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Marking Period 1 (45 days)
10th Grade CP US History I
Time
Unit 1
1 day
Objectives
Materials
Assessment
6.1.12.B.1.a, *textbook
6.1.12.D.1.a *notebook
*maps
*YouTube clip:
“Bridging the
Bering Strait”
*PowerPoint
6.2.12.C.1.e *textbook
*notebook
*PowerPoint
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 1 quiz
6.2.12.D.1.a
*textbook
*notebook
* video:
Magnificent
Voyage of
Christopher
Columbus
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 1 quiz
Examine Spanish
colonization in
America to provide a
foundation for British
colonization
Discuss English
exploration and
identify Jamestown
6.2.12.C.1.e
*textbook
*notebook
*PowerPoint
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch.2 test
6.1.12.A.1.a
*textbook
*notebook
*PowerPoint
*video:
Nightmare in
Jamestown
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch.2 test
2 days
Identify the beliefs of
the Pilgrims and
examine the reasons
for their migration to
America
6.1.12.A.1.a, *textbook
6.1.12.A.1.b *notebook
*video: History
ChannelPilgrims
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch.2 test
3 days
Describe the kind of
society the Puritans
tried to establish in
America (include the
impact of the Salem
Witch Hysteria)
6.1.12.A.1.a, *textbook
6.1.12.A.1.b *notebook
* video: Salem
Witch Trials
*PowerPoint
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 2 test
2 days
2 days
Unit 2
1 day
2 day
Describe how Native
Americans migrated to
North America and
formed cultural areas
Standards
Review the causes and
development of the
European Age of
Discovery and identify
the achievements of
European explorers
Analyze the voyage of
Christopher Columbus
describe the results of
the Columbian
Exchange
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 1 quiz
Time
Unit 3
3 days
3 days
2 days
1 days
4 days
Unit 4
6 days
10 days
Objectives
Standards
Materials
Analyze the
development and many
facets of the Atlantic
Slave Trade during the
colonial period
6.1.12.C.1.b
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 3 test
Identify the 13
Colonies and state
founding dates,
purpose, and the people
who founded them
Examine the life of Ben 6.1.12.A.1.a
Franklin and identify
aspects of colonial
society
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*ch. 3 test
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*ch. 3 test
*textbook
*notebook
* YouTube clip:
Racism in
America
*clips from The
Amistad
6.1.12.A.1.a, *textbook
6.1.12.A.1.b *notebook
* worksheet
*PowerPoint
*textbook
*notebook
*video: History
Channel- Ben
Franklin
*worksheet
*textbook
*notebook
*PowerPoint
Identify the causes and
results of the French
and Indian War and
discuss its conclusion
(end ch.3)
Identify issues
regarding the French
and Indian War (social,
military, cultural)
6.1.12.D.1.a
Identify and discuss the
causes of the American
Revolution
6.1.12.A.2.a, *textbook
6.1.12.A.2.b *notebook
*media center
*research
materials
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.2.a, *textbook
6.1.12.A.2.b *notebook
*worksheet
*film: “The
Patriot”
Identify and discuss the
battles of the American
Revolution
6.1.12.D.1.a
* worksheet
*Film “The Last
of the Mohicans”
Assessment
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 3 test
*completed
worksheet
*teacher initiated
discussion
*teacher
observation
*oral presentations
*student produced
activities
*ch. 4a test
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*ch. 4b test
Time
Unit 5
Objectives
Marking Period 2 (45 days)
10th Grade CP US History I
Standards
Materials
Assessment
2 days
Analyze the Articles of
Confederation
6.1.8.A.3.b,
6.1.8.A.3.c
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
(cooperative)
2days
Discuss the Compromises
made at the Constitutional
Convention
6.1.8.A.3.b,
6.1.8.A.3.c
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
(cooperative)
4 days
Analyze and discuss aspects of 6.1.8.A.3.b,
the Constitution
6.1.8.A.3.g
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
(cooperative)
4 days
Discuss the Bill of Rights and
its present day implications
6.1.8.A.3.b,
6.1.8.A.3.g
*textbook
*notebook
*teacher observation
*notebook
*ch.5 test
Common Writing
Benchmark # 1
Unit 6
2 days
Identify the differences in
beliefs between the Federalists
and Democratic Republicans
and relate the First Party
System to ;modern political
parties
6.1.12.A.2.d,
6.1.12.A.2.f,
6.1.12.C.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*video:
Founding
Brothers
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
2 days
Discuss the beginning of the
government after the
ratification of the Constitution
and the presidency of George
Washington
6.1.12.A.2.d,
6.1.12.A.2.f,
6.1.12.C.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*video: George
Washington
(bio)
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
1 days
Explain why Congress passed
the Alien and Sedition Acts
6.1.12.A.2.d,
6.1.12.A.2.f,
6.1.12.C.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*paper, colored
pencils
*political
cartoons
*teacher observation
*notebook
*student generated
political cartoons
2 days
Describe the events leading to
the election of Thomas
Jefferson and determine why
the U.S. purchased Louisiana
from France
6.1.12.A.2.d,
6.1.12.A.2.f,
6.1.12.C.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*video: Lewis
and Clark
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
1 day
Explain the significance and
purpose of the Lewis and
Clark expedition
6.1.12.A.3.b
*textbook
*notebook
*video: National
Geographic
*teacher observation
*notebook
*ch. 6 test
Time
Unit 7
2 days
Objectives
Marking Period 3 (45 Days)
10th Grade CP US History I
Standard
Materials
Assessment
Discuss the causes
and outcomes of
the War of 1812
6.1.12.A.3.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
2 days
Evaluate Andrew
Jackson’s Indian
Policy and Bank
Policy
6.1.12.A.3.b
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
2 days
Discuss important
political
developments such
as the Adams-Onis
Treaty and the
Monroe Doctrine
Analyze the ways
in which the
Industrial
Revolution
changed the U.S,
particularly in the
area of cotton
production
Common Writing
Benchmark # 2
6.1.12.A.3.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*video: History
Channel Andrew
Jackson
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*ch. 7
2 days
6.1.12.A.3.b
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
Unit 8
4 days
2 days
2 days
6 days
Unit 9
4 days
4 days
2 days
2 days
Examine the rise
of Nativism during
the mid-19th
century
Discuss reasons
for Irish
immigration and
its effects on
America
Examine the
Second Great
Awakening and
the spread of
evangelical
Christianity
throughout the U.S
Analyze numerous
reform movements
including
temperance,
education,
literature, prisons,
abolition, and
womens’ rights
6.1.12.A.3.g,
6.1.12.D.3.b,
6.1.12.D.e
*worksheet
*movie: Gangs of
New York
*teacher
observation
*movie viewing
questions
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.3.g,
6.1.12.D.3.b,
6.1.12.D.e
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.3.f
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.3.f
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*ch. 8 test
Examine the role
that Mountain Men
played in western
expansion
Identify Manifest
Destiny and
analyze
the arguments of
the expansionists;
discuss the war for
Texan
Independence
Analyze the issues
and events that led
to the war between
the US and
Mexico; discuss
the results of the
war and its impact
Describe the
difficulties US
settlers faced on
the Oregon Trail;
discuss the impact
of the California
Gold Rush of 1849
6.1.12.D.3.a,
6.1.12.B.3.a
*worksheet
*movie: Jeremiah
Johnson
*teacher
observation
*viewing guide
6.1.12.A.3.a,
6.1.12.A.3.b
*textbook
*notebook
*full size US map
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
6.1.12.A.3.a,
6.1.12.A.3.b
*textbook
*notebook
*full size US map
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
6.1.12.C.3.b,
6.1.12.D.3.a
*textbook
*notebook
*full size US map
*video: America: The
Story of us
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*ch. 9 test
Unit 10
2 days
2 days
5 days
Identify and
6.1.12.D.3.c
discuss the
components of the
Compromise of
1850;
Discuss the
Fugitive Slave Act
Identify the Kansas- 6.1.12.A.4.a
Nebraska Act and
discuss the
formation of the
Republican Party.
*textbook
*notebook
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*textbook
*notebook
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*discussion
Identify the Dred
Scott Decision,
Uncle Tom’s
Cabin, and John
Brown; discuss
how all
contributed to the
outbreak of the
Civil War
*textbook
*notebook
*full size US map
*worksheet
(cooperative)
*video: America- the
story of us
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*ch. 10 test
6.1.12.A.4.a
Marking Period 4 (45 days)
10th Grade CP US History I
Standards
Materials
Assessment
Time
Unit 11
4 days
Objectives
Identify the 54th
Massachusetts
Regiment and how
they effected the
war
6.1.12.A.4.c, *Video: “Glory”
6.1.12.B.4.a *teacher generated
questions
3 days
Discuss the impact
of the election of
1860, the Fort
Sumter crisis, and
the First Battle of
Bull Run
6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
*full size US map
2 days
Identify strengths
and weaknesses for
both the Union and
the Confederacy
and discuss each
country’s war
strategy
Identify and discuss
important battles of
6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
*full size US map
*cooperative
activity
3 days
6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
*teacher
observation
*teacher
generated
discussion
*questions
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*ch.11 test
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*teacher
observation
the Civil War
*full size US map
*cooperative
activity
1 day
Identify the
Emancipation
Proclamation and
discuss its
significance
6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
*full size US map
*Video: Civil War
(PBS series)
1 day
Analyze the
contributions of
William Sherman
including the
capture of Atlanta
and the March to
the Sea.
6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
*video: Americastory of us
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
Unit 12
2 days
Identify Ulysses S. 6.1.12.A.4.c, *textbook
Grant and discuss
6.1.12.B.4.a *notebook
how his leadership
*full size US map
led to Union victory
*Video: Civil War
(PBS series)
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
2 days
Examine events
surrounding the
assassination of
Abraham Lincoln
and its effects on
the Reconstruction
Era
6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
6.1.12.D.4.c *worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
2 days
Compare and
contrast Lincoln’s
and Congress’s
views of
Reconstruction
2 days
Explain why
6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
6.1.12.D.4.c *full size US map
*worksheet
(cooperative)
*supplemental
materials
6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*worksheet
*teacher
Radical
Republicans and
President Johnson
had differing views
on Reconstruction
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
6.1.12.D.4.c *full size US map
*worksheet
(cooperative)
*supplemental
materials--Cartoons
6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
6.1.12.D.4.c *worksheet
2 days
Explain the
importance of the
13th, 14th and 15th
Amendments
2 days
Identify violence
faced by African
Americans during
Reconstruction and
the formation of the
KKK
2 days
Analyze the reasons 6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
that the
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
Reconstruction Era 6.1.12.D.4.c *full size US map
came to an end
*supplemental
materials
6.1.12.A.4.d, *textbook
6.1.12.B.4.b, *notebook
6.1.12.D.4.c *worksheet
observation
*notebook
*teacher
discussion
*worksheet
(cartoons)
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
discussion
*worksheet
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
generated
discussion
*teacher
observation
*notebook
*teacher
discussion
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Early Americans
Target Course/Grade Level: CP United States History I
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
During the Ice Age, nomads crossed a land bridge connecting Asia and North America. These
people arrived on the American continents thousands of years ago and developed flourishing
societies. These diverse and complex societies existed in different regions on North America
before European Explorers arrived in the early 1500s.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.B.1.a: Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other natural
resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.D.2.a: Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
Unit Essential Questions:
According to scientists and historians, how and when did the first migration to the Americas occur?
What kind of cultures developed in Central and South America?
What are the characteristics of the early cultures in North America?
How did regional differences among Native Americans shape their diverse cultures?
What Native American customs were shared among several groups?
How did trading networks link Native American societies?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Native Americans migrated to the Americas thousands of years ago and were able to develop
flourishing societies.
A variety of complex societies existed in different regions of North America before European
explorers arrived in the early 1500s.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, evaluate the following
information…
About 10,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, an ancient land bridge called Beringia was
exposed between Asia (Siberia) and North America (Alaska). This land bridge allowed for the
migration of peoples from Asia to North America.
Small groups of hunters traveled across the land bridge in order to follow their food.
As the climate changed and the Ice Age ended, the land bridge was submerged by water, and these
groups of hunter and gatherers had to move southward. In addition, the hunters had wiped out most
of the huge Ice Age animals. They had to move southward in order to find new food supplies.
The civilizations and cultures that developed in Central and South America were the Olmecs,
Mayas, Toltecs, Aztecs, and Incas.
The Olmecs were the first major Mesoamerican society that grew up around 1200 B.C.E. The
Olmec culture is known as the mother culture of Mesoamerica. The Olmec's religion, art,
agriculture, and social organizations influenced later peoples. As early farmers, they are known for
their slash and burn techniques. It is unknown why the the Olmec civilization declined.
The Mayas rose around 300 B.C.E. The Mayas culture reached its height between about 250 C.E.
and 900. The Mayas developed a writing system and a number system that used the concept of
zero. The Mayan civilization declined but it never disappeared and Mayan speaking people can be
found today in southern Mexico and Guatemala.
The Toltec civilzation came to dominate central Mexico around C.E. 900. They were known as
warriors, artisans, and builders.
The Aztecs came to power in the central valley of Mexico in the 1400s. They were a warlike
people. They built their capital city of Tenochtitlan on an island in a shallow lake. The Aztecs
conquered many of the neighboring people. Their decline came when Hernan Cortes found the
Aztecs.
The Incas rose to power in the Andes Mountains of South American. They too conquered their
neighbors. At its height, the Incas were the largest empire in the Americas. Their declined occurred
when conquistador, Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incan Empire.
Due to the diverse climate, geography, and resources, the Native American cultures were
influenced differently in each region.
Although each society existed in various regions, similarities can be found in their ideas and
customs. Families were organized into clans on a basis of kinship. Housing patterns and social
arrangements in many societies depended on the position of women. Social and political structures
also were similar. For instance, most clans or nations were headed by chiefs. Villages were usually
run by a council of elders with wisdom and experience. The Native Americans concept of land
ownership was similar. They believed land should not be bought or sold. It was to be used and
shared by the village or group for farming or hunting. Lastly, Native Americans shared similar
spiritual and religious ideas. For instance, spiritual connection to the natural world.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets, a teacher created test will be
provided on chapter One that includes the early Americans.
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures will be displayed in a common writing assessment
on the Columbian Exchange given in October.
3.
Quiz
Knowledge of specific Native American groups and cultural characteristics.
4.
Worksheet
Vocabulary Builder Worksheets for Sections one and two
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Short assignment comparing two Native American cultures: share answers
3. Cooperative Activity
Student discussion of specific Native American groups and cultural characteristics.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray white, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin: Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
Teacher handouts/worksheets
Clips from motion picture: Apocalypto
Notes from Power-Point Presentations
Native American: Fact or Fiction
Homework/Classwork
Native American Quizzo
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO
 Where is the unit headed?
 Hook the learner with engaging work.
 Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
 Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
 Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
 Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
 Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: European Settlement of America/Formation of the 13 Colonies
Target Course/Grade Level: United States History I, CP
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
Following Columbus's voyages, European nations, such as Spain, competed to establish colonies in
the Americas. Adventurers, traders, settlers, and religious leaders came looking for gold, or for
religious freedom. By 1733 the English had founded a diverse group of colonies along the Atlantic
Ocean seaboard. Their efforts, however, had disastrous consequences for Native Americans.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance
structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory government;
Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.
6.1.12.A.1.a,b:
Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other
natural resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.B.1.a:
Explain how economic ideas and the practices of mercantilism and capitalism
conflicted during this time period; Determine the extent to which natural resources, labor systems
(i.e., the use of indentured servants, African slaves, and immigrant labor), and entrepreneurship
contributed to economic development in the American colonies.
6.1.12.C.1.a,b:
6.1.12.D.2.a:
Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
6.2.12.D.1.a-c: Assess the political, social, and economic impact of the Columbian Exchange of
plants, animals, ideas, and pathogens on Europeans and Native Americans; Compare slavery
practices and other forms of coerced labor or social bondage common in East Africa, West Africa,
Southwest Asia, Europe, and the Americas; Analyze various motivations for the Atlantic slave
trade and the impact on Europeans, Africans, and Americans
Unit Essential Questions:
Which Spanish conquistadors explored North America, and what were they seeking?
How did Spain build an empire?
What other nations explored North America?
Why were the first English colonies established?
What helped the Jamestown colony survived?
How did Virginia grow and change during the 1600s?
Why did the Puritans flee England?
How did dissent among the Puritans threaten the New England colonies?
Analyze the difference between Puritans and Pilgrims.
What was life like in New England?
What brought about a new era of colonization in America?
Why were new southern colonies founded?
Why did Quakers settle in Pennsylvania?
Why was Maryland founded?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
In the 1500s and 1600s, European nations, led by Spain, continued to explore, claim territory, and
build settlements in America.
After several failed attempts, the English established a permanent settlement at Jamestown,
Virginia.
The Pilgrims escaped persecution and founded colonies in Massachusetts based on Puritan
religious ideals, while dissent led to the founding of other New England colonies.
Events in England during and after the English Civil War led to a new wave of colonization along
the Atlantic coast south of New England.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, apply, evaluate the following
information:
Later explorers from Spain, such as Juan Ponce de Leon, Hernan Cortes, and Francisco Pizarro
traveled to lands an ocean away for "God, gold, and glory." These men were able to build Spain an
empire by establishing colonial governments. The Spanish Crown set up viceroyalties. New Spain
consisted of the American Southwest, and present-day Mexico, along with Florida, Central
American, and part of Venezuela and some Caribbean islands.
Following the Spanish in exploration where England, France, and Netherlands. They too were
seeking the riches of the new world and in converting the natives.
The English were not successful in their first attempt of establishing a settlement. The colony of
Roanoke was lost and to this day it is unknown were the settlers disappeared to. The English were
not discouraged and finally succeeded in their attempt to get a permanent foothold in the Americas.
Many of the new settlers came for new economic opportunities while others came for religious and
political freedom. Despite their reasoning, the first English colony was established in Jamestown.
There were many difficulties that the colonists faced. The colonists were able to survive because of
the peace made by Pocahontas and the profitable crop of tobacco.
In the 1600s, a group of English Protestant wanted to reform the Church of England. These people
were known as the Puritans. Strict Puritans known as Separatists wanted total separation from the
Church of England which caused them to be persecuted. Both the Separatists and the Puritans
decided to journey to America in order to find religious freedom.
The Puritans and the Separatists both left for religious freedom which they believed they could find
in America. While the Puritans claimed to be religiously tolerant those who went against the
society's rules were seen as dissenters. Thomas Hooker and his congregation left the colony
because they did not agree with Winthrop's government. He founded Connecticut. Roger Williams
clashed with authorities in Boston. He believed that the church and government should be separate.
He founded Rhode Island. The last dissenter, Anne Hutchinson, angered the Puritan community by
taking it upon herself to interpret the minister's sermons and she believed you did not need a
minister's teaching in order to be spiritual. She also migrated to Rhode Island.
In 1692, the Puritan society would see a series of bizarre events. It started in Salem Village.
Several girls were exhibiting strange behavior. They claimed to have been bewitched. The girls
accused several women of witchcraft. This led to the arrest of hundreds of people in the colony.
Nineteen people were executed and others died in jail. The witch scare quickly passed and those
still in jail were released.
The first public schools appeared in the Puritan colonies. Children learned reading, writing, and
arithmetic. Most of the Puritan societies were royal colonies under the direct control of the king of
England.
The English Civil war brought a new wave of colonization. This time, they targeted the middle and
southern parts of the Atlantic Coast of North America. King Charles II, in order to colonize North
America, gave large land grants to his friends and supporters. The Quakers led by William Penn,
founded Philadelphia in order to create a religiously tolerant colony.
George Calvert set up a colony in Maryland in order to allow Catholics religious tolerance. He died
before gaining the land grant but his son, Cecilius Calvert, also known as Lord Baltimore, received
the rights.
Mercantilism stated that a nation’s power was directly related to its wealth. The American colonies
were very profitable to England. The colonists supplied raw materials and could buy English
goods.
In the North, the colonial economy consisted of farming, natural resources, colonial industries, and
trade and commerce. The Southern economy consisted mostly of farming. The weather was
suitable to growing cotton, tobacco, rice and indigo. A plantation system would emerge in the
South that would use slave labor.
By the 1600s, Portugal, Spain, France, Holland, and England were involved in the trans-Atlantic
slave trade. Most captured Africans were taken to colonies in the Caribbean and South America.
They were then brought to North America. Since the South relied on slave labor, the number of
slaves in the south was very large.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets and written homework, a teacher created
test will be provided on chapter two, including information on specific explorers/founders and
reasons for founding the 13 English Colonies
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures/European Exploration will be displayed in a common
writing assessment on the Columbian Exchange given in October.
3. Quiz
Knowledge of specific explorers/founders and reasons for founding the 13 English Colonies
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Short assignment: Factors that would force you to move to a new location
3. Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: Compare English and Spanish colonization
4. Cooperative Activity
Student discussion of founders/reasons for founding 13 English Colonies;
Extra credit: 13 Colonies quizzo
5. Written Homework: chapter 2 section assessments
6. Primary Source Readings: Mayflower Compact, Puritan Education (old Deluder Satan Law)
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Written reflection on the impact of the Salem Witch Hysteria
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray, White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
PowerPoint presentations
Teacher handouts/worksheets
History Channel Video: Salem Witch Hysteria
13 Colonies quizzo
Homework/Classwork—notebook chart
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Life In Colonial America
Target Course/Grade Level: CP United States History I
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
For more than 100 years, England's colonies in America grew steadily. Over time, the colonies
developed their own economies, political systems, traditions of local government, and sense of
self-reliance. Colonists maintained economic, political, and personal ties with Great Britain. But as
time wore on, serious strains between the colonists and Britain began to appear.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance
structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory government;
Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.
6.1.12.A.1.a,b:
Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other
natural resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.B.1.a:
Explain how economic ideas and the practices of mercantilism and capitalism
conflicted during this time period; Determine the extent to which natural resources, labor systems
(i.e., the use of indentured servants, African slaves, and immigrant labor), and entrepreneurship
contributed to economic development in the American colonies.
6.1.12.C.1.a,b:
Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
Unit Essential Questions:
6.1.12.D.2.a:
What is mercantilism?
How did the Glorious Revolution and the English Bill of Rights affect political developments in
the colonies?
How did government in the colonies change under the policy of salutary neglect?
What were the characteristics of northern colonial economies?
what were the characteristics of southern colonial economies?
What was the impact of slavery in the colonies?
What impact did the Enlightenment have in the colonies?
What effects did the achievements of Ben Franklin have on colonial society?
How was the Great Awakening significant?
How did the colonies become more diverse in the 1700s?
What was life like in colonial America?
How did France develop an empire in North America?
Why did Spain and England clash in North America?
What were major events in the French and Indian war?
What were the effects of the French and Indian War on all those involved?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
British mercantilist policies and political issues helped shape the development of the American
colonies.
A commerce-based economy developed in the northern colonies, while the southern colonies
developed an agricultural economy.
Enlightenment ideas and the Great Awakening brought new ways of thinking to the colonists, and
a unique American culture developed.
The French and Indian War established British dominance in North America but put a strain on the
relationship with the colonists.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, apply, evaluate the following
information:
The economic policy of mercantilism held that a nation's power was directly related to its wealth.
The American colonies were valuable to England because the colonists could supply raw materials
and could buy English goods. It encouraged a favorable balance of trade. Examples of mercantilist
policies include the Navigation Acts.
The Glorious Revolution restored monarchy to England. To reward their supporters, William and
Mary issued land grants which in turn became colonies in North America. The Glorious
Revolution had shifted considerable power to Parliament. Parliament dealt with issues mainly in
England. This led the appointment of colonial governors that handled most of the affairs in the
colonies. Many English officials were involved but they did not rule the colonies very strictly. This
situation was later termed Salutary neglect. In other words the colonies benefitted from being
alone.
In the northern colonies, farming, fishing, lumber, shipbuilding, whaling, and trade dominated
economic activity. Farming in New England was difficult due to thin and rocky soil and long
winters. Further south, in the middle colonies, there was better land and milder climate. Farmers
here could grow enough wheat to export to other colonies and abroad. Major cities such as Boston,
New York, and Philadelphia were hubs for trade and economic activity. The trade routes that
linked the Americas, Europe, Africa, and the West Indies are often described as the triangular
trade. In that triangle, ships carried rum from New England to Africa to trade for enslaved
Africans. Traders shipped the Africans to plantations in the West Indies and traded them for sugar
and molasses. Finally, traders shipped the sugar and molasses back to New England to be made
into rum. The horrific journey the enslaved Africans made across the Atlantic was known as the
Middle Passage.
Products from the southern colonies were very important in colonial trade. The region's economy
was based on agriculture. The southern colonies produced valuable cash crops such as tobacco.
Due to the south's reliance on agriculture, slavery became essential to the southern economy. The
number of Africans in the English colonies grew quickly during the 1700s because of births as well
as the slave trade. by 1760, the African population was about 250,000 - 10 times greater than it had
been in 1700.
In the late 1600s, new ways of thinking changed about government and human rights. These new
ways of thinking gave rise to a European movement called the Enlightenment. Because the
Enlightenment emphasized a search for knowledge, the period is also known as the Age of Reason.
These ideas began in the educated upper classes of Europe but soon spread to America. John Locke
in particular was widely read in the American colonies. His ideas influenced Thomas Jefferson and
Benjamin Franklin, among others.
At this time, a religious revival known as the Great Awakening changed religious attitudes in
America. The Great Awakening led to an increase in church membership in the 1700s. It also
resulted in the growth of new Protestant denominations in America.
As time progressed, the colonies became more diverse due to immigration. Groups such as the
Dutch, Scots-Irish, Germans, French Huguenots, and Jews settled in America.
Colonial cities were lively exciting places with libraries, bookshops, and impressive public
buildings. People in colonial America worked hard but had time to play too. Social events in the
colonies also included getting together with neighbors to dance or listen to music. As for colonial
communications, printers in the colonies were also publishers. They printed and distributed
newspapers, books, advertisements, and political announcements.
The French began to settle permanently in North America around the early 1600s. They began
lucrative fur trading posts. Instead of creating towns along the coast, they moved into the interior
of North America. Once there, they formed alliances with the Native American populations
residing there. They learned the natives' languages and married their women. France built outposts
from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi Valley by the early 1700s.
Spain and England clashed during the French and Indian War due to the fact that both wanted the
territory of known as La Florida. Spain controlled the territory but as English colonies spread
southward, they threatened the Spanish missions and settlements. During the war, Spain joined the
war on the side of France, which would prove costly for them in the end.
With the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763, Great Britain received all French lands east of the
Mississippi River which included most of Canada. They also gained Florida from Spain. Although
Spain lost the war along with France, Spain acquired the Louisiana Territory from them. France
was able to keep two islands near Canada and regained some Caribbean Islands. For the colonists,
the war would prove to be a burden. The British expected the colonists to pay for most of the war
debts accumulated during the war.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets, a teacher created test will be provided on
chapter three, including information on life in Colonial America
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures in America will be displayed in a common writing
assessment on the Columbian Exchange given in October.
3. Quiz
Knowledge of aspects of Colonial Life/Colonial Economy
4. Writing Prompt/5 Paragraph Persuasive Essay
Students will write a 5 Paragraph Persuasive Essay after viewing the film, The Last of the
Mohicans
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Short assignment: Do Now Activity: Put events in chronological order - Chapter 3 Section 2
3. Cooperative Activity
Student discussion of the wisdom of Benjamin Franklin/Poor Richard’s Almanac
4. Written Homework: chapter 3 section assessments
5. Collins Type Two Writing Assignment:
List two ways the Enlightenment influenced political thinking in the 13 Colonies
6. Worksheets/Primary Source:
Biography of Olaudah Equiano
History and Geography: Population of the Colonies
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray, White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
PowerPoint presentations
Teacher handouts/worksheets
DVD: The Last of the Mohicans
Homework/Classwork
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: American Revolution
Target Course/Grade Level: CP
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
Great Britain began to increase taxes on the American colonists in order to help pay for the
French and Indian War. The colonists protested these taxes because they felt they were not
represented in Parliament. Small rebellions, mostly in the form of boycotts, led to tighter
controls, which triggered all-out war. A series of increasingly restrictive laws angered many
American colonists, leading to rebellion against Britain. As a revolutionary ideology grew and
conflicts with Britain continued, the Second Constitutional Congress declared American
Independence. While the colonies and the British began with difference strengths and
weaknesses, the Revolutionary War demonstrated Washington's great leadership.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.2.a
6.1.12.C.2.a
8.1.12.C.1
9.1.12.C.3
6.1.12.D.2.a
Unit Essential Questions:
Why did Great Britain pass new laws in America?
How did the colonists respond to the new laws?
How did the colonists’ response lead to even stricter measures?
Why did the First Constitutional Congress meet?
What was the significance of the Battles at Lexington and Concord?
What actions did the Second continental Congress take?
How did violence in Boston push the colonies closer to revolution?
What revolutionary ideology lay behind the writing of the Declaration of Independence?
How did colonist's reactions to the Declaration of Independence differ?
What groups of people played a part in the Revolutionary War?
What major revolutionary battles took place in the North?
In what ways was the Battle of Saratoga a British setback?
How did Washington's leadership at Valley Forge influence the course of the Revolutionary
War?
Why did France and other European nations assist the Americans?
What led to the British surrender at Yorktown?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
A series of increasingly restrictive laws angered many American colonists, leading to rebellion
against Great Britain.
As revolutionary ideology grew and conflicts with Britain continued, the Second Continental
Congress declared American independence.
While the colonies and the British began with different strengths and weaknesses, the
Revolutionary War demonstrated Washington's great leadership.
A strengthened Continental Army, along with European allies, helped the colonists achieve
victory at Yorktown.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
After the French and Indian War, Great Britain needed a way to pay off war debts. Since they
had protected the colonists from the French, the British felt that the colonists should help pay for
some of the war. The British created acts and laws in order to raise revenue.
The Colonists were very angry over the new taxes. They believed that the colonists should
not have to pay taxes if they were not represented in parliament. The colonists protested many of
the new laws. When the Stamp Act was issued, the colonists formed the Stamp Act Congress to
protest it. The Sons of liberty were created to organize the protests. In response, the British
created more strict laws and sent more troops to North America.
In response, the British created more strict laws and sent more troops to North America.
The First Constitutional Congress met in Philadelphia in September 1774. The 13 colonies came
together in order to effectively handle the new laws that the British were imposing on them.
The battles of Lexington and Concord (The Shot heard around the world) started the
Revolutionary war.
The Second Continental Congress formed the Continental Army and appointed George
Washington commander in chief. They issued a Continental currency. They wrote A Declaration
of the Causes and Necessity of Taking up Arms and finally, proposed reconciliation with King
George III in the Olive Branch Petition.
The violence that erupted in Boston led to the first major battle of the Revolutionary War, the
Battle of Bunker Hill.
The colonists believed they were entitled to all the rights that British citizens had claimed over
the years. The idea of natural rights was part of their revolutionary ideology. According to John
Locke, the present British government was failing to protect the rights and liberties of its citizens
in America. That would justify a rebellion against it.
How did colonist's reactions to the Declaration of Independence differ?
Not everyone was convinced that America needed to be independent. Many colonists still hoped
for a compromise that would let the colonies remain part of Great Britain. Some colonists
remained loyal to the British. They became known as the Loyalists. The Declaration of
Independence forced the colonists to choose sides.
There were many groups that participated in the Revolutionary war. Not only were the white
male colonists involved in the fight but also women, African Americans, and Native Americans.
The major revolutionary battles that took place in the North were the battle of Saratoga and
Valley Forge. The battle of Saratoga was a setback for the British because the American victory
encouraged the colonists and surprised the British and Europeans. The battle of Saratoga
convinced the French to support the American cause. At Valley Forge, Washington faced a harsh
winter, no supplies, and insufficient food. Despite all the obstacles, the men survived the winter
and this gave them hope.
Americans wanted recognition as a sovereign nation from Europe. Europeans nations could also
provide the Americans with money and supplies to fight the war. France became America's
strongest ally but help also came from Spain and the Netherlands. France joined forces with the
Americans because they were a long time enemy of Great Britain. France also hoped that a
British defeat in America would help restore French power in Europe.
The war finally ended with the Battle of Yorktown. The British were surrounded by the
Americans and the French. They could not escape by land or sea. The Battle of Yorktown last 3
weeks. Cornwallis had little choice but to surrender. He did so on October 19, 1781. The
colonists were now free of British rule.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
After completion of instruction of the topic of American Revolution, students will take a test
which will assess their knowledge on Chapter 4.
Students will be quizzed on the causes of the American Revolution
Formative Assessments:
Open ended questions/ Summary on Video Clips from the American Revolution Box Set:
History Channel
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
Collins Type One Writing Assignment:
Using single words, write down how you would feel if the school cafeteria raised their prices by
one dollar overnight.
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment:
Write down at least three advantages the colonists had in fighting the Revolutionary war.
Write down at least three advantages the British had in fighting the Revolutionary war.
Collins Type Three Writing Assignment
Students will evaluate whether the British lost the Revolutionary War or did the Americans win
it. (One page rough draft; students will edit each other's work)
Primary Source Visual
Compare two varying interpretations of the Boston Massacre
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
EBoard PowerPoint Presentation
Teacher Made Test
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Quiz
American Revolution Quizzo
Open ended questions/Summary (American Revolution Box Set)
Primary Source Visual (Boston Massacre)
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Creating of a National Government / the Constitution
Target Course/Grade Level: CP
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In order to carry on the war and build a new nation, Americans had to create a framework of
government, but their first attempt of government had many weaknesses. The Articles of
Confederation under which the thirteen colonies had united to win independence, proved
insufficient to govern the new nation. The Constitutional Convention tried to write a document
that would address the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and make compromises
between large and small states and between the North and the South. Federalists and Antifederalists struggled over the principles of the new constitution. But the promise of a Bill of
rights brought about ratification. Delegates from 12 states met at the Constitutional Convention
in Philadelphia and fashioned a newer, stronger form of government, which has endured for
more than 200 years.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.2.c
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.e
6.1.12.A.2.f
8.1.12.C.1
9.1.12.C.3
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the key aspects of the new American republic?
What was the structure of the new national government?
What problems did the Confederation face?
What did the government accomplish in the Northwest Territory?
What different points of view emerged at the Constitutional Convention?
What compromises did the delegates make at the Constitutional Convention?
How does a system of checks and balances prevent any one branch of the federal government
from becoming too powerful?
What arguments for and against the Constitution were put forth by Federalists and Antifederalists?
Why was adding a Bill of Rights significant in the ratification process?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
In order to carry on the war and build a new nation, Americans had to create a framework of
government, but their first attempt of government had many weaknesses.
The Articles of Confederation under which the thirteen colonies had united to win independence,
proved insufficient to govern the new nation.
The Constitutional Convention tried to write a document that would address the weaknesses of
the Articles of Confederation and make compromises between large and small states and
between the North and the South.
Federalists and Anti-federalists struggled over the principles of the new constitution.
The promise of a Bill of rights brought about ratification.
Delegates from 12 states met at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia and fashioned a
newer, stronger form of government, which has endured for more than 200 years.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
After fighting the Revolutionary war, the Americans did not want another monarchy. The idea of
republicanism was that hard-working, property-owning citizens would be active in government.
The first government that the Americans set up after the revolutionary war was the Articles of
Confederation. Under the Articles of Confederation, the central government had only one branch
of government, which was the legislative branch. There were no judicial or executive branches.
Each state also had only one vote in Congress, regardless of population. The Articles could
establish national policies and conduct foreign relations, including relations with Native
American nations. Congress could borrow and coin money, and set up post offices. It also has
the power to establish an army and declare war.
The Articles were far from perfect. Americans experienced many problems under the Articles.
Congress faced financial problems and problems with the states and foreign nations.
The Northwest Ordinance divided the territory in 10 districts. It made land available for the
settlement, extended civil rights and enforced education. Slavery was not allowed in the territory.
Also they were allowed to have religious freedom. It also outlined a process to becoming a state.
Once it was obvious the Articles were not working, the delegates from each state met at the
constitutional convention. At the Constitutional Convention, the Virginia Plan and the New
Jersey plans were combined to from the Great Compromise. In the Great Compromise, a
bicameral legislature was set up, in the lower house, the number of representatives for each state
was to be determined by population, and in the upper house, each state has an equal number of
representatives.
At the Constitutional Convention, the Great Compromise and the Three-Fifths compromise were
made.
The checks and balances among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government
that were added to the Constitution provided that each branch with power to slow or stop an
action taken by one of the other branches. These checks and balances ensured that no one branch
of the government would dominate the others.
Throughout the process of creating the Constitution, Federalists were in support of the
Constitution and the Anti-Federalists were against ratification of the constitution. The Federalists
believed a strong national government was necessary for the survival of the republic. They
wanted government to end chaos and be a check on the kind of mob rule seen during Shays’
Rebellion. At the same time, they pointed out that the separation of powers in the Constitution
put limits on government power. The Anti-federalists argued that a republic could not succeed in
a nation as large as the United States. They also criticized specific features such as the role of the
president, the number of congressional representatives, and the length of senatorial terms.
Anti-federalists demanded the addition of a Bill of Rights. Because they did not trust
government, the wanted to spell out some basic rights in the Constitution to make sure those
rights would be protected. Adding a Bill of Rights became the main focus of the struggle over
ratification.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher Made Test
After completion of instruction of the topic of the Constitution, students will take a test which
will assess their knowledge on Chapter 5.
Title: Quiz
Checks and Balances quiz
Title: Common Writing Assessment
Five Paragraph Essay: Bill of Rights
Title: Project
Bill of Rights Project: Poster or Video
Formative Assessments:
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
Title: Constitution Scavenger Hunt
Students will look for answers throughout the Constitution.
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Create a list of problems faced by our modern government
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Describe at least two weaknesses associated with the Articles of Confederation.
Title: Collins Type Three Writing Assignment
One page rough draft: Which right in the Bill of Rights is most important to you and why?
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Teacher made test
Quiz
Collins Type One - Three Writing Assignment
Constitution Scavenger Hunt
Constitution Quizzo
Primary Source Analysis
Common Writing Assessment
Cooperative Activities
Video Clips
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: College Prep United States History I
Unit Title: Early Republic/ War of 1812
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In the last decade of the 1700s, debates over the size and role of the federal government led to the
emergence of rival political parties, the Federalists and the Democratic Republicans. George
Washington and the First Congress struggled to organize a new government and John Adams dealt
with threats from abroad. Thomas Jefferson's election as president in 1800 led to the eventual
demise of the Federalists. Jefferson also expanded the size of the country with the Louisiana
Purchase. In the administration of James Madison, a military conflict with Great Britain erupted
known as the War of 1812. This war finally solidified our status as an independent country.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.b: Determine the extent to which America’s foreign policy (i.e., Tripoli pirates, the
Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, the War with Mexico, and Native
American removal) was influenced by perceived national interest.
6.1.12.A.3.c: Assess the role of geopolitics in the development of American foreign relations
during this period.
Unit Essential Questions:
What steps did Congress and the president take to organize the new government?
What was Alexander Hamilton's plan to settle the nation's debt?
What was the debate over the national bank?
How did the first political parties form?
Why did Washington want to remain neutral in response to events in Europe?
What conflicts took place in the Northwest Territory?
What challenges did John Adams face as president, and what was the XYZ Affair?
Why was the transfer of power in the election of 1800 significant?
What changes did Jefferson make when he took office?
What was the impact of the Louisiana Purchase?
How did the role of the Supreme Court change?
What violations of American neutrality led to the War of 1812?
How did Tecumseh resist American settlers?
How did the War of 1812 begin? How did the war affect the new nation?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
President Washington and other leaders tired to solve the new nation's economic problems. This
led to the rise of political parties.
The United States faced many challenges during the 1790s. It tried to remain neutral in European
wars while dealing with conflicts with Native Americans in the Northwest Territory.
The rise of political parties influenced the election of 1800, bringing Thomas Jefferson and a new
outlook to the presidency.
In the early 1800s, Americans unified to face Great Britain in war once again and to battle
resistance from Native Americans over attempts to seize their lands.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
George Washington and Congress took steps to organize the newly created American government.
One of his first actions was the creation of a presidential cabinet. Alexander Hamilton took control
of the nation's finance and organized a plan to settle the national debt. Another aspect of
Hamilton's financial plan was the creation of the National Bank. Republicans, led by Thomas
Jefferson, opposed the bank based on strict constructionist view of the Constitution. At this time,
the first American political parties formed. The Federalists were led by Hamilton and called for a
strong national government. The Democratic-Republicans were led by Jefferson and called for a
weak national government.
During the Washington presidency, France and Britain went to war. Washington chose a policy of
neutrality in order to focus on domestic problems and ensure future prosperity. Violent conflicts
erupted between settlers and Native Americans in the Northwest Territory. These problems did not
end for the next president, John Adams, who dealt with the XYZ affair. As a response, Adams
retaliated with legislation known as the Alien and Sedition Acts.
The election of 1800 marked a change in the politics in America. Jefferson, a Republican, assumed
the presidency after two federalist administrations. Jefferson decreased the size of the national
government and lowered taxes. The most important event of Jefferson's presidency was the
Louisiana Purchase, which virtually doubled the size of the country. Additionally, the supreme
court took a more prominent role, establishing the power of Judicial Review in the landmark case,
Marbury v. Madison.
A military conflict with Great Britain emerged during the presidency of James Madison. The war
of 1812 was caused by a controversial practice called impressment. Another cause of the conflict
was Britain's alliances with Native Americans in the Northwest Territory. The war lasted three
years until the Treaty of Ghent was signed. Effects of the conflict on the U.S. included an
outpouring of national pride, an increased level of respect from nations abroad, and a decrease in
Native American resistance.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Teacher made test
Once instruction is completed on the early Republic/War of 1812, students will be tested on
Chapter 6.
Formative Assessments:
Collins Type One Writing Assignment
In five lines or more, write down ideas on why a strong economy is important for the United
States.
Map Activity
Louisiana Purchase: Expanding of the United States
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Students will view the video "Journey of Lewis and Clark"
Summarize the journey of Lewis and Clark based on the video
Worksheets
Vocabulary Builder: Chapter 6
Graphic Organizer: XYZ Affair
Guided Notes: War of 1812
Primary Source Readings
George Washington's First Inaugural Speech
George Washington's Farewell Address
Collins Type Three Writing Assignment
Write a letter to your representative in the House either supporting or opposing anti-terror
legislation that infringes upon peoples' right to privacy. (Patriot Act)
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem.
Sutin: Hart, Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Worksheets
Video "The Founding Brothers"
Video "The Journey of Lewis and Clark"
Video "War of 1812: History Channel"
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
Eboard (Powerpoint presentation)
Teacher made test - Chapter 6
Videos "Founding Brothers", "The Journey of Lewis and Clark", and "The War of 1812: History
Channel"
Collins Type One-Three Writing Assignment
Worksheets/Graphic Organizers
Primary Source Readings
Map Activity
Class Discussion
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: College Prep United States History I
Unit Title: The Age of Jackson
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
The War of 1812 filled Americans with national pride and confidence in the future. A war hero in
the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson, who formed the Democratic Party, became president in 1828 and
the Age of Jackson had begun. With his bold policies, such as the spoils system, the Indian Removal
Act, and the closing of the national bank, Jackson was seen as "a man of the people" by his
supporters but criticized by many of his peers. More importantly, against the backdrop of an
emerging national identity, two distinct economic systems were developing in the North and South.
The North developed into a manufacturing powerhouse due to the Industrial Revolution. The South,
with the invention of the cotton gin, expanded the Cotton Belt and ultimately spread the institution of
slavery. Nationalism gave way to sectionalism as the two sections disagreed over issues such as
slavery, economic policy, and the issue of states' rights.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication; Collaboration; Creativity
and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.b: Determine the extent to which America’s foreign policy (i.e., Tripoli pirates, the
Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, the War with Mexico, and Native
American removal) was influenced by perceived national interest.
6.1.12.A.3.c: Assess the role of geopolitics in the development of American foreign relations
during this period.
6.1.12.A.3.d: Describe how the Supreme Court increased the power of the national government and
promoted national economic growth during this era.
6.1.12.A.3.e: Judge the fairness of government treaties, policies, and actions that resulted in Native
American migration and removal.
6.1.12.D.3.c: Assess how states' rights (i.e., Nullification) and sectional interests
influenced party politics and shaped national policies (i.e., the Missouri Compromise
and the Compromise of 1850).
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the characteristics of the new American culture?
How did nationalism influence domestic policy?
How did nationalism guide foreign policy?
What was the Missouri Compromise?
What path led to Andrew Jackson's presidency?
How did the Indian Removal Act lead to the Trail of Tears?
Why was the national bank a source of controversy?
How did a conflict over the issue of states' rights lead to a crisis?
What was the Industrial Revolution?
How did the Industrial Revolution affect the North?
What advancements were made in transportation and communication?
Why was cotton king in the South?
How did the cultivation of cotton lead to the spread of slavery?
What key differences developed between the North and the South?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Nationalism contributed to the growth of American culture and influenced domestic and foreign
policies.
President Andrew Jackson's bold actions defined a period of American history.
The North developed an economy based on industry.
During the early 1800s, the South developed an economy based on agriculture.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
During the 1800s, a new American Culture emerged. In his famous work, Democracy in America,
Tocqueville commented on the unique characteristics of America. Also during this time, American
art and literature flourished. The English language even changed in America documented by Noah
Websters creation of a new dictionary.
At this time, a great sense of Nationalism emerged. These feelings of nationalism were soon reflected
in government policies such as Supreme Court decisions and the American System. We also
established our dominance over the Americas with the Monroe Doctrine.
The expansion of the United States led to tensions between the North and the South. To resolve some
of these tensions, Congress passed the Missouri Compromise which temporarily delayed a conflict
between slave and free states.
Andrew Jackson, a popular war hero, created the Democratic Party and won the election of 1828. He
was seen as the president of the common man. One of Jackson's first acts in office was to replace
many officials with his supporters. This became known as the spoils system.
By the time Andrew Jackson became president, there were Five major Native American groups
occupying the southeastern United States. These groups, the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw,
Seminole, and Creek were sometimes called the "five civilized tribes" because many of their
members had adopted aspects of European and American culture. The White American wanted the
farmland that existed in this region. Jackson concluded that the best course of action would be to
relocate the five nations to an area west of the Mississippi River called Indian Territory. Jackson
signed the Indian Removal Act into law and the Native American groups had to march west,
hundreds of miles in miserable conditions.
The Cherokee nation fought the removal act in the American Court System. In the case of Worcester
v. Georgia, the court ruled in favor of the Cherokee, claiming the state Georgia did not have the right
to take the Cherokee lands. To get around the court's ruling, government officials signed a treaty with
Cherokee leaders who favored relocation even though they did not represent most of the Cherokee
people. Under this treaty, the Cherokee were relocated west. Of the 16,000 Cherokee who made the
journey, 4,000 died on the march to Indian Territory. Their exodus became known as the Trial of
Tears.
Another issue in President Jackson's presidency was the issue of the Second National Bank. Jackson
believed the bank was a "monster". Once he won reelection in 1832, Jackson ordered Secretary of the
Treasury to take money out of the Bank and deposit it in select state banks or as critics called these
banks "pet banks". In 1836, the Second Bank became nothing more than another state bank. At the
forefront of the bank issue was how power should be divided between the federal and state
governments. In 1828, Congress raised the tariff which increased the price of British goods. This was
to encourage Americans to buy American goods. The agricultural southern states despised this tariff.
It forced southerners to buy northern goods instead of less expensive British goods. When Congress
passed another tariff in 1832, South Carolina declared the tariff "null and void" and threatened to
secede if the government tried to enforce the tariff. Congress empowered Jackson with the Force Bill
which would allow him to use military force to collect the tariff. The situation was resolved when
Henry Clay worked out a compromise in which tariffs would be reduced over a period of 10 years.
The North was greatly affected by the Industrial Revolution. The Industrial Revolution was the birth
of modern industry and the social changes that accompanied it. Industrialization in the North led to
urbanization. People left the farms and moved to the cities where they could find work. The North
underwent dramatic and rapid changes. Within decades, it evolved from a region of small towns and
farms into one including large cities and factories. Some inventions of the Industrial Revolution were
the steamboat, the first railroads, and the telegraph.
While the North was greatly affected by the Industrial Revolution, the Cotton belt grew due to the
invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney. Since the cotton gin made it easier to clean the cotton,
large scale cotton production was now possible. With the expansion of the Cotton Belt, more slaves
were need as laborers. Thus, there was a powerful economic incentive to maintain slavery in the
South.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
After completion of instruction and class work on Jackson and the Industrial revolution, students will
be given a test on Chapter 7 to assess their learning.
Formative Assessments:
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Write a list of the times you have felt pride to be an
American.
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: Name and briefly describe two invention that have changed
American history.
Industrial Revolution Project: In cooperative learning groups, students will create their own invention
as close to reality as possible. They will also compile an advertising campaign to sell their product.
Jackson Video Summary: Students will view the video "The Life of Andrew Jackson" (PBS). Write a
one paragraph summary on each clip shown.
Primary Source Readings: Patent for the Cotton Gin and Excerpts from Democracy in America
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin: Hart,
reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Worksheets
Video "The Life of Andrew Jackson"
Video "500 Nations"
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at the
summative tasks.
Eboard - Powerpoint presentation
Teacher made Test
Class Discussion
Collins Type One - Two Writing Assignment
Cooperative Learning Activity
Video "The Life of Andrew Jackson"
Project materials
Primary Sources
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: College Prep United States History I
Unit Title: The Reform Movements: 1830-1860
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
The religious revival called the Second Great Awakening set off one of the great periods of social
reform in American history. Some reformers sought to improve conditions in prisons, factories, and
the increasingly crowded cities. Other reformers worked to extend women's rights and to end slavery
in the United States. Inspired to do good works, the reformers changed the face of America.
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.f: Compare and contrast the successes and failures of political (i.e., the 1844 State
Constitution) and social (i.e., abolition, women’s rights, and temperance) reform movements in New
Jersey and the nation during the Antebellum period.
6.1.12.A.3.h: Analyze the various rationales provided as a justification for slavery.
6.1.12.A.3.i: Relate the impact of the Supreme Court decision regarding the Amistad to the
antislavery movement.
Unit Essential Questions:
How did religion help lead to reform?
What role did Horace Mann play in reforming education?
What role did Dorothea Dix play in reforming prisons?
What are transcendentalism and utopianism?
Why did many Irish and Germans immigrate to the United States in the 1840s and 1850s?
What was life in the United States like for the new immigrants?
How did urbanization and industrialization lead to reform?
What limits were placed on women's lives in the early 1800s?
What role did women play in the movements of the Reform Era?
Why was the Seneca Falls Convention important?
What was life like for enslaved African Americans in the South?
How did people in the South fight against slavery?
What were the major developments in the abolition movement?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
A revival in religion in the early 1800s helped lead to an era of reform.
A wave of Irish and German immigrants entered the United States during the period of urbanization
and reform.
After leading reform movements to help others, some American women began to work on behalf of
themselves.
The movement to end slavery dominated the Reform Era.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
During the early 1800s, religious fervor swept through America in the form of a movement known as
the Second Great Awakening. This movement led to changes throughout American society. One area
of society in which reforms took place was education. Horace Mann played an integral role in
organizing public education. Another reformer, Dorothea Dix was an advocate for prison reform. A
group of philosophers in New England, known as the Transcendentalists, started a movement
encouraging gaining knowledge through reason, intuition, and spiritual experiences.
Irish and German immigrants came to America in large numbers during the mid 1800s. Life was hard
for immigrants, who were often turned away from jobs. Immigrants tended to settle in crowded urban
neighborhoods in buildings called tenements. Low wages, long hours, and unsafe conditions were
common.
The women's rights movement also began in the mid 19th century. Women were severely restricted
in terms of the law, property ownership, and cultural opportunities. The birth place of the women's
rights movement was the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth
Cady Stanton.
The Great Awakening led people to question the morality of slavery. Free African Americans, former
slaves, and elite whites came together and protested slavery though the abolition movement. Leaders
of the movement such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass increased awareness
concerning the horrors of slavery.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Upon completion of instruction on the reform movements 1830-1860, students will be tested on
chapter 8.
Formative Assessments:
Film Summary: Summarize urban life, Irish Immigration, and the Nativist movement as depicted in
the film, the Gangs of New York.
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Is religion important in your life? Why or why not?
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: Which reform movement from this era has created the
highest impact on the U.S. today? Name three reasons why.
Cooperative Activity: Discussion of current issues in society based on reform movement of this era.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin:
Hart, Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Worksheets
Resources: Gangs of New York
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at the
summative tasks.
E-board (Powerpoint presentation)
Teacher Created Test
Reform Quizzo
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Video: The Gangs of New York
Cooperative Activity
Class Discussion
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Westward Expansion/Manifest Destiny
Target Course/Grade Level: CP
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
They were drawn by varied dreams: of gold, of religious freedom, of good farmland. They
possessed a belief that settling the lands from the Atlantic to the Pacific was America's destiny.
Between 1830 and 1860 Americans by the thousands migrated westward into the frontier
wilderness. In 1846, souring relations led to war between Mexico and the United States, and the
outcome defined America's borders.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.a
6.1.12.A.3.b
8.1.12.C.1
9.1.12.C.3
6.1.12.A.3.e
6.1.12.D.3.a
Unit Essential Questions:
Why did Americans head west?
What were the major western trails?
How did the gold rush affect California?
What were some major effects of westward migration?
What system did the Spanish use to settle Texas?
How did Americans begin to move into Texas?
What were the causes and effects of the Texas Revolution?
What were the arguments for and against the annexation of Texas?
What created tensions between the United States and Mexico in the 1840s?
What were the causes and effects of the Mexican-American War?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Americans in large numbers followed trails to the West in the 1840s and 1850s because of
"manifest destiny."
American settlers in Texas revolted against the Mexican government and created the independent
Republic of Texas.
Soon after annexing Texas, the United States declared war on Mexico.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
In the 1840s America was expanding west and many settlers moved into new areas. Americans
believed it was their "Manifest Destiny" to expand the U.S. to the Pacific Ocean. The most
common mode of western travel was trails. The most popular trails west included the Santa Fe
trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Mormon Trail. Another reason many settlers traveled west was
the discovery of gold in California. Although most gold seekers never struck it right, the gold
rush led to the settlement and organization of California.
Many Americans were responsible for colonizing Texas. Led by Stephen Austin and other
empresarios, many Americans moved their families to Texas, which was a property of Mexico.
Disagreements between Texans and the Mexican Government led to the Texas Revolution. In
three famous battles, including the Alamo, Texas won its independence from Mexico.
Texas remained an independent republic for nearly ten years. In 1846, the U.S. annexed Texas
creating a dispute with Mexico. Tensions between the two nations led to the Mexican-American
war. The U.S. defeated Mexico and won a large piece of western land known as the Mexican
Cession.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher made test
After completion of instruction and classwork on Westward Expansion, students will be given a
test on Chapter 9 to assess their learning.
Formative Assessments:
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Make a list of items you would need for a trip west on the Oregon Trail.
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Briefly describe three aspects of the painting "American Progress" that illustrate the concept of
Manifest Destiny.
Title: Primary Source
Lincoln's Spot Resolutions opposing the Mexican War
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
E-board (Powerpoint presentation)
Teacher made test
Class discussion
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Primary Source
Video: The Alamo
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Causes of the Civil War/Secession
Target Course/Grade Level: CP U.S History I/ Grade 10
School: HHS
UNIT SUMMARY:
After the war with Mexico ended, one question stirred national politics: Would these new
territories be slave or free? Congressional attempts to settle this question only triggered greater
division. By 1860 the nation had split along sectional lines-North and South-and hostile camps
took steps that would lead to war.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Unit Essential Questions:
What factors made slavery in the United States an issue before 1850?
How did the Compromise of 1850 seek to settle issues between the North and the South?
In what ways did the North and South each hope to benefit from the Kansas-Nebraska Act?
How did people in the North and South react to the Kansas-Nebraska Act?
Why did popular sovereignty lead to violent struggle in Kansas?
In what ways did the presidential election of 1856 illustrate the nation's growing divisions?
What events of Buchanan's presidency further divided the nation?
Why was John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry an important event in American History?
How did Lincoln's personal views on slavery differ from his political position on the subject?
How did the Lincoln-Douglas debates benefit Lincoln's political career?
What circumstances resulted in Lincoln's election as president in 1860?
What led to the secession of the states of the Lower South from the Union?
How and why was the Confederacy formed?
Why did compromises and other attempts to save the Union fail?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
The issue of slavery dominated national politics during the 1850s. The federal government forged
policies in attempts to satisfy both the North and the South.
Rising tensions over slavery expanded from political rhetoric into outright violence.
After gaining national prominence in the late 1850s, Abraham Lincoln became president in 1860.
The election of Abraham Lincoln led to the secession of the southern states.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
Following the Mexican-American war, the United States finally achieved its Manifest Destiny.
Expansion led to renewed tensions between Northern and Southern states. The free/slave status of
western lands was settled by a piece of legislation known as the Compromise of 1850. The
Compromise of 1850 temporarily delayed conflict between slave and free states by giving some
concessions to both sides. The Kansas-Nebraska act repealed the Missouri Compromise and
further endorsed the doctrine of popular sovereignty. Reaction to the Kansas-Nebraska Act led to
the creation of the Republica Party which represented the interests of free labor in the North.
As a result of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the status of slavery in the territory of Kansas was
determined by popular sovereignty. This caused violent conflict between pro-slave and anti-slave
settlers. During the presidency of James Buchanan, the nation became further divided as a result
of the landmark Dred Scott decision.
Lastly, John Brown, an anti-slavery crusader, launched a violent raid on the federal arsenal at
Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Although unsuccessful, Brown's raid further divided the nation and
increased public awareness about slavery.
In the election of 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected president. Lincoln rose to national
prominence through his debates with Stephen Douglas. The election of Lincoln was the South's
impetus to secede from the Union. The seceded states formed the Confederate States of America
and named Jefferson Davis the president. After failed compromise attempts, it became apparent
the only way to reunite the country was through military action.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Teacher Made Test
After completion of instruction of the topic, Causes of the Civil war, students will take a test
which will assess thier knowledge on Chapter 10.
Title: Quiz
Causes of the Civil War Quiz
Formative Assessments:
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
A list of characteristics of life in the South and a list of characteristics of life in the North.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
In three to four sentences, summarize the political views of both Abraham Lincoln and Stephen
Douglas.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin: Hart,
reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/Worksheets
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Resources:
Video “John Brown’s Body”
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: The Civil War
Target Course/Grade Level: CP U.S History 1/ Grade 10
School: HHS
UNIT SUMMARY:
The Civil War was fought nationwide, using new technologies and strategies, but by soldiers
who were often ill equipped, underfed, and poorly trained. The conflict resulted in freedom for
some 4 million enslaved people and the preservation of a nation. The costs were staggering-more
than 600,000 lives lost and about $5 billion in property damaged or destroyed.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Unit Essential Questions:
How did the fall of Fort Sumter lead to war?
Why did many northerners and southerners eagerly rush to war?
Why was the loyalty of the border states important, and how did Lincoln obtain it?
What were Union and Confederate goals and strategies for the war?
What factors made the major battles in the war so bloody?
How did the Union carry out its strategy in the Mississippi Valley?
What led to the Confederate successes in the war in the East?
Why did Confederate forces invade the Union, and with what result?
How did the Emancipation Proclamation affect the Civil War?
How did African Americans contribute to the war effort?
What was life like in the military?
What similarities and differences existed on the home front in the North and South?
In what ways was the war at sea an important part of the Civil war?
What were each side's goals in the West, and how were events there influenced by the rest of the
war?
What three major battles took place in 1863, and why was each important?
Why was the fighting around Chattanooga, Tennessee, important to the outcome of the war?
What tactics did Grant use against Lee to change the course of the war?
How did the election of 1864 affect Confederate hopes for victory in the Civil War?
How did the actions of Sherman and Grant help bring the war to an end?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
The attack on Fort Sumter led both the North and the South to prepare for war in earnest.
Widespread fighting occurred during the first two years of the Civil War.
The Civil War created hardships, challenges, and opportunities for people in the North and
South.
Important fighting occurred in all sections of the country as well as at sea.
Southerners continued to hope for victory in 1864, but military and political events caused those
hopes to fade.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
The Civil War began at Fort Sumter. Fort Sumter was an important symbol to the Union because
it was the last federal possession in Confederate Territory. Although no one was killed in the
fighting, the war was underway.
The first major battle took place at Bull Run. The battle proved that the war was going to be
longer and bloodier than most expected. Early n the war, the South proved to be a formitable
opponent for the North. The confidence of the Confederate Army led them to invade the North at
the battle of Antietam. Although a tactical draw, Antietan ended the Southern invasion and gave
Lincoln an opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation
changed the scope of the war by maing the Civil War a fight to end slavery.
The Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville led to the pivotal battle of Gettysburg.
Gettysburg was a crushing defeat for the South, ending yet another Southern invasion of the
North.
In 1864, Lincoln installed Ulysses S. Grant as the leader of the Union troops in Virginia. At the
same time, Union generl William Sherman Tecumseh was launching a destructive march through
Georgia. The War came to an end in 1865 when Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at
Appomattox Courthouse.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher made test
After completion of instruction of the topic of the Civil War, students will take a test which will
assess thier knowledge on Chapter 11.
Title: Quiz
First year of the Civil War
Formative Assessments:
Title: Primary Source Readings
Emancipation Proclamation
Gettysburg Address
RUBRICS
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Make a list of items a typical civil war soldier would have in his backpack.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Write down at least two reasons, either for or against, President Lincoln's suspension of Habeas
Corpus in Maryland.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem.
Sutin: Hart, reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/Worksheets
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Resources:
Video “Glory”
Video “Civil War Box Set: History Channel”
Video “Gettysburg”
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area:
Social Studies
Unit Title:
Reconstruction
Target Course/Grade Level: CP U.S 1
School:
Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY:
Following the Civil War, the U.S faced a tumultuous political atmosphere. Slaves freed by the
13th Amendment had to be integrated into American society. Other problems, such as how to
treat the Southern states after the war, were major problems facing American politicians. Further
complicating matters, Abraham Lincoln, was assassinated, forcing Andrew Johnson to assume
control of executive power. White southerners felt that the federal government was playing too
large a role in Reconstruction and struck back at increased suffrage by forming terrorist
organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. Overall Reconstruction was deemed a failure because
African Americans failed to achieve social equality.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.4.d, 6.1.12.B.4.b, 6.1.12.D.4.c, 6.1.12.D.4.d
Unit Essential Questions:
 What challenges faced the South after the Civil War?
 What actions did Union leaders take during wartime to reconstruct the nation after the
war’s end?
 How did Lincoln’s assassination affect the nation?
 Why did President Johnson and Congress differ over Reconstruction
 How did the South respond to Reconstruction under President Johnson?
 Why did Congress take control of Reconstruction, and what changes were made?
 How did Radical Reconstruction differ from earlier Reconstruction plans and what were
its effects?
 What changes did Republican government bring to the South?
 What was life after slavery like for African Americans?
 How did Reconstruction affect patterns of land ownership and land use in the South?
 What problems caused support for Reconstruction to decline?
 What events brought Reconstruction to an end?
 What was Reconstruction’s legacy for the South and for the rest of the nation?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
 Northern leaders had differing ideas for dealing with the many issues and challenges of
restoring the southern states to the Union
 Congress took control of Reconstruction as a new, radical branch of the Republican Party
was emerging
 Republican Reconstruction had a significant impact on life in the South
 A variety of events and forces led to the end of Reconstruction, which left a mixed legacy
for the nation
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
 Understand the various plans for reconstruction
 Identify measures taken by the federal government to aid former slaves
 Analyze the contributions of the North during Reconstruction
 Understand the reason that Reconstruction failed to provide full equality for African
Americans
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:

Teacher created tests


Essay: “Affects of the Lincoln Assassination”
Quizzes
Formative Assessments:
 Class discussion
 Collins Type 1 and 2: “Differences between Reconstruction Plans”
 Homework
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
 Write about the fear tactics used by the Klan to intimidate African Americans
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
 Textbook
 Powerpoint
 Worksheets
 Videos
 Primary Sources
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative task.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: College Prep United States History I
Unit Title: The American West
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In opening the West for settlement, the federal government relocated Native Americans to
vastly diminished homelands or eliminated them in military battles. During this cultural encounter,
the white Americans were driven by a strong sense of cultural superiority. This mentality
generated brutal and inhumane treatment of Native Americans. Not only were Native
Americans robbed of their lives and land, they also faced a century of forced assimilation. Once
Native Americans were confined to reservations, white Americans, immigrants, and African
Americans eagerly moved into the new frontier to mine, ranch, and establish farms. New
technologies and perseverance helped them survive in the new landscape.
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.8.B.4.a - Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the
expansion and economic development of the United States.
6.1.8.B.4.b- Map territorial expansion and settlement, as well as the locations of conflicts with
and removal of Native Americans.
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the culture, heritage, traditions, and religion of Plains Indians and why were
they devalued by white Americans?
In what ways did American officials, soldiers, and settlers disrupt and ultimately destroy the
Native Americans' ability to resist white encroachment on Indian land?
Why was the American army able to conquer the Native Americans in battle?
Who were significant Native American leaders and how did they attempt to maintain their peoples'
land and culture?
In what ways did the U.S. government attempt to assimilate Native Americans?
What new technologies and government policies made it possible for miners, ranchers, and farmers
to survive and flourish in the American West?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Students will recognize the characteristics and achievements of the culture of Plains Indians.
Students will understand how and why Native Americans were massacred, sent to reservations,
their lands stolen, and their culture destroyed.
After Native Americans were relocated to reservations:
The U.S. government forced assimilation on Native Americans.
The mining boom created new towns and businesses.
The cattle boom created new trails and ranches.
Farmers settled the Plains, building permanent settlements and communities.
The "frontier" was a fluid, diverse, multi-cultural community.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
The Plains Indians had their own culture and religion.
The contrast between the Plains Indians' nomadic hunting lifestyle and the desire to incorporate the
lands of the West into the rapidly industrializing United States set the stage for cultural conflict.
The Native Americans fought the movement of settlers westward, but the U.S. military and the
persistence of American settlers proved too strong to resist.
The resulting "Indian Wars" had disastrous consequences for Native Americans. Those that
survived the battles lost their land and were forced to assimilate into white America.
Many people sought fortunes during the mining and cattle booms of the American West.
The U.S. government promoted the settlement of the West, offering free or cheap land to those
willing to put in the hard work of turning the land into productive farms.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
A teacher constructed test will assess student learning for chapter 13
Formative Assessments:
Homestead Act poster project: Homestead Act advertisement
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Write a list of characteristics of a cowboy.
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: You are living on the prairie. Write a letter to a friend
back east describing the challenges of living in a sod house
Quiz: Native American Battles quiz
Native American Battles Chart: Organize information from the textbook on battles between the
U.S. Army and the Plains Indians
Summary : Write a one page summary based on viewing 500 Nations video on Chief Joseph and
Americanization.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook: Ayers, de la Teja, Gray White, and Schulzinger. American Anthem. Austin: Hart,
Rinehart, and Winston, 2009.
Teacher handouts / worksheets
Supplemental readings/primary sources
Resources:
Teacher notes from PowerPoint presentations
Video: 500 Nations
Video: Dances With Wolves
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
Eboard - Powerpoint presentation
Teacher made Test
Lecture accompanied by notes via a PowerPoint presentation.
Cooperative Activity: Homestead Act poster project.
Class Discussion
Collins Type One-Three writing assignments
Battles Quiz
Cooperative activity: Native American Battles Chart
Marking Period 1 (45 Days)
10 Grade General US History I Pacing Chart
th
TIME
3 days
2 days
2 days
OBJECTIVES
Describe how Native
Americans migrated to
North America and
formed cultural areas
STANDARDS
6.1.12.B.1.a.
6.1.12.D.1.a
MATERIALS
*textbook Chapter 1
*maps
*Power-point
*teacher created graphic
organizer
*Youtube clip: “Bridging
the Bering Strait”
*Clips from film
Apocalypto
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
ASSESSMENT
*teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 1 quiz
Review the causes and
development of the
European Age of
Discovery and identify
the achievements of
European Explorers
Analyze the voyage of
Christopher Columbus
describe the results of the
Columbian Exchange
6.2.12.C.1.e
6.212.D.1.a
*textbook
*notebook
*Video Clips
*teacher observation
*notebook
*chapter 1 quiz
Examine Spanish
Colonization in America
to provide a foundation
for British Colonization
6.2.12.C.1.e
*teacher Observation
*notebook
*Chapter 2 test
Discuss English
exploration and identify
Jamestown
6.1.12.A.1.a
*textbook
*notebook
*Powerpoint
*Article: Genocide in the
Americas by David E.
Stannard
*textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*Video: Nightmare in
Jamestown
Identify the beliefs of
Pilgrims and discuss the
reasons for their
migration to America
6.1.12.A.1.a
6.1.12.A.1.b
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 2 test
Describe the kind of
society the Puritans tried
to establish in America
(include the impact of the
Salem Witch Hysteria)
6.1.12.A.1.a
6.1.12.A.1.b
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*Video: History Channel
- Pilgrims
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*Video: Salem Witch
Trials
*teacher observation
*notebook
*chapter 1 quiz
Unit 2
2 days
2 days
2 days
3 days
Unit 3
*teacher observation
*Notebook
*chapter 2 test
*teacher observation
*notebook
*chapter 2 test
Identify the 13 Colonies
and state founding dates,
purpose, and the people
who founded them
6.1.12.A.1.a
6.1.12.A.1.b
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*graphic organizer
*worksheets
*teacher observation
*notebook
*chapter 3 test
Analyze the development
and many facets of the
Atlantic Slave Trade
during the Colonial
Period
Examine the life of Ben
Franklin and identify
aspects of colonial
society
6.1.12.C.1.b
*textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*Clips from Amistad
*Teacher Observation
*Notebook
*Chapter 3 Test
6.1.12.A.1.a
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*Worksheet
*Chapter 3 test
Identify the causes of the
French and Indian War
and discuss its conclusion
(end ch.3)
6.1.12.D.1.a
*textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*Video: history Channel
– Ben Franklin
*worksheet
*textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*worksheet
Identify issues regarding
the French and Indian
War (social, military,
cultural)
6.1.12.D.1.a
*worksheet
*Film “The Last of the
Mohicans”
*completed worksheet
*teacher initiated
discussion
* teacher made quiz
6 days
Identify and discuss the
causes of the American
Revolution
6.1.12.A.2.a
6.1.12.A.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet/project
*teacher observation
*notebook
*project
*Chapter 4 test
10 days
Identify and discuss the
battles of the American
Revolution
6.1.12.A.2.a
6.1.12.A.2.b
*textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*Worksheets
* Film “Patriot”
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheets
*ch. 4 test
3 Days
2 days
2 days
1 day
4 days
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*Chapter 3 Test
Unit 4
TIME
OBJECTIVES
STANDARDS
MATERIALS
ASSESSMENT
Unit 5
2 days
2 Days
4 day
4 days
Identify the
formation of our
Republic and
analyze The
Articles of
Confederation
6.1.8.A.3.b
6.1.8.A.3.c
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
Discuss the
Constitutional
convention and the
compromises made
in order to draft the
Constitution.
Discuss the
ratification of the
Constitution and
the addition of the
Bill of Rights
Describe the
Principles, Articles
and the
Amendments of
the Constitution
and their
implications today
Common Writing
Benchmark # 1
6.1.8.A.3.b
6.1.8.A.3.c
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.8.A.3.b
6.1.8.A.3.c
*Textbook
*notebook
*Power-point
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 5 test
6.1.8.A.3.b
6.1.8.A.3.g
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Scavenger Hunt
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 5 test
Identify the
differences in
beliefs between the
Federalist and the
Democratic
Republicans and
relate the First
Party System to
modern political
parties
Discuss the
beginning of the
government after
the ratification of
the Constitution
and the presidency
of George
Washington
Explain why
Congress passed
the Alien and
Sedition Acts
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.f
6.1.12.C.2.b
*Textbook
*notebook
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.f
6.1.12.C.2.b
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Video: George
Washington (Bio)
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 5 Test
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.f
6.1.12.C.2.b
*Textbook
*notebook
*graphic organizer
*political
cartoon/pencils and
paper
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*student generated political
cartoons
Unit 6
2 days
2 days
1 day
Marking Period 2 (45 Days)
10 Grade General US History I Pacing Chart
th
2 days
2 days
Describe the events
leading to the
election of Thomas
Jefferson and
determine why the
U.S. Purchased
Louisiana
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.f
6.1.12.C.2.b
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*map
*Video: “Lewis and
Clark
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*maps
Explain the
significance and
purpose of the
Lewis and Clark
Expedition
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.f
6.1.12.C.2.b
*Textbook
*notebook
*Video: National
Geographic
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 6 Test
Marking Period 3 (45 Days)
10 Grade General US History I Pacing Chart
th
TIME
OBJECTIVES
STANDARDS
MATERIALS
ASSESSMENT
*textbook
*notebook
*powerpoint
*graphic organizer
*textbook
*Notebook
*worksheet
*Power-point
*Video: History
Channel Andrew
Jackson
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
Unit 7
3 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
Discuss the causes
and outcomes of the
War of 1812
6.1.12.A.b
Evaluate Andrew
Jackson’s Indian
Policy and Bank
Policy
6.1.12.A.b
Discuss important
political
developments such as
the Adams-Onis
Treaty and the
Monroe Doctrine
Analyze the ways in
which the Industrial
Revolution changed
U.S. particularily in
the area of cotton
production
6.1.12.A.b
6.1.12.A.b
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
Chapter 7 test
Identify problems and
struggles faced by
early Immigrant and
rise of Nativitism
during the mid-19th
century
Identify features of
life in the North and
the South
6.1.12.A.3.g
6.1.12.D.3.b
6.1.12.D.3.e
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Film: “Gangs of
New York”
* textbook
*notebook
*Graphic Organizer
*teacher observation
*notebook
*worksheet
Analyze Reform
Movements made
during the 19th
Century starting with
the Second Great
Awakening
6.1.12.A.3.f
* textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*Test Chapter 8
*Teacher observation
*notebook
*Chapter 7 test
*teacher Observation
*notebook
*Worksheet
*Chapter 7 test
Unit 8
6 days
2 days
8 days
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
1 day
Identify Abolitionists
and their attempt to
put an end to slavery.
(Underground
Railroad)
6.1.12.A.3.f
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*Chapter 8 test
Examine the role that
Mountain Men played
in western expansion
Identify westward
expansion and
analyze the arguments
of the expansionists:
discuss the war for
Texan Independence
Determine the causes
and effects of the war
with Mexico and its
impact
Describe the
difficulties US settlers
faced on the Oregon
Trail; discuss the
impact of the Gold
Rush of 1849 in
California
Common Writing
Benchmark # 2
6.1.12.D.3.a
6.1.12.B.3.a
*textbook
*notebook
*worksheet
* textbook
*notebook
*Full size US Map
*Teacher Observation
Unit 9
1 day
4 days
2 days
2 days
6.1.12.D.3.a
6.1.12.B.3.a
6.1.12.D.3.a
6.1.12.B.3.a
6.1.12.C.3.b
6.1.12.D.3.a
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Video: America the
Story of Us
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*teacher Generated
discussion
*teacher Observation
*Test chapter 9
Unit 10
2 days
2 days
5 days
Identify and discuss
6.1.12.D.3.c
the components of the
Compromise of 1850
and the Fugitive Slave
Act
Identify the Kansas6.1.12.A.4.a
Nebraska Act and
discuss the formation
of the Republican
Party
Identify the Dred
6.1.12.A.4.a
Scott Decision, Uncle
Tom’s Cabin, and
John Brown; discuss
how all of these
contributed to the
outbreak of the Civil
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*teacher Observation
*notebook
*Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*teacher Observation
*notebook
* Textbook
*notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Video: America,
The Story of Us
*teacher Observation
*notebook
*Chapter 10 test
War
Marking Period 4 (45 Days)
10 Grade General US History I Pacing Chart
th
TIME
OBJECTIVES
STANDARDS
MATERIALS
ASSESSMENT
Unit 11
Discuss the impact of
the election of 1860,
Fort Sumter, and the
First Battle of Bull
Run
Identify the strengths
and weakness for both
the Union and the
Confederacy and
discuss each country’s
war strategy
Identify and Discuss
the important battles
of the Civil War
Identify the
Emancipation
Proclamation and
discuss its significance
Analyze the
contributions of
William Sherman
including the capture
of Atlanta and the
March to the sea
Identify Ulysses S.
Grant and discuss how
his leader ship led to
Union Victory
Identify the 54th
Massachusetts
regiment and how they
effected the war
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
*textbook
*Notebook
*power-point
*worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*Quiz chapter 11
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
* textbook
*notebook
*Powerpoint
*worksheet/chart
* teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
*Textbook
*notebook
*Chart (cooperative)
* textbook
*notebook
*Powerpoint
*worksheet/chart
* textbook
*notebook
*Powerpoint
*worksheet/chart
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
* teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
* textbook
*notebook
*Powerpoint
*worksheet/chart
*Film “Glory”
*teacher generated
questions
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*Chapter 11 test
3 days
Examine events
surrounding the
assassination of
Abraham Lincoln
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
*Textbook
*Powerpoint
*notebook
*Video: The Hunt for
John Wilkes Booth
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
2 days
Compare and Contrast
Lincoln’s and
Congress’s views on
Reconstruction
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
*Textbook
*Powerpoint
*Notebook
*Worksheet
*Teacher Observation
4 days
3 days
3 days
1 day
1 day
2 days
4 days
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
6.1.12.A.4.c
6.1.12.B.4.a
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*Chapter 11 test
*Teacher Observation
*Project Rubric
Unit 12
2 days
2 days
2 days
2 days
Explain why Radical
Republicans and
President Johnson had
differing views on
Reconstruction
Explain the
importance of the 13th,
14th and 15th
Amendments
Discuss the rise of the
KKK and the
discrimination that
ensued for African
Americans post Civil
War
Explain the reasons
why Reconstruction
came to end in the
South and ultimately
failed in the South
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
*Textbook
*Powerpoint
*Notebook
*Worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
*Textbook
*Powerpoint
*Notebook
*Worksheet
* Textbook
*Powerpoint
*Notebook
*Worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
* Textbook
*Powerpoint
*Notebook
*Worksheet
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
*Chapter 12 Test
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
6.1.12.A.4.b
6.1.12.B.4.b
6.1.12.D.4.c
*Teacher Observation
*notebook
*worksheet
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Early Americans
Target Course/Grade Level: United States History I
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
During the Ice Age, nomads crossed a land bridge connecting Asia and North America. These
people arrived on the American continents thousands of years ago and developed flourishing
societies. These diverse and complex societies existed in different regions on North America
before European Explorers arrived in the early 1500s.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.B.1.a: Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other natural
resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.D.2.a: Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
Unit Essential Questions:
According to scientists and historians, how and when did the first migration to the Americas occur?
What kind of cultures developed in Central and South America?
What are the characteristics of the early cultures in North America?
How did regional differences among Native Americans shape their diverse cultures?
What Native American customs were shared among several groups?
How did trading networks link Native American societies?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Native Americans migrated to the Americas thousands of years ago and were able to develop
flourishing societies.
A variety of complex societies existed in different regions of North America before European
explorers arrived in the early 1500s.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, evaluate the following
information…
About 10,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, an ancient land bridge called Beringia was
exposed between Asia (Siberia) and North America (Alaska). This land bridge allowed for the
migration of peoples from Asia to North America.
Small groups of hunters traveled across the land bridge in order to follow their food.
As the climate changed and the Ice Age ended, the land bridge was submerged by water, and these
groups of hunter and gatherers had to move southward. In addition, the hunters had wiped out most
of the huge Ice Age animals. They had to move southward in order to find new food supplies.
The civilizations and cultures that developed in Central and South America were the Olmecs,
Mayas, Toltecs, Aztecs, and Incas.
The Olmecs were the first major Mesoamerican society that grew up around 1200 B.C.E. The
Olmec culture is known as the mother culture of Mesoamerica. The Olmec's religion, art,
agriculture, and social organizations influenced later peoples. As early farmers, they are known for
their slash and burn techniques. It is unknown why the the Olmec civilization declined.
The Mayas rose around 300 B.C.E. The Mayas culture reached its height between about 250 C.E.
and 900. The Mayas developed a writing system and a number system that used the concept of
zero. The Mayan civilization declined but it never disappeared and Mayan speaking people can be
found today in southern Mexico and Guatemala.
The Toltec civilization came to dominate central Mexico around C.E. 900. They were known as
warriors, artisans, and builders.
The Aztecs came to power in the central valley of Mexico in the 1400s. They were a warlike
people. They built their capital city of Tenochtitlan on an island in a shallow lake. The Aztecs
conquered many of the neighboring people. Their decline came when Hernan Cortes found the
Aztecs.
The Incas rose to power in the Andes Mountains of South American. They too conquered their
neighbors. At its height, the Incas were the largest empire in the Americas. Their declined occurred
when conquistador, Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incan Empire.
Due to the diverse climate, geography, and resources, the Native American cultures were
influenced differently in each region.
Although each society existed in various regions, similarities can be found in their ideas and
customs. Families were organized into clans on a basis of kinship. Housing patterns and social
arrangements in many societies depended on the position of women. Social and political structures
also were similar. For instance, most clans or nations were headed by chiefs. Villages were usually
run by a council of elders with wisdom and experience. The Native Americans concept of land
ownership was similar. They believed land should not be bought or sold. It was to be used and
shared by the village or group for farming or hunting. Lastly, Native Americans shared similar
spiritual and religious ideas. For instance, spiritual connection to the natural world.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets, a teacher created test will be provided on
chapter One that includes the early Americans.
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures will be displayed in a common writing assessment on the
Columbian Exchange given in October.
3. Quiz
Knowledge of specific Native American groups and cultural characteristics.
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Short assignment comparing two Native American cultures: share answers
3. Cooperative Activity
Student discussion of specific Native American groups and cultural characteristics.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray white, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin: Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
Teacher handouts/worksheets
Clips from motion picture: Apocalypto
Notes from Power-Point Presentations
Native American: Fact or Fiction
Homework/Classwork
Native American Quizzo
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: European Settlement of America/Formation of the 13 Colonies
Target Course/Grade Level: United States History I
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
Following Columbus's voyages, European nations, such as Spain, competed to establish colonies in
the Americas. Adventurers, traders, settlers, and religious leaders came looking for gold, or for
religious freedom. By 1733 the English had founded a diverse group of colonies along the Atlantic
Ocean seaboard. Their efforts, however, had disastrous consequences for Native Americans.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance
structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory government;
6.1.12.A.1.a,b:
Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.
Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other
natural resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.B.1.a:
Explain how economic ideas and the practices of mercantilism and capitalism
conflicted during this time period; Determine the extent to which natural resources, labor systems
(i.e., the use of indentured servants, African slaves, and immigrant labor), and entrepreneurship
contributed to economic development in the American colonies.
6.1.12.C.1.a,b:
6.1.12.D.2.a:
Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
6.2.12.D.1.a-c: Assess the political, social, and economic impact of the Columbian Exchange of
plants, animals, ideas, and pathogens on Europeans and Native Americans; Compare slavery
practices and other forms of coerced labor or social bondage common in East Africa, West Africa,
Southwest Asia, Europe, and the Americas; Analyze various motivations for the Atlantic slave
trade and the impact on Europeans, Africans, and Americans
Unit Essential Questions:
Which Spanish conquistadors explored North America, and what were they seeking?
How did Spain build an empire?
What other nations explored North America?
Why were the first English colonies established?
What helped the Jamestown colony survived?
How did Virginia grow and change during the 1600s?
Why did the Puritans flee England?
How did dissent among the Puritans threaten the New England colonies?
Analyze the difference between Puritans and Pilgrims.
What was life like in New England?
What brought about a new era of colonization in America?
Why were new southern colonies founded?
Why did Quakers settle in Pennsylvania?
Why was Maryland founded?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
In the 1500s and 1600s, European nations, led by Spain, continued to explore, claim territory, and
build settlements in America.
After several failed attempts, the English established a permanent settlement at Jamestown,
Virginia.
The Pilgrims escaped persecution and founded colonies in Massachusetts based on Puritan
religious ideals, while dissent led to the founding of other New England colonies.
Events in England during and after the English Civil War led to a new wave of colonization along
the Atlantic coast south of New England.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, apply, evaluate the following
information:
Later explorers from Spain, such as Juan Ponce de Leon, Hernan Cortes, and Francisco Pizarro
traveled to lands an ocean away for "God, gold, and glory." These men were able to build Spain an
empire by establishing colonial governments. The Spanish Crown set up viceroyalties. New Spain
consisted of the American Southwest, and present-day Mexico, along with Florida, Central
American, and part of Venezuela and some Caribbean islands.
Following the Spanish in exploration where England, France, and Netherlands. They too were
seeking the riches of the new world and in converting the natives.
The English were not successful in their first attempt of establishing a settlement. The colony of
Roanoke was lost and to this day it is unknown were the settlers disappeared to. The English were
not discouraged and finally succeeded in their attempt to get a permanent foothold in the Americas.
Many of the new settlers came for new economic opportunities while others came for religious and
political freedom. Despite their reasoning, the first English colony was established in Jamestown.
There were many difficulties that the colonists faced. The colonists were able to survive because of
the peace made by Pocahontas and the profitable crop of tobacco.
In the 1600s, a group of English Protestant wanted to reform the Church of England. These people
were known as the Puritans. Strict Puritans known as Separatists wanted total separation from the
Church of England which caused them to be persecuted. Both the Separatists and the Puritans
decided to journey to America in order to find religious freedom.
The Puritans and the Separatists both left for religious freedom which they believed they could find
in America. While the Puritans claimed to be religiously tolerant those who went against the
society's rules were seen as dissenters. Thomas Hooker and his congregation left the colony
because they did not agree with Winthrop's government. He founded Connecticut. Roger Williams
clashed with authorities in Boston. He believed that the church and government should be separate.
He founded Rhode Island. The last dissenter, Anne Hutchinson, angered the Puritan community by
taking it upon herself to interpret the minister's sermons and she believed you did not need a
minister's teaching in order to be spiritual. She also migrated to Rhode Island.
In 1692, the Puritan society would see a series of bizarre events. It started in Salem Village.
Several girls were exhibiting strange behavior. They claimed to have been bewitched. The girls
accused several women of witchcraft. This led to the arrest of hundreds of people in the colony.
Nineteen people were executed and others died in jail. The witch scare quickly passed and those
still in jail were released.
The first public schools appeared in the Puritan colonies. Children learned reading, writing, and
arithmetic. Most of the Puritan societies were royal colonies under the direct control of the king of
England.
The English Civil war brought a new wave of colonization. This time, they targeted the middle and
southern parts of the Atlantic Coast of North America. King Charles II, in order to colonize North
America, gave large land grants to his friends and supporters. The Quakers led by William Penn,
founded Philadelphia in order to create a religiously tolerant colony.
George Calvert set up a colony in Maryland in order to allow Catholics religious tolerance. He died
before gaining the land grant but his son, Cecilius Calvert, also known as Lord Baltimore, received
the rights.
Mercantilism stated that a nation’s power was directly related to its wealth. The American colonies
were very profitable to England. The colonists supplied raw materials and could buy English
goods.
In the North, the colonial economy consisted of farming, natural resources, colonial industries, and
trade and commerce. The Southern economy consisted mostly of farming. The weather was
suitable to growing cotton, tobacco, rice and indigo. A plantation system would emerge in the
South that would use slave labor.
By the 1600s, Portugal, Spain, France, Holland, and England were involved in the trans-Atlantic
slave trade. Most captured Africans were taken to colonies in the Caribbean and South America.
They were then brought to North America. Since the South relied on slave labor, the number of
slaves in the south was very large.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets, a teacher created test will be provided on
chapter two, including information on specific explorers/founders and reasons for founding the 13
English Colonies
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures/European Exploration will be displayed in a common
writing assessment on the Columbian Exchange given in October.
3. Quiz
Knowledge of specific explorers/founders and reasons for founding the 13 English Colonies
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Short assignment: Factors that would force you to move to a new location
3. Cooperative Activity
Student discussion of founders/reasons for founding 13 English Colonies
Extra credit: 13 Colonies quizzo
4. Written Homework: chapter 2 section assessments
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Written reflection on the impact of the Salem Witch Hysteria
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray, White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
PowerPoint presentations
Teacher handouts/worksheets
History Channel Video: Salem Witch Hysteria
13 Colonies quizzo
Homework/Classwork—notebook chart
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Life In Colonial America
Target Course/Grade Level: United States History I
School: High School
UNIT SUMMARY
For more than 100 years, England's colonies in America grew steadily. Over time, the colonies
developed their own economies, political systems, traditions of local government, and sense of
self-reliance. Colonists maintained economic, political, and personal ties with Great Britain. But as
time wore on, serious strains between the colonists and Britain began to appear.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Explain how British North American colonies adapted the British governance
structure to fit their ideas of individual rights, economic growth, and participatory government;
Analyze how gender, property ownership, religion, and legal status affected political rights.
6.1.12.A.1.a,b:
Relate regional geographic variations (e.g., climate, soil conditions, and other
natural resources) to economic development in the New World.
6.1.12.B.1.a:
Explain how economic ideas and the practices of mercantilism and capitalism
conflicted during this time period; Determine the extent to which natural resources, labor systems
(i.e., the use of indentured servants, African slaves, and immigrant labor), and entrepreneurship
contributed to economic development in the American colonies.
6.1.12.C.1.a,b:
6.1.12.D.2.a:
Explain the consequences to Native American groups of the loss of their land and
people.
Unit Essential Questions:
What is mercantilism?
How did the Glorious Revolution and the English Bill of Rights affect political developments in
the colonies?
How did government in the colonies change under the policy of salutary neglect?
What were the characteristics of northern colonial economies?
what were the characteristics of southern colonial economies?
What was the impact of slavery in the colonies?
What impact did the Enlightenment have in the colonies?
What effects did the achievements of Ben Franklin have on colonial society?
How was the Great Awakening significant?
How did the colonies become more diverse in the 1700s?
What was life like in colonial America?
How did France develop an empire in North America?
Why did Spain and England clash in North America?
What were major events in the French and Indian war?
What were the effects of the French and Indian War on all those involved?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
British mercantilist policies and political issues helped shape the development of the American
colonies.
A commerce-based economy developed in the northern colonies, while the southern colonies
developed an agricultural economy.
Enlightenment ideas and the Great Awakening brought new ways of thinking to the colonists, and
a unique American culture developed.
The French and Indian War established British dominance in North America but put a strain on the
relationship with the colonists.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to identify, discuss, analyze, apply, evaluate the following
information:
The economic policy of mercantilism held that a nation's power was directly related to its wealth.
The American colonies were valuable to England because the colonists could supply raw materials
and could buy English goods. It encouraged a favorable balance of trade. Examples of mercantilist
policies include the Navigation Acts.
The Glorious Revolution restored monarchy to England. To reward their supporters, William and
Mary issued land grants which in turn became colonies in North America. The Glorious
Revolution had shifted considerable power to Parliament. Parliament dealt with issues mainly in
England. This led the appointment of colonial governors that handled most of the affairs in the
colonies. Many English officials were involved but they did not rule the colonies very strictly. This
situation was later termed Salutary neglect. In other words the colonies benefitted from being
alone.
In the northern colonies, farming, fishing, lumber, shipbuilding, whaling, and trade dominated
economic activity. Farming in New England was difficult due to thin and rocky soil and long
winters. Further south, in the middle colonies, there was better land and milder climate. Farmers
here could grow enough wheat to export to other colonies and abroad. Major cities such as Boston,
New York, and Philadelphia were hubs for trade and economic activity. The trade routes that
linked the Americas, Europe, Africa, and the West Indies are often described as the triangular
trade. In that triangle, ships carried rum from New England to Africa to trade for enslaved
Africans. Traders shipped the Africans to plantations in the West Indies and traded them for sugar
and molasses. Finally, traders shipped the sugar and molasses back to New England to be made
into rum. The horrific journey the enslaved Africans made across the Atlantic was known as the
Middle Passage.
Products from the southern colonies were very important in colonial trade. The region's economy
was based on agriculture. The southern colonies produced valuable cash crops such as tobacco.
Due to the south's reliance on agriculture, slavery became essential to the southern economy. The
number of Africans in the English colonies grew quickly during the 1700s because of births as well
as the slave trade. by 1760, the African population was about 250,000 - 10 times greater than it had
been in 1700.
In the late 1600s, new ways of thinking changed about government and human rights. These new
ways of thinking gave rise to a European movement called the Enlightenment. Because the
Enlightenment emphasized a search for knowledge, the period is also known as the Age of Reason.
These ideas began in the educated upper classes of Europe but soon spread to America. John Locke
in particular was widely read in the American colonies. His ideas influenced Thomas Jefferson and
Benjamin Franklin, among others.
At this time, a religious revival known as the Great Awakening changed religious attitudes in
America. The Great Awakening led to an increase in church membership in the 1700s. It also
resulted in the growth of new Protestant denominations in America.
As time progressed, the colonies became more diverse due to immigration. Groups such as the
Dutch, Scots-Irish, Germans, French Huguenots, and Jews settled in America.
Colonial cities were lively exciting places with libraries, bookshops, and impressive public
buildings. People in colonial America worked hard but had time to play too. Social events in the
colonies also included getting together with neighbors to dance or listen to music. As for colonial
communications, printers in the colonies were also publishers. They printed and distributed
newspapers, books, advertisements, and political announcements.
The French began to settle permanently in North America around the early 1600s. They began
lucrative fur trading posts. Instead of creating towns along the coast, they moved into the interior
of North America. Once there, they formed alliances with the Native American populations
residing there. They learned the natives' languages and married their women. France built outposts
from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi Valley by the early 1700s.
Spain and England clashed during the French and Indian War due to the fact that both wanted the
territory of known as La Florida. Spain controlled the territory but as English colonies spread
southward, they threatened the Spanish missions and settlements. During the war, Spain joined the
war on the side of France, which would prove costly for them in the end.
With the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763, Great Britain received all French lands east of the
Mississippi River which included most of Canada. They also gained Florida from Spain. Although
Spain lost the war along with France, Spain acquired the Louisiana Territory from them. France
was able to keep two islands near Canada and regained some Caribbean Islands. For the colonists,
the war would prove to be a burden. The British expected the colonists to pay for most of the war
debts accumulated during the war.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
1. Teacher-created test
After instruction and students' completion of worksheets, a teacher created test will be provided on
chapter three, including information on life in Colonial America
2. Common Writing Assessment
Knowledge of Native American cultures in America will be displayed in a common writing
assessment on the Columbian Exchange given in October.
3. Quiz
Knowledge of aspects of Colonial Life/Colonial Economy
Formative Assessments:
1. Class discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
2. Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Short assignment: Do Now Activity: Put events in chronological order - Chapter 3 Section 2
3. Cooperative Activity
Aspects of the Colonial Economy
4. Written Homework: chapter 3 section assessments
5. Collins Type Two Writing Assignment:
List two ways the Enlightenment influenced political thinking in the 13 Colonies
6. Viewing Guide/Open Ended Question
Students will be responsible for answering questions while viewing the film, The Last of the
Mohicans
7. Worksheets/Primary Source:
Biography of Olaudah Equiano
History and Geography: Population of the Colonies
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook-Ayers de la Teja, Gray, White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Hart,
Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Teacher Handouts/worksheets
Primary Sources
Resources:
PowerPoint presentations
Teacher handouts/worksheets
DVD: The Last of the Mohicans
Homework/Classwork
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area:
Social Studies
Unit Title:
American Revolution
Target Course/Grade Level: General
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
Great Britain began to increase taxes on the American colonists in order to help pay for the
French and Indian War. The colonists protested these taxes because they felt they were not
represented in Parliament. Small rebellions, mostly in the form of boycotts, led to tighter
controls, which triggered all-out war. A series of increasingly restrictive laws angered
many American colonists, leading to rebellion against Britain. As a revolutionary ideology
grew and conflicts with Britain continued, the Second Constitutional Congress declared
American Independence. While the colonies and the British began with difference
strengths and weaknesses, the Revolutionary War demonstrated Washington's great
leadership.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.2.a 6.1.12.C.2.a
8.1.12.C.1
6.1.12.D.2.a
9.1.12.C.3
Unit Essential Questions:
Why did Great Britain pass new laws in America?
How did the colonists respond to the new laws?
How did the colonists’ response lead to even stricter measures?
Why did the First Continental Congress meet?
What was the significance of the Battles at Lexington and Concord?
What actions did the Second Continental Congress take?
How did violence in Boston push the colonies closer to revolution?
What revolutionary ideology lay behind the writing of the Declaration of Independence?
How did colonists' reactions to the Declaration of Independence differ?
What groups of people played a part in the Revolutionary War?
What major revolutionary battles took place in the North?
In what ways was the Battle of Saratoga a British setback?
How did Washington's leadership at Valley Forge influence the course of the Revolutionary
War?
Why did France and other European nations assist the Americans?
What led to the British surrender at Yorktown?
What were the terms of the Treaty of Paris? What was their significance?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
A series of increasingly restrictive laws angered many American colonists, leading to
rebellion against Great Britain.
As revolutionary ideology grew and conflicts with Britain continued, the Second
Continental Congress declared American independence.
While the colonies and the British began with different strengths and weaknesses, the
Revolutionary War demonstrated Washington's great leadership.
A strengthened Continental Army, along with European allies, helped the colonists achieve
victory at Yorktown.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
After the French and Indian War, Great Britain needed a way to pay off war debts. Since
they had protected the colonists from the French, the British felt that the colonists should
help pay for some of the war. The British created acts and laws in order to raise revenue.
The Colonists were very angry over the new taxes. They believed that the colonists should
not have to pay taxes if they were not represented in parliament. The colonists protested
many of the new laws. When the Stamp Act was issued, the colonists formed the Stamp Act
Congress to protest it. The Sons of liberty were created to organize the protests. In
response, the British created more strict laws and sent more troops to North America.
In response, the British created more strict laws and sent more troops to North America.
The First Constitutional Congress met in Philadelphia in September 1774. The 13 colonies
came together in order to effectively handle the new laws that the British were imposing on
them.
The battles of Lexington and Concord (The Shot heard around the world) started the
Revolutionary war.
The Second Continental Congress formed the Continental Army and appointed George
Washington commander in chief. They issued a Continental currency. They wrote A
Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking up Arms and finally, proposed
reconciliation with King George III in the Olive Branch Petition.
The violence that erupted in Boston led to the first major battle of the Revolutionary War,
the Battle of Bunker Hill.
The colonists believed they were entitled to all the rights that British citizens had claimed
over the years. The idea of natural rights was part of their revolutionary ideology.
According to John Locke, the present British government was failing to protect the rights
and liberties of its citizens in America. That would justify a rebellion against it.
How did colonists' reactions to the Declaration of Independence differ?
Not everyone was convinced that America needed to be independent. Many colonists still
hoped for a compromise that would let the colonies remain part of Great Britain. Some
colonists remained loyal to the British. They became known as the Loyalists. The
Declaration of Independence forced the colonists to choose sides.
There were many groups that participated in the Revolutionary war. Not only were the
white male colonists involved in the fight but also women, African Americans, and Native
Americans.
The major revolutionary battles that took place in the North were the battle of Saratoga
and Valley Forge. The battle of Saratoga was a setback for the British because the
American victory encouraged the colonists and surprised the British and Europeans. The
battle of Saratoga convinced the French to support the American cause. At Valley Forge,
Washington faced a harsh winter, no supplies, and insufficient food. Despite all the
obstacles, the men survived the winter and this gave them hope.
Americans wanted recognition as a sovereign nation from Europe. Europeans nations
could also provide the Americans with money and supplies to fight the war. France became
America's strongest ally but help also came from Spain and the Netherlands. France joined
forces with the Americans because they were a long time enemy of Great Britain. France
also hoped that a British defeat in America would help restore French power in Europe.
The war finally ended with the Battle of Yorktown. The British were surrounded by the
Americans and the French. They could not escape by land or sea. The Battle of Yorktown
last 3 weeks. Cornwallis had little choice but to surrender. He did so on October 19, 1781.
The colonists were now free of British rule.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
After completion of instruction of the topic of American Revolution, students will take a
test which will assess their knowledge on Chapter 4.
Students will complete a project on the various Acts and Laws passed prior and during the
American Revolution. Their project will be assessed by a rubric.
Students will be quizzed on the restrictive acts imposed on the American colonists.
Students will be responsible for answering questions while viewing the film, The Patriot.
Formative Assessments:
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Using single words, write down how you would feel if the school cafeteria raised their
prices by one dollar overnight.
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Write down at least two advantages the colonists had in fighting the Revolutionary war.
Write down at least two advantages the British had in fighting the Revolutionary war.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
PowerPoint Notes from Aboard.
Classroom Discussion
Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Film/ "The Patriot"
Quiz
Chapter Four Test
Acts and Laws Project
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Creating of a National Government / the Constitution
Target Course/Grade Level: General
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In order to carry on the war and build a new nation, Americans had to create a framework of
government, but their first attempt of government had many weaknesses. The Articles of
Confederation under which the thirteen colonies had united to win independence, proved
insufficient to govern the new nation. The Constitutional Convention tried to write a document
that would address the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and make compromises
between large and small states and between the North and the South. Federalists and Antifederalists struggled over the principles of the new constitution. But the promise of a Bill of
rights brought about ratification. Delegates from 12 states met at the Constitutional Convention
in Philadelphia and fashioned a newer, stronger form of government, which has endured for
more than 200 years.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.2.c
6.1.12.A.2.d
6.1.12.A.2.e
6.1.12.A.2.f
8.1.12.C.1
9.1.12.C.3
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the key aspects of the new American republic?
What was the structure of the new national government?
What problems did the Confederation face?
What did the government accomplish in the Northwest Territory?
What different points of view emerged at the Constitutional Convention?
What compromises did the delegates make at the Constitutional Convention?
How does a system of checks and balances prevent any one branch of the federal government
from becoming too powerful?
What arguments for and against the Constitution were put forth by Federalists and Antifederalists?
Why was adding a Bill of Rights significant in the ratification process?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
In order to carry on the war and build a new nation, Americans had to create a framework of
government, but their first attempt of government had many weaknesses.
The Articles of Confederation under which the thirteen colonies had united to win independence,
proved insufficient to govern the new nation.
The Constitutional Convention tried to write a document that would address the weaknesses of
the Articles of Confederation and make compromises between large and small states and
between the North and the South.
Federalists and Anti-federalists struggled over the principles of the new constitution.
The promise of a Bill of Rights brought about ratification.
Delegates from 12 states met at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia and fashioned a
newer, stronger form of government, which has endured for more than 200 years.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
After fighting the Revolutionary war, the Americans did not want another monarchy. The idea of
republicanism was that hard-working, property-owning citizens would be active in government.
The first government that the Americans set up after the revolutionary war was the Articles of
Confederation. Under the Articles of Confederation, the central government had only one branch
of government, which was the legislative branch. There were no judicial or executive branches.
Each state also had only one vote in Congress, regardless of population. The Articles could
establish national policies and conduct foreign relations, including relations with Native
American nations. Congress could borrow and coin money, and set up post offices. It also has
the power to establish an army and declare war.
The Articles were far from perfect. Americans experienced many problems under the Articles.
Congress faced financial problems and problems with the states and foreign nations.
The Northwest Ordinance divided the territory in 10 districts. It made land available for the
settlement, extended civil rights and enforced education. Slavery was not allowed in the territory.
Also they were allowed to have religious freedom. It also outlined a process to becoming a state.
Once it was obvious the Articles were not working, the delegates from each state met at the
constitutional convention. At the Constitutional Convention, the Virginia Plan and the New
Jersey plans were combined to from the Great Compromise. In the Great Compromise, a
bicameral legislature was set up, in the lower house, the number of representatives for each state
was to be determined by population, and in the upper house, each state has an equal number of
representatives.
At the Constitutional Convention, the Great Compromise and the Three-Fifths compromise were
made.
The checks and balances among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government
that were added to the Constitution provided that each branch with power to slow or stop an
action taken by one of the other branches. These checks and balances ensured that no one branch
of the government would dominate the others.
Throughout the process of creating the Constitution, Federalists were in support of the
Constitution and the Anti-Federalists were against ratification of the constitution. The Federalists
believed a strong national government was necessary for the survival of the republic. They
wanted government to end chaos and be a check on the kind of mob rule seen during Shays’
Rebellion. At the same time, they pointed out that the separation of powers in the Constitution
put limits on government power. The Anti-federalists argued that a republic could not succeed in
a nation as large as the United States. They also criticized specific features such as the role of the
president, the number of congressional representatives, and the length of senatorial terms.
Anti-federalists demanded the addition of a Bill of Rights. Because they did not trust
government, the wanted to spell out some basic rights in the Constitution to make sure those
rights would be protected. Adding a Bill of Rights became the main focus of the struggle over
ratification.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher Made Test
After completion of instruction of the topic of the Constitution, students will take a test which
will assess their knowledge on Chapter 5.
Title: Common Writing Assessment
Five Paragraph Essay: Bill of Rights
Title: Quiz
Checks and Balances quiz
Formative Assessments:
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
Title: Constitution Scavenger Hunt
Students will look for answers throughout the Constitution.
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Create a list of problems faced by our modern government
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Describe at least two weaknesses associated with the Articles of Confederation.
Title: Collins Type Three Writing Assignment
One page rough draft: Which right in the Bill of Rights is most important to you and why?
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Teacher made test
Quiz
Collins Type One - Three Writing Assignment
Constitution Scavenger Hunt
Constitution Quizzo
Common Writing Assessment
Cooperative Activities
Video Clips
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: General United States History I
Unit Title: Early Republic/ War of 1812
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In the last decade of the 1700s, debates over the size and role of the federal government led to the
emergence of rival political parties, the Federalists and the Democratic Republicans. George
Washington and the First Congress struggled to organize a new government and John Adams dealt
with threats from abroad. Thomas Jefferson's election as president in 1800 led to the eventual
demise of the Federalists. Jefferson also expanded the size of the country with the Louisiana
Purchase. In the administration of James Madison, a military conflict with Great Britain erupted
known as the War of 1812. This war finally solidified our status as an independent country.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.b: Determine the extent to which America’s foreign policy (i.e., Tripoli pirates, the
Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, the War with Mexico, and Native
American removal) was influenced by perceived national interest.
6.1.12.A.3.c: Assess the role of geopolitics in the development of American foreign relations
during this period.
Unit Essential Questions:
What steps did Congress and the president take to organize the new government?
What was Alexander Hamilton's plan to settle the nation's debt?
What was the debate over the national bank?
How did the first political parties form?
Why did Washington want to remain neutral in response to events in Europe?
What conflicts took place in the Northwest Territory?
What challenges did John Adams face as president, and what was the XYZ Affair?
Why was the transfer of power in the election of 1800 significant?
What changes did Jefferson make when he took office?
What was the impact of the Louisiana Purchase?
How did the role of the Supreme Court change?
What violations of American neutrality led to the War of 1812?
How did Tecumseh resist American settlers?
How did the War of 1812 begin? How did the war affect the new nation?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
President Washington and other leaders tired to solve the new nation's economic problems. This
led to the rise of political parties.
The United States faced many challenges during the 1790s. It tried to remain neutral in European
wars while dealing with conflicts with Native Americans in the Northwest Territory.
The rise of political parties influenced the election of 1800, bringing Thomas Jefferson and a new
outlook to the presidency.
In the early 1800s, Americans unified to face Great Britain in war once again and to battle
resistance from Native Americans over attempts to seize their lands.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
George Washington and Congress took steps to organize the newly created American government.
One of his first actions was the creation of a presidential cabinet. Alexander Hamilton took control
of the nation's finance and organized a plan to settle the national debt. Another aspect of
Hamilton's financial plan was the creation of the National Bank. Republicans, led by Thomas
Jefferson, opped the bank based on strict constructionist view of the Constitution. At this time, the
first American political parties formed. The Federalists were led by Hamilton and called for a
strong national government. The Democratic-Republicans were led by Jefferson and called for a
weak national government.
During the Washington presidency, France and Britain went to war. Washington chose a policy of
neutrality in order to focus on domestic problems and ensure future prosperity. Violent conflicts
erupted between settlers and Native Americans in the Northwest Territory. These problems did not
end for the next president, John Adams, who dealt with the XYZ affair. As a response, Adams
retaliated with legislation known as the Alien and Sedition Acts.
The election of 1800 marked a change in the politics in America. Jefferson, a Republican, assumed
the presidency after two federalist administrations. Jefferson decreased the size of the national
government and lowered taxes. The most important event of Jefferson's presidency was the
Louisiana Purchase, which virtually doubled the size of the country. Additionally, the supreme
court took a more prominent role, establishing the power of Judicial Review in the landmark case,
Marbury v. Madison.
A military conflict with Great Britain emerged during the presidency of James Madison. The war
of 1812 was caused by a controversial practice called impressment. Another cause of the conflict
was Britain's alliances with Native Americans in the Northwest Territory. The war lasted three
years until the Treaty of Ghent was signed. Effects of the conflict on the U.S. included an
outpouring of national pride, an increased level of respect from nations abroad, and a decrease in
Native American resistance.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Teacher made test
Once instruction is completed on the early Republic/War of 1812, students will be tested on
Chapter 6.
Formative Assessments:
Collins Type One Writing Assignment
In five lines or more, write down ideas on why a strong economy is important for the United
States.
Map Activity
Louisiana Purchase: Expanding of the United States
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Students will view the video "Journey of Lewis and Clark"
Summarize the journey of Lewis and Clark based on the video
Worksheets
Vocabulary Builder: Chapter 6
Graphic Organizer: XYZ Affair
Guided Notes: War of 1812
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem.
Sutin: Hart, Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Worksheets
Video "The Founding Brothers"
Video "The Journey of Lewis and Clark"
Video "War of 1812: History Channel"
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
Eboard (Powerpoint presentation)
Teacher made test - Chapter 6
Videos "Founding Brothers", "The Journey of Lewis and Clark", and "The War of 1812: History
Channel"
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Worksheets/Graphic Organizers
Map Activity
Class Discussion
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: General United States History I
Unit Title: The Age of Jackson
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
The War of 1812 filled Americans with national pride and confidence in the future. A war hero in
the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson, who formed the Democratic Party, became president in 1828 and
the Age of Jackson had begun. With his bold policies, such as the spoils system, the Indian Removal
Act, and the closing of the national bank, Jackson was seen as "a man of the people" by his
supporters but criticized by many of his peers. More importantly, against the backdrop of an
emerging national identity, two distinct economic systems were developing in the North and South.
The North developed into a manufacturing powerhouse due to the Industrial Revolution. The South,
with the invention of the cotton gin, expanded the Cotton Belt and ultimately spread the institution of
slavery. Nationalism gave way to sectionalism as the two sections disagreed over issues such as
slavery, economic policy, and the issue of states' rights.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication; Collaboration; Creativity
and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.b: Determine the extent to which America’s foreign policy (i.e., Tripoli pirates, the
Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, the War with Mexico, and Native
American removal) was influenced by perceived national interest.
6.1.12.A.3.c: Assess the role of geopolitics in the development of American foreign relations
during this period.
6.1.12.A.3.d: Describe how the Supreme Court increased the power of the national government and
promoted national economic growth during this era.
6.1.12.A.3.e: Judge the fairness of government treaties, policies, and actions that resulted in Native
American migration and removal.
6.1.12.D.3.c: Assess how states' rights (i.e., Nullification) and sectional interests influenced party
politics and shaped national policies (i.e., the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850).
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the characteristics of the new American culture?
How did nationalism influence domestic policy?
How did nationalism guide foreign policy?
What was the Missouri Compromise?
What path led to Andrew Jackson's presidency?
How did the Indian Removal Act lead to the Trail of Tears?
Why was the national bank a source of controversy?
How did a conflict over the issue of states' rights lead to a crisis?
What was the Industrial Revolution?
How did the Industrial Revolution affect the North?
What advancements were made in transportation and communication?
Why was cotton king in the South?
How did the cultivation of cotton lead to the spread of slavery?
What key differences developed between the North and the South?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Nationalism contributed to the growth of American culture and influenced domestic and foreign
policies.
President Andrew Jackson's bold actions defined a period of American history.
The North developed an economy based on industry.
During the early 1800s, the South developed an economy based on agriculture.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
During the 1800s, a new American Culture emerged. In his famous work, Democracy in America,
Tocqueville commented on the unique characteristics of America. Also during this time, American
art and literature flourished. The English language even changed in America documented by Noah
Websters creation of a new dictionary.
At this time, a great sense of Nationalism emerged. These feelings of nationalism were soon reflected
in government policies such as Supreme Court decisions and the American System. We also
established our dominance over the Americas with the Monroe Doctrine.
The expansion of the United States led to tensions between the North and the South. To resolve some
of these tensions, Congress passed the Missouri Compromise which temporarily delayed a conflict
between slave and free states.
Andrew Jackson, a popular war hero, created the Democratic Party and won the election of 1828. He
was seen as the president of the common man. One of Jackson's first acts in office was to replace
many officials with his supporters. This became known as the spoils system.
By the time Andrew Jackson became president, there were Five major Native American groups
occupying the southeastern United States. These groups, the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw,
Seminole, and Creek were sometimes called the "five civilized tribes" because many of their
members had adopted aspects of European and American culture. The White American wanted the
farmland that existed in this region. Jackson concluded that the best course of action would be to
relocate the five nations to an area west of the Mississippi River called Indian Territory. Jackson
signed the Indian Removal Act into law and the Native American groups had to march west,
hundreds of miles in miserable conditions.
The Cherokee nation fought the removal act in the American Court System. In the case of Worcester
v. Georgia, the court ruled in favor of the Cherokee, claiming the state Georgia did not have the right
to take the Cherokee lands. To get around the court's ruling, government officials signed a treaty with
Cherokee leaders who favored relocation even though they did not represent most of the Cherokee
people. Under this treaty, the Cherokee were relocated west. Of the 16,000 Cherokee who made the
journey, 4,000 died on the march to Indian Territory. Their exodus became known as the Trial of
Tears.
Another issue in President Jackson's presidency was the issue of the Second National Bank. Jackson
believed the bank was a "monster". Once he won reelection in 1832, Jackson ordered Secretary of the
Treasury to take money out of the Bank and deposit it in select state banks or as critics called these
banks "pet banks". In 1836, the Second Bank became nothing more than another state bank. At the
forefront of the bank issue was how power should be divided between the federal and state
governments. In 1828, Congress raised the tariff which increased the price of British goods. This was
to encourage Americans to buy American goods. The agricultural southern states despised this tariff.
It forced Southerners to buy northern goods instead of less expensive British goods. When Congress
passed another tariff in 1832, South Carolina declared the tariff "null and void" and threatened to
secede if the government tried to enforce the tariff. Congress empowered Jackson with the Force Bill
which would allow him to use military force to collect the tariff. The situation was resolved when
Henry Clay worked out a compromise in which tariffs would be reduced over a period of 10 years.
The North was greatly affected by the Industrial Revolution. The Industrial Revolution was the birth
of modern industry and the social changes that accompanied it. Industrialization in the North led to
urbanization. People left the farms and moved to the cities where they could find work. The North
underwent dramatic and rapid changes. Within decades, it evolved from a region of small towns and
farms into one including large cities and factories. Some inventions of the Industrial Revolution were
the steamboat, the first railroads, and the telegraph.
While the North was greatly affected by the Industrial Revolution, the Cotton belt grew due to the
invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney. Since the cotton gin made it easier to clean the cotton,
large scale cotton production was now possible. With the expansion of the Cotton Belt, more slaves
were need as laborers. Thus, there was a powerful economic incentive to maintain slavery in the
South.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
After completion of instruction and class work on Jackson and the Industrial revolution, students will
be given a test on Chapter 7 to assess their learning.
Formative Assessments:
Worksheets: Vocabulary Builder: Chapter 7
Quiz: Students will describe the differences between the North and the South
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Write a list of the times you have felt pride to be an
American.
Industrial Revolution Project: In cooperative learning groups, students will create their own invention
as close to reality as possible. They will also compile an advertising campaign to sell their product.
Jackson Video Summary: Students will view the video "The Life of Andrew Jackson" (PBS). Write a
one paragraph summary on each clip shown.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin: Hart,
reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Project Materials
Worksheets
Video "The Life of Andrew Jackson"
Video "500 Nations"
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at the
summative tasks.
Eboard - Powerpoint presentation
Teacher made Test
Class Discussion
Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Cooperative Learning Activity
Video "The Life of Andrew Jackson"
Project materials
Primary Sources
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: General United States History I
Unit Title: The Reform Movements: 1830-1860
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
The religious revival called the Second Great Awakening set off one of the great periods of social
reform in American history. Some reformers sought to improve conditions in prisons, factories, and
the increasingly crowded cities. Other reformers worked to extend women's rights and to end slavery
in the United States. Inspired to do good works, the reformers changed the face of America.
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.f: Compare and contrast the successes and failures of political (i.e., the 1844 State
Constitution) and social (i.e., abolition, women’s rights, and temperance) reform movements in New
Jersey and the nation during the Antebellum period.
6.1.12.A.3.h: Analyze the various rationales provided as a justification for slavery.
6.1.12.A.3.i: Relate the impact of the Supreme Court decision regarding the Amistad to the
antislavery movement.
Unit Essential Questions:
How did religion help lead to reform?
What role did Horace Mann play in reforming education?
What role did Dorothea Dix play in reforming prisons?
What are transcendentalism and utopianism?
Why did many Irish and Germans immigrate to the United States in the 1840s and 1850s?
What was life in the United States like for the new immigrants?
How did urbanization and industrialization lead to reform?
What limits were placed on women's lives in the early 1800s?
What role did women play in the movements of the Reform Era?
Why was the Seneca Falls Convention important?
What was life like for enslaved African Americans in the South?
How did people in the South fight against slavery?
What were the major developments in the abolition movement?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
A revival in religion in the early 1800s helped lead to an era of reform.
A wave of Irish and German immigrants entered the United States during the period of urbanization
and reform.
After leading reform movements to help others, some American women began to work on behalf of
themselves.
The movement to end slavery dominated the Reform Era.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
During the early 1800s, religious fervor swept through America in the form of a movement known as
the Second Great Awakening. This movement led to changes throughout American society. One area
of society in which reforms took place was education. Horace Mann played an integral role in
organizing public education. Another reformer, Dorothea Dix was an advocate for prison reform. A
group of philosophers in New England, known as the Transcendentalists, started a movement
encouraging gaining knowledge through reason, intuition, and spiritual experiences.
Irish and German immigrants came to America in large numbers during the mid 1800s. Life was hard
for immigrants, who were often turned away from jobs. Immigrants tended to settle in crowded urban
neighborhoods in buildings called tenements. Low wages, long hours, and unsafe conditions were
common.
The women's rights movement also began in the mid 19th century. Women were severely restricted
in terms of the law, property ownership, and cultural opportunities. The birth place of the women's
rights movement was the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth
Cady Stanton.
The Great Awakening led people to question the morality of slavery. Free African Americans, former
slaves, and elite whites came together and protested slavery though the abolition movement. Leaders
of the movement such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass increased awareness
concerning the horrors of slavery.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Upon completion of instruction on the reform movements 1830-1860, students will be tested on
chapter 8.
Formative Assessments:
Film Summary: Summarize urban life, Irish Immigration, and the Nativist movement as depicted in
the film, the Gangs of New York.
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Is religion important in your life? Why or why not?
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: Which reform movement from this era has created the
highest impact on the U.S. today? Name three reasons why.
Cooperative Activity: Discussion of current issues in society based on reform movement of this era.
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
Worksheets: Graphic Organizer: Chapter 8
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Textbook- Ayers de la Teja, Gray White, and Schukzinger. American Anthem. Sutin:
Hart, Reinhart, and Winston, 2009
Power Presentation
Primary Sources
Project Materials
Worksheets
Resources: Gangs of New York
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at the
summative tasks.
E-board (Powerpoint presentation)
Teacher Created Test
Reform Quizzo
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Video: The Gangs of New York
Cooperative Activity
Class Discussion
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: Westward Expansion/Manifest Destiny
Target Course/Grade Level: General
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
They were drawn by varied dreams: of gold, of religious freedom, of good farmland. They
possessed a belief that settling the lands from the Atlantic to the Pacific was America's destiny.
Between 1830 and 1860 Americans by the thousands migrated westward into the frontier
wilderness. In 1846, souring relations led to war between Mexico and the United States, and the
outcome defined America's borders.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.3.a
6.1.12.A.3.b
6.1.12.A.3.e
6.1.12.D.3.a
8.1.12.C.1
9.1.12.C.3
Unit Essential Questions:
Why did Americans head west?
What were the major western trails?
How did the gold rush affect California?
What were some major effects of westward migration?
What system did the Spanish use to settle Texas?
How did Americans begin to move into Texas?
What were the causes and effects of the Texas Revolution?
What were the arguments for and against the annexation of Texas?
What created tensions between the United States and Mexico in the 1840s?
What were the causes and effects of the Mexican-American War?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Americans in large numbers followed trails to the West in the 1840s and 1850s because of
"manifest destiny."
American settlers in Texas revolted against the Mexican government and created the independent
Republic of Texas.
Soon after annexing Texas, the United States declared war on Mexico.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
In the 1840s America was expanding west and many settlers moved into new areas. Americans
believed it was their "Manifest Destiny" to expand the U.S. to the Pacific Ocean. The most
common mode of western travel was trails. The most popular trails west included the Santa Fe
trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Mormon Trail. Another reason many settlers traveled west was
the discovery of gold in California. Although most gold seekers never struck it right, the gold
rush led to the settlement and organization of California.
Many Americans were responsible for colonizing Texas. Led by Stephen Austin and other
empresarios, many Americans moved their families to Texas, which was a property of Mexico.
Disagreements between Texans and the Mexican Government led to the Texas Revolution. In
three famous battles, including the Alamo, Texas won its independence from Mexico.
Texas remained an independent republic for nearly ten years. In 1846, the U.S. annexed Texas
creating a dispute with Mexico. Tensions between the two nations led to the Mexican-American
war. The U.S. defeated Mexico and won a large piece of western land known as the Mexican
Cession.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher made test
After completion of instruction and class work on Westward Expansion, students will be given a
test on Chapter 9 to assess their learning.
Formative Assessments:
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Make a list of items you would need for a trip west on the Oregon Trail
Title: Collins Type two Writing assignment
Briefly describe three aspects of the painting "American Progress" that illustrate the concept of
Manifest Destiny.
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning.
Title: Worksheet
Graphic Organizer
Vocabulary Builder: Chapter 9
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
E-board (PowerPoint presentation)
Teacher made test
Class discussion
Collins Type One-Two Writing Assignment
Primary Source
Video: The Alamo
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: Social Studies
Unit Title: The Civil War
Target Course/Grade Level: U.S History I/ Grade 10
School: HHS
UNIT SUMMARY:
The Civil War was fought nationwide, using new technologies and strategies, but by soldiers who
were often ill equipped, underfed, and poorly trained. The conflict resulted in freedom for some 4
million enslaved people and the preservation of a nation. The costs were staggering-more than
600,000 lives lost and about $5 billion in property damaged or destroyed.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
Unit Essential Questions:
How did the fall of Fort Sumter lead to war?
Why did many northerners and southerners eagerly rush to war?
Why was the loyalty of the border states important, and how did Lincoln obtain it?
What were Union and Confederate goals and strategies for the war?
What factors made the major battles in the war so bloody?
How did the Union carry out its strategy in the Mississippi Valley?
What led to the Confederate successes in the war in the East?
Why did Confederate forces invade the Union, and with what result?
How did the Emancipation Proclamation affect the Civil War?
How did African Americans contribute to the war effort?
What was life like in the military?
What similarities and differences existed on the home front in the North and South?
In what ways was the war at sea an important part of the Civil war?
What were each side's goals in the West, and how were events there influenced by the rest of the
war?
What three major battles took place in 1863, and why was each important?
Why was the fighting around Chattanooga, Tennessee, important to the outcome of the war?
What tactics did Grant use against Lee to change the course of the war?
How did the election of 1864 affect Confederate hopes for victory in the Civil War?
How did the actions of Sherman and Grant help bring the war to an end?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
The attack on Fort Sumter led both the North and the South to prepare for war in earnest.
Widespread fighting occurred during the first two years of the Civil War.
The Civil War created hardships, challenges, and opportunities for people in the North and South.
Important fighting occurred in all sections of the country as well as at sea.
Southerners continued to hope for victory in 1864, but military and political events caused those
hopes to fade.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
The Civil War began at Fort Sumter. Fort Sumter was an important symbol to the Union because it
was the last federal possession in Confederate Territory. Although no one was killed in the
fighting, the war was underway.
The first major battle took place at Bull Run. The battle proved that the war was going to be longer
and bloodier than most expected. Early n the war, the South proved to be a formitable opponent for
the North. The confidence of the Confederate Army led them to invade the North at the battle of
Antietam. Although a tactical draw, Antietan ended the Southern invasion and gave Lincoln an
opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation changed the
scope of the war by maing the Civil War a fight to end slavery.
The Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville led to the pivotal battle of Gettysburg.
Gettysburg was a crushing defeat for the South, ending yet another Southern invasion of the North.
In 1864, Lincoln installed Ulysses S. Grant as the leader of the Union troops in Virginia. At the
same time, Union generl William Sherman Tecumseh was launching a destructive march through
Georgia. The War came to an end in 1865 when Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at
Appomattox Courthouse.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
Title: Teacher Made test
After completion of instruction of the topic of the Civil War, students will take a test which will
assess thier knowledge on Chapter 11.
Title: Quiz
Battles Quiz
Formative Assessments:
Title: Letter
Civil War Letter
RUBRICS
Title: Class Discussion
Teacher-facilitated discussions will assess students learning.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type One Writing Assignment
Make a list of items a typical civil war soldier would have in his backpack.
RUBRICS
Title: Collins Type Two Writing Assignment
Write down at least two reasons, either for or against, President Lincoln's suspension of Habeas
Corpus in Maryland.
RUBRICS
Title: Worksheets
Battles Chart
Advantages and Disadvantages of the Confederate and Union Army
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Resources:
Video "Glory"
Video "Civil War Box Set: History Channel"
Video "Gettysburg"
Media Center
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO




Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.



Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area:
Social Studies
Unit Title:
Reconstruction
Target Course/Grade Level: General U.S 1
School:
Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY:
Following the Civil War, the U.S faced a tumultuous political atmosphere. Slaves freed by the
13th Amendment had to be integrated into American society. Other problems, such as how to
treat the Southern states after the war, were major problems facing American politicians. Further
complicating matters, Abraham Lincoln, was assassinated, forcing Andrew Johnson to assume
control of executive power. White southerners felt that the federal government was playing too
large a role in Reconstruction and struck back at increased suffrage by forming terrorist
organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. Overall Reconstruction was deemed a failure because
African Americans failed to achieve social equality.
21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and problem solving; Communication;
Collaboration; Creativity and Innovation
21st Century Themes: Civic Literacy; Financial, Economic, Business and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental
Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.12.A.4.d, 6.1.12.B.4.b, 6.1.12.D.4.c, 6.1.12.D.4.d
Unit Essential Questions:
 What challenges faced the South after the Civil War?
 What actions sdid Union leaders take during wartime to reconstruct the nation after the
war’s end?
 How did Lincoln’s assassination affect the nation?
 Why did President Johnson and Congress differ over Reconstruction
 How did the South respond to Reconstruction under President Johnson?
 Why did Congress take control of Reconstruction, and what changes were made?
 How did Radical Reconstruction differ from earlier Reconstruction lans and what were its
effects?
 What changes did Republican government bring to the South?
 What was life after slavery like for African Americans?
 How did Reconstruction affect patterns of land ownership and land use in the South?
 What problems caused support for Reconstruction to decline?
 What events brought Reconstruction to an end?
 What was Reconstruction’s legacy for the South and for the rest of the nation?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
 Northern leaders had differing ideas for dealing with the many issues and challenges of
restoring the southern states to the Union
 Congress took control of Reconstruction as a new, radical branch of the Republican Party
was emerging


Republican Reconstruction had a significant impact on life in the South
A variety of events and forces led to the end of Reconstruction, which left a mixed legacy
for the nation
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
 Understand the various plans for reconstruction
 Identify measures taken by the federal government to aid former slaves
 Analyze the contributions of the North during Reconstruction
 Understand the reason that Reconstruction failed to provide full equality for African
Americans
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:



Teacher created tests
Essay: “Affects of the Lincoln Assassination”
Quizzes
Formative Assessments:
 Class discussion
 Collins Type 1 and 2: “Differences between Reconstruction Plans”
 Homework
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
 Write about the fear tactics used by the Klan to intimidate African Americans
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
 Textbook
 Powerpoint
 Worksheets
 Videos
 Primary Sources
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities
WHERETO







Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at
the summative tasks.
HAMMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
CURRICULUM PROJECT
Creating a Student-Centered Classroom
Content Area: General United States History I
Unit Title: The American West
Target Course/Grade Level: Sophomore
School: Hammonton High School
UNIT SUMMARY
In opening the West for settlement, the federal government relocated Native Americans to vastly
diminished homelands or eliminated them in military battles. During this cultural encounter, the
white Americans were driven by a strong sense of cultural superiority. This mentality generated
brutal and inhumane treatment of Native Americans. Not only were Native Americans robbed of
their lives and land, they also faced a century of forced assimilation. Once Native Americans were
confined to reservations, white Americans, immigrants, and African Americans eagerly moved into
the new frontier to mine, ranch, and establish farms. New technologies and perseverance helped
them survive in the new landscape.
21st
Century
Themes:
Civic
Literacy;
Financial,
Economic,
Business
and
Entrepreneurial Literacy; Global Awareness; Health Literacy; Environmental Literacy
STAGE ONE: LEARNING TARGETS
2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards including Cumulative Progress
Indicator (CPI):
6.1.8.B.4.a - Assess the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and western exploration on the expansion
and economic development of the United States.
6.1.8.B.4.b- Map territorial expansion and settlement, as well as the locations of conflicts with and
removal of Native Americans.
Unit Essential Questions:
What were the culture, heritage, traditions, and religion of Plains Indians and why were
they devalued by white Americans?
In what ways did American officials, soldiers, and settlers disrupt and ultimately destroy the Native
Americans' ability to resist white encroachment on Indian land?
Why was the American army able to conquer the Native Americans in battle?
Who were significant Native American leaders and how did they attempt to maintain their peoples'
land and culture?
In what ways did the U.S. government attempt to assimilate Native Americans?
What new technologies and government policies made it possible for miners, ranchers, and farmers to
survive and flourish in the American West?
Unit Enduring Understandings:
Students will recognize the characteristics and achievements of the culture of Plains Indians.
Students will understand how and why Native Americans were massacred, sent to reservations, their
lands stolen, and their culture destroyed.
After Native Americans were relocated to reservations:
The U.S. government forced assimilation on Native Americans.
The mining boom created new towns and businesses.
The cattle boom created new trails and ranches.
Farmers settled the Plains, building permanent settlements and communities.
The "frontier" was a fluid, diverse, multi-cultural community.
Key Knowledge and Skills students will acquire as a result of this unit:
Students will be able to …
The Plains Indians had their own culture and religion.
The contrast between the Plains Indians' nomadic hunting lifestyle and the desire to incorporate the
lands of the West into the rapidly industrializing United States set the stage for cultural conflict.
The Native Americans fought the movement of settlers westward, but the U.S. military and the
persistence of American settlers proved too strong to resist.
The resulting "Indian Wars" had disastrous consequences for Native Americans. Those that survived
the battles lost their land and were forced to assimilate into white America.
Many people sought fortunes during the mining and cattle booms of the American West.
The U.S. government promoted the settlement of the West, offering free or cheap land to those
willing to put in the hard work of turning the land into productive farms.
STAGE TWO: EVIDENCE OF LEARNING
Summative Assessment:
A teacher constructed test will assess student learning for chapter 13
Formative Assessments:
Homestead Act poster project: Homestead Act advertisement
Collins Type One Writing Assignment: Write a list of characteristics of a cowboy.
Collins Type Two Writing Assignment: You are living on the prairie. Write a letter to a friend back
east describing the challenges of living in a sod house
Quiz: Native American Battles quiz
Worksheets: Vocabulary Builder: chapter 13
Video Guided Notes: Answer questions based on the viewing of 500 Nations
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher facilitated class discussions will assess student learning
STAGE THREE: THE LEARNING PLAN
Sequence of teaching and learning experiences
Unit Resources:
Printed Materials:
Textbook: Ayers, de la Teja, Gray White, and Schulzinger. American Anthem. Austin: Hart,
Rinehart, and Winston, 2009.
Teacher handouts / worksheets
Supplemental readings/primary sources
Resources:
Teacher notes from PowerPoint presentations
Video: 500 Nations
Video: Dances With Wolves
Instructional Guidelines: Aligning Learning Activities







WHERETO
Where is the unit headed?
Hook the learner with engaging work.
Equip for understanding, experience and explore the big ideas.
Rethink opinions, revise ideas and work.
Evaluate your work and adjust as needed.
Tailor the work to reflect individual needs, interests, and styles.
Organize the work flow to maximize in-depth understanding and success at the
summative tasks.
Eboard - Powerpoint presentation
Teacher made Test
Lecture accompanied by notes via a PowerPoint presentation.
Cooperative Activity: Homestead Act poster project.
Class Discussion
Collins Type One-Two writing assignments
Battles Quiz
Worksheets