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Lesson Sequence 1 for Tuesday 5th of May. Part of a lesson sequence which satisfies the teaching requirements for
EPR200.
Lessons will be taught to two year 7 classes to be evaluated after each lesson.
Timing of some of the lessons was an issue – sometimes I actually had a single lesson when I had planned for a double
and I learnt very quickly to be flexible. Some activities also provided very high levels of student engagement and were
worth continuing with for longer. As a result I taught these lessons in a sequence over a number of lessons and broke up
activities into smaller pieces. For example, 7A spent one double and one single 50 minute lesson on the “Introduction to
Ancient Egypt/Explore the Pyramids of Giza” lesson.
Learning Area: History
Year Level : 7
Class Size: 25
Timing: Double 50 minute lesson
Topic: Lesson 1: Introduction to Ancient Egypt
Curriculum Connections
Australian Curriculum Year 7
History
-
The physical features of ancient Egypt (such as the River Nile) and how they influenced the civilisation that
developed there (ACDSEH002)
The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient Egyptians, with a particular emphasis on ONE of the
following areas: everyday life, warfare, or death and funerary customs (ACDSEH033)
Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS206)
Intended
learning
outcomes
Assessment
Prep
(negotiation)
Procedure
To introduce the topic of Ancient Egypt as well as the importance of the Nile to ancient Egyptian
society in an engaging way.
Completed worksheets from the “Explore the Pyramids of Giza” activity which includes
responses to questions
 Student responses to class discussion
 Students’ newspaper contributions (which may be a work in progress)
 Negotiation with mentor teacher.
 Students can frame their own focus question this lesson during discussion of “What do we want
to know?” Class discussion also looks at prior learning.
 Students will have some ownership of the lesson by determining content by having some choice
over which part of the Ancient Egypt newspaper they will be doing.
Engagement: Students first engaged in shared reading task: reading class novel “Pharaoh” 15
minutes.
Students watch short 3 minute film clip “The Nile River – Educational Video” on YouTube.
Learning experiences: Students are going to organise themselves into pairs and they will need to
share a laptop between them. They are going to be doing the “Explore the Pyramids of Giza” using
Google Maps’ streetview function which can be found by googling “Pyramids of Giza Google”. The
teacher could also have the website up on the Smartboard to help guide students. Students will be
given some time to explore this website and the streetview “virtual reality” exploration tool where
they can walk around and explore the pyramids. Students will complete a worksheet as they go
through this activity (see attached). Ask students to reflect: What did they see? Do you think it looks
different now then what it might have looked in Ancient times? Put the satellite view on the board
and zoom out until the Nile is visible. Bring up a map of Ancient Egypt and point out where the
primary limestone quarry for the pyramids was (Tura, halfway between Cairo and Helwan). How
would the Egyptians have transported their limestone from the quarry to the building site at Giza?
Also ask students what else they can observe such as the red land (deshuret) and black land
(kemet) where the Nile flooded and made washed up fertile soil called silt. Also let students know
that this exploration is part of a series by Google. Google are working on creating a streetview virtual
reality space for the wonders of the world. There are some other ones they could explore at home

Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho
including Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat, the Coliseum, as well as Mount Everest and the grand canyon.
Variable time depending on student engagement.
Students have remainder of the lesson to complete unfinished geography mapping and history
research presentations.
Closure: 5 minutes before end of lesson have students leave their groups and rejoin the class. Ask
students if any of them found anything interesting today in Google Streetview that they would like to
share.
Resources
Questions
Evaluation
 Smartboard
 Class set of laptops and/or iPads with internet access
 Explore the Pyramids of Giza on Google Maps
 Worksheets to go with the Explore the Pyramids activity, including questions.
 Some text books on Ancient civilisations/Ancient Egypt
 Some examples of things they could put into their newspaper
Explore the Pyramids of Giza Questions found on the worksheet
Class brainstorming and discussion will open opportunities for questioning
Students have opportunities to answer their own questions through research for the newspaper task
 I can use the assessment information to improve student learning by looking at the work output
of students. The purpose of this lesson is to engage students in the new topic Ancient Egypt –
are students engaged and on task?
 Feedback and evaluation of lesson by mentor teacher.
 What do I need to build on next lesson?
 What students do I need to follow up on?
Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho
Learning Area: History and English
Year Level : 7
Class Size: 25
Timing: Double 50 minute lesson
Topic: Lesson 2: Create a newspaper
Curriculum Connections
Australian Curriculum Year 7
History
-
Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS206)
The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient Egyptians, with a particular emphasis on ONE of the
following areas: everyday life, warfare, or death and funerary customs (ACDSEH033)
English
-
Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, selecting aspects of subject matter and
particular language, visual, and audio features to convey information and ideas (ACELY1725)
Use a range of software, including word processing programs, to confidently create, edit and publish written and
multimodal texts(ACELY1728)
Intended
learning
outcomes
Assessment
Students explore Ancient Egypt concepts with some choices about content by creating a
hypothetical newspaper.
Prep
(negotiation)


Procedure


Newspaper contributions
Student participation in class discussion and response to questions
Negotiation with mentor teacher.
Negotiation with team teacher about “Call my bluff” game and using the learning space for “move
to the answer” activity.
Engagement: Students first engaged in shared reading task: reading class novel “Pharaoh” 15
minutes.
A game of “Call my Bluff”. The teacher writes the term “Inundation” on the board and explains the
rules to the students. The teacher is going to write three definitions on the board and the students
have to try and guess which one is the right answer. Delegate three walls or corners of the room for
each of the answers and have students move to the answer. 2 is the right answer.5 minutes
1. A great catastrophe or disaster.
2. Another name for when the Nile would flood the lands.
3. A funeral for a Pharaoh.
Learning experiences: The class will then have a whole class discussion/brainstorm. Write
“Ancient Egypt” in the middle of the board and ask students what they already know about Ancient
Egypt and fill in the mind map. THEN ask students what they would like to learn more about. If there
are any key questions students can write these in their books and find the answers in their own time.
20 minutes.
Students will then be given instructions for the next activity. Students will be putting together a
hypothetical youth magazine/newspaper set in the time of Ancient Egypt. Come up with a name for
the publication and specify the purpose and the audience (young people who lived in Ancient
Egypt?). Students will be given specific roles they will have to fill.
- Weather
- Puzzles and cartoons
- Front page
- cover article
- Classifieds/For Sale/Advertisements
Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho
-
Articles (give some ideas eg. A death of a pharaoh, a new pharaoh coming to power, a
religious event, a fashion editorial)
- Sport
- Horoscopes/star signs
- Celebrities, Fashion and Gossip
Students will be using class books, laptops, iPads and they may use their smartphones to research
for their role. Their sections and articles need to be based on fact and evidence, eg. Puzzles could
be Ancient Egyptian puzzles, or a small hieroglyph crossword etc. Students can have the remainder
of the lesson to work on this task, which needs to be finished by the end of the next lesson. Make
this explicitly clear to students.
Students may need time next lesson to complete this task.
Fast finishers can research and complete a second article for the newspaper.
Resources
Questions
Evaluation
Closure: 10 minutes before end of lesson have students pack up the room, leave their groups and
rejoin the class. Ask students if any of them found anything interesting today whilst doing their
newspapers that they would like to share with the class.
 Smartboard or whiteboard with markers
 Class set of laptops and/or iPads with internet access
 If possible, an example of an already completed hypothetical newspaper to show the students.
 Books on Ancient Egypt (there are a variety available in class)
The teacher should use questioning to collect feedback on student learning throughout the lesson.
Class brainstorming and discussion will open opportunities for questioning
Students have opportunities to answer their own questions through research for the newspaper task
 Feedback and evaluation of lesson by mentor teacher.
 What do I need to build on next lesson?
 What students do I need to follow up on?
 Do students have adequate time to complete all tasks? Is there too much/too little time? Does
the lesson provide and sustain engagement?
 Are students given sufficient explicit instruction to be able to complete the task with confidence?
Learning Area: History, Geography and English
Year Level : 7
Timing: Double 50 minute lesson
Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho
Class Size: 25
Topic: Lesson 3: The Nile in Ancient Egypt
Curriculum Connections
Australian Curriculum Year 7
History
-
The physical features of ancient Egypt (such as the River Nile) and how they influenced the civilisation that
developed there (ACDSEH002)
Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS206)
Geography
-
The ways that flows of water connect places as it moves through the environment and the way this affects
places (ACHGK038)
Apply geographical concepts to draw conclusions based on the analysis of the data and information
collected (ACHGS052)
English
-
Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, selecting aspects of subject matter and
particular language, visual, and audio features to convey information and ideas (ACELY1725)
Use a range of software, including word processing programs, to confidently create, edit and publish written and
multimodal texts(ACELY1728)
Intended
learning
outcomes
Assessment
Prep
(negotiation)
Procedure
Students understand the importance of The Nile for providing food and essential goods to the
Ancient Egyptians.
Completed tables and any research notes for “Should we Dam the Nile”? case study.
Student participation in some class discussion and response to questions, which there will be
opportunities for during the powerpoint.
 Damming persuasive writing/oral presentations
 Negotiation with mentor teacher.
 Preparation of table worksheets (pros/cons) for case study activity
 Negotiation with team teacher about “Call my bluff” game and using the learning space for “move
to the answer” activity.
Engagement: Students first engaged in shared reading task: reading class novel “Pharaoh” 15
minutes.


Bring up picture of cartoon of Egyptians working on the River Nile. Ask students the 5 W’s: Who,
What, When, Where, Why. 10 minutes.
Learning experiences: Teacher to present powerpoint presentation on Food and the Nile. Explain
key concepts in greater detail and encourage students to study the images and draw their own
conclusions. Have students get out their SOSE books and take note from the presentation as you
go. 30 minutes.
Organise the students into groups of 3-4 and have them sit a group at each table. Each group
should be handed a task sheet with instructions. Students are going to be completing a short case
study. Have students pretend that each group is the water management board for the River Nile.
They are going to be researching the impacts of damming rivers and will complete a table for “pros”
and “cons” of damming the Nile in ancient times and each group will need to make a decision
whether they would allow construction or not.
Remind students to think about the economic costs, archaeological risks and environmental impacts
when completing this task. Students choose a person in their group to be the speaker who will share
findings with the class by giving an informal oral presentation. 30-40 minutes.
English: students work individually to fill out persuasive maps using the information they gathered for
the case study. Students then use the map as a framework to write a persuasive text in their books.
Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho
Remind students about: Structure, introduction, 3 points/paragraphs, and a conclusion. Paragraph
should be 3-5 sentences, should explain the reason why/why not. Write this on the board for
students to refer to, and have students get out their English books and refer to the mind maps they
made with Mrs Furniss at the start of term. 40 minutes.
Students may spend the remainder of their lesson completing their newspaper tasks from the
previous lesson, or if still unfinished their history presentations and geography mapping.
Closure: The teacher might like to explain that actually the Egyptians did end up building a dam on
the River Nile – the Aswan Dam has been built three times because the first two times it overflowed
and failed and in 1946 they just built a second dam upstream. Because it was finally successful, for
the first time in history man could finally control the annual Nile flood. This was necessary because
the population had grown from 2 million to 16 million people in 70 years so a lot more people needed
to be fed. Unfortunately many important artefacts and large populations of people had to be moved
as a result of the dam. The flooding has also stopped, which means that no more silt is being
washed up onto the river banks. Environmental impacts of this include the increased use of
chemicals for farming, increase in algae levels and increases in erosion. Did students find some of
these pros and cons in their case study? 5 minutes.
Resources




Questions
Students will have opportunities to ask questions during the powerpoint. There are slides which ask
for student responses. The teacher should use questioning to collect feedback on student learning
throughout the lesson. The case study provides opportunities for questioning surrounding our own
water usage, sustainability, and the environmental impacts of human development.
 I can use the assessment information to improve student learning by assessing whether students
can understand and apply concepts such as the importance of water and the ways geographical
features such as the Nile impact societies.
 Feedback and evaluation of lesson by mentor teacher.
 What do I need to build on next lesson?
 What students do I need to follow up on?
 Do students have adequate time to complete all tasks? Is there too much/too little time? Does
the lesson provide and sustain engagement?
Evaluation
Smartboard
Class set of laptops and/or iPads with internet access
Table worksheets for case study
“The Nile and Food” powerpoint presentation resource
Adapted from Forthcoming John Wiley publication, 2010. © Sally Godinho