used as
part of the minimum 60 points needed at 300
level to major in Biological Sciences. Students
intending to enrol in fourth year courses should
have gained the equivalent of at least 90 points
in 300 level BIOL courses. Students admitted to
an Honours or Masters Degree in Ecology must
include BIOL 309, or an equivalent course, in
their undergraduate degree. BIOL 309 is strongly
recommended for ALL intending postgraduate
students.
8
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Choosing your first
year courses
Starting your BSc in Biology is straightforward.
Most students begin by taking the core biology
courses during their first year at Canterbury, but
students who discover an interest in biology
later can also take the core courses during their
second year. The three core courses are:
BIOL 111 Cellular Biology and Biochemistry
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution and Conservation
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
[BIOL 111 is required for Biochemistry majors, BIOL
112 and 113 are recommended.]
Because statistical analysis and experimental
design is such a fundamental aspect of all
biological research, all Biology majors are
required to take STAT 101 Statistics 1 (unless you
have NCEA L3 Maths achieved with excellence)
and BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data
Analysis (or equivalent preparation e.g. STAT 201,
PSYC 206).
Two additional first year courses are also offered
for students. These optional courses cannot be
substituted for the core biology courses.
BIOL 116 Human Biology
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous
Knowledge
Choosing courses for your second and
third year: Pathways in Biology
In order to help you to choose your second and
third year courses, Biological Sciences has created
a range of pathways (see pages 9–23). They allow
you to create a personalised degree that suits
your interests. Pathways are informal selections
of courses that we recommend taking to become
proficient in your area of interest. For each
pathway, we list the core courses and several
complementary courses that you might be
interested in. You don’t have to select a pathway
to major in Biology, nor do you need to take
all core courses in your pathway/s of interest.
However, many students find it helpful to use
one or more pathways for selecting a coherent
combination of courses. The Biochemistry
pathway can also be taken as a major if all core
courses are taken. The Biosecurity, Biotechnology,
Ecology, and Environmental Science pathways
can also be taken as endorsements if all core
courses are taken.
Find maths or chemistry intimidating?
Mathematics and Chemistry can seem
intimidating to many - if you lack confidence
in these (or haven’t done them to year 13)
but want to expand your background, don’t
worry! UC provides plenty of support. This
includes introductory courses at 1st year that
are specifically tailored to biologists’ needs
– Methods of Mathematics (MATH 101) and
Introductory Chemistry (CHEM 114). If in doubt,
talk to one of our academic advisors.
Love maths or computers?
If you enjoy mathematics or computing, and are
interested in biology, UC is well suited to cater
for your needs. There are mathematicians on
campus who work closely with biologists, and UC
is home to the UC HPC (University of Canterbury
High Performance Computing). Combining
biology with computing and/or mathematics will
give you plenty of options in the future. Some
papers you could do at first year to complement
your interest in biology include MATH 120/170
and COSC 121/122.
Pathways in Biology
Animal Behaviour
Animal Behaviour is the scientific study of the
“how” and “why” of what animals do. This
can range from answering questions about
how animals communicate and how neural
mechanisms control behaviour, to questions
about why animals are altruistic to family
members, why some animals look after their
offspring while others do not, or why species differ
in their mating systems.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Graduates who specialise in Behaviour generally
also take courses in Ecology and Evolution. Some
of our recent graduates have taken up careers such
as:
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
Humans probably always have been fascinated
by the behaviour of animals. By studying animal
behaviour through a scientific framework, we can
understand the reasons for the rich behavioural
repertoire seen across the animal kingdom and
in the process perhaps learn something about
our own sometimes perplexing behaviour.
Understanding the behaviour of animals in
nature also is becoming increasingly important in
conservation biology programmes to ensure that
they survive and reproduce.
• Conducting research projects for Wool Research
Year 1
• Monitoring endangered species like the Chatham
Island taiko for the Department of Conservation
• Working on nature documentaries for the BBC
• Biosecurity officer for the Department of
Conservation in Wellington
• Researching behavioural means to control
agricultural pest insects in Australia
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
• Conducting research on spider monkeys in
Panama
• Teaching animal behaviour courses in Fiji
• Curator at the Canterbury Museum
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 309
Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
Core
BIOL 111 Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
BIOL 355 Neurons, Hormones and Behaviour
Statistics 1
BIOL 271 Evolution
BIOL 371 Evolutionary Ecology
BIOL 272 Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
Complementary
BIOL 210 Vertebrate Biology
Complementary
BIOL 354 Animal Ecophysiology
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
BIOL 211 Insect Biology
BIOL 375
Freshwater Ecosystems
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology - Brain, Behaviour and Cognition
BIOL 212 Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
BIOL 231 Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 378
Population Ecology and Conservation
BIOL 384
Marine Ecosystems
STAT 101
Complementary
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 270 Ecology
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
BIOL 273
NZ Biodiversity and Biosecurity
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
9
Animal Physiology
Animal physiology is the study of the physical
and chemical processes that occur within
animals—in other words, how animals work!
Animal physiology is concerned with such
topics as gas exchange, blood and circulation,
osmoregulation, digestion, nervous and muscle
systems and endocrinology.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Graduates specialising in Animal Physiology can
find teaching and research careers in hospitals,
schools of medicine, universities, pharmaceutical
laboratories and crown research institutes.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
They may also work in fields as diverse as
conservation, the food industry, fisheries and
aquaculture concerns and in the sports industry.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
Core
BIOL 309
Experimental Design & Data Analysis
for Biologists [3]
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 250
BIOL 351
Cell Biology 2
Animal Ecophysiology
BIOL 355
Neurons, Hormones and Behaviour
Principles of Animal Physiology
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
Complementary
BIOL 210 Vertebrate Biology
BIOL 354
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics
BIOL 212 Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 231 Foundations in Molecular Biology
Complementary
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
Complementary
BIOL 116 Human Biology
BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 271
Evolution
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
CHEM 111
BIOL 272
Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
STAT 101
[2]
Statistics 1
Chemical Principles and Processes
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
10
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Biochemistry (major)
Biochemistry uses the techniques of chemistry,
physics and molecular biology to probe the
mysteries of biology. At UC, biochemistry
courses are taught as a collaboration between
the Department of Chemistry and the School of
Biological Sciences. For Biochemistry students it is
important to consider both biology and chemistry
courses in addition to the biochemistry core when
designing your degree.
Within the broad field of biochemistry, research
interests at UC focus on the following key areas:
• Intermediary metabolism: studies of the
integration of reactions in living cells; how cells
make and use energy; biosynthesis of proteins;
DNA & RNA; and cellular control mechanisms
• The molecular basis for biological phenomena:
studies of molecular biology; gene expression
and control; hormones and physiological
phenomena
• Ultrastructure: studies of the coordination of the
structure and function of cells, their organelles
and their proteins.
careers including teaching and research in
hospitals and medical fields, in the food and drink
industries, in agriculture and in industry.
• The structure of biopolymers: studies of the
structure of proteins, DNA & RNA, cell walls,etc.
Postgraduate
• Applied biochemistry: studies of immobilised
enzymes; biochemical engineering, food
biochemistry, etc.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
• Free radical biochemistry.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
• Enzyme inhibition and drug design
• Natural products chemistry and drug discovery
Career paths
Biochemistry is a “central science” allowing
employment across a wide range of disciplines
- from chemistry to molecular biology; from
medicine to food technology.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
A Biochemistry major can prepare you for diverse
• The nature of enzyme-catalysed reactions.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 111
Core
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the reactions of molecules in cells
Core
BCHM 301 Biochemistry 3 (aka BIOL 331)
BCHM 202 Foundations of Molecular Biology (aka BIOL 231)
BCHM 381 Biochemical Techniques [3]
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry
and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
Complementary
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes
STAT 101
Statistics 1 (or MATH 101) [2]
BCHM 212 Chemical Reactivity
BCHM 253 Cell Biology 1 (aka BIOL 253)
BCHM 281 Practical Biochemistry
Complementary
BCHM 206 Organic Chemistry
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Required if your BSc Major is Biology
[3] BCHM 381 is essential for postgraduate
Biochemistry.
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BCHM 302 Biological Chemistry (aka CHEM 325)
Complementary
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 351 Cell Biology 2
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
BIOL 213 Microbiology and Genetics
CHEM 321 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: From Structure to Function
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
CHEM 322 Organic Chemistry
BIOL 254 Principles of Plant Physiology
CHEM 381 Advanced Synthetic Techniques
CHEM 211 Molecules
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
11
Biosecurity (endorsement)
Career paths
Postgraduate
Biosecurity is a major growth industry in New
Zealand, spearheaded by the regulatory authority
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Biosecurity
New Zealand (MAFBNZ), and this is generating
many positions, from border control, to pest
surveillance and eradication, to strategic planning.
District and regional councils employ biologists
to manage invading organisms, while DoC and
other environmental agencies need biologists to
manage our native heritage.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core [3]
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
Core
BIOL 332 Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Species
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
BIOL 231 BIOL 352 Plant Development & Biotechnology
Biosecurity is more that just a subject stream;
we have determined that it is important enough
to warrant it being an endorsement to the
degree. What this means is that rather than just
gaining a BSc in Biological Sciences you gain a
BSc in Biological Sciences (Biosecurity). This tells
prospective employers that you have a degree that
is focused on issues relevant to the security of
New Zealand’s flora and fauna.
Biosecurity focuses on native organisms, how
they have shaped New Zealand, and the impact
of human occupation and consequent invasions.
However, biosecurity is global and our courses
reflect this. Biosecurity also focuses on epidemics,
such as bird flu, how it could affect New Zealand,
and how we keep ourselves free of it.
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
(or CHEM 114)
STAT 101 Statistics 1
Foundations in Molecular Biology
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
BIOL 270 Ecology
BIOL 377 BIOL 271 Complementary [5]
BIOL 305 Practical Field Botany
Evolution
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
Global Change and Biosecurity
Complementary
LAWS 101 The Legal System: Legal Method and Institutions
BIOS 201 Issues in New Zealand Biosecurity
BIOL 309 Experimental Design & Data Analysis [4]
Complementary [5]
BIOL 215 Plant Diversity and Systematics
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
LAWS 110 Legal Foundations, Research and Writing
BIOL 203 Introduction to Forensic Biology
BIOL 333
Molecular Genetics
Any 2nd year BIOL courses
BIOL 371 Evolutionary Ecology
FORE 218
BIOL 375 Freshwater Ecosystems
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
Forest Biology
ANTA 201 Antarctica and Global Change
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level 3 chemistry take CHEM
114 before starting BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you have good NCEA level
3 maths credits.
[3] These courses do not all have to be taken in your second year of
study, but are required to qualify for the endorsement in Biosecurity.
[4] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
[5] There are two pathways within the Biosecurity endorsement, either
molecular/genetics or ecological/applied. See the regulations to
select appropriate courses.
12
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
BIOL 378 Population Ecology & Conservation
BIOL 384 Marine Ecosystems
Full regulations for endorsements can be found at:
www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/bsc_schedule_endorsements.shtml
Biotechnology (endorsement)
Postgraduate
Biotechnology is of national and international
importance. It can be defined as fundamental
research contributing knowledge about
biochemical, molecular, ecological and
evolutionary processes; research underpinning
biodiversity and biosecurity management in
New Zealand; and research directed towards
technology development with dual economic and
environmental outcomes.
Consequently, biotechnology research has key
roles to play in helping us characterise New
Zealand’s indigenous genetic heritage through
biosystematics, to protect New Zealand’s
indigenous genetic heritage through the
provision of tools to identify biosecurity threats,
and, through research, to help counter the
environmental impacts of farming in areas such
as agricultural methane emissions and nitrogen
fixers in pastures.
Biotechnology goes beyond genetic modification
and includes a range of laboratory based tissue
culture and breeding techniques such as the use
of somatic hybridisation.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
Career paths
Employment opportunities for graduates with
good biotechnology training are exceptionally
attractive overseas, since biotechnology is widely
considered to be the industrial growth area of this
century.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology and Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 213
Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 231
Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
BIOL 271
Evolution
BIOL 333 BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
and a minimum of 30 points from:
BIOL 254
Principles of Plant Physiology
BIOL 332 Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Species
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
STAT 101
Statistics 1
Complementary
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics
LAWS 101 The Legal System: Legal Method and Institutions
Complementary [2]
BIOL 215 Plant Diversity & Systematics
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
Molecular Genetics
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 351
Cell Biology 2
BIOL 371
Evolutionary Ecology
LAWS 110 Legal Foundations, Research and Writing
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the
reactions of molecules in cells
Complementary [2]
BCHM 303 Special Topic: Toxicology
ENGR 101
Foundations of Engineering
BCHM 281 Practical Biochemistry
CHEM 111
Chemical Principles and Processes [1]
BIOL 309 Experimental Design & Data Analysis [3]
BIOL 331
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] There are two pathways within the
endorsement, either environmental biotech
or plant biotech. See the regulations to select
appropriate courses.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
Biochemistry 3
Full regulations for endorsements can be found at:
www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/bsc_schedule_endorsements.shtml
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
13
Cellular and Molecular Biology
Cell biology is the science of the living cell. Cell
theory, developed in the 1800s, states that all
organisms are composed of one or more cells,
that cells are the smallest living units of all living
organisms, and that cells arise only by division of a
previously existing cell. Recent decades have seen
stunning advances in the study of cell biology
as a range of different imaging, biochemical
and molecular techniques have been used to
investigate how cells work, and how cells interact
with other cells.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Cell and molecular biologists have many career
options. They are employed by in universities,
biotechnology companies and crown research
institutes (e.g. Agresearch, Plant & Food
Research). Many cell biologists also work in the
medical sciences, either as researchers or in
the pharmaceutical industry and contribute to
civil society and organisations and government
agencies.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
Molecular biology is the science of how things
work at the molecular level, from gene expression
to genetics. This fundamental science underpins
our understanding of how cells and organisms
work.
Year 1
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data
Analysis
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 213
Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 331
Biochemistry 3 (30 points)
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 231
Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
BIOL 351
Cell Biology 2
STAT 101
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the reactions of molecules in cells
Statistics 1
Complementary
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
14
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Complementary
BIOL 250 Principles of Animal Physiology
BIOL 254
Principles of Plant Physiology
BCHM 281 Practical Biochemistry
Complementary
BIOL 309 Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
BIOL 354
Animal Ecophysiology
BIOL 355
Neurons, Hormones and Behaviour
BCHM 381 Biochemical Techniques
Ecology (endorsement)
Ecology is the study of organisms and how
they relate to their environment. Evolution is
a closely related area of study that focuses on
how organisms change to adapt to their local
surroundings. Related courses are also offered on
plant systematics (the study of plant classification
and evolutionary relationships) and animal
behaviour.
Ecology is an increasingly important field, as
we struggle to protect plants and animals
from growing human impacts. Ecologists and
evolutionists try to understand our endangered
native organisms such as kiwi, kakapo and rare
plants, and they also try to predict or mitigate
the effects of exotic pests such as possums and
old man’s beard. This work can take them to a
wide range of beautiful and unique areas in New
Zealand and beyond.
The School has teaching and research strengths in
terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecology.
Career paths
Graduates who specialise in Ecology, Evolution and
Behaviour may take up careers like:
District conservation officer for the Department of
Conservation in Tekapo, Haast
Postgraduate
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
Monitoring of ecological values along streams,
rivers and estuary for the Christchurch City Council
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
Field technician in Landcare Research’s
programme to help meet Kyoto agreements on
global warming
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Member of project team with a private
environmental consulting company
Operating an aquaculture facility for a
Marlborough Sounds seafood company
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
Core
BIOL 309 Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
BIOL 270
Ecology
BIOL 375 Freshwater Ecosystems
STAT 101
Statistics 1
BIOL 271 Evolution
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
Population Ecology and Conservation
Complementary
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes [1]
Complementary
BIOL 210 Vertebrate Biology
BIOL 378
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 211 Insect Biology
BIOL 212 Marine Biology and Ecology
Complementary
BIOL 305 Practical Field Botany
FORE 111
BIOL 215 Plant Diversity & Systematics
BIOL 354
Animal Ecophysiology
Trees, Forest and Environment
BIOL 384 Marine Ecosystems
GEOG 106 Global Environmental Change
BIOL 272 Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 371
Evolutionary Ecology
GEOG 109 Physical Geography: Earth, Ocean, Atmosphere
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
GEOL 111 Planet Earth: An Introduction to Geology
GEOL 115 The Dynamic Earth System
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
Full regulations for endorsements can be found at:
www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/bsc_schedule_endorsements.shtml
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
15
Environmental Science (endorsement)
broader than a single subject area. Obviously you
will not be able to study all of the listed areas in
depth, but you should aim to take a wide range of
topics in your first year and at least two subject
areas in your second year.
Postgraduate
Career paths
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
Graduates with an endorsement in Environmental
Science are likely to find employment with
organisations involved with managing the
environment, such as city and regional councils,
Department of Conservation, Cawthron Institute,
Landcare.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
At least 60 points in your major (BIOL).
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
GEOG 106 Global Environmental Change
BIOL 270
STAT 101
GEOG 205 Introduction to GIS
We recommend you follow the guidelines from the
streams listed below to choose courses of interest
for your 300-level.
Environmental Science is more that just a subject
stream, we have determined that it is important
enough to warrant it being an endorsement to the
degree. What this means is that rather than just
gaining a BSc in Biological Sciences you gain a BSc
in Biological Sciences (Environmental Sciences).
This tells prospective employers that you have a
degree that is much wider than just biology and
that it has a focus on environmental issues.
Environmental Science is bigger than just biology,
it includes subjects such as law, chemistry,
geography, geology and forestry. It is all about
identifying aspects of the environment and having
the right tools to manage it. So to graduate with
Environmental Science you need to be much
Statistics 1
Ecology
15 points of CHEM
15 points of GEOG
Complementary
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
GEOL 113
Environmental Geohazards
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
We recommend you follow the guidelines from the
streams listed below to choose courses of interest
for your 200-level.
•
Biosecurity
•
Biotechnology
•
Ecology
•
Biosecurity
•
Marine Biology
•
Biotechnology
•
Microbiology
•
Ecology
•
Plant Biology
•
Microbiology
•
Plant Biology
Full regulations for endorsements can be found at:
www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/bsc_schedule_endorsements.shtml
16
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Evolutionary Biology
Tools and technologies of evolutionary biology
underpin all the biological sciences, including
molecular biology, cell biology, ecology,
biodiversity and behaviour. A course in evolution
may cover topics as diverse as understanding
HIV; measuring natural selection; investigating
how new species arise, and making predictions
about the survival of rare species and the spread
of invasive ones. The common theme is the study
of how organisms change and adapt to their local
environment.
Evolution complements Ecology in areas such
as conservation biology, the study of plant and
animal invasions, and predicting the potential
spread of GMOs. Evolution complements
Behaviour in explaining topics such as sexual
selection and social behaviour. Evolution is also
fundamental to the designing of effective drugs
and predicting the spread of new diseases such as
Zika virus.
Year 1
Career paths
Graduates who specialise in Evolutionary Biology
generally also take courses in Ecology and
Behaviour. Some of our recent graduates have
taken up careers like:
• Private environmental consultancy work
• Botanist / Zoologist at Landcare Research
involved in biodiversity studies and the
management of New Zealand biodiversity
• Botanist/Zoologist for the Department of
Conservation monitoring and managing rare
species
• Biosecurity officer for MAF involved in predicting
and managing the spread of introduced
organisms
• Scientist for AgResearch working in biocontrol
• Scientist/Technician with Crop & Food Research
involving plant breeding
• Technician at the National Herbarium
Postgraduate
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 332 Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Species
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 213 Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 231 Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 371
Evolutionary Ecology
BIOL 271
Evolution
STAT 101
Complementary
BIOL 210 Vertebrate Biology
Complementary
BIOL 309 Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BIOL 211 Insect Biology
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
BIOL 212 Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 215 Plant Diversity & Systematics
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
BIOL 270 Ecology
BIOL 378
Population Ecology and Conservation
BIOL 272 Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 383 Behavioural Ecology
Statistics 1
Complementary
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
17
Freshwater Ecology
Freshwater is an important natural resource
necessary for the survival of all ecosystems.
From the glaciers of South Westland to the
braided rivers of Canterbury, New Zealand has an
abundance of freshwater systems.
Freshwater ecology is the understanding of the
ecology of rivers, lakes and wetlands. Focussing
on ecological concepts but also applied freshwater
science, it includes the study of water chemistry,
plant, invertebrate and fish diversity and
communities.
With increasing land use pressures and climate
change there is a need to better understand these
freshwater systems to support management
decisions regarding usage, conservation and
rehabilitation.
Year 1
Career paths
Postgraduate
Increasing demand for freshwater scientists in NZ
and internationally has resulted in a wide range
of jobs including regional council water quality
scientists, Crown Research Institute scientists,
Department of Conservation scientists and
technical officers, and private consultants.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
A degree in freshwater ecology will give you the
skills for the many ecological monitoring positions
that exist within engineering and consulting firms
as well as science policy jobs within government
In addition, freshwater ecology is a great
background field for teachers and environmentally
aware citizens.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 309
Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists
Freshwater Ecosystems
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology and Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 210
Vertebrate Biology
BIOL 375
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
BIOL 211
Insect Biology
WATR 301 Water Resource Management
BIOL 270
Ecology
STAT 101
WATR 201 Freshwater Resources
Complementary
BIOL 354 Animal Ecophysiology
Complementary
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
WATR 203 Freshwater Science Field Skills
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
Complementary
BIOL212
Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 378
Population Ecology and Conservation
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
GEOG 106 Global Environmental Change
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
BIOL 384
Marine Ecosystems
GEOG 109 Physical Geography: Earth, Ocean, Atmosphere
BIOL 271
Evolution
Statistics 1
GEOL 111 Planet Earth: An Introduction to Geology
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
CHEM 244 Applied Analytical Chemistry for Environmental Sciences
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
Additional complementary courses can be chosen from BIOL, BCHM, CHEM, GEOG, GEOL, ECON, FORE,
LAWS, SOCI and SUST, to suit your interests. We recommend you consult with Profs Jon Harding or Angus
McIntosh to ensure your degree plan is suitable.
18
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Genetics
Genetics is the science of heredity. It has a history
of less than 150 years, yet the most significant
discovery, the double helix, celebrated its 50th
birthday in 2003. The completion of the human
genome project, followed by a proliferation of
genome projects on endemic and endangered
species has promised to challenge the creativity of
future scientists. Genetics will provide a platform
for the development of new drugs to combat
diseases, methodology for the conservation
of endangered species and understanding
evolutionary history. Furthermore, it will help us to
understand who we are and what we are, enhance
our biosecurity and even catch criminals.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Geneticists have a wide range of possible career
options. They are employed by biotechnology
companies and research institutes (e.g.
AgResearch, Plant and Food Research, Landcare
Research) to undertake genetic typing and to
develop new strains of organisms.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
They may also work for pharmaceutical companies
developing approaches to disease control, and for
health research organisations and hospitals using
genetics to identify disease-causing organisms as
well as the genetic basis for human diseases.
Genetics is a rapidly advancing field that creates
challenges and opportunities for society. Our
graduates and staff also work in civil society
organisations and for government agencies
providing expertise to maximise the benefits of
genetic technologies while minimising risk.
Year 1
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 332 Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Species
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 213 Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 231 Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 271 Evolution
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
STAT 101
Complementary
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the reactions of molecules in cells
Complementary
BIOL 309 Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BCHM 281 Practical Biochemistry
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
Statistics 1
Complementary
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
BIOL 215 Plant Diversity & Systematics
BIOL 253 Cell Biology 1
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
BIOL 331 Biochemistry 3 (aka BCHM 301)
BIOL 351 Cell Biology 2
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
BIOL 371 Evolutionary Ecology
BCHM 381 Biochemical Techniques
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
19
Marine Biology
Marine Biology is the science of the sea.
Understanding and appreciating the complex
biological and ecological interactions of organisms
in the oceans requires a good understanding of
the ecosystem connections, from the depths
of the open oceans to the coastal interface of
land and sea. Marine biologists are essential to
the modern world as resources are increasingly
over-used, and the oceans are affected by trade,
travel and recreation. The sustainability and
conservation of marine biodiversity is essential
to the health of the planet and conservation of
core human values. We urgently need people with
knowledge of marine biology who can contribute
to this goal.
The Kaikoura Marine Environment is a sentinel
focus area for our teaching and research, providing
the opportunity for students to gain exposure to
Year 1
key elements of New Zealand’s complex marine
ecosystems, while gaining experience in data
management, analysis and writing of scientific
reports.
Career paths
Specialising in Marine Biology and Ecology
provides suitable training for employment as
a marine scientist in organisations such the
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric
Research, the Cawthron Institute, Department
of Conservation and the Ministry of Primary
Industry (fisheries or biosecurity research), as well
as consultancy roles in Regional Councils and
engineering consultant companies. In addition,
Marine Biology is a great background field for
teachers and environmentally aware citizens.
Postgraduate
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 309
Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
BIOL 212 Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 375 Freshwater Ecosystems
Statistics 1
BIOL 270
Ecology
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
BIOL 271
Evolution
BIOL 384
Marine Ecosystems
STAT 101
Complementary
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes [1]
Complementary
BIOL 210 Vertebrate Biology
Complementary
BIOL 354 Animal Ecophysiology
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
BIOL 371
Evolutionary Ecology
GEOG 106 Global Environmental Change
BIOL 253
Cell Biology I
BIOL 378
Population Ecology and Conservation
GEOL 111 Planet Earth: An Introduction to Geology
BIOL 272
Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
GEOL 115
The Dynamic Earth System
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
20
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
BIOL 273 New Zealand Biodiversity and Biosecurity
GEOG 201 Environmental Processes: Principles
and Applications
GEOG 205 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
Microbiology
Microbiology is the study of organisms such as
algae, fungi, bacteria and viruses that cannot be
seen with the naked eye. These micro-organisms
are abundant and diverse, and they affect humans
in both negative and positive ways. Some microorganisms cause diseases in humans, other
animals, or agricultural crops. Others can be used
to benefit humans, such as microbes that can be
used to kill insect pests (biocontrol) and those that
destroy harmful chemicals such as pesticides (bioremediation). Other microbes are simply essential
to the maintenance of all life, such as those that
generate oxygen and other critical elements.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Microbiologists are employed by various industries
to test product safety, by waste-water treatment
plants to ensure water quality, by hospitals to
identify disease-causing microbes, and by research
institutes to explore basic aspects of microbial
biology, diversity and ecology.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
Year 1
Core
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
The food industry employs many microbiologists
for food testing and production of items such as
wine, beer, dairy products and mushrooms.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
Careers can also be in horticulture, plant disease
research, terrestrial and freshwater ecology, water
pollution investigations and biology teaching.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Year 2
Year 3
Core
Core
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 113 Diversity of Life
BIOL 213 Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 231 Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
BIOL 351 Cell Biology 2
STAT 101
Complementary
Complementary
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the
reactions of molecules in cells
BIOL 309
Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BIOL 254 Principles of Plant Physiology
BIOL 331 Biochemistry 3 (aka BCHM 301)
Statistics 1
Complementary
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes
[1]
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics [2]
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
BIOL 332 Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Species
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
21
Plant Biology
Plants are central to the maintenance of life on
Earth and for the basis of agricultural production.
Plant biology is a very broad discipline that covers
the study of the structure, function and evolution
and diversity of plants. Plant biologists study
processes at the cellular and whole organism
level, and address questions on how plants
respond to the environment and other organisms.
Others study the evolutionary history of the
huge diversity of plant species. The study of plant
biology can be undertaken in the lab or in the
field, and is central to agricultural production and
ecosystem function.
Career paths
Postgraduate
Plant Biology graduates may find employment
in diverse fields, including teaching and research
for Universities, Crown Research Institutes and
biological industries.
BSc (Hons) - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers and a
research project.
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Core
BIOL 333 Molecular Genetics
Employment opportunities for graduates with
good plant biology training are in demand
overseas as understanding plant biology is key
to solving problems faced by agriculture, the
environment and medicine through sustainable
technologies.
PGDipSc - Students complete a fourth year of
study comprising four 400-level papers.
MSc- Students complete a fourth year of study
comprising four 400-level papers (part I), then
proceed to a research project (part II), written up
as a thesis.
PhD - Students complete a 3 year research project
written up as a thesis. Entry is after successful
completion of either BSc(Hons) or an MSc.
Core
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology & Biochemistry
BIOL 112 Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
Core
BIOL 209 Introduction to Biological Data Analysis
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
BIOL 213
Microbiology and Genetics
BIOL 351 Cell Biology 2
BCHM 112 Structure and Reactivity in Chemistry and Biochemistry [1] (aka CHEM 112)
BIOL 215
Plant Diversity & Systematics
BIOL 231
Foundations in Molecular Biology
BIOL 352 Plant Development and Biotechnology
STAT 101
BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
BIOL 254
Principles of Plant Physiology
Statistics 1
Complementary
CHEM 111 Chemical Principles and Processes [1]
MATH 101 Methods of Mathematics
[2]
SCIM 101 Science, Maori and Indigenous Knowledge
Notes
[1] If you have fewer than 14 credits of NCEA level
3 chemistry take CHEM 114 before starting
BCHM/CHEM 112.
[2] Math 101 is strongly recommended unless you
have good NCEA level 3 maths credits.
[3] BIOL 309 is essential for postgraduate Biology.
22
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Complementary
BCHM 222 Biochemistry B – Metabolism; the
reactions of molecules in cells
Complementary
BIOL 305 Practical Field Botany
BIOL 309
Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists [3]
BCHM 281 Practical Biochemistry
BIOL 313 Advanced Molecular and industrial Microbiology
BIOL 271
BIOL 331 Biochemistry 3 (aka BCHM 301)
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
Evolution
BCHM 381 Biochemical Techniques
Biology Courses
Key
P: Pre-requisites
RP: Recommended Preparation
R: Restrictions
EQ: Equivalent Course
BIOL 111
Cellular Biology and Biochemistry
Semester 1
15 points
A foundation course that will introduce you to
the basic processes of cellular biology. The cell
is considered the basic unit of life because every
organism whether animal, plant, or microorganism consists of cells or is itself a single
cell. As such the structure and function of the
cell impacts on all other levels of life including
organisms, ecosystems and the biosphere. For
this reason it is essential for all biologists to
understand the fundamentals of cell biology.
In this course you will learn the basic concepts
of cell function and how these are related to
cell structure, which is in turn dependent on
molecular structure and biochemical interactions
between molecules.
R: ENCH 281
BIOL 112
Ecology, Evolution and Conservation
Semester 2
15 points
See www.canterbury.ac.nz/courses for full details of each course.
number of different viewpoints including the
actions of individual cells and even individual
molecules. Labs will cover aspects of histology,
nutrition, skeletons and genetics. Examples of
lecture topics include: Introduction to toxicology,
nutritional requirements, human genetics and
human evolution, molecular basis of diseases
and their treatment, immune responses and
drugs from plants.
Semester 2
15 points
This is an integrated multi-disciplinary course
between the School of Maori and Indigenous
Studies and the College of Science, studying
Maori and other indigenous peoples knowledge
and its relevance to today’s western science.
BIOL 209
Introduction to Biological
Data Analysis
Semester 1
15 points
Introductory statistics with specific examples for
biologists. This course is required for all students
in Biology.
P: STAT 101 and 15 points of BIOL at 100 level.
BIOL 210
Vertebrate Biology
BIOL 113
Diversity of Life
This course deals with the biology and evolution
of the phylum Chordata and in particular the
subphylum Vertebrata, animals with backbones.
The course gives an overview of the phylum
highlighting form and function and gives
information on evolutionary relationships.
15 points
This course provides an overview of the vast
diversity of life on Earth. You will hear about the
evolution, structure, function and importance
of animals, plants and microbes. The first part of
the course focuses on the diversity, reproduction
and structure of bacteria, protists and fungi. The
second part focuses on plants whilst the third
part examines animals and includes discussion
of locomotion, respiration, circulation, nervous
and endocrine systems. Hands-on investigation
of a variety of organisms in laboratory classes is
an important part of the course.
Semester 2 (term 3) 15 points
Semester 2
15 points
Human Biology is an introductory course that
looks at the biology of Homo sapiens from a
BIOL 213
Microbiology and Genetics
15 points
This course will introduce you to fundamental
principles of microbiology and microbial
genetics. Microbiology is a broad subject and
includes areas of fundamental and applied
science. The course builds on and extends the
brief introduction you had to the microbial world
and genetics in first year courses and prepares
you for third year microbiology (BIOL 313) and
molecular genetics (BIOL 333).
P: BIOL 231 or BCHM 202
RP: CHEM 112 or CHEM 114
BIOL 215
Plant Diversity and Systematics
Offered in odd years, next offered 2017
Semester 2 (term 4) 15 points
Systematics is the scientific discipline that
encompasses the description, identification,
nomenclature, and classification of organisms
(taxonomy) and the reconstruction of their macroevolutionary history (phylogenetics). Knowing
the identity and evolutionary relationships of
organisms is crucial to any biological study and
systematics is therefore an important cornerstone
of Biology. This course is an introduction to the
methodology and principles of systematics and
patterns and origin of seed plant diversity.
P: BIOL 113, or with the approval of the Head of
School.
RP: BIOL 271
P: BIOL 113
BIOL 211
Insect Biology
Offered in even years, next offered 2018
Semester 2 (term 4) 15 points
The biology of insects and other non-marine
arthropods, with emphasis on environmental
relationships and management.
P: BIOL 113
BIOL 116
Human Biology
P: BIOL 112 and BIOL 113
Semester 1
SCIM 101
Science, Maori and
Indigenous Knowledge
This is an integrated course, with a conservation
perspective, embracing the principles of genetics,
evolution, behaviour and ecology.
Semester 1
the marine environment. Including description
and analysis of marine communities and the
biodiversity, ecology and behaviour of marine
organisms. Includes a field trip.
Semester 1
15 points
Principles of genetics, including the structure of
RNA and DNA, molecular replication, transcription,
translation, recombination and gene expression.
P: BIOL 111 or ENCH 281
RP: CHEM 112 or CHEM 114
R: BCHM 202, ENCH 480, BIOL 230
BIOL 212
Marine Biology and Ecology
Semester 1
BIOL 231
Foundations in Molecular Biology
EQ: BCHM 202, ENCH 480
15 points
An introduction to the ecology and biology of
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
23
BIOL 250
Principles of Animal Physiology
Semester 1
15 points
This is a broad-based, elementary course in
animal physiology providing an introduction
to the principal physiological systems in
animals, how they operate and how they are
regulated. Topics include gas exchange, blood
and circulation, osmoregulation and excretion,
digestion, nervous and muscle systems,
immunology, and endocrinology. The treatment
is comparative although human and mammalian
physiology receives greatest emphasis.
Selected examples from lower vertebrates and
invertebrates are used to illustrate physiological
principles.
communities and food webs, history and pattern
in New Zealand landscapes, experimental design
and field research. Field trip to be arranged.
P: BIOL 112
R: FORE 202
BIOL 271
Evolution
Semester 1
15 points
An introduction to evolution: patterns and
processes of evolution; mechanisms of evolution,
adaption, speciation and extinction. Tutorials to
be arranged.
P: BIOL 112
P: BIOL 111 or ENCH 281
BIOL 272
Principles of Animal Behaviour
BIOL 253
Cell Biology 1
Semester 2 15 points
Mechanistic, developmental and evolutionary
processes underlying animal behaviour. Tutorials
to be arranged.
Semester 1
15 points
The course will cover membrane structure,
membrane transport of small molecules and the
electrical properties of membranes, intracellular
compartments and protein sorting, intracellular
vesicle transport, aspects of the cytoskeleton, the
cell cycle and apoptosis. These topics will give
the students a comprehensive grounding in cells
as single entities. This will prepare students for
an updated 3rd year cell biology course that will
consider cells in their social context i.e. how they
interact with other cells.
P: BIOL 112 or PSYC 105
BIOL 273
New Zealand Biodiversity
and Biosecurity
Semester 2
15 points
skills for field biologists, ecologists, conservation
biologists, taxonomists, teachers, students, and
plant enthusiasts, providing valuable training in
plant identification, collection, and preservation.
It will complement existing courses in the
ecology and evolutionary biology streams as well
as providing a base for further training in the
specialised area of plant taxonomy. The course
is run at the Cass field station and examples
used will be from the montane and alpine flora
of Canterbury - but most acquired skills will be
transferable to other regions and other groups of
organisms.
This is a seven day residential summer course at
Cass field station running 19–27 January 2017.
P: BIOL 215 or BIOL 270 or BIOL 273 or subject to
approval by the Head of the School of Biological
Sciences.
BIOL 309
Experimental Design & Data
Analysis for Biologists
Semester 2
15 points
Advanced experimental design and statistical
techniques for biologists. This course is essential
for all students considering postgraduate study
in biological sciences.
P: BIOL 209 or other statistical background as
determined by the Head of School.
P: BIOL 111 or ENCH 281 and 15 pts of CHEM at 100
level
An overview of the native plants and animals
of New Zealand, including their biogeographic
origins, the unique and unusual aspects of native
organisms, the makeup of native communities,
and their interactions with introduced
organisms.
RP: 30 pts of Chemistry
P: BIOL 112 or BIOL 113
Semester 2 (term 3) 15 points
R: BCHM 253
R: BIOL 114
This course extends material given in BIOL 213
and explores advanced food and agriculture
microbiology, microbial disease and pathogenesis,
immunology and anti-microbial therapies.
Additional topics in the field of applied
microbiology including bioremediation, biofuels
and biogeochemical engineering will also be
covered. The entire practical component of the
course consists of a small research project.
EQ: BCHM 253
BIOL 254
Principles of Plant Physiology
Semester 2
15 points
To introduce the principles of plant development,
including the basic anatomy of higher plants,
and how they grow, respond to external stimuli
and reproduce, and to relate these concepts to
developments in agriculture and biotechnology.
WATR 203
Freshwater Science Field Skills
Summer (Feb) 15 points
A field and laboratory course which focuses on
practical skills in identifying and measuring
physical freshwater habitats, aquatic plants,
invertebrates and fish and in analysing water
chemistry.
P: BIOL 111 or ENCH 281
R: BIOL 252
RP: Chem 114
P: A freshwater-related course of study or
appropriate freshwater-related work experience
subject to approval by the Head of the School of
Biological Sciences.
BIOL 270
Ecology
BIOL 305
Practical Field Botany
Semester 1
30 points
Principles of ecology, population ecology,
24
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Summer (Jan) 15 points
This course will focus on practical taxonomic
BIOL 313
Advanced Molecular and
industrial Microbiology
P: BIOL 213 and BIOL 231 or BCHM 202
RP: BIOL 253
BIOL 331
Biochemistry 3
Whole Year 30 points
Co-coded as BCHM 301
This course is designed to help you understand
the chemistry and biology of cellular processes,
including how biochemistry is controlled,
how different molecules function and how
studies and the study of gene expression. The
course also provides students with a strong
foundation in bioinformatics as a scientific
discipline and as a set of practical tools for
analysing and studying genomic data.
P: 30 points from: BIOL 209, BIOL 231, BIOL
253, BCHM 253, BIOL 271, BCHM 221, BCHM 222,
BCHM 202, BIOL 213, COSC 261, COSC 262, COSC
265, 200 level MATH, 200 level STAT. Students
with no Biology/Biochemistry papers require
permission from the Head of School.
RP: BIOL 333 or BIOL 334
R: BIOL 330
BIOL 351
Cell Biology 2
Semester 2 (term 4) 15 points
This course examines the relationships between
molecular structure and organelle and cell
function. It focuses on structure, physiology,
biochemistry and molecular biology of cells.
P: BIOL 253
biochemists seek the answers to such questions.
The course aims to introduce you to modern
biochemical ideas and research, and will include
a substantial amount of reading from the
biochemical literature, as well as from your
standard textbook. The course is intended to
complement courses such as BCHM 302/CHEM
325, BCHM 381, BIOL 330, BIOL 313. Tutorials to be
arranged.
in the pre-requisite courses BIOL231 and BIOL213.
It provides in-depth coverage across the breadth
of life with an emphasis on gene expression, gene
concepts and biotechnology.
P: (1) BCHM 201, or BCHM 221 and BCHM 222; (2)
BCHM 202 or BIOL 230 or BIOL 231
BIOL 334
Evolutionary Genetics
R: BCHM 301
Semester 2
EQ: BCHM 301
BIOL 332
Genetics and Evolution
of Invasive Species
Semester 2 15 points
An introduction to the genetics and evolution
of biological invasions, including the use of
molecular tools to answer applied questions
regarding the source and spread of introduced
organisms.
P: BIOL 271
P: BIOL 231 / BCHM 202
RP: BIOL 213
R: BIOL 330
An advanced course that builds on the
conceptual frameworks developed in the
prerequisite course BIOL 271. It provides in-depth
coverage across the breadth of evolutionary
genetics with an emphasis on population,
conservation and quantitative genetics,
phylogenetics and phylogeography.
P: BIOL 271
Semester 1
15 points
An advanced molecular genetics course that
builds on the conceptual frameworks developed
Semester 1
15 points
This course highlights how a knowledge of
plant development is necessary to drive new
applications of plant biotechnology.
Topics covered include the applications of tissue
culture and genetic engineering of plants;
examination of issues associated with the
potential use of genetically modified plants;
research advances and applied aspects of plant
hormone biology, secondary metabolism, cell wall
biology and disease resistance. The laboratories
will provide skills used in plant biotechnology
research.
P: BIOL 254 or BIOL 253 / BCHM 253 or BIOL 231 /
BCHM 202
BIOL 354
Animal Ecophysiology
R: BIOL 330
BIOL 335
Bioinformatics and Genomics
Semester 1
BIOL 333
Molecular Genetics
15 points
BIOL 352
Plant Development and
Biotechnology
15 points
This course introduces students to the biology
and evolution of genomes from across the tree
of life, including the human genome and the
genetics of human disease. It provides up-to-date
knowledge of high throughput methods used in
genome sequencing, genome-wide association
Semester 2 (term 3) 15 points
Comparative aspects of physiological adaptation
to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Topics
include osmoregulation, excretion, respiration,
circulation, temperature acclimation, using both
vertebrate and invertebrate examples.
P: BIOL 250
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
25
BIOL 355
Neurons, Hormones and Behaviour
BIOL 377
Global Change and Biosecurity
BIOL 383
Behavioural Ecology
Semester 1
Semester 1
15 points
A discussion of major concepts in community
and ecosystems ecology in the context of
anthropogenic changes to the environment
and pressure from invasive exotic species. Note:
fieldwork is required.
Semester 1
15 points
The physiological basis of behaviour. Building
on the introduction to Animal Physiology in
BIOL250, this course will concentrate on the
endocrine and nervous systems and develop
an understanding of how these systems have
evolved to fine-tune the behaviour of animals.
P: BIOL 250
RP: BIOL 272
BIOL 371
Evolutionary Ecology
Semester 1
15 points
Advanced theories of evolution, emphasising the
interaction between ecology and evolution, in
relation to the evolutionary history of species and
interactions among them.
P: BIOL 271
BIOL 375
Freshwater Ecosystems
Semester 2 (term 3) 15 points
Advanced theories and concepts of freshwater
ecology and their practical application to current
issues. Field trip to be arranged.
P: BIOL 270 and BIOL 209
26
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
P: (1) BIOL 270 or FORE 202; (2) BIOL 209 or FORE
222 / FORE 224
BIOL 378
Population Ecology and
Conservation
Semester 1 (term 1) 15 points
Advanced concepts in population ecology,
especially those most relevant to the New Zealand
region and to the conservation of the New Zealand
biota. Topics include life history tradeoffs, dispersal
and metapopulations, species interactions,
population regulation, population modelling,
management of populations, and issues for
species conservation in New Zealand.
Note: fieldwork is required.
P: (1) BIOL 270 or FORE 202; (2) BIOL 209 or FORE
222 / FORE 224
15 points
The development and adaptive significance of
behaviour with emphasis on the relationship
between ecology and behaviour.
P: (1)BIOL 272; (2) BIOL209 or equivalent
preparation in statistics.
RP: BIOL 271
BIOL 384
Marine Ecosystems
Semester 2 15 points
Advanced theories, concepts and applications of
marine ecology to current issues. Field trip to be
arranged.
P: (1) BIOL 270 and (2) BIOL 209 or PSYC 206
R: BIOL 374
RP: BIOL 209
Key
P: Pre-requisites
RP: Recommended Preparation
R: Restrictions
EQ: Equivalent Course
Biochemistry Courses
BCHM 112 (co-coded as CHEM 112)
Structure and Reactivity in
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Semester 2
15 points
Structure, isomerism, stereochemistry, synthesis,
and reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry;
transition metal chemistry and electrochemistry.
P: (1) NCEA: at least 14 credits NCEA Level 3
Chemistry, or (2) CIE: at least D grade in CIE AL
Chemistry or A grade in CIE ASL Chemistry, or (3) IB:
at least Grade 4 in IB HL Chemistry or Grade 6 in IB
SL Chemistry, or (4) CHEM 114, or at least B Grade
in BRDG 022.
R: CHEM 112
EQ: CHEM 112
BCHM 202 (co-coded as BIOL 231)
Foundations of Molecular Biology
Semester 1
15 points
Term 1
Principles of genetics, including the structure
of RNA and DNA, molecular replication,
transcription, translation, recombination and
gene expression.
P: (1) BIOL 111; (2) BIOL 112 or BIOL 113 or CHEM 114 or
BCHM 112 or CHEM 112.
R: BIOL 230, BIOL 231, ENCH 480
EQ: BIOL 231
BCHM 206
Organic Chemistry
Semester 2
15 points
The organic chemistry of π-bonded systems;
alkenes, alkynes and aromatic compounds.
The organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds:
aldehydes/ketones and carboxylic acid
derivatives; their reactivity, inter-conversions
and use for C-C bond forming reactions. An
introduction to ring compounds; the special
properties of cyclic molecules and how strain
affects their reactivity. An introduction to
bioorganic chemistry; carbohydrates and
the mechanisms of some important enzyme
catalysed processes, including the biosynthesis
of polyketides and some amino acids.
P: CHEM 212 or BCHM 212
R: CHEM 242
EQ: CHEM 242
BCHM 212
Chemical Reactivity
Semester 1
15 points
Structures and properties of organic and
biological molecules; application of kinetics and
thermodynamics to organic and biochemical
reactions; substitution and elimination
chemistry; bioinorganic chemistry and
electrochemistry.
P: CHEM 112 or ENCH 241
R: CHEM 212
EQ: CHEM 212
BCHM 222
Biochemistry B - Metabolism; the
reactions of molecules in cells
Semester 2
15 points
General principles of metabolism, particularly
how the pathways are controlled in response to
the changing needs within the cell. These general
principles will be illustrated by an in-depth look
at particular metabolic pathways, especially
glycolysis and the Krebs’ cycle. Bioenergetics:
membranes and energy transduction, the
chemiosmotic theory, oxidative phosphorylation
and photosynthesis.
BCHM 253 (co-coded as BIOL 253)
Cell Biology 1
Semester 2
15 points
The course will cover membrane structure,
membrane transport of small molecules and the
electrical properties of membranes, intracellular
compartments and protein sorting, intracellular
vesicle transport, aspects of the cytoskeleton, the
cell cycle and apoptosis. These topics will give
the students a comprehensive grounding in cells
as single entities. This will prepare students for
an updated 3rd year cell biology course that will
consider cells in their social context i.e. how they
interact with other cells.
P: BIOL 111 and 15 pts of CHEM at 100 level
RP: 30 pts of Chemistry
R: BIOL 253
EQ: BIOL 253
P: BIOL 111 or BCHM 221
R: BCHM 201, ENCH 323
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
27
BCHM 281
Practical Biochemistry
BCHM 302
Biological Chemistry
BCHM 381
Biochemical Techniques
Semester 2
Whole Year
Semester 2
15 points
Experimental biochemistry, synthetic organic
and inorganic chemistry with an emphasis
on preparation, separation, isolation, and
characterisation techniques that are used in
chemistry and biochemistry. Safety and library
elements will be integrated into the course,
biochemistry and chemistry options will be
available.
P: CHEM 111 or BCHM 112 or CHEM 112 or CHEM 114.
R: CHEM 281
BCHM 301 (co-coded as BIOL 331)
Biochemistry 3
Whole Year
30 points
This course is designed to help you understand
the chemistry and biology of cellular processes,
including how biochemistry is controlled,
how different molecules function and how
biochemists seek the answers to such questions.
The course aims to introduce you to modern
biochemical ideas and research, and will include
a substantial amount of reading from the
biochemical literature, as well as from your
standard textbook. The course is intended to
complement courses such as BCHM 302/CHEM
325, BCHM 381, BIOL 330, BIOL 313.
P: (1) Either BCHM 201 or BCHM 221 and BCHM 222;
(2) BCHM 202 or BIOL 230 or BIOL 231.
R: BIOL 331
EQ: BIOL 331
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www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
30 points
Chemical aspects of biosynthetic pathways.
Chemical biology of molecular recognition.
Pharmaceutical chemistry, bio-inorganic
chemistry, bio-physical chemistry.
P: Either (1) 30 points from BCHM 206 or BCHM
212 or CHEM 212 or CHEM 242; or (2) BCHM 221 and
BCHM 222 and either BCHM 212 or CHEM 212.
15 points
Biochemical experiments and analysis
such as transport kinetics, DNA sequence
analysis and manipulation, lipid isolation and
characterisation. Safety, bioethical and library
elements will be integrated into the coursework.
P: BCHM 281 or CHEM 281
R: CHEM 325
EQ: CHEM 325
Key
BCHM 335
Biochemical and
Environmental Toxicology
P: Pre-requisites
RP: Recommended Preparation
R: Restrictions
EQ: Equivalent Course
Semester 2 15 points
This course examines the effects of exposure
to toxic chemicals, risk assessment, risk
management, routes of exposure and
biochemical mechanisms of toxicity. This course
is the second semester of BCHM302/CHEM325
P: (1) CHEM 244 or CHEM 211, (2) BIOL 111
R: BCHM 302; CHEM 325
RP: CHEM 112
School Facilities
The School of Biological Sciences
has modern, well-equipped
research laboratories. Our new
research building Pūtaiao koiora
has state of the art facilities to
allow us to conduct research
across a wide range of biological
fields.
Ecology laboratories are equipped to measure
environmental parameters at the macro and
micro levels. They include seawater, Antarctic
and freshwater aquaria, as well as environmental
chambers with controlled light and temperature.
A large microscopy facility is also available for
sorting and identifying organisms.
Pūtaiao koiora, the new Biological Sciences research building.
Animal physiological laboratories contain
research equipment for neurophysiology, ion and
water regulatory physiology, cardiac, respiratory
and exercise physiology.
Molecular genetics and molecular biology
research laboratories are fully equipped for DNA,
RNA and protein analysis, recombinant DNA
techniques, real-time PCR and microinjection of
macromolecules into cells. We also house the
Canterbury Sequencing Facility and Ancient DNA
laboratory.
We have a microscopy facility which includes a
confocal microscope.
An extensive plant herbarium and insect
collection are housed in specialist facilities.
Plant physiology laboratories have research
equipment for transgenic plant production,
including comprehensive plant growth rooms
and greenhouse facilities.
Biochemistry and biotechnology labs house
advanced tools for the study of macro-molecular
structure and enzyme function.
Prime Minister John Key views Dr Esme Robinson’s Antarctic fish physiology experiment.
Microbiology laboratories have equipment to
study the genetics, physiology and biochemistry
of a diverse range of microbes.
The School has a computational cluster for high
performance applications such as bioinformatics
and ecological modelling. Researchers can also
access time on BlueFern® the UC super computer.
Hannah McKercher (LLB, BSC(Hons)) is undertaking a PhD in protein biochemistry and is co-supervised by staff at
AgReserarch, Lincoln, where she has access to additional specialist equipment.
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
29
Field Stations
Research activities are greatly assisted by field stations located around the South Island and around the
world. The most widely used South Island stations are at Cass and Kaikoura, but additional stations exist
at Hari Hari, Westport and Mount John. Our extensive global collaborations also allow access to field sites
around the world.
Students of BIOL 305 stay at the UC Cass field station and learn practical field taxonomy skills in the surrounding area.
Edward Percival Field
Station, Kaikoura
Cass Field Station,
Mid Canterbury
With panoramic views of sea and mountains,
the field station has residential and laboratory
facilities and is an ideal location for field
studies of native birds, rocky shore ecosystems,
and marine animal behaviour. The George
Knox Research Laboratory includes a large
general research laboratory, library, computer
facilities, workroom, tank rooms and controlled
temperature rooms, as well as a large covered
working area suitable for algal culture and
maintaining live animals.
Situated at Cass, 105 km west of Christchurch in
the mountains of the Waimakariri Basin, the field
station has a research laboratory and associated
residential facilities for hardy terrestrial and
freshwater field workers. The Cass area comprises
a wide range of environments – montane
grasslands, scrub, riverbed, scree, beech forest,
swamp, bog, lake, stream and alpine habitats.
Close by, Arthurs Pass and the Craigieburn Range
also provide accessible areas from alpine habitats
to lowland and montane mixed podocarpbroadleaved forest of Westland.
30
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Scott Base, Antarctica
In collaboration with Gateway Antarctica,
Biological Science staff and students make
regular summer visits to the Antarctic to work
on mosses, lichens, microbes including algae,
soils, fish, birds and seals. These studies can be
extended at the University using environment
controlled rooms in the Biological Sciences
research building.
Ngel Nyaki, Nigeria
This field station is situated on the Mambilla
Plateau in Eastern Nigeria, adjacent to the
montane forest reserve of Ngel Nyaki. It is
available for use by staff and students from UC
as well as Nigerian and International Universities.
Associate Professor Hazel Chapman leads the
Nigerian Montane Forest Project, which is closely
associated with this research facility. There are 15
full time research assistants based at the facility
allowing for extensive data collection.
Research Centres
Biomolecular
Interaction Centre
Biomolecular Interaction
Centre (BIC)
The Biomolecular Interaction Centre (BIC) is
a multi-disciplinary centre dedicated to the
study of molecular interactions critical to
biological function. Understanding biomolecular
interactions is central to a range of fundamental
sciences, new treatments for disease, and a wide
range of highly functional products.
The Centre was founded in 2007 at the University
of Canterbury and includes researchers from the
Colleges of Science and Engineering and partners
with several New Zealand CRIs, Universities
and Callaghan Innovation. In 2010, BIC received
a multi-million dollar investment from the
University of Canterbury to become one of two
new premier research institutes on campus.
BIC has 7 Principal Investigators and more
than 30 Partner, Associate and Affiliated
Investigators. These investigators are supported
by 7 Postdoctoral Fellows and more than 30
Postgraduate students researching biomolecular
interactions. The biomolecular flagship projects
include investigating protein and peptide surface
coatings, protein as building blocks and enzyme
evolution and design. Together BIC supports a
dynamic research environment for both staff and
students.
Centre for Integrative Ecology
School of Biological Sciences
The Centre seeks to develop the intellectual
capacity to mitigate negative human impacts on
essential ecosystem services, and maximise the
sustainable provision of multiple services.
Enduring solutions to the problems caused by
human impacts must be multidisciplinary and
cut across biological scales, from molecules to
landscapes to the entire planet.
By educating tomorrow’s trans-disciplinary,
solutions-focussed scientists and policy-makers,
we will effect lasting, positive impact on NZ’s
natural environment for future generations
The Centre for Integrated
Research in Biosafety (INBI)
Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE)
Innovative Research and Education
Cross-scale, cross-ecosystem, ecologicallyfocused, the Centre of Integrative Ecology
involves some of NZ’s best scientists and
students.
Our community of learners is united with
collaborators and end-users in generating the
depth of understanding required for effective and
practical cross-ecosystem management.
INBI is a multi-disciplinary centre devoted to
career-minded researchers in the biological,
physical and social sciences, philosophy, law,
engineering and cultural studies. The primary
mission of the centre is to produce graduates
and professionals equipped to contribute to
the global demand for research and expertise in
bringing forth safe and effective biotechnologies.
INBI actively collaborates with civil society and
industry organisations around the world. We
work on special projects with governments and
the United Nations Environment Programme. We
will assist you in building an international career.
Centre of Excellence in Aquaculture
and Marine Ecology (CEAME)
CEAME is a joint marine research centre that
provides students an opportunity to engage with
University staff and scientists from the National
Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
(NIWA). The objectives of CEAME are to promote
and enhance excellence in aquaculture and
marine ecological research, to attract the best
students nationally and internationally.
Projects within CEAME include a broad range
of disciplines such as mathematics and
engineering, theoretical and conceptual issues
of marine science, sustainability of cultured
fisheries, and genetics based research..
Currently, our research focus is on the effects of
agricultural chemicals on microbes and how to
integrate science-informed research into public
policy and communication.
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
31
Postgraduate Degrees
Postgraduate degrees taken by
students include a Bachelor of
Science (Honours), a Postgraduate
Diploma, a Master of Science, or a
Doctor of Philosophy.
BSc (Hons)
MSc
Honours is an intensive one-year programme
designed for high achieving students seeking to
fast-track to a PhD.
A Master of Science degree comprises one year
of coursework (part I) and a 12 month research
project (part II).
Honours students must take four 400-level
courses and a research project.
Any student who wishes to enrol for a research
degree should contact an academic staff member
of the School for further information and advice.
Also visit our website (www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz)
or contact us for a copy of the Biological Sciences
Postgraduate Handbook.
We recommend this option only for students with
an A- average (GPA 7) or higher at 300-level.
The MSc degree provides a solid grounding
in the scientific process and provides sought
after research skills applicable to a wide range
of careers. This degree is also arguably the best
route into a PhD because you gain more in-depth
research experience than is possible during an
Honours degree.
An interdisciplinary course, Environmental Science,
is also offered at postgraduate level by Biological
Sciences, Geography and Geological Sciences.
Details can be obtained from www.canterbury.
ac.nz/subjects/envr/ or the Environmental Science
Coordinator, Dr Sally Gaw, sally.gaw@canterbury.
ac.nz.
PgDipSc
The Postgraduate Diploma of Science is a one-year
program equivalent to the first year of an MSc.
Students take four 400-level courses, but do not
carry out research. See below for the list of courses
we offer, full course details are on our website.
The PgDipSc is a great option if you are unsure
whether you want to commit to an MSc or if you
want to extend your theoretical grounding in
biology prior to entering the workforce.
It is common for students enrolled in a PgDipSc to
transfer to MSc part II providing they achieve a B
average or better in their 400-level courses.
Undergraduate Pathway
Postgraduate Major
PhD
The PhD at UC is a research degree that typically
requires three, but no more than four years of
study. It is the highest academic qualification
available at the University. Completing a doctorate
is a mark of academic achievement and requires
self-discipline and commitment.
A PhD prepares you for an academic or research
career and the skills you gain are increasingly
sought after in the international job market.
400-level Biology Courses
Any Science Background
Biological Sciences or Environmental Science
Full descriptions on our website
Animal Behaviour
Ecology or Biological Sciences
Animal Physiology
Biological Sciences
BIOL 411 Research Preparation
BIOL 412 Research Preparation
BIOL 420 Terrestrial Ecology
BIOL 423 Evolutionary Ecology
BIOL 424 Community Ecology
BIOL 425 Freshwater Ecology
BIOL 426 Conservation Biology
BIOL 427 Global Change Biology
BIOL 428 Marine Biology and Ecology
BIOL 429 Conservation Genetics
BIOL 438Behaviour
BIOL 455 Applied and Molecular Microbiology
BIOL 456 Evolution and Dynamics of Biological Interactions
BIOL 457 Macromolecular Evolution & Engineering
BIOL 459Genomics
BIOL 460 Molecular Biology
BIOL 461 Protein Science
BIOL 462 Medical Biochemistry
BIOL 463 Cell Biology
BIOL 481 Environmental Animal Physiology
BIOL 496 Plant Developmental Biology and Biotechnology
BiochemistryBiochemistry
Biotechnology
Biotechnology or Cellular & Molecular Biology or Microbiology
Biosecurity
Biological Sciences or Ecology
Cell Biology Cellular & Molecular Biology
EcologyEcology
Environmental Science
Environmental Science
Evolutionary Biology
Biological Sciences or Ecology
Genetics
Cellular & Molecular Biology or Biological Sciences
Marine Biology
Biological Sciences or Ecology
MicrobiologyMicrobiology
Plant Biology 32
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Biotechnology or Biological Sciences or
Ecology
Career Opportunities
Graduates with bachelors
degrees (BSc, BSc(Hons)) are
employed as agricultural
workers, biological and physical
scientists/technicians, teachers,
scientific sales representatives,
environmental health officers,
bacteriologists and zoologists.
Employers include research institutions, regional
councils, dairy companies, secondary schools,
tertiary institutions, department of health,
area health boards, pharmaceutical companies,
medical laboratories, and meat companies.
Potential Employers
• School Biology Teacher - general science, biology,
science advisors.
• University Teaching and Research- technicians,
research assistants
Crown Research Institutes
• Industrial Research Ltd (IRL)- microbiology,
biochemistry, electron microscopy, genetics
• Scion (Formerly Forest Research) - ecology,
taxonomy, morphology, wood anatomy, wildlife
biology, entomology, biochemistry, plant
physiology, microbiology, genetics
• Institute of Environmental Science and Research
Ltd (ESR) - microbiology, biochemistry,
environmental quality, electron microscopy,
geonomics, forensics
• Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment
(MBIE) - science policy development
Research Associations
• Canterbury District Health Board - cancer
research & cytogenetics unit, Christchurch
- molecular/-cytogenetics, mutagenesis,
microbiology, immunology, physiology,
histology, biochemistry
• Fonterra (Formerly New Zealand Dairy Research
Institute)
• New Zealand Logging Industry Research
Association
• Meat Industry Research Institute of New Zealand
• Cawthron Institute - genetics, plant physiology
& biochemistry, resource management, ecology,
microbiology, freshwater & estuarine biology,
biological survey
• Aquaculture - salmon farms, mussel farms,
management
Ministries
• Ministry for the Environment - resource
management policy development, ecology, new
organisms in New Zealand
• Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) - ecology,
taxonomy, morphology, wood anatomy,
plant pathology, mycorrhizae, timber decay
control, electron microscopy, wildlife biology,
entomology
Other
• Christchurch Clinical School - clinical
endocrinology, endocrine biochemistry,
endocrine physiology (both in vivo and in vitro
studies)
• Regional Councils (Water Boards) - ecology, environmental monitoring and assessment,
land inventory, resource management,
phycology, microbiology
• Department of Conservation - genetics,
marine ecology, wildlife biology, ornithology,
entomology, resource management, freshwater
biology, plant ecology, conservation
• Museums - ecology, taxonomy, entomology,
ornithology, invertebrate zoology, science
communication.
Biological consultants; pharmaceutical companies;
industrial microbiology; fish and game councils;
salmon farms; dairy research; meat industries; food
industries; –plus many more.
• Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences (GNS) palynology, palaeobotany, geobotany
• New Zealand Pastoral Agriculture Research
Institute Ltd (AgResearch) - genetics, animal
behaviour, animal physiology, biochemistry,
plant physiology, genomics, biochemistry,
microbiology, ecology, entomology
• Landcare Research NZ Ltd - land inventory,
wildlife biology, ecology, microbiology,
entomology, biochemistry, conservation, plant
physiology, pollution, taxonomy, evolution,
genetics
• Plant & Food Research Ltd - plant physiology,
biochemistry, biotechnology, genetics, microbiology, marine science
• The Horticulture and Food Crown Research
Institute of NZ Ltd (HortResearch) - plant
physiology, biochemistry, biotechnology,
microbiology, electron microscopy, genetics
• National Institute of Water & Atmosphere Ltd
(NIWA) - fisheries biology & ecology, biology of
marine & freshwater organisms, oceanography,
pollution, water quality, limnology, biophysics,
genetics
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
33
Contact Information
Please contact us if you have further questions regarding our courses or research, questions for individual
staff members can be sent via email using the format firstname.surname@canterbury.ac.nz.
Head of School
Undergraduate Advisor
Student Advisor, College of Science
Professor Matthew Turnbull
Our advisor can offer advice and help you plan
your biology degree
Enquiries
Dr Pieter Pelser
pieter.pelser@canterbury.ac.nz
Phone: 364 2987 Ext. 45605
The Student Advisor is available to provide
accurate and timely academic advice and
assistance on course options and/or degree
programmes in science subjects.
Phone: +64 3 364 2500
Fax: +64 3 364 2590
E-mail: biology@canterbury.ac.nz
Web:
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Postal Address:
School of Biological Sciences
University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800
Christchurch
New Zealand
Postgraduate Advisor
Dr Marie Hale
marie.hale@canterbury.ac.nz
Phone: 364 2987 Ext. 6739
Students in the behaviour lab (Biol 383) investigate cockroach nerve reactions.
34
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
Anna Chapman
College of Science
Phone: +64 3 364 2987 ext. 3127
anna.chapman@canterbury.ac.nz
University of Canterbury
Contact Centre
For more information about study options or an
enrolment pack get in touch with the Contact
Centre on:
Freephone: 0800 VARSITY
(0800 827 748) in NZ
Or phone: +64 3 364 2555
Email: enrol@canterbury.ac.nz
Web: www.canterbury.ac.nz
www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz
35
CP
College of Education office
Closed temporarily
Security
Student Services Centre
Major cycle stand
Heat and Eat
Café or Bar
Library
Accessible parking
Link parking
Pay and Display parking
Permit parking
Contractor permit parking
Bus stop
Directory
Pay and Display parking
Permit parking
Contractor permit parking
College of Engineering office
College of Arts office
College of Business and Law office
College of Science office
College of Education office
Closed temporarily
Security
Student Services Centre
Major cycle stand
Heat and Eat
Café or Bar
Library
Accessible parking
Link parking
www.canterbury.ac.nz/theuni/maps
CP
I4
H4
B2
I3
I5
D5
G3
G5
H7
H4
H4
Café 101 – Psychology/Sociology
Café 1894 – Puaka-James Hight
Collective – Dovedale Village
Hard Hat Cafe
Ilam Campus Gallery – Fine Arts 2
Food Base – Ilam Apartments
Reboot Cafe – Erskine
The Foundry and Bentleys – UCSA Events Centre
The Shed – Kirkwood Village
The Shilling Club – Puaka-James Hight
Undercroft Food Hall – Puaka-James Hight
Cafes, bars and galleries
UC Campus Map
Bus stop
Directory
Kōtuku
Erskine
D4
D4
E5
F6
C3
F1
D3
Bishop Julius
College House
Ilam Apartments
Rochester and Rutherford
Sonoda Christchurch Campus
University Hall
Waimairi Village
Halls of Residence
A2
G3
Computer workrooms (24/7)
A3
H4
H5
H4
H3
I4
B2
Jack Mann Auditorium
A1 – A3 North Arts lecture theatres
A4 – A9 South Arts lecture theatres
C1 – C3 Central lecture theatres
E8 – E9 Engineering lecture theatres
F3 Forestry lecture theatre
L1 – L2 Ōtakaro lecture theatres
Lecture Theatres
Central Library – Puaka-James Hight
Education Library – Henry Field
Engineering and Physical Sciences Library
Macmillan Brown Library – Te Ao Mārama
H4
G5
B2
H4
Bank, ANZ – Puaka-James Hight
Health Centre
IT Service Desk – Henry Field
IT Service Desk – Puaka-James Hight
Services
H4
B2
I2
I4
Libraries
The School of Biological Sciences is housed in the Biology building
with teaching laboratories in the adjacent von Haast building.
Pharmacy – Puaka-James Hight
Postal Agency – Puaka-James Hight
Recreation Centre
Students’ Association (UCSA) – Puaka-James Hight
Uni Bookshop
Vice-Chancellor’s Office – Matariki
A2
F2
Te Puna i Te Ora – Dovedale
Te Whare Akonga o Te Akatoki – Ilam
Whares
H4
H4
I7
H4
H4
G4
Jul 2015
School of Biological Sciences:
T: +64 3 364 2500
E: biology@canterbury.ac.nz
University of Canterbury
Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha
Private Bag 4800
Christchurch 8140
New Zealand
www. biol.canterbury.ac.nz