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COURSE STRUCTURE
Introduction to the Programme.
The Department of History offers a three year undergraduate
programme in History as part of a triple major, along with Economics
and Political Science .A student is required to study one History paper
in each of the first four semesters .In the Fifth and Sixth semesters
there are two papers per semester, thus making it a total of eight
papers spread across three years. There is also a provision for students
to opt for an additional elective in the sixth semester which is research
based dissertation writing for hundred marks carrying three credits.
Programme Objectives:
The predominant concern of the programme is to orient the students
to articulate history in a conceptual mode, where in ideas; debates and
ideological affiliations are understood and inferred in an analytical
manner.
I SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 131
Title
Modern India
Hours
5
Marks
100
Credits
4
II SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 231
Title
Hours
Contemporary India from 1947 to 5
Marks
100
Credits
4
2000
III SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 331
Title
Post Colonial Asia 1945 to 2000
Hours
5
Marks
100
Credits
4
IV SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 431
Title
Research and Writing
Hours
5
Marks
100
Credits
4
V SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 531
Title
Hours
Conceptual Approaches to Ancient and 4
Marks
Credits
100
4
100
4
Medieval India
HIS 532
Indian Architectural Identities
4
VI SEMESTER
Course Code
HIS 631
Title
Post War Discourses 1945 - 2000
Hours
4
Marks
100
Credits
4
HIS 632
Historiography – Concepts, Schools 4
100
4
100
3
and Debates.
HIS 641
Assessment
Additional Elective - Dissertation
CIA
Pattern
ESE
50%
50%
Courses Outline:
There are eight papers in History spread across three years carrying a total of thirty two credits.
Each year is categorized into two semesters, thus making the entire programme a six semester’s
course. While the first four semesters have five lecture hours per week, the last two semesters
have eight hours a week. Sixth semester also has a choice based additional elective. The courses
are a combination of empirical, skill and thought based papers such as Contemporary India,
Research and Writing, Post Colonial Asia, Indian architectural Identities and Historiography.
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code: HIS 131-
MODERN INDIA
75Hrs
Course Description - The main objective of this paper is to examine the history of the Indian
subcontinent when it was a British colony. The idea is to understand and trace the emergence of
modern India from 19th century onwards. The emphasis in understanding is on concepts, ideas
and movements rather than events.
Course Learning Outcome : It provides a background in understanding the history of Post
independent India specifically in the context of the Colonial past.
19th C India
Unit 1
17 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Introduction to Colonialism, Mercantilism, Imperialism.
b) British revenue policies – The Permanent Zamindari Settlement.
The Mahalwari System – The Ryatwari System – Ruralization & disintegration of Village
Economy.
c) Commercialization of agriculture & Deindustrialization.
Unit 2
Resistance to Colonization
15 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Basic
a) Civil Rebellions & Tribal Uprisings - Bengal, East India & South India.
b) Revolt of 1857 – Historiographical writings – Nature, Course & impact.
c) The Development of Famine Policy – Famines during Colonial India –Strachey
Commission of 1880 – MacDonnell Commission – Bengal Famine of 1942-43.
Unit 3
Formation of National Identity
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
17 Hours
a) Cultural Encounters and Social change – English education Woods Dispatch, Orientalist
Vs Anglicist, Development of Vernacular Education, Wardha Scheme of Basic
Education.
b) Press and its impact – Early History of Press in India – Print Nationalism
c) Social reforms in Modern India – Phule, Narayan Guru, Periyar and Ambedkar
Unit 4
Towards Freedom
26 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) Growth of National Consciousness – The Indian National Congress, Myth and Reality –
Economic Nationalism and Swadeshi – The Congress from 1885 to 1919 –The Ghadr
Movement.
b) Gandhiji and anti colonial struggles –1919 – 1922, 1930-1934, 1942 – The Cabinet
mission plan – The Mountbatten plan 1947.
c) The left movements in India – Telangana Movement – Trade Union Movement – I world
war, Left awakening and organized Trade Unionism – Impact of II World War.
Self Study Topics.
1)
2)
3)
4)
Civil Rebellions in South India
MacDonnell Commission – Bengal famine of 1942-43
Early History of Press in India – Phule, Narayan Guru, Periyar and Ambedkar.
The Ghadr Movement – Impact of Second World War
Essential Reading:
1. Bipan Chandra, Mridula Mukherjee, Aditya Mukherjee K.N.Panikkar, Sucheta Mahajan
– India’s Struggle for Independence – Penguin Books, New Delhi – 1989.
2. B.L.Groover, Alka Mehta – A new look at Modern Indian History (From 1707 to the
Modern Times) - S.Chand & Company – 2010.
3. Sumit Sarkar - Modern India, 1885-1947, Macmillan India 2002
Recommended Readings:
1. B.R.Tomlinson - The Economy of Modern India
2. K.N.Panikkar - Culture, Ideology, Hegemony: Intellectuals and Social Conscious in
Colonial India, Tulika Books, Delhi, 1998.
3. Irfan Habib - Indian Economy, 1858-1914, A people’s History of India, Vol.28, Tulika
Books, Delhi 2006.
4. Aparna Basu - The Growth of Education and Political Development in India 1898-1920,
Oxford University Press, Delhi 1974.
5.
6.
7.
8.
A.R.Desai - Peasant Struggles in India, Oxford University Press, Delhi 1979.
K.N. Panikkar(ed) - National Left Movements in India Vikas, New Delhi 1980
Sabyasachi Bhattacharya - Development of Modern Indian thought & the Social Sciences
Peter Heels - Nationalism, Terrorism, Communalism, Essays in Modern Indian History –
Oxford University Press 2000
9. Bidyuk Chakraborthy, Rajendra Kumar Pandey - Modern Indian political thought: text
and context, Sage publications 2009.
10. Donald Anthony Low - Congress and the Raj; facts of Indian Struggle 1947-47 – Oxford
University Press 2004.
11. Mridula Mukherjee - Peasants in India’s non-violent revolution; practice and theory,
Sage publications 2004.
12. Rakesh Batabyal - Communalism in Bengal; from famine to Noakhali, 1943-47, Sage
Publications 2005.
13. Herman Kulke - A history of India – Routledge 1998
14. Burton Stein - History of India Oxford University Press 1998.
15. Erwin Neumayer & Christine Schelberger - Bharatmata; India’s Freedom movement in
Popular art – Oxford University Press 2008
16. Sekhar Bandyopadhyay - From Plassey to Partition; a history of modern India – Orient
Longman 2004.
Visual Texts :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Richard Attenborough – Gandhi.
Ketan Mehta – Sardar
Ketan Mehta – Mangal Pandey – The rising.
Ketan Mehta – Mirch Masala
Ashutosh Gowrikar – Lagaan.
Bhagat Singh – The rising.
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment - 100 marks.
CIA 1 – Project Work/ Exhibition on History and the Self CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Critical writing on Cinema and History
Attendance
Total
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
Visual text as CIA
-
End Semester Exams
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
100 marks
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Notes
Section C – Objective type
Total
2 out of 4
6 out of 8
5 out of 8
15 x 2 = 30
10 x 6 = 60
2 x 5 = 10
100
A 10 hour orientation course on “Cinematic medium and historical narratives” for
students composed of
1) Issues of Language
2) Representation
3) Dichotomies.
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code: HIS 231– Contemporary India from 1947 to 2000
75Hrs
Course Description:- The main objective of this paper is to understand the formation of
national identity in India in the post colonial period. The attempt here is to trace the emergence
of social, political, economic, literary ideologies that together formulated the historical identity
of the nation.
Course Learning Outcome: This course assists in placing many of the issues of Contemporary
India in a balanced perspective by providing the historical background of their origin.
Unit I
India Independent upto 1964
20 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Basic
a) The Legacy of National movement – 1950 Constitution – Historiographical trends, the
Subalterns – Lohia.
b) Integration & Consolidation of National Identities – Linguistic, Tribals, Regions
(Hyderabad, Kashmir & Junagadh).
c) Nehruvian Socialism – Planning & Public sector – Agriculture and Industries in the first
three five year plans – Foreign Policy, Non-alignment – India & the World- The Korean
war, Crisis at Congo, Relations with USA and USSR.
Unit 2
Independent India from 1965 to 1977
21 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a) Period of Transition – 1964 to 1969, Internal Conflicts in the Congress.
b) Politics & political parties from 1969 to 1977 – Issues of Legitimacy, Administration and
popular Anti – Government movement. Turmoil in Congress Hegemony, The Bangladesh
Crisis, Sampooran Kranti, Emergency.
c) Political Formulations form 1977 to 2000 - Technology Missions – Social Turmoil –
Foreign Policy initiatives
Unit 3
Regional Identities
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Assertions of Regions - Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.
b) Regional Identities – West Bengal & Assam.
c) Crisis of National Unity – Punjab.
18 Hours
Unit 4
Reforms & Movements
16 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) Land Reforms – Zamindari Abolition & Tenancy reforms – Land ceiling & Bhoodan
Movement – Green revolution.
b) Agrarian struggle since independence – Telangana peasant struggle – Naxalite Peasant
movement – Srikakulam struggle
c) New Farmers movement with special reference to Karnataka
Contemporary Indian Identities
CIA Themes
1) Cinema – Issues of Diaspora, inter and intra.
2) Literature – Concerns of Linguistic identities and sub nationalism in Hindi,
Kannada, and English and Urdu writings.
3) Media and communications – Media in Free India Issues of Patronage, Prioritization and
Publicity.
Self Study Topics.
1) Agriculture and Industries in the first three five year Plans.
2) Non- Alignment, India and the world.
3) Zamindari abolition and Tenancy reforms, Green Revolution, Telangana Peasant struggle.
Essential Reading:
1. Paul R.Brass - The politics of India since Independence – Cambridge University Press,
1993
2. Bipan Chandra (Mridula Mukherjee, Aditya Mukherjee) - India after independence 1947
– 2000, Penguin publication 1999
Recommended Readings:
1. Chandi Lahiri - Since freedom, New Central Book Agency 1994
2. Selig S.Harison Paul H.Kriesberg & Dennis Kun (ed) - India & Pakistan the first fifty
years, Cambridge University Press 1999
3. C.P.Srivastava - Lal Bahadur Shastri, Oxford University Press, 1995
4. Arun Shourie - Mrs Gandhi’s Second Reign, Vikas publishing, 1983
5. S.Gopal - Nehru an Anthology, Oxford University Press 1980
6. K.M. George - Modern India & Literature an Anthology Fiction Vol.2 Sahitya Academy
1993
7. P.N.Dhar - Indira Gandhi, the Emergency and Indian Democracy Oxford University
Press 2001
8. Tapan Raychaudhari - Perceptions, emotions, sensibilities; essays on India’s Colonial &
Post colonial experiences – Oxford University Press 1999
9. Preben Kaarsholm, Menaka Bisvasa -City flicks; Indian Cinema & the urban experience
Seagull books 2004
10. Brian Z Tamanaha - On the rule of Law, history, politics, theory Cambridge University
Press 2004
11. Mushirul Hasan - The Partition Omnibus – Oxford University Press 2002
12. Sudarshan Ranjan - Jayaprakash Narayan; Prophet of People’s Power National Book
Trust, New Delhi 2002
13. Sugata Bose, Ayesha Jalal - Modern South Asian History, Culture, political Economy –
Routledge, New York 2004
14. Saurab Dube - Postcolonial passage, contemporary history writing on India Oxford
University Press 2005
15. Priya Jaikumar - Cinema at the end of empire, a politics of transition in Britain & India –
Duke University Press 2006
16. Madhubala Sinha - Encyclopedia of Kannada Literature Anmol Publications 2009
17. G.S.Amura - Adhunika Kannada Vimarshe Swapna Book house 2008
The last module is inter domain as and will be articulated by visiting/guest faculty. Hence the
reading list will be formulated by them, which will have broad linkages as specified in the
curriculum.
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Activity on Contemporary Indian Identity
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Literature Review/Fiction Reading
Attendance
Total
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
End Semester Exams
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
-
Pattern of End Semester Exam Question paper
Section A – Essay
2 out of 4
Section B – Short Notes
6 out of 8
Section C – Objective type
5 out of 8
Total
15 x 2 = 30
10 x 6 = 60
02x 5 = 10
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code: HIS-331 – Post Colonial Asia 1945 to 2000
75Hrs
Course Description: Post 1990’s, the focus of World’s attention has turned towards Asia. The
balance of power has shifted from Euro-American territory to strengthened economies of SouthEast Asia. There is a change in practice of politics & economics in West & Central Asia.
Development, Political Structure, Cultural Identity are all issues that are being articulated from
regional perspective, thus contesting the western notions about them. Hence it becomes
imperative to engage with these issues from a historical background. This paper attempts to
(1) Understand Asia from a post colonial world.
(2) Trace the various binaries of positions & opinions in the process of constructing nations
& national identities.
Course Learning Outcome: The study of this course helps the student to trace the emergence of
Asia as an important player in international relations through oil politics and liberalized
economies.
Unit 1
Near East
22 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Empirical
a) China – Mao and the communist victory – China & the super powers – New initiatives–
Xinjiang & Tibet.
b) Japan- post war Japan- From 1960 to 2000
c) Neutralism & Realignments
Unit 2
South East, South & Central Asia
13 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Myanmar – Indonesia – The Indo–China Peninsula
b) Srilanka – Ethnic and nationalist conflicts
c) Afghanistan – Cold war and post cold war developments - Central Asia, Decolonization
& after
Unit 3
West Asia
21 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) Formation of Israel –Arab-Israeli frictions- The wars of Suez, Six days & Yom Kippur.
b) Destruction of Lebanon- Israel’s invasion – civil war – Camp David
c) Palestinian state & Israel’s dilemma
Unit 4
Arab World
19 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Basic
a) Oil & Nationalism – The shah & the ayatollah
b) Saddam Hussein – Kuwait & the Gulf war
c) The Arabian Peninsula – The Saudi Kingdom – The Southern Fringe – The Kurds
Self study Topics
1) Neutralism.
2) Realignments.
Essential reading
1. Peter Calvocoressi - World Politics 1945-2000, Person Education, 2006
2. Norman Lowe - Mastering Modern World History – Macmillam, 1997
Recommended Reading
1. Immannel C.Y Tsu -The rise of Modern China- OUP 1983
2. Ainslie T. Embree & Carol Gluck -Asia in Western & World History – Spring Books, 2004
3. Aylett.J F - The Cold War & After-Hodder & Stoughton, 1996
4. Mansfiled P - A History of the Middle East-Penguin, 1992
5. Lynch.M - China: From Empire to People’s Republic-Hodder & Stoughton, 1996
6. Albert Hourani, Philip Khoury & Mary C. Wilson (ed)- The Modern Middle East – I.B. Tauris
-2004
7. Harold Vinaike - A History of the Far East in Modern Times – Kalyani Publishers -1996
Examination and Assessment
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Activity/Presentation/Exhibition
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Literature Review
Attendance
Total
End Semester Exams
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Pattern of End Semester Exam Question paper
-
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Notes
Section C – Objective type
Total
2 out of 4
6 out of 8
5 out of 8
15 x 2 = 30
10 x 6 = 60
02x 5 = 10
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code: HIS 431 Research & Writing
75 Hrs
Course Description: Knowledge of how History is & has to be written is as important a
component as studying the discipline. Issues that are contested, problems of ideological
orientation as well as the structure in writing history are areas that are relevant for a better
understanding of the Discourse. As an extension this whole process translates well into
understanding ‘Writing’ as a creative & intellectual activity that requires a certain extent of
academic rigor for greater validation. This paper attempts to
1) Understand the primacy of research as a vital component of academic activity.
2) Explore the various nuances of writing as a thought & as an activity
Course Learning Outcome: This course trains the learner in the technique of data collection,
field study and in writing skills.
Unit 1
The Scope of History
23 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a) What is History? – Uses of History
b) History & National myth – Ideology, Sources & History
c) History & Sociology, Psychoanalysis, Literature
Unit 2
Historical Method
17 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Basic
a) Preliminary Operations – Research – Types, Requisites & Stages of Research
b) Sources – Written and Unwritten Sources, Categorisation of Sources
c) Historians & Sources – Using the Sources
Unit 3
Analytical Operations
19 Hrs
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Hermeneutics & Heuristics
b) Positive Interpretative Criticism
c) Negative Interpretative Criticism – Errors of Good faith & Errors of Accuracy
Unit 4
Synthetic Operations
Level of Knowledge: Empirical
a) Synthesizing – Negative Reasoning – Positive Reasoning
16 Hrs
b) Concluding operations – Framing the Questions
c) Exposition
Self Study Topics
a)History and Sociology, literature.
Essential Reading
1. Jeremy Black and Donald D Macraild - Studying History Macmillan – 2000
2. Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield - Making History: An Introduction to the history and
practices of a discipline- Routledge 2008
3. B. Sheik Ali - History its theory & method Macmillan 2000
Recommended Reading
1. E.H Carr - What is History? Macmillan 1983
2. R.G. Collingwood - The Idea of History – Oxford University Press
3. R.J. Evans - In defense of History – Granta 1997
4. P. Loewenberg - Psychohistory in M. Kammen (ed) The Past Before Us: Contemporary
Historical Writing in the United States – Cornell University Press – 1980
5. M.C. Lemon - Philosophy of History – (Chapter 12) Rutledge -2008
6. A. Tucker - Our Knowledge of the Past: A philosophy of Historiography (Chapter 3) –
Cambridge University Press, 2004
7. Mark Day - The Philosophy of History (Part 1 chapters 1,2 & 3) – Viva Continuum -2008
8. Alan Bullock & Stephen Trombley (ed) - The New Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought –
Harper Collins – 2000
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Analysis of Writings in the Media
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Literature Review
Attendance
Total
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
End Semester Exams
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Pattern of End Semester Exam Question paper
-
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Notes
Section C – Objective type
Total
2 out of 4
6 out of 8
5 out of 8
15 x 2 = 30
10 x 6 = 60
02x 5 = 10
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code HIS-531-Conceptual Approaches to Ancient and Medieval India
60 Hrs
Course Description: The post colonial emphasis on the study of ancient and medieval India has
been on interpretation and theorization of events. Several trajectories have emerged in the
articulation of issues, events and ideas of this period. The paper highlights some of these
approaches.
Course Learning Outcome: The student will be able to trace the process of transformation of
India from ancient past leading to the present. Origin of language based regions, financial
institutions, urbanization will enable the student to analyze the political, cultural and social
issues in contemporary India from a historical perspective.
Unit 1
Ancient Cultures
16 hours
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a)
Issues related to the writing of Indian History – Orientalism, Utilitarianism – William Jones
and James Mill.
b)
From agricultural communities to urban configurations – The Harappan State, Society and
Commerce – Decline.
c)
Vedic culture – Eastward movement, Mahajanapadas – Kingship and Paramountcy – Social
differentiation – Second Urbanization – Buddhism, Jainism and Women in the Heterodoxies.
Text : A History of India by Burton Stein.
Unit 2
Early Political Structures
16 hours
Level of Knowledge: Basic
a) The Greek intervention and its impact-The origins of early state - The Mauryan State and
Ashoka – From Mauryas to Guptas.
b) The Gupta classical pattern – State and Community – Social mobility – Merchant guilds
– Literature.
c) From Guptas to Harsha – Harsha, his neighbours and the Samantas – the question of
centralization.
Text : A History of India by Hermann Kulke and Dietmar Rothermund.
Unit 3
Regional Kingdoms, Gods, Temples and Poets
18 hours
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Regionalization – Peninsular kingdoms, the Chalukyas, Pallavas and the Cholas – the
Brahmins and ritual sovereignty of the king – the merchant guilds of south India.
b) Ideology and Authority – Community Autonomy and Institutions.
c) New systems of Indian Philosophy – Bhakti movement – Emergence of temple cities –
Divinity and territory – Quest for philosophical synthesis in Medieval India.
Text: For section a & b – Burton Stein : A History of India.
For Section c – Hermannkulke and Dietmar Rothermund A History of India
.
Unit 4
Textual Readings
10 hours.
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a) In the Neighborhood: Early Medieval Karnataka Velevali in Karnataka.
b) Landed magnets as State Agents – Kesavan Veluthat – The Early Medieval in South
India.
Essential Reading
1. Burton Stein (2003) A History of India, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
2. Hermann kulke and Dietmar Rothermund (2004), A History of India, Routledge, New
York.
3. Kesavan Veluthat (2010), The Early Medieval in South India, Oxford University Press,
New Delhi.
Extended Readings
1. Romila Thapar (2002), Early India from the origins to A.D 1300. Penguin Books, New
Delhi.
2. David Ludder (1999), The New Cambridge History of India IV. Cambridge University
Press, U.K.
3. Michael Gottlab (2003), Historical thinking in South Asia, Oxford University Press, U.K
4. Romila Thapar (2000);
a) Interpreting early India, Oxford University Press, U.K
b) Cultural Pasts, Essays in Early Indian History, Oxford University Press, U.K.
5. S.Settar (ed) (2000), We lived together, Pragati Publications, New Delhi.
6. Burton Stein (1980) Peasant State and Society in Medieval South India, Oxford
University Press, U.K.
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Mapping the sites of ancient cultures and states
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Literature Review
Attendance
Total
End Semester Exams
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Pattern of End Semester Exam Question paper
-
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Notes
Section C – Note on 4th Module
-
Total
2 out of 4
6 out of 8
1 out of 2
15 x 2 = 30
10 x 6 = 60
1 x 10 = 10
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code HIS-532-Indian Architectural Identities
60 hours
Course Description: The theorization of Indian architecture, in a post modernist approach is
deeply involved with understanding and analyzing space, defining Form, Structure and Identity
in relation to architectural traditions of ancient and early medieval India. This paper has
incorporated all these articulations in understanding art and architecture of ancient India
Course Learning Outcome: This course assists in critically evaluating, interpreting and
understanding spatial identities and structures as political and economic statements. It provides
the necessary theoretical support for a student to analyze the prevailing spatial demarcations as
gendered, politicized and impacted under caste, class considerations.
Unit 1
Precursors
15 hours
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a. Defining, Interpreting and Analyzing Space and its contours-Structures as SourcesAnthropomorphization- Early Indian Architecture-Gandhara, Mathura and Amaravati.
b. Paintings and Images.
c. Later Rock cut Architecture
Unit 2
Context and Concept
16 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a. Introduction- Centers of Power- Temple Body and Movement
b. Placing the Gods- Bhangas and Mudras- Absence of Vedic structure.
c. The Architect and unfolding traditions.
Unit 3
Designs and Readings
18 hours
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a. Plans and spaces- Geometry- Mouldings-Pillars-Finials: Varieties and categories-Nagara
structures of Orissa and Madhypradesh- Dravida Structures of Aihole, Pattadakal and
Kanchipuram.
b. Temples as political and social statements- issues of caste, class and gender-Rituals and
Ceremonies as sacred initiatives: A contested notion.
c. Minority Traditions, Ideal Beauty and Eroticism.
Unit 4
Extinct Images
11 hours.
Level of Knowledge: Empirical
a. Perceived Priorities- process of reconstructing vanished images.
b. Public Space- Fort, Port cities, Temple towns
c. Private space: Residential dwelling –Tribal and rural settlements: Social and Political
hierarchies.
Essential Readings
2. Adam Hardy (2007), The Temple Architecture of India, Wiley, England.
3. Partha Mitter (2001), Indian Art, Oxford University Press, U.K.
Recommended Reading.
2. Lawrence A. Babb, John.E.Cort, Michael.W.Meister (2008) Desert Temples: Sacred
Centers of Rajasthan in Historical, Art-Historical and Social Contexts, Rawat
Publications, Jaipur.
3. Tapati Guha- Thakurta (2004), Monuments, Objects, Histories, Institutions of Art in
Colonial and Post colonial India, Permanent Black, Ranikhet.
4. Christopher Tadgell, (2002), The History of Architecture in India: from the Dawn of
Civilization to the End of the Raj, Phaidon Press, New York.
5. Michael Meister and M.A Dhaky (ed) (1996) Encyclopaeadias of Indian Temple Vol I and II,
American Institute of Indian Studies, New Delhi.
6. Jose Pereira (1987), Elements of Indian Architecture, New Delhi.
7. J.C. Harle, (1986) Art and Architecture of the Indian Sub continent Pelican, England.
8. George Michell and Antonio Martinelli (1998), The Royal Palaces of India, Thames and
Hudson.
9. Narayani Gupta (ed) (1993) Crafts and Merchants –Essays in south Indian Urbanism,
Urban History Association of India.
Drawings of
1. Stupa, 2. Pillars 3. Base 4 Horizontal plan of a temple
5. Vertical plan of a temple 6. Karle Chaityagriha Basic Plan.
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Mapping/sketching the sites and structure
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Field Study based Project report
Attendance
Total
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
End Semester Exams
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Section A
Skill Component Drawing
and explanatory note
1 out of 2 = 1x20=20
Section B
Analytical component-Essays
2 out of 4 = 2 x15=30
Section C
Empirical component-Short notes
4 out of 8 = 4x10=40
Section D
Objective type
5 out of 8 = 5x2 = 10
Total
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code HIS 631 Post War Discourses
60 hours
Course Description : The two world wars and the radical ideologies transformed the entire
politico – social landscape of the world. The reverberations of this change was felt throughout
the world and dominated the histories of Afro-American and European continent in the post war
period. This paper aims to map out the various trajectories of the post war world.
Course Learning Outcome: This course imparts skills needed to critically evaluate the shifting
balance of power in international affairs.
Unit 1
Decolonization of Africa
16 hours
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) The end of European empires – Factors and Determinants – The British evacuation from
Africa – West Africa : Nigeria, East Africa : Kenya, Central Africa : Southern Rhodesia.
b) The French and the Maghrib – Tunisia, Morocco and Algeria – The end of Belgian,
Spanish and Portugese colonialism in Africa.
c) Africa and the world : 1) Libya 2) South Africa – Formation of the Union of South
Africa, Policy of Apartheid, its main features, Anti apartheid movement and its end,
Period of transition – Nelson Mandela.
Unit 2
Post War Europe
14 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Empirical
a) Western Europe – Recovery – Franco German Entente – Britain on the edge – European
Union.
b) Central and Eastern Europe – Stalin’s Empire – Khrushchev and Russia, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia and Poland – The communist disintegration in Russia.
c) Federated Yugoslavia – Dissolution – civil war.
Unit 3
North America
16 hours
Level of Knowledge: Empirical
a) USA – Poverty and Social Policies : Truman, Eisenhower, John F Kennedy and Nixon –
Racial Problems and civil rights – Response of the State – Campaign for equal rights.
b) Anti Communism and McCarthyism – Nixon and the Watergate scandal – USA from
1977 to 2000 – Ronald Reagan : 1) Problems in economy, Stock market crash 2) Foreign
policy, Libya, South Africa and Irangate scandal – Bill Clinton.
c) Canada – Internal politics in the post war period.
Unit 4
South America and Global Problem
14 hours.
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) South America in the 20th C, a general background – Brazil : Economy – Argentina :
post war politics – period of Peron – Falkland crisis.
b) Chile : Centre – left alliance and Salvador Allende
c) The developing world and the north south divide – world economy and its effects on the
environment.
Essential Readings
1. Peter Calvocoressi (2006), World politics 1945-2000 Pearson Education, New Delhi.
2. Norman Lowe (2008), Mastering Modern World History Macmillan, New Delhi.
Recommended Readings
1. Christopher Culpin (2000), Making History, Harpercollins.
2. Phili Zelikon and Condoleezza Rice (1997), Germany Unified and Europe Transformed,
A Study in State Craft, Harvard University Press, USA.
3. Neil Demario and Richard Radway (1997), Twentieth century 1900-1995 a world Transformed,
Hodder and Stoughton.
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Mapping/locating the event sites
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Analytical/Report writing/Exhibition
Attendance
Total
End Semester Exams
20 marks
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Section A – Analytical component –
2 out of 4 –
2 X 15 = 30
Section B – Empirical component –
6 out of 8 –
6 X 10 = 60
Section C – Objective type –
5 out of 8 –
2 X 5 = 10
Total
100
Detailed Course Description.
Course Code: HIS 632 – Historiography- Concepts, Schools and Debates
60 hours
Course Description: Knowledge of Historiography is vital for its components of technical and
theoretical representation of the philosophy of History.
Process of construction and
deconstruction of historical concepts act as a foundation for setting a critical link system within
and across the discipline. Apart from its intellectual strength, the field of Historiography is a tool
to critique set notions and understandings.
Course Learning Outcome: It sharpens the critical thinking ability and writing skills of the
student which is a required quality for being a successful professional in academic and other
areas too.
Unit 1
Concepts
15 hours
Level of Knowledge: Conceptual
a) Historiography - Time as a concept – Competing Histories – A priori/ a posteriori.
b) Form and content – Empiricism – Historicism- Modernism
c) Causation – Emplotment- Epistemology – Discourse
Text : Alan Munslow – The Routledge companion to Historical studies
Unit 2
Schools of History
16 Hours
Level of Knowledge: Analytical
a) Scientific Revolution and Cartesian Historiography- The new Science of history: Vico and
Anti- Cartesianism-Enlightenment Of 18th C and Edward Gibbon-Romanticism.
b) The Berlin Revolution : Niebuhr and Ranke- Positivism and Auguste Comte- Historical
Materialism and Karl Marx.
c) The Annales School : Lucien Febvre, Marc Bloch, Braudel and Ladurie- Deconsrutionist
History and Jacques Derrida- Cultural History – Gender and Womens History.
Text : Jeremy Black and Mac RaildDonald M- Studying History.
Unit 3
Debates
16 hours
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) What is History? What is History for? Theoretical Preliminaries- the Epistemological
status of History- The questions of by and for whom?
b) Structuralism and Michael Foucault – Post Modernism – Alan Munslow’s alternative
history and Keith Jenkins ‘own- sakism’
c) End of History ? Fukayama
Text L M.C. Lemon : Philosophy of History
Unit 4
Textual Readings
13 hours.
Level of Knowledge: Critical
a) Historians and Film by Peter Miskell in Making History: An introduction to the history
and practices of a discipline.
b) What History is ? in Rethinking History by Keith Jenkins
Self Study Topics
1. Historicism, Modernism
2. Cultural History.
Essential Readings
1. Alan Munslow (2000), The Routledge companion to Historical studies, Routledge,
London.
2. Lemon. M.C. (2003) Philoscophy of History, Routledge, London.
Recommended Readings
1. Keith Jenkins (1991) Rethinking History, Routledge, London.
2. Mark Day (2008) The Philosophy of History, Continuum International, New York.
3. R.G. Collingwood (1994) The Idea of History, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
4. Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield (Ed) (2006), Making History: An introduction to
the history and practices of a discipline, Routledge, London.
5. E. Sreedharan (2009), A textbook of Historiogrphy 500 BC to AD2000, Orient Blacks
wan, New Delhi.
6. Jeremy Blackand Macraild Donald,M, (2000) Studying History, Macmillan.
7. Alan Bullock and Stephen Trombley (ed) (2000), The New Fontana Dictionary of
Modern Thought, Harper Collins
Examination and Assessments:
Continuous Internal Assessment 100 marks
CIA 1 Critical /Analytical writing exercises
20 marks
CIA 2 Mid Semester Examinations
CIA 3 Analytical/Report writing
Attendance
Total
50 marks
20 marks
10 marks.
100 marks
End Semester Exams
100 marks
Question paper pattern for mid semester Examination.
Section A – Essay
Section B – Short Essay
Total
2 out of 4
2 out of 4
15x 2 = 30
10 x 2 = 20
50
Question paper pattern for end semester examination.
Section A – Analytical component –
2 out of 4 –
2 X 15 = 30
Section B – Empirical component –
6 out of 8 –
6 X 10 = 60
Section C –Note on the 4th Unit
1 out of 2 –
1 X 10 = 10
Total
100
Additional Elective in History.
Course Code-HIS 633
Credits- 04
Subject-Dissertation (Additional Elective)
Objectives- A paradigm shift in research specifically in History has been from an empirical
approach into that of theorization. The emphasis is to locate History with in a framework of
Concepts, Schools and Debates. To facilitate an understanding of these orientations for students
a four credit additional elective has been designed. This will be a Dissertation work by the
student under the guidance of a faculty of the department.
Modalities.
*Registration by the student at the end of the 4th semester. Topics to be decided tentatively.
*The Dissertation work begins from 5th semester with Literature Survey, Methodology, Field
Studies and Statistical Survey etc.
*Once a week meeting with the guide is mandatory which will be documented through a record
register duly signed by the student and the guide.
*The writing starts in 6th semester. The first, second and third drafts are CIA 1, CIA 2, and CIA 3
respectively of the 6th semester.
*Last draft to be submitted in the second week of February.
*Final submission and Viva one week before the last class day in March.
Process of Evaluation and Submission.
*Dissertation to be evaluated by one external (outside the department) and one internal (guide)
faculty.
*Average marks of the two evaluators will be the final marks.
*In case of a difference of more than 15 marks it is referred to moderation.
*Three hard copies (one each for the external, internal and the department). Two soft copies (one
each for the library and the department) to be submitted.
Beginning of the course.
After the approval by the Board of Studies and the Academic Council, this elective becomes
operational from June 2013 for the existing 4th semester batch.
Certificate Courses
01.Colonial Economy – a Historical Perspective :
Duration 45 Hours.
Unit 1
Understanding Theorizations – Colonialism, Imperialism, Mercantilism.
Unit 2
Institutionalization of Economic practices – Phases of Economic Colonialism – Drain of
Wealth Deindustrialization: Decline of Handicrafts Ruralization of Indian Economy.
Unit 3
Commercialization of Agriculture – Entry of British Finance Capital in India – Modern Industry
and colonial state policy.
Unit 4
Growth of Indian capitalist Enterprise Industrial
Capitalist class.
Development State Policy and India’s
Reading List :
1. Om Prakash - European commercial enterprise in pre-colonial India Cambridge
University Press 1998.
2. Manu Goswami - Producing India, from colonial economy to national space University
of Chicago Pres 2004.
3. Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal - Modern South Asia History, culture, political economy –
Routledge 2004
4. Thomas Metcalf Gardon Johnson(ed) - The new Cambridge history of India – Cambridge
University Press 2005
5. Majundar & Roy Chaudary - History & culture of Indian People; British paramount’s
and Indian Renaissance
6. Partha Sarathi Gupta - Power, politics and the people : Studies in British imperialism and
Indian Nationalism Permanent Black 2002
7. Thomas.R.Metcalf - New Cambridge History of India; Ideologies of the Raj – Foundation
Books, New Delhi 2005
8. Bipan Chandra - History of Modern India – Orient Longman 2009
9. Pruthi Rajkumar - History of Modern India – Mohit Publications 2005
02.Medieval India
Duration 45 Hours
Unit 1
Era and Influence
a) Time line – Background of the Period – 9th to 12th centuries C.E
b) Identities – Political environment in the subcontinent – Important dynasties.
c) Frictions – Wars and Diplomacy in the early years.
Unit 2
Military strategies
a) Campaigns of Alladin Khalji – Devagiri, Gujrat, Chittorgarh and Deccan.
b) Practice of Politics – Tughlaq’s initiatives.
c) Akbar , Rajputs and Revenue settlements.
Unit 3
Cultural Orientations
a) Paintings – Themes, Technique and Styles.
b) Structures – Styles , Important monuments.
c) Philosophies – Sufi and Bhakti movements.
03.Aesthetics of ancient Indian Art and Architecture
Duration 45 hours.
Unit 1.
Theorization on Art –Classical- Dilemmas arising out of comparison and contrast
Gendered and Spatial - Anthropomorphisation – Bhangas and Mudras
Unit 2
Architectural Identities - Art as Political Statement - Buddhist phase – Traditions of
Gandhara, Mathura and Amaravati – Chaitya Vihara and Stupa.
Devalayas – Technical and Interpretative Study – Pillars – Base –Walls – Towers
variety and styles – Politics of Patronage.
Unit 3
Extinct Images – Secular Art - Process of Retrieving the vanished images
Forts – Palaces – Temple Towns.
04.History and Cinema
45 hours
Unit 1
a) History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and
Historian
b) Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy
& Justification.
Unit 2
a) Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality –
Propaganda – selling History.
b) Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement
Unit 3
a) Between History and Cinema : The problem of linear narratives and flash back –
questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.
b) Cinema as a political, social and historical text.
45 Hours
05.History of Jewelry
Unit 1
a) Jewelry in Spatial & Visual Expressions
b) Representations in History
c) Guilds
13 Hrs
Unit 2
a) Mediums & Forms
b) Motifs & Cultural affiliations
c) Evolution
14 Hrs
Unit 3
a) Changed perceptions & priorities
b) Identities & regional variations
13 Hrs