Download APPSYCHOLOGY - Kingsway Regional School District

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Social perception wikipedia, lookup

Albert Bandura wikipedia, lookup

21st century skills wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Kingsway Regional School District
Committed to Excellence
Course Name: AP Psychology
Department: Social Studies/History
BOE Adoption Date: September 22, 2014
Grade Level(s): 11-12
Credits: 5
Revision Date(s): October 22, 2015
ABSTRACT
The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While
considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key
concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and
cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social
psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use
the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.
1
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Mission Statement
Page 3
Curriculum and Instruction Goals
Page 3
Philosophy of Shared Curriculum Service with South Harrison Township Elementary
Page 3
How to Read this Document
Page 3
Terms to Know
Pages 4-6
Pacing Guide
Pages 6-45
Curriculum Units
Pages 46-158
2
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Mission Statement
The Kingsway Regional School District believes that this school district is responsible for developing and maintaining a comprehensive educational program that
will foster the academic, social, and personal growth of all students. The Kingsway Regional School District provides a secure, supportive environment. It also
provides high quality resources to challenge and empower each individual to pursue his/her potential, to develop a passion for learning in a diverse and
challenging world, to encourage active citizenship, and to reach a high standard of achievement at all grade levels as defined by the New Jersey Core Curriculum
Content Standards (NJCCCS) & Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
Curriculum & Instruction Goals
Goal(s):
1. To ensure students are college and career ready upon graduation
2. To vertically and horizontally align curriculum K-12 to ensure successful transition of students at each grade level
3. To identify individual student strengths and weaknesses utilizing various assessment measures (formative, summative, alternative, etc.) so as to
differentiate instruction while meeting the rigor of the applicable content standards
4. To improve student achievement as assessed through multiple measures including, but not limited to, state testing, local assessments, and intermediate
benchmarking
Philosophy of the Shared Curriculum Service with South Harrison Township Elementary
The ultimate goal of the newly established shared curriculum service with South Harrison Township Elementary is to provide clearly coherent curriculum for
grades K-12 to enhance student growth and achievement and provide learning experiences that assist in providing an inherent love of learning. With true
vertical and horizontal curricular alignment all students will be effectively prepared for their arrival onto the campus of Kingsway Regional Middle School.
Through this shared vision, both school districts are able to work earlier and more productively with students to ensure they are properly equipped with the
knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in college and career upon graduation from high school. The alignment of curriculum K-12 safeguards countless
benefits for our children; it is the very foundation for the improved teaching and learning that is our goal as educators, parents, and community members. Most
notably, an aligned curriculum K-12 creates a common ownership and understanding of what must be taught and learned at each grade level for each subject
area. No matter where a student attends, the curriculum requirements are the same across buildings, grade levels and teachers. Additionally, an aligned
curriculum serves to provide valuable information to parents who will know what each child is expected to learn while in the classroom.
How to Read this Document
3
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
This curricular document contains both pacing guides and curriculum units. The pacing guides serve to communicate an estimated timeframe as to when skills
and topics will be taught throughout the year. The pacing, however, may differ slightly depending upon the unique needs of each learner. The curriculum units
contain more detailed information as to the content, goals, and objectives of the course well as how students will be assessed. The terms and definitions below
will assist the reader to better understand the sections and components of this curriculum document.
Terms to Know
1. Accommodation(s): The term "accommodation" may be used to describe an alteration of environment, curriculum format, or equipment that allows an
individual with a disability to gain access to content and/or complete assigned tasks. They allow students with disabilities to pursue a regular course of
study. The term accommodation is often used interchangeable with the term modification. However, it is important to remember that modifications
change or modify the intended learning goal while accommodations result in the same learning goal being expected but with added assistance in that
achievement. Since accommodations do not alter what is being taught, instructors should be able to implement the same grading scale for students
with disabilities as they do for students without disabilities.
2. Differentiated Instruction: Differentiation of instruction relies on the idea that instructional approaches should be tailored to each individual student’s
learning needs. It provides students an array of options during the learning process that allows them make sense of ideas as it relates to them. The integration
of differentiated instructional techniques is a curriculum design approach to increase flexibility in teaching and decrease the barriers that frequently limit
student access to materials and learning in classrooms.
3. Enduring Understanding: Enduring understandings (aka big ideas) are statements of understanding that articulate deep conceptual understandings at
the heart of each content area. Enduring understandings are noted in the alongside essential questions within each unit in this document.
4. Essential Question: These are questions whose purpose is to stimulate thought, to provoke inquiry, and to spark more questions. They extend beyond a
single lesson or unit. Essential questions are noted in the beginning of each unit in this document.
5. Formative Assessments: Formative assessments monitor student learning to provide ongoing feedback that can be used by (1) instructors to improve
teaching and (2) by students to improve their learning. Formative assessments help identify students’ strengths and weaknesses and address problems
immediately.
6. Learning Activity(s): Learning activities are those activities that take place in the classroom for which the teacher facilitates and the students participate
in to ensure active engagement in the learning process. (Robert J. Marzano, The Art and Science of Teaching)
7. Learning Assignment(s): Learning assignments are those activities that take place independently by the student inside the classroom or outside the
classroom (i.e. homework) to extend concepts and skills within a lesson.
8. Learning Goal(s): Learning goals are broad statements that note what students “should know” and/or “be able to do” as they progress through a unit.
Learning goals correlate specifically to the NJCCCS and CCSS are noted within each unit.
9. Learning Objective(s): Learning objectives are more specific skills and concepts that students must achieve as they progress towards the broader
learning goal. These are included within each unit and are assessed frequently by the teacher to ensure students are progressing appropriately.
10. Model Assessment: Within the model curriculum, model assessments are provided that included assessments that allow for measuring student
proficiency of those target skills as the year of instruction progresses.
11. Model Curriculum: The model curriculum has been provided by the state of New Jersey to provide a “model” for which districts can properly implement
4
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
the NJSLS (New Jersey Student Learning Standards) by providing an example from which to work and/or a product for implementation.
12. Modification(s): The term "modification" may be used to describe a change in the curriculum. Modifications are typically made for students with
disabilities who are unable to comprehend all of the content an instructor is teaching. The term modification is often used interchangeable with the term
accommodations. However, it is important to remember that modifications change or modify the intended learning goal while accommodations result
in the same learning goal being expected but with assistance in that achievement.
13. Performance Assessments: (aka alternative or authentic assessments) Performance assessments are a form of assessment that requires students to
perform tasks that generate a more authentic evaluation of a student’s knowledge, skills, and abilities. Performance assessments stress the application
of knowledge and extend beyond traditional assessments (i.e. multiple-choice question, matching, true & false, etc.).
14. Standards: Academic standards, from which the curriculum is built, are statements that of what students “should know” or “be able to do” upon
completion of a grade-level or course of study. Educational standards help teachers ensure their students have the skills and knowledge they need to be
successful by providing clear goals for student learning.
o
State: The New Jersey Student Learning Standards (NJSLSs) include Preschool Teaching and Learning Standards as well as K-12 standards for:
Visual and Performing Arts; Comprehensive Health and Physical Education; Science; Social Studies; World Languages; Technology; 21stCentury Life and Careers; Language Arts Literacy; and, Mathematics.
15. Summative Assessments: Summative assessments evaluate student learning at the end of an instructional time period by comparing it against some
standard or benchmark. Information from summative assessments can be used formatively when students or faculty use it to guide their efforts and
activities in subsequent courses.
st
16. 21 Century Skills: These skills emphasis the growing need to focus on those skills that prepare students successfully by focusing on core subjects and
21st century themes; learning and innovation skills; information, media and technology skills; and life and career skills. These concepts are embedded in
each unit of the curriculum.
5
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Proficiencies and Pacing
Course Title: AP Psychology
Unit Title:
Unit 1: History and
Approaches &
Research Methods
6
Duration/
Month(s)
3 weeks
September
Related Standards:
Subject Area (Primary):
IA-1.1
Describe and compare
the biological,
behavioral, cognitive,
sociocultural,
humanistic, and
psychodynamic
perspectives.
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1. Students will understand 1. Recognize how philosophical
the birth of Psychology
and physiological perspectives
and will be able to explain
shaped the development of
how the findings of the
psychological thought.
fathers of Psychology
2. Describe and compare different
began the development
theoretical approaches in
of the 7 major
explaining behavior:
perspectives using 4 goals
— structuralism, functionalism,
of psychology.
and behaviorism in the early
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
IA-3.1
Describe the elements
of an experiment.
IA-5.1
Identify ethical issues
in psychological
research.
IA-3.2
Explain the importance
of sampling and
random assignment in
psychological research.
IA-3.3
Describe and compare
quantitative and
qualitative research
strategies.
Secondary:
IA-2.1
IA-4.1
IA-4.2
IA-4.3
IA-4.4
IA-6.1
IA-6.2
IA-6.3
IA-6.4
Interdisciplinary:
Mathematics:
MA.12.4.4.12 A.2.4
Statistical claims based
7
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
2. Students will understand
the different types of
variables and ethical
issues associated with
experiments and will be
able to design an
experiment using the
scientific method.
Topics and Skills:
years
— Gestalt,
psychoanalytic/psychodyna
mic, and humanism
emerging later
— evolutionary, biological,
cognitive, and
biopsychosocial as more
contemporary approaches.
3. Recognize the strengths and
limitations of applying theories
to explain behavior.
4. Distinguish the different
domains of psychology (e.g.,
biological, clinical, cognitive,
counseling, developmental,
educational, experimental,
human factors, industrial–
organizational, personality,
psychometric, social).
5. Identify major historical figures
in psychology (e.g., Mary
Whiton Calkins, Charles
Darwin, Dorothea Dix, Sigmund
Freud, G. Stanley Hall, William
James, Ivan Pavlov, Jean Piaget,
Carl Rogers, B. F. Skinner,
Margaret Floy Washburn, John
B. Watson, and Wilhelm
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
on sampling
MA.12.4.4.12 A.3 Design a statistical
experiment, conduct the
experiment, and
interpret and
communicate the
outcome.
MA.12.4.4.12 A.5
Analyze data using
technology, and use
statistical terminology to
describe conclusions.
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.a
Mathematical, physical,
and computational tools
are used to search for
and explain core
scientific concepts and
principles.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.1
Refine interrelationships
among concepts and
patterns of evidence
found in different central
scientific explanations.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3
Use scientific principles
8
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Wundt).
Research Methods
Differentiate types of research
(e.g., experiments,
correlational studies, survey
research, naturalistic
observations, and case studies)
with regard to purpose,
strengths, and weaknesses.
Describe how research design
drives the reasonable
conclusions that can be drawn
(e.g., experiments are useful
for determining cause and
effect; the use of experimental
controls reduces alternative
explanations).
Identify independent,
dependent, confounding, and
control variables in
experimental designs.
Distinguish between random
assignment of participants to
conditions in experiments and
random selection of
participants, primarily in
correlational studies and
surveys.
Predict the validity of
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
and theories to build and
refine standards for data
collection, posing
controls, and presenting
evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others
ideas, observations, and
experiences.
Social Studies:
SOC.9-12.6.2.12.D.2.d
Analyze the impact of
new intellectual,
philosophical, and
scientific ideas on how
humans viewed
themselves and how
they viewed their
9
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
behavioral explanations based
on the quality of research
design (e.g., confounding
variables limit confidence in
research conclusions).
6. Distinguish the purposes of
descriptive statistics and
inferential statistics.
7. Apply basic descriptive
statistical concepts, including
interpreting and constructing
graphs and calculating simple
descriptive statistics (e.g.,
measures of central tendency,
standard deviation).
8. Discuss the value of reliance on
operational definitions and
measurement in behavioral
research.
9. Identify how ethical issues
inform and constrain research
practices.
10. Describe how ethical and legal
guidelines (e.g., those provided
by the American Psychological
Association, federal
regulations, local institutional
review boards) protect
research participants and
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
physical and spiritual
worlds.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
10
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
promote sound ethical
practice.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
11
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 2: Social
Psychology
2 weeks
October
12
Related Standards:
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
VC-1.1
Demonstrate an
understanding of person
perception.
VC-1.2
Describe how
attributions affect our
explanations of behavior.
VC-2.1
Identify basic social and
cultural categories.
VC-3.1
Describe effects of the
presence of others on
individual behavior.
VC-3.3 Explore the
nature and effects of
bias and discrimination.
Secondary:
VC-1.2
VC-1.3
VC-1.4
VC-2.2
VC-3.2
VC-3.4
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
1. Students will understand
our thoughts about others
and will be able to explain
the psychological
phenomena of the
Fundamental Attribution
Error, Self-Serving Bias,
and Cognitive Dissonance.
2. Students will understand
our feelings about others
through stereotyping and
prejudice and will reflect
on their own personal and
observed stereotypes.
3. Students will understand
our actions toward others
and will be able to
synthesize a persuasion
campaign through
conformity, compliance,
and obedience.
Topics and Skills:
1. Identify important figures in
social psychology (e .g.,
Solomon Asch, Leon Festinger,
Stanley Milgram, Philip
Zimbardo).
2. Apply attribution theory to
explain motives (e.g.,
fundamental attribution error,
self-serving bias).
3. Describe the structure and
function of different kinds of
group behavior (e.g.,
deindividuation, group
polarization).
4. Explain how individuals
respond to expectations of
others, including groupthink,
conformity, and obedience to
authority.
5. Discuss attitudes and how they
change (e .g., central route to
persuasion).
6. Predict the impact of the
presence of others on
individual behavior (e.g.,
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
VC-3.5
VC-3.6
VC-3.7
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.1
Refine interrelationships
among concepts and
patterns of evidence
found in different central
scientific explanations.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3
Use scientific principles
and theories to build and
refine standards for data
collection, posing
controls, and presenting
evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
13
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
bystander effect, social
facilitation).
7. Describe processes that
contribute to differential
treatment of group members
(e.g., in-group/out-group
dynamics, ethnocentrism,
prejudice).
8. Articulate the impact of social
and cultural categories (e.g.,
gender, race, ethnicity) on selfconcept and relations with
others.
9. Anticipate the impact of
behavior on a self-fulfilling
prophecy.
10. Describe the variables that
contribute to altruism,
aggression, and attraction.
11. Discuss attitude formation and
change, including persuasion
strategies and cognitive
dissonance.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
and learn from others’
ideas, observations, and
experiences.
Social Studies:
SOC.9-12.6.2.12.D.2.d
Analyze the impact of
new intellectual,
philosophical, and
scientific ideas on how
humans viewed
themselves and how
they viewed their
physical and spiritual
worlds.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
14
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
15
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 3: Biological Basis
of Behavior
3 weeks
October/November
16
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
1. Students will understand
IIA-1.2
neural transmission and
Describe how
will be able to describe the
information is
process of sending and
transmitted and
receiving neurological
integrated in the nervous
messages with and
system.
without an influence of
IIA-2.1
drugs.
Classify the major
2. Students will understand
divisions and
the complexity of the
subdivisions of the
brain and will be able to
nervous system.
draw each of the brain’s
IIA-3.2
regions, lobes, cortical
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
1. Identify key contributors (e .g.,
Paul Broca, Charles Darwin,
Michael Gazzaniga, Roger
Sperry, Carl Wernicke).
2. Diagram a neuron and label its
parts with a description of each
part’s function.
3. Discuss the influence of drugs
on neurotransmitters.
4. Label the effect of the
endocrine system on behavior.
5. Draw the nervous system and
its subdivisions and functions:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Recognize that specific
areas, brain lateralization
functions are centered in
and hemispheres with
specific lobes of the
descriptions of their
cerebral cortex.
responsibilities.
IIA-4.1
3. Students will understand
Explain how research
how the nervous system
and technology have
and endocrine system
provided methods to
operate and will be able to
analyze brain behavior
investigate the genetic
and disease.
connections on nature vs.
IIA-6.1
nurture.
Assess the effects of
heredity and
environment on
behavior.
Secondary:
IIA-1.1
IIA-1.3
IIA-2.2
IIA-3.1
IIA-3.3
IIA-5.1
IIA-6.1
IIA-7.1
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.D
Organisms reproduce,
develop, and have
predictable life cycles.
17
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
central and peripheral nervous
systems; major brain regions,
lobes, and cortical areas; brain
lateralization and hemispheric
specialization.
6. Create a hypothesis about
psychology’s abiding interest in
how heredity, environment,
and evolution work together to
shape behavior.
7. Predict how traits and behavior
can be selected for their
adaptive value.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Organisms contain
genetic information that
influences their traits,
and they pass this on to
their offspring during
reproduction.
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.D.b
Inserting, deleting, or
substituting DNA
segments can alter the
genetic code. An altered
gene may be passed on
to every cell that
develops from it. The
resulting features may
help, harm, or have little
or no effect on the
offspring's success in its
environment.
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.E.d
Evolution occurs as a
result of a combination
of the following factors:
Ability of a species to
reproduce; Genetic
variability of offspring
due to mutation and
recombination of genes;
Finite supply of the
18
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
resources required for
life; Natural selection,
due to environmental
pressure, of those
organisms better able to
survive and leave
offspring.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3
Use scientific principles
and theories to build and
refine standards for data
collection, posing
controls, and presenting
evidence.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
19
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
20
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 4: Learning
2 weeks
December
21
Related Standards:
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
IVA-1.1
Discuss learning from a
psychological viewpoint.
IVA-2.1
Describe the classical
conditioning paradigm.
IVA-3.1
Describe the operant
conditioning paradigm.
Secondary:
IVA-1.2
IVA-4.1
IVA-4.2
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1. Students will understand
Classical and Operant
conditioning and will be
able to experience and
tweet their observations
of daily life conditioning.
2. Students will analyze
learning both biologically
and socially and will write
a self-reflection
description of their
learning traits and connect
themselves to the
1. Identify key contributors in the
psychology of learning (e .g.,
Albert Bandura, John Garcia,
Ivan Pavlov, Robert Rescorla, B.
F. Skinner, Edward Thorndike,
Edward Tolman, John B.
Watson).
2. Distinguish general differences
between principles of classical
conditioning, operant
conditioning, and observational
learning (e .g., contingencies).
3. Draw an example of each
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
22
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
IVA-5.1
IVA-5.2
IVA-5.3
IVA-5.4
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
observed world around
conditioning in notebooks and
them.
use appropriate vocabulary to
label the examples.
3. Students will understand
4. Make a prediction of the
the principles of learning
effects of operant conditioning
and its many variables and
(e .g., positive reinforcement,
will be able to describe the
negative reinforcement,
connections between
punishment) and predict how
learning and behavior.
practice, schedules of
reinforcement, and motivation
will influence quality of
learning.
5. Interpret graphs that exhibit
the results of learning
experiments.
6. Provide examples of how
biological constraints create
learning predispositions.
7. Describe the essential
characteristics of insight
learning, latent learning, and
social learning.
8. Apply learning principles to
explain emotional learning,
taste aversion, superstitious
behavior, and learned
helplessness.
9. Suggest how behavior
modification, biofeedback,
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
23
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
coping strategies, and selfcontrol can be used to address
behavioral problems.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
24
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1. Students will understand
the physical, cognitive, and
emotional developments of
psychology by analyzing
Jean Piaget’s 4 stages of
development, Mary
Ainsworth’s attachment
theory, and Baumrind’s
parenting styles.
2. Students will understand
that development is a
lifelong process and will be
able to describe how their
own experiences and
interactions have
contributed to their lives
today.
3. Students will understand
how sex and gender play a
role in our society and will
be able to bring in
examples that demonstrate
their influence on us and
other countries.
1. Identify key contributors in
developmental psychology
(e.g., Mary Ainsworth, Albert
Bandura, Diana Baumrind, Erik
Erikson, Sigmund Freud, Carol
Gilligan, Harry Harlow,
Lawrence Kohlberg, Konrad
Lorenz, Jean Piaget, Lev
Vygotsky).
2. Discuss the interaction of
nature and nurture (including
cultural variations) in the
determination of behavior.
3. Explain the process of
conception and gestation,
including factors that influence
successful fetal development
(e.g., nutrition, illness,
substance abuse).
4. Discuss maturation of motor
skills.
5. Describe the influence of
temperament and other social
factors on attachment and
appropriate socialization.
6. Explain the maturation of
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Unit 5: Developmental
2 weeks
Psychology
December/January
25
Subject Area (Primary):
IIIA-1.1
Describe physical, social,
and cognitive changes
from the prenatal period
throughout the life span.
IIIA-1.2
Examine the nature of
change over the life
span.
IIIA-2.1
Explain the
distinguishing
characteristics of the
longitudinal and crosssectional methods of
study.
IIIA-4.1
Describe the role of
critical periods in
development.
IIIA-3.1
Explain various
developmental models.
Secondary:
IIIA-1.3
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
IIIA-1.4
IIIA-3.2
IIIA-3.3
IIIA-3.4
IIIA-4.2
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
26
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
cognitive abilities (e.g., Piaget’s
stages, information
processing).
7. Compare and contrast models
of moral development (e.g.,
Kohlberg, Gilligan).
8. Discuss maturational
challenges in adolescence—
including related family
conflicts.
9. Explain how parenting styles
influence development.
10. Characterize the development
of decisions related to intimacy
as people mature.
11. Predict the physical and
cognitive changes that emerge
as people age, including steps
that can be taken to maximize
function.
12. Describe how sex and gender
influence socialization and
other aspects of development.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
ideas, observations, and
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
27
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
28
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1. Students will understand
how memory is organized
for storage, usage, and
retrieval and will be able
to evaluate their own
memory and their
classmates' memories
using time trials.
2. Students will understand
language development as
a whole and will be able
to compare psychological
points of view on the
nature vs. nurture debate
(Skinner/Chomsky).
3. Students will understand
how genetics and
environmental influences
affect intelligence and will
analyze the difficulties of
measuring intelligence.
1. Identify key contributors in
cognitive psychology (e .g.,
Noam Chomsky, Hermann
Ebbinghaus, Wolfgang Köhler,
Elizabeth Loftus, George A.
Miller).
2. Compare and contrast various
cognitive processes: effortful
versus automatic processing;
deep versus shallow
processing; and focused versus
divided attention.
3. Describe and differentiate
psychological and physiological
systems of memory (e .g.,
short-term memory,
procedural memory).
4. Outline the principles that
underlie effective encoding,
storage, and construction of
memories.
5. Describe strategies for memory
improvement.
6. Synthesize how biological,
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Unit 6: Cognition
3 weeks
January/February
29
Subject Area (Primary):
Memory
IVB-1.1
Characterize the
difference between
surface and deep
(elaborate) processing.
IVB-2.2
Describe the operation
of short-term memory
and working memory.
IVB-2.3
Describe the operation
of long-term memory.
IVB-5.2
Describe strategies for
improving memory
based on our
understanding of
memory.
IVB-6.1 Describe the
processes that lead to
inaccuracies in memory
Thinking, Language &
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
30
Related Standards:
Intelligence
IVC-1.1
Define thinking as a
mental process involved
in the manipulation and
understanding of
information.
IVC-2.1
Identify problem solving
as a directed and
productive example of
thinking.
IVC-3.1
Define language as
symbols and sounds that
convey meaning and
facilitate
communication.
IVC-4.1
Discuss the effects of
development on
language acquisition.
Secondary:
Memory
IVB-1.2
IVB-2.1
IVB-3.1
IVB-3.2
IVB-3.3
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
cognitive, and cultural factors
converge to facilitate
acquisition, development, and
use of language.
7. Discuss the process of thought
translating into language and
how it has been shaped by our
social influences.
8. Identify the elements that
encompass language and how
we use them in our own way.
9. Compare and contrast B.F.
Skinner and Chomsky using the
nature vs. nurture debate to
describe language
development.
10. Identify problem-solving
strategies as well as factors
that influence their
effectiveness.
11. List the characteristics of
creative thought and creative
thinkers.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
IVB-4.1
IVB-5.1
Thinking, Language &
Intelligence
IVC-1.2
IVC-2.2
IVC-2.3
IVC-3.2
IVC-4.2
IVC-4.3
IVC-5.1
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
31
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
32
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
33
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 7: Personality &
Individual Differences
2 weeks
March
34
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
Personality &
Assessment
IIIB-1.1
Define personality as the
individual's unique way
of thinking, feeling, and
acting.
IIIB-2.1
Explain the
characteristics of the
psychodynamic,
cognitive-behavioral,
humanistic, and trait
approaches.
IIIB-3.1
Distinguish between
Personality
1. Students will understand
the different approaches
to explaining personality
and will be able to explain
the dynamics of “how”
each approach explains
behavior.
2. Students will understand
how our culture influences
our personality
development and will be
able to compare individual
developments from
different cultures and
reflect on the criticisms of
the social cognitive
Personality
1. Compare and contrast the
major theories and approaches
to explaining personality (e.g.,
psychoanalytic, humanist,
cognitive, trait, social cognition,
behavioral).
2. Describe and compare research
methods (e .g., case studies
and surveys) that psychologists
use to investigate personality.
3. Identify frequently used
assessment strategies (e.g., the
Minnesota Multiphasic
Personality Inventory [MMPI],
the Thematic Apperception
Test [TAT]), and evaluate
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
objective and projective
techniques of personality
assessment.
approach.
Individual Differences &
Testing
3. Students will understand
the historic development
of intelligence testing and
the bias they have faced
over time and will be able
to debate the appropriate
testing practices,
particularly in relation to
culture-fair test uses.
relative test quality based on
reliability and validity of the
instruments.
4. Speculate how cultural context
can facilitate or constrain
personality development,
especially as it relates to selfconcept (e.g., collectivistic
versus individualistic cultures).
5. Identify key contributors to
personality theory (e.g., Alfred
Adler, Albert Bandura, Paul
Costa and Robert McCrae,
Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung,
Abraham Maslow, and Carl
Rogers).
Individual Differences
IVE-1.1
Define and understand
the nature of test
constructs, such as
intelligence, personality,
and creativity.
IVE-2.1
Explain how intelligence
and personality may be
influenced by heredity
and environment.
IVE-3.1
Link intelligence to the
use of cognitive skills and
strategies.
Secondary:
Personality &
Assessment
IIIB-1.2
IIIB-2.2
IIIB-3.2
Individual Differences
IVE-1.2
35
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Individual Differences & Testing
6. Define intelligence and list
characteristics of how
psychologists measure
intelligence: abstract versus
verbal measures and speed of
processing.
7. Discuss how culture influences
the definition of intelligence.
8. Compare and contrast historic
and contemporary theories of
intelligence (e.g., Charles
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
IVE-3.2
IVE-4.1
IVE-4.2
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
36
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Spearman, Howard Gardner,
and Robert Sternberg).
9. Explain how psychologists
design tests, including
standardization strategies and
other techniques to establish
reliability and validity.
10. Interpret the meaning of scores
in terms of the normal curve.
11. Describe relevant labels related
to intelligence testing (e.g.,
gifted, cognitively disabled).
12. Debate the appropriate testing
practices, particularly in
relation to culture-fair test
uses.
13. Identify key contributors in
intelligence research and
testing (e .g., Alfred Binet,
Francis Galton, Howard
Gardner, Charles Spearman,
Robert Sternberg, Louis
Terman, and David Wechsler).
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
experiences.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
37
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
38
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 8: Sensation and
Perception/States of
Consciousness
39
3 weeks
March/April
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
1. Students will understand
IIB-1.1
the basic principles of
Explain the concepts of
sensory transduction and
threshold, adaptation,
will be able to explain the
and constancy.
sensory process and how
IIB-2.2
they interact with the
Describe binocular and
brain including common
monocular depth cues.
sensory disorders.
IIB-2.3
2. Students will understand
Describe the influence
the sleep cycle and will be
on perception of
able to keep a dream log
environmental variables,
with analysis and
motivation, past
correlation to their REM
cycles.
experiences, culture, and
3. Students will analyze drug
expectations.
Secondary:
use and dependency and
IIB-1.2
will be able to chart the
IIB-1.3
major psychoactive drug
IIB-1.4
categories as well as their
IIB-2.1
effects both psychological
IIB-3.1
and physiological.
IIB-3.2
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
1. Discuss basic principles of
sensory transduction, including
absolute threshold, difference
threshold, signal detection, and
sensory adaptation.
2. Describe sensory processes
(e.g., hearing, vision, touch,
taste, smell, vestibular,
kinesthesis, pain), including the
specific nature of energy
transduction, relevant
anatomical structures, and
specialized pathways in the
brain for each of the senses.
3. Explain common sensory
disorders (e.g., visual and
hearing impairments).
4. Describe general principles of
organizing and integrating
sensation to promote stable
awareness of the external world
(e.g., Gestalt principles, depth
perception).
5. Discuss how experience and
culture can influence perceptual
processes (e.g., perceptual set,
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
40
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
6.
7.
8.
9.
context effects).
Explain the role of top-down
processing in producing
vulnerability to illusion.
Discuss the role of attention in
behavior.
Challenge common beliefs in
parapsychological phenomena.
Identify the major historical
figures in sensation and
perception (e.g., Gustav
Fechner, David Hubel, Ernst
Weber, and Torsten Wiesel).
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
41
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
1. Students will understand
the motivational theories
and will be able to
1. Identify key contributors in the
psychology of motivation and
emotion (e .g., William James,
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
Unit 9: Motivation and
Emotion
42
2 weeks
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
IIC-1.1
Apply motivational
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit Title:
43
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
April/May
concepts to the behavior
of humans and other
animals.
IIC-2.1
Describe the interaction
of internal cues and
learning on basic drives.
IIC-3.1
Describe one or more
theories of motivation,
such as expectancy
value, cognitive
dissonance, arousal,
Maslow's hierarchy of
needs, and drive
reduction.
IIC-4.1
Explain how common
motives and emotions
develop.
IIC-5.1
Use expectancy-value
theory to explain their
own and others'
behavior.
IID-1.1
Identify and explain
major sources of stress.
IID-2.1
compare and contrast
them including their
strengths and weaknesses
and will incorporate both
the biological and social
underpinnings of
motivation.
2. Students will understand
the different theories of
emotion and will be able
to describe how our
cultural influences shape
our emotional
expressions.
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alfred Kinsey, Abraham
Maslow, Stanley Schachter, and
Hans Selye).
Identify and apply basic
motivational concepts to
understand the behavior of
humans and other animals
(e.g., instincts, incentives,
intrinsic versus extrinsic
motivation).
Discuss the biological
underpinnings of motivation,
including needs, drives, and
homeostasis.
Compare and contrast
motivational theories (e .g.,
drive reduction theory, arousal
theory, general adaptation
theory), including the strengths
and weaknesses of each.
Describe classic research
findings in specific motivation
systems (e .g., eating, sex,
social).
Discuss theories of stress and
the effects of stress on
psychological and physical wellbeing.
Compare and contrast major
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
List and explain possible
physiological reactions
to stress.
Secondary:
IIC-2.2
IIC-2.3
IIC-6.1
IIC-6.2
IIC-7.1
IIC-7.2
IID-3.1
IID-4.1
IID-4.2
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
44
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
theories of emotion (e .g.,
James–Lange, Cannon–Bard,
Schachter two-factor theory).
8. Describe how cultural
influences shape emotional
expression, including variations
in body language.
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
45
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
46
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Unit 10: Psychological
Disorders & Therapy
3 weeks
May/June
47
Related Standards:
Learning Goals:
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
Subject Area (Primary):
VA-3.1
Discuss major categories
of abnormal behavior.
VA-3.2
Explore the challenges
associated with accurate
diagnosis.
VB-1.1
Describe availability and
appropriateness of
various modes of
treatment for individuals
(e.g., children,
adolescents, and adults)
with psychological
1. Students will understand
what constitutes
“abnormal behavior”
through contemporary
and historical conceptions
and will be able to use the
Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental
Disorders (DSM) published
by the American
Psychiatric Association as
the primary reference for
making diagnostic
judgments.
2. Students will understand
how different
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Topics and Skills:
1. Describe contemporary and
historical conceptions of
what constitutes
psychological disorders.
2. Recognize the use of the
Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders
(DSM) published by the
American Psychiatric
Association as the primary
reference for making
diagnostic judgments.
3. Discuss the major
diagnostic categories,
including anxiety and
somatoform disorders,
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
disorders.
VB-1.2
Describe characteristics
of effective treatment
and prevention.
VB-3.2
Examine the influence of
ethics and professional
practice.
VA-2.1
Identify the purpose of
different research
methods.
Secondary:
VA-1.1
VA-4.1
VA-4.2
VA-4.3
VA-1.2
VA-2.2
VA-1.3
VA-1.4
VB-2.1
VB-2.2
VB-3.1
Interdisciplinary:
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A
Students understand
48
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
psychologists approach
treatment depending on
their views and will be
able to analyze the
different approaches
through research and
activities.
Topics and Skills:
mood disorders,
schizophrenia, organic
disturbance, personality
disorders, and dissociative
disorders, and their
corresponding symptoms.
4. Evaluate the strengths and
limitations of various
approaches to explaining
psychological disorders:
medical model,
psychoanalytic, humanistic,
cognitive, biological, and
sociocultural.
5. Identify the positive and
negative consequences of
diagnostic labels (e.g., the
Rosenhan study).
6. Discuss the intersection
between psychology and
the legal system (e.g.,
confidentiality, insanity
defense).
Treatment of Abnormal Behavior
1. Describe the central
characteristics of
psychotherapeutic
intervention.
2. Describe major treatment
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
core concepts and
principles of science and
use measurement and
observation tools to
assist in categorizing,
representing, and
interpreting the natural
and designed world.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c
Revisions of predictions
and explanations are
based on systematic
observations, accurate
measurements, and
structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1
Engage in multiple forms
of discussion in order to
process, make sense of,
and learn from others'
ideas, observations, and
experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1
Construct a spreadsheet,
enter data, and use
mathematical or logical
functions to manipulate
49
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
orientations used in
therapy (e.g., behavioral,
cognitive, humanistic) and
how those orientations
influence therapeutic
planning.
Compare and contrast
different treatment formats
(e.g., individual, group).
Summarize effectiveness of
specific treatments used to
address specific problems.
Discuss how cultural and
ethnic context influence
choice and success of
treatment (e.g., factors that
lead to premature
termination of treatment).
Describe prevention
strategies that build
resilience and promote
competence.
Identify major figures in
psychological treatment (e
.g., Aaron Beck, Albert Ellis,
Sigmund Freud, Mary Cover
Jones, Carl Rogers, B. F.
Skinner, and Joseph
Wolpe).
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret
the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3
Participate in online
courses, learning
communities, social
networks or a virtual
world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12.
The use of digital tools
and media-rich resources
enhances creativity and
the construction of
knowledge.
21st Century Life and
Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
The ability to recognize a
problem and apply
critical thinking and
problem-solving skills to
solve the problem is a
lifelong skill that
develops over time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2
Participate in online
strategy and planning
50
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Unit Title:
Duration/
Month(s)
Related Standards:
sessions for coursebased, school-based, or
outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1
Communication with
people from different
cultural backgrounds is
enhanced by the
understanding of
different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2
Determine the
immediate and longterm effects of crosscultural misconceptions
or misunderstandings
resulting from past or
current international
issues or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2
Ethical behaviors
support human rights
and dignity in all aspects
of life.
51
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Goals:
Topics and Skills:
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 1: History and Approaches & Research Methods
52
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Recommended Duration: 3 weeks
Unit Description:
The history of Psychology dates as far back as 1879 when Wilhelm Wundt established Psychology as an academic discipline. From this point, a
vast number of students have engorged the field with a systematic research method based on experimentation, observation, and data analysis.
The conclusions that have been drawn laid the foundation of psychological theories that have been strengthened and disproven while trying to
understand the behavior of people and to learn how we think, feel, develop, love, and grieve amongst many other aspects. The most important
understanding is that all of the findings are done through the standards of the scientific method and that Psychology is a science based on data.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
History
1. What makes psychology a science?
2. What are the four goals of psychological scientists?
3. How and why did the science of psychology begin?
4. Why did the science of psychology flourish in the United States?
5. Why did the focus and methods of each school of thought
evolve?
6. What areas of specialization in psychology exist?
Research
1. What are the steps in the scientific method?
2. What are operational definitions and why are they valuable/
3. Why is meta-analysis useful?
4. What are the three major kinds of research designs and what
are their strengths and weaknesses?
5. What are the conclusions one can make from each kind of
design?
6. Why is correlation not the same as causation?
7. Why is control needed in a “classical experiment”?
8. What is the difference between a population and a sample?
9. What different kinds of samples do psychologists use?
10. What is the difference between random sample and random
assignment?
History
1. Psychology is data driven unlike pseudoscience.
2. The four goals of psychological scientists are to explain,
describe, predict, and to change behavior.
3. Psychology began with Wilhelm Wundt and his investigation of
reaction times coining the thought of introspection and
structuralism.
4. Wundt influenced an American psychologist named William
James who utilized Wundt’s research but adapted it to a
thought known as functionalism.
5. As new schools of thought were being developed, students
became more intrigued by the field of psychology and each
began to build off of previous research and even challenge
them as they made new discoveries that opened even newer
doors for more research.
6. Psychology offers a wide range of specializations today
including but not limited to teaching, counseling, analyzing, and
researching.
Research
1-3 – Researchers need a scientific method to make accurate and
generalizable conclusions.
4-7 – It is important for researchers to use different designs for the
53
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
11. What kinds of settings do psychologists typically use?
12. Why is central tendency useful?
13. Why does a researcher need data on dispersion?
14. Why is a Standard Deviation so useful for statistical analysis?
15. What can inferential statistics tell a researcher about the
relationship between a sample and a population?
16. Why is it necessary to balance individual rights with the rights
of the researcher to ask and answer important questions?
17. Why is it important to protect participants from harm in a
psychological study?
18. What key issues do the APA ethics guidelines address?
19. Why are media reports on psychological studies often
problematic?
20. Why is a broad understanding of the literature important?
21. Why is peer review important?
22. What does the accumulated body of evidence show us about
the importance of health and wellness?
Relevant Standards:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
IA-1.1 Describe and compare the biological,
behavioral, cognitive, sociocultural,
humanistic, and psychodynamic
perspectives.
IA-3.1 Describe the elements of an
experiment.
IA-5.1 Identify ethical issues in
54
variety of psychological issues studied. The design used will limit the
conclusions.
8-11 – The way psychologists design their research informs decisions
about sample and setting.
12-15 – The way psychologists design their research informs what
statistical techniques they can use to make conclusions.
16-18 – Psychological science adheres to a strict ethical code, which is
enforced by the American Psychological Association.
19-21 – Researchers must use care in their interpretation of data.
22 – Psychological research can improve the quality of life.
Learning Goals:
1. Students will understand the birth of
Psychology and will be able to explain
how the findings of the fathers of
Psychology began the development of the
7 major perspectives using 4 goals of
psychology in a research paper.
2. Students will understand the different
types of variables and ethical issues
associated with experiments and will be
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Recognize how philosophical and
physiological perspectives shaped the
development of psychological thought.
2. Describe and compare different theoretical
approaches in explaining behavior:
structuralism, functionalism, and behaviorism
in the early years.
3. Understand Gestalt,
psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, and
Relevant Standards:
psychological research.
IA-3.2 Explain the importance of sampling
and random assignment in psychological
research.
IA-3.3 Describe and compare quantitative
and qualitative research strategies.
Secondary (Supportive):
IA-2.1 List and explain the major subfields
of psychology.
IA-4.1 Define descriptive statistics and
explain how they are used by behavioral
scientists.
IA-4.2 Explain and describe measures of
central tendency and variability.
IA-4.3 Describe the concept of correlation
and explain how it is used in psychology.
IA-4.4 Recognize how inferential statistics
are used in psychological research.
IA-6.1 Discuss psychology s roots in
philosophy and natural science.
IA-6.2 Describe the emergence of
experimental psychology.
IA-6.3 Recognize the diversity of
psychological theories in the 20th and 21st
centuries.
IA-6.4 Describe psychology s increasing
inclusiveness of diverse interests and
constituents.
55
Learning Goals:
able to design an experiment using the
scientific method.
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
humanism.
Understand evolutionary, biological,
cognitive, and biopsychosocial as more
contemporary approaches.
Recognize the strengths and limitations of
applying theories to explain behavior.
Distinguish the different domains of
psychology (e.g., biological, clinical, cognitive,
counseling, developmental, educational,
experimental, human factors, industrial–
organizational, personality, psychometric,
social).
Identify major historical figures in psychology
(e .g., Mary Whiton Calkins, Charles Darwin,
Dorothea Dix, Sigmund Freud, G. Stanley Hall,
and William James).
Demonstrate knowledge of Ivan Pavlov, Jean
Piaget, Carl Rogers, B. F. Skinner, Margaret
Floy Washburn, John B. Watson, and Wilhelm
Wundt).
Research Methods
9. Differentiate types of research (e.g.,
experiments, correlational studies, survey
research, naturalistic observations, and case
studies) with regard to purpose, strengths,
and weaknesses.
10. Describe how research design drives the
reasonable conclusions that can be drawn
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
(e.g., experiments are useful for determining
cause and effect; the use of experimental
controls reduces alternative explanations).
11. Identify independent, dependent,
confounding, and control variables in
experimental designs.
12. Distinguish between random assignment of
participants to conditions in experiments and
random selection of participants, primarily in
correlational studies and surveys.
13. Predict the validity of behavioral explanations
based on the quality of research design (e.g.,
confounding variables limit confidence in
research conclusions).
14. Distinguish the purposes of descriptive
statistics and inferential statistics.
15. Apply basic descriptive statistical concepts,
including interpreting and constructing
graphs and calculating simple descriptive
statistics (e.g., measures of central tendency,
standard deviation).
16. Discuss the value of reliance on operational
definitions and measurement in behavioral
research.
17. Identify how ethical issues inform and
constrain research practices.
18. Describe how ethical and legal guidelines
(e.g., those provided by the American
Psychological
Association,
federal
56
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
regulations, local institutional review boards)
protect research participants and promote
sound ethical practice.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
1. Summer Assignment
2. AP Free Response
Questions
3. Unit Objective Test
4. Summer Research Paper
1. Research Design with practice
and reflection
57
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Summer Research Paper
2. Perspectives Blog
3. Behavior Observation
4. Operational Definition Activity
5. Independent Variable/
Dependent Variable Activity
6. Ethics Investigation
7. Psych Sim 5 - Standard
Deviation
8. Chart Analysis
9. Full Class Research Design
10. Research Design 2 variables
11. Data Collection of Research
12. Data Presentation in various
charts
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-minute papers
Possible Assessment Modifications/Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
58
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Journals
59
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
60
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
History – structuralism, functionalism
Research – hypothesis, theory, applied research, basic research, dependent variable (DV), independent variable (IV), operational definition,
statistical significance
Non-Essential:
History – psychology, science, behavior, mental processes, critical thinking, empirical method, positive psychology, natural selection, biological
approach, neuroscience, behavioral approach, psychodynamic approach, humanistic approach, cognitive approach, evolutionary approach,
61
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit Vocabulary:
sociocultural approach, psychopathology
Research –behavioral perspective, biological perspective, biopsychosocial model, case study, cognitive perspective, confounding variables, control
group, correlation coefficient, correlational research, critical thinking, debriefing, descriptive research, double-blind study, ethnocentrism,
evolutionary perspective, experimental group, experimental research, experimenter bias, humanistic perspective, informed consent, metaanalysis, naturalistic observation, nature-nurture controversy, participant bias, placebo, random assignment, replication, sample bias, single-blind
study, survey
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Mathematics:
MA.12.4.4.12 A.2.4 - Statistical
claims based on sampling
MA.12.4.4.12 A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Design a
statistical experiment, conduct the
experiment, and interpret and
communicate the outcome.
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
MA.12.4.4.12 A.5 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Analyze data
using technology, and use
statistical terminology to describe
conclusions.
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.a - [Content
Statement] - Mathematical,
physical, and computational tools
are used to search for and explain
core scientific concepts and
62
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
principles.
Integration of Technology:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Refine
interrelationships among concepts
and patterns of evidence found in
different central scientific
explanations.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Use scientific
principles and theories to build and
refine standards for data collection,
posing controls, and presenting
evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others ideas,
observations, and experiences.
Social Studies:
SOC.9-12.6.2.12.D.2.d [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Analyze the impact of new
intellectual, philosophical, and
63
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
scientific ideas on how humans
viewed themselves and how they
viewed their physical and spiritual
worlds.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 -
64
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
[Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
Integration of Technology:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
65
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
5. Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Summer Research Paper
2. Research Design 2 variables
3. Data Collection of Research
4. Data Presentation in various charts
Major Activities (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Perspectives Blog
Behavior Observation
Operational Definition Activity
Independent Variable/Dependent Variable Activity
Ethics Investigation
Psych Sim 5 - Standard Deviation
Chart Analysis
Full Class Research Design
Research Design 2 variables
Data Collection of Research
Data Presentation in various charts
66
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 2: Social Psychology
Recommended Duration: 2 Weeks
Unit Description:
We are all a very small part of a large social world coming from different cultures, religions, and political views. As we grow, we learn to interact
with the world that immediately surrounds us and have many obstacles that can both inhibit and promote growth in society. Social psychology is
the way people come together to solve problems, interact, and form bonds with one another.
Essential Questions:
1. How does the attractiveness of a person influence our
perception of her or him?
2. What are the dimensions of attributions as humans try to
explain the behavior of self and others?
3. What errors do humans make when making attributions of
67
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Enduring Understandings:
1-6 – Individuals select, interpret, and use social information both
accurately and inaccurately.
7-9 – The factors that influence altruism are similar to the factors that
influence aggression.
10-12 – Being part of a group positively and negatively affects
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
others?
4. How do we view and evaluate ourselves, both accurately and
inaccurately?
5. Can attitudes predict behavior? Can behavior predict attitudes?
6. How do psychologists explain the elements of persuasion?
7. What factors influence altruism?
8. What factors influence aggression?
9. How does media affect pro-social and violent behavior?
10. In what ways are the research designs and findings of Asch and
Milgram similar and how are they different?
11. Why and how do individuals who would never perform harmful
acts alone perpetrate them while in a group?
12. What are some of the distinct ways that individuals are
influenced by being in a group?
13. What factors are typically contained in one’s social identity?
14. How might stereotyping lead to prejudice?
15. What are some specific strategies to improve intergroup
relations?
16. How do proximity, acquaintance, and similarity affect our
attraction to others?
17. What is the difference between romantic and affectionate love?
18. What do the social exchange theory and investment model say
about happy romantic relationships?
19. How do social networks combat the negative effects of social
isolation, especially during stressful times?
individual behavior.
13-15 – Although prone to stereotyping and prejudice, people can
promote positive intergroup relations.
16-18 – Close relationships are crucial for human happiness.
19 – Social networks improve our health and well-being.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
VC-1.1 Demonstrate an understanding of
1. Students will understand our thoughts
about others and will be able to explain
the psychological phenomena of the
1. Identify important figures in social psychology
(e.g., Solomon Asch, Leon Festinger, Stanley
Milgram, and Philip Zimbardo).
68
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
person perception.
Fundamental Attribution Error, SelfVC-1.2 Describe how attributions affect our
Serving Bias, and Cognitive Dissonance.
explanations of behavior.
2. Students will understand our feelings
VC-2.1 Identify basic social and cultural
about others through stereotyping and
prejudice and will reflect on their own
categories.
VC-3.1 Describe effects of the presence of
personal and observed stereotypes.
others on individual behavior.
3. Students will understand our actions
VC-3.3 Explore the nature and effects of
toward others and will be able to
synthesize a persuasion campaign
bias and discrimination.
Secondary (Supportive):
through conformity, compliance, and
VC-1.2 Describe how attributions affect our
obedience.
explanations of behavior.
VC-1.3 Identify sources of attitude
formation.
VC-1.4 Assess some methods used to
change attitudes.
VC-2.2 Discuss how social and cultural
categories affect behavior.
VC-3.2 Describe how social structure can
affect intergroup relations.
VC-3.4 Describe circumstances under which
conformity and obedience are likely to
occur.
VC-3.5 Discuss the nature of altruism in
society.
VC-3.6 Discuss the significance of
aggression.
VC-3.7 Discuss factors influencing
attraction.
69
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
2. Apply attribution theory to explain motives
(e.g., fundamental attribution error, selfserving bias).
3. Describe the structure and function of
different kinds of group behavior (e.g.,
deindividuation, group polarization).
4. Explain how individuals respond to
expectations of others, including groupthink,
conformity, and obedience to authority.
5. Discuss attitudes and how they change (e.g.,
central route to persuasion).
6. Predict the impact of the presence of others
on individual behavior (e.g., bystander effect,
social facilitation).
7. Describe processes that contribute to
differential treatment of group members (e.g.,
in-group/out-group dynamics, ethnocentrism,
prejudice).
8. Articulate the impact of social and cultural
categories (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity) on
self-concept and relations with others.
9. Anticipate the impact of behavior on a selffulfilling prophecy.
10. Describe the variables that contribute to
altruism, aggression, and attraction.
11. Discuss attitude formation and change,
including persuasion strategies and cognitive
dissonance.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One minute papers
1. AP Free Response
Questions
2. Unit Objective Test
3. Persuasion Poster
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
70
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Performance Assessments:
Persuasion Campaign Poster
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Group Think Blog
2. Fundamental Attribution Activity
3. Deindividuation Note Card
4. Just World Phenomenon List &
Reflection
5. Stanley Milgram’s Experiment
Reflection
6. Phillip Zimbardo Reflection
7. Solomon Asch Conformity
Activity
8. Friends Episode Altruism
9. Break a Social Norm
10. Good Samaritan Activity
11. Jane Elliot Rendition(test/
passable/impassable)
12. The Tipping Divide article
13. Jelly Bean Stereotype
14. Defining Aggression
15. Romantic Relationships
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
71
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
72
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
73
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
Attribution, fundamental attribution error (FAE), social influence, normative, obedience, conformity, discrimination, prejudice, stereotypes
Non-Essential:
Aggression, altruism, attitude, cognitive dissonance, companionate love, deindividuation, diffusion of responsibility, egoistic model, empathyaltruism hypothesis, foot-in-the-door technique, frustration-aggression hypothesis, group polarization, group think, implicit bias, informational
social influence, in-group favoritism, interpersonal attraction, just-world phenomenon, need compatibility, need complementarity, norm, outgroup homogeneity effect, proximity, reference groups, romantic love, saliency bias, self-serving bias, Sternberg’s triangular theory of love
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Refine
interrelationships among concepts
and patterns of evidence found in
different central scientific
explanations.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Use scientific
principles and theories to build and
74
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
refine standards for data collection,
posing controls, and presenting
evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others ideas,
observations, and experiences.
Social Studies:
SOC.9-12.6.2.12.D.2.d [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Analyze the impact of new
intellectual, philosophical, and
scientific ideas on how humans
viewed themselves and how they
viewed their physical and spiritual
worlds.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
75
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 -
76
Integration of Technology:
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
[Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
1.
2.
3.
4.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Persuasion Poster
2. Stereotype Essay
3. Chapter Reflection Essay
77
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
Major Activities (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Group Think Blog
Fundamental Attribution Activity
Deindividuation Note Card
Just World Phenomenon List & Reflection
Stanley Milgram’s Experiment Reflection
Phillip Zimbardo Reflection
Solomon Asch Conformity Activity
Friends Episode Altruism
Break a Social Norm
Good Samaritan Activity
Jane Elliot Rendition (test/passable/unpassable)
The Tipping Divide Article
Jelly Bean Stereotype
Defining Aggression
Romantic Relationships
78
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 3 - Biological Basis of Behavior
Recommended Duration: 3 Weeks
Unit Description:
Our minds are a mystery and can be difficult to understand. Through scientific inquiry, psychologists have been able to identify how the brain
sends and receives messages as well as which parts of the brain are responsible for certain interpretations, sensations, and perceptions.
Psychologists have used this data to conduct experiments on behavior to learn even more about how the brain works. As exciting as all of their
discoveries have been, there is still so much more to this massively complex and small part of our body that controls everything we think about
and do. How does it work?
Essential Questions:
79
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Enduring Understandings:
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. What characteristics allow the nervous system to direct human
behavior?
2. How is the nervous system divided and organized?
3. How do neurons communicate with one another?
4. How do neuroscientists conduct research on the brain?
5. How do each of the major parts of the brain respond to and direct
behavior?
6. How do the parts of the brain work together in adapting to the
environment?
7. What does split-brain research tell us about brain functions?
8. What role do hormones play in behavior?
9. What is the relationship between the endocrine system and the
nervous system?
10. How does the brain repair itself when damaged?
11. How do neuroscientists repair damaged brains?
12. What is the relationship among cells, genes, DNS, and
chromosomes?
13. How do molecular genetics and behavior genetics inform our
understanding of genotype and phenotype?
14. What is the best way for humans to manage stress?
1-2 – The electrochemical nervous system integrates information from a
variety of sources, is incredibly complex, and is amazingly adaptable to
the demands of the environment.
3 – During the neural transmission, structure and function are intimately
related.
4-7 – The organization of the brain makes it efficient and responsive.
8-9 – The endocrine system complements the nervous system by
regulation important hormones.
10-11 – Contrary to what was previously thought, the brains is
remarkably plastic.
12-13 – Genes are more important than many think, but their
expression in a particular environment is more subtle than expected.
14 – Our bodies are designed to respond to stressors in the
environment.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
IIA-1.2 Describe how information is
transmitted and integrated in the nervous
system.
IIA-2.1 Classify the major divisions and
subdivisions of the nervous system.
IIA-3.2 Recognize that specific functions are
1. Students will understand neural
transmission and will be able to describe
the process of sending and receiving
neurological messages with and without an
influence of drugs.
2. Students will understand the complexity of
the brain and will be able to draw each of
the brain’s regions, lobes, cortical areas,
1. Identify key contributors (e.g., Paul Broca,
Charles Darwin, Michael Gazzaniga, Roger
Sperry, and Carl Wernicke).
2. Diagram a neuron and label its parts with a
description of each part’s function.
3. Discuss the influence of drugs on
neurotransmitters.
4. Label the effect of the endocrine system on
80
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
centered in specific lobes of the cerebral
cortex.
IIA-4.1 Explain how research and
technology have provided methods to
analyze brain behavior and disease.
IIA-6.1 Assess the effects of heredity and
environment on behavior.
Secondary (Supportive):
IIA-1.1 Identify the neuron as the basis for
neural communication.
IIA-1.3 Analyze how the process of
neurotransmission can be modified by
heredity and environment.
IIA-2.2 Differentiate the functions of the
various subdivisions of the nervous system.
IIA-3.1 Identify the structure and function
of the major regions of the brain.
IIA-3.3 Describe lateralization of brain
functions.
IIA-5.1 Describe how the endocrine glands
are linked to the nervous system.
IIA-6.1 Assess the effects of heredity and
environment on behavior.
IIA-7.1 Explain how evolved tendencies
interact with the present environment and
culture to determine behavior.
brain lateralization, and hemispheres with
descriptions of their responsibilities.
3. Students will understand how the nervous
system and endocrine system operate and
will be able to investigate the genetic
connections on nature vs. nurture.
behavior.
5. Draw the nervous system and its subdivisions
and functions:
— central and peripheral nervous systems;
— major brain regions, lobes, and cortical
areas;
— brain lateralization and hemispheric
specialization.
6. Create a hypothesis about psychology’s abiding
interest in how heredity, environment, and
evolution work together to shape behavior.
7. Predict how traits and behavior can be selected
for their adaptive value.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
1. AP Free Response
Questions
1. Pipe cleaner neuron
2. Brain Surgery (orange)
81
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Neuron ID test
2. Psych Sim 5 Neuron
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One minute papers
2.
3.
4.
5.
Unit Objective Test
Neuron Quiz
Neuron Essay Test
Brain ID/description Test
Possible Assessment Modifications/Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
82
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Performance Assessments:
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
3. Neuron Transmission Time Trials
4. Neuron Essay Explanation
5. Brain Model Creation (play
dough/foam/Styrofoam/various
other materials)
6. Brain Surgery (Orange)
7. Endocrine System Diagram
Possible Assessment Modifications/Accommodations:
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
83
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
84
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
85
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
action potential, Neurogenesis, neurotransmitters, central nervous system (CNS), cerebellum, cerebral cortex, limbic system, reflex,
Non-Essential:
amygdale, association areas, autonomic nervous system (ANS), axon, behavioral genetics, brainstem, cell body, chromosomes, corpus callosum,
dendrites, endocrine system, endorphins, evolutionary psychology, forebrain, frontal lobes, genes, glial cells, heritability, hindbrain, hippocampus,
hormones, hypothalamus, medulla, midbrain, myelin sheath, natural selection, occipital lobes, parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), pons,
reticular formation (RF), somatic nervous system (SNS), split-brain surgery, stem cells, sympathetic nervous system, synapse, temporal lobes,
thalamus
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.D - [Strand] Organisms reproduce, develop, and
have predictable life cycles.
Organisms contain genetic
information that influences their
traits, and they pass this on to their
offspring during reproduction.
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.D.b - [Content
Statement] - Inserting, deleting, or
substituting DNA segments can
alter the genetic code. An altered
86
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
gene may be passed on to every
cell that develops from it. The
resulting features may help, harm,
or have little or no effect on the
offspring's success in its
environment.
SCI.9-12.5.3.12.E.d - [Content
Statement] - Evolution occurs as a
result of a combination of the
following factors: Ability of a
species to reproduce; Genetic
variability of offspring due to
mutation and recombination of
genes; Finite supply of the
resources required for life; Natural
selection, due to environmental
pressure, of those organisms better
able to survive and leave offspring.
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Use scientific
principles and theories to build and
refine standards for data collection,
posing controls, and presenting
evidence.
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
87
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 -
88
Integration of Technology:
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
[Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1. Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
2. American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
3. Teacher Website
4. Moodle Website
5. Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Neuron ID test
2. Neuron Essay Explanation
3. Endocrine System diagram
4. Chapter Reflection Essay
Major Activities (required):
89
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
1. Psych Sim 5 Neuron
2. Neuron Transmission Time Trials
3. Brain Model Creation (play dough/foam/Styrofoam/various other materials)
4. Brain Surgery (Orange)
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 4: Learning
Recommended Duration: 2 Weeks
Unit Description:
This unit begins by defining learning and sketching out its main types: associative learning and observational learning. We then turn attention to
two types of associative learning—classical conditioning and operant conditioning—followed by a close look at observational learning. Next, we
consider the role of cognitive processes in learning before finally examining biological, cultural, and psychological constraints on learning.
Essential Questions:
90
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Enduring Understandings:
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. What is associative learning?
2. What are the similarities and differences between classical
conditioning and operant conditioning?
3. How is observational learning different from conditioning?
4. How does a response shift from unconditioned to conditioned?
5. How are generalization and discrimination related?
6. How are extinction and spontaneous recovery related?
7. How is classical conditioning evident in your daily life?
8. Why was the Law of Effect so important to behaviorism?
9. What are the advantages of operant conditioning over classical
conditioning?
10. How does delivery and kind of reinforcement affect the process of
learning?
11. How are punishment and negative reinforcement similar and
different?
12. How is operant conditioning evident in your daily life?
13. What processes ensure observational learning?
14. What other names do psychologists use to describe observational
learning?
15. Why are vicarious reinforcement and punishment powerful in daily
life?
16. How does expectancy affect learning?
17. How does insight affect learning?
18. What are biological constraints on learning?
19. How does culture affect learning?
20. What are some psychological constraints on learning?
21. Why are predictability and control so important to human health?
1-3 – Organisms make associations that form the basis of much learning.
Relevant Standards:
91
Learning Goals:
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
4-7 – Conditioning based on automatic processing (classical
conditioning) has power in daily life but is limited by its inflexibility.
8-12 – Conditioning based on voluntary processing (operant
conditioning) is not only powerful but also incredibly flexible.
13-15 – People see therefore people do.
16-17 – Cognitive factors affect learning.
18-20 – Biological and psychological factors can limit learning, but
cultural factors always provide the context for learning.
21 – Learning can affect an individual’s response to stressful situations.
Learning Objectives:
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Content Standards:
1. Students will understand Classical and
Operant conditioning and will be able to
experience and tweet their observations
of daily life conditioning.
Primary (Power):
IVA-1.1 Discuss learning from a
psychological viewpoint.
IVA-2.1 Describe the classical conditioning
paradigm.
IVA-3.1 Describe the operant conditioning
paradigm.
Secondary (Supportive):
IVA-1.2 Recognize learning as a vehicle to
promote adaptation through experience.
2. Students will analyze learning both
biologically and socially and will write a
self-reflection description of their learning
traits and connect themselves to the
observed world around them.
3. Students will understand the principles of
learning and its many variables and will be
able to describe the connections between
learning and behavior.
IVA-4.1 Explain how observational learning
works.
IVA-4.2 Describe cognitive learning
approaches.
IVA-5.1 Identify biological contributions to
learning.
IVA-5.2 Speculate on the role of culture in
determining what behaviors will be
learned.
92
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify key contributors in the psychology of
learning (e.g., Albert Bandura, John Garcia,
Ivan Pavlov, Robert Rescorla, B. F. Skinner,
Edward Thorndike, Edward Tolman, and John
B. Watson).
2. Distinguish general differences between
principles of classical conditioning, operant
conditioning, and observational learning (e.g.,
contingencies).
3. Draw an example of each conditioning in a
notebook and use appropriate vocabulary.
4. Make a prediction of the effects of operant
conditioning (e.g., positive reinforcement,
negative reinforcement, punishment) and
predict how practice, schedules of
reinforcement, and motivation will influence
quality of learning.
5. Interpret graphs that exhibit the results of
learning experiments.
6. Provide examples of how biological constraints
create learning predispositions.
7. Describe the essential characteristics of insight
learning, latent learning, and social learning.
8. Apply learning principles to explain emotional
learning, taste aversion, superstitious behavior,
and learned helplessness.
9. Suggest how behavior modification,
biofeedback, coping strategies, and self-control
can be used to address behavioral problems.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
IVA-5.3 Explore how biological and cultural
factors interact to impede or enhance
learning.
IVA-5.4 Describe the collaborative nature of
some forms of learning within cultures.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
3. Interview of Child/Parent
Project
None
93
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Classical Conditioning
demonstration description
2. Music Salivation
3. Shaping Demonstration
(misunderstood)
4. Schedules of Reinforcement
5. Critical Thinking Questions
6. Reflection Paper
(People/Concepts/Criticisms)
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
21. Think-pair-share
22. One minute papers
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
94
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
95
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
96
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
classical conditioning, Acquisition, operant conditioning, observational learning, cognitive map
Non-Essential:
biofeedback, biological preparedness, cognitive-social theory, conditioned emotional response (CER), conditioned response (CR), conditioned
stimulus (CS), conditioning, continuous reinforcement, discriminative stimulus, extinction, fixed interval (FI) schedule, fixed ratio (FR) schedule,
higher-order conditioning, insight, instinctive drift, latent learning, law of effect, learning, mirror neurons, negative punishment, negative
reinforcement, neutral stimulus (NS), partial (intermittent) reinforcement, positive punishment, positive reinforcement, Pre-mack principle,
primary reinforcers, punishment, reinforcement, secondary reinforcers, shaping, spontaneous recovery, stimulus discrimination, stimulus
generalization, taste aversion, unconditioned response (UR), unconditioned stimulus (UCS), variable interval (VI) schedule, variable ratio (VR)
schedule
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] -
97
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
natural and designed world.
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
98
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
Integration of Technology:
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
99
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Integration of Technology:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Interview of Child/Parent Project
2. Chapter Reflection Essay
100
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
Major Activities (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Classical Conditioning Demonstration Description
Music Salivation
Shaping Demonstration (mis – mistake - mistakenly)
Schedules of Reinforcement
Critical Thinking Questions
Reflection Paper (People/Concepts/Criticisms)
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 5 – Developmental Psychology
Recommended Duration: 2 Weeks
Unit Description:
Developmental psychologists are interested in all the ways a person grows and changes throughout life from its beginning to its inevitable end.
We begin this unit by examining the meaning of development and exploring key questions in the field. We then trace the processes of physical,
cognitive, and socio-emotional development throughout the life span: prenatally (before birth), during childhood, and in adolescence and
adulthood. We round off our tour of the human life span with a look at development and wellness.
Essential Questions:
101
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Enduring Understandings:
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. What three broad processes of change do developmental
psychologists study?
2. What two unique research methods do developmental
psychologists use to capture change and what are their strengths
and limitations?
3. What three major questions underlie the different theories of
development?
4. What are the periods of prenatal development and what threats
exist to the developing baby?
5. How does wiring in the brain facilitate the achievement of physical
milestones from reflexes through motor and perceptual abilities?
6. How do children actively construct their thinking across major age
periods?
7. How is the parent-child relationship affected by what the child
brings to it, how parents relate to the child, and the bond between
them?
8. What psychosocial tasks must people master over their lifespan?
9. How does children’s thinking about morality differ by gender?
10. What characteristics of the adolescent brain help to explain why
adolescents often display strong emotions that they cannot
control?
11. What challenges do adolescents face in trying to establish an
identity?
12. Why is a strong ethnic identity important?
13. In what ways do parents and peers help an adolescent develop an
identity?
14. What are the major features of emerging adulthood?
15. What psychical changes of improvement and decline exist across
adulthood?
16. What cognitive changes of improvement and decline exist across
adulthood?
1-3 – Because developmental psychologists study constancy and change
over the lifetime, they organize inquiry and use particular methods.
102
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
4-9 – The child plays a central role in its own development with
caregiver providing essential support.
10-13 – Identity formation is central to adolescence.
14-17 – Development continues long into adulthood.
18 – Actively developing oneself can be important to the happiness of
older adults.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
17. How do relationships affect the lives of adults as they age?
18. How can adults enhance their wellness through the pursuit of
meaning in life and new goals?
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Content Standards:
1. Students will understand the physical,
cognitive, and emotional developments of
psychology by analyzing the Jean Piaget’s
4 stages of development, Mary
Ainsworth’s attachment theory, and
Baumrind’s parenting styles.
Primary (Power):
IIIA-1.1 Describe physical, social, and
cognitive changes from the prenatal period
throughout the life span.
IIIA-1.2 Examine the nature of change over
the life span.
IIIA-2.1 Explain the distinguishing
characteristics of the longitudinal and
cross-sectional methods of study.
IIIA-4.1 Describe the role of critical periods
in development.
IIIA-3.1 Explain various developmental
models.
2. Students will understand that
development is a lifelong process and will
be able to describe how their own
experiences and interactions have
contributed to their lives today.
3. Students will understand how sex and
gender play a role in our society and will
be able to bring in examples that
demonstrate their influence on us and
other countries.
Secondary (Supportive):
IIIA-1.3 Identify the complex cognitive
structures found in the early development
103
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify key contributors in developmental
psychology (e.g., Mary Ainsworth, Albert
Bandura, Diana Baumrind, Erik Erikson,
Sigmund Freud, Carol Gilligan, Harry Harlow,
Lawrence Kohlberg, Konrad Lorenz, Jean
Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky).
2. Discuss the interaction of nature and nurture
(including cultural variations) in the
determination of behavior.
3. Explain the process of conception and
gestation, including factors that influence
successful fetal development (e.g., nutrition,
illness, substance abuse).
4. Discuss maturation of motor skills.
5. Describe the influence of temperament and
other social factors on attachment and
appropriate socialization.
6. Explain the maturation of cognitive abilities
(e.g., Piaget’s stages, information processing).
7. Compare and contrast models of moral
development (e.g., Kohlberg, Gilligan).
8. Discuss maturational challenges in adolescence
including related family conflicts.
9. Explain how parenting styles influence
development.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
of infants and young children.
10. Characterize the development of decisions
related to intimacy as people mature.
11. Predict the physical and cognitive changes that
emerge as people age, including steps that can
be taken to maximize function.
12. Describe how sex and gender influence
socialization and other aspects of
development.
IIIA-1.4 Apply life span principles to
personal experience.
IIIA-3.2 Recognize how biological and
cultural notions of gender shape the
experiences of men and women.
IIIA-3.3 Examine the development of ethnic
identity.
IIIA-3.4 Explore developmental theories as
they relate to cultural bias.
IIIA-4.2 Explain the issues of
continuity/discontinuity and
stability/instability in development.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
3. Interview of Child/Parent
Project
Virtual Child
104
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Introductory survey and content
discussion
2. Nature and nurture in
development survey/debate
3. Early motor and verbal
development activity
4. Three tasks of adolescent identity:
cognitive, moral, and social
5. Bridging the generation gap:
interviewing a senior citizen about
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-Minute papers
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
105
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Performance Assessments:
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
adolescence
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
Structured Overview
106
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
107
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
activity theory of aging, developmental psychology, psychosocial stages, schema, Accommodation, assimilation
108
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Non-Essential:
ageism, attachment, collectivistic cultures, concrete operational stage, conservation, conventional level, critical period, crossectional method,
disengagement theory of aging, egocentrism, embodied cognition, embryonic period, fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), fetal period, formal
operational stage, germinal period, imprinting, individualistic cultures, longitudinal method, maturation, object permanence, post-conventional
level, pre-conventional level, preoperational stage, puberty, resiliency, sensorimotor stage, socio-emotional selectivity theory of aging,
temperament, teratogen
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
natural and designed world.
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
109
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] -
110
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
Integration of Technology:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1. Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
2. American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
111
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
3. Teacher Website
4. Moodle Website
5. Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Piaget Proof poster
2. Erickson Stages of Development chart
3. Bridging the generation gap: interviewing a senior citizen about adolescence
Major Activities (required):
1. Introductory Survey and Content discussion
2. Nature and Nurture in development survey/debate
3. Early Motor and Verbal Development activity
4. Three tasks of adolescent identity: cognitive, moral, and social
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 6 – Cognition
Recommended Duration: 3 Weeks
Unit Description:
Cognition encompasses our memory, thoughts, language, and intelligence. This unit starts by analyzing the complexities of our memories like
how it is formed, retrieved, and stored in our brains. It also analyzes how we can “convince” ourselves of false truths which can explain many
circumstances we have all been through in our lives. The second part of our unit investigates the way we think and develop a language. What is
language? This unit also focuses on a huge question in psychology: What is intelligence? Intelligence and the heredity of it is a complex concept.
We must define and recognize its inefficiencies through testing and the labels it creates for people as well as the cultural differences that are
related.
112
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
Memory
1. What is memory?
2. How does multitasking interfere with one’s ability to sustain
attention?
3. Why is depth of processing important?
4. Why is elaboration important to memory?
5. How does imagery improve memory?
6. What is the relationship between sensory and short-term
memory?
7. How does the space limitation of short-term memory affect
memory?
8. How do the two major models of memory inform our
understanding of how memory works?
9. What is the relationship among components of long-term
memory?
10. What are the similarities and differences between schema
theory of memory and connectionism?
11. What brain structures are involved in the storage of memory?
12. What are some limitations to retrieval of memories?
13. How does emotion affect the retrieval of memories?
14. How accurate is eyewitness testimony?
15. What factors can cause forgetting?
16. How do case studies of people with amnesia inform our
understanding of memory?
17. What explicit steps can students take to improve organization,
encoding, rehearsal, and retrieval of information?
18. Why is memory the foundation of identity?
19. How can one preserve one’s memory?
Memory
1 – The processes of encoding, storage, and retrieval encompass
memory.
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
113
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
2-5 – Encoding requires processing at a depth and breadth that make
the most connections possible.
6-11 – Understanding the structure and storage of memory facilitates
better use of it.
12-14 – Memory is constructed and therefore subject to bias.
15-16 – Memories regularly fail.
17 – Students can actively change how they study.
18-19 – Your memory dictates who you are.
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
20 – The mind matters.
21-24 – While thinking has its limitations, it can also be enhanced.
25-28 – It is challenging to identify and measure intelligence.
29-33 – As language and thinking develop together over the life span,
they are influenced by both biology and culture.
34 – What are cognitive coping strategies?
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
20. How did advances in technology influence our view of the
human mind?
21. How do concepts help us organize our thinking?
22. What are the key steps in solving problems?
23. What are some obstacles to problem solving?
24. What enhances creative thinking?
25. What is intelligence and how can it be measured?
26. How do genetic and environmental influences affect
intelligence?
27. What are the characteristics of extremes in intellectual
functioning?
28. What are the strengths and limitations of the multiple
intelligences approach?
29. What are the basic properties of language?
30. What is the role of language in cognition?
31. What is the role of cognition in language?
32. What are the biological and environmental influences on
language development?
33. How does language develop over the life span?
34. What are cognitive coping strategies?
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Content Standards:
1. Students will understand how memory is
organized for storage, usage, and retrieval
and will be able to evaluate their own
memory and their classmates’ memories
using time trials.
Primary (Power):
Memory
IVB-1.1 Characterize the difference
between surface and deep (elaborate)
processing.
114
2. Students will understand language
development as a whole and will be able
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1.
2.
Identify key contributors in cognitive
psychology (e.g., Noam Chomsky, Hermann
Ebbinghaus, Wolfgang Köhler, Elizabeth
Loftus, and George A. Miller).
Compare and contrast various cognitive
processes:
— effortful versus automatic processing;
— deep versus shallow processing;
Relevant Standards:
IVB-2.2 Describe the operation of shortterm memory and working memory.
Learning Goals:
to compare psychological points of view
on the nature vs. nurture debate (Skinner
/Chomsky).
IVB-2.3 Describe the operation of long-term
memory.
3. Students will understand how genetics
and environmental influences affect
IVB-5.2 Describe strategies for improving
intelligence and will analyze the
memory based on our understanding of
difficulties of measuring intelligence.
memory.
IVB-6.1 Describe the processes that lead to
inaccuracies in memory
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
IVC-1.1 Define thinking as a mental process
involved in the manipulation and
understanding of information.
IVC-2.1 Identify problem solving as a
directed and productive example of
thinking.
IVC-3.1 Define language as symbols and
sounds that convey meaning and facilitate
communication.
IVC-4.1 Discuss the effects of development
on language acquisition.
Secondary (Supportive):
Memory
IVB-1.2 Identify other factors that influence
115
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
— focused versus divided attention.
3. Describe and differentiate psychological
and physiological systems of memory (e.g.,
short-term memory, procedural memory).
4. Outline the principles that underlie
effective encoding, storage, and
construction of memories.
5. Describe strategies for memory
improvement.
6. Synthesize how biological, cognitive, and
cultural factors converge to facilitate
acquisition, development, and use of
language.
7. Discuss the process of thought translating
into language and how it has been shaped
by our social influences
8. Identify the elements that encompass
language and how we use them in our own
way.
9. Compare and contrast B.F. Skinner and
Chomsky using the nature vs. nurture
debate to describe language development.
10. Identify problem-solving strategies as well
as factors that influence their effectiveness.
11. List the characteristics of creative thought
and creative thinkers.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
encoding.
IVB-2.1 Describe the operation of sensory
memory.
IVB-3.1 Analyze the importance of retrieval
cues in memory.
IVB-3.2 Explain the role that interference
plays in retrieval.
IVB-3.3 Relate difficulties created by
reconstructive memory processes.
IVB-4.1 Identify the brain structures most
important to memory.
IVB-5.1 Identify factors that interfere with
memory.
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
IVC-1.2 Recognize that information is
classified into categories containing similar
properties known as concepts
IVC-2.2 Explain the use of creative thinking
in problem solving.
IVC-2.3 Analyze the obstacles that inhibit
problem solving and decision-making.
116
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
IVC-3.2 Recognize that language is
organized in a hierarchical structure.
IVC-4.2 Evaluate the theories of language
acquisition.
IVC-4.3 Speculate on whether animals
acquire and use language.
IVC-5.1 Examine the influence of language
on thought and behavior
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Memory
Test
3. Unit Objective Thinking,
Language & Intelligence
Test
None
117
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
Memory
1. Pervasive Role of Memory in
Everyday Life
2. Categorizing Different Types of
Memory
3. Operation Span Task
4. Repeated Exposure versus Deep
Processing
5. How to Study Actively
6. Read the Label (The use of labels
aids comprehension and
retention).
7. Constructive Memory/Schemas:
The Rumor Chain
8. The importance of Cues (Mantyla
Cue Demonstration)
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-minute papers
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
118
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Performance Assessments:
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
9. An All-Purpose Memory
Demonstration
10. Critical thinking exercises for
memory
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
11. What is Intelligence blog
12. Army Alpha Test
13. Divergent/Convergent Thinking &
Confirmation Bias paragraphs
14. Babies and Language Essay
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
Structured Overview
119
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
120
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
encoding/storage/retrieval (ESR) model, implicit (non-declarative) memory, intelligence, convergent thinking, divergent thinking, heuristic, levels
of processing model, language, explicit (declarative) memory
121
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Non-Essential:
Algorithm, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), antegrade amnesia, availability heuristic, babbling, chunking, cognition, concept, confirmation bias,
consolidation, constructive process, cooing, creativity, crystallized intelligence, distributed practice, elaborative rehearsal, encoding, encoding
specificity principle, episodic memory, fluid intelligence, functional fixedness, grammar, language acquisition device (LAD), long-term memory
(LTM), long-term potentiation (LTP), maintenance rehearsal, massed practice, memory, mental image, mental set, misinformation effect,
mnemonic device, morpheme, overextension, overgeneralization, parallel distributed processing (PDP), phoneme, priming, proactive interference,
prototype, recall, recognition, relearning, reliability, representativeness heuristic, retrieval, retrieval cue, retroactive interference, retrograde
amnesia, savant syndrome, semantic memory, semantics, sensory memory, serial position effect, short-term memory, sleeper effect, source
amnesia, standardization, stereotype threat, storage, syntax, telegraphic speech, three stage memory model, tip of the tongue (TOT) phenomenon,
validity, working memory
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation tools
to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
natural and designed world.
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of predictions
and explanations are based on
systematic observations, accurate
measurements, and structured
data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
122
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
multiple forms of discussion in order
to process, make sense of, and learn
from others' ideas, observations,
and experiences
Integration of Technology:
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions to
manipulate data, generate charts
and graphs and interpret the results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to recognize
a problem and apply critical thinking
123
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
and problem-solving skills to solve
the problem is a lifelong skill that
develops over time.
Integration of Technology:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online strategy and planning
sessions for course-based, schoolbased, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Determine the
immediate and long-term effects of
cross-cultural misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity in
all aspects of life.
124
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Major Assignments (required):
1. Memory time trial data sheet with charts
2. Online Section Quiz
3. Divergent/Convergent Thinking & Confirmation Bias paragraphs
4. Chapter Reflection Essay (Pre-Test)
Major Activities (required):
Memory
1. Pervasive Role of Memory in Everyday Life
2. Categorizing Different Types of Memory
3. Operation Span Task
4. Repeated Exposure versus Deep Processing
5. How to Study Actively
6. Read the Label (The use of labels aids comprehension and retention).
7. Constructive Memory/Schemas: The Rumor Chain
8. The Importance of Cues (Mantyla Cue Demonstration)
125
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
9. An All-Purpose Memory Demonstration
10. Critical Thinking Exercises for Memory
Thinking, Language & Intelligence
11. What is Intelligence Blog
12. Army Alpha Test
13. Babies and Language essay
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 7 – Personality & Individual Differences
Recommended Duration: 2 Weeks
Unit Description:
Personality psychology explores the psychological attributes that underlie who we really are—the unified and enduring core characteristics that
account for our existence as one and the same person throughout the life span. In this unit, we survey the field of personality from a variety of
perspectives. We begin with classic theories from psychodynamic and humanistic thinkers and then examine more contemporary approaches,
including the trait, life story, social cognitive, and biological perspectives. We then look at personality assessment, and finally, consider the role of
personality in health and wellness.
126
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. What is the psychodynamic explanation for personality?
2. What are important revisions and criticism of psychodynamic
theory?
3. What are some core principles of psychodynamic perspectives?
4. What factors do the humanistic perspectives on personality
emphasize?
5. What are some similarities and differences in the approaches of
Maslow and Rogers?
6. What are some criticisms of the humanistic approach?
7. How do trait theorists define personality?
8. What are some similarities and differences between theory of
Allport and Odbert and the five-factor model?
9. What are some criticisms of the trait approach?
10. What are some similarities and differences between the
personological and the life story approaches to personality?
11. What are some criticisms of the personological and life story
approaches?
12. What are some similarities and differences between the personality
theories of Bandura and Mischel?
13. What are some criticisms of the social cognitive approach?
14. What are some similarities and differences between the theories of
Eysenck and Gray?
15. How do twin studies inform the study of personality?
16. What are some criticisms of biological explanations of personality?
17. What are some strengths and weaknesses of self-report
mechanisms to measure personality and projective tests?
18. What other scientific methods exist to assess personality?
19. What personality characteristics are associated with positive
functioning?
1-3 – Psychodynamic explanations of personality development are
based on unconscious processing and conflict.
127
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
4-6 – Humanistic explanations of personality development are based on
human potential and growth.
7-9 – Trait explanations of personality development are based on broad,
enduring dispositions.
10-11 – Personological and life story explanations of personality
development stress the uniqueness of each individual’s history and
story.
12-13 – The social cognitive approach to personality emphasizes
conscious awareness, beliefs, expectations, and goals.
14-16 – Personality may have biological explanations.
17-18 – Psychologists use a number of scientifically developed methods
to evaluate personality.
19-20 – Personality affects health and subjective well-being.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
20. How does Type A behavior contribute to disease?
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
Personality & Assessment
IIIB-1.1 Define personality as the
individual's unique way of thinking, feeling,
and acting.
IIIB-2.1 Explain the characteristics of the
psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral,
humanistic, and trait approaches.
IIIB-3.1 Distinguish between objective and
projective techniques of personality
assessment.
Individual Differences
IVE-1.1 Define and understand the nature
of test constructs, such as intelligence,
personality, and creativity.
IVE-2.1 Explain how intelligence and
personality may be influenced by heredity
and environment.
128
Learning Objectives:
Personality
1. Students will understand the different
approaches to explaining personality and
will be able to explain the dynamics of
“how” each approach explains behavior.
2. Students will understand how our culture
influences our personality development
and will be able to compare individual
developments from different cultures and
reflect on the criticisms of the social
cognitive approach.
Individual Differences & Testing
3. Students will understand the historic
development of intelligence testing and
the bias they have faced over time and will
be able to debate the appropriate testing
practices, particularly in relation to
culture-fair test uses.
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Personality
1. Compare and contrast the major theories and
approaches to explaining personality (e.g.,
psychoanalytic, humanist, cognitive, trait,
social cognition, behavioral).
2. Describe and compare research methods (e.g.,
case studies and surveys) that psychologists
use to investigate personality.
3. Identify frequently used assessment strategies
(e.g., the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality
Inventory [MMPI], the Thematic Apperception
Test [TAT]), and evaluate relative test quality
based on reliability and validity of the
instruments.
4. Speculate how cultural context can facilitate or
constrain personality development, especially
as it relates to self-concept (e.g., collectivistic
versus individualistic cultures).
5. Identify key contributors to personality theory
(e.g., Alfred Adler, Albert Bandura, Paul Costa
and Robert McCrae, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung,
Abraham Maslow, and Carl Rogers).
Individual Differences & Testing
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
IVE-3.1 Link intelligence to the use of
cognitive skills and strategies.
Secondary (Supportive):
Personality & Assessment
IIIB-1.2 Explain the role of personality
constructs as a framework for organizing
behavioral phenomena.
IIIB-2.2 Identify important contributions to
the understanding of personality.
IIIB-3.2 Describe tests used in personality
assessment.
Individual Differences
IVE-1.2 Describe basic statistical concepts in
testing.
IVE-3.2 Describe theories of intelligence.
IVE-4.1 Explain why intelligence tests
predict achievement.
IVE-4.2 Explain issues of using conventional
intelligence tests.
129
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Define intelligence and list characteristics of
how psychologists measure intelligence:
— abstract versus verbal measures;
— speed of processing.
2. Discuss how culture influences the definition of
intelligence.
3. Compare and contrast historic and
contemporary theories of intelligence (e.g.,
Charles Spearman, Howard Gardner, and
Robert Sternberg).
4. Explain how psychologists design tests,
including standardization strategies and other
techniques to establish reliability and validity.
5. Interpret the meaning of scores in terms of the
normal curve.
6. Describe relevant labels related to intelligence
testing (e.g., gifted, cognitively disabled).
7. Debate the appropriate testing practices,
particularly in relation to culture-fair test uses.
8. Identify key contributors in intelligence
research and testing (e.g., Alfred Binet, Francis
Galton, Howard Gardner, Charles Spearman,
Robert Sternberg, Louis Terman, and David
Wechsler).
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-Minute papers
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
3. My Personality Diagram
None
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
130
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. The Psychosocial Family Tree
2. What is Personality?
3. Personality and Personality
Assessment
4. Personality Tests
5. Ethical Principles and
Dilemmas in the Practice of
Psychology
6. Freud's Personality Theory: Id,
Ego, Superego Role-play
7. Defense Mechanisms
8. Simulation for Teaching
Personality Psychology
9. Understanding the Type A
Behavior Pattern
10. Trait vs. Situation as a
Predictor of Behavior
11. Unconditional Positive Regard
Exercise
12. Cognitive Styles
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
131
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
132
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
133
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
personality, unconscious, validity, collective unconscious, conscious, five factor model (FFM), projective tests,
Non-Essential:
Archetypes, basic anxiety, defense mechanisms, id, ego, superego, factor analysis, inferiority complex, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality
Inventory (MMPI), morality principle, Oedipus complex, pleasure principle, preconscious, psychosexual stages, reality principle, reciprocal
determinism, reliability, repression, Rorschach Inkblot Test, self-actualization, self-concept, self-esteem, Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) trait,
unconditional positive regard
Interdisciplinary
Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
134
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary
Connections Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
natural and designed world.
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
135
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary
Connections Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] -
136
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary
Connections Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Various Psychology Videos
Major Assignments (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
My personality Diagram
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Reflection
Create an evaluation for personality
Evaluation for Personality Debate
Chapter Reflection Essay (Pre-Test)
137
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
Major Activities (required):
1. The Psychosocial Family Tree
2. What is Personality?
3. Personality and Personality Assessment
4. Personality Tests
5. Ethical Principles and Dilemmas in the Practice of Psychology
6. Freud's Personality Theory: Id, Ego, Superego Role-play
7. Defense Mechanisms
8. Simulation for Teaching Personality Psychology
9. Understanding the Type A Behavior Pattern
10. Trait vs. Situation as a Predictor of Behavior
11. Unconditional Positive Regard Exercise
12. Cognitive Styles
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 8: Sensation and Perception/States of Consciousness
Recommended Duration: 3 Weeks
Unit Description:
Sensation and perception are the vital processes by which we connect with and function in the world. We first examine vision—the sense about
with scientists know the most. We then investigate the nature of hearing, the skin, senses, taste, smell, and kinesthetic and vestibular senses.
Finally, we trace the connections between our senses and health and wellness.
We will also review about various states of consciousness, as well as the world of sleep and dream. We will survey two channels of altered states
of consciousness: psychoactive drugs and hypnosis. Finally, we consider the effects of achieving a meditative state of consciousness on health and
well-being.
138
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. What is the relationship between how we sense the world and how
we make sense of it?
2. What is the relationship between our sensory receptors and how
we perceive our environment?
3. How does the concept of threshold help us understand the nature
of perception?
4. How do selective attention, perceptual set, and sensory adaptation
limit our interpretation of the environment?
5. How is light transduced to sight?
6. How did competing research evidence in color vision lead to a more
comprehensive theory?
7. How do artists use gestalt principles to realistically represent our
world in two dimensions?
8. What is the relationship between the mechanical energy of sound
and hearing?
9. How is sound transduced?
10. How do theorists explain hearing?
11. What receptors from the cutaneous senses?
12. How are the chemical senses linked?
13. Why is pain understood to be adaptive?
14. What information about the body do the kinesthetic senses and the
vestibular sense provide?
15. How can individuals protect and preserve vision?
16. What factors post the most serious threat to hearing?
17. What can consumers do to reduce the harm from using portable
media players?
1-4 – Humans do not have a 1:1 relationship between what surrounds us
and our understanding of it.
Relevant Standards:
139
Learning Goals:
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
5-7 – Vision, our primary sense, requires complex neural processing to
create useful information.
8-10 – The transformation of sound waves to hearing allows us to
perceive conversation, music, and even a rebuke.
11-14 – Each of our senses shapes our perception of the world and
performs and important function in our experience of it.
15-17 – It is important to care for your sensory organs.
Learning Objectives:
Relevant Standards:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
IIB-1.1 Explain the concepts of threshold,
adaptation, and constancy.
IIB-2.2 Describe binocular and monocular
depth cues.
IIB-2.3 Describe the influence on
perception of environmental variables,
motivation, past experiences, culture, and
expectations.
Secondary (Supportive):
Learning Goals:
1. Students will understand the basic
principles of sensory transduction and will
be able to explain the sensory process and
how they interact with the brain including
common sensory disorders.
2. Students will understand the sleep cycle
and will be able to keep a dream log with
analysis and correlation to their REM
cycles.
3. Students will analyze drug use and
dependency and will be able to chart the
major psychoactive drug categories as well
as their effects both psychological and
physiological.
IIB-1.2 Describe the operation of sensory
systems.
IIB-1.3 List forms of energy for which we do
and do not have sensory receptors.
IIB-1.4 Relate knowledge of sensory
processes to applications in areas such as
engineering psychology, advertising, music,
architecture, and so on.
IIB-2.1 Explain Gestalt concepts and
principles, such as figure-ground,
continuity, similarity, proximity, closure,
140
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Discuss basic principles of sensory
transduction, including absolute threshold,
difference threshold, signal detection, and
sensory adaptation.
2. Describe sensory processes (e.g., hearing,
vision, touch, taste, smell, vestibular,
kinesthesis, pain), including the specific nature
of energy transduction, relevant anatomical
structures, and specialized pathways in the
brain for each of the senses.
3. Explain common sensory disorders (e.g., visual
and hearing impairments).
4. Describe general principles of organizing and
integrating sensation to promote stable
awareness of the external world (e.g., Gestalt
principles, depth perception).
5. Discuss how experience and culture can
influence perceptual processes (e.g.,
perceptual set, context effects).
6. Explain the role of top-down processing in
producing vulnerability to illusion.
7. Discuss the role of attention in behavior.
8. Challenge common beliefs in parapsychological
phenomena.
9. Identify the major historical figures in
sensation and perception (e.g., Gustav
Fechner, David Hubel, Ernst Weber, and
Torsten Wiesel).
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
and so on.
IIB-3.1 Explain what is meant by attention.
IIB-3.2 Describe how attention differs for
demanding versus simple tasks.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
None
141
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
1. Can you notice the changes?
2. Sensation: Movement Detectors
3. Distribution of rods, cones, and
color vision in the retina
4. Blind spot in vision
5. Locating sound sources
6. Sensory interdependencies
7. Sensory interdependencies
8. The McGurk Effect
9. The Stroop Effect
10. Sleep Journal
11. Hypnosis Survey
12. Drug Reflection
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-Minute papers
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
142
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
143
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
144
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
absolute threshold, bottom-up processing, top-down processing, opponent-process theory, gate-control theory, illusion
Non-Essential:
accommodation, audition, binocular cues, blind spot, cochlea, conduction deafness, cones, convergence, depth perception, difference threshold,
extrasensory perception (ESP), feature detectors, fovea, frequency theory, gestation, habituation, inner ear, kinesthesis, middle ear, nerve
deafness, olfaction, outer ear, perception, perceptual constancies, perceptual sets, pheromones, place theory, psychophysics, retina, retinal
disparity, rods, selective attention, sensation, sensory adaptation, subliminal, trichromatic theory, vestibular sense
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
145
Integration of Technology:
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
natural and designed world.
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
146
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Integration of Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
147
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
Integration of Technology:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Various Psychology Videos
Major Assignments (required):
1. Sleep Journal
148
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
2. Hypnosis survey
3. Drug reflection
4. Chapter Reflection Essay (Pre-Test)
Major Activities (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Locating sound sources
Can you notice the changes?
Sensation: movement detectors
Distribution of rods, cones, and color vision in the retina
Blind spot in vision
Sensory interdependencies
Sensory interdependencies
The McGurk Effect
The Stroop Effect
149
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
Unit 9: Motivation and Emotion
Recommended Duration: 2 Weeks
Unit Description:
This unit examines the ways psychologists study motivation and emotion. We first review some general approaches to motivation and consider
one important physiological source of motivation: hunger. We then examine motivation as it applies to everyday life. Next, we explore the rich
topic of emotion. To close, we consider the ways that motivation and emotion intertwine in the pursuit of happiness.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
1. Why is motivation important in life?
2. How are the three theoretical approaches to motivation similar and
different?
3. What biological processes are involved in hunger?
4. What biological and psychological factors cause and maintain
obesity?
5. What are some key ways that anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa,
and binge eating disorder differ?
6. How is Maslow’s theory of motivation both similar to and different
from that of Deci and Ryan?
7. Does extrinsic motivation undermine intrinsic motivation?
8. How does self-regulation help us set long and short term goals?
9. How does arousal express itself in the body?
10. Which comes first—thinking or feeling?
11. How do we detect emotions in facial expressions?
12. What sociocultural factors affect the experience of emotion?
1-2 – One’s motivation largely determines how one lives one’s life.
150
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
3-5 – Our hunger motivation must be moderated or we risk our health.
6-8 – Feeling effective and in control are central to achieving motivation.
9-14 – The body and the mind play key roles in emotions, which are
both universal and culturally influenced.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
13. How do psychologists classify emotions?
14. How do positive emotions affect behavior?
15. How can one cultivate positive emotion?
16. How does committing oneself to a meaningful goal affect wellbeing?
Relevant Standards:
Content Standards:
Primary (Power):
IIC-1.1 Apply motivational concepts to the
behavior of humans and other animals.
IIC-2.1 Describe the interaction of internal
cues and learning on basic drives.
IIC-3.1 Describe one or more theories of
motivation, such as expectancy value,
cognitive dissonance, arousal, Maslow's
hierarchy of needs, and drive reduction.
Learning Goals:
1. Students will understand the motivational
theories and will be able to compare and
contrast them including their strengths
and weaknesses and will incorporate both
the biological and social underpinnings of
motivation.
2. Students will understand the different
theories of emotion and will be able to
describe how our cultural influences
shape our emotional expressions.
IIC-4.1 Explain how common motives and
emotions develop.
IIC-5.1 Use expectancy-value theory to
explain their own and others' behavior.
IID-1.1 Identify and explain major sources
of stress.
151
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify key contributors in the psychology of
motivation and emotion (e.g., William James,
Alfred Kinsey, Abraham Maslow, Stanley
Schachter, and Hans Selye).
2. Identify and apply basic motivational concepts
to understand the behavior of humans and
other animals (e.g., instincts, incentives,
intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation).
3. Discuss the biological underpinnings of
motivation, including needs, drives, and
homeostasis.
4. Compare and contrast motivational theories
(e.g., drive reduction theory, arousal theory,
general adaptation theory), including the
strengths and weaknesses of each.
5. Describe classic research findings in specific
motivation systems (e.g., eating, social, etc.)
6. Discuss theories of stress and the effects of
stress on psychological and physical well-being.
7. Compare and contrast major theories of
emotion (e.g., James–Lange, Cannon–Bard,
Schachter two-factor theory).
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
IID-2.1 List and explain possible
physiological reactions to stress.
Secondary (Supportive):
IIC-2.2 Describe the situational cues giving
rise to anger and fear.
IIC-2.3 Describe the situational cues and
individual characteristics giving rise to
curiosity and anxiety.
IIC-6.1 Describe theories of emotion, such
as James-Lange, Cannon-Bard, or cognitive
theories.
IIC-6.2 Explaining how emotions and
behaviors are related.
IIC-7.1 Describe differences in perception
between individuals differing in motivation.
IIC-7.2 Explain how learning, memory,
problem-solving, and decision-making
strategies are influenced by motivation and
emotion.
IID-3.1 List and explain possible
psychological reactions to stress.
IID-4.1 Identify and explain cognitive
strategies to deal with stress and promote
152
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Learning Objectives:
8. Describe how cultural influences shape
emotional expression, including variations in
body language.
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
Learning Objectives:
health.
IID-4.2 Identify and explain behavioral
strategies to deal with stress and promote
health.
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-Minute papers
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
None
153
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/Assignments
(required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The Sensation-Seeking Scale
Classification of needs
Flow
A Survey of Eating Habits
Intrinsic Motivation and
Achievement
6. Human Emotions
7. The Autonomic Nervous System
8. Differentiating between jealousy
and envy
9. Facial Feedback Hypothesis
10. What do you fear?
11. The PANAS (Positive and Negative
Effect Schedule)
12. Flashing Faces
13. Perspective-Taking
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
154
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
155
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
156
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
achievement motivation, intrinsic motivation, emotional intelligence (EI), extrinsic motivation, hierarchy of needs, homeostasis, instinct, stress,
stressor, approach-approach conflict, approach-avoidance conflict, avoidance-avoidance conflict
Non-Essential:
(HPA) axis, (SAM) system, amygdale, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, burnout, Cannon-Bard theory, cataclysmic events, chronic stressors,
conflict, distress, drive-reduction theory, emotion, emotion-focused coping, eustress, external locus of control, facial-feedback hypothesis,
frustration, general adaptation syndrome (GAS), hardiness, hassles, health psychology, incentive theory, instinct theory, internal locus of control,
James-Lange theory, job stressors, misattribution of arousal, motivation, optimal arousal theory, polygraph, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD),
primary appraisal, problem-solving coping, psychoneuroimmunology, role conflict, secondary appraisal, two-factor theory, Type A personalities
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
157
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
natural and designed world.
Integration of Technology:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
158
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
lifelong learning.
Integration of Technology:
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] -
159
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Various Psychology Videos
Major Assignments (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
What do you fear?
The PANAS (Positive and Negative Effect Schedule)
The Autonomic Nervous System
A Survey of Eating Habits
Chapter Reflection Essay (Pre-Test)
160
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
Major Activities (required):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
The Sensation-Seeking scale
Classification of Needs
Flow
Intrinsic motivation and achievement
Human emotions
Differentiating between jealousy and envy
Facial Feedback Hypothesis
Flashing Faces
Perspective taking
Kingsway Regional School District
Grades 11-12—AP Psychology
161
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Unit 10: Psychological Disorders & Therapy
Recommended Duration: 3 Weeks
Unit Description:
This unit will survey the variety of psychological disorders. We will first explore the meaning of the word abnormal and examine approaches to
understanding abnormal behavior. We then survey a number of disorders and consider the influences of the stigma associated with psychological
disorders on the health and wellness of those who experience them. We will close the unit by looking into the treatments that have been
developed through psychotherapy as well as biological and social approaches.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
Psychological Disorders
Psychological Disorders
1. What criteria distinguish abnormal from typical behavior?
2. What are the assumptions of each theoretical approach to
psychological disorders?
3. Why should we have systems to classify abnormal behavior?
4. What are the main characteristics of anxiety disorders?
5. What are the characteristics of each of the types of anxiety
disorders?
6. What are the main characteristics of mood disorders?
7. What factors influence the expression of mood disorders?
8. What are the characteristics of each of the main types of mood
disorders?
9. What are the factors that increase risk of suicide?
10. What are the main characteristics of dissociative disorders?
11. What are the characteristics of each of the main types of
dissociative disorders?
12. What are the characteristics of schizophrenia?
13. What factors influence the expression of schizophrenia?
14. What are the characteristics of personality disorders?
1-3 – Psychologists have criteria for separating typical and abnormal
behavior.
162
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
4-5 – Anxiety disorders are characterized by high levels of worry.
6-9 – Mood disorders involve prolonged sadness or cycling between
sadness and elation.
10-11 – Dissociative disorders are characterized by sudden loss of
memory or change in identity.
12-13 – Schizophrenia is a severe psychotic disorder characterized by
disturbed thought and emotion.
14-15 – Personality disorders are chronic and maladaptive patterns
integrated into the personality.
16-17 – Labeling a psychological disorder can create stigma.
Essential Questions:
15. What are some similarities and differences of antisocial personality
disorder and borderline personality disorder?
16. What social and physical effects can result from the stigma
associated with psychological disorders?
17. How can we eliminate the stigma associated with psychological
disorders?
Therapy
18. How do psychoactive drugs work?
19. How does electroconvulsive therapy work?
20. Why might a person seek psychosurgery?
21. What is psychotherapy?
22. What are the similarities and differences among the different
approaches to psychotherapy?
23. What therapeutic approaches are most effective for each of the
main categories of disorders?
24. Why might group therapy be more successful than individual
therapy?
25. What are common family therapy techniques?
26. What are the benefits of self-help support groups?
27. What social and economic forces drove the community mental
health improvement?
28. What roles do ethnicity and gender play in psychotherapy?
29. What factors predict a successful outcome for psychotherapy?
30. What research findings demonstrate that psychotherapy can be
effective in coping with medical problems?
Relevant Standards:
Learning Goals:
163
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Enduring Understandings:
Therapies
18-20 – Biological therapies alter aspects of bodily functioning to treat
disorders.
21-23 – How a psychologist views the cause of a disorder dictates the
approach to treatment.
24-28 – Groups can facilitate therapeutic healing.
29 – Research demonstrates that psychotherapy is effective.
30 – Psychotherapy is also effective in helping patients cope with
medical problems.
Learning Objectives:
Essential Questions:
Content Standards:
Enduring Understandings:
VA-3.2 Explore the challenges associated
with accurate diagnosis.
1. Students will understand what constitutes
“abnormal behavior” through
contemporary and historical conceptions
and will be able to use the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
(DSM) published by the American
Psychiatric Association as the primary
reference for making diagnostic judgments.
VB-1.1 Describe availability and
appropriateness of various modes of
treatment for individuals (e.g., children,
adolescents, and adults) with psychological
disorders.
2. Students will understand how different
psychologists approach treatment
depending on their views and will be able
to analyze the different approaches
through research and activities.
Primary (Power):
VA-3.1 Discuss major categories of
abnormal behavior.
VB-1.2 Describe characteristics of effective
treatment and prevention.
VB-3.2 Examine the influence of ethics and
professional practice.
VA-2.1 Identify the purpose of different
research methods.
Secondary (Supportive):
VA-1.1 Distinguish the common
characteristics of abnormal behavior.
VA-4.1 Consider factors that influence
164
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
1. Describe contemporary and historical
conceptions of what constitutes psychological
disorders.
2. Recognize the use of the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)
published by the American Psychiatric
Association as the primary reference for making
diagnostic judgments.
3. Discuss the major diagnostic categories,
including anxiety and somatoform disorders,
mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic
disturbance, personality disorders, and
dissociative disorders, and their corresponding
symptoms.
4. Evaluate the strengths and limitations of various
approaches to explaining psychological
disorders: medical model, psychoanalytic,
humanistic, cognitive, biological, and
sociocultural.
5. Identify the positive and negative consequences
of diagnostic labels (e.g., the Rosenhan study).
6. Discuss the intersection between psychology
and the legal system (e.g., confidentiality,
insanity defense).
Treatment of Abnormal Behavior
1. Describe the central characteristics of
psychotherapeutic intervention.
2. Describe major treatment orientations used in
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings:
vulnerability to abnormal behavior.
VA-4.2 Discuss the stigma associated with
abnormal behavior.
VA-4.3 Speculate about means for
promoting greater understanding of
abnormal behavior.
VA-1.2 Cite examples of abnormal
behavior.
VA-2.2 Characterize the advantages and
limitations of different research methods
for studying abnormal behavior.
VA-1.3 Relate judgments of abnormality to
contexts in which those judgments occur.
VA-1.4 Describe major explanations for the
origins of abnormality.
VB-2.1 Identify therapists according to
training.
VB-2.2 Describing strategies for locating
appropriate therapists.
VB-3.1 Describe the intersection between
mental health and law.
165
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
therapy (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, humanistic)
and how those orientations influence
therapeutic planning.
Compare and contrast different treatment
formats (e.g., individual, group).
Summarize effectiveness of specific treatments
used to address specific problems.
Discuss how cultural and ethnic context
influence choice and success of treatment (e.g.,
factors that lead to premature termination of
treatment).
Describe prevention strategies that build
resilience and promote competence.
Identify major figures in psychological
treatment (e.g., Aaron Beck, Albert Ellis,
Sigmund Freud, Mary Cover Jones, Carl Rogers,
B. F. Skinner, and Joseph Wolpe).
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Performance Assessments:
1. Pre-Assessment
2. Chapter Outlines
3. Section Quizzes
4. Group Discussions
5. Guided Activities
6. Debate
7. Section Reflections
8. Various HW Assignments
9. Exit Tickets
10. Index Card
11. Analogy Prompt
12. Quiz
13. One-Sentence Summary
14. One-Word Summary
15. Oral Questioning
16. Journal Entry
17. Group-based test prep
18. Generating Test items
19. Hot-Seat questioning
20. Observation
21. Think-pair-share
22. One-Minute papers
1. AP Free Response
Question
2. Unit Objective Test
3. Psychological Disorder
Research Presentation
None
166
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
Psychological Disorders
1. What is Abnormal Behavior?
2. Understanding Abnormal
Behavior: Wearing the Other
Shoe
3. The Insanity Plea
4. Measuring Social Avoidance
and Distress
5. Symptoms of Dissociative
Disorders
6. Narcissism
7. Self-Assessment of
Depression
8. Promoting Greater
Understanding of Abnormal
Behavior
Therapies
1. Empathy: The Cornerstone of
Counseling
2. Handout Master Listening
Empathically
3. Using Psychological
Perspectives To Change
Habits
4. Handout Master A - Why the
Heck Do I Do That?
Formative Assessments
Summative Assessments:
Possible Assessment Modifications /Accommodations:
Class Participation
Guided Practice
Individual Practice
Presentations
Oral Responses
Written Work
Teacher Observation
Guided Practice
Creative Writing
167
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Performance Assessments:
Major Activities/ Assignments
(required):
5. Handout Master B - Habit
Journal
6. Using Systematic
Desensitization and Rational
Emotive Therapy To Treat
Test Anxiety
7. Handout Master A
8. Table 1. Sample Anxiety for
Systematic Desensitization of
Test Anxiety
9. Handout Master B - Table 2.
Rational Versus Irrational
Beliefs
10. Handout Master C - Figure 451: The ABC’s of R.E.T
11. Transparency Master Systematic Desensitization
Hierarchy
12. Readers Theatre “Cinderella”
13. Case Histories
Worksheets
Group Work
Exam/Quiz
Instructional Strategies (refer to Robert Marzano’s 41 Elements):
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about knew knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
168
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Structured Overview
Lecture
Explicit Teaching
Drill & Practice
Compare & Contrast
Didactic Questions
Demonstrations
Reading
Listening
Viewing
Thinking
Debates
Role Playing
Panels
Brainstorming
Peer Partner Learning
Discussion
Laboratory Groups
Think, Pair, Share
Cooperative Learning Groups
Jigsaw
Problem Solving
Structured Controversy
Tutorial Groups
169
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Interviewing
Conferencing
Problem Solving
Case Studies
Reading for Meaning
Inquiry
Reflective Discussion
Writing to Inform
Concept Formation
Concept Mapping
Concept Attainment
Cloze Procedure
Essays
Computer Assisted Instruction
Journals
Learning Logs
Reports
Learning Activity Packages
Correspondence Lessons
Learning Contracts
Homework
Research Projects
Assigned Questions
Learning Centers
Explaining
Demonstrating
Questioning
Questioning Technique
Wait Time
Levels of Questions
170
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Possible Instructional Modifications/Accommodations/Differentiation:
Unit Vocabulary:
Essential:
Abnormal behavior, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
(DSMV), borderline personality disorder (BPD), psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder,
personality disorders, phobia, psychiatry, psychopharmacology,
Non-Essential:
active listening, ant anxiety drugs, antidepressant drugs, antipsychotic drugs, antisocial personality disorder, anxiety disorder, aversion therapy,
behavior therapy, biomedical therapy, bipolar disorder, client-centered therapy, cognitive therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, comorbidity,
delusions, diathesis stress model, dissociative disorders, dopamine hypothesis, dream analysis, eclectic approach, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT),
empathy, free association, genuineness, group therapy, hallucinations, humanistic therapy, insanity, insight therapies, interpretation, learned
helplessness, lobotomy, major depressive disorder, medical model, modeling therapy, mood disorder, mood stabilizer drugs, neurosis, psychosis,
psychosurgery, psychotherapy, rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), resistance,
schizophrenia, self-help group, self-talk, substance related disorders, systematic desensitization, transference, unconditional positive regard
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Science:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A - [Strand] Students understand core concepts
and principles of science and use
measurement and observation
tools to assist in categorizing,
representing, and interpreting the
natural and designed world.
171
Integration of Technology:
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Technology:
__X_ Global Awareness
__X_ Creativity & Innovation
Moodle
Blog
Online Quizzing
Google Docs
Google Presentation
____ Civic Literacy
__X_ Media Literacy
____ Financial, Economic,
__X_ Critical Thinking and Problem
Business, & Entrepreneurial
Solving
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.A.c - [Content
Statement] - Revisions of
predictions and explanations are
based on systematic observations,
accurate measurements, and
structured data/evidence
Integration of Technology:
SCI.9-12.5.1.12.D.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Engage in
multiple forms of discussion in
order to process, make sense of,
and learn from others' ideas,
observations, and experiences
Technology:
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.1 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Construct a
spreadsheet, enter data, and use
mathematical or logical functions
to manipulate data, generate
charts and graphs and interpret the
results.
TEC.9-12.8.1.12.A.3 - [Cumulative
Progress Indicator] - Participate in
online courses, learning
communities, social networks or a
virtual world as resources for
lifelong learning.
172
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Literacy
__X_ Life and Career Skills
__X_ Health Literacy
__X_ Information & Communication
Technologies Literacy
__X_ Communication & Collaboration
__X_ Information Literacy
Interdisciplinary Connections
(Applicable Standards):
Integration of Technology:
TEC.9-12. - [Content Statement] The use of digital tools and mediarich resources enhances creativity
and the construction of knowledge.
21st Century Life and Careers:
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - The ability to
recognize a problem and apply
critical thinking and problemsolving skills to solve the problem is
a lifelong skill that develops over
time.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.A.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] Participate in online strategy and
planning sessions for course-based,
school-based, or outside projects.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.1 - [Content
Statement] - Communication with
people from different cultural
backgrounds is enhanced by the
understanding of different cultural
perspectives
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.D.2 [Cumulative Progress Indicator] -
173
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Interdisciplinary Connections
Integration of Technology:
(Applicable Standards):
Determine the immediate and longterm effects of cross-cultural
misconceptions or
misunderstandings resulting from
past or current international issues
or events.
WORK.9-12.9.1.12.2 - [Content
Statement] - Ethical behaviors
support human rights and dignity
in all aspects of life.
Resources:
Texts/Materials:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Huffman, Karen. Psychology in Action. New York: Wiley, 2014.
American Psychology Association TOPSS – Unit Lesson Plans
Teacher Website
Moodle Website
Various Psychology Articles
Various Psychology Videos
Major Assignments (required):
6. Psychological Disorder Research Presentation
7. Handout Master A - Why the Heck Do I Do That?
8. Handout Master B - Habit Journal
9. Handout Master B - Table 2. Rational Versus Irrational Beliefs
10. Handout Master C - Figure 45-1: The ABC’s of R.E.T
174
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction
21st Century Themes:
21st Century Skills:
Resources:
11. Handout Master Listening Empathically
12. Chapter Reflection Essay (Pre-Test)
Major Activities (required):
Psychological Disorders
1. What is Abnormal Behavior?
2. Understanding Abnormal Behavior: Wearing the Other Shoe
3. The Insanity Plea
4. Measuring Social Avoidance and Distress
5. Symptoms of Dissociative Disorders
6. Narcissism
7. Self-Assessment of Depression
8. Promoting Greater Understanding of Abnormal Behavior
Therapies
1. Empathy: The Cornerstone of Counseling
2. Using Psychological Perspectives To Change Habits
3. Using Systematic Desensitization and Rational Emotive Therapy To Treat Test Anxiety
4. Handout Master A
5. Table 1. Sample Anxiety for Systematic Desensitization of Test Anxiety
6. Transparency Master - Systematic Desensitization Hierarchy
7. Readers Theatre “Cinderella”
8. Case Histories
175
KRSD Office of Curriculum and Instruction