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AP® Summer Institute
World History
Drew University: Caspersen School of Graduate Studies
S.W. Bowne, room 126
36 Madison Avenue
Madison, NJ 07940
July 21 – July 25, 2014
Presented by: Frank J. Passaro, Jr.
Social Studies Department Chairman
Calvert Hall High School
Towson, Maryland, 21286
[email protected]
410-530-4692
Tentative Agenda
Monday, July 21, 2014
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Icebreaker/ Introductions/Expectations for the Week
Take a modified AP® World History Exam
o Assess skills needed to be successful on the test
Equity and Access
AP® World History Curriculum Framework
Understanding the Exam
Teaching Skills for the Multiple-Choice Section --- (or, Teaching for Learning AND
success) --- Activities that will get your students
Technological and Environmental Transformations; --- Activities
Why Study History?
Daily feedback on YOUR progress
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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Designing lessons that will teach knowledge, skills and attitudes
Formative and summative assessment
What historical thinking skills will you address in an AP® World History Course?
Working with historical thinking skills
Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies --- Activities
Teaching and grading the Comparison Free-Response Question
Syllabus Development
Daily feedback on YOUR progress
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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Teaching the Continuity and Change Over Time Free Response Essay
o Big History - What is it? Why use it in an AP® course?
(http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu/;
https://course.bighistoryproject.com/bhplive)
Aligning the AP® World History Exam with the Curriculum Framework
Working on individual teachers’ courses integrating what each has learned about
preparing an AP® World History Course
Regional and Transregional Interactions --- Activities
Syllabus Development
Daily feedback on YOUR progress
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Tentative Agenda
Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Teaching Students the Document-Based Question
Global Interactions; Industrialization and Global Integration --- Activities
Sharing websites, films, listserves, etc.
Syllabus Development
Working on individual teachers’ courses integrating what each has learned about
preparing an AP® World History Course
Friday, July 25, 2014
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Accelerating Global Change and Realignments --- Activities
Syllabus Development
Assessing syllabi
Workshop evaluation
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Objectives
Emphasis:
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“Philosophy” of World History (aka “How to teach a course you never took yourself!”)
Creating a syllabus and submitting it for the AP Audit
How to teach essay writing
Sharing classroom activities that will provide students with higher order thinking skills
and that will move from teacher-centered to a student-centered class
Review activities that help students organize 10,000 years of knowledge.
Big Questions:
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What difference does an AP® course make for students and teachers?
Who should take/teach AP®?
How must an AP® course be organized?
What do my students need to know and be able to do in order to succeed in an AP®
course? How about on the AP® examination?
Assessment: In one page or less, describe three things you plan to do in your class this year that
you have learned (or re-called) in our workshop; further, explain how each of these will help
your students become better students in a college class in history.
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Equity & Access
The College Board and the Advanced Placement Program encourage teachers, AP
Coordinators, and school administrators to make equitable access a guiding principle for
their AP programs. The College Board is committed to the principle that all students
deserve an opportunity to participate in rigorous and academically challenging courses
and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous
academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. The Board
encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from
ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in
the AP Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect
the diversity of their student population.
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