Download Montessori Sentence Analysis

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts
no text concepts found
Transcript
Sentence Analysis
Language
MONTESSORI 6-12 YEARS| MONTESSORI HOMESCHOOL COLLECTIVE
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Introduction
The primary purpose of sentence analysis is to help children think, write, and express
themselves clearly. The reasoning mind is the central figure. The way that the minds of human
beings have developed to organise language is the real object of study.
As we look at the history of language - spoken language came first, followed by written. Then
formal grammar came as a system of classification as human beings were interested in
reflecting upon this great gift of language.
'Analysis' comes from the Greek meaning - to resolve into parts. Sentence analysis involves
breaking up a sentence into its parts. In doing this the children begin to grasp the principle of
Syntax. Syntax means the way the words are arranged in groups and the way the groups
relate to other groups. An understanding of syntax is essential in English as English lacks
inflections of individual words to denote relationships between words.
Generally, we do not add endings that tell you if a word is a subject object, agent, time etc. In
Latin Syntax is more fluid because of case endings. Syntax effects style in English. We look at
syntax and judge whether a piece of writing or verbal communication is clear, concise
attractive, poetic, and logical, reasoned, convoluted, or deliberately miss leading.
In English, the arrangement of phrases to each another creates the logical sense of a piece of
communication. We understand sequence through the clues of syntax. We also understand
when phrases are dependent on other phrases or when they come consequently. A phrase is
a group of words together that makes sense internally yet is still not as complete as a thought.
By the time the children are doing the verb grammar box, they have discovered the element
that completes the thought.
The verb, or action, is the central focusing point of both the reading analysis and the sentence
analysis work. It is the first word that is cut out of the sentence by the child, and all the questions
that we use, except for the ones on the blue arrows, are related to the verb.
The black arrows show the relationship of subject, direct and indirect object to the action. The
orange arrows represent adverbial extensions of the action. All these arrows radiate out from
the red circle representing the action. Sentence analysis shows the place of the action word in
the totality of the sentence.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Sentence analysis begins with complete sentences - first simple ones and then ones with
extensions. The simple sentences contain one finite verb as the action of the sentence. This is
a familiar construction for the child from the grammar box work. The child should also have
been presented with the simple tense work that shows the arrangement of the person and verb.
In the Children's House, reading analysis is a preparation for total reading. We do not give the
terminology at that time. It is in the elementary that we give names to these different parts. The
same thing happened with the Grammar Boxes. That is where the children were first introduced
to the names of the parts of speech. But of the course even in the elementary we first help the
children become comfortable with the different parts of speech, and then we give the names predicate, subject, direct object etc. Later we add in other parts and name them gradually.
It is more helpful if the sentences for the presentation are those that you make up on the spot
that you relate to the children that you are working with. The children need to see you writing
and see that the exercise is a function of the active mind at work. Prepared command cards
do not give the same impression as the work becomes static and the children do not see that
they too are the creators of sentence that can be analysed. For their own independent work,
the children should make up sentences. They can ask the teacher for sentences, or each other,
or look to books in the classroom. The sentences therefore will have a meaning to the children
beyond their function as a grammar exercise.
Terminology
Depending on the prior experience of the children, terminology may be presented in the first
lectures or a little later. The goal is to have the children work with the terminology as a guide
so the introduction of the names must not be put off too long. After having been given the
names, the children may work with the arrow with either the question side or the nomenclature
side up. If the children are using only the question side, it is important to periodically ask them
- What part of the sentence is this?
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentences:
Predicate, Subject, Direct Object, Indirect Object
Purpose:
To introduce the use of the arrows and circles
To introduce the terminology for subject, predicate, direct object, indirect object
Prerequisite:
Some work with Grammar boxes
Some work with simple tenses that shows agreement of person and verb
Materials:
•
•
•
•
•
Question and name box of analysis materials (question on one side, name on the
other)
Red circle (the word, Predicate, is printed on one side)
3 black arrows
Question Side:
Who is it that? What is it that?
Whom? What?
Name Side:
Subject
Direct Object
To whom? To what?
Indirect Object
Three black circle each a different size
Tray containing scissors, pencil and a roll of adding paper or long strips of paper with
sticky tape.
When Given: Early in the 6-9
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Presentation:
Lay out the arrows and circles
Write a sentence on a strip
Laura ran
What is the action?
[ran]
Cut off ran and place on the red circle
Who is it that or what is it that ran?
Place the appropriate black arrow extending to the left
[Laura]
Place the large black circle and the place Laura- subject on it.
Do several with the children then introduce the names — predicate, subject
The action part of the sentence has its own name
Turn over arrow
It says predicate.
The action part of the circle is called predicate.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
The part of the sentence that answered the question:
Who is it that?
What is it that?
Turn the arrow over
It says subject. The part of the sentence that answers the question
Who is it that? What is it that? - Is called the subject.
Take the written strips off and put the material back question side up, except for the
red verb which should say — predicate.
The children do a lot of practice with this material.
Possible children's Work:
Make up own sentence
On another day:
Write a sentence on a strip of paper
John climbed the stairs.
What is the predicate or action word?
[Climbed]
Cut out and place on the red circle
Who is it that climbed?
[John]
Place John on the black circle
There is still something left in the
sentence. Here is another arrow.
It says whom? What? John
climbed whom or John climbed
what?
Place the appropriate black arrow to the right of the predicate
Cut and place the stairs on top of black circle
After doing several like this
This part of the sentence also has a name
Turn over arrow
It is called the direct object
Point to the appropriate circle
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Now we have the name for three parts of speech, predicate,
subject and direct object. As you point turn over them to be
sure the correct name is showing eg: subject.
On another day:
Write another Strip
Ava gave the dog a bubbly bath
Place the appropriate arrow circle and label while asking the following questions:
What is the predicate or the action word?
[gave]
Who is it that gave?
[Ava]
Ava gave who or what?
[a bubbly bath]
There is still a part of the sentence left: Ava gave a bath to
whom or what?
[the dog]
Place the dog on the smallest black circle on the end of the question arrow
We know the names of some of the parts of the sentence already:
predicate, subject and direct object.
Flip over new arrow
This new part is called the indirect object.
Give another example of a sentence that has a part the children have not yet had
a lesson on:
Yesterday Ethan washed the dog
What is the predicate or the action word?
[Wash]
Who is it that Washed?
[Ethan]
Ethan washed who or what?
[the dog]
Ethan washed who?
The only answer we have left is yesterday, does that answer the question.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
[no]
We have not had a lesson on that part of the sentence yet so we will
put it that one aside for another day.
Possible Children's Work:
The children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves.
Possible Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose to by copying the layout on paper. The
illustrated work may be made into a booklet. However, this must be the children's idea, not
the teacher's requirement. Requiring this work to be written can kill the children's enjoyment
of the work, especially for the children who are still struggling with their writing skills. The result
will be that they avoid this work.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentences with Extensions
Attributes and Appositives
Purpose:
To introduce attributives and appositives
Materials:
• Question and Name box of analysis materials (question on one side,
name on the other)
• red circle (the word 'predicate' is printed on one side)
• three black arrows
• Three black circles each of different sizes
Question Side:
Name Side:
Who is it that? What is it that?
Subject
Whom? What?
Direct Object
To whom? To what?
•
Indirect Object
two blue arrows
Question Side:
Which? What kind of?
Which? What kind of?
•
•
•
Name Side:
Attributive
Appositive
Two blue triangles
1 black triangle
Tray containing scissors, pencil and a roll of adding paper or long strips of
paper and sticky tape
Prerequisites:
Simple sentences with subject, predicate, direct object, and indirect object
Presentation: Attributives
Lay out the materials
Write a sentence on a strip of paper
Morris washed the muddy dog
What is the action?
[Washed]
Who is it that washed?
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
[Morris]
Finn washed what or whom?
[The muddy dog]
Cut and place
There are some other arrows here that we can use to separate another
part of this sentence.
This blue arrow says which or what kind of
Morris washed which or what kind of dog?
[A muddy dog.]
So, let's take muddy
Separate muddy from the dog and place on the blue triangle
Read sentence without muddy
Morris washed the dog
But if I say, Morris washed the muddy dog it gives us more information.
Do you remember from the grammar boxes what type of word muddy was
in the relation to the dog?
[An adjective]
It is an adjective it gives us more information about the dog. So, we use
this blue arrow and place the word, muddy on the blue triangle, which is
the symbol for adjective.
Turn over the blue arrow
It says attributive. A word that tells you 'which or what kind of' is an attributive.
Muddy tells something about the dog. Muddy is an attribute of this dog.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Presentation: Appositives
Morris, the Pitcher, caught the ball
Place pieces as in previous presentations
What is the action?
[Caught]
Who is it that caught?
[Morris, the pitcher]
Morris caught what?
[the ball]
Take blue arrows and read through them
Which Morris caught the Ball?
[Morris the pitcher]
Place the arrow
Place the pitcher, on top of a black triangle
What type of word is pitcher?
[It is a noun]
That is why it is going on a black triangle.
Listen to the sentence: Morris caught the Ball.
Is that a proper sentence?
[yes]
If I say Morris, the pitcher, caught the ball, it gives you more information
about Morris.
Pitcher is a noun, and because it is a noun, I am not going to turn over the
blue arrow as it says attributive. If a noun answers the question what kind
of? We call it an appositive. We can also say it is a noun in apposition. I
will make a label that says appositive and place on top of blue arrow.
A noun in apposition, is a noun that renames the first noun. It usually
follows the first one and is usually set off by commas. When I wrote the
sentence, I wrote Morris comma the pitcher comma and when I cut them
I made sure both commas stay on the slips.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Children's Work:
Children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves.
Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper. The
illustrated work could be made into booklet form.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentences with Adverbial Extensions
Purpose:
To introduce adverbial extensions on the sentence
Materials:
• Question and Name box of analysis materials (question on one side,
name on the other)
• red circle (the word 'predicate' is printed on one side)
• three black arrows
• Three black circles each of different sizes
Question Side:
Name Side:
Who is it that? What is it that?
Subject
Whom? What?
Direct Object
To whom? To what?
•
two blue arrows
Question Side:
Which? What kind of?
Which? What kind of?
•
•
Indirect Object
Name Side:
Attributive
Appositive
Two blue triangles
1 black triangle
Question Side:
Of whom? Of what?
From what? From where?
Name Side:
Possessive/Material
Source
What for?
Purpose
By means of whom?
By means of what?
Instrument
Why?
Cause/Reason
With whom? With what?
Accompaniment
Where?
Place
When?
Time
By whom? By what?
Agent
How?
Manner
•
•
10 orange circles
Tray containing scissors, pencil and a roll of adding paper or long strips of
paper and sticky tape
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Prerequisites:
Simple sentences with subject, predicate, direct object, indirect object, attributives and
appositives
Presentation:
Gather the children and the materials. Lay the materials to the left of the table.
Note:
There is no specific layout order for the arrows but be sure to lay out the orange arrows so
the ones you need for the first example are not at the top of the column.
Today we are going to use all the materials in the box
These orange arrows have questions on one side, just as the other
arrows do.
Write a sentence
Last spring, I planted flowers in my garden.
What is the action?
[planted]
Who is it that planted?
I planted what?
[flowers]
Read through the remaining black and blue arrows answering any possible questions Let's
see if the parts of the sentence that remain answer any of the questions on the orange
arrows? Go through orange arrows answering the questions
I planted flowers when?
I planted flowers where?
[last spring]
[in my garden]
Position the orange arrows so they point out from the red circle, place the orange circle on
the points of the arrows and place slips on the circles.
All the orange arrows represent adverbial extension of the predicate.
Remember that adverbs modify verbs, and it is always a verb that we
put on the red circle.
There are 9 different adverbial modifiers, and each has its own name.
There are 2 adverbial modifiers in this sentence.
Turn over the arrows as they are named
The name of the word or words that tell you when an action has a
occurred is time. The full name is adverbial modifier of time. It tells you
more about the verb.
The name of the word or words that tell you where an action has
occurred is the adverbial modifier of place.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Replace the material to its original place
Let's try another sentence
Mary moved quickly from the table to answer the phone
What is the action?
[Moved]
Who is it that moved?
[Mary]
Mary moved why?
[to answer the phone]
Mary moved how?
[quickly]
Mary moved whence.
[from the table]
Read through remaining questions to see if they can be answered.
Write another sentence
Rosemary sweetly sang a song during the program in the
auditorium
Proceed as before
What is the action?
[sang]
Who is it that sang?
[Rosemary]
Rosemary sang what?
[a song]
Rosemary sang a song when?
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
[during the program]
Rosemary sang where?
[in the auditorium]
Rosemary sang how?
[sweetly]
Flip over the arrows to reveal the adverbial modifiers
The adverbial modifier of manner asks the question how.
The adverbial modifier of place asks the question where.
The adverbial modifier of time asks the question when.
Possible Children's Work:
Children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves or find in a book.
Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper.
The illustrated work could be made into booklet form.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentence with Inverted Order
Purpose:
To show the difference in the order of the sentence when the sentence asks a question
Materials:
As in initial presentation
Prerequisites:
Simple sentences with adverbial extensions
Presentation:
Write a sentence on a strip of paper
Sam is going to the auditorium for the rehearsal.
What is the action?
[is going]
Note: If the children answer 'going' ask — Can I say "who is it that going:
To make it a proper sentence we need to use is going.
Who is that is going?
[Sam]
Sam is going whom or what?
Sam is going to whom to what?
[the rehearsal]
Adverbial modifier for purpose
Sam is going which what kind of?
Sam is going why?
Sam is going what for?
Sam is going where?
[to the auditorium]
Adverbial modifier for place
Let's see what happens if we write this sentence a different way
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Is Sam going to the auditorium for the rehearsal?
Place the original slips to the outside of their corresponding circle
What is the action?
[is going]
Who is it that is going?
[Sam]
Sam is going where?
[ to the auditorium]
Sam is going what for?
[for the rehearsal]
Let's look to see what is different.
The predicate 'is going' was on 2 slips instead of one
When we place 'is’ at the beginning of the sentence it changes it into a
question.
Questions use a different order of words and this is called 'inverted
order'.
You can try this yourself write a sentence, then write is again as a
question and see what happens when you analyse them.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentences with Elliptical Order
Purpose:
To explore sentences that have the subject implied
Prerequisite:
Simple Sentences with adverbial
Presentation:
Place out the materials to the left, reading as you lay them out
Write some sentences:
•
•
•
Jump
Sit down
Yawn loudly
These are sentences but they do not have anything written done
If I say 'go' does that sound like a sentence?
But do you know what it means?
[Yes]
We can place 'go' on the predicate.
But grammar people would say that a sentence must have a subject
and a predicate. Does this sentence have predicate?
[Yes, go]
Does it have a subject?
Yes, we know that it means you
Write you onto a slip with brackets around you
This is kind of a defective sentence. It is called an elliptical sentence.
Ellipse is from a Greek word meaning 'defective'
Do you remember the ellipse? It is not really a circle. It is a kind of a
defective circle.
Write a ticket for elliptical sentence and place it above the predicate
That is what kind of sentence you have if you do not say the
subject, but the person can understand what you mean anyway.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Place you on it on the large black circle as the subject
Let's try another one
Thank you
If I say thank you what is the predicate?
[Thank]
The answer to who is it that thanks is not written down, but I
am the one who said, 'thank you', so 'l' is the subject
Place 'l' in brackets and place it on the large black circle.
I put the brackets around it to emphasise it is the missing part
We still have the word 'you'
I thank whom or what
[I thank you]
Let's try another
Sit down
Repeat with the same process as for previous elliptical sentences
I wonder if you can think of any other sentences which are elliptical
Perhaps you can make a list of the ones you think of or find
And then you could analyse those.
Children's Work:
Children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves
Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper. The illustrated
work could be made into booklet form.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Personal Pronouns
Purpose:
To explore the use of personal pronouns in sentences
Materials:
As above plus a large sheet of paper
Prerequisites:
Simple sentence with adverbial extensions
Introduction of pronouns
Presentation:
I am going to write 2 sentences now
The children wrote mother a letter
The children wrote her a letter
We are going to have several sentences out at one time, so I will draw
the analysis on this large sheet of paper.
Read the first slip and draw the analysis on paper
What is the action?
[Wrote]
Who is it that wrote?
[The children]
The children wrote whom or what?
[A letter]
The children wrote a letter to whom to what?
[mother]
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Read the second sentence and analyse it on the paper
Second sentence the children wrote her a letter
What is the action?
[Wrote]
Who is it that wrote?
[The children]
The children wrote whom or what?
[A letter]
The children wrote a letter to whom to what?
[herl
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Compare the 2 sentences
The analysis looks the same the only difference is in the words that are
used. We replace mother with her.
Draw and arrow from mother to her
Repeat the procedure for another sentence:
"They wrote a letter to their mother"
Difference 'they' instead of 'the children'
Draw a line from "The children" to " they"
Then repeat the procedure for : "They wrote it to their mother.”
Is the analysis the same?
[yes]
What part of speech were the words that were replaced?
[Nouns]
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Did we still know what the replacement word referred to?
Mother became her; letter became it, and children became they.
Whenever we have a word that takes the place of a noun, we call it a
pronoun.
Let's check what part of the sentence the words were?
Mother and her were indirect objects
Letter and it were direct objects
Children and they were both subjects
What can we conclude from this?
Pronouns used in place of the noun, are in the same part of the
sentence as the noun.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Long Simple Sentences
Purpose:
To give children experience with increasing complexity in analysis
Materials: As in initial
presentation
Prerequisites:
Simple sentences with adverbial extension
Presentation:
Let's see how many of the arrows we can use for one sentence.
Yesterday, for exercise, I rode quickly from home to school on
a bicycle, with my friend, Kirsty.
What is the action?
[rode]
Who or What is it that rode?
I rode whom or what?
I rode which or what kind of?
I rode by means of what?
[Bicycle]
I rode whence?
[from home]
I rode by whom by what?
I rode with whom with what?
I rode where?
I rode what for?
I rode how?
[my friend Kirsty]
[to school]
[ for exercise]
[quickly]
I rode why?
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
I rode when?
[yesterday]
Which or what kind of friend?
[Kirsty]
We have used quite a few. I wonder if you could make up some long
sentences.
Children's Work:
Children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves
Possible Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper. The illustrated
work could be made into a booklet.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
The Sentence Analysis Chart A
Introduction:
At this point the children should be writing their own sentences. They may or may not be to
the point where they can work from the names rather than the questions. Allow the children to
work at whatever level of ability they are at. As the children get older the chart will be more
appealing than the moveable pieces.
Purpose:
To analyse sentences in a different format
Materials:
• Analysis Chart A: This contains all the information from the loose pieces
• Tray containing scissors, pencil, and a roll of adding paper or long strips of paper
Prerequisites:
Simple sentence analysis with extensions
Presentation:
This chart has all the information that we have been working with in the
arrow and circle material. Here is all that information on one chart.
Write a sentence and read it aloud
One afternoon in October, Ava found me a female ginkgo tree near her
house.
We are going to follow the same procedure as for the loose pieces.
Direct the children to follow the same procedure as for the loose pieces. Either reading the
questions on the chart or just looking for the proper categories for their sentence
components. These are cut out and placed on the chart in the proper squares.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
What is the predicate?
[Found]
Who is it that found?
[Ava]
Ava found whom or what?
[A female ginkgo tree]
Ava a found a female ginkgo tree by means by whom by what?
of whom of what?
When?
[On afternoon in October]
Found a female Ginkgo tree where?
[Near her house]
Let's try one more sentence with this.
You may keep the book for a week, Katie.
Go through the sentences
Predicate
[can keep]
Subject
[you]
You may keep what or whom?
[the book]
You may keep the book when?
[for a week]
We are left with Katie
This is one we have not had before
Can you see down in the lower chart it says 'noun of direct address' in this sentence you may
keep the book for a week Katie. I am directly addressing Katie, so we will put Katie down the
bottom.
We already had a subject in this sentence it was ' you', but we addressed the person again by
saying her name 'Katie' this is called a noun of direct address.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Children's Work:
The children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves.
Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper.
Notes:
This work does not need to be corrected by the teacher. If they are placing the components
improperly, ask them the reasons for their choices. If they are not responding clearly, it is not
necessary to correct the children but perhaps to give another presentation emphasising the
points they may not have understood.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Simple Sentences with Name Only Box
Introduction:
This box is identical to the second box, but the arrows and red circle contain only the
classification names, not the questions. It does not need to be formally presented, but the
children can use it as a way of checking themselves and testing their mastery of Logical
Analysis when they have reached proficiency with the Analysis Chart A. The children work with
it in the exact manner they have done with the second box.
The third box is like the Blank Charts in the maths material and the third period of a threeperiod lesson. If the child runs into any difficulty, he or she can check the Analysis
Chart A for the questions they may need.
Purpose:
To do the analysis using the names only (not the questions)
Materials:
Paper and pencil
Prerequisites:
Simple sentence analysis with extensions using the question and name box
Presentation:
This box of sentence analysis material is the same as the box you have been using, except
the arrows do not have the questions printed on one side.
When have the children become sure of a name or part of a sentence, they can begin to use
this box?
If the children need to refresh their memory, they may refer to Analysis Chart A
Children's Work:
Children repeat the activity with sentences they make up themselves.
Further Work:
Children may illustrate this work if they choose by copying the layout on paper. The illustrated
work can be made into booklet form.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Writing the Analysis on Paper
Purpose:
To analyse sentences in a different format
Materials:
• Pencil and paper
Prerequisites:
Knows the names of the parts of a sentence
Experience with the names only box
Presentation:
Today you are going to see how to do logical analysis with just paper
and pencil.
We went to Bribie last week.
The analysis can be done in one of two ways:
a)
Go through the different parts of the sentence one by one and write the heading
and the answer on paper
b)
give the children a prepared form to use
The children can either
a)
go through the list of questions and names on the Sentence Analysis Chart A and
write the parts
e.g. What is the predicate? - went
What is the subject? – we etc.
b) the teacher can make a form for the children to fill in the spaces
What is the predicate?
What is the subject?
The direct object?
Indirect object?
Adverbial extensions:
Place?
Time?
Is there and attributive clauses?
Is there any Appositive clauses?
They could have a list if they need to be reminded of the part of a sentence or a form made to
write sentence at top and break it down.
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
Analysis of Simple Sentences Having a Linking Verb
Purpose:
To explore the use of linking verbs
Materials:
• Chart A
• Slips of paper
• Pencil and scissors
Prerequisites:
Work with Sentence Analysis Chart A
Presentation:
Gather the children and the materials
Place Analysis Chart A upside down on the table
Write a phrase on a slip of paper
Romy is
Do you know what I am talking about if I have something like this?
I am going to add one word.
Romy is pretty
How is that different from the first thing I said
It tells us something about Romy.
It gives a description of how Romy is.
Pretty is an adjective for Romy.
There are sentences like this which do not have an action they just tell
you about the subject.
Can you think of any?
[The chickens are cute.]
It tells you something about the chickens
'Is' connects Romy to pretty, that little word is a verb. It is not an action
verb
It is a linking verb
It connects something to the subject.
When you want to analysis sentences like that you can use the chart.
Turn the chart over
Always look for the predicate first
In this sentence it is 'is'
Cut out 'is' and place on the predicate
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective
Language19: Sentence Analysis
What is the subject
[Romy]
Cut and place on the subject
The word that is connected and fills out the meaning or the thought is
'pretty' it goes with the verb
Place it with the verb on the predicate.
'Pretty' compliments the subject, so it is called a subject complement.
Because it is an adjective, we can also call it a predicate adjective.
The chart calls it a predicate complement
The test for a linking verb is if you can substitute the verb 'to be' and it
still makes the same sense then it is a linking verb.
Romy is to be Pretty
You can make a list of verbs that are linking
Note:
other examples of linking verbs are sounds, seems, looks
Montessori 6-12 Years
Montessori Homeschool Collective