Download Insect Pest Identification Workshop

Document related concepts

Myiasis wikipedia, lookup

Sarcophaga bullata wikipedia, lookup

Entomological evidence collection wikipedia, lookup

Home-stored product entomology wikipedia, lookup

Forensic entomology wikipedia, lookup

External morphology of Lepidoptera wikipedia, lookup

Insects in culture wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Insect Pest
Identification
Workshop
Farm Fair
5 December, 2013
Instructors
Mary Corp
Stuart Reitz
Silvia Rondon
Steve Van Vleet
Program
• Introduction to Insect Taxonomy and Basic
Morphology
• Pest and Beneficials Insects in Wheat
• Pest and beneficials Insects in Potato
• Summary
• Survey
Scouting or looking for pests
and beneficials
• Key to a successful pest control
program: regular monitoring
• Why ? Because:
• Presence/absence
• Whether the pests are parasitized or
diseased
• Whether pest infestation is decreasing or
not
• Have all what you need
• Information available
• Data sheet
Advantages
• Prevention of the problem
• Determine the exact cause of the
problem
• Identify and localize where the problem
occurs
• Determine the best economic control
• Evaluates the efficiency of the control
method
• What is sampling? technique of
selecting a suitable sample, or a
representative part of a
population
• How and where to sample?
Insect sampling tools
Yellow sticky trap
Insect nets
Record keeping
Basic identification
Animal
Kingdom,
Linnaeus
1758
Kingdom
Phylum
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Phylum
Phylum Arthropod
Class insecta
(insects)
Class crustacea
(lobster, crabs,
pill bugs)
Class chilopoda
(centipids)
Class diplopoda
(milipids)
Class arachnida
(spiders and
mites)
Parts of an insect: how insects
became so successful !
• Wings
• Legs
• Antenna
• Mouthparts
Head - mouthparts
•
•
•
•
•
Chewing
Sucking
Siphoning
Siphoning/sponging
Rasping
Thorax
Legs
Wings
Abdomen
Some important orders
• There are 32 insect orders, but we will
concentrate on just 8: Orthoptera, Odonata,
Hemiptera, Homoptera, Lepidoptera,
Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera.
• Ptera” means wing, so we define by the
wings for most insects
Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets)
• Straight wings is the
meaning
• The hind wings are
folded like a fan and
stored under the
forewings
• Gradual metamorphosis
• Grasshoppers, crickets,
katydids, walking sticks
• Mantids and cockroaches
used to be in this order,
but now each have their
own
Hemiptera (stinkbugs, plant bugs,
squash bugs)
• 2 pair of wings, the hind
pair like membrane, the
front pair partly
hardened
• All have a triangular
shield on their back
• Easily confused with
beetles
• Nymphs and adults
usually feed on the
same food
• All true bugs: stinkbug,
Lygus bug
Homoptera (scales, mealygus,
whiteflies, cicadas, leafhoppers)
• 2 pair of
membranous
wings
• Wings held in tent
over body when
resting
• Nymphs and adults
have the same diet
• Wings may be
missing
(aphid*, scale)
Coleoptera (beetles, weevils)
• The largest order by
number of species is
Coleoptera
• One in five living
animal species is a
beetle
• Underwings are
soft and do the
flying
• Overwings are
armored and
meet in a
straight line
down the back
• Chewing mouthparts
• Complete
metamorphosis
• Young are called larvae
or grubs
• Beetles and weevils
Diptera (flies, mosquitoes,
gnats, midges)
• The only insects with
just 2 wings
• The other pair are
gone or, halteres
• The eyes are very
prominent and faceted
• Flies, gnats,
mosquitoes
• Complete metamorphosis
• Young are larvae or maggots
Hymenoptera(bees, waps, ants,
sawflies)
• 2 pair of clear, thin,
membranous wings
• Have a stinger
and/or protruding
ovipositor
• Most are beneficial
•Complete
metamorphosis
•Young are larvae
•Wasps, hornets,
bees, ants,
sawflies
Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Moth
• 2 pair of often
showy wings,
covered with
small scales that
can easily be
rubbed off
• Moths usually fly
at night,
butterflies by day
Butterfly
PNW 2013 Online now !!!!
http://insects.ippc.ors
t.edu/pnw/insects?23
POTA01.dat
Silvia I. Rondon
Hermiston Ag. Res. & Ext. Center
2121 South First Street
Hermiston, OR 97838
Phone: (541) 567-8321
E-mail: [email protected]
http://oregonstate.edu/Dept/hermiston/
http://cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/entomology_lab/
http://oregonstate.edu/potatoes/ipm/index.htm
Disclaimer: Many pictures were taken from the world web for educational purposes only