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Transcript
May 10-13, 2016 • New Orleans, LA
Sher aton New Orleans Hotel
Jointly provided by the University of Cincinnati
TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4
Future SAEM Annual Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
SAEM Annual Meeting Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
FORUMS
SAEM Leadership Development Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
SAEM Education Leadership Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Resident Academic and Leadership Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Junior Faculty Development Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-11
Medical Student Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
TEACH Residents: Technology for Educational Advancement Creates Happy Residents . . . .
Cochrane Systematic Reviews of Interventions Training Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Med-Ed Bootcamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Social Media to Enhance Your Academic Career . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Global Emergency Medicine Think Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Core Skills in Palliative Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grant Writing Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Train the Trainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEM Consensus Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diversity 301 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Building Your Brand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wilderness Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Challenges and Controversies of ED Opioid Prescribing in the Era of Opioid Epidemic . . . . .
13
14
15
15
16
17
17
18
19
20
20
21
22
Insight to Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Navigating the Academic Ranks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Daily Schedule and Grid (Pull-out Section) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-32
Didactic Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-52
Oral Abstracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53-56
Lightning Orals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57-67
ePosters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74
Innovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76
Ignite! SAEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Acknowledgement of Abstract Reviewers and Moderators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80-81
Acknowledgement of Medical Student Ambassadors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Photography Exhibit & Visual Diagnosis Contest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
SAEM16 Exhibitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84-88
Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-105
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106-108
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel
May 10-13, 2016
WELCOME!
Welcome to SAEM16. We hope you enjoy the exciting and high quality didactics, research
presentations, and innovative programs that we have to offer. Our program committee has created
an amazing meeting that highlights the excellence and diversity of our membership. This is our
opportunity to engage, debate, and collaborate with the leaders in our field. Most importantly, it is a
time for us to come together as an academic community so we can share our successes, learn from
each other, and develop the specialty for the future. I hope you leave this meeting having renewed old
friendships, made new ones, and with heightened enthusiasm for academic emergency medicine.
Welcome to New Orleans!
SAEM16 – GENER AL INFOR M ATION
2016 ANNUAL MEETING
Deborah Diercks, MD, MSc
President, SAEM
A LEANER AND MEANER SAEM ANNUAL MEETING
Last year’s annual meeting, set against the beautiful city of San Diego, was the largest meeting
in SAEM’s history. We packed in more content than ever before and had our conference hotel
bursting at the seams. It was absolutely amazing! However, while everyone had a great time at
the conference—from the filled-to-capacity opening party to the celebratory closing reception—we
heard from quite a few attendees that there was TOO much content and not enough time to see it all.
So this year, we’ve focused on the best of the best. We’ve returned to New Orleans (site of some
of our best annual meetings of the past) with a collection of abstracts, didactics, and innovations
that were put through a selection process that was more competitive than ever. This is going to be
a streamlined annual meeting with less—but more robust—content, shorter didactics, a greater
number of Lightning Oral Presentations, and even more of the popular IGNITE! talks. So, while
there will still be plenty of outstanding content, we’re confident that this year you’ll be able to attend
everything you want to see.
Our Pre-meeting Workshops, including the legendary Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference (focusing on
Shared Decision Making) will bring together topic experts in specific areas. And, for the first time, we’re capturing 150 hours
of quality content and offering it at no cost to all attendees through our OnDemand platform. So even if you do happen to
miss a great session, you can watch it later, at any time, for free.
We’ve also fine-tuned the ePoster hall that we trialed last year. This year we have moderated ePoster rooms instead, allowing
for greater audience interaction and networking.
Both the exhibit hall and the Residency and Fellowship Fair have more registrants than ever before, and should be great
places to meet with vendors and program directors focused on improving the care we provide in the ED.
As always, annual meeting attenders will have the opportunity to attend audience-specific educational sessions, including
the Educational Leadership Forum, Junior Faculty Development Forum, Resident Academic Leadership Forum, and Medical
Student Symposium. The popular and energetic SonoGames® and SIM Wars are also back.
SAEM16 has built in plenty of time for the society’s academies, committees, and interest groups to reconnect and forge
ahead. In addition, the Opening Reception, the Foundation FUND Run, Dodgeball, Networking Breakfast, the SAEMF Wine
Tasting, and Closing Reception will allow for plenty of fun breaks throughout the week.
Don’t forget to tweet! We’re hoping to have #SAEM16 trend at the top of Twitter again and, with your help, it will. Medical
Student Ambassadors will be tweeting and helping attendees find their way around the conference. They’ll be wearing polo
shirts branded with the SAEM logo and colors. Please ask for their help if you need anything. The mobile app is also available
to provide updated information on the meeting.
Finally, SAEM16 couldn’t happen without countless hours of work by the SAEM staff, CEO, and Board of Directors, the
SAEM16 Program Committee, and all of the SAEM academies. So to them and all of you I’d like to say “Thank you!” and have
a fantastic time here in New Orleans!
Ali Raja, MD
Chair, SAEM16 Program Committee
1
SAEM16 – GENER AL INFOR M ATION
GENER AL INFORMATION
Welcome to the 27th Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting. You will notice many significant innovations and
additions to this year’s offerings. The Sheraton New Orleans Hotel has multiple levels which may be accessed via elevators and
escalators. Please note the escalators do not go to the 8th Floor meeting space; you will need to access this floor via elevator.
The session and meeting listings have the room names and floor numbers for reference.
Registration
The registration desks are located on the 5th Floor in the Grand Foyer across from our exhibitor area in Grand Ballrooms C/D/E.
Please remember you must wear your name badge at all times for entry into educational sessions and social events.
REGISTRATION HOURS
• Monday, May 9:
• Tuesday, May 10:
• Wednesday, May 11:
3:00 pm-7:00 pm
7:00 am-5:00 pm
7:00 am-5:00 pm
• Thursday, May 12:
• Friday, May 13:
7:00 am-5:30 pm
7:00 am-4:00 pm
Continuing Medical Education
Target Audience:
The CME program offered by SAEM targets, but is not limited to, emergency healthcare providers such as medical students,
allied healthcare providers (nurse practitioners, physician assistants), emergency medicine technicians, nurses, residents, fellows,
researchers, faculty and physicians.
Overall Program Objectives:
• To enhance participants’ knowledge of cutting-edge research being conducted in emergency medicine.
• To provide physician with the tools to address gaps in their knowledge, competence, and experience through the translation of
new findings, procedures, and methods in emergency medicine into their clinical and research practices.
Joint Accreditation Statement:
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the
Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of Cincinnati and
SAEM OnDemand
View the SAEM16 Presentations —
Anytime, Anywhere
• Unlimited online access to up to 150 hours of education
• Presentations include synchronized slides, audio
and embedded video
• Download PDFs of presenter slides and audio MP3
NEW THIS
YEAR —
Learn more and see a demo at the SAEM
OnDemand Booth in the Exhibit Hall!
Viewing Begins
on May 11th at saem.org/ondemand
2
FREE
to all
registered
attendees!
Faculty Disclosure Declaration:
According to the disclosure policy of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, all faculty, planning committee
members, and other individuals who are in a position to control content are required to disclose any relevant relationships with
any commercial interest related to this activity. The existence of these interests or relationships is not viewed as implying bias
or decreasing the value of the presentation, and any conflict of interest is resolved prior to the activity. All education materials
are reviewed for fair balance, scientific objectivity and levels of evidence. Disclosure will be made at the time of the activity.
Welcome and Award Ceremony
Join us as we recognize the 2016 award winners, on Wednesday, May 11 from 9:15 am-9:50 am in the Napoleon Ballroom on
the 3rd Floor.
SAEM16 – GENER AL INFOR M ATION
Society of Academic Emergency Medicine. The University of Cincinnati is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing
medical education for physicians. The University of Cincinnati designates this live activity for a maximum of 26 AMA PRA
Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in
the activity.
Plenary Session
The plenary session will be presented Wednesday, May 11 from 9:50 am-12:00 pm, in the Napoleon Ballroom on the
3rd Floor, immediately following the Welcome and Award Ceremony.
Breaks
• Wednesday, May 11:2:30 pm-3:00 pm (Exhibitor Hall located in Grand Ballroom C/D/E on the 5th Floor)
• Friday, May 13:
7:00 am-9:00 am & 10:00 am-10:30 am (Registration Area located on the 5th Floor)
Social Events:
Hurricane Party
Tuesday, May 10 from 4:30 pm-6:00 pm in the Exhibit Hall. Exhibitors welcome attendees to SAEM16 with mini hurricanes
and souvenir glasses.
Networking Breakfast
Join us on Wednesday, May 11 from 7:00 am-9:00 am in the Grand Ballroom C/D/E on the 5th floor for a special
breakfast bar. Enjoy visiting the exhibitors and networking with colleagues in the expanded exhibitor area.
Networking Continental Breakfast
Thursday, May 12 from 7:00 am-8:00 am. Join us for a quick breakfast on the go as you visit with the exhibitors in the
expanded Exhibitor area Grand Ballroom C/D/E on the 5th floor.
Networking Walking Lunch
Lunch is served! Thursday, May 12 from 12:00 pm-1:00 pm link in with your colleagues and check out the products and
services offered by the Exhibitors while enjoying lunch in the exhibitor area Grand Ballroom C/D/E on the 5th floor.
Opening Reception
Always one of the highlights of the annual meeting, the 2016 opening reception, will be Wednesday, May 11 from
4:00 pm-6:00 pm, in the Main Hotel Lobby on the first floor and the second floor Balcony. Join us for traditional
New Orleans food, specialty drinks, and NOLA Hospitality! This is a great opportunity to network with other SAEM members
and attendees.
SAEMF Wine Tasting Event
The SAEM Foundation is hosting a wine tasting and auction to benefit EM research and education. Enjoy great wines and
wonderful conversation on Wednesday, May 11 from 6:00 pm-8:30 pm in the Waterbury Ballroom-Lagniappe/2nd Floor.
FUND RUN
NEW ORLEANS, LA
SAEMF FUND Run
Thursday, May 12 from 6:30 am - 8:00 am at Woldenberg Park. Race check-in begins at 6:00 am in the lobby of the
Sheraton Hotel New Orleans. The race begins at 6:30 am.
MAY 12
20
16
3
SAEM16 – GENER AL INFOR M ATION
Dodgeball
Take a break from the business of the annual meeting and have some fun as you cheer on residency programs teams who battle
it out with Dodgeball on Thursday, May 12 from 4:00 pm-6:00 pm. The indoor tennis courts are a short walk from the Sheraton
host hotel at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside in the Health Club by Hilton, 2 Poydras Street.
Academy for Women in Academic EM (AWAEM) and Global Emergency Medicine Academy (GEMA) Luncheon
Thursday, May 12 from 11:30 am-1:00 pm in Bayside A/B/C 4th Floor. Back for 2016! The Academy for Women in Academic
Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) has invited the Global Emergency Medicine Academy (GEMA) to join them again this year for
AWAEM’s Annual Luncheon. Last year’s sold-out event was an opportunity to network with old friends and new, explore joint
issues, and learn about the hottest topics in emergency departments domestically and globally. This year promises more of the
same, so don’t miss out! You do not need to be an academy or SAEM member to attend.
Resident and Medical Student Reception
Thursday, May 12 from 6:30 pm-8:30 pm at the Bourbon Cowboy, 241 Bourbon Street, New Orleans-French Quarter. Residents,
medical students, and fellows are invited to join the reception. Enjoy a boot-scootin’ good time in a true honky-tonk saloon, with
the best beats and mechanical bull-ridin’ The Big Easy has to offer!
Closing Reception
Finish out the annual meeting with refreshments and beverages. Plan on joining us for the closing reception on Friday, May 13
from 5:00 pm-6:30 pm in the Waterbury Ballroom-Lagniappe/2nd Floor.
2016 Annual Meeting Program Committee
Ali S. Raja, MD, MBA, MPH
Program Committee Chair, Massachusetts General Hospital
Srikar Adhikari, MD
University of Arizona
Medical Center
Harrison Alter, MD
Highland Hospital
- Alameda Health System
Jason Hoppe, MD
University of Colorado
Laura Hopson, MD
University of Michigan
Zachary Meisel, MD
University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine
Joseph Miller, MD
Henry Ford Hospital
Joel Moll, MD
Virginia Commonwealth University
Gillian Beauchamp, MD
Oregon Health and
Science University
Jonathan Jones, MD
University of Mississippi
Medical Center
Calvin Brown, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Gabor Kelen, MD
Johns Hopkins University
Elizabeth Burner, MD
University of Southern California
David Kim, MD
UCLA/Olive View-UCLA
Steven Nazario, MD
Florida Hospital East Orlando
Jennifer Carey, MD
University of Massachusetts
Kelly Klein, MD
UT Southwestern at Dallas
Lewis Nelson, MD
NYU School of Medicine
Ilene Claudius, MD
USC, Keck School of Medicine
Ryan LaFollette, MD
University of Cincinnati
Medical Center
Jason Nomura, MD
Christiana Care Health System
Moira Davenport, MD
Allegheny General Hospital
Kevin Ferguson, MD
Kaweah Delta Medical Center
Jo Anna Leuck, MD
John Peter Smith Health System
Michael Levine, MD
University of Southern California
Mark Mycyk, MD
Cook County Health and
Hospitals System
Charissa Pacella, MD
University of Pittsburgh
Daniel Pallin, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Sarah Ronan-Bentle, MD
University of Cincinnati
Matthew Ryan, MD
University of Florida
Kinjal Sethuraman, MD
University of Maryland
Sneha Shah, MD
University of Massachusetts
Richard Sinert, DO
SUNY-Downstate Medical Center
Jean Sun, MD
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Jessica Swanson, MD
UTSW-Austin
Lorraine Thibodeau, MD
Albany Medical Center
Kelly Thomas, MD
University of Cincinnati
R. Jason Thurman, MD
Vanderbilt University
Alexis Pelletier-Bui, MD
Cooper University Hospital
William F. Toon, EdD, NRP
Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue, & Emergency Services
Brandon Maughan, MD
University of Pennsylvania
Joshua Reynolds, MD
Michigan State University
Jody Vogel, MD
Denver Health Medical Center
Erin McDonough, MD
Emergency Physicians Integrated Care
Rick Ricer, MD
CME Compliance
Eric Wei, MD
LAC+USC
Mike Gottlieb, MD
John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County
Henderson McGinnis, MD
Wake Forest Baptist Health
Janet Young, MD
Virginia Tech-Carilion
Kohei Hasegawa, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital
Colleen Marie McQuown, MD
Summa Akron City Hospital
Rob Rogers, MD
University of Kentucky Department of
Emergency Medicine / University of
Kentucky College of Medicine
Heather Fleming, MD
Indiana University
Barbara Forney
CME Compliance
Alise Frallicciardi, MD
Hartford Hospital/University of
Connecticut School of Medicine
4
Jeff Holmes, MD
Maine Medical Center
Shawn London, MD
University of Connecticut
M AY 10-13
FUTURE SAEM ANNUAL MEETINGS
|
MAY 16-19, 2017
HYATT REGENCY
NEW ORLEANS, LA
ORLANDO
INDIANAPOLIS
MAY 15-18, 2018
JW MARRIOTT
LAS VEGAS
MAY 14-17, 2019
THE MIRAGE CASINO-HOTEL
DENVER
MAY 12-15, 2020
SHERATON DENVER
DOWNTOWN HOTEL
5
SAEM AWARDS
SAEM AWARDS
The Awards Committee and the Board of Directors would like to congratulate the following recipients of the 2016 SAEM
Awards. Every one of our winners showed impressive achievements in their categories, and displayed high potential for
continuing to contribute to SAEM and emergency medicine in the future.
JOHN MARX LEADERSHIP
The John Marx Leadership Award honors an SAEM member who has made exceptional contributions to
emergency medicine through leadership - locally, regionally, nationally or internationally - and within SAEM.
Congratulations to Dr. Jeffrey A. Kline for winning this year’s award!
Jeffrey A. Kline, MD
Professor and Vice Chair of Research
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Indiana University
EXCELLENCE IN
RESEARCH AWARD
Alan E. Jones, MD
ADVANCEMENT OF
WOMEN IN ACADEMIC
EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Chair,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Gail D’Onofrio, MD, MS
YOUNG INVESTIGATORS
AWARD
HAL JAYNE
EXCELLENCE IN
EDUCATION AWARD
Marian (Emmy) Betz, MD, MPH
Chair,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Yale University
Assistant Professor,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Colorado
Sally A. Santen, MD, PhD
YOUNG INVESTIGATORS
AWARD
YOUNG INVESTIGATORS
AWARD
Michael Alexander Puskarich, MD
Kohei Hasegawa, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Assistant Professor,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Massachusetts General Hospital
Clinical Associate Professor,
Department of Medical Education,
University of Michigan Medical School
ARNOLD P. GOLD HUMANISM IN MEDICINE AWARD
The Arnold P. Gold Foundation has selected the SAEM to administer the Gold Foundation Humanism in
Medicine Award to a practicing emergency medicine physician who exemplifies compassionate, patientcentered care. Congratulations to Dr. Jay M. Baruch for winning the first ever award in this category!
Jay M. Baruch, MD
Associate Professor,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Alpert Medical School, Brown University
6
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Oak Alley (4th Floor)
FORUMS
SAEM LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Academic emergency medicine has an obligation to develop leaders who can manage complex organizations and affect
change to improve health. This SAEM forum is designed for aspiring leaders at all levels of experience and academic
rank interested in improving their leadership skills. It provides exposure to core leadership topics with an emphasis
on experiential learning and practical application. Faculty presenters are recognized experts with extensive leadership
experience in academic emergency medicine. Presentations are designed to be interactive, case-based, engaging, and
relevant to participant needs. This year’s forum will cover core leadership topics such as: developing a vision, motivating
others, building an effective team, leading change, conflict management, negotiation skills, persuasive communication,
and how to run productive meetings. It will also feature a leadership panel where participants pose challenging leadership
scenarios to obtain advice and solutions.
Upon completion of this forum, participants should be able to:
1. Identify as a developing physician leader
2. Demonstrate the ability to articulate a personal vision
3. Apply knowledge and skills related to core leadership concepts including: team-building, communication, negotiation,
conflict management, and leading change
4. Integrate expert and peer experience to analyze personal leadership challenges
Agenda
8:00 am-8:15 am
Welcome and Introduction
Brian Clyne, MD
8:15 am-9:15 amDefining, Articulating, and Sustaining
Your Personal Vision
Carey Chisholm, MD
9:15 am-9:30 am
Break
9:30 am-10:30 amBuilding a Highly Functional Team
Todd Crocco, MD
10:30 am-11:30 am
Leading in Austere Times
Brian Zink, MD
11:30 am-12:30 pmLunch & Running More Productive Meetings
Rob Strauss, MD
1:30 pm-2:30 pmCreating Win-Wins:
The Art of Effective Negotiation
Jill Baren, MD
2:30 pm-2:45 pm Break
2:45 pm-4:00 pmHoning Your Persuasive
Communication Skills
Kate Heilpern MD, FACEP
4:00 pm-4:55 pm
Leadership Challenge Rounds
Panelists: Brian Zink, MD,
Andy Jagoda, MD, Annie Sadosty, MD,
Adrian Tyndall
4:55 pm-5:00 pm
Closing Comments and Reflections
12:30 pm-1:30 pmNavigating Conflict: Practical Skills for
Resolving Disagreements
Jim Adams, MD
7
FORUMS
SAEM EDUCATION LEADERSHIP FORUM
Tuesday, May 10: 1:00 pm-5:00 pm — Rodrigue Gallery (1st Floor)
Purpose: The Education Leadership Forum is a program designed specifically for those with either involvement or
interest in Medical Education, to include program directors, assistant/associate program directors, clerkship directors,
program coordinators, as well as senior residents, fellows, and faculty with a career interest in medical education and
administration. The forum will include presentations from experienced leaders in EM residency education, focusing on
highly relevant topics such as: ACGME initiates, remediation of the struggling trainee, utilizing non-traditional learning
venues including asynchronous activities, and exploring novel publishing modalities.
Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the current environment of ACGME/EM-RRC and prepare for current and upcoming changes including the
ongoing merger of the ACGME and AOA.
2. Define key principles of remediation in the GME environment and identify potential prevention and remediation strategies
for trainees who experience difficulties.
3. Identify methods which can be used to convey information outside of the traditional lecture format and understand the
regulatory considerations involved in using these in a residency setting.
4. Identify non-journal based venues for dissemination of educational ideas and accomplishments and be able to discuss
their benefits and limitations.
Agenda
1:00 pm-2:10 pm
ACGME/EM RRC Update
Philip Shayne, MD Emory University and
Emergency Medicine RRC
Felicia Davis, MHA, ACMGE
2:15 pm-3:15 pm
Case Studies in Resident Remediation
Brian Stettler, MD, University of Cincinnati
Fiona Gallahue, MD, University of Washington
3:20 pm-4:10 pmBreaking Away from the Lecture Hall:
Alternatives to the Traditional Lecture Experience
Sam Luber, MD, University of Cincinnati
Jeff Siegelman, MD, Emory University
4:15 pm-5:00 pm
Options for Publishing as an Educator
Salim Rezaie, MD, University of Texas San Antonio
David Wald, DO, Temple University
CAREER CENTER
SAEM’s
Career Center
Looking for a
new position?
Log on to find
new opportunities
careers.saem.org
8
Thursday, May 12: 8:00 am-3:30 pm — Armstrong Ballroom and Foyer (8th Floor)
FORUMS
RESIDENT ACADEMIC LEADERSHIP FORUM
In keeping with our mission of advancing leadership development among resident trainees in academic emergency
medicine, SAEM is pleased to present the 2016 Resident Academic Leadership Forum (RALF) at this year’s annual
meeting in New Orleans. The RALF is designed to enable current emergency medicine residents, our current chief
residents in EM, and our future leaders in emergency medicine, to engage with senior leaders in our field; to develop
strategies for the development of a roadmap to leadership in EM; to develop leadership and communication skills; and
to overcome challenges facing resident leaders while developing wellness and time management skills. It is intended
for junior leaders, senior leaders, and chief residents from national and international EM residencies. The RALF will
feature focused and dynamic didactic presentations, interactive sessions, panel discussions, and networking sessions
with fellow resident leaders as well as established senior leaders in EM administration, education and research. We are
excited to offer this program for our resident leaders, including emerging junior leaders, chief residents, and resident
leaders in EMS/HEMS, EM research, EM education, and EM administration.
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
• P
rovide specific guidance on establishing a roadmap in to leadership in EM
• Develop and cultivate junior and senior emergency medicine residents to become the next generation of academic
leaders in research, administration and education
• Nurture emergency medicine resident networking across institutions
• Develop specific leadership skills by improving approaches to communication
• Demonstrate that they are better bedside educators and utilizers of academic resources
• Develop goals and learn new approaches to leadership in the field of EM research
• Troubleshoot challenges facing resident leaders by learning from program directors, as well as a panel of former chief
residents in EM
• Develop time management skills in order to maintain wellness and work-life balance as resident leaders
Agenda
8:00 am-8:20 amBreakfast and Keynote:
A Roadmap to Leadership in EM
Amal Mattu, MD
8:20 am-8:40 am
Maximizing your Communication Skills
Jim Adams, MD
8:40 am-9:00 am
Developing the Leader within You
Robert Hockberger, MD
9:00 am-9:20 am
The Resident as Leader
Damon Kuehl, MD
9:20 am-9:40 amThe Art of Middle Management:
Tips for the Resident Leader
Jennifer Walthall, MD
9:40 am-9:55 am
Coffee Break and Networking
9:55 am-10:15 am
Educational Resources in the Age of FOAMEd
Brett Rosen, MD
10:15 am-10:55 am
Effective Bedside Teaching:
Panel: Sneha Shah, MD, Mike Epter, DO,
Todd Guth, MD and Elise Lovell, MD
10:55 am-11:55 am
Lunch with Academic Leaders in EM
Kevin Rodgers, MD
11:55 am-12:25 pmManaging Difficult Resident Problems:
A Program Director’s Perspective
12:25 pm-1:35 pmManaging Difficult Resident Problems:
Pearls and Pitfalls from a Panel of Former
Chief Residents
Mary Jo Wagner, MD-Moderator
Panelists: Lauren Hudak, MD, Matthew J. Stull, MD
and William E. Soares, III, MD
1:35 pm-1:55 pmHaving a Vision: Planning your EM Career
Andra Blomkalns, MD
1:55 pm-2:15 pm
Coffee Break and Networking
2:15 pm-2:35 pm
Getting a Research Project off the Ground?
Steven Bird, MD
2:35 pm-2:55 pmHow Do I Get All of this Done?
Time Management Skills
Megan Fix, MD
2:55 pm-3:15 pm
What’s Next: Careers in EM
Eric Katz, MD
3:15 pm-3:30 pmClosing Remarks
Beyond Patient Care: Developing Your
Career During Residency
Gillian Schmitz, MD
3:30 pmResident Dodge Ball Tournament Followed by
Resident Reception at Bourbon Cowboy
Mary Jo Wagner, MD
9
FORUMS
JUNIOR FACULTY DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Thursday, May 12: 9:00 am-1:30 pm — Waterbury Ballroom (2nd Floor)
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
• Provide specific guidance on building a foundation for success in academic EM
• Develop and cultivate junior faculty to become the next generation of academic leaders in research,
administration and education
• Nurture emergency medicine junior faculty collegiality and collaborations across institution
At the end of this program, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the structure of a career in academic emergency medicine, including the promotion process and the
three major pathways for career development (administration, research, and education)
2. Identify skills and required for success in EM administration and describe the differences between common EM
administrative positions.
3. Identify strategies for success in medical education, including mechanisms for more effective teaching and feedback,
and describe approaches for professionally documenting your efforts as a medical educator.
4. Explain the skills necessary for an emergency medicine research career and describe relevant grant
funding mechanisms
5. Describe specific strategies that the individual will use for success as a junior faculty member in the 12 months
following the annual meeting.
Title
Objectives
• Summarize the three pillars of academic
medicine: clinical care, research and education
9:00 am-9:40 am
Overview of
Academic Medicine:
How to Survive & Thrive
• Describe what makes a career
in academic medicine unique
Specific Content Outline
Speaker(s)
Overview of Academic Medicine and
Strategies for Success
• Mission of academic medicine centers and the
role of faculty
• Infrastructure of academic EM
• Examine the distinctive challenges that face
junior faculty
• Academic advancement: appointments,
promotions, and protected time
• Review examples of career
track options
• Selecting and creating a “niche”
• Discuss factors to consider in selecting a career
track and how to be successful
• Challenges of junior faculty
Terry Kowalenko, MD
• Making the transition from trainee to staff
• Successful work-life balance and strategies for
time management
Careers in EM Administration
9:40 am-10:15 am
Careers in EM
Administration
• Review ED Administration positions and potential
avenues to reach these positions/careers
• Explain the pros and cons of ED
Administration roles
• Describe leadership principles and
characteristics necessary for ED Administration
• What is a career in EM administration?
• R oles and responsibilities of common
administrative positions with departments and
academic medical centers
•C
hallenges and advantages to a career
in administration
• L eadership and management principles of
effective administrators
10:15 am - 10:25 am — Break
10
Eric Gross, MD
FORUMS
JUNIOR FACULTY DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Thursday, May 12: 9:00 am-1:30 pm — Waterbury Ballroom (2nd Floor)
Title
Objectives
Specific Content Outline
Speaker(s)
Developing a Career in EM Education
• Review the continuum of medical education
and relevant accreditation agencies and
requirements
10:25 am-11:25 am
Careers in
EM Education
•O
ptions for careers in EM education
• E ducational leadership in GME
• E ducation as research and scholarship
• Examine educational leadership opportunities
in medical education
•H
ow to document & be recognized for
educational efforts (e.g. portfolio)
• Identify the diverse venues and learners at
academic medical centers
• B ecoming involved at the medical school
• Explain the critical need to provide effective
feedback to learners
• Acquire basic skills in teaching, giving feedback
and evaluation
• Discuss challenges and strategies for managing
poor performing residents
Strategies for Effective
Bedside Teaching
Fiona Gallahue, MD
Brian Stettler, MD
• E ffective bedside teaching
• The importance of giving meaningful feedback
(formative and summative)
•H
ow to handle poor performing learners
• R esources for teachers (masters programs,
teaching fellowships, academies)
Choosing a Career in EM Research
11:25 am–12:25 pm
Careers in
EM Research
• Provide a general overview of funding structures
for Academic Medicine and EM more specifically
• F unding structures and the grant process
• Detail the step by step process for setting up a
research project
• B uilding a research question
• Explain the importance of fostering innovation
and teamwork/collaboration for a successful
research career.
• Integrating research into an academic career
without independent funding
• Discuss grant opportunities
• Describe techniques and strategies required for
successful publication
• S trategies for sustaining funding
• P itfalls of early investigators
Strategies for Success: Project Creation and
Publication
Jason Haukoos, MD
Ed Boyer, MD, PhD
• Writing for publication
•M
aximizing efficiency and productivity
• Avenues to further develop research skills
12:25 pm - 12:35 pm — Break/Lunch
12:35 pm-1:30 pm
Lessons Learned:
If I Knew Then
What I Know Now…
• Discuss the opportunities, support, resources
and relationships that will foster a successful
academic career
• Explain the benefits and the logistics of
identifying and working with a mentor
Roundtable discussion of senior faculty who have
successfully navigated the academic waters:
• What I did well
Jim Adams, MD
John Ma, MD
• What I would have done differently
• What I wish I had known
• Who was my mentor, how did I identify them and
what were the benefits of this relationship
Cherri Hobgood, MD
Jill Baren, MD
11
FORUMS
MEDICAL STUDENT SYMPOSIUM
Friday, May 13: 8:00 am-3:00 pm — Bayside Room A-B-C (4th Floor)
The Medical Student Symposium will serve as an overview of emergency medicine (EM) and will discuss in-depth the
process of applying for an EM residency position.
There will be specific discussions about clerkships, away rotations, personal statements, the match process and
interviews. There will also be ample time for questions and discussions during a lunch with EM program directors and
clerkship directors and with a panel of resident representatives of EM organizations, (ACEP, AAEM, EMRA).
The SAEM Residency Fair, showcasing many of the EM programs in the country, will immediately follow the medical
student symposium.
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1. Determine if EM is the right career choice.
2. Explore the training and practice options within the specialty of EM.
3. Illustrate the process of the national residency match program.
4. Discuss how to create the best application for success in the match.
5. Describe key components of a successful personal statement.
6. Review the strategies to excel in EM rotations and if you need to do a visiting rotation.
7. Identify key strategies to have a successful interview.
Agenda
8:00 am-8:05 am
Introduction / Overview of Days’ Activities
Henderson McGinnis, MD
8:05 am-8:15 amME=EM? A Look at the Highs and Lows of
the Specialty
Henderson McGinnis, MD
8:15 am-8:35 amYou can do that in EM? A Look at Options
Within the Specialty
Liz Edelstein, MD
8:40 am-9:30 am
Top innovations in EM
9:35 am-10:00 amThe Match Process: Your Application
and Personal Statement
Paulette Wehner, MD
10:05 am-10:30 am How do I Match?
Megan Fix, MD 10:30 am-10:50 am How to Crush Your Clerkship
George Willis, MD
12
10:50 am-11:10 am Away Rotations
David Story, MD
11:10 am-11:30 am SLO Down (Letters of Recommendation)
Shawn London, MD
11:30 am-12:00 pm Interview Wins/Fails
Corey Heitz, MD and John Pettey Sandifer , MD
12:00 pm-12:20 pmQuestion and Answer
12:20 pm-12:30 pm Overview of Residency Fair
12:30 pm-2:00 pmLunch with Program Directors
and Clerkship Directors
2:00 pm-3:00 pm Question and Answer with Emergency
Medicine Residents
Representatives from SAEM, AAEM and EMRA
3:00 pm-5:00 pmSAEM 2016
Residency/Fellowship Fair
TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATIONAL ADVANCEMENT CREATES HAPPY RESIDENTS
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-12:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom C2 (3rd Floor)
Through hands-on tools, group discussions, and team-based exercises, participants should, by the end of this workshop,
be able to create a sample podcast lecture; restate the requirements for incorporating asynchronous learning into a
curriculum; identify strategies for improving didactics; use teaching strategies to revise their curriculum for maximal learning
efficiency; use technological strategies to improve observation and feedback; and apply multimedia education principles to
create podcast lectures.
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
TEACH RESIDENTS:
Upon completion of this workshop, the learner will be able to:
• Create a sample podcast lecture
• Explain the requirements for incorporating asynchronous learning into their curriculum
• Participate in a team-based learning exercise and be more familiar with strategies for improving didactics, including small
group learning, case based learning, problem based learning, and team based learning.
• Revise their curriculum for maximal learning efficiency, by using teaching strategies discussed in this session.
• Identify with technological strategies for improving observation and feedback.
Agenda
8:00 am: Introduction
8:20 am-9:00 am: Effective Teaching Techniques
Team-based learning exercise to introduce various educational strategies — small group learning, problem based learning,
commitment activities, and team based learning. Participants will complete an individual readiness assurance test (iRAT), group
readiness assurance test (gRAT), and a group application exercise. We will discuss the best practices for incorporating small
group discussions, and how to facilitate these sessions.
9:00 am-9:30 am: Incorporating technology in bedside teaching and feedback
How to incorporate video and Google Glass into residency assessment and quality improvement projects. A large group
discussion will cover compliance/HIPAA, other ways to bring technology to the bedside, and barriers to adoption.
9:30 am-10:00 am: Asynchronous learning
ACGME requirements for individualized interactive instruction and possibilities for asynchronous learning. This will be followed
by a large group facilitated discussion.
10:00 am-11:00 am: Podcasting
Multimedia education principles and how to easily create podcast lectures. This will include a hands-on workshop of tools that
can be used for creating podcasts.
11:00 am-12:00 pm: Revamping the curriculum
Through small and large group discussions we will guide participants through creating a revised schedule of didactics, reading,
individualized interactive instruction, simulation, and small group schedule.
Speakers
Warren Wiechmann, MD, Megan Boysen Osborn, MD, Shannon Toohey, MD, and Alisa Wray, MD
13
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
COCHR ANE SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS OF INTERVENTIONS
TR AINING WORKSHOP
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-12:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom D1 (3rd Floor)
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have exploded in medical literature since 2000, with almost 10,000 systematic
reviews being published in the last 4 years alone. Cochrane reviews are systematic reviews of primary research in human
health care and health policy, and are internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care.
They investigate the effects of interventions for prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation, and also the accuracy of a
diagnostic test for a given condition in a specific patient group and setting. Without Cochrane Reviews, people making
health care decisions are unlikely to be able to access and make full use of existing health care research. Each Cochrane
Review addresses a clearly formulated question. Workshop leaders are experts in Cochrane Review methodology, and will
train participants on how to develop a protocol for a Cochrane Review. By the end of the workshop, participants should
be able to deduce the question their review is addressing; assess the implications of the review methods they will use;
summarize the scope of their review; and have successfully entered the background, objectives, and criteria for selecting
studies as well as methods of the planned Cochrane Review protocol into RevMan.
Speakers:
1. Richard Sinert, DO, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, Submitter
2. Abel Wakai, MD, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland, Presenter
Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
1) Interpret the question their planned Cochrane review is addressing and the implications for the review methods they will use.
2) Explain the scope of their planned Cochrane review.
3) P
roject confident about entering the Background, Objectives, Criteria for Selecting Studies and Methods sections of a
Cochrane review protocol into the software used for preparing and maintaining Cochrane Reviews (Review Manager [RevMan]).
Agenda
8:00 amFormat of a Cochrane Review
& Cochrane Title
Registration (Didactic Presentation)
8:30 am
Small Group Discussion Session 1
9:00 amThe Cochrane Review Background Section
(Didactic Presentation)
9:30 am
Small Group Discussion Session 2
10:00 amThe Cochrane Review Methods Section
(Didactic Presentation)
14
10:30 am
Small Group Discussion Session 3
11:00 am
Break
11:15 amThe Cochrane Information
Management System (IMS)
11:45 am
Small Group Discussion Session 4
12:30 am
Close
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom B2 (3rd Floor)
Many faculty members involved in educating residents and medical students have not had formal training in how to teach,
yet this type of training has been shown to have a positive effect on faculty evaluations, which are widely used to assess
teaching performance and are factored into faculty promotions and incentive plans. This workshop is designed as a boot
camp to provide time- and resource-limited medical educators with a short, intensive course on the basics of teaching.
Through facilitated discussions, application, and practice, this workshop seeks to provide the fundamental knowledge and
tools necessary for a practicing emergency medicine physician to be an effective educator. After successful completion of
this workshop, emergency medicine physician educators should be able to provide effective procedural teaching; apply
clinical bedside teaching methods to everyday patient care; provide effective feedback; describe several strategies for
dealing with difficult learners; improve assessments; practice education theory and active learning techniques; and design
effective program evaluations.
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
MED-ED BOOTCAMP
Agenda
8:00 am-8:10 am
Introduction
Sarah Williams, MD, Jaime Jordan, MD,
Sally Santen, MD
8:10 am-8:40 amCreate and Deliver Effective Large Group
Didactic Sessions
Sarah Williams, MD
8:40 am-9:20 amProvide Effective Procedural Teaching
Mary Jo Wagner, MD
9:20 am-10:00 amApply Clinical Bedside Teaching Methods to
Everyday Patient Care Using SNAPS, 1-Minute
Preceptor, Teaching Scripts, Modeling
Rob Rogers, MD and Mike Gisondi, MD
10:00 am-10:20 am Networking Break
10:20 am-11:00 am Provide Effective Feedback
Susan Promes, MD and Sally Santen, MD
11:00 am-11:50 amDescribe Several Strategies for Dealing
with Difficult Learners
Nicole Deiorio, MD
Noon-1:00 pm
Lunch
1:00 pm-1:30 pmImprove Assessments, Including use of RIME,
Milestones, and Direct Observation
Louis Ling, MD and Danielle Hart, MD
1:30 pm-3:30 pmEducation Theory and Active Learning
Techniques (Not Another Boring Lecture)
Meg Wolf, MD, Steve Cico, MD, Sally Santen, MD,
Mary Jo Wagner, MD, Sarah Williams, MD,
Jaime Jordan, MD
3:30 pm-4:10 pm
Roundtable – chose one table
- How to Evaluate Your Program - Jeff Love, MD
- How to Turn your work into Scholarship
Sally Santen, MD
- How to be Mentored and How to Mentor
Joe La Mantia, MD and Jaime Jordan, MD
4:10 pm-5:00 pmEducational Panel Discussion: Tips and Tricks
All Faculty
USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO ENHANCE YOUR ACADEMIC CAREER
Tuesday, May 10: 1:00 pm-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom C2 (3rd Floor)
This half-day, special session piggy-backs on last year’s very successful workshop focusing on social media as it relates
to the academician and adds topics that both residency and department leaders will find useful. By the end of this
workshop participants, whether novice or expert, should know how to start using social media (if they never have before)
as well as how to create content and use it in the context of research and education. Workshop speakers are well-known
social media gurus from all over the country who have held leadership positions within academic departments, residency
programs, and emergency medicine organizations.
Agenda
1:00 pm-1:45 pmSession 1: Maximizing Social Media - Finding
and Utilizing the Content you Need
Michael Bond, MD & Robert Cooney, MD
1:45 pm-2:30 pm
ession 2: Integrating Social Media
S
into Research
Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH
2:40 pm-3:40 pmSession 3: Latest Methods and Tools for
Trainee Education Using Social Media
Ryan Radecki, MD MS, Salim Rezaie, MD,
Rob Rogers, MD
3:40 pm-4:10 pmSession 4: Marketing Your Department or
Program Using Social Media
Michael Gisondi, MD & James Miner, MD
ession 5: Panel - Best & Worst of
S
Social Media
Matthew Astin, MD, Alisa Hayes, MD,
Jason Nomura, MD, Brett Rosen, MD
4:10 pm-4:50 pm
4:50 pm-5:00 pm
Wrap-Up: Final Questions & Summary
15
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
GLOBAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE THINK TANK
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am–5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom A3 (2nd Floor)
We are excited to present our pre-meeting workshop which this year will be in the “think tank” format, an innovative
process of discussing, refining, and developing a consensus-based agenda. This session is geared toward both novices
and experts and engages all participants in the working groups to build consensus on key metrics for Global Emergency
Medicine in the domains of clinical care, education, and health systems. Open discussion, collaboration, and mentorship
will be key features of this agenda.
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1. Provide updates to the 2013 AEM Global Emergency Medicine Research agenda
2. Utilize working groups to build consensus on key metrics for global health and emergency care development under the
research domains of clinical care, education, and health systems
3. Identify the critical next steps for research implementation
Agenda
8:00 am-11:00 amWhere are we in Global
Emergency Medicine?
A series of small talks from global health and
emergency care updates
9:40 am-10:00 amHow does Global Emergency Medicine Align
with Millennium Development Goals and
Sustainable Development Goals
Dr. Junaid Razzak
8:00 am-8:20 am
10:00 am-10:30 am
Questions and Discussion
11:00 am-3:30 pm
Where is Global Emergency Medicine Going?
Workgroups and consensus building
• Research - Define research priorities, metrics
for evaluation, overcoming barriers
• Education - Study emergency care curricula,
education and competencies for accreditation
• Health Systems - Access to emergency care and
outcome measures
Registration, Housekeeping, Welcome
Dr. Bhakti Hansoti
8:20 am-8:40 amIntroduction to the Pre-conference Meeting,
Invitation to the 2013 CC Co-chairs
Dr. Ian Martin
8:40 am-9:00 amDevelopments in Global EM Research and
the Forces that Drive it
Dr. Adam Levine and Dr. Jeremy Brown
9:00 am-9:20 amWHO components of Essential Emergency
Care Systems
Dr. Teri Reynolds
9:20 am-9:40 amLancet Commission on NCDIs of the
Poorest Billion
Dr. Lee Wallis (via. Skype)
16
3:30 pm-5:00 pmWhat has Global Emergency
Medicine Achieved?
Poster session, summaries from
workgroup leaders
THE EDUCATION IN PALLIATIVE AND END-OF-LIFE CARE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE
(EPEC-EM) MINI-COURSE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE EDUCATORS
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom A2 (3rd Floor)
Using a combination of role play, case-based teaching, and didactics, with a focus on interaction and the use of
high-fidelity videos, the objective of the Core Skills in Palliative Medicine: Education in Palliative and End-of-life Care
for Emergency Medicine (EPEC-EM) Mini-Course is designed to essential clinical competencies in palliative care to
professionals who work in the emergency department (ED). The course curriculum was written and edited by emergency
physicians and nurse educators with the objective of addressing issues that are specific to the practice of emergency
medicine. Supported by the National Institutes of Health, the EPEC-EM Mini-Course has been offered continuously
since 2006 with over several hundred participants trained to date. By the end of this course, participants should be
able to determine how, when, and why to contact hospice or a primary care provider; effectively and compassionately
communicate bad news to patients and families; and assess patients for psychological, spiritual, and social needs. All
course attendees will receive a free copy of the EPEC-EM curriculum.
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
CORE SKILLS IN PALLIATIVE MEDICINE:
Agenda
8:00 am-8:45 am
Palliative Care in Emergency Medicine
8:45 am-9:30 amIllness Trajectories and Prognostication
in the ED
9:30 am-10:30 amRapid Palliative Care Assessment &
Goals of Care Conversation
10:30 am-10:45 am Break
10:45 am-11:15 am Breaking Bad News
11:15 am-12:00 pm Death Disclosure
12:00 pm-12:45 pm Lunch
12:45 pm-1:30 pmCommon Non-Pain Symptoms:
Dyspnea/Vomiting
1:30 pm-2:15 pm
2:15 pm-3:15 pm
3:15 pm-3:30 pm
3:30 pm-4:00 pm
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Hospice Care in the Emergency Department
Cancer Pain Management/Opioid Conversions
Break
Family Presence During Resuscitation
Advance Care Plans/Advance Directives
SPEAKERS:
Paul DeSandre, DO
Michael Gisondi, MD
Sangeeta Lamba, MD Tammie E. Quest, MD
GR ANT WRITING WORKSHOP
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Borgne (3rd Floor)
This workshop is designed to improve investigators’ skills in successful grant writing through didactics, panel
discussions, and focused small group sessions. The course faculty includes federally funded investigators and NIH staff.
Agenda
7:30 am
8:00 am
8:30 am
9:15 am
10:10 am
10:15 am
11:45 am
Continental Breakfast
What are the Grants That Are Out There The Anatomy of a Grant NIH Update: Emergency Care Research
Break
Small Groups:
1) Developing your nascent idea
2) Where are my problems?
Mentoring:
1) Mentee responsibilities
2) Mentor responsibilities
3) Career Timeline Construction
12:00 pm
Networking Lunch/Small Groups
• Write 5 year Career Timeline
• Meet topic mentor
• Discuss research plan and timeline with mentor
1:30 pm
How Are Grants Scored
2:00 pm
How Grants Fail and Resiliency
2:30 pmThe Little Things that Take BIG TIME
(small group sessions)
• Budget
• Letters of support
• Time negotiation
3:30 pm
Career Development Grant Panel Discussion
4:00 pm
Wrap-Up
17
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
TR AIN THE TR AINER:
INSTRUCTOR TRAINING IN SIMULATION CASES AND DEBRIEFING
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom B1 (3rd Floor)
The learner will participate in both lecture-based and hands-on activities with national experts in the specific topics
presented and will have experience with case development/writing, team SIMS, debriefing, rescuing failing scenarios, and
hands-on practice running simulations with debriefing.
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1. Explain the background and fundamentals for writing good simulation cases.
2. Practice writing those cases.
3. Describe the fundamentals of team simulations.
4. Apply a few models for debriefing a learner.
5. Practice debriefing the learner.
6. Illustrate ways to rescue a failing scenario “on the fly.”
7. Develop practice sessions of running and debriefing a full case.
Agenda
8:00 am
8:05 am
8:20 am
8:50 am
9:20 am
11:20 am
12:05 pm
12:35 pm
1:35 pm
2:05 pm
Introduction
History of Simulation
Case Development
Team Sims
Case Writing Team
Debriefing
Debrief Practice Team
Lunch
Intro to Mannequin Team
Rescuing Scenarios
2:30 pm
3:00 pm
3:40 pm
4:10 pm
4:50 pm
Faculty Lecture List:
William Bond, MD
James Gordon, MD
Danielle Hart, MD
Steven McLaughlin, MD
Michael Smith, MD
WINE TASTING
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
6:00 – 8:30 pm
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel
Hotel Waterbury Ballroom, 2nd floor
Single ticket: $125 – Group tickets (10): $1,000
18
Scenario No.1 Run Team
Scenario No.1 Debrief Team
Scenario No. 2 Run Team
Scenario No. 2 Debrief Team
Course Wrap-Up
SHARED DECISION MAKING IN
May 10, 2016
THE
8:00
amEMERGENCY
– 5:00 pm ET DEPARTMENT:
nd floor)
DEVELOPMENT
OF A(2POLICY-RELEVANT
Rhythms
Ballroom 1/2/3
Sheraton
Hotel New Orleans
PATIENT-CENTERED
RESEARCH AGENDA
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am–5:00 pm
Rhythms Ballroom
1/2/3
Floor)
Thank you
to all(2nd
of our
supporters!
SESSION
TIME
7:30 am–8:00 am
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
Shared
in the Emergency Department:
2016Decision
AEM Making
CONSENSUS
Development of a Policy-Relevant Patient-Centered
CONFERENCE
Research Agenda
Registration and Breakfast
Welcome and Opening Remarks
8:00 am–8:30 am
8:30 am–9:00 am
Time
7:30 – 8:00 am
am
8:009:00
– am–9:45
8:15 am
9:45 am–10:00 am
10:00 am-11:45 am
11:45 am-12:00 pm
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
1:00 pm-1:15 pm
8:15 – 8:45 am
1:15 pm-1:30 pm
3:30 pm-3:15 pm
8:45 – 9:30 am
3:15 pm-4:45 pm
- Jeffrey A. Kline, MD, AEM Editor-in-Chief
- Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS, NYU School of Medicine
- Erik Hess, MD, MSc, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic
- Christopher Carpenter, MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis
NYU
Challenging Myths about Shared Decision Making
- VictorSession
Montori, MD, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic
Registration
Breakfast
State of
the Science: Tools and
& Measurement
for Shared Decision Making
- KarenWelcome
Sepucha, PhD,and
Massachusetts
General
Hospital
Opening
Remarks
- Maggie Breslin, Smaller Sanities Design & Research
Break
Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS
Medicine
Morning
Breakout
Sessions
NYU
School
of
• Session 1: Diagnostic Testing
• Session 2: Policy
• Session
3: Dissemination
& Implementation
Erik
Hess, MD,
MSc
BreakCollege
of Medicine, Mayo Clinic
From Tears to Transparency (Panel Discussion)
Christopher Carpenter, MD, MSc
University in St. Louis
Afternoon
Breakouts
Challenging Myths about Shared Decision Making
- Patty & David Skolnik, Patient Advocates
BreakWashington
• Session 4: Testing SDM in Practice
• Session 5: Palliative Care & Geriatrics
• Session
6: Vulnerable
Populations
Victor
Montori,
MD
BreakCollege
of Medicine, Mayo Clinic
of the
Science:
Tools & Measurement
for Shared Decision Making
FutureState
Opportunities
for Measuring
ED Patient-Centered
Outcomes (Panel Discussion)
- Amy Berman, BS, RN, The Hartford Foundation
- Jeremy Brown, MD, Office of Emergency Care Research
Karen
Sepucha,
PhDof Health and Human Services
- Brendan
Carr, MD,
U.S. Department
- Pat Dunn,
American
Heart
Association
Massachusetts General Hospital
- Christopher Gayer, PhD, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
- Mira Grieser, MHS, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Maggie Breslin
Wrap Up/Consensus
Findings
4:45 pm-5:00 pm
Sanities
Design
Research
- CoritaSmaller
Grudzen, MD,
MSHS, NYU
School of&
Medicine
- Erik Hess, MD, MSc, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic
- Christopher Carpenter, MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis
Break
Morning Breakout Sessions
Funding for this conference was made possible [in part] by grant number 1R13HS024172-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ); grant number 1R13MD010171-01 from the National
Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and contract
from the Patient-Centered
Outcomes Research
Institute (PCORI). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by
• #0876
Session
1: Diagnostic
Testing
speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services or PCORI; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply
• Session 2: Policy
endorsement by the U.S. Government.”
• Session 3: Dissemination & Implementation
Thank you to all of our supporters!
11:30 - 11:45 am
Break
9:30 – 5:00
9:45
pmam
9:45 – 11:30 am
Cocktail Reception
11:45 am – 12:45 pm
From Tears to Transparency (Panel Discussion)
19
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
DIVERSITY 301
Tuesday, May 10: 1:00 pm-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom C1 (3rd Floor)
Agenda and Course Objectives
1:00 pm-1:05 pm
Welcome-Jeff Druck, MD
1:05 pm-1:20 pm
Why Diversity Matters
Joel Moll, MD
- Objective - List objective elements that diversity
improves, as well as list the ethical requirements
for diversity.
1:20 pm-1:50 pm
How to Sway the Undecided
Bernie Lopez, MD
- Objective - delineate strategies for convincing
those uncertain about supporting diversity efforts
to firm supporters of diversity endeavors.
1:50 pm-2:35 pmDealing with Unprofessional Behavior
- Peer to Peer/To Superior/To Student:
Panel Discussion
Thea Gill, MD, Marcia Perry, MD,
Adrianne Haggins, MD
- Objective - Identify strategies for dealing with
racist, sexist, and gender-biased behavior in
peers, students, and superiors.
2:35 pm-3:20 pmReligion in Medicine: Panel Discussion
Ava Pierce moderating; Kathy Clem, MD (7th Day
Adventist), Najam Fasiuddin, MD (Islam), Moishe
Weisberg, MD (Judaism)
- Objective - List difficult patient issues that
focus on religious issues from a patient, and
subsequently from a provider, standpoint.
3:20 pm-3:40 pmTransgender Health
Shannon McNamara, MD
Sarah Cham Sante, MD
- Objective - Identify barriers to transgender
care and identify best practices for improving
transgender health
3:40 pm-4:25 pmDiversity Group Therapy - Solving our
Problems Together
- Objective - List specific problems group
individuals have encountered, and discuss as a
group how to solve diversity related issues.
BUILDING YOUR BR AND
Tuesday, May 10: 1:00 pm-5:30 pm — Napoleon Ballroom D2 (3rd Floor)
This year, the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) is kicking off a career development
workshop that is open to all. For the inaugural year of the workshop, an introductory session has been designed to guide
participants in developing effective personal introductions to use when meeting new colleagues and key decision makers.
Time will be set aside for participants to practice these “elevator speeches” and obtain feedback. A second workshop
session seeks to help participants address the questions: What makes you unique in EM? What are your short- and
long-term goals? How do you best achieve these goals? At the end of this session, participants will draft a personal road
map and be able to set tangible career goals. A third workshop session focuses on techniques to effectively manage time
in the midst of chaos. At the close of this session participants should be able to manage their emails more effectively,
plan their weekly schedules, and set strategies for prioritizing their work. Participants will share additional techniques and
resources during a question and answer period and through a crowdsourcing exercise. A concluding session aims to
prepare participants for their annual faculty evaluations. Upon the conclusion of this session participants should be able
to advocate for themselves effectively; develop their own niches within their departments; articulate their value to their
departments; and devise clear working plans.
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
• Develop networking techniques to effectively communicate with confidence
• Develop personalized short- and long-term career goals
• Employ a lean workday to maximize efficiency
Agenda
1:00 pm
Opening Remarks
1:05 pm-2:20 pmMaximize Your Potential at the Annual Meeting:
Develop and practice your elevator speech
Tracy Sanson, MD
2:20 pm-2:25 pm
Wellness Pearl
Amy Leuthauser, MD
2:25 pm-3:40 pm
Developing Your Personal Roadmap
Stephanie Abbuhl, MD
20
3:40 pm-3:50 pm
Wellness Pearl / Coffee Break
Amy Leuthauser, MD
3:50 pm-4:30 pmFind the TIME to Build Your Brand
Susan Johnson, MD, MS
4:30 pm-5:00 pmMake the Most of Your Annual Faculty Meeting
Flavia Nobay, MD
5:00 pm-5:30 pm
Optional Yoga/Meditation
Amy Leuthauser, MD
LEARNING THE FUNDAMENTALS AND IMPLEMENTING INNOVATIVE AND PRACTICAL
EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUMS INTO RESIDENCY AND MEDICAL SCHOOL
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom B3/C3 (3rd Floor)
Emergency physicians are uniquely equipped to provide improvised medical care, the hallmark of wilderness medicine.
With increased travel, increased incidence of natural disasters, and humanitarian response needs, we have an obligation
to instruct our residents with the fundamentals of WM to provide care outside an ED. The goals: (1) to provide instruction
in basic wilderness medicine skills, (2) Present innovative and practical WM curriculums for medical education
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
WILDERNESS MEDICINE:
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1) Implement WM skills to provide basic and critical care in austere environments.
2) Demonstrate remote MCI management.
3) Identify the best equipment and medication choices for medical/survival kits.
4) Perform evacuation decisions vs field management.
5) Discuss recent WM evidence based guidelines and literature.
6) Appraise and implement WM curriculums for medical schools and EM residencies.
Part 1: Fundamental Wilderness Medicine Skill Set
To teach providers the practical skills to render care in resource limited environments, construction of WM immobilization
devices, improvised wound care, building of devices for critical stabilization. Further, medical kit construction,
the principles of evacuation, and field remote MCIs, and a literature review will be taught.
Part 2: Implementation of a Wilderness Medicine Educational Curriculum in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs
and Medical Schools
Building on Part 1, implementable WM curriculums for EM residency and medical schools will be discussed.
This discussion includes logistics of implementation, institutional barriers, and solutions.
Agenda
PART 1: FUNDAMENTAL WILDERNESS MEDICINE SKILL SET
1. Lecture: Introduction to WM Principles
PART 2: IMPLEMENTATION OF A WILDERNESS MEDICINE
EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL EDUCATION
2. Lecture: Evidence Based WM Literature and Guidelines
3. Small Group Sessions
a. Medical Kit Development
b. Improvised Medical Care Basics
c. Remote Mass Causality Basics
d. Evacuation Modalities/Criteria
e. Improvised Medical Device Construction
f. Field Splinting
g. Case Studies
1. Lecture: Curriculums
2. Small Group Sessions
a. Curriculums
b. Implementation
c. Barriers and Solutions
SPEAKERS:
Nicole Battaglioli, MD
Sanjey Gupta, MD
Stuart Harris, MD
Hillary Irons, MD PhD
Henderson McGinnis, MD Renee Salas, MD
Christopher McStay, MD Walter A. Schrading,MD,
FACEP, FAWM
Lara Philips, MD
21
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
CHALLENGES AND CONTROVERSIES OF ED OPIOID
PRESCRIBING IN THE ERA OF OPIOID EPIDEMIC
Tuesday, May 10: 1:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom D3 (3rd Floor)
Mission: This session will provide insights to the challenges and controversies of current opioid prescribing practices in
the ED as the US faces an epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, addiction, overdose, and death. ED. The goal of the
workshop is to develop a working group to put together a framework for effective, rational, and safe opioid prescribing
practices in the ED by applying current available evidence with a potential of creating a set of guidelines for ED physicians
and/or developing a white paper.
Course Description: The workshop will include a series of lectures, interactive small group sessions, and panel discussions
with a total duration of 4 hours. The speakers will discuss the current states of the opioid epidemics in the US, the role
of electronic prescription drug monitoring databases in curbing the uncontrolled opioid prescribing, as well as legal
ramifications of prescribing opioids in the ED. Particular attention will be given to ED opioid prescribing practices upon
discharge as well as controlling pain while preventing addiction in the ED. Small group sessions will focus on challenges
of recognizing aberrant-drug related behaviors in the ED, treatment of patients with chronic intractable pain, rational opioid
prescribing practices, and introduction to non-opioid pain management of such condition. The panel discussion in an
open forum format will focus on strategies of curbing opioid epidemics and providing effective, rational, and safe opioid
prescribing in the ED.
Structure: The duration of the workshop is 4 hours, split into the following sessions:
1. Six, 20 min lectures with 5 min each for Q&A (2 hours)
2. Small group session (45 minutes - 1 hour)
3. Open forum panel discussion (45 minutes - 1 hour)
4. Closing remarks
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the current state of opioid epidemic in the US
2. Describe the challenges of opioid prescribing in the ED
3. Develop mechanisms to implement evidence-based strategies for safe and rational opioid prescribing in the ED
Lectures:
Small Group Sessions:
1. T he Opioid Epidemic:
A Modern History and View Towards the Future?
Lewis Nelson, MD
1. H
ow to Identify and Manage Patients with Aberrant Drug Use
Related Behaviors?
Scott Weiner, MD & Jason Hoppe, MD
2. “You Want to Give Me a Prescription Just for 3 Days?”
Opioid Prescribing Practices Upon Discharge from the ED
Jeanmarie Perrone, MD
2. C
hronic Intractable Pain in the ED: What are We Supposed to
Do? Lessons from Implementation of a Multimodal Strategy at
Highland General Hospital.”
Lewis Nelson, MD & Andrew Herring, MD
3. A
Double Edged Sword: Balancing the Benefits and Liabilities
of Using Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs in the ED?
Scott Weiner, MD
4. “Am I going to be reprimanded by my Chairman for
prescribing, or for not prescribing, opioids from the ED?”
-Patient Satisfaction and Opioid Prescribing in the ED
Jason Hoppe, MD
5. H
ydromorphone use in the ED: Necessary Analgesic or
Unnecessary Evil?
Sergey Motov, MD
6. P
ain is not a Vital Sign: Reality Check on in the Subjectivity of
Pain Assessment”- Strategies for Global Assessment of Pain
Emphasizing Function and Behavior
Andrew Herring, MD
22
3. D
o we Have Alternatives to Opioid Analgesics for Patients
with CNCP?
Sergey Motov, MD & Jeanmarie Perrone, MD
Panel Discussion
1. S
trategies to Curbing Opioid Epidemics and Providing Effective,
Rational and Safe Opioid Prescribing in the ED
Lewis Nelson, MD & Scott Weiner, MD
2. O
pen forum.
Lewis Nelson, MD
TRANSLATING YOUR IDEAS INTO MARKETABLE PRODUCTS
Wednesday, May 11: 8:00 am-5:00 pm — Napoleon Ballroom A1 (3rd Floor)
This one-day workshop will build the basis for you to take a clinical problem and transform it into a marketable product
that you can pitch to a venture capitalist. The day will be spent in groups that will work through the process. Topics
include doing a needs assessment, market analysis, brainstorming design concepts, thinking about intellectual property,
considering FDA regulatory pathways, and the “killer” experiment. In one day you will go from clinical challenge to “pitching”
your idea. We will provide expert access and a community to support your future innovation efforts.
PRE-MEETING WORKSHOPS
INSIGHT TO INNOVATION
Upon completion of this course the participants should be able to:
1. Develop an understanding of the medical device innovation process.
2. Identify problem identification, needs assessment, market analysis, design concept brainstorming and developing the
“killer” experiment.
3. U
tilize introductory of start-up corporate funding and structure, intellectual property, and FDA regulatory concepts.
Agenda
8:00 amWelcome, Introductions and
Overview of Innovation
Jeremy Ackerman, MD, PhD
11:30 am-12:00 am Intellectual Property 101
Jeremy Ackerman, MD, PhD
12:00 pm-1:00 pm Lunch
8:20 am-8:40 am
1:00 pm-1:30 pm Killer It Quick! The Killer Experiments
Mene Demestihas, MD
8:40 am - 9:30 amHow to Really Brainstorm Brainstorming Interactive Event
1:30 pm-2:00 pm FDA and Regulatory Considerations
Jeremy Ackerman, MD, PhD
9:30 am-10:00 am
Needs Assessment
Mene Demestihas, MD
2:00 pm-2:30pm Pitching Panel - How, Why, and What
10:00 am-10:30 am Needs Statement Interactive Event
2:30pm-3:00 pm Break
10:30 am-11:00 am 11:00 am-11:30 am Break and Networking
Market Analysis
Angela Fusaro, MD
3:00 pm-3:30 pm Pitch Prep
3:30 pm-4:30 pm 4:30 pm-5:00 pm First Pitches
Closing Remarks and Next Steps
Role of Clinical Innovator
Angela Fusaro, MD
NAVIGATING THE ACADEMIC RANKS:
MENTORSHIP FROM LEADERS IN ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE (NAR)
Thursday, May 12: 4:00 pm-5:30 pm — Maurepas Room (3rd Floor)
A brief panel discussion where representatives from the SAEM academies share what they have learned about academic
promotion and scaling the academic ranks within emergency medicine. The panel will be followed by a break out reception
event where small groups (based on the various backgrounds of the panel members) can network, address questions
and learn more about academic advancement. Targeted audience includes junior faculty (clinical instructors, assistant
professors, fellows and senior level residents)
Agenda
4:05 pm-4:15 pmPanel Members Introduce
Themselves and Specialties
4:15 pm-4:40 pm
Panel Members Discussion
4:45 pm-5:45 pm
Closing Networking Session
Panel Members:
Doug Franzen, MD, CDEM
Bhakti Hansoti, MD, GEMA
Bernard Lopez, MD, ADIEM
Paul Pepe, MD
Stacey Poznanski, MD, AWAEM
Manish Shah, MD, AGEM
Michael Smith, MD, SIMULATION
Jim Tsung, MD, AEUS
Allan Wolfson, MD
23
SAEM16
SAEM16 EUSEM SPOTLIGHT
Wednesday, May 10: 3:00 pm-3:50 pm — Napolean Ballroom B3 & C3 (3rd Floor)
1 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EUROPEAN CURRICULUM ON
GERIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE.*
Abdelouahab Bellou, MD, PhD, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medicine Department, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Boston, USA. Chair of the GEM Section of the European Society for Emergency Medicine, Co-Chair of the European Task Force on Geriatric
Emergency Medicine.
Simon Conroy, MD, PhD, Professor of Geriatrics, University Hospital of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, UK. Chair of the GEM
Interest Group of the European Union of Geriatric Medicine Co-Chair of the European GEM Task Force.
*On behalf the European GEM Task Force:
EuSEM: Abdelouahab Bellou (FR/USA), Christian Nickel (SW), Richard Wolfe (USA), Jay Banerjee (UK), Marc Sabbe (BE),
Olivier Ganansia (FR), Jacinta Lucke (NL).
EUGMS: Simon Conroy (UK), Simon Mooijaart, (NL), F. Javier Martín-Sánchez (ES), Anna Björg Jónsdóttir (IS), Maria Fernandez (ES),
Regina Roller-Wirnsberger (AU), Fredrik Sjöstrand (SE), Attracta Heffernana (IR), Petra Wilke (GE).
Emergency Medicine (EM) has been recently implemented as a primary specialty in 20 countries in Europe. Efforts have been focused on
setting design, organization of pre-hospital systems and emergency departments (ED) and improving outcomes of life-threatening conditions
like myocardial infarction or trauma. Despite all international multicentric studies, including all ages of patients, attention towards older
patients remains still low although they represent one of the most important groups because of the changing population demographics.
Emergency care of older people is increasing exponentially in Europe because the number of older people will increase for the next 50
years. This evolution will generate increase of health demand in emergency medicine settings and significant increase of health cost at the
national and global level. In 2050, the number of people over the age of 85 will outnumber those under 16. Europe has 23 of the world’s 25
“oldest” countries. In 2013, the European Society for EM (EuSEM) created the Section of Geriatric Emergency Medicine (GEM). The mission
of this section is to develop GEM with the collaboration between emergency physicians and geriatricians involved in two different societiesEuSEM and the European Union of Geriatric Emergency Medicine Society (EUGMS) which have a common objective to improve the quality
of older patients emergency care. One of the originality of this approach is the creation of the European GEM Task Force (EGTF) including
emergency physicians and geriatricians. The objective is to concentrate concepts and goals. The EGTF is focused on three domains,
organization, education and research.
The objective of this session is to share the recent developments on training in GEM. The EGTF has written the European Curriculum
on GEM (ECGEM) and the Council of the two societies (EuSEM and EUGMS) and the Sections of EM and Geriatrics of the Union of the
European Medical Specialists (UEMS) based in Brussels, Belgium approved it in 2015. The ECGEM will be integrated to the European
Curriculum of Emergency Medicine and Geriatrics.
2 PRE-HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT OF THE MULTISITE
TERRORIST ATTACKS IN PARIS: THE BLACK FRIDAY IN PARIS.
Eric Revue, MD, Chair of the Website Committee of the European Society for Emergency Medicine, Chair of Emergency Department,
Chartres, France.
# Friday, Nov 13, 2015. It’s 2130 when the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP) is alerted to the explosions that have just occurred
at the Stade de France, a stadium in Saint-Denis just outside Paris. Within 20 min, there are shootings at four sites and three bloody
explosions in the capital. At 2140 h, a massacre takes place and hundreds of people are held hostage for 3 h in Bataclan concert hall.#
(Martin Hirsch, et al. Lancet. 2015; 386:2535-2538).
In the first minutes that followed the suicide bombing at the Stade de France, the French EMS (SAMU) and the Fire Brigade of Paris sent
out their EMT units for rapid on-the-scene prehospital triage and strategy for damage control using tourniquets to allow the fastest possible
hemostatic surgery as a civil application of war medicine. As part of the prehospital management of the severe wounded patients, the APHP
of Paris activated the Emergency Mass terrorist attack Plan (White Plan) to mobilize all the hospitals resources of personnel (EP, surgeons,
intensivists, nurses, anesthesiologists...).
The objective of this session is to share the experience of EM professionals during this dramatic night.
24
NEW ORLEANS, LA
THE ROTATING RESEARCH CURRICULUM
|
From the research novice to the professional, the SAEM Research Committee has you
covered! In addition to the myriad of research-related didactics this year, we annually host
these recurring programs:
M AY 10-13
RESEARCH
Thursday, May 12: 10:00 AM-2:00 PM — Napoleon Ballroom B2 (3rd Floor)
This “Introduction to Research” program provides yearly didactics in four discrete areas. This multi-year
curriculum has been designed to prevent overlap from consecutive years and provide a robust, broad
introduction to research.
1. Getting Started: Responsible Conduct of Research: How To Love Your IRB
2. M
ethods: Introduction to Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research: Which Method(s) Should You Use?
3. Analysis: How to Unveil Causal Inference and Properly Analyze Your Findings
4. D
issemination of Information: Perils and Pitfalls of Journal Peer Review: Navigating the Process and
Responding to Manuscript Critique
THE NIH PROGRAM
Each year, we reserve space for NIH representatives to highlight signature programs and discuss new
opportunities for emergency care research.
• The NIH SIREN Network
Wednesday, May 11: 12:00 PM-1:00 PM — Oak Alley (4th Floor)
Speakers will include, Jeremy Brown, MD, Director, Office of Emergency Care Research as well as
representatives from NHLBI Research and Research Training groups.
• NIH Institutional (T32) Research Training Programs
Wednesday, May 11: 1:00 PM-1:50 PM — Oak Alley (4th Floor)
Charles Joyce, Scientific Review Officer of the NHLBI T32 Review Committee will present information about
this grant mechanism, which is widely used by other specialties to get junior faculty trained in high-quality
research methods. This is a great opportunity for people planning to apply, either individually or on behalf of
their department.
• From K to R01: Tips for Success
Wednesday, May 11: 2:00 PM – 2:50 pm — Oak Alley (4th Floor)
Drew Carlson and Wayne Wang from NHLBI will provide an overview and answer questions regarding the
transition from career development award to independent investigator. A “must attend” for junior researchers
and their mentors!
• NIH Emergency Care Research and Training Update 2016
Wednesday, May 11: 3:00 PM – 3:50 PM — Bayside C (4th Floor)
The purpose of this session is to inform the SAEM community of the latest NIH efforts to support research
and research training in emergency care. We will discuss new initiatives/programs, and answer questions.
Speakers will include Jeremy Brown and Jane Scott, both of NIH.
25
SAEM16
V
FRIDAY, MAY 13
NAPOLEON
B1-C3
(3rd Floor)
NAPOLEONBALLROOM
BALLROOM
B1-C3,
3RD
7:00 AM – 7:45 AM TEAM CHECK-IN
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM SONOGAMES
Come cheer on your residency team! Spectators are welcome.
SonoChamps
2016
[Your Program Here!]
26
M AY 10-13
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
DON’T MISS OUR EVENTS AT SAEM16
Join us at the following events to support emergency care research and education.
WINE TASTING
Wednesday, May 11: 6:00 pm–8:30 pm
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel – Waterbury Ballroom (2nd Floor)
Single ticket: $125 – Group tickets (10): $1,000
WINE
TASTING
The SAEM Foundation is hosting a Wine Tasting promptly following the opening
reception. Gather your colleagues to join us for a remarkable evening of sampling
wines. This is a perfect opportunity for you to network with your colleagues or catch
up with old friends.
New to the event this year is our wine auction! Bring a bottle of your favorite wine
as a donation to the SAEM Foundation, and purchase premium wines from your
colleagues’ collections. Enjoy your purchase throughout your stay in New Orleans,
or remember to save space in your luggage if you wish to take it home (shipping is
not available). All proceeds from the wine auction will benefit the SAEM Foundation.
FUND RUN
Thursday, May 12: 6:30 am–8:00 am
Check in and warm ups begin at 6:00 am at the
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel Lobby.
Ticket: $50
Race for Education and Research!
Race your colleagues to the finish line, or walk at your own pace. The FUND Run
is a gratifying event where you can enjoy the outdoors, clear your mind and
increase you energy level to take on a day full of educational sessions. Runners
and walkers of all ages are invited to run for research and education. Help support
the SAEM Foundation!
The mission of the SAEM Foundation is to improve patient care through medical research and scientific discovery;
to enhance research capabilities within emergency medicine; and to help emergency physicians develop the skills
to become successful investigators. SAEM Foundation is a 501c3 public charity.
27 27
SAEM16
Join us for GEMA Events at SAEM i
Pre Conference Workshop
Tues, May 10, 2016 from 8-5pm
• Developments in Global EM Research
JOIN US FOR GEMA EVENTS AT
SAEM IN NEW ORLEANS!!!
•
•
Pre-Meeting Workshop
•
WHO components essential care systems
GEM and sustainable development goals
Academic success in GEM
THE GLOBAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE THINK TANK**
Tuesday, May 10: 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Napoleon Ballroom A3 (3rd Floor)
•
•
•
•
• Developments in Global EM Research
• WHO Components Essential Care System
• GEM and Sustainable Development Goals
• Academic Success in GEM
Th
**extra registration fee required
General Business Meeting
Wednesday, May 11: 1:00 pm-4:00 pm
Nottoway (4th Floor)
• Global EM Literature Review Top 10
• High Tech Solutions in a Low Tech Environment
• From Thinking to Acting:
Changing Global EM with GEMA
• Fellowship Showcase
G
H
e
F
E
F
**extra registration fee required
GEMA/AWAEM Luncheon**
Thursday, May 12 – 11:30 am-1:00 pm
Bayside A/B/C (4th Floor)
GEMA/EMRA Med Student
& Resident Workshop
M
•
•
Th
W
T
f
Thursday, May 12 – 2:30 pm-4:30 pm
Bacchus & Iris (8th Floor)GEMA Sponsored Dida
• Thursday 1pm: GEMA Didactic Series: So you
• What is Global EM and how to get involved?
Educator?
Thursday 1:30pm:GEMA Didactic Series: So Y
Health Researcher?
•
Thursday
2pm: GEMA Didactic Series: So You
Thursday, May 12 – Napoleon Ballroom C2 (3rd Floor)
Humanitarian Responder?
• 1:00 pm: GEMA Didactic Series: So you want to be a Global EM Educator?
• Friday 2:30pm: Point of Care Ultrasound in th
• 1:30 pm: GEMA Didactic Series: So You Want to be a Global Health Researcher?
Setting: Advances in New Educational Techniq
• 2:00 pm: GEMA Didactic Series: So You Want to be a Humanitarian
Responder?
Telemedicine
GEMA Sponsored Didactics
•
Friday, May 13 – Grand Ballroom E (5th Floor)
Cocktail Time!!!! Don’t miss the opportunity to socialize, ha
• 2:30 pm: Point of Care Ultrasound in the Resource-Limited Setting:
minded
colleagues
who
work
around the world. Tuesday 5:30p
Advances in New Educational
Techniques,
Tools,
and
Telemedicine
Cocktail
Time!!!!
28
Don’t miss the opportunity to socialize, hangout and network
with your globally minded colleagues who work around the world.
Tuesday, May 10: 5:30 pm – Sheraton’s Pelican Bar
NEW ORLEANS, LA
Tuesday, May 10
|
MEETINGS AND EVENTS
M AY 10-13
@
8:00 am–5:00 pm
Napoleon Ballroom B1 (3rd Floor)
Train the Trainer: Instructor Training in Simulation Cases and Debriefing
This pre-meeting workshop provides an immersive, hands-on experience in how to be a simulation instructor.
Background on simulation, scenario design, and debriefing will be presented in lecture format and participants will have
an opportunity to run and debrief cases. By the end of this course, participants should be able to effectively design, run,
and debrief cases for learners in their own institutions.
Wednesday, May 11
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
Napoleon Ballroom C1 (3rd Floor)
Watch a Doctor Get Sued: Live Medico Legal Simulation
This course will allow participants to experience, from the comfort of their chairs, one of the most stressful aspects of
medical practice: Being sued. Presenters will use simulation principles to provide a live simulation of a novice participant
being deposed by actual attorneys as well as an expert version of a deposition by an experienced emergency physician.
Participants will then be debriefed by the attorneys in a Q & A session. The anatomy of a lawsuit, common pitfalls, and
preparation strategies will also be discussed.
Thursday, May 12
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
Oak Alley Room (4th floor)
Sim Academy Business Meeting/SIM Fellows Forum
12:30 pm-2:00 pm—General Business Meeting
2:00 pm-2:30 pm—Reporting Guidelines of
Simulation-Based Research
2:30 pm-4:30�pm—SIM Fellows Forum
Friday, May 13
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3 (2nd Floor)
EMRA/SAEM Sim Academy Resident SIM Wars
This lively competition allows residents from various institutions
to demonstrate their skills in teamwork and communication
during the management of simulated cases in front of a live
audience.
About us
The Simulation Academy is a national
educational organization that focuses on
the development and use of simulation in
emergency medicine education, research,
and patient care. We maintain strong ties
and share many members with the Society
for Simulation in Healthcare Emergency
Medicine Interest Group. The Simulation
Academy provides training and networking
for emergency medicine educators.
Consider joining Simulation Academy if
you’re are a medical student educator,
residency faculty, or just want to learn
more. To join the Simulation Academy, visit
the membership section of the SAEM
website:
www.saem.org/membership
29
SAEM16
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY, MAY 9-11
Monday, May 9 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Medical Student Ambassadors Orientation Meeting
Gallier A & B/4th Floor
5:00 pm-9:00 pm
AEM CC 2016 Pre-Planning Dinner
Grand Chenier Room/5th Floor
Monday, May 9 – Affiliate Meetings
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
EMRA Finance Committee Meeting Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Tuesday, May 10 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
8:00 am-8:50 am
SAEM Medical Quality Management Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
8:00 am-11:00 am
SAEM Fellowship Approval Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
AWAEM Academy Meeting
Grand Couteau Room/5th Floor
10:00 am-10:50 am
SAEM Trauma Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
11:30 am-1:30 pm
New BOD Orientation with Outgoing BOD (Lunch)
Maurepas/3rd Floor
2:00 pm-5:00 pm
Academy Leaders and Committee Chairs Orientation with BOD
Bayside C/4th Floor
5:00 pm-5:50 pm
SAEM Wilderness Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Napoleon Ballrooms B3-C3/3rd Floor
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
BOD/Academy Leaders & Committee Chairs Reception
Bayside A/4th Floor
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
SAEM PC Sub-Committee Medical Student Ambassadors Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Tuesday, May 10 – Affiliate Meetings
7:30 am-5:00 pm
ABEM EM Model Task Force Meeting
Poydras/3rd Floor
8:30 am-6:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
8:00 am-5:00 pm
The HIV TESTED Trial Investigator’s Meeting Affiliate (Invitation Only)
Iris & Bacchus/8th Floor
8:00 am-5:00 pm
CORD Committee Meetings
Muses/8th Floor
8:00 am-7:00 pm
ACEP Meetings Gallier A & B/4th Floor
9:00 am-4:00 pm
MERC Session Nottoway/4th Floor
Wednesday, May 11 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
30
7:00 am-8:00 am
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
7:00 am-8:00 am SAEM COAL Committee Meeting
Nottoway/4th Floor
12:00 pm-1:30 pm
AEM Reviewers Luncheon
Rodrigue/1st Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM WEB Evolutions Committee Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM GME Committee Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM Social Media Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM Advanced Practice Providers Medical Director IG Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
1:00 pm-4:00 pm
GEMA Academy Meeting Nottoway Room/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Critical Care Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Edgewood B/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Consultation Services Committee Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM CME Committee Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SEAM Research Directors Interest Group Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Neurological Emergency Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Resident Student Advacacy Committee Meeting
Rodrigue/1st Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Evidence Based Healthcare & Implementation Interest Group Meeting Estherwood/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Grants Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Membership Committee Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Health Services & Outcomes Interest Group Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
SAEM/ABEM Executive Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
M AY 10-13
WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY, MAY 11-12
Wednesday, May 11 – Affiliate Meetings
Gallier A & B/4th Floor
Bacchus & Iris Combined/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Bacchus & Iris Combined/8th Floor
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Orpheus/8th Floor
Muses/8th Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
NEW ORLEANS, LA
ACEP Meetings EMRA BOD meeting EMRA Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation (Affiliate)
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Medical Student Governing Council EMRA Reference Committee Public Hearing EMRA Reference Committee Work Meeting EMRA Quiz Show Contest |
8:00 am-7:00 pm
8:30 am-1:00 pm
9:00 am-10:00 am 1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-5:00 pm
1:30 pm-2:30 pm
2:30 pm-3:00 pm
5:00 pm-7:00 pm
Thursday, May 12 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00 am-8:00 am
7:00 am-8:00 am 7:00 am-9:00 am
7:00 am-12:00 pm
7:30 am-10:00 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-12:00 pm
9:00 am-9:50 am
9:00 am-9:50 am
10:00 am-10:50 am
11:00 am-11:50 am
11:00 am-11:50 am
11:30 am-1:00 pm
12:00 pm-12:50 pm
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
SAEM COAL Committee Meeting AEM CC 2017 Planning Meeting
AAAEM Academy Strategic Planning Session
Executive Leadership Meeting of all EM organizations
SAEM Sex and Gender in EM Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Faculty Development Committee Meeting
SAEM EMS Interest Group Meeting
AEUS Academy Meeting
SAEM Observation Medicine Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Operations Interest Group Meeting
SAEM External Collaboration Committee Meeting
SAEM Ethics Committee Meeting
SAEM Pediatric EM Interest Group Meeting
AWAEM/GEMA Luncheon
SAEM Toxicology Interest Group Meeting
CDEM Academy Meeting
SIM Academy Meeting
SAEM Research Committee Meeting
SAEM/AACEM Executive Committee Meeting
SAEM/CORD Executive Committee Meeting
Topic Benchmark Data & Retreat Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Nottoway/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Edgewood B/4th Floor
Bayside A/4th Floor
Ellendale/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Crescent/4th Floor
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Bayside A-B-C/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Nottoway/4th Floor
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Rex/8th Floor
Rex/8th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Thursday, May 12 – Affiliate Meetings
8:00 am-8:30 am 8:00 am-3:00 pm 8:00 am-5:00 pm 8:00 am-7:00 pm 8:30 am-12:00 pm 9:00 am-9:50 am
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
5:30 pm-7:00 pm
6:00 pm-7:00 pm
10:00 pm-2:00 am
EMRA Rep. Council Welcome Breakfast & Registration CORD Committee Meetings AAEM/RSA Board of Directors Meeting (Invitation Only) ACEP Meetings EMRA Rep Council Meeting & Town Hall Emergency Care Translational Research Collaborative Meeting (ECTRC) EMRA Board Lunch
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
NEAR Meeting (Affiliate) By Invitation Only
Syncope Risk Stratification Study Meeting
Brown Dept. of EM Alumni Reception (Invitation Only)
EMRA Spring Awards Reception EMRA Party
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Borgne/3rd Floor
Muses/8th Floor
Gallier A & B/4th Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Crescent/4th floor
Off-Site
Bacchus & Iris/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Waterbury Ballroom/2nd Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Off-Site
31
SAEM16
FRIDAY, MAY 13
SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00 am-8:00 am
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
7:00 am-9:00 am
AEM Editorial Board Breakfast Meeting
Borgne/3rd Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
ADIEM Academy Meeting
Oak Alley Room/4th Floor
8:30 am-9:30 am
SAEM/EMRA Executive Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
9:00 am-9:50 am
SAEM Constitution and Bylaws Committee Meeting Ellendale/4th Floor
9:00 am-9:50 am
SAEM Sports Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
10:00 am-10:50 am
SAEM Medical Education Research Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
10:30 am-12:00 pm
SAEM 2017 PC Planning Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
11:00 am-11:50 am
SAEM Disaster Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Oakley/4th Floor
11:00 am-11:50 am
SAEM Patient Safety Interest Group Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
11:00 am-12:00 pm
SAEM Finance Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
12:00 pm-2:00 pm SAEM Foundation BOT Luncheon
Borgne/3rd Floor
12:00 pm-4:00 pm
SAEM Disaster Medicine Interest Group Curriculum Research Meeting
Oakley/4th Floor
12:30 pm-2:00 pm
International EM Fellowship Consortium Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
2:00 pm-4:00 pm AGEM Academy Meeting
AEM Education and Training Editorial Board Meeting
SAEM Foundation Development Meeting
Nottoway Room/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Borgne/3rd Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Bacchus & Iris/8th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
8:00 am-4:00 pm
CORD Committee Meetings
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
8:00 am-7:00 pm
ACEP Meetings Gallier A & B/4th Floor
8:30 am-12:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting Muses/8th Floor
11:00 am-1:00 pm
WestJEM Editorial Meeting Evergreen Room/ 4th Floor
12:00 pm-5:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting & Committee Updates Luncheon Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
EMRA/SAEM Sim Academy Resident SIM WARS Competition
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3 /2nd Floor
Affiliate Meetings
SATURDAY, MAY 14
SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
8:00 am-12:00 pm
32
New SAEM BOD Meeting
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom A2
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom A3
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B1
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B3 &
C3 Combined
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B2
3rd Floor
Napoleon Ballroom Napoleon Ballroom
C1
C2
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
Napoleon Ballroom Napoleon Ballroom Napoleon Ballroom
D1
D2
D3
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
Rhythms Ballroom
1-2-3
2nd Floor
Nottoway
4th Floor
Borgne
3rd Floor
Oak Alley
4th Floor
Rodrigue Gallery
1st Floor
Grand Couteau
5th Floor
Core Skills in Palliative
Medicine: The Education in
Insight to Innovation:
Palliative and End of Life
Translating your Ideas Care - Emergency Medicine
into Marketable Products (EPEC-EM) Mini-Course
for Emergency Medicine
Educators
12:00 PM
1:00 PM
Global Health and
Emergency Care:
Advancing the
Research Agenda.
Train the Trainer:
Instructor Training in
Simulation Cases
and Debriefing
MedEd
Boot Camp
AWAEM Academy Meeting
Wilderness Medicine:
Learning the
Fundamentals and
Implementing Innovative
and Practical Educational
Curriculums into Residency
and Medical School
TEACH Residents:
Technology for Educational
Advancement Creates
Happy Residents
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Core Skills in Palliative
Medicine: The Education in
Insight to Innovation:
Palliative and End of Life
Translating your Ideas Care - Emergency Medicine
into Marketable Products (EPEC-EM) Mini-Course
for Emergency Medicine
Educators
5:00 PM
Global Health and
Emergency Care:
Advancing the
Research Agenda.
Train the Trainer:
Instructor Training in
Simulation Cases
and Debriefing
Cochrane Systematic
Reviews of
Interventions Training
MedEd
Boot Camp
Diversity 301
Using Social Media to
Enhance Your
Academic Career
Grand
Napoleon
Napoleon
Napoleon
Ballroom
Ballroom A1
Ballroom A2
Ballroom A3
C-D-E
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
5th Floor
Networking Breakfast in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
10:00 AM
SAEM Leadership
Forum
8:00 am-5:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
Napoleon
Ballroom
B1
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B2
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom
B3 & C3
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom C1
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom C2
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom D1
3rd Floor
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
AEM CC
Education Leadership
Forum
8:00 am-5:00 pm
Napoleon
Ballroom D2
3rd Floor
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
Napoleon
Ballroom D3
3rd Floor
Bayside A
4th Floor
Bayside B
4th Floor
Bayside C
4th Floor
Grand
Chenier
5th Floor
Grand
Couteau
5th Floor
Nottoway
4th Floor
Oak Alley
4th Floor
Borgne
3rd Floor
Networking Breakfast in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
Networking Breakfast in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
7:00 AM
Welcome and Award Ceremony
9:15 am-9:50 am
Welcome and Award Ceremony
9:15 am-9:50 am
Welcome and Award Ceremony
9:15 am-9:50 am
9:00 AM
Plenary Abstracts - Napolean Ballrooms/3rd Floor
9:50 am-12:00 pm
1-6
Plenary Abstracts - Napolean Ballrooms/3rd Floor
9:50 am-12:00 pm
1-6
Plenary Abstracts - Napolean Ballrooms/3rd Floor
9:50 am-12:00 pm
1-6
10:00 AM
11:00 AM
12:00 PM
2:00 PM
12:00 PM
5:00 PM
11:00 AM
1:00 PM
8:00 AM
1:00 PM
Hurricane Party in Exhibit Hall – 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
Grand
Ballroom B
5th Floor
9:00 AM
Challenges and
Controversies of ED
Opioid Prescribing in the
Era of the Opioid Epidemic.
Grants Writing
Workshop
MERC Session
Hurricane Party in Exhibit Hall – 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
7:00 AM
Shared Decision Making
(SDM) in the Emergency
Department: Development
of a Policy-Relevant,
Patient-Centered
Research Agenda
Building Your Brand:
Tools to Develop a
Successful Career
Hurricane Party in Exhibit Hall – 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Grand
Ballroom A
5th Floor
AEM CC
8:00 am-5:00 pm
AEM CC
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Wilderness Medicine:
Learning the
Fundamentals and
Implementing Innovative
and Practical Educational
Curriculums into Residency
and Medical School
8:00 am-9:30 am
AWAEM Business Meeting
9:30 am-10:00 am
Wellness Essentials
- Amy Leuthauser, MD
10:15 am-11:45 am
New Orleans Cultural Walking Tour
(ends at location for lunch options)
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
ePosters
Shared Decision
Making and Patient
Centered Care
455-460
ePosters
Pediatrics 1
461-466
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Imaging and
Ultrasound
107-115
Airways/
Anesthesia/
Analgesia
and Peds
7-12
Power Break in Exhibit Hall – 2:30 pm- 3:00 pm
3:00 PM
Lightning Oral Abstracts
Heath Policy and Health
Services Research 1
143-148
Oral Abstracts
Peds and
Psychiatry
19-22
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Lunch Break – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Oral Abstracts
2:30 PM
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy and
Health Services 1
13-18
DS3
Human Resources
for the Research
Enterprise
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
IGNITE!
DS4
AEUS/Peds IG:
Judge Me By My Size,
Do You? Using the
Force of Ultrasound in
the Pediatric Patient
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
DS5
Nepal Earthquake
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
DS6
Watch a doctor get
sued: Live medical
legal simulation
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
DS7
Wanna Be
Academician
1:30 pm-2:20 pm
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Clinical Operations 1
116-124
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Lightning Oral
Abstracts 1
Critical Care and
Resuscitation 1
125-133
Geriatrics
134-142
DS6
DS9
Education Value Unit
2:00 pm-2:20 pm
Baltimore’s Unrest
2:00 pm-2:20 pm
Power Break in Exhibit Hall – 2:30 pm- 3:00 pm
Oral Abstracts
Critical Care/
Resuscitation
23-26
DS12
Accepting Risk
Myth of Zero
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
DS13
Research
Out There
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
EuSEM Spotlight
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
DS14
The Safety Dance
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
DS15
Tech Tools
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Education 1
116-124
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
EMS 1
155-160
ePosters
1-10
ePosters
IGNITE!
Education
467-472
DS11 Improve Your Academic
Coaching Skills 3:00 pm-3:20 pm
11-20
DS19 Flipping Out about the Flipped
classroom 3:30 pm-3:50 pm
DS16
DS17 NIH Emergency
Care Research and
AWAEM
Hybrid Careers Training Update 2016
3:00 pm-3:50 pm 3:00pm - 3:50pm
DS2
GEMA Academy
NIH Institutional
Meeting
(T32) Research
1:00 pm-4:00 pm Training Programs
Disease and Injury
Global EM Literature
Prevention
Review Top 10
473-478
DS10
From K to RO1:
High Tech Solutions
Tips for Success!
in a Low Tech
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
12:00 PM
Innovations:
1:00 PM
Medical Student
Focused Spotlights
1-7
2:00 PM
Environment
Power Break in Exhibit Hall – 2:30 pm- 3:00 pm
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Cardiovascular 1
161-166
DS1
The NIH SIREN Network
From Thinking
to Acting: Changing
Global EM with GEMA
Fellowship
Showcase
2:30 PM
DS18
SGEM Geopardy
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Innovations:
Orals 1
8-14
3:00 PM
4:00 PM
Opening Reception — Lobby
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Opening Reception — Lobby
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Opening Reception — Lobby
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
4:00 PM
6:00 PM
SAEMF Event — Waterbury Ballroom
6:00 pm-8:30 pm
SAEMF Event — Waterbury Ballroom
6:00 pm-8:30 pm
SAEMF Event — Waterbury Ballroom
6:00 pm-8:30 pm
6:00 PM
8:30 PM
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY, M AY 10-11
7:00 AM
7:00 AM
8:00 AM
|
Napoleon
Ballroom A1
3rd Floor
TUESDAY, MAY 10
TUESDAY, MAY 10
SAEM16
TUESDAY, MAY 10
8:30 PM
T-W
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY, MAY 9-11
Monday, May 9 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Medical Student Ambassadors Orientation Meeting
Gallier A & B/4th Floor
5:00 pm-9:00 pm
AEM CC 2016 Pre-Planning Dinner
Grand Chenier Room/5th Floor
Inclusion • Diversity • Eliminate Health Disparities
BENCHMARK DATA COLLECTION:
EMRA Finance Committee Meeting Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Tuesday, May 10 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
8:00 am-8:50 am
SAEM Medical Quality Management Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
8:00 am-11:00 am
SAEM Fellowship Approval Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
AWAEM Academy Meeting
Grand Couteau Room/5th Floor
10:00 am-10:50 am
SAEM Trauma Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
11:30 am-1:30 pm
New BOD Orientation with Outgoing BOD (Lunch)
Maurepas/3rd Floor
2:00 pm-5:00 pm
Academy Leaders and Committee Chairs Orientation with BOD
Bayside C/4th Floor
• Basic benchmarking goals
Identify opportunities
High Performance/Best Practice
Performance Improvement
5:00 pm-5:50 pm
SAEM Wilderness Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Napoleon Ballrooms B3-C3/3rd Floor
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
BOD/Academy Leaders & Committee Chairs Reception
Bayside A/4th Floor
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
SAEM PC Sub-Committee Medical Student Ambassadors Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
• Focus on tripartite mission
7:30 am-5:00 pm
ABEM EM Model Task Force Meeting
Poydras/3rd Floor
• Meaningful use of the data
Perception of ED performance
Value proposition
Statistically driven improvement
8:30 am-6:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
8:00 am-5:00 pm
The HIV TESTED Trial Investigator’s Meeting Affiliate (Invitation Only)
Iris & Bacchus/8th Floor
8:00 am-5:00 pm
CORD Committee Meetings
Muses/8th Floor
8:00 am-7:00 pm
ACEP Meetings Gallier A & B/4th Floor
9:00 am-4:00 pm
MERC Session Nottoway/4th Floor
“HOW DO YOU COMPARE? RESULTS OF THE 2016 AAAEM
ED OPERATIONS AND SAEM SALARY BENCHMARK SURVEY”
SURVEY EXPECTATIONS:
Tuesday, May 10 – Affiliate Meetings
• CMS Quality Metrics
• Clinical Emergency Data Registry
James Scheulen, PA, MBA
Would you like to know the latest trends in compensation for academic emergency medicine physicians?
Are you interested in trends in patient populations, boarding, observation medicine, provider coverage
hours, billing, research activity, educational metrics, faculty effort across missions, or faculty diversity? The
Academy of Administrators in Academic Emergency Medicine has the answers!! Please attend “How do you
compare? Results of the 2016 AAAEM ED Operations and SAEM Salary Benchmark Survey” a presentation
by James Scheulen, PA, MBA on Thursday May 12, 2016 2:00 – 2:50 pm, Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor.
Want to learn more about AAAEM or become a member?
Please visit our website at http://community.saem.org/aaaem
Wednesday, May 11 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00 am-8:00 am
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
7:00 am-8:00 am SAEM COAL Committee Meeting
Nottoway/4th Floor
12:00 pm-1:30 pm
AEM Reviewers Luncheon
Rodrigue/1st Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM WEB Evolutions Committee Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM GME Committee Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM Social Media Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
SAEM Advanced Practice Providers Medical Director IG Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
1:00 pm-4:00 pm
GEMA Academy Meeting Nottoway Room/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Critical Care Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Edgewood B/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Consultation Services Committee Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM CME Committee Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
AAAEM Retreat held in
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SEAM Research Directors Interest Group Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
SAEM Neurological Emergency Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
Tempe, Arizona,
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Resident Student Advacacy Committee Meeting
Rodrigue/1st Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Evidence Based Healthcare & Implementation Interest Group Meeting Estherwood/4th Floor
February, 2016
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Grants Committee Meeting
Evergreen/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Membership Committee Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
SAEM Health Services & Outcomes Interest Group Meeting
Ellendale/4th Floor
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
SAEM/ABEM Executive Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
Administrators at the
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
(Preconference day)
A Cultural Competency Curriculum
for Emergency Medicine
Monday, May 9 – Affiliate Meetings
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
DIVERSITY 301
OUR MISSION
To promote equal access to quality healthcare and the elimination of disparities
in treatment and outcomes through education and research.
To enhance the retention and promotion of those historically under-represented
in medicine and to create an inclusive environment for the training of emergency medicine providers; specifically using the AAMC’s guide “to unite expertise,
experience and innovation to inform and guide the advancement of diversity
and inclusion in emergency medicine”.
To enhance the professional development of all EM faculty and residents with
respect to culturally competent medical care.
DIDACTICS
Wednesday, May 11 , 2016
3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
Hybrid Careers in Emergency Medicine: The What, When, and How-To
Elizabeth Goldberg, MD • Leana Wen, MD • Sheryl Heron, MD, MPH, FACEP • Kimberly Pringle, MD
Thursday, May 12, 2016
8:00 - 8:50 AM
Emergency Medicine X: Creating Innovations Towards Equity (ExCITE)
Neha Raukar, MD • Cherri Hobgood, MD • Annie Sadosty, MD • Peter Sokolove, MD • Brian Zink, MD
10:00 - 10:50 AM
Translating Sex and Gender Research into Clinical Practice
Alyson McGregor, MD • Basmah Safdar, MD • Charles Wira, MD • Gillian Beauchamp, MD • Sarah Perman, MD
1:00 - 1:50 PM
Sex, Gender, and Sexual Orientation: A Potent
Concoction for Health Disparities
Tracy Madsen, MD • Esther Choo, MD • Joel Moll, MD
Paul Krieger, MD
2:00 - 2:50 PM
Caring for the Transgender Patient in the
Emergency Department: A Module From the New
ADIEM LGBT Curriculum
Anne Daul, MPH • Joel Moll, MD • Paul Krieger, MD
Thea James, MD • Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD, MPH
Available on Amazon
"Diversity and Inclusion in Quality Patient Care"
Marcus L. Martin, Sheryl L. Heron,
Lisa Moreno-Walton, Anna Walker Jones, editors.
LGBT MIXER
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
5:30 PM-7:30 PM
Location: Ernst Cafe
600 South Peters Street
CULTURAL AND
SOCIAL EVENT
Thursday, May 12, 2016
5:00 PM-6:30 PM
Private Treme Tour
Reception @ Ooh Poo Pah Doo Bar
Local food, drink and musical
entertainment
BUSINESS
MEETING
Friday, May 13, 2016
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
"Advances in LGBT Medical School
Education: Recent Work by the
American Association of Medical
Colleges" - Andrew Hollenback ,
PhD, Professor of Genetics,
Louisiana State University
"Disparities in Aboriginal Health" Alastair D. McR. Meyer, MBBS,
University of Melbourne
www.facebook.com/
SAEM.ADIEM
Twitter @saem_adiem
#ADIEMSAEM16
ePosters
ePosters
Cardiovascular
479-486
Clinical Operations 1
487-494
9:00 AM
ePosters
Information Technology
511-518
ePosters
Health Policy &
Health Services
519-526
11:00 AM
4:00 PM
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Health Policy and Health
Services Research 2
191-196
Psychiatry 1
215-220
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Psychiatry 2
239-244
Napoleon
Ballroom A3
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B1
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom B2
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Ballroom
B3 & C3
3rd Floor
Oral Abstracts
EMS and Trauma
27-30
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy & Health
Services Research/
Airways/Anesthesia/
Analgesia
31-34
Oral Abstracts
Critical Care/
Resuscitation/
Neurology
35-38
Oral Abstracts
Imaging
43-46
Oral Abstracts
Infectious Diseases
39-42
Oral Abstracts
Clinical Decisions
Guidelines/Health
Policy/Health
Services Research
47-50
DS23
DS21
Quailty Measurement
Registries and
Performance Reporting
DS27
Sudden Death
in Overtime
9:00 am-9:50 am
DS30
End of the Shift
Assessment Forms
10:00 am-10:50 am
DS36
Oral Abstracts
Oral Abstracts
EMS
51-54
Pediatrics
55-58
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
ePosters
ePosters
Airway/
Anesthesia/
Analgesia
543-550
Toxicology/
Environmental/
Health Policy
551-558
Education 3
263-268
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
EMS 3
287-292
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
AEM/Social Emergency
and Disease/Injury
Prevention
311-316
Oral Abstracts
EMS and
Geriatrics
59-62
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy and Helath
Services Research 2
67-70
Oral Abstracts
AEM/Health Policy/
Pulmonary/Infectious
Diseases
75-78
Dodge Ball
Hilton Water Front Health Club
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Oral Abstracts
Cardiovascular
63-66
Oral Abstracts
Cardiovascular
and Diease/
Injury Prevention
71-74
Oral Abstracts
Research Design/
Methodology/Statistics/
Simulation/Toxicology/
Environmental
79-82
Napoleon
Ballroom C1
3rd Floor
Napoleon
Napoleon
Napoleon
Napoleon
Ballroom C2 Ballroom D1 Ballroom D2 Ballroom D3
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
3rd Floor
Bayside
A/B/C
4th Floor
Grand
Chenier
5th Floor
Grand
Couteau
5th Floor
Nottoway
4th Floor
Get Them
Ready for
Residency
11:00 am-11:50 am
DS22
Emergency
Conducting EM
Medicine
Research using
X: Creating
Social Media Tools Innovations Towards
Equity (ExCITE)
Education 2
173-178
Lightning Oral Abstracts
ECG Research/
Abdominal/
Gastrointestinal/
Genitourinary 179-184
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
EMS 2
185-190
DS29
Lightning Oral
Lightning Oral
Lightning Oral
Does your
Abstracts
Attention Innovative
Disemination of
Abstracts
Abstracts
Teaching StickEducators:
Infectious
Research through
Ultrasound 1
International EM
Myths and Facts
Get Published!
Diseases 1
Social Media
197-202
209-214
about Learning
9:00 am-9:50 am
203-208
9:00 am-9:50 am
9:00 am-9:20 am
DS31
DS33
DS32
Lightning Oral
Lightning Oral
DS34
Lightning Oral
Introduction to
Translating Sex
Abstracts
Abstracts
Frailty of
Abstracts
Qualities and
and Gender
Are you the
Infectious
Toxicology and
Emergency
Research into
Opioid Outlaw?
Pediatrics 1
Mixed Methods
Diseases 2
Environmental
Medicine
clinical Practice 10:00 am-10:50 am
221-226
Research
227-232
233-238
10:00 am-10:50 am
10:00 am-10:50 am
10:00 am-10:50 am
DS35
High
Yield
Teaching
in
DS39
Lightning Oral
DS37
DS38
the ED Using Low Tech
Lightning Oral
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
The Role of
11:00 am-11:20 am
Reponsible
Moving from
Abstracts
Abstracts
DS40
Deliberate
Curriculum
Airways/Anesthesia/
Emergency
Conduct
Guidelines to
Design- Effectively translate
Analgesia
/Information
Medicine in Future
Trauma
Cardipvascular 2
your content & navigate the
of Research
ED Practice
Technology
AWAEM/GEMA
245-250
257-262
of Healthcare
CME
process
11:00 am-11:50 am 11:00 am-11:50 am
251-256
11:00 am- 11:50am
11:30 am-11:50 am
Luncheon
Walking Lunch in Grand Ballroom C-D-E/5th Floor – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
11:30 am-1:00 pm
(Exhibit Area closes 1:00 pm)
DS43
Navigating the
Chair Negotiation
Process
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
Rotating
Research
Curriculum
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
DS48
How do you compareResults of the AAAEM
ED Operations and SAEM
Salary Benchmark Survey
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
DS49
Leadership Blindsponts
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
DS26
DS28
DS42
DS54
DS20 New Models of
Care for Psychiatric
Medical Education Patients in the ED
Research: Are you
Doing it Without DS25 Fellowship in
even Knowing it? Emergency Psychiatry
DS24
Perils and Pitfalls
of Journal
Peer Review
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
DS41 GEMA Didactic Series:
So you want to be a Global
EM Educator?
Sex, Gender
1:00 pm-1:20 pm
To Err
and Sexual
DS46 GEMA Didactic series:
is Human
So you want to be a Global
Orientation
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
Health Researcher?
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
1:30 pm-1:50 pm
DS47 GEMA Didactic
DS51
DS50
Series: So you want
to be a Humanitarian
Controversies
Caring for the
Responder?
in Emergency
Transgender
2:00 pm-2:20 pm
Ultrasound: The
DS52 A Dean’s
Patient in the ED
Debate Rages On
Perspective
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
2:30 pm-2:50 pm
DS44
DS45
DS56
Cardiac Arrest
Resuscitation and
Palliative Care
How to Run a
Post Arrest Care
Starts in the ED
Successful ED
Updates
3:00 pm-3:50 pm 3:00 pm-3:20 pm
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
DS55
DS53
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Research Design/
Methodology/
Statistics
269-274
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Clinical Decision
Guidelines/Health
Policy/Health
Services Research
293-298
DS57
Lightning Oral
Updates in
Abstracts
Identification and
Simulation/Ethics/
Care of Suicidal
Patients in the ED Education/OB-GYN
317-322
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Ultrasound 3
275-280
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Pediatrics 2
299-304
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Pediatrics 3
323-328
Dodge Ball
Hilton Water Front Health Club
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
ePosters
ePosters
Pediatrics 2
495-502
Geriatrics
503-510
AAAEM
Sponsored:
ePosters
Ultrasound 1
527-534
ePosters
Critical Care and
Resuscitation 1
535-542
Lightning Oral Abstracts
Critic Care/
Resuscitation/
International EM/
Psychiatry
305-310
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Health Policy
and Health
Services Research 4
329-334
Armstrong
Ballroom
8th Floor
Waterbury
Ballroom
2nd Floor
AEUS Didactic:
AEUS Academy
Where’s
the On
Meeting
Button?
Inspiring
8:00
am-12:00
pm
Ultrasound
Use
Amongst Late
8:00Adopters!
am-9:00 am
Where is the
AEUS
Didactic:
On Button?
Wet or dry?
State
of the art
9:00
am-10:00
am
techniques
forof
Wet
or Dry State
the assessing
Art Technique
volume status
10:00 am-10:30 am
US
for
US for
CP/Dyspnea
CP/Dyspnea
10:00 am-10:30am
Junior Faculty
Development
Forum
How Does Your 10:30 am-11:30 am
Salary Compare?
AEUS
AEUS
Business
Meeting
Business Meeting
10:30 am-11:30 am
Resident
Academic
11:30 am-12:00 pm
AEUS
Top Articles
Articles
Leadership
AEUS Top
and
Forum
and Research
Research
Awards
Awards
8:00
am-3:30
pm
11:30 am-12:00 pm
CDEM Academy
Meeting
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
ePosters
ePosters
Clinical Decision
Guidelines
559-566
Critical Care/
Resuscitation
567-574
12:30 pm
President’s Address
and Awards
1:30 pm
Didactic Session
- NMRP Match &
Student Advising
2:30 pm
Didactic Session
- SLOE
3:30 pm
CDEM Initiatives
(Roundtable
Discussions)
8:30 PM
Mauspaus
Room
3rd Floor
Networking Breakfast
7:00 am-8:00 am
7:00 AM
Innovations:
Educational
Technology
Spotlights
15-19
8:00 AM
Innovations:
Patient Safety
and Quality
Improvement
Spotlights
20-24
9:00 AM
Active Shooters
Perpetration,
Response and
Recovery
9:00 am-10:00 am
10:00 AM
Innovations:
Orals 2
25-34
11:00 AM
Walking Lunch
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
SIM Academy
Meeting
Innovations:
Orals 3
35-39
12:00 PM
1:00 PM
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
12:30 pm-2:00 pm
General Business
Meeting
2:00 PM
2:00 pm-2:30 pm
Reporting
Guidelines of
Simulation-Based
Research
2:30 pm-4:30 pm
SIM Fellow Forum
Dodge Ball
Hilton Water Front Health Club
4:00 pm-6:00 pm
6:00 PM
6:30 PM
Orpheus
8th Floor
7:00 am-1:30 pm
Walking Lunch
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Health Policy
and Health
Services Research 3
281-286
Oak Alley
4th Floor
Networking Breakfast
7:00 am-8:00 am
Networking Breakfast in Grand Ballrooms C-D-E/5th Floor – 7:00 am-8:00 am
Walking Lunch in Grand Ballroom C-D-E/5th Floor – 12:00 pm-1:00 pm (Exhibit Area closes 1:00 pm)
1:00 PM
3:00 PM
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
Airway/Anesthesia/
Analgesia
167-172
Lightning Oral
Abstracts
10:00 AM
2:00 PM
Napoleon
Ballroom A2
3rd Floor
Networking Breakfast in Grand Ballrooms C-D-E/5th Floor – 7:00 am-8:00 am
8:00 AM
12:00 PM
Napoleon
Ballroom A1
3rd Floor
THURSDAY, M AY 12
7:00 AM
Grand
Ballroom B
5th Floor
THURSDAY, MAY 12
|
Grand
Ballroom A
5th Floor
THURSDAY, MAY 12
SAEM16
THURSDAY, MAY 12
IGNITE!
3:00 PM
21-30
Navigating the
Academic Ranks
Session (NAR)
4:00 PM
4:00 pm-5:30 pm
6:00 PM
Resident & Student Advosory Committee Reception
Bourbon Cowboy
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
Resident & Student Advosory Committee Reception
Bourbon Cowboy
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
Resident & Student Advosory Committee Reception
Bourbon Cowboy
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
6:30 PM
8:30 PM
Th
WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY, MAY 11-12
Wednesday, May 11 – Affiliate Meetings
Thursday, May 12
SAEM 2016 MEETING EVENTS
10:00 am-10:50 am Frailty in Emergency Medicine – Napoleon Ballroom B3/C3 (3rd Floor)
This didactic session will provide attendees with critical information on the
concept of frailty, tools for measuring frailty in older emergency department
patients, and potential research applications.
11:00 am-11:50 am Moving from Guidelines to ED Practice – Napoleon Ballroom B3/C3 (3rd Floor)
Real-world lessons on how implementation science tools have been used to
promote Geriatric Emergency Department (GED) guideline adoption and
practice change in the case of older emergency department patients.
7:00 am- 9:00 pm
Geriatric EM Networking Dinner
Get to know others interested in Geriatric EM over food and drink; email
mkennedy@bidmc.harvard.edu for details; fee; not an official AGEM event
Friday, May 13
12:30 pm- 4:30 pm AGEM Business Meeting – Nottoway Room/4th Floor, tea & coffee
served. Non-members welcome!
12:30 pm-12:50 pm Call to order, introductions, academy business and presentation of AGEM
awards
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
Messaging and More: Communication beyond academic journals
An interactive workshop providing practical approaches for distilling
complex research and innovative ideas into clear, powerful, and engaging
messages, and using these messages in the media and social media to
build awareness and drive practice and policy change.
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
Small Group Break-out Sessions
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Elder Abuse: That Case You Missed Last Shift
This didactic will focus on strategies to improve detection of elder abuse
and neglect, discuss how to incorporate elder abuse identification into ED
care, and provide resources for educating residents and faculty.
4:00 pm-4:30 pm
Looking forward to 2016-2017: introduction of new executive board and
future plans and projects.
8:00 am-7:00 pm
8:30 am-1:00 pm
9:00 am-10:00 am 1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-5:00 pm
1:30 pm-2:30 pm
2:30 pm-3:00 pm
5:00 pm-7:00 pm
ACEP Meetings EMRA BOD meeting EMRA Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation (Affiliate)
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Medical Student Governing Council EMRA Reference Committee Public Hearing EMRA Reference Committee Work Meeting EMRA Quiz Show Contest Gallier A & B/4th Floor
Bacchus & Iris Combined/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Bacchus & Iris Combined/8th Floor
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Orpheus/8th Floor
Muses/8th Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Thursday, May 12 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00 am-8:00 am
7:00 am-8:00 am 7:00 am-9:00 am
7:00 am-12:00 pm
7:30 am-10:00 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-8:50 am
8:00 am-12:00 pm
9:00 am-9:50 am
9:00 am-9:50 am
10:00 am-10:50 am
11:00 am-11:50 am
11:00 am-11:50 am
11:30 am-1:00 pm
12:00 pm-12:50 pm
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
SAEM COAL Committee Meeting AEM CC 2017 Planning Meeting
AAAEM Academy Strategic Planning Session
Executive Leadership Meeting of all EM organizations
SAEM Sex and Gender in EM Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Faculty Development Committee Meeting
SAEM EMS Interest Group Meeting
AEUS Academy Meeting
SAEM Observation Medicine Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Operations Interest Group Meeting
SAEM External Collaboration Committee Meeting
SAEM Ethics Committee Meeting
SAEM Pediatric EM Interest Group Meeting
AWAEM/GEMA Luncheon
SAEM Toxicology Interest Group Meeting
CDEM Academy Meeting
SIM Academy Meeting
SAEM Research Committee Meeting
SAEM/AACEM Executive Committee Meeting
SAEM/CORD Executive Committee Meeting
Topic Benchmark Data & Retreat Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Nottoway/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Edgewood B/4th Floor
Bayside A/4th Floor
Ellendale/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Crescent/4th Floor
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Bayside A-B-C/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Nottoway/4th Floor
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Maurepas/3rd Floor
Rex/8th Floor
Rex/8th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Thursday, May 12 – Affiliate Meetings
8:00 am-8:30 am 8:00 am-3:00 pm 8:00 am-5:00 pm 8:00 am-7:00 pm 8:30 am-12:00 pm 9:00 am-9:50 am
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
12:30 pm-5:30 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
3:00 pm-4:00 pm
5:30 pm-7:00 pm
6:00 pm-7:00 pm
10:00 pm-2:00 am
EMRA Rep. Council Welcome Breakfast & Registration CORD Committee Meetings AAEM/RSA Board of Directors Meeting (Invitation Only) ACEP Meetings EMRA Rep Council Meeting & Town Hall Emergency Care Translational Research Collaborative Meeting (ECTRC) EMRA Board Lunch
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
EMRA Committee Meetings
NEAR Meeting (Affiliate) By Invitation Only
Syncope Risk Stratification Study Meeting
Brown Dept. of EM Alumni Reception (Invitation Only)
EMRA Spring Awards Reception EMRA Party
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Borgne/3rd Floor
Muses/8th Floor
Gallier A & B/4th Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Crescent/4th floor
Off-Site
Bacchus & Iris/8th Floor
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Evergreen/4th Floor
Waterbury Ballroom/2nd Floor
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3/2nd Floor
Off-Site
Wednesday, May 11 AEUS Didactic Sessions Activities 2016 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm. Napoleon Ballroom B2, 3rd Floor. Judge Me By My Size Do You? Using the Force of Ultrasound in the Pediatric Patient. Learn evidence-­‐‑
based radiation-­‐‑free ways to assess pediatric patients. Kids are not just small adults—or are they? Speakers: Tarina Kang, Alyssa Abo, Resa Lewiss, Jennifer Marin. Co-­‐‑sponsored by the Pediatric Interest Group. Thursday, May 12 AEUS Didactic Sessions 8:00 am -­‐‑ 9:00 am. Oak Alley Room, 4th floor. Sonophobe to Sonophile—Inspiring Ultrasound Use Among Late Adopters and Occasional Users. Do you have trouble getting motivated to use ultrasound? Having issues with resident and faculty sono-­‐‑apathy? This moderated panel session will interactively explore some of the barriers and challenges to regular use of clinical ultrasound and offer tips and tricks to increasing compliance! Moderators: Melissa Skaugset, Rob Huang. Panelists: Nik Theyyunni, David Bahner, Resa Lewiss, Angela Zamarripa, Mark Lowell, Marisa Martinez-­‐‑Swanson. 9:00 am - 10:00 am. Oak Alley Room, 4th floor. Wet or dry? State of the art techniques for assessing volume status. The ultimate question in critical care gets a new look. This panel of expert speakers will review traditional and novel methods of determining volume status and guiding your resuscitation. Speakers: David Mackenzie, David Blehar, Michael Filbin, Susan Wilcox, Lori Stolz. AEUS Didactic Sessions 10:00 am – 10:30 pm. Oak Alley Room, 4th floor. Bedside Ultrasound in the Patient with ndifferentiated Chest Pain & Dyspnea. Do B-lines, lung points, and spine signs make your head spin? Learn about up-and-coming cardiothoracic ultrasound in this symptom-based didactic that will change your practice immediately! Speaker: Ryan Gibbons. AEUS Business Meeting 10:30 am – 11:30 am. Oak Alley Room, 4th floor. Updates from the Academy Board, presentation of individual Education and Research Awards, learn about the inaugural AEUS Research Grant and how to apply! Presenters: Andrew Liteplo, Rachel Liu, Matt Fields, Steve Leech, Srikar Adhikari, Arthur Au, Ken Cody. AEUS Research Awards 11:30 am – 12:00 pm. Oak Alley Room, 4th floor. Join us for the inaugural presentation of the AEUS Research Awards—learn about the best research studies done by Academy members in 2015 and see which one takes home the SAEMMY! AEUS Didactic Sessions 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm. Napoleon Ballroom C1, 3rd Floor. Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound: The Debate Rages On! Watch ultrasound heavyweights debate contentious aspects of point-­‐‑of-­‐‑care ultrasound and take each other on in this popular slug-­‐‑fest. Moderator: Chris Raio. Debaters: Vicki Noble vs Mike Stone, Jason Nomura vs Srikar Adhikari. Friday, May 13 SonoGames® V 7:00 am – 7:45 am Registration 8:00 am – 12:00 pm Games Begin Room: Napoleon Ballroom B&C, 3rd Floor. Come watch residencies compete in ultrasound knowledge and skills in the 5th Annual SonoGames! Cheer on your program in their quest to win the SonoCup and be crowned National Champions! S G
ono
ames
Academy of Emergency
Ultrasound of SAEM
AEUS Didactic Sessions 1:30 pm – 2:20 pm. Grand Ballroom E, 5th Floor. Bowel Ultrasound -­‐‑ Ready for primetime or just a bunch of crap? The frontier of point-­‐‑of-­‐‑care ultrasound has advanced to the bowel. Learn about assessment of appendicitis, small bowel obstruction, and other pathologies in this didactic session. Speakers: Matt Fields, Nova Panebianco, Chris Fox, Carl Alsup. 2:30 – 3:30 pm. Grand Ballroom E, 5th Floor. Point of Care Ultrasound in the Resource-­‐‑Limited Setting: Advances in New Educational Techniques, Tools and Telemedicine. The title says it all! Learn from pioneers in the field about ultrasound in its most powerful setting! Speakers: Devjani Das, Megan Leo, Mark Bisanzo, Sam Licciardo, Katie O’Brien. Co-­‐‑sponsored by GEMA. Browse SAEM16 ultrasound-­‐‑related abstracts at www.saem.org/abstracts
www.saem.org/aeus FRIDAY, MAY 13
ePosters
Infectious Diseases
575-582
9:00 AM
ePosters
Cardiovascular and
Pulmonary
583-590
10:00 AM
DS59
Diagnosising and Remediating
Clinical Reasoning Difficulties
8:00 am - 8:50 am
DS63
DS61
Lions Den 2016
8:00 am - 9:50 am
Lightning
DS58 Cutting the KT Window
to Less than 1 Month with
Oral Abstracts
#SGEMHOP
EMS and Orthopedics
DS62 The Lecture is DeadLong Live the Lecture
8:30 am - 8:50 am
DS64 Emerging Infectious
Diseases
9:00 am - 9:50 am
Stump the Experts!
9:00 am - 9:50 am
Coffee Break – 10:00 pm-10:30 am
10:30 AM
DS67
ePosters
Abdominal/
Gastrointestinal/
Genitourinary
607-614
ePosters
EMS 1
615-622
How to Effectively
Supervise and
Teach Residents
10:30 am - 11:20 am
KL2 Research
Teaching Programs
10:30 am - 10:50 am
11:30 AM
DS71
Improve Your Teaching
by Debunking
Education Myths
11:30 am - 12:20 pm
12:00 PM
12:30 PM
DS68
Off the Beaten Path:
Building a Career in
Sport Medicine
10:30 am - 11:20 am
DS69
The Future of Cancer
11:00 am - 11:50 am
DS70
Pain Management
and Shared Decisionmaking in the ED
11:30 am - 11:50 am
The Scholarship
Pipeline
1:30 pm - 1:50 pm
ePosters
ePosters
Pediatrics 3
639-646
Ultrasound 2
647-654
Orpheus
8th Floor
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Clinical Operations 2
359-364
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Geriatrics 2
383-388
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Cardiovascular 3
407-412
Lightning Oral Abstracts
Toxicology/Environmental /
Research Design/Methodology/
Statistics
341-346
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Pediatrics 4
347-352
Lightning Oral Abstracts
Pulmonary and Ultrasound
365-370
Imaging and Infectious
Diseases
371-376
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Disease/Injury
Prevention
389-394
DS60
Taking Advantage
of the Teachable Moment
8:00 am - 8:50 am
Lightning Oral Abstracts
Neurology /Health Policy/
Health Services/Research
377-382
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Ultrasound 3
395-400
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Critical Care/
Resuscitation/
Disaster Medicine
413-418
Health Policy
and Health
Services Research 5
419-424
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Neurology
353-358
DS66
SONO
Games
Sepsis in the
Emergency
Department
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Critical Care/Resuscitation/
Disease/Injury Prevention
401-406
Apprenticship to
Independence
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
DS73
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Cardiovascular 4
431-436
Bowel Ultrasound
1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Bayside
A-B-C
4th Floor
Grand
Chenier
5th Floor
Grand
Couteau
5th Floor
Grand
Foyer
5th Floor
7:00 AM
Coffee Break in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy & Health
Services Research 3
83-86
Oral Abstracts
Pediatrics and
Ultrasound
87-90
ePosters
Clinical Operations 2
591-598
Oral Abstracts
Oral Abstracts
Imaging & Health Policy & Infectious Diseases and
Health Services Research
Pediatircs
91-94
95-98
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy and
Health Services
Research /Injury
Prevention
99-102
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy/Health Services
Research/Pediatrics /
Abdominal/Gastrointestinal/
Genitourinary
103-106
Innovations:
ADIEM Meeting
Critical Care and
Resuscitation 3
599-606
Exhibit Presentations 1
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
40-44
Advances in LGBT
Medical School Education:
Recent Work by the
American Association of
Medical Colleges
10:00 PM
Andrew Hollenback, PhD,
Professor of Genetics,
Louisiana State University
10:30 AM
Education and Simulation
623-630
Imaging and
Ultrasound
631-638
9:00 AM
------------
ePosters
ePosters
8:00 AM
ePosters
Innovations:
Exhibit Presentation 2
45-49
Disparities in
Aboriginal Health
Alastair D. McR. Meyer,
MBBS,
University of Melbourne
Medical Student
Symposium
11:00 AM
11:30 AM
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Critical Care/
Resuscitation 2
437-442
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Health Policy & Health
Services Research 6
443-448
Lunch – 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
Lunch – 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
DS77
Pearls and Pitfalls
of the Resident and
Faculty Roast
3:30 pm - 4:20 pm
12:30 PM
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
Infectious Diseases 3
449-454
1:30 PM
AGEM Meeting
12:30 pm - 4:30 pm
ePosters
12:30 pm-12:50 pm
Welcome and Awards
Psychiatry and
Social EM
Research
655-662
1:00 pm-1:50 pm
Messaging and More:
Communication Beyond
Academic Journals
ePosters
EMS 2
663-670
2:00 pm-2:50 pm
Small Group
Break-out Sessions
3:00 PM
3:00 pm-3:50 pm
Elder Abuse:
That Case You
Missed Last Shift
4:00 pm-4:30 pm
Looking Forward
to 2016-2017
Residency/Fellowship
Fair
Armstrong Ballroom
3:00 pm-5:00 pm
2:00 PM
2:30 PM
3:30 PM
Residency/Fellowship Fair
Armstrong Ballroom - 8th Floor
3:00 pm-5:00 pm
4:00 PM
4:30 PM
5:00 PM
Oak Alley
4th Floor
8:00 am-3:00 pm
Point of Care
Ultrasound in the
Resource-Limited
Setting
2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
3:30 PM
Perception and
Metacognition
4:00 pm - 4:20 pm
Nottoway
4th Floor
Pediatrics and
Information Technology
425-430
DS76
DS75
Closing the EM
Knowledge Gap about
Human Trafficking
2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
DS78
Waterbury
Ballroom
2nd Floor
Lightning
Oral Abstracts
DS74
3:00 PM
4:00 PM
Napoleon
Ballroom D2
3rd Floor
12:00 PM
DS72
2:30 PM
335-340
Lunch – 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
1:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom
B1/B2/B3 &
C1/C2/C3
3rd Floor
Coffee Break in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
DS65
2:00 PM
Napoleon
Ballroom A3
3rd Floor
Coffee Break in Exhibit Hall – 7:00 am-9:00 am
8:00 AM
11:00 AM
Napoleon
Ballroom A2
3rd Floor
FRIDAY, M AY 13
7:00 AM
Napoleon
Ballroom A1
3rd Floor
|
Grand Ballroom Grand Ballroom Grand Ballroom Grand Ballroom Grand Ballroom
A
B
C
D
E
5th Floor
5th Floor
5th Floor
5th Floor
5th Floor
FRIDAY, MAY 13
SAEM16
FRIDAY, MAY 13
4:30 PM
Closing Reception — Waterbury Ballroom/Lagniappe - 2nd Floor
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Closing Reception — Waterbury Ballroom/Lagniappe - 2nd Floor
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
Closing Reception — Waterbury Ballroom/Lagniappe - 2nd Floor
5:00 pm-6:30 pm
5:00 PM
F
FRIDAY, MAY 13
SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00 am-8:00 am
SAEM Program Committee Daily Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
7:00 am-9:00 am
AEM Editorial Board Breakfast Meeting
Borgne/3rd Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
ADIEM Academy Meeting
Oak Alley Room/4th Floor
8:30 am-9:30 am
SAEM/EMRA Executive Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
9:00 am-9:50 am
SAEM Constitution and Bylaws Committee Meeting Ellendale/4th Floor
9:00 am-9:50 am
SAEM Sports Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
10:00 am-10:50 am
SAEM Medical Education Research Interest Group Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
10:30 am-12:00 pm
SAEM 2017 PC Planning Meeting
Maurepas/3rd Floor
11:00 am-11:50 am
SAEM Disaster Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Oakley/4th Floor
11:00 am-11:50 am
SAEM Patient Safety Interest Group Meeting
Crescent/4th Floor
11:00 am-12:00 pm
SAEM Finance Committee Meeting
Rex/8th Floor
12:00 pm-2:00 pm SAEM Foundation BOT Luncheon
Borgne/3rd Floor
12:00 pm-4:00 pm
SAEM Disaster Medicine Interest Group Curriculum Research Meeting
Oakley/4th Floor
12:30 pm-2:00 pm
International EM Fellowship Consortium Meeting
Estherwood/4th Floor
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
2:00 pm-3:00 pm
2:00 pm-4:00 pm AGEM Academy Meeting
AEM Education and Training Editorial Board Meeting
SAEM Foundation Development Meeting
Nottoway Room/4th Floor
Estherwood/4th Floor
Borgne/3rd Floor
Academy Block
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Bacchus & Iris/8th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Endymion & Mid-City/8th Floor
Tuesday, May 10 - Grand Couteau/5th Floor
8:00 am-12:00 pm
EMRA Committee Meetings
Proteus & Zulu/8th Floor
8:00 am-4:00 pm
CORD Committee Meetings
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
8:00 am-7:00 pm
ACEP Meetings Gallier A & B/4th Floor
9:30 am-10:00 am – Wellness Essentials - Amy Leuthauser, MD
8:30 am-12:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting Muses/8th Floor
10:15 am-11:45 am – New Orleans Cultural Walking Tour (ends at location for lunch options)
11:00 am-1:00 pm
WestJEM Editorial Meeting Evergreen Room/ 4th Floor
12:00 pm-5:00 pm
EMRA BOD Meeting & Committee Updates Luncheon Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
12:30 pm-4:30 pm
EMRA/SAEM Sim Academy Resident SIM WARS Competition
Rhythms Ballroom 1-2-3 /2nd Floor
Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine
Affiliate Meetings
8:00 am-9:30 am – AWAEM Business Meeting
Pre-Meeting Workshop
Tuesday, May 10 - Grand Couteau/5th Floor
1:00 pm-5:30 pm – Building Your Brand: Tools to Develop a Successful Career
Didactics
Wednesday, May 11 - Bayside B, 4th Floor
3:00 pm-3:50 pm – Hybrid Careers in Emergency Medicine: The What, When, and How-To
Thursday, May 12 - Napoleon Ballroom B3/C3, 3rd Floor
8:00 am-8:50 am – Emergency Medicine X: Creating Innovations Towards Equity (ExCITE)
Social Events
Thursday, May 12
11:30 am-1:00 pm – AWAEM/GEMA Luncheon
SATURDAY, MAY 14
SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy/Interest Group/Board Meetings
8:00 am-12:00 pm
New SAEM BOD Meeting
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
CDEM Academy Meeting
Thursday, May 12
12:30 pm President’s Address and Awards
1:30 pm Didactic Session - NMRP Match & Student Advising
2:30 pm Didactic Session - SLOE
3:30 pm CDEM Initiatives (Roundtable Discussions)
Nottoway Room, 4th Floor
Anyone who advises medical students is encouraged to attend the didactic
sessions.
CDEM Sponsored Educational Programs
Thursday, May 12
End of Shift Assessment Forms: Results and Updates from the National CDEM
Consensus Conference
10:00 - 10:50 am
K. Hiller, D. Franzen, L. Lawson, J. Jung
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Get Them Ready for Residency: Opportunities for Emergency Medicine
Leadership in Medical School Capstone Courses
11:00 – 11:50 am
C. Richardson, M. Stull, D. Wald, M. Fix, J. Liebzeit, D. Axelson, R. Grosso
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Other sessions of interest
Wednesday, May 11
Education Value Units: Crafting a Mechanism
to Recognize Educational Contributions
2:00 - 2:20 pm. L. Hopson, M. Carney
Bayside A, 4th Floor
Thursday, May 12
Medical Education Research: Are you Doing It
Without Even Knowing It?
8:00 - 8:50 am. J. Love, S. Bentley, J. Nelson, B.
Schnapp. Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Friday, May 13
Improve Your Teaching by Debunking
Education Myths: An Evidence-based Teaching
Workshop Using Articles That Will Change
Your Teaching Practice (Flipped Classroom)
11:30 am - 12:20 pm. S. Santen, S. Farrell, L.
Hopson, R. Hemphill. Grand Ballroom C/5th
Floor
MAY 10-13 — NEW ORLEANS, LA
Wednesday, May 11: 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Wednesday, May 11: 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
DS1: A New Odyssey for Emergency Research:
The NIH SIREN Network
DS3: Human Resources for the Research Enterprise
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe various approaches to advertising and recruitment of research
project personnel,
2.Describe a general framework for interviewing and selecting candidates,
3.Identify specific strategies for onboarding, retaining, and dismissing
research project personnel,
4.Incorporate clinical and research trainees into their research project
workforce.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the NIH’s vision for the SIREN network,
2.Recognize the features of funding and peer review for the SIREN network,
3.Describe the process for participating in clinical trials and submitting
scientific ideas to the SIREN network for senior and junior investigators.
Description: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) continue to transform
their approach to emergency research. The purpose of this session is
to provide an overview of the NIH’s vision for the Strategies to Innovate
EmeRgENcy Care Clinical Trials (SIREN) network, which will replace the
Neurological Emergency Treatment Trials and Resuscitation Outcomes
Consortium networks. The presenter heads the Office of Emergency Care
Research at the NIH and will provide insight into the scope, distinctions,
and funding mechanisms of the SIREN network. Attendees will gain insight
into the priorities of the SIREN network, the types of studies it will fund,
and mechanisms of peer review and funding. Attendees will also gain
greater appreciation for how they can interact with the network towards
advancing emergency care research and how the network will engage junior
investigators. Ample time will be available for questions and answers.
Joseph Miller, MD, MS, Henry Ford Hospital, Wayne State University, Submitter Jeremy
Brown, MD, National Institutes of Health, Presenter
Wednesday, May 11: 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
DS2: NIH Institutional (T32) Research Training Programs:
A Critical Missing Element in Emergency Care Research Training
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify key characteristics of a T32 program director,
2.In developing a research career, explain when T32 training occurs,
3.Once T32 training is completed, identify two appropriate next steps in
developing a research career.
Description: The emergency care research community has worked
extensively to expand research training capabilities for young trainees over
the past decade. Great successes have been made with the standardization
of SAEM clinical research training requirements, six new research training
centers created by the NHLBI Emergency Medicine K12 Program and the
new Trans-NIH K12 program in emergency care research. However, NIH K12
programs are finite targeted initiatives generally limited to five years to train a
bolus of competitive investigators in a discrete domain. K12 programs are
temporary whereas NIH T32 grants provide ongoing research training grants
that can be renewed every five years. The T32 training program was created
41 years ago and currently there are more than 2300 programs funded by
NIH across the US. In the NHLBI Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, more
than 120 T32 programs are funded at any time and support clinical research
training to fellows in in cardiology, vascular surgery, thoracic surgery, critical
care, pediatric cardiology, but only one T32 program in emergency care
research.. We will provide basic information regarding the T32 mechanism,
its benefits, and initiate conversation about these awards. There will be three
panelists addressing program planning, selecting an NIH institute, mentor
requirements, program director attributes, choosing scientific scope, as well
as review criteria. Twenty minutes will be devoted to questions and answers.
Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of
Health, Presenter/Submitter
Charles Joyce, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health,
Presenter
*Disclaimer: Didactics are placed in the program how they were submitted to SAEM.
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Description: Much effort is spent helping young investigators develop
research projects, hone skills in specific content areas or statistical
analysis, obtain funding, and publish findings. However, the actual work
required to run even a small research project quickly exceeds the capacity
of any emergency medicine physician scientist; therefore, investigators
must assemble the personnel required to complete the proposed work.
Research personnel can include research assistants, lab technicians, project
managers, lab managers, trial coordinators, administrative assistants, and
trainees (i.e., med students, residents, post-docs, and fellows). The process
of building this workforce can be daunting to the junior research investigator
who has recently been awarded his/her first major funding. Despite extensive
years of training, most junior faculty have no education in human resources.
This session will address this deficiency by providing developing research
investigators with practical knowledge on human resources from established
investigators. A panel of well-established researchers in emergency medicine
will impart their pearls of wisdom through a moderated Q & A session.
Specific discussion topics will include: general approach to advertising/
recruiting for positions, framework for interviewing and candidate selection,
absolute do’s and don’ts for the interview process, orientation/onboarding
of new hires, retaining excellent research staff, firing substandard personnel,
and special considerations for clinical or research trainees such as med
students, residents, post-docs, and fellows. The session will conclude with
an open-ended Q & A period.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
SAEM16 DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS
J. Scott Van Epps, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Submitter
Rebecca Cunningham, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Clifton W. Callaway, MD, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, Presenter
Jeffrey A. Kline, MD, Indiana University, Presenter
DS4: Judge Me By My Size, Do You? Using the Force of
Ultrasound in the Pediatric Patient
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Assess the current literature on high-yield pediatric ultrasound applications,
2.Apply new ways to improve clinical practice using bedside ultrasound,
3.Explain how ultrasound can augment the workup for patients in spite of the
limitations of bedside ultrasound for certain pediatric cases.
Description: Pediatric emergency medicine physicians continue to make
advances in point-of-care ultrasound use while appreciating its diagnostic
limitations. Using a case-based approach with audience participation, this
session will explore the literature and current practice regarding the FAST
exam and point-of-care ultrasound for non-traumatic abdominal pain and
for the evaluation of shock and head trauma. There is controversy over
the FAST application for pediatric trauma patients given that patients may
lack free fluid after blunt abdominal injury, whereby CT is the gold standard.
Regardless, nearly 90% of blunt abdominal trauma patients are managed
non-operatively. This session will present anatomical and physiologic
pearls as well as provide a critical examination of the literature for the FAST.
Appendicitis, intussusception, and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) are
three of the most common reasons for emergent abdominal imaging in
pediatric patients. Using an interactive, case-based format, this session will
highlight US findings of the most common ED presentations of abdominal
33
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
pain in the pediatric population. Point-of-care US can be used to distinguish
different types of shock in pediatric patients. Pediatric anatomy plays a
role in threshold measurements of the IVC or lung, for example, that are
not used in adult calculations. Session speakers will present cases and
discuss how the literature explores these differences. The presence of skull
fractures increases the risk of intracranial injury four-fold in pediatric patients.
US is increasingly being used to diagnose fractures due to its ease of use
and safety profile. Presenters will discuss the current literature and whether
ultrasound is as sensitive as CT scanning in detecting skull fractures.
Tarina Kang, MD, Los Angeles County Medical Center + USC, Submitter
Jennifer Marin, MD, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Presenter
Resa Lewiss, MD, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Presenter
Alyssa Abo, MD, Children’s National Medical Center, Presenter
DS5: Nepal Earthquake 2015: Post-Disaster Lessons for
Professional Development, Education, and Research in
Academic Wilderness Medicine
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe and appreciate the impact of basic austere medical skill sets and
disaster preparedness, especially in remote locations,
2.Articulate important professional development lessons, especially for
academic junior faculty in austere medicine,
3.Apply educational lessons to existing wilderness, disaster, and international
curriculums and director management,
4.Formulate possible future austere research avenues and advocacy.
Description: The academic practice of wilderness medicine (the provision of
resource-limited medicine under austere conditions) is rapidly expanding with
14 fellowships at present. Last April, two wilderness medicine fellows, now
junior faculty at academic institutions, were working clinically and performing
research at remote high altitude clinics in Nepal when the 7.8 magnitude
earthquake struck. The resulting avalanche at Everest Base Camp caused a
mass causality incident (MCI) whereby victims were evacuated to Pheriche.
In the weeks to follow, we experienced a wide spectrum of austere medical
practice from mass causality care to disaster relief in remote villages and
field hospitals. From Boston, the fellowship director navigated strategically
to ensure adequate safety and institutional support. Lessons learned
can forward SAEM’s professional development and educational mission.
Professional development implications for junior academic faculty working in
austere environments will be discussed at this session. Possible educational
reforms may influence wilderness, disaster, and international curriculums.
In addition, the importance of receiving training in austere medical skills
and disaster preparedness for all emergency medicine physicians will be
highlighted. Research needs learned from this experience will also be
discussed. The format of the session will be a moderated panel. Clinical
experiences in Nepal and from the fellowship director stateside will be briefly
described. The implications on SAEM’s mission of professional development,
education, research, and advocacy will be discussed. Questions from the
audience guided by the moderator’s multi-decade expertise in austere
medicine will conclude the session.
Renee Salas, MD, MS, Massachusetts General Hospital / HMS, Submitter/Presenter
Lara Phillips, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Presenter
N. Stuart Harris, MD, MFA, Massachusetts General Hospital / HMS, Presenter
Edward Otten, MD, University of Cincinnati, Presenter
34
DS6: Watch a Doctor Get Sued: Live Medico Legal Simulation
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the course of events from notification to courtroom,
2.Describe the deposition process,
3.Discuss common pitfalls, preparation strategies, and medico-legal
information from experienced defense attorneys.
Description: This course will allow participants to experience, from the comfort
of their chairs, one of the most stressful aspects of medical practice: Being
sued. Presenters will use simulation principles to provide a live simulation of
a novice participant being deposed by actual attorneys as well as an expert
version of a deposition by an experienced emergency physician. Participants
will then be debriefed by the attorneys in a Q & A session. The anatomy of a
lawsuit, common pitfalls, and preparation strategies will also be discussed.
Michael Smith, MD, Ochsner Clinic, Submitter/Presenter
DS7: So You Want to be an Academician: Getting (and Giving)
Mentoring that Spans an Emergency Medicine Career
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explore mentorship for emergency medicine faculty in education and
administration career paths,
2.Explain approaches to mentoring of junior and mid-career faculty
describing successful implementation at several institutions,
3.Describe the varied roles of senior faculty mentors and the benefits that
result for both the individual and the department,,
4.Discuss the benefits of a spectrum of mentorship regarding departmental
objectives and its trajectory over time.
Description: Mentorship is a key element of successful career development
in academic emergency medicine. While there is generally a strong focus
on mentorship of junior faculty there is often little guidance for mid-career
faculty and their more senior mentors; there is even less focus on the
resultant benefits to both mentor and mentee within departments. The
subsequent benefits of these activities towards departmental objectives
and trajectory should be recognized and encouraged. An expert panel will
explore how mentorship can benefit an entire departmental faculty— from
senior to junior—and how it benefits emergency medicine departments
overall. The session will a focus on the role of both the mentor and mentee.
Various examples of successful mentorship activities will be described and
key elements of these approaches will be explored. Finally, presenters will
describe opportunities for senior faculty members to mentor junior and
mid-career faculty and the critical ways these interactions can contribute to
departmental trajectory.
Alise Frallicciardi, MD, Hartford Hospital/University of Connecticut, Submitter
Kathleen Clem, MD, Loma Linda University, Presenter
Gail D’Onofrio, MD, Yale University, Presenter
Brian J. Zink, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Presenter
Kate Heilpern, MD, Emory University, Presenter
DS8: Education Value Units: Crafting a Mechanism to Recognize
Educational Contributions
Bayside A/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Define an Education Value Unit (EVU),
2.Identify a strategy to implement in their own institutions,
3.Develop a mechanism to link EVUs to faculty incentives.
Description: Faculty educational contributions are hard to quantify, yet in an era
of limited resources, there is increasing pressure to link funding with faculty
teaching efforts. Educational Value Units (EVUs) are one mechanism to quantify
these activities. This session will present one institution’s model of EVU’s.
During the session, learners will actively participate in considering the essential
components of developing such a system for their own institutions. These
components include: a) Developing buy-in to the system and an implementation
strategy; b) Defining tangible and intangible incentives for achievement; and c)
Defining reporting mechanisms and activities to be recognized.
Laura Hopson, MD, University of Michigan, Submitter/Presenter
Michele Carney, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
DS9: Baltimore’s Unrest: Perspectives and Lessons from Two
Public Health/Emergency Physician Leaders
Bayside B/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss how a health department responds during times of civil unrest and
how the emergency department can be a key partner in that response,
2.Assess how their emergency departments might benefit from public health
resource integration.
Description: Presenters at this session are public health leaders and boardcertified emergency physicians who were leaders of the Baltimore City
Health Department during the April 2015 civil unrest. Using the analogy of
running a medical “code” as a useful model for integrating public health into
a city’s broader emergency response plan, they will discuss how emergency
medicine might be better incorporated into public health emergency
preparedness and response. In this lecture-based session, presenters will
highlight lessons learned, including the importance of: a centralized and
coordinated public health response; frequent and effective communication;
flexibility and adaptability in unrest; and adequate debriefing in preparation
for trauma-informed interventions. In addition, based on their own ED
interventions in Baltimore to reduce violence and connect patients with social
services, presenters will propose how emergency departments might benefit
from integrating a public health model into their daily operations.
Joneigh Khaldun, MD, MPH, Baltimore City Health Department/University of Maryland
School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Leana Wen, MD, MSc, Baltimore City Health Department, Presenter
Wednesday, May 11: 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
DS10: From K to R01: Tips for Success
Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of
Health, Submitter
Drew Carlson, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institutes, National Institutes of Health,
Presenter
Wednesday, May 11: 3:00 PM - 3:20 PM
DS11: Improve Your Academic Coaching Skills
Bayside A/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the current state of the literature on academic coaching in
medical education,
2.List 3-5 desirable skills for coaches and learners to demonstrate in the
coaching relationship,
3.Relate an improvement in their coaching technique based on feedback
from a fellow participant.
Description: Academic coaching is becoming increasingly more recognized
as a potentially effective way to help learners improve self-assessment skills
and identify gaps and strategies for improvement. This course will help
attendees better their academic coaching skills. The session will briefly review
the medical and non-medical literature around constructs for coaching, then
showcase specific skills that coaches can use to improve the coaching
environment and relationship. Important learner attributes and behaviors will
also be discussed. Finally, participants will have an opportunity to practice
coaching principles with a peer.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Wednesday, May 11: 2:00 PM - 2:20 PM
Nicole Deiorio, MD, Oregon Health and Science University, Submitter/Presenter
Wednesday, May 11: 3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
DS12: Accepting Risk and the Myth of Zero
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss the concept and myth of zero medical risk,
2.Explain how Bayesian probabilities inform patient evaluations,
3.Formulate evaluation and treatment plans that accept appropriate risk.
Description: With the advent and widespread use of sophisticated testing
and imaging modalities in U.S. hospitals, medical students, residents, and
attending physicians have drifted toward an inability to accept ambiguity.
This uncomfortableness with ambiguity is part of what has been termed
“risk aversion.” Such risk aversion has led to an over reliance on testing
and imaging, resulting in increased costs, longer emergency department
length of stays, and greater risk of complications; moreover, it has not been
demonstrated to decrease morbidity or mortality. In essence, physicians
often seek to find a mythical miss rate of zero percent. Award-winning
speakers will use Bayesian probabilities, mathematics, economics, and
state-of-the-art testing, to demonstrate how practitioners can learn to accept
risk in their medical practice and how the zero percent risk is a statistical
impossibility, particularly in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome,
pulmonary embolism, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and blunt trauma patients.
The speakers will engage the audience through the use of examples ranging
from Ernest Shackleton to pop culture.
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Steve Bird, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Submitter
Mark Bisanzo, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss the importance of planning for R01 submissions,
2.Identify the role of NIH program staff and their role in assisting potential
applicants,
3.Discuss the importance of first author and senior author peer reviewed
publications to substantiate expertise in the topical area.
DS13: Research Out There: A Look at Research in Wilderness
and Limited Resource Environments
Description: NIH career development awards are an important first step in
creating an independent research career. Unfortunately, only about 40% of
those who complete individual K awards are able to transition to NIH R01
research awards as principal investigators. The purpose of this session is to
discuss the details and issues that must be accomplished in order to obtain
an R01 grant. In addition to providing information, the panel will answer
audience questions.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain the current state of research in wilderness or limited resource
environments,
2.Identify the obstacles and opportunities with designing and performing
research in a variety of settings with various levels of resources,
3.Discuss the best approach for increasing the quality and quantity of limited
resource research.
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
35
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Description: Research is a cornerstone of academic emergency medicine
and one of the ways that the specialty is constantly advancing. There are
many opportunities and obstacles to performing high quality and meaningful
research in the conventional emergency medicine arena. The challenges
are even greater when attempted in wilderness or limited resource
environments or when looking at delivery of care, treatment, or other clinical
matters in these environments. This session will discuss the current state
of wilderness or limited resource research by examining its history as well
as what lies on the horizon for wilderness or limited resource environments.
A panel will present examples of quality wilderness medicine research and
offer possible solutions to overcoming some of the obstacles faced with
designing and conducting research in challenging environments. There will
also be a discussion on how to increase the quality and quantity of research
in wilderness and limited resource environments. Wilderness or limited
resource research can be an extremely challenging and rewarding part of an
academic emergency medicine career; it can also be an appealing access
point for students, residents, and faculty to gain exposure to research,
possibly develop an academic niche, and contribute to the growing body of
knowledge in wilderness medicine.
Henderson McGinnis, MD, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Submitter/Presenter
Sanjey Gupta, MD, North Shore Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Presenter
N. Stuart Harris, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Presenter
Hillary Irons, MD, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
Renee Salas, MD, MS, Massachusetts General Hospital / HMS, Presenter
DS14: The Safety Dance: Championing Patient Safety Initiatives
Using Simulation in Emergency Medicine
3.Describe useful tools for keeping current in medical education,
4.Apply tips and strategies for incorporating technology into daily practice as
a medical educator.
Description: Most busy academic emergency physicians have limited time
to sample and experiment with the overwhelming number of available
educational apps, electronic resources, and other technology tools. This
practical session will introduce participants to a carefully curated list of useful
apps and resources for medical educators. In the first 15 minutes, a panel
of expert users will introduce a Top 10 list of “tech tools” encompassing
four categories: 1. personal productivity/organizing your academic life,
2. clinical bedside teaching, 3. didactic teaching, 4. keeping current in
medical education. The next 25 minutes of the session will feature handson, interactive learning. Participants will break into small groups (based
on the categories above) in which they will receive a hands-on, detailed
demonstration with tips on the practical use of each tool. The session will
conclude with a 10-minute crowdsourcing exercise, allowing participants
to share their recommendations for additional apps and resources for the
medical educator. These suggested resources will be compiled, provided
to participants, and made available online. Participants are encouraged to
bring their personal devices so that they may access and practice with these
valuable resources in real time.
Jeffrey Feden, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Submitter, Presenter
Brian I. Clyne, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Rachel Fowler, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Sarah Michael, DO, MS, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Gita Pensa, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Neha Raukar, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Jessica Smith, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Determine challenges and barriers to conducting simulation-based patient
safety initiatives in emergency medicine,
2.Formulate effective strategies to leverage health care simulation to improve
safety using evidence-based frameworks in educational theory, leadership,
change implementation, and organizational transformation,
3.Apply best practices in designing simulation-based patient safety
programs using a small group, problem-based, learning discussion format.
Description: Health care simulation creates a safe learning environment for
testing new clinical processes. It has become increasingly recognized as a
powerful tool for addressing patient safety issues in emergency medicine.
However, implementing an effective simulation-based safety initiative requires
strategy and careful planning. Leveraging expertise in both administration and
education is necessary to ensure sustained impact. In this session, a panel
of simulation and patient safety experts will guide the participants through
an interactive workshop using case-based methods and facilitated, small
group discussions. Participants will be introduced to key concepts from
organizational psychology, educational theory, and change management
strategies. The presenters will provide learners with concrete steps to
implementation, including identifying champions, providing experiential
learning, leveraging stakeholders, and creating a sense of urgency.
Techniques to be discussed will include in-situ simulations, latent safety
threat discovery, and staff competency training and assessment applications.
Participants are encouraged to bring their own patient safety concerns to
tackle during the workshop.
Ambrose Wong, MD, Yale University School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Marc Auerbach, MD, MSCI, Yale University School of Medicine, Presenter
Andrew Petrosoniak, MD, MSc, St. Michael’s Hospital, Presenter
Christopher Hicks, MD, MEd, FRCPC, University of Toronto, Presenter
Silas Smith, MD, NYU School of Medicine, Presenter
Maureen Gang, MD, NYU School of Medicine, Presenter
DS15: Tech Tools: Top 10 Apps and Electronic Resources for the
Medical Educator
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify practical technology resources designed to improve productivity
among academic emergency physicians,
2.Discuss the features, benefits, and applications of specific technology
tools for clinical and didactic teaching,
36
DS16: Hybrid Careers in Emergency Medicine: The What, When,
and How-To
Bayside B/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe what hybrid models of careers exist in academic emergency
medicine,
2.Identify what benefits and obstacles exist in achieving this career path,
3.Describe what key contractual elements are in non-traditional hybrid
careers.
Description: For academic physicians, work involves caring for patients,
educating students and residents, and contributing to the literature.
However, the model of the traditional, tenure-tracked physician is changing.
Along with practicing traditional academic medicine there are opportunities
in quality improvement, patient education, medical devices, global health,
IT, and many other areas. The MD degree is opportunity-granting and
many skills are transferrable to other areas. Hybrid careers come from a
desire for physicians to develop non-clinical interests, become leaders and
administrators, or develop a niche beyond the general emergency medicine
scope. Alternative tracks may allow for more control over professional
and personal lives, making such paths potentially more fulfilling. Women
and minorities face unconscious biases and tend to carry more nonpromotion-related responsibilities such as disproportionately mentoring
other women and minorities, providing community service, and committee
work. Additionally, women continue to carry more family responsibilities.
Together, these factors may inhibit advancement along traditional pathways.
Hybrid careers may offer attractive alternatives to physicians seeking more
career flexibility. With more women in the specialty, earlier retirement for older
physicians, an increased prevalence and duration of parental leave, and a
surge in dual degree programs, it is crucial to adapt more flexible staffing
models. In this panel presentation, speakers will discuss how their current
careers break from the traditional, academic EM physician model, how they
achieve work-life balance, and what motivated them to embark on this nontraditional model.
Elizabeth Goldberg, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Submitter
Leana Wen, MD, MSc, FAAEM, George Washington University, Presenter
Sheryl Heron, MD, MPH, FACEP, Emory University, Presenter
Kimberly Pringle, MD, DeKalb Medical Center, Presenter
Bayside C/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the purpose of the new NIH network SIREN, which is to be
created,
2.Explain how the newTrans-NIH K12 Program in Emergency Care Research
differs from the first program,
3.Identify the newly awarded K12 program sites.
Description: A decade ago, SAEM and ACEP leadership went to NIH to
underscore the urgent need for research and research training in emergency
care research. Three NIH Roundtable Meetings were held and papers
written describing the acute need of skilled investigators and training
programs. NIH has funded several large programs including the NHLBI ROC
and NINDS NETT research consortia. NHLBI also funded the K12 program
in Emergency Care Research and by programs end, 36 trainees will have
completed research training. The purpose of this session is to inform the
SAEM community of the latest NIH efforts to support research and research
training in emergency care. We will discuss new initiatives/programs, and
answer questions.
Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health
Jeremy Brown, MD, National Institutes of Health
Wayne Wang, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health
DS18: SGEM: Geopardy Event
Robert Cooney, MD, MS Med Ed, Geisinger Medical Center, Submitter/Presenter
Seth Trueger, MD, MPH, University of Chicago, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 8:00 AM - 8:20 AM
DS20: New Models of Care for Psychiatric Patients in the ED
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Evaluate the need for new models of psychiatric care,
2.Assess the options for care of the ED psych patients,
3.Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of the new models of care.
Description: Psychiatric patients represent an increasing percentage of
patients seen in the emergency department who may receive suboptimal
care. The Accountable Care Organization (ACO) environment will challenge
the traditional ways these patients are cared for and require emergency
physicians to advance care provided to and reduce admissions and
readmissions of these patients. The new models of care for treating these
patients in the ED include direct triage to other facilities, regionalization of
acute psychiatric care, and crisis stabilization units. This course will exam
these changing provisions of care to psychiatric patients in the ED.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
DS17 NIH Emergency Care Research and Training Update 2016
Leslie Zun, MD, Chicago Medical School, Submitter/Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
Oak Alley/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Define what sex- and gender-based medicine is and why it is important for
the optimization of men and women’s health,
2.Recognize how men and women differ in their physiological response to
certain toxic, infectious, ischemic or traumatic stimuli,
3.Cite recent medical studies that identify important sex- and/or genderbased differences in clinical trials,
4.Identify opportunities to include sex- and gender-based medicine into
future research and teaching.
Description: Sex-and Gender-Based Medicine (SGBM) is the study of how
biological sex and/or gender affect baseline health and disease in men and
women. Historically, the medical dogma has been that men and women are
physiologically “the same,” excluding their reproductive organs. Over the past
decade, this assumption has been disproven. Through recent basic science
research, functional MRI studies, and clinical trials, the data is unequivocal
that not only do sex based differences exist but that in many instances the
differences have huge clinical implications in the optimization of both men
and women’s health. For example, Shah’s 2015 BMJ article suggests that
conventional troponin cut off levels likely miss a significant portion of women
with ACS. This new knowledge requires education of EM researchers,
educators and practitioners. The intention of SGEM Geopardy is to increase
awareness and engagement of the SAEM community of the importance
of including biological sex and gender into both basic science and
clinical research.
Jeannette Wolfe, MD, Baystate Hospital, Submitter/Presenter
Wednesday, May 11: 3:30 PM - 3:50 PM
DS19: Flipping Out About the Flipped Classroom
Bayside A/4th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain the educational theory behind the flipped classroom,
2.Cite potential benefits, risks, and costs of using a flipped
classroom model.
Description: The rise of Web 2.0 has ushered in an era of consumer-driven
content creation that has been rapidly adopted by educators wishing to take
advantage of the technology to disseminate learning materials. One popular
use of online education resources is to “flip the classroom.” First popularized
by the Khan Academy, flipped classroom proponents claim that learning
can be effective by maximizing classroom efficiency and activating learners.
This debate will explore these claims and help educators determine whether
flipping is all fad or the solution to modern learning challenges.
DS21: Quality Measurement Registries and Performance
Reporting in Emergency Care
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss barriers to the creation of clinically meaningful, emergency care
quality measures,
2.Describe the current efforts in emergency medicine to meet quality
reporting requirements through the development of registries,
3.Identify opportunities for investigators to use registry data for unique
observational studies and the development of quality metrics,
4.Associate quality reporting and registry development to the educational
mission and residency milestone requirements of academic centers,
5.Cite potential risks and benefits of publicly reporting emergency
department performance.
Description: Emergency providers confront the demands of quality
measurement every day (e.g., door to balloon time for STEMI, ED length
of stay, and surveys of emergency patient’s satisfaction). These measures
are reported to agencies such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid
Services (CMS) and The Joint Commission, and the results may impact
hospital ratings or payment. Increasingly, the federal government and other
payers are expanding the scope of quality measurement, all while putting
greater proportions of reimbursement at risk based on pay-for-performance
programs. However, the number of quality measures to describe emergency
care is small, and the research base on which to develop such measures
is even smaller. Historically, this measure gap has made meeting residency
training milestones challenging and determining the clinical effectiveness of
faculty difficult. This didactic will put these national efforts into an emergency
medicine-specific context by describing the building of two new emergency
department-focused quality reporting registries: 1.) the Clinical Emergency
Data Registry, supported by ACEP, and 2.) the state-based Michigan
Emergency Department Improvement Collaborative, supported by Blue
Cross Blue Shield of Michigan/Blue Care Network. The session will compare
and contrast the goals and impetus for these projects, examine the potential
benefits and harms of publicly reporting ED performance, and discuss the
possible impact this may have on the practice of emergency medicine and
the educational mission of academic centers. The session will conclude
by identifying potentially high-yield areas for investigators to conduct future
investigations in ED quality measurement and how the data collected in these
registries might be used by researchers and educators alike.
Keith Kocher, MD, MPH, University of Michigan, Submitter/Presenter
Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Presenter
Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA, MHS, Yale University, Presenter
37
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
DS22: Conducting EM Research Using Social Media Tools:
Applications for Disease Surveillance and Community
Engagement
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the benefits of querying social media conversations versus
traditional public health survey methods,
2.Discuss the rationale for using digital health tools for community
engagement, and how these can improve disaster readiness, adherence
to patient care plans, and preventative health,
3.Define the potential technical and ethical hurdles to conducting digital
health and social media trials,
4.Cite statistical approaches to designing and interpreting “big data”
research.
Description: Fleeting interactions between patients and ED providers may
make it difficult for providers to recognize local health trends, attitudes, and
behaviors. This, in turn, may undermine patient care plans and/or diminish
patient adherence to those plans, thus limiting the effectiveness of ED care
and potentially resulting in undesirable outcomes. However, the explosion in
social media participation and mobile device usage presents opportunities
for improving care by reaching and engaging with patients where they are.
This session’s panelists are emergency medicine faculty who make use of
new social media and mobile health (mHealth) tools for improving recognition
of disease and extending the reach of emergency care. Presenters will
explain the advantages of these new, local, and individualized methods over
traditional means for surveillance and outreach, as well as the technical,
ethical, and analytic considerations in conducting this research. Specifically,
presenters will discuss how social media research tools can aid ED
recognition of local presentations of disease and how by using scripted
queries of platforms such as Twitter and Yelp, robust surveillance of new
toxicologic, foodborne, and contagious illness is possible. Presenters
will also explain how analyzing social media discussions provides insight
regarding patients’ behavioral risks and health attitudes and how fostering
ED/community engagement through social channels has the potential to
improve preventative health and disaster readiness. Finally, presenters will
outline the necessary steps for ethical conduct in researching patients’ digital
discussions, and the challenges of properly interpreting “big data” generated
by these research tools.
Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Submitter/Presenter
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, Brown University School of Medicine, Presenter
Austin S. Kilaru, MD, Highland Hospital, Presenter
to the program and we will report the results of all implemented ExCITE
program(s) at SAEM17.
Neha Raukar, MD, MS, Brown University, Submitter/Presenter
Annie T. Sadosty, MD, Mayo Clinic, Presenter
Peter Sokolove, MD, University of California, Presenter
Brian J. Zink, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Presenter
DS24: Medical Education Research: Are You Doing It Without
Even Knowing It?
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe how to ask a good research question,
2.Demonstrate how to conduct a literature review for medical
education projects,
3.Write a needs assessment,
4.Design learning objectives and assessment tools,
5.Create feasible ideas for possible medical education research projects,
6.Identify several venues for publishing medical education data.
Description: The aim of this session is to provide an introduction to medical
education research. The first section of this session will review the basics
of research, including how to generate answerable questions and conduct
literature reviews to identify what sort of work has been done in the past. The
session will include discussions on how to write learning objectives, conduct
needs assessments, and design an assessment tool and will provide an
overview of how all of these elements are foundational to medical education
research. Part two will showcase the different types of projects that can
be published as research, including simulation cases, small groups, and
surveys, and explain how anyone can turn his or her work into publishable
research. The session will conclude by identifying the various venues for
publication, including Med Ed portal, Journal of Graduate Medical Education,
Academic Emergency Medicine, and Academic Medicine.
Kelly Barringer, MD, Regions Hospital, Submitter
Jeffrey Love, MD, George Washington University, Presenter
Suzanne Bentley, MD, MPH, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Presenter
Jesse Nelson, MD, Regions Hospital, Presenter
Benjamin H. Schnapp, MD, Northwestern University, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 8:30 AM - 8:50 AM
DS25: Fellowship in Emergency Psychiatry: Is It The Right Time?
DS23: Emergency Medicine X: Creating Innovations Towards
Equity (ExCITE)
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss disparities among emergency medical faculty,
2.Create innovate solutions to address the disparities,
3.Develop new models for departments across the country to emulate,
4.Identify programs that are leaders in seeking gender and racial equity.
Description: There is strong data revealing persistent inequalities among
academic faculty in terms of salary and other incentives, promotion, and
academic productivity. In order to seek solutions to this perennial and critical
problem, this session seeks to foster novel solutions around gender and
racial diversity. Using a “Shark Tank” format, individual “entrepreneur” faculty
will pitch diversity-enhancing innovations to “investor” department chairs.
Innovations will include programs to strengthen mentorship, recruitment,
retention, or advancement of groups that are traditionally underrepresented
in emergency medicine (e.g., women, and certain racial and ethnic groups).
Department chairs will consider the strength and feasibility of ideas presented
and will choose whether to “invest” in a program by developing and piloting
the initiative at their institutions over the next one to two years. The chairs
may decline investing in an idea, but must provide rationale and offer
suggestions to improve any program that is declined. Chairs that invest in
a program will be given $1,000 by AWAEM to support the development of
the program within their department. Additionally, the entrepreneur faculty
member will receive $100 in recognition of his or her vision. The AWAEM
Research Committee will provide support in measuring outcomes related
38
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Analyze the current training available for trainees in
psychiatric emergencies,
2.Evaluate a fellowship in emergency psychiatry,
3.Critique the options to advance training in emergency psychiatry.
Description: Some studies have demonstrated that the volume of psychiatric
patients seen in the emergency department has increased substantially to
about 10% of all ED patients. Many EDs are experiencing significant boarding
of these psychiatric patients, which occurs for a multiplicity of reasons:
inadequate number of inpatient and crisis beds; missed opportunities for brief
treatment and release; under-calibrated risk tolerance; insufficient options for
outpatient follow up; iatrogenic escalation; and lack of inter-agency leadership
in marshaling and coordinating existing mental health resources communitywide. The training of emergency physicians in psychiatric emergencies is
variable, ranging from no training to short rotation on a psychiatric service.
This limited education can lead to discomfort in dealing with psychiatric
patients and issuing effective care. Increased educational experience as well
as fellowship in emergency psychiatry have been proposed as solutions.
This course will review the concern for training of emergency physicians in
psychiatry and the prospect of fellowship training in emergency psychiatry.
Leslie Zun, MD, Chicago Medical School, Submitter/Presenter
Jon S. Berlin, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Presenter
DS26: Does Your Teaching Stick: Myths and Facts About
Learning, Memory, and Studying…From the Best of the
Educational Psychology Literature
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe effective learning techniques from the educational psychology
literature,
2.Integrate the principles of effective learning into their own residency
curriculum, lecturing, or studying.
Description: Do you want your conference curriculum to lead to more
efficient, long-term retention? Do you have a high stakes exam coming up?
Do you want your lecture content to be remembered by your audience?
This session will provide an evidence-based approach to making learning
“stick.” Psychologists have been developing and evaluating the efficacy of
techniques for study and instruction for more than 100 years. This session’s
speakers have scoured the educational and cognitive psychology literature to
bring participants an evidence-based understanding of how people learn and
how that relates to emergency medicine education. Presenters will expose
common learning myths and demonstrate best-practices and effective
techniques to improve teaching and learning in emergency medicine. This
interactive session will introduce participants to learning techniques such
as rigorous reflection, spaced repetition, interleaved learning, and effortful
memory retrieval. Presenters will demonstrate how these evidenced-based
learning techniques can be easily adopted for a curriculum, lecture, and
studying.
Jeff Riddell, MD, University of Washington, Submitter/Presenter
Rob Rogers, MD, University of Kentucky, Presenter
Alisha Brown, MD, University of Washington, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
DS27: Sudden Death in Overtime: Ethical and Practical
Challenges for Emergency Physicians and Prehospital Providers
in Pursuing Organ Donation After Circulatory Death
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the logistics of uncontrolled donation after cardiac death protocols
in the pre-hospital and emergency department setting,
2.Describe the potential ethical and practical challenges posed by protocols
for uncontrolled donation and cardiac death,
3.Analyze how ethical and practical tensions for pre-hospital providers and
emergency physicians in uncontrolled donation after cardiac death can be
overcome.
Description: Transplantation represents a beneficial medical intervention for
patients whose lives are threatened by organ failure. In the United States, the
primary source of transplanted organs are patients who have been declared
dead by neurologic criteria or living donators of kidneys and partial livers.
Yet, despite maximal education efforts, it is anticipated that neither of these
pathways will meet the growing need for transplanted organs in the United
States. Uncontrolled donation after cardiac death, in which patients who are
pronounced dead by cardiac criteria after resuscitative measures are rapidly
managed to allow organ donation, represents a pathway that may increase
available organs for transplantation. This course will provide an overview of
the ethical and practical challenges posed to emergency physicians and prehospital providers by organ donor management in uncontrolled donation after
cardiac death and how they might be resolved. The session will begin with
an overview of the current protocols for organ donation under neurologic and
cardiac criteria and the role that emergency physicians play in their execution.
Following this introduction will be a presentation discussing the experience
in New York of developing a protocol for uncontrolled donation after cardiac
death and the lessons learned from this program. Presenters will highlight the
ethical and practical difficulties posed by uncontrolled donation after cardiac
death for emergency physicians and pre-hospital providers. The session will
conclude with a point-counterpoint analysis of how emergency physicians
can resolve potential ethical and practical dilemmas that are part of protocols
for uncontrolled donation after cardiac death.
Raquel Schears, MD, MPH, Mayo Clinic, Submitter/Presenter
Lewis Goldfrank, MD, Bellevue Hospital, University School of Medicine, Presenter
Arvind Venkat, MP, Allegheny Health Network, Drexel UCM and Temple USM, Allegheny
General Hospital, Presenter
Stephen Wall, MD, MSc, MAEd, New York University School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital
Center, Presenter
DS28: Dissemination of Research Through Social Media
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe various strategies that can be utilized to disseminate research
results to emergency medicine clinicians through social media
2.Describe the impact of active interactions and discussions regarding
the research
3.Utilize social media effectively to promote their own research
Description: Translation of research findings to clinical practice has historically
been a slow process. From the time a study is completed, it takes an
average of 5 -10 years for its findings to become standard of care. Research
manuscripts disseminate slowly, and only to those who subscribe to a
journal or happen to search for a specific topic. In this age of social media,
the gap between research and practice can be closed quicker and faster.
Social media allows immediate dissemination, and discussion, of novel
research by a global audience. Of additional importance to researchers,
research significance is increasingly being measured by its media impact
(e.g., Altmetric score), rather than by traditional (and delayed) metrics such as
number of citations or h-indices.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Thursday, May 12: 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM
Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Presbyterian-Queens, Submitter
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Presenter
Esther Choo, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Presenter
Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Presenter
DS29: Attention Innovative Educators: Get Published
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Define the term, “educational innovation”,
2.Describe examples of innovative teaching methods that are publishable,
3.Outline the key elements of an “educational innovations publication”,
4.Cite examples of peer-reviewed journals or blogs that publish
educational innovations.
Description: The specialty of academic emergency medicine is advanced
when EM educators find novel and improved methods for teaching; however,
educators often fail to disseminate their innovative instructional methods.
Common barriers to publication include an inability to define what is truly
innovative, a poor understanding of how to disseminate an educational
innovation, and a perceived lack of opportunities for publishing in the field of
medical education. This workshop will provide a conceptual framework for
disseminating a novel teaching method as peer-reviewed scholarship. Audience
members will participate in a “think-pair-share” activity that will allow immediate
feedback about their individual proposals for publication. Participants will receive
a calendar that lists submission deadlines for annual calls to publish educational
innovations in major EM and medical education journals.
Michael Gisondi, MD, Northwestern University, Submitter/Presenter
Jeremy Branzetti, MD, University of Washington, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
DS30: End of Shift Assessment Forms: Results and Updates from
the National CDEM Consensus Conference
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the National End of Shift Assessment for medical students in the
emergency department,
2.Describe best practices for using an End of Shift Assessment forms for
clinical assessment of medical students, including: a) learners at different
levels, b) criterion- vs norm-referenced assessment, c) translation of clinical
assessment data into other products (SLOE, end of rotation forms, etc.), d)
39
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
faculty/resident development around use of a form, e. post-implementation
assessment, validation, and usage research.
Description: This session will disseminate the results of the National CDEM
Consensus Conference on End of Shift Assessment of Medical Students in
the Emergency Department, to be held at CORD Academic Assembly 2016.
The consensus conference will bring all the stakeholders in medical student
assessment in the emergency department to the table in order to develop
best practices in assessment of students with an end of shift form. It will also
generate a national form that would help standardize assessment of students
across the country based on these expert-driven recommendations. Early
and aggressive dissemination of the results will assist with the wider adoption
of a national assessment form as well as generate educational research
around the use and validation of the form and guidelines. In addition to
unveiling and disseminating the national form itself, the course will describe
the consensus-driven best practice guidelines surrounding the major themes
of end of shift medical student assessment: 1. criterion vs norm-referenced
assessment, 2. assessment of learners at different levels of training/
experience, 3. translation of clinical assessment data into other products
(such as the SLOE, end of rotation evaluation, MSPE, etc.), 4. faculty and
resident development around use of a national form, 5. post-implementation
assessment, usage, and validation of a national form.
Katherine Hiller, MD, MPH, University of Arizona, Submitter/Presenter
Douglas Franzen, MD, MEd, University of Washington, Presenter
Luan E. Lawson, MD, MAEd, East Carolina University, Presenter
Juliana Jung, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Presenter
DS31: Introduction to Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research:
Which Method(s) Should You Use?
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe fundamental qualities of and differences between surveys,
focus groups, and interview,
2.Identify research projects for which qualitative methods versus surveys
are the appropriate study design,
3.Describe the critical steps for developing a survey study,
4.Describe the basic approach to developing and piloting an
interview guide.
Description: Qualitative and mixed methods research has gained increasing
attention over recent years as important research methodology, likely in
large part to the increasing focus on ensuring adequate patient engagement
in research studies. While some individuals may refer to interviews, focus
groups, and surveys as essentially interchangeable entities, they each have
distinct qualities that make them appropriate for different circumstances. This
session will be divided into 2 sections. The first half will be an introductory
lecture on the fundamental characteristics of qualitative and mixed methods
research studies with an emphasis on focus groups, interviews, and surveys.
This will include an overview of when to use surveys versus qualitative
methods, with subsequent focus on the basic approach to designing
surveys including: sampling frame, response rate, use of validated questions/
scales, proper length, and formatting. The second half will be a discussion
of the approach to designing qualitative studies, including: choosing
the appropriate population, when to do focus groups versus interviews,
developing and piloting an interview guide, selecting interviewers, preparing
for an interview, and preparing for common interview pitfalls.
Kristin Rising, MD, MS, Thomas Jefferson University, Submitter/Presenter
Tracy E. Madsen, MD, ScM, Brown University, Presenter
DS32: Frailty in Emergency Medicine: Measurement and
Research Implications in Older Emergency Department Patients
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3 /3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Define frailty and discuss the major operationalized definitions of frailty,
2.Describe various tools utilized in clinical research to measure frailty,
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40
Description: By 2030 approximately 19% of the US population will be
65 years of age or older, and older adults represent a growing and
disproportionate percentage of emergency department (ED) patients.
Frailty is an age-related, multi-dimensional state of decreased physiologic
reserves that results in diminished resiliency, loss of adaptive capacity,
and increased vulnerability to stressors. While frailty research has rapidly
increased in medical and surgical literature, there are only a handful of
ED-based research studies on frailty and the existing literature has had
conflicting findings. Some ED studies have shown an association between
frailty and adverse events, including acute hospitalization, admission to a
long term care facility, death, or loss of ADLs after a minor fall. Other studies,
however, have not demonstrated such an association. The lack of research
and conflicting findings may be due in part to competing definitions of frailty
and the presence of over 70 different tools for measuring frailty. Session
panelists will review the concept of frailty and the major operationalized
definitions of frailty: The phenotypic and accumulation of deficits definitions.
Subsequently, different frailty measurement tools will be presented, including
the advantages and disadvantages of these tools in the emergency
research setting. Finally, the ways in which frailty can be incorporated into
EM research will be discussed, including in risk prediction for adverse
events or outcomes, as a triage screening tool, or in the identification of
individuals who, at ED discharge, may require increased resources or
specialized discharge planning.
Maura Kennedy, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Submitter/Presenter
Kirk A. Stiffler, MD, MPH, FACEP, Summa Akron City Hospital, Presenter
Simon P. Mooijaart, MD, PhD, Leiden University Medical Center, Presenter
DS33: Translating Sex and Gender Research into
Clinical Practice
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the “gap” areas where research exists demonstrating sex and
gender differences or similarities in disease etiologies, presentations,
responses to treatment, clinical outcomes, and the knowledge and clinical
practice of emergency physicians,
2.Describe current challenges in the implementation of sex and gender into
clinical practice,
3.Cite examples of concrete approaches where emergency management
and treatment differ when managing male or female patients in common
emergency department scenarios.
Description: The 2014 AEM consensus conference on gender-specific
research in emergency medicine laid the foundation for improving patient
care through the inclusion of sex and gender in acute care research. This
state-of-the-art research has indicated significant physiologic differences
between men and women that may have important clinical implications in
the emergency care of patients. Knowledge of how emergency department
patients’ sex and gender affects the presentation and management of
common and often life-threatening conditions can now be translated to
bedside clinical care. This session aims to demonstrate how to decrease the
translational gap and incorporate key research findings in sex- and genderbased emergency care into the clinical practice of emergency medicine.
Case-based scenarios of conditions commonly seen in the emergency
department will be used to demonstrate crucial differences or similarities
between male and female patients. A question-based format will be used
to tailor the discussion, for example: “How would the management of this
patient change if it were male/female?” Examples of emergency department
patient cases will include cardiovascular and neurologic emergencies,
toxicology, and resuscitation during cardiac arrest. This is the first step
towards translating state-of-the-art knowledge of sex and gender specific
emergency medicine evidence to practicing emergency physicians in order
to improve outcomes for both men and women.
Alyson McGregor, MD, MA, FACEP, Brown University, Submitter/Presenter
Basmah Safdar, MD, Yale New Haven Hospital, Presenter
Charles R. Wira, MD, Yale New Haven Hospital, Presenter
Gillian Beauchamp, MD, Oregon Health & Science University, Presenter
Sarah Perman, MD, MSCE, University of Colorado, Presenter
DS34: Are You an Opioid Outlaw: Legal Controversies
Surrounding Opioid Prescribing
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss issues surrounding EMTALA and pain management,
2.Integrate PDMP look-ups into the routine practice of emergency medicine,
3.Explain the current medicolegal environment surrounding opioid
prescribing and dispensing of naloxone.
Description: Prescription drug overdoses are the most common reason for
accidental death in adults in the U.S. and opioid prescriptions are by far
the greatest cause. Opioid prescribing is surprisingly risky, despite being
something emergency physicians do on a routine basis. This innovative
session will discuss up-to-date concepts about opioid prescribing as
it pertains to medicolegal risk. Presenters with extensive research and
teaching experience regarding opioid prescribing, will lead evidence-based
discussions on topics that include: a. whether EMTALA requires treatment of
pain or prohibits pain guideline posters, b. how prescription drug monitoring
programs (PDMPs) can both help and hurt from a legal standpoint, c.
policy implications of the recent West Virginia supreme court ruling that
permits patients to sue their physician for becoming addicted after an opioid
prescription, d. research surrounding naloxone prescribing and dispensing
from the ED – and more. The session’s goal is to provide up-to-date
information to physicians about these issues in order to more safely prescribe
opioids and mitigate risk.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
3.Discuss potential applications of frailty measurement in emergency
clinical research.
Scott Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Submitter/Presenter
Lewis Nelson, MD, New York University, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 11:00 AM - 11:20 AM
DS35: High Yield Teaching in the ED Using Low Tech
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe a method of increasing teaching productivity and learning
retention during even busy ED shifts,
2.List various methods of using the whiteboard for teaching,
3.Improve learner satisfaction with ED teaching.
Description: Teaching in a busy ED is a challenge for even the most
experienced educators. It is often difficult to know when and also how much
teaching to engage in such a fast-paced environment. Furthermore, learners
often are uncertain which aspects of the teaching are most important, and
they will often retain little information. The overall result is that both teaching
and learning in the fast-paced environment of the ED suffer. In this session,
an experienced educator will discuss a single, low-tech method of teaching
in the busy ED which can improve both the quality and quantity of teaching
and learning.
Amal Mattu, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
DS36: Get Them Ready for Residency: Opportunities for
Emergency Medicine Leadership in Medical School
Capstone Courses
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe curricular elements and teaching strategies that make for
effective capstone courses,
2.Devise at least one curriculum design change that would positively impact
the learner experience in a capstone course.
Description: A majority of medical schools now offer capstone or transition
to residency courses for fourth-year medical students, allowing them to
integrate concepts learned throughout medical school and focus on practical
skills required at the beginning of residency. Such courses are growing
in popularity and are a natural fit for emergency medicine (EM) educators
who wish to impact the preparedness of incoming residents across the
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DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
medical and surgical specialties. The structure and content of capstone
courses varies widely across different medical schools. This workshop will
begin with brief presentations by capstone course directors from several
schools highlighting their different approaches for creating effective capstone
experiences. Participants will then break into small groups to discuss their
individual goals for their institutions, align these goals with appropriate
teaching modalities, and discuss strategies for advocating EM participation
within capstone leadership. Topics will range from initial course development
and curriculum design to incorporating simulation and other learner-centered
teaching strategies for courses on scales ranging from 25-200 students.
This session is appropriate both for participants who are new to capstones
as well as educators with experience and existing teaching roles within
such courses.
Christopher Richardson, MD, University of Cincinnati, Submitter/Presenter
Matthew J. Stull, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
David Wald, DO, Temple University, Presenter
Megan Fix, MD, University of Utah, Presenter
Jason Liebzeit, MD, Emory University, Presenter
Daniel Axelson, MD, MPH, University of Cincinnati, Presenter
Riley Grosso, MD, University of Cincinnati, Presenter
DS37: Responsible Conduct of Research: How to Love Your IRB Rotating Research Curriculum
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB),
2.List some of the common steps in preparation for an IRB submission,
3.Summarize some of the common procedures used to maintain
compliance with IRB regulations as the research is performed.
Description: At some point, all researchers must navigate the seemingly
complex and burdensome realm of human subjects protections in the form
of obtaining institutional review board (IRB) approval for their research project.
Understanding the role of the IRB and planning ahead for institutional review
board submissions can help transform your interactions with the IRB into a
mutually beneficial relationship. The goal of this presentation and ensuing
discussion will be to introduce researchers to some of the background
behind IRBs and how they are beneficial to researchers and the medical
community in general. Additionally, this session will provide concrete advice
on some of the best practices for preparing IRB submissions, performing
the research in compliance with IRB guidelines, and avoiding many of the
common pitfalls that other researchers have experienced. Topics to be
covered include: how to ensure the science is ethical; what regulatory and
training requirements must be met before research begins; the differences
between exempt, expedited, and full board proposals; concepts of risk
and minimal risk; health insurance portability and accountability act (HIPAA);
privacy and confidentiality implications; consenting and consent form issues;
special population needs; and the mechanics of proper planning and
execution of approved IRB projects in order to maintain compliance with the
rules and regulations.
Kirk Stiffler, MD, MPH, Summa Akron City Hospital, Submitter/Presenter
Kinjal Sethuraman, MD, MPH, University of Maryland, Presenter
Alex Limkakeng Jr., MD, MHSc, Duke University, Presenter
DS38: Moving from Guidelines to ED Practice with
Implementation Science Tools: The Case of Older Adults in
the Emergency Department
practice and develop clinical practice guideline recommendations are
essential components to a successful knowledge translation project. In
addition, strategies that target key financial, administrative, and clinical
stakeholders within individual healthcare systems are needed to overcome
inertia and transform research into practice. Using the timely example of
the newly issued GED guidelines, this session will highlight one approach to
navigate these challenges. After the completion of this session, participants
should be able to (1) Describe the collection of baseline data on ED practice
with older adults using a web-based survey platform and on-site systematic
observation to document current care practices across disparate ED
settings. (2) Understand the efficacy of the methods used to derive and
disseminate evidence- and consensus-based practice recommendations
endorsed by national multi-specialty professional societies. (3) Articulate
strategies to overcome common barriers to implementation of ED practice
guidelines via a “boot camp” model emphasizing individualized, site-specific
curricula, a quality improvement projects framework, engagement of key
stakeholders, on-site workshops, post-workshop mentoring and project
accountability, and the establishment of an expanding learning collaborative
as a resource for current and future participants.
Christopher Carpenter, MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis, Submitter/Presenter
John Schumacher, PhD, University of Maryland, Presenter
Kevin Biese, MD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Presenter
DS39: The Role of Emergency Medicine in Future of Healthcare
Delivery System Reforms
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the role of emergency care in delivery system reform,
2.Analyze the high yield areas for emergency medicine policy research over
the next decade,
3.Define the new payments models (e.g., Accountable Care Organizations,
Medical Shared Savings Programs, Clinically Integrated Networks) and
how emergency physicians can help shape their development,
4.Differentiate innovative payment models from innovative delivery models
and determine how emergency care researchers can impact both.
Description: Emergency care is delivered in the context of health care
delivery models that are changing rapidly. Being hospital-based specialists,
emergency physicians are highly embedded in the systems in which they
work. Therefore, it is critical that emergency care providers play a role in
informing policy changes regarding acute unscheduled care or risk being left
out of the discussion, which could result in health care delivery systems that
do not accommodate the unique needs of unscheduled acute care. This
session will discuss the basics of health care reform from the perspective
of both payers and the federal government. Participants will be provided
an overview of ways that emergency physicians can get involved. The first
speaker will describe the alphabet soup of new payment models such as
accountable care organizations (ACO), narrow networks, clinically integrated
networks (CIN), Medicare shared savings programs (MSSP), medical homes,
and population health management. A second presentation will discuss
the priorities and structure of the Department of Health & Human Service’s
Delivery System Reform initiative. Finally, all panel members will engage in a
lively discussion of future research priorities, including funding opportunities
and ways to partner with payers in order to determine best practices for
delivering high value acute care. Ample time will be available at the end of
the session for Q & A.
Judd Hollander, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Health System, Submitter
Anne Docimo, MD, MBA, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Health System, Presenter
Brendan Carr, MD, MS, Jefferson Health System, Presenter
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Assess current healthcare delivery principles to develop multi-specialty
organization clinical practice guidelines,
2.Implement practice-change based on awareness of standard practice and
guideline recommendations,
3.Incorporate these principles into their scientific and academic work-products.
Description: Implementation science concepts are used to accelerate
clinically relevant practice change to improve patient care. Implementation
science involves understanding an organization’s underlying cultural capacity
for change, key stakeholders and local opinion leaders, and post-intervention
sustainability. Understanding valid strategies to measure pre-intervention
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Thursday, May 12: 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM
DS40: Deliberate Curriculum Design: Effectively Translate Your
Content and Navigate the CME Process
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe an ordered approach to curriculum design,
2.Discuss how adult learning influences curriculum implementation.
Michael Brown, MD, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Presenter
Andrew S. Nugent, MD, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Presenter
Bret P. Nelson, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Submitter/Presenter
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Thursday, May 12: 1:00 PM - 1:20 PM
DS41: GEMA Didactic Series: So You Want to be a Global EM
Educator?
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the various roles of Global EM educators,
2.Discuss the variability of the global EM education experience and list some
options to obtain that knowledge,
3.Explain the evolving role for global EM educators in international emergency
medicine policy development and the global EM research agenda.
Description: Emergency physicians have much to offer in the global
attempt to reach the United Nations Development Program’s Sustainable
Development Goal Number 3: To Ensure Good Health and Well-Being for
all. EM physicians play a role in meeting explicit goals, including developing
sustainable health care workforces (both in supervision of clinical care
and also in the development and delivery of training programs) to ready
clinicians to provide care for acute illness and injury as well as obstetric
emergencies. But what does an international EM physician focusing on
education do in the field? Programs may focus on training academics,
the physician workforce and/or their complementary cadres of midlevel
providers, nurses, paramedics, and community health workers. The may also
focus on advocating for funding, accreditation. and systems development to
support these providers. During this 20-minute session, panelists will briefly
describe an innovative education program they’ve developed and detail
the paths they took to reach these positions. Is an International Emergency
Medicine fellowship required? What about a Master’s in Public Health or
other advanced degree? What kinds of research can Global EM educators
pursue? Panelists will discuss lessons learned in education program delivery
and the necessary training and experience for effective
international educators.
Elizabeth DeVos, MD, MPH, University of Florida, Submitter
Bradley A. Dreifuss, MD, University of Arizona, Presenter
Rockefeller Oteng, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
DS42: Navigating the Chair Negotiation Process: Get the Job and
Get What You Need To Be Successful
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the different structures of academic departments and how each
impacts a chair negotiation,
2.Assess opportunities,
3.Develop allies,
4.Negotiate with a dean and/or a hospital president,
5.Discuss the basic information needed to access a “Chairs Package.”
Description: This program will provide an overview of the steps and strategies
for navigating the complex process of negotiating a department chair
position. Topics will include approaching the process of applying for a
position, accessing a department to inform negotiation, identifying key stake
holders and advocates, negotiating resources, structure and compensation,
and common pitfalls of negotiation.
The Executive Committee of the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine:
Richard Zane, MD, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Gregory A. Volturo, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
Theodore R. Delbridge, MD, MPH, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina
University, Presenter
Andy Jagoda, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Presenter
DS43: Rotating Research Curriculum: How to Unveil Causal
Inference and Properly Analyze Your Findings
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Distinguish association and causation,
2.Utilize directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) in order to illustrate causality and
identify sources of bias,
3.Define odds ratios and relative risk,
4.Describe analytical techniques for interpreting study results and adjusting
for confounding.
Description: To succeed in research and academia, a fundamental
knowledge of important statistical concepts is a necessity. Knowledge on
causal inference is fundamental to planning sound studies with testable
hypothesis and appropriate methods. This session will be broken down into
two phases. In the first phase the basics of study design will be covered,
from identifying the causal inference, to using directed acyclic graphs
(DAGs) to visualize the connection while identifying sources of potential
bias. The second phase will focus on analytical techniques to interpret data,
express the measure of association, and deal with confounding. Comparing
crude and adjusted analysis will highlight the importance of adjusting
for confounding. Through discussion of these concepts at this session,
participants will increase their understanding of statistical concepts and will
be able to apply this knowledge to their research and practice.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Description: Educators are increasingly tasked with formal curriculum
development, implementation, and assessment. Navigating ACGME
requirements for CME can be challenging. In this lecture an evidencebased curriculum design process grounded in adult learning theory will be
described. In addition, the CME application process will be clarified and
linked back to these theories
Joseph B. Miller, MD, MS, Henry Ford Hospital and Wayne State University, Submitter/
Presenter
John Patrick Haran, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
DS44: Sex, Gender, and Sexual Orientation: A Potent Concoction
for Health Disparities
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe an example of a healthcare disparity based on patient sex,
gender, and/or sexual orientation,
2.Define the terms sex, gender, and LGBQTIA and identify examples of
misuse of these terms,
3.Describe one strategy to reduce sex-, gender-, or sexual orientationbased health disparities in the emergency department.
Description: The session will begin with an introduction on the background of
SGEM and ADIEM, a brief overview of sex, gender, and sexual orientationbased healthcare disparities, and the impact of these factors on health
outcomes. The next portion of the session will be an overview of specific
topics critical to the discussion of sex-, gender-, and sexual-orientationbased health disparities given by 3 content experts in the areas of sex,
gender, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, queer, intersex,
asexual (LGBTQIA) and health. Topics will include the practice of limiting
gender to two categories and misusing/confusing the terms sex and gender
in both clinical and research realms. The second broad topic will be the
categorization and definitions of sexual orientation (LGBTQIA). Next, will be a
discussion about the challenges and approaches to educating physicians on
sex, gender, and LGBTQIA health issues. The final topic will be an overview
of potential strategies to reduce health disparities based on sex, gender,
or sexual orientation. Time will be given at the conclusion of the session for
audience discussion. Topics will include resources needed to improve sex-,
gender-, and sexual orientation-based treatment health disparities, relevant
experiences of audience members, and a discussion of how SAEM, SGEM,
and ADIEM can work to educate emergency physicians on these topics.
Audience members will also be encouraged to initiate discussion topics of
their own.
Tracy Madsen, MD, ScM, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Submitter
Esther Choo, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Joel Moll, MD, FACEP, Virginia Commonwealth University, Presenter
Paul Krieger, MD, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, Presenter
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DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
DS45: To Err is Human: Apologizing in the Emergency Department
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain the statistics regarding medical error,
2.Develop methods to apologize,
3.Interpret the literature that supports and refutes apologizing in the
emergency department.
Description: In a profession where veracity is a professional duty and an
ethical imperative, this session will explore the idea of disclosure as a risk
management tool. The session will start with the concept of medical error
and describe the classification of error. The bulk of the presentation will be
an evidence-based debate of the pros and cons of apologizing. The session
will highlight cases where there is negligence and cases where there is not.
An exploration of the barriers to error disclosure will follow, with practical
guidelines to promote the practice of error disclosure. Specific attention will
be paid to legal precedent.
Neha Raukar, MD, MS, Brown University, Submitter/Presenter
Annie T. Sadosty, MD, The Mayo Clinic, Presenter
Cherri Hobgood, MD, Indiana University, Presenter
Suzanne Duni Briggs, JD, RN, BSN, CPHRM, Lifespan, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 1:30 PM - 1:50 PM
DS46: GEMA Didactic Series: So You Want To Be a Global
Health Researcher?
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Articulate the need for research as a part of any Global Health initiative,
2. Discuss the variability of global health research and the utility of both
complex and simple studies,
3.Describe the unique challenges and key components for success in
developing a career in global health research.
Description: Over the last few decades, global emergency medicine has
grown from a few passionate difference-makers into a vibrant stream of
clinician/educator/researchers of all levels impacting lives across the globe.
Educational initiatives ranging from emergency medicine residencies to
task-shifting emergency skills classes have sprung up across low and
middle income countries. Various triage protocols have been developed and
implemented. The largest funders are still aimed at a siloed approach to noncommunicable diseases. But are the right problems being addressed? Is a
difference being made? During this session, two experienced global health
researchers will make their cases for why research is imperative in the global
health setting and tell participants how they got where they are and how a
career in global health research should be approached. The session format
includes brief, TED talk style presentations followed by a panel discussion
and open question/answer time. Lecture topics include: “Traditional Research
Pathways in Global Emergency Medicine” and “Challenges of Research
as Indicator for Health System Capacity Development in Global
Emergency Medicine.”
Stephen Dunlop, MD, MPH, CTropMed, Hennepin County Medical Center, Submitter
Adam Levine, MD, MPH, Brown University, Presenter
Mark Bisanzo, MD, DTM&H, University of Massachusetts, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 2:00 PM – 2:20 PM
DS47: GEMA Didactic Series: So You Want To Be a Humanitarian
Responder?
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the need for responder preparation as a part of any
humanitarian initiative,
2.Describe the variability of humanitarian response preparation and list some
options to obtain that knowledge,
3.Discuss the evolving role for humanitarian responders in
disaster mitigation.
44
Description: Haiti, Katrina, Nepal, Darfur, Ebola, Syria…These names
evoke strong emotions in physicians of all types. But who among us is
appropriately prepared to deal with some of the worst calamities of recent
times? Emergency physicians have been at the forefront of humanitarian
response since before the EM specialty even existed. The inevitable truth is
that disasters will continue; however, significant advances in the science of
humanitarian response have taken place in the last 2 decades, leading to
improved responder education and enhanced disaster mitigation. This panel
session will put two experienced humanitarian responders on the hot seat
to make their cases for why specific education on humanitarian response is
a tremendous asset. Participants will learn how these physicians got started
as humanitarian responders and their approaches to a career involving
humanitarian response.
Stephen Dunlop, MD, MPH, CTropMed, Hennepin County Medical Center, Submitter
Adam Levine, MD, MPH, Brown Alpert School of Medicine, Presenter
Hilarie Cranmer, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM
DS48: How Do You Compare: Results of the 2016 AAAEM ED
Operations and SAEM Salary Benchmark Survey
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the idiosyncrasies of academic emergency medicine data,
2.Discuss the results of the most recent AAAEM Benchmark Survey,
including key performance metrics on ED operations, activity, education
and research,
3.Apply the results in their own institutions for comparison.
Description: Benchmarking performance is fundamental to performance
improvement (clinical performance improvement, operational improvement, or
improving performance in research and education. In order for benchmarking
to be of value, key performance metrics must be compared to like
institutions. Because they face competing missions of research, education,
and patient care, academic medical centers and emergency departments,
in particular, should be benchmarked against other academic centers as
opposed to community hospital emergency department standards. The
Academy of Administrators in Academic Emergency Medicine (AAAEM)
conducts an annual survey of academic medical center departments of
emergency medicine, gathering operational and financial data on measures
where there is value in comparison. The purpose of the survey is to allow for
direct comparison of resources among academic departments as they seek
to provide high quality patient care, education, and meaningful research.
This course presents the results of the 2016 AAAEM survey, including data
trends over the last 5 years. Every other year, AAAEM collects data regarding
physician salaries in academic emergency medicine programs. This
presentation will include results of the 2016 AAAEM/SAEM salary survey.
James Scheulen, MBA, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
DS49: Perils and Pitfalls of Journal Peer Review: Navigating the
Process and Responding to Manuscript Critiques
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe how the peer review process works at academic journals in
general, with an emphasis on EM journals in particular,
2.Apply this understanding to maximize chances of manuscript acceptance,
3.Respond appropriately to negative reviewer critiques.
Description: To junior investigators, submission of scholarly work to an
academic journal can seem foreign and subjective. Understanding common
techniques that editors and reviewers use to screen and review manuscript
submissions can lead to higher chances of acceptance by submitting
authors. Responding to criticism of a submitted work is part of the process;
experienced authors often use a standard, systematic, and non-emotional
approach to get their work accepted. This session will introduce early
researchers to ways to optimize manuscript acceptance, including a
discussion of how to navigate revision or rejection letters. The session will
begin with a brief introduction to peer review, followed by a presentation
by an experienced emergency medicine journal editor who will provide an
Willard Sharp, MD, PhD, University of Chicago, Submitter
John Nagurney, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Submitter
Judd Hollander, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Presenter
Brian Hiestand, MD, MPH, Wake Forest, Presenter
DS50: Caring for the Transgender Patient in the Emergency
Department: A Module From the New ADIEM LGBT Curriculum
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Differentiate among “sex,” “gender,” and “sexual orientation” and
demonstrate how to sensitively elicit this information from patients,
2.Identify biases that impact the health of transgender/gender
nonconforming (TGGNC) persons,
3.Discuss emergency care needs and health disparities of TGGNC patients,
4.Examine and apply best practices in caring for TGGNC patients, 5.
Facilitate cultural competency in caring for TGGNC emergency patients.
Description: Original research has demonstrated a need for and a desire
by program directors and residents for education on LGBT health care
during residency. Moreover, a Canadian study published by Greta Bauer
et al in 2013 demonstrated that transgender patients specifically avoid
the emergency department and that over half of transgender ED utilizers
have had a negative experience. The LGBT subcommittee of ADIEM has
developed a modular LGBT Curriculum for use in EM residency education
and this course will highlight the newly developed module on emergency
care for TGGNC patients. After a brief introduction, participants will divide into
small groups to explore case-based scenarios that will facilitate discussion of
the dilemmas, management, and best practices in providing emergency care
for TGGNC patients. At the conclusion of the session, a debrief will bring
the groups back together to summarize challenges, recommendations, and
future needs.
Anne Daul, MD, MPH, FACEP, Emory University, Submitter/Presenter
Joel Moll, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University, Presenter
Paul Krieger, MD, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, Presenter
Thea James, MD, Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical, Presenter
Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD, MPH, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Presenter
DS51: Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound: The Debate
Rages On
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1.Discuss cutting edge and controversial issues in emergency
ultrasound today.
Description: This session will feature a debate-style format with discussants
utilizing an evidence-based approach to dispute two controversial topics in
emergency ultrasound. The most current controversial issues in point-ofcare ultrasound will be discussed. Audience participation via turning point
technology will be utilized.
Christopher Raio, MD, MBA, Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, Submitter/Presenter
Srikar Adhikari, MD, University of Arizona, Presenter
Vicki Noble, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Presenter
Michael B. Stone, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Presenter
Jason Nomura, MD, Christiana Care Health System, Presenter
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
overview of the process of screening manuscripts, selecting reviewers, and
how decisions regarding publication are made. This will be followed by a
senior EM researcher will share insight and experiences on the peer review
process and offer suggestions on how to respond to reviewer critiques or
article rejection letters. The session will close with a time for Q & A and
group discussion.
Thursday, May, 12: 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM
DS52: A Dean’s Perspective: Attracting the Best and Brightest
Medical Students to Emergency Medicine
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Apply the objectives of the lecture to their individual programs,
2.Formulate practical changes to their own medical school curriculums,
specifically in the first two years,
45
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
3.Implement curriculum changes through coordination with faculty of other
specialties and national committees,
4.Evaluate the importance of earlier exposure of EM to students and
disseminate the mission to local faculty.
Description: A recent trend of concern in emergency medicine is the loss of
top, potential EM students to other specialties (e.g., anesthesia and surgical
subspecialties). This loss is due, in part, to the lack of student exposure to
EM until the fourth and final year of medical school and carries long-term
ramifications for the specialty nationwide. The purpose of this course is to
raise awareness among EM faculty of this issue and to encourage EM faculty
to work with medical students starting in the pre-clinical years. With the
new curriculum changes in medical schools nationwide, which focus more
heavily on clinical experience and system-based education, opportunities
are opening for EM to have a bigger academic presence in the classroom
years. Specifically, EM faculty should teach basic courses such as anatomy
and pharmacology but enhance the courses with EM content, such as using
ultrasound to illustrate anatomy, and integrating toxicology into pharmacology.
Likewise, EM faculty can teach physiology through commonly-encountered
cardio-pulmonary resuscitation cases. EM should also be better represented
in electives to first- and second-year students through courses in related
fields such as trauma, wilderness, disaster and prehospital, and disaster relief
to name a few. Clinically, a third-year rotation in EM must be established and
is critical to cultivating an interest in the specialty early enough for students to
explore it in more depth in their fourth year rotations. To this end, coordination
is needed with CDEM. This session will be a lecture format with practical
illustrations, followed by a time of Q & A.
David Zhou, MD, Emory University, Submitter
David Milzman, MD, Georgetown University, Presenter
Douglas Ander, MD, FACEP, Emory University, Presenter
Thursday, May 12: 3:00 PM - 3:50 PM
DS53: Palliative Care Starts in the Emergency Department
Napoleon Ballroom B3 & C3/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain how the emergency department can serve as an early gateway
into the palliative care continuum,
2.Discuss best practices around piloting palliative care specific research and
initiatives in the emergency department,
3.Recognize evolving educational milestones for resident training around EM
palliative care core competencies.
Description: In 2013, the American College of Emergency Physicians
prioritized earlier access to Palliative Care as one of its top five Choosing
Wisely measures. Since then, multidisciplinary efforts have demonstrated
there is significant need and opportunity for the emergency department
to serve as a gateway to comprehensive palliative care. This session will
first highlight the value add and experience of one academic center’s
experience in identifying, capturing, and integrating palliative care eligible
patients early in their disease course. Secondly, this session will address
developing educational milestones for resident training around palliative care
core competencies relevant to the scope of emergency medicine. Lastly,
this session will also review recent studies demonstrating clear reduced
healthcare utilization through earlier integration into palliative care, notably
in less ED presentations, higher concordance with end of life wishes, and
reduced financial burden.
David Wang, MD, Stanford Healthcare, Submitter/Presenter
DS54: Leadership Blind Spots: Revealing and Overcoming
Hidden Weaknesses
Napoleon Ballroom B1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify and discuss the most common leadership blind spots,
2.Illustrate (using case examples) how blind spots can influence a leader’s
effectiveness,
3.Describe practical strategies to reveal and confront hidden weaknesses,
4.Explain why addressing blind spots is essential for developing leaders.
46
Description: Every leader has blind spots—unconscious assumptions or
automatic behaviors that can limit effectiveness, or worse, sabotage a career.
This session will begin with a brief introduction exploring how blind spots
develop, persist, and even serve an adaptive role for leaders. Participants
will learn the most common unseen weaknesses, along with ways to
increase self-awareness and change how to see the “truths” that influence
our actions. Leaders will describe situations that exposed their respective
blind spots and share how they learned from these experiences. Discussion
panelists will include leaders in emergency medicine education.
Andra L. Blomkalns, MD, University of Texas Southwestern at Dallas, Submitter/Presenter
Brian J. Zink, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Presenter
Brian I. Clyne, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Presenter
Cherri Hobgood, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Presenter
Kathleen Clem, MD, Loma Linda University, Presenter
Richard E. Wolfe, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Presenter
Gregory A. Volturo, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
Kate Heilpern, MD, Emory University, Presenter
DS55: How to Run a Successful ED-Based, Industry-Sponsored
Clinical Trials Program
Napoleon Ballroom B2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the potential monetary and non-monetary value of running a clinical
trials program,
2.Assess a budget for a study and identify the potential for negotiation,
3.Explain the pros and cons of various structures for a clinical trials program,
4.Describe how to integrate faculty, residents, and students in such a
program to enhance the educational value.
Description: The importance of emergency care in improving outcomes for
patients with acute illness and injury is well established. With recognition of
its importance, there is a growing demand for industry to conduct research
in the emergency care population. Meeting this demand by running a “clinical
trials program” is a potentially valuable opportunity for emergency physicians.
Many academic and private emergency medicine groups now run such
programs; however, selecting appropriate trials, negotiating budgets,
navigating regulatory hurdles, and managing a research staff is challenging.
This session will present an educational discussion of challenges and
solutions to common obstacles in administering a clinical trials program by
experts in the field.
Timothy Platts-Mills, MD, MSc, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Submitter/
Presenter
Gregory Fermann, MD, University of Cincinnati, Presenter
Judd Hollander, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Presenter
Eugenia Quackenbush, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Presenter
Christopher Jones, MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Presenter
DS56: Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation and Post-Arrest Care
Updates: What You Need to Know at the Bedside
Napoleon Ballroom C1/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain the findings of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report as well as the
American Heart Association (AHA) 2015 guidelines,
2.Discuss the primary literature that has contributed to these changes,
3.Implement protocol changes at their home institutions to improve
outcomes from cardiac arrest.
Description: Emergency medicine physicians are charged with resuscitating
out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, but despite relatively high
incidence and the availability of several interventions with proven efficacy to
improve outcomes, survival from OHCA is poor. In 2015, two very important
events occurred in the domain of cardiac arrest science: First, the Institute
of Medicine (IOM) formally released the report “Strategies to Improve Cardiac
Arrest Survival,” a document aimed at advancing clinical practice, reporting,
and research in order to improve clinical outcomes. Second, the American
Heart Association (AHA) published the 2015 update to the consensus
resuscitation guidelines, including recommendations for the care of OHCA
patients that are relevant to all emergency medicine providers. This session
Sarah Perman, MD, MSCE, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Benjamin Abella, MD, MPhil, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine,
Presenter
David F. Gaieski, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Presenter
DS57: Updates in Identification and Care of Suicidal Patients
in the ED
Napoleon Ballroom C2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss emerging, evidence-based strategies to identify and care for
suicidal ED patients, including: a) pros and cons of screening options;
b) the ED-SAFE trial (including main findings and implications for ED
practice); c) recommendations from the Suicide Prevention Resource
Center guide (including which patients can be discharged without a mental
health consultation); d) options for brief interventions in the ED and after
discharge.
Description: Caring for ED patients with suicidal ideation or suicide attempts
(SI/SA) is often challenging, given time pressures, boarding of patients
waiting for psychiatric beds, and the inherent difficulty in predicting imminent
self-harm. In addition to the larger volume of patients who present with
mental health complaints, approximately 8% of all ED patients (regardless
of complaint) have recent SI/SA, which has questions about “universal
screening” for suicide risk. In this session, a panel of experts will provide a
brief introductory update on current statistics concerning ED care of suicidal
patients, including annual visit volumes and dispositions, the screening
debate, and the role of EDs in suicide prevention. This will be followed by
a discussion of the recent NIH-funded, ED-SAFE trial, including its design,
major findings, and lessons learned about conducting research with suicidal
ED patients. Session participants will also be introduced to the new Suicide
Prevention Resource Center ED Guide for care of suicidal patients, including
its development, and main recommendations about brief, risk assessment
and ED interventions. The session will conclude with an open discussion
among participants and panelists about the challenges and opportunities in
caring for ED patients at risk of suicide.
Marian Betz, MD, MPH, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Edwin Boudreaux, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Presenter
Leslie Zun, MD, MBA, Chicago Medical School / Mount Sinai Hospital, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 8:00 AM - 8:20 AM
DS58: Cutting the Knowledge Translation Window to Less Than 1
Month with #SGEMHOP
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Explain the leaky pipe model of knowledge translation
2. Define and describe social media and FOAMed (Free Open Access to
Medical Education)
3. Demonstrate how the SGEMHOP is successfully addressing the
knowledge translation problem.
Description: Last year, SAEM’s flagship journal, Academic Emergency
Medicine, entered into a relationship with The Skeptics’ Guide to Emergency
Medicine to create Hot Off the Press. This was to cut the knowledge
translation (KT) window down from over ten years to less than one month
using the power of social media. This lecture will describe that process and
as well as the results of this successful KT project.
Ken Milne, MD, MSc, CCFP-EM, FCFP, FRRMS, South Huron Hospital Association,
Submitter/Presenter
Friday, May 13: 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
DS59: Diagnosing and Remediating Clinical Reasoning Difficulties
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the steps to clinical reasoning,
2.Identify the 5 domains of clinical reasoning difficulties,
3.Develop tailored approaches to each domain of clinical reasoning
Description: In clinical teaching, difficulties in clinical reasoning are some
of the most difficult remediation. Evidence based work by Dr. MC Audétat
describe the taxonomy of five domains of clinical reasoning difficulties: 1)
Difficulties in generating hypotheses, identifying clues, and directing data
gathering, 2) Premature closure, 3) Difficulties prioritizing, 4) Difficulties
in painting an overall picture of the clinical situation, and 5) Difficulties
elaborating a management plan. This workshop will help faculty identify cues
to domain of difficulty that includes examples of questions that can help to
demonstrate learner reasoning. Presenters and other facilitators will then work
with participants to develop tailored remediation strategies for each of the
domains. The workshop will incorporate large and small group exercises to
aid participants in understanding the concepts presented and in developing
practical and realistic ways to improve their clinical reasoning identification
and remediation teaching skills.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
brings together national research and clinical care experts in cardiac arrest
and post-arrest care to discuss the latest scientific evidence, as well as
summary details, from these two very important guidance documents. The
session will close with a discussion on implementing protocol change. Time
will be reserved for a Q & A discussion with the three panelists. Participants
will leave with an understanding of the most recent clinical science; how
recent international statements will improve the clinical care provided to
cardiac arrest patients in the ED; and how protocol initiatives can potentially
improve outcomes for OHCA patients.
Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Submitter/Presenter
Laura R. Hopson, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Michelle Daniel, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Louis Ling, MD, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Presenter
DS60: Taking Advantage of the Teachable Moment: A Workshop
for Efficient, Learner-Centered Clinical Teaching
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss barriers to effective clinical teaching,
2.Identify characteristics of ideal clinical teachers,
3.Describe principles of learner-centered education,
4.Practice a variety of evidence-based teaching models in small-groups,
5.Incorporate learner-centered teaching techniques into clinical practice.
Description: When working in a chaotic emergency department with
competing priorities, clinical teaching may be sacrificed for the sake of
patient flow and throughput. An organized, efficient approach to clinical
teaching based upon constructivist educational theory helps focus the
teaching on what the learner needs at that moment, incorporates regular
feedback, keeps the department on track, and prevents over-teaching. In
this interactive workshop, participants will be engaged in a discussion about
barriers to teaching in the emergency department, learn about characteristics
of teachers appreciated by learners, understand basic principles of learnercentered education, and practice a number of teaching models such as
OMP, SNAPPS, ED STAT! At the end of this workshop, participants will
be prepared to seize teachable moments and provide timely and learnercentered clinical educational encounters.
Sneha Shah, MD, University of Massachusetts, Submitter/Presenter
Todd A. Guth, MD, University of Colorado, Presenter
Elise Lovell, MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Presenter
Michael Epter, DO, Maricopa Medical Center, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 8:00 AM - 9:50 AM
DS61: Lion’s Den 2016: 3rd Annual Research Proposal
Development Symposium
Grand Ballroom D/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify the 4 basic structural components of a successful study proposal,
2.Describe, and avoid, the 4 key mistakes made by junior researchers in
study design and proposal,
3.Maximize the success of their own study proposals.
47
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Description: A perennial issue for junior emergency medicine investigators
is lack of guidance in, and experience with, the development and funding
of initial, small-scale study proposals. Many senior investigators believe
that creating and acquiring funding for a research proposal is similar to the
entrepreneurial process of developing and funding a business proposal.
Drawing on the innovative and humorous format of the popular “Shark Tank”
television show and adapting it for the emergency medicine specialty, a panel
of senior EM researchers will provide real-time guidance on this model of
proposal development. The didactic will begin with a brief presentation, by
a mid-career EM researcher, on the 5 critical elements of a junior research/
grant proposal. This will be followed by the introduction of the 4 basic
structural components of a successful study proposal: The concept (the
unmet need), the plan (how they are going to solve it), the outcome (what the
metric of success is), and their credentials (why we should “invest” in them).
Junior researchers will then be offered the chance to present their study
ideas to a “Lion’s Den” panel (Proposals will be solicited in advance through
research director and research fellowship listserves, as well as SAEM-wide
advertisements.). Each proposal will be presented using a standard format
and then critiqued by session panelists. The most successful proposals will
be offered a true “investment” in the form of distance mentorship by panel
members, all of whom are highly respected senior researchers.
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Submitter
Judd Hollander, MD, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Jefferson University, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 8:30 AM - 8:50 AM
DS62: The Lecture is Dead: Long Live the Lecture
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Analyze the role of traditional lectures as part of weekly conference,
2.Evaluate the potential benefits and costs associated with individualized
interactive instruction,
3.Describe the evidence supporting blended learning techniques medical
education.
Description: The increasing use of social media platforms for medical
education has opened the door for significant innovation in the weekly
conferences that make up the core of resident didactics. There is some
question, however, as to the practicality of implementation, costs, and,
ultimately, the effectiveness of individualized interactive instruction, flipped
classrooms, small group teaching, simulation, and other novel educational
modalities. This didactic will use a debate format to explore the integration of
online audio and video resources, traditional lecture, and blended learning
techniques to highlight the pros and cons of replacing or augmenting
traditional lecture didactics with asynchronous education. Proffering evidence
from both sides of the argument, the presenters will identify and highlight the
best practices for the integration of FOAMed with the intent of streamlining the
integration of individualized interactive instruction into residency education.
Jeffery Hill, MD, MEd, University of Cincinnati, Submitter/Presenter
Jeffrey Riddell, MD, University of Washington, Presenter
Robert Cooney, MD, MSMed Ed, Geisinger Medical Center, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
DS63: Stump the Experts: Solving Challenging Cases
in Remediation
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify common categories of difficult learners,
2.Describe internal and external variables that contribute to the challenges of
successfully educating this subgroup,
3.Discuss a systematic approach to improve the performance and
educational experience of difficult learners,
4.Apply the concepts discussed to design effective interventions for your
learners in difficulty.
Description: Do you have a vexing case of a learner in difficulty? Are you
frustrated by a complex remediation problem? Bring your challenging issues
to this interactive session, where experienced residency and medical student
educators will trouble-shoot cases of professionalism, clinical reasoning, and
48
inter-personal skills. Building on Steinert’s three step model of managing the
problem learner, and incorporating best practice approaches to remediation,
this session will explore: a) the accurate and timely identification of barriers to
effective learning (e.g. knowledge and focus, integration, motivation, and/or
professionalism); b) the assessment of contributing factors (learner, teacher,
environment/situational); and c) the implementation of specific interventions
in order to optimize outcomes for this cohort. A facilitated discussion of reallife cases put forward by participants and session leaders will reinforce the
concepts presented.
Elise Lovell, MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Submitter/Presenter
Michael Epter, DO, Maricopa Medical Center, Presenter
Todd Guth, MD, University of Colorado, Presenter
DS64: Emerging Infectious Diseases:
Translating Knowledge into Action
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain the Identify-Isolate-Inform tool and understand how it can be
modified to fit the characteristics of specific emerging infectious diseases,
2.Demonstrate effective use of decision-making for quarantine,
3.Describe how “serious games” can guide leadership to establish valid
research-based policy, and the cascade of effects that result in improved
outcomes in a public health emergency,
4.Describe essential elements of an academic medical center program for
management of emerging infectious diseases.
Description: Emerging infectious diseases like the 2009 H1N1 pandemic,
Ebola virus disease (EVD), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)
present challenges to emergency physicians already working in crowded
and resource-constrained conditions. Available health policy often fails
to provide emergency physicians and other healthcare providers with
appropriate guidance and tools to manage the emerging crisis. Generalized
recommendations lack sufficient detail to accurately inform providers on
effective implementation of screening and interventions. Poorly-informed
decision-makers have recommended personal protective equipment
unsupported by science, and inappropriately implemented 21-day quarantines
of asymptomatic healthcare workers exposed to EVD patients. Health policy
decisions must be based on the best available evidence during these evolving
and uncertain situations. Building on work presented at the SAEM15, panel
speakers will discuss the development of various novel tools and techniques,
such as the quarantine decision algorithm and the Identify-Isolate-Inform tool,
and how cutting-edge leadership teaching and training techniques using
“serious games” are cost effective methods to improve frontline conditions. A
case study of preparing an academic medical center for managing patients
infected with EVD will be used to illustrate translation of knowledge into
action. Presenters will describe strategies to maintain competencies and
preparedness for a rare, but resource-intensive event in which healthcare
providers may be at risk for contracting and spreading disease.
Kristi L. Koenig, MD, Center for Disaster Medical Sciences, University of California,
Irvine, Submitter/Presenter
Carl H. Schultz, MD, Center for Disaster Medical Sciences, University of California,
Irvine, Presenter
Donna Barbisch, MG(Ret.), DHA, MPH, RN, Center for Disaster Medical Sciences,
University of California, Irvine,Presenter
Friday, May 13: 10:30 AM - 10:50 AM
DS65: KL2 Research Training Programs:
What Are They and Should I Apply?
Grand Ballroom D/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the KL2 mechanism,
2.List the benefits of a KL2 program,
3.Explain the KL2 application process.
Description: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) funds approximately 60
Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) across the country. With
this award, every CTSA is required to provide a research training program
for junior faculty. These research training programs utilize a KL2 mechanism
and can train junior faculty for one to three years. The research training
James Holmes, MD, MPH, UC Davis School of Medicine, Submitter/Presenter
Larissa May, MD, MSPH, MSHS, UC Davis School of Medicine, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
DS66: Sepsis in the Emergency Department: New Data, New
Definitions, New Practice?
effective learning environment. Small group sessions will explore resident
perceptions of autonomy, the learning environment, and strategies for faculty
to enhance resident learning within this framework.
Michele Carney, MD, University of Michigan, Submitter/Presenter
Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Margaret (Meg) Wolff, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Robin Hemphill, MD, VA Ann Arbor Hospitals, Presenter
Felix Ankel, MD, HealthPartners, Regions Hospital, University of Minnesota Medical School,
Presenter
L. Melissa Skaugset, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Ashley Pavlic, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Angela Zamarripa, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Erin Dunbar, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Dan Nguyen, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
DS68: Off the Beaten Path: Building a Career in Sports Medicine
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the history of sepsis and the development of National Quality
Forum and CMS measures.
2.Discuss the new literature and recommendations for its application to
clinical practice.
3.Discuss the newly proposed definitions and implications for resourcelimited environments.
4.Describe the new developments in sepsis and implications for tertiary care
environments.
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Description: We have come a long way in our understanding of the
physiologic mechanisms of sepsis, effects of various therapies, and benefits
of screening tools. Of all these advances, early recognition and treatment—or
early goal directed therapy—has led to the largest reduction in mortality in the
last 50 years. As a result, the first national measure for sepsis management
became reality in 2015. Three new trials have brought reevaluation of early
sepsis management: ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE. The National Quality
Forum (NQF) and Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) have
ratified measures for treatment and management of patients with severe
sepsis and septic shock. Additionally, the European Society of Intensive Care
Medicine and the Society of Critical Care Medicine have collaborated on
the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock
(Sepsis-3). We will address these developments and their effect on the
assessment and treatment of the emergency department patient with sepsis.
Evie G. Marcolini MD, FACEP, FAAEM, FCCM, Yale University School of Medicine,
Submitter/Presenter
Emanuel P. Rivers, MD, MPH, Henry Ford Hospital, Wayne State University, The National
Academies Institute of Medicine, Presenter
Peter DeBlieux, MD, Louisiana State University, Presenter
Kyle Gunnerson, MD, University of Michigan Health System, Presenter
Charles R. Wira III, MD, Yale School of Medicine, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
DS67: How to Effectively Supervise and Teach Residents:
Entrustment and Autonomy
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the factors affecting autonomy,
2.Identify and navigate the barriers to entrustment,
3.Facilitate resident autonomy and grant trainee suitable entrustment of
patient care to enhance resident education.
Description: The goal of residency is to train residents to manage patients
independently while the role of the attending faculty is to provide both
appropriate supervision and autonomy. This concept has been termed
“entrustment” and is essential for implementation of the milestones. As
residents progress along the milestones, the role of the supervising physician
is to grant incremental responsibilities of patient care to residents with
concurrent reduction in clinical oversight. This entrustment of professional
activities to each resident by each faculty member varies based on multiple
influences, including practice environment, patient severity of illness and
complexity, and factors unique to each faculty member and resident. This
interactive session will discuss how leveraging entrustment can create an
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss the fundamental practice of primary care sports medicine,
2.Describe the routes of entry into the subspecialty,
3.Define the role and unique qualifications of the emergency physician in
sports medicine,
4.Summarize the spectrum of career paths available to the fellowship-trained
emergency physician,
5.Identify areas of involvement for the interested resident or emergency
physician without formal training.
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
may involve coursework, workshops, individualized programs of study, and
a multidisciplinary clinical/translational research study. Critical among the
training is suitable mentorship. The goal of the KL2 programs is to train junior
faculty to become independent investigators and most graduates of the
program apply for either an individual K award or a R series grant. Historically,
junior emergency medicine faculty have not utilized this mechanism to its
fullest extent.
Description: Primary care sports medicine has seen continued growth
in recent years as a subspecialty of emergency medicine. Emergency
physicians offer a unique skill set and are well-positioned for success in
sports medicine. With the proper training, experience, or special interest,
there are a variety of opportunities in sports medicine available to the
emergency physician. This session will describe the role of the emergency
physician in sports medicine, the current state of sports medicine fellowship
training, and career paths and other opportunities for residents and practicing
emergency physicians with or without fellowship training. Each session
speaker practices academic emergency medicine, clinical sports medicine,
and team medicine in settings encompassing high school, college, and
professional sports. The session will open with a brief description of the
evolution of sports medicine and its current place in emergency medicine,
and will be followed by an overview of the fellowship experience and
training options. A range of career paths will be reviewed, with a focus
on incorporating sports medicine into academic practice. The majority
of the program will feature a moderated panel discussion, during which
panelists will expand upon the introductory remarks and highlight their
recommendations for the pursuit of training and a career in sports medicine.
In addition, the panel will address several frequently asked questions from
prospective fellowship applicants. A brief, interactive Q & A session will
conclude the program.
Jeffrey Feden, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Submitter/Presenter
Moira Davenport, MD, Allegheny General Hospital, Presenter
AJ Monseau, MD, West Virginia University, Presenter
Anna Waterbrook, MD, University of Arizona, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
DS69: The Future of Cancer-Related Research in Emergency
Medicine: An Update From the National Cancer Institute and the
Comprehensive ONCologic Emergencies Research Network
Location: Grand Ballroom D/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe opportunities for NCI-sponsored research,
2.List the key elements of the research agenda for oncologic emergencies,
3.Discuss the structure of, current activities of, and opportunities for
collaboration with CONCERN.
Description: The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of recent
developments in collaboration between the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
and emergency medicine researchers and to describe opportunities and
49
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
mechanisms for future research funding in this area. In spring 2015, NCI
held an initial conference to develop a research agenda for cancer-related
emergencies and the Comprehensive ONCologic Emergencies Research
Network (CONCERN), a NCI-supported research consortia. Panelists
will include representatives from NCI and CONCERN. NCI program staff
will introduce the structure of NCI, review NCI areas of interest relevant
to emergency medicine, and discuss potential funding mechanisms.
CONCERN leadership will discuss the recently developed research agenda
for oncologic emergencies as well as the structure of CONCERN and the
methods of joining the network and collaborating with research projects. They
will also discuss current projects and future plans of CONCERN, including
preliminary results from the network’s first observational trial.
This session will pull from the top cited articles in medical education and
return to the foundational evidence of how we teach. The workshop will help
participants translate the evidence from landmark education articles: “What
Clinical Teachers in Medicine Need to Know,” by David M. Irby, Ph.D. and
“A Cognitive Perspective on Medical Expertise: Theory and implications,”
by H.G. Schmidt, Ph.D. Participants will be asked to read the 2 articles in
advance. The evidence will be briefly presented and then, in small groups,
participants will problem solve from their own setting and plan solutions. The
workshop will be highly interactive, requiring participants to use the evidence
and apply it to their teaching, learning, and assessment practices. The
workshop will incorporate large and small group exercises to understand the
concepts and develop ways to improve participants’ teaching skills.
Jeffrey M. Caterino, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center,
Submitter/Presenter
Demetrios Kyriacou, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Presenter
Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS, NYU Langone Medical Center, Presenter
Nonniekaye Shelburne, CRMP, MS, AOCN, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Presenter
Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Submitter/Presenter
Susan E. Farrell, MD, EdM, Partners HealthCare International, Harvard Medical School,
Presenter
Laura R. Hopson, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Robin Hemphill, MD, MPH, Veterans Association, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM
DS70: Pain Management and Shared Decision-Making in the ED:
The Future or Destined to Fail?
DS72: The Scholarship Pipeline: Best Practices to Keep Your
Academic Career Moving Forward
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify and discuss the barriers to and opportunities for SDM in the
treatment of acute pain,
2.Discuss the SDM factors influencing the pain management discussion in
the ED,
3.Evaluate the option of incorporating SDM in to their pain management
decisions in clinical practice.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Identify educational activities that should move into scholarship,
2.Describe the stages of a scholarship pipeline and their interaction with an
individual’s research agenda,
3.Construct a personal scholarship pipeline,
4.Evaluate the progress of projects through the pipeline (detect issues
with specific project completions, construct strategies for advancing
stalled projects, and reflect on personal limitations in completing scholarly
projects),
5.Implement a personal action plan on scholarship pipeline.
Description: Opioid analgesic related morbidity and mortality have reached
epidemic proportions in the U.S. In response to escalating pressure to
address pain while prescribing opioids responsibly, patient-centered
approaches are clearly needed to guide both clinical decisions and
departmental, health system, and governmental policies. Shared decisionmaking (SDM), a collaborative process in which patients and physicians
make a health care decision together using the best evidence available
and the patient’s preferences, is increasingly being used for ED diagnostic
and therapeutic decisions. SDM for acute pain treatment poses unique
challenges and opportunities for patient care, scientific investigation, and
education. Can patients in pain make an informed decision? Are they
willing to? Are providers ready to discuss opioid prescribing with patients?
Is there equipoise in these decisions? Do ED providers have time for these
deliberations? Does it impact patient satisfaction? Expert presenters will
address these barriers and opportunities in the consideration of using of a
SDM approach for ED pain management. After providing background about
the current state of ED analgesia and SDM, the presenters will also speak to
patient, provider, and system factors that influence the decisions to prescribe
and use prescription opioids. The session will conclude with a suggested
approach to using SDM for ED pain management.
Jason A. Hoppe, DO, University of Colorado, Submitter/Presenter
Zachary Meisel, MD, MPH, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM
DS71: Improve Your Teaching by Debunking Education Myths:
An Evidence-Based Teaching Workshop Using Articles That Will
Change Your Teaching Practice (Flipped Classroom)
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Question their thinking about traditional teaching,
2.Extrapolate evidence from teaching and learning literature,
3.Apply the evidence to develop a plan for incorporating the evidence into
their teaching practices.
Description: In clinical teaching, medical educators should use the evidence
from education literature and incorporate it into their teaching practice. By
including methods that work, teaching will be improved and trainees will learn
more. However, frequently educators may not be aware of the evidence.
50
Friday, May 13: 1:30 PM - 1:50 PM
Description: Educational faculty frequently focus the majority of their time on
teaching and in service to the educational missions of their departments.
With very little time for individual scholarly production, educators often fall
behind on promotion metrics, such as publications. In order to advance
in academic rank, clinician educators need to translate their teaching
excellence into meaningful scholarship beyond abstracts and presentations
and into peer-reviewed publications. This session will provide best practices
for developing and nurturing scholarship pipeline and will use a “scholarly
pipeline” worksheet to practically implement these best practices. The
session will start with a description of the scholarship pipeline and will go on
to detail the various stages of the pipeline from the conception/idea phase
(i.e. “entering the pipeline”) through development and IRB, data collection,
analysis, presentation, writing, submission, resubmission/rewrites, and finally,
on to acceptance. Strategies for organizing projects and keeping projects
moving forward through the pipeline will be discussed. Participants should
bring their personal projects to the session. The session will be interactive,
with participants completing the course by working with a table facilitator to
develop their own, initial “pipelines” and future action plans.
Nik Theyyunni, MD, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Submitter
Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Presenter
John Burkhardt, MD, MA, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
DS73: Bowel Ultrasound: Ready for Primetime or Just a Bunch
of Crap?
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Name the basic techniques for performing bowel sonography and relevant
literature supporting its use,
2.Describe the sonographic appearance of normal and pathologic bowel
sonography,
3.Discuss the diagnostic capabilities and limitations for diagnosing various
bowel conditions, including small bowel obstruction, bowel strangulation,
appendicitis, hernia, diverticulitis, pneumoperitoneum and intussusception.
Jason Matthew Fields, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Submitter/Presenter
Nova Panebianco, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Presenter
Carl Alsup, MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Presenter
John C. Fox, MD, University of California, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
DS74: Apprenticeship to Independence: Facilitating Autonomy in
EM Learners
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the steps in the process of entrustment,
2.Deliver the cognitive supports required by residents and other learners as
they seek and attain successive steps of entrustment,
3.Apply techniques of cognitive support in their educational practices.
Description: The goal of medical education is to support the process leading
from novice to skilled independent practitioner. Faculty must teach so that
trainees take on sequentially more complex responsibilities as they progress
toward independence. The traditional apprenticeship model, focused on
skill acquisition and performance, has evolved to include cognitive as well
as physical domains. For an effective “cognitive apprenticeship,” faculty
must make their internal thought processes explicit and visible to the learner
to observe, endorse, and practice. At each stage in development from
novice to expert, faculty must tailor the techniques of instruction, using both
cognitive and traditional apprenticeship approaches to further learning and
foster ever-increasing autonomy. Faculty must gauge learner readiness, and
ensure that the process of entrustment runs smoothly, granting incrementally
greater responsibilities to trainees with concurrent reduction in cognitive
support. This session will first discuss different levels of training, autonomy,
and entrustment and then offer a variety of teaching approaches based on
the level of trainee using cognitive support techniques such as modeling,
coaching, scaffolding, articulation, exploration, and reflection. Presenters will
discuss their understanding of how targeted cognitive support, balanced with
with increasing entrustment, can create an effective learning environment,
supporting the path toward independent practice. Presenters will use
simulated learner scenarios to encourage interactive participation. Additional
faculty will be engaged to facilitate small group sessions.
Chris Merritt, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Submitter/Presenter
Margaret Wolff, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Michelle Daniel, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Felix Ankel, MD, HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research, Presenter
Courteney MacKuen, MD, MPH, Brown University, Presenter
William Peterson, MD, University of Michigan, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
DS75: Closing the EM Knowledge Gap about Human Trafficking:
Advancing Education, Research, and Advocacy in
Emergency Medicine
Grand Ballroom D/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss human trafficking, including prevalence, risk factors, and at least
3 related health problems in each of the following categories: physical,
reproductive, and mental health,
2.Name potential red flag indicators of human trafficking and how these can
be used to identify trafficked victims,
3.Describe how emergency providers might screen a patient for human
trafficking and respond to a disclosure.
Description: Human trafficking for the purpose of forced labor or sexual
exploitation occurs in all 50 states and affects US- and foreign-born
men, women, and children (age < 18 years). Global health research has
established that victims of human trafficking suffer poor health and mental
health outcomes as a result of the abuse and violence they experience
during their exploitation. Survey-based research in the US has shown that
a significant percentage of trafficking survivors who reported accessing
health care while trafficked did so through emergency departments. Thus,
emergency medicine as a specialty is uniquely positioned to advance our
understanding of this population’s injury and disease patterns and long-term
health and mental health outcomes, as well as develop and advocate for the
use of evidence-based screening and response practices. To accomplish
this, emergency medicine must first close the knowledge gap among
emergency providers and incorporate the education and training needed
to be able to identify and respond to victims of human trafficking in the
emergency department.
Wendy Macias-Konstantopoulos, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard
Medical School, Submitter/Presenter
Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD, MPH, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Presenter
Hanni Stoklosa, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School,
Presenter
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Description: Bowel ultrasound is considered an advanced application of
emergency ultrasound. This didactic will discuss the integration of bowel
ultrasound into clinical practice in the workup of abdominal pain. Topics
discussed will include normal bowel appearance, small bowel obstruction,
appendicitis, hernia, diverticulitis, intussusception, strangulation and
pneumoperitoneum. Relevant literature and clinical pathways for use of bowel
sonography will be examined and discussed for each modality. The benefit
of adopting bowel sonography in the bedside workup of abdominal pain will
be explored.
DS76: Point-of-Care Ultrasound in the Resource-Limited
Setting: Advances in New Educational Techniques, Tools, and
Telemedicine
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Discuss novel ultrasound findings and protocols currently being used to
diagnose certain disease processes unique to specific global regions,
2.Integrate new ultrasound teaching techniques into ultrasound curriculum in
the resource limited setting,
3.Describe several novel technologies being used in a telemedicine program
that can aide in global teaching and QA of POCUS
Description: Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) is a valuable diagnostic tool
in resource-limited settings (RLS). POCUS provides an effective, affordable,
and mobile method of diagnosis. Ultrasound educators have a unique
challenge to deliver targeted courses in RLS and to provide ongoing support.
There have recently been exciting advances in ultrasound to aid in the
diagnosis of specific diseases. New research and technology provide a
variety of methods to utilize, teach, and provide quality assurance (QA). In
this session, clinician experts with unique knowledge of global health and
ultrasound will discuss novel ultrasound findings that have been attributed
to certain disease processes. For example, the Focused Assessment
with Sonography for HIV-associated tuberculosis (FASH) has recently
been viewed as an effective diagnostic tool for patients in settings where
prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection is high. IVC/Ao assessment in children is
also guiding fluid resuscitation in diarrhea-associated dehydration. Session
presenters will discuss innovative ultrasound teaching techniques and course
design to make targeted learning effective, including phantom models,
homemade gel models, online tools, and other methods to enhance teaching
of POCUS. There will also be discussion of the benefits and disadvantages
of using more compact ultrasound machines, including hand held models.
Telemedicine has recently gained much attention as an effective means
of communication between educators and trainees in RLS. Techniques
include online teaching, live video conferencing, and social media. Experts
will discuss how QA of POCUS can be achieved by combining conventional
teaching and remote guidance and telecommunication.
Devjani Das, MD, Staten Island University Hospital, Submitter
Megan Leo, MD, Boston University School of Medicine, Presenter
Kathleen M. O’Brien. Kaiser Permanente, CA, Presenter
Mark Bisanzo, MD, University of Massachusetts, Presenter
Samuel Licciardo, MD, University of Massachusetts, Presenter
51
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
Friday, May 13: 3:30 PM - 4:20 PM
DS77: Pearls and Pitfalls of a Resident or Faculty Roast
Grand Ballroom E/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Describe the potential benefits of a roast to the residency culture,
2.Identify common pitfalls of roasts, both from the faculty and resident
perspectives.
Description: A roast to honor and poke fun at graduates and faculty inresidency training is common across specialties and has certainly found
a home in emergency medicine. In this course, speakers from residency
programs that have long traditions of hosting roasts will share common
pitfalls to avoid in a roast and provide pearls for creating a memorable event.
The session will provide guidance for how to use audio-video to optimize the
roast experience for presenters and audience members alike and will include
examples of successful AV presentations. Faculty and residents that are new
to participating in a roast will gain appreciation for the benefits of a well-done
roast to the emergency medicine residency culture.
Joseph Miller, MD, Henry Ford Health System, Submitter/Presenter
Seth Krupp, MD, Henry Ford Health System, Presenter
Amy Dickson, MD, UT Houston, Presenter
Kunal Sharma, MD, UT Houston, Presenter
Samuel Prater, MD, UT Houston, Presenter
Friday, May 13: 4:00 PM - 4:20 PM
DS78: Perception and Metacognition:
Thinking About How You Think
Grand Ballroom C/5th Floor
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.Explain how perception and cognition affect clinical decision-making,
2.Describe the use of specific cognitive forcing strategies to improve clinical
decision-making.
Description: Perception and cognition are neglected aspects of medical
education and training, yet both of these complex processes are critical to
medical decision-making and providing high-quality medical care. Using
examples from disparate fields such as film animation, basketball, various
medical specialties, and interactive videos, this session will demonstrate
limits to perception and how such limits affect medical decision-making.
The session presenter will also introduce and discuss metacognition; that is,
thinking about how we think. Through the use of examples from disparate
fields such as competitive chess and trauma radiology, participants will be
introduced to the limitations of specific cognitive forcing strategies to assist
them in improving their own medical decision-making.
Steven Bird, MD, University of Massachusetts, Submitter/Presenter
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52
MAY 10-13 — NEW ORLEANS, LA
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
PLENARY
Wednesday, May 11: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Napoleon Ballroom/3rd Floor
1
2
3
4
5
6
Opioid Management Polices in New England Emergency Departments, 2014
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
The Safe and Effective Implementation of Telestroke in a U.S.
Community Hospital Setting
Adam L. Sharp, MD, Kaiser Permanente Southern California Los Angeles Medical Center
A Double Blind Multi-Arm Randomized Trial for Efficacy of Intramuscular
Diclofenac Versus Intravenous Morphine Versus Intravenous
Paracetamol, in Renal Colic Emergency Department Pain Management
Sameer A. Pathan, MBBS, CABEM, MRCEM, Emergency Department, Hamad
General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation
Going the Extra Mile: Predictors of Higher Milestone Achievement
in Emergency Medicine Using Longitudinal Multicenter Direct
Observation Data
Arjun Dayal, BS, University of Chicago
Youth Violence Prevention: Effects of a Universal Violence
Intervention in an Urban ED
Patrick M. Carter, MD, University of Michigan
A Novel ED-based Critical Care Unit Reduces ICU Utilization
Ben Bassin, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan
AIRWAY/ANESTHESIA/ANALGESIA AND PEDIATRICS
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University College of
Human Medicine
7
8
9
10
11
12
A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Three Doses
of Intravenous Ketorolac for Pain Management in the
Emergency Department
Matthew Yasavolian, MD, Maimonides Medical Center
A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled,
Multicenter Clinical Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of
Icatibant for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Induced
Angioedema in Adults
Richard Sinert, DO, Department of Emergency Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical
Center / Kings County Hospital Medical Center
Incidence, Management and Outcomes of Laryngospasm in Children
Undergoing Procedural Sedation in the Emergency Department
Jana L. Anderson, MD, College of Medicine Mayo Clinic (Rochester)
Esophageal Intubation as an Adjunct to Direct Laryngoscopy in Upper
Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Description of a Novel Technique
Ife Adabonyan, MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
Impact of Preprocedural Fasting on Sedation-Associated Adverse
Events in Pediatric Emergency Sedation
Maala Bhatt, MD, MSc., Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario
Use of a Dental Vibration Tool to Reduce Pain from Digital Blocks a Randomized Controlled Trial
Craig Pedersen, DO, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
14
15
16
17
18
Profile of Emergency Department Utilization by High Cost
Medicare Beneficiaries
Laura G. Burke, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
Relationship Between Admission Rate and Outcomes for Medicare
Beneficiaries
Laura G. Burke, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
Changes in Emergency Department Use by Insurance Status in Illinois
After Implementation of the Affordable Care Act
Scott M. Dresden, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
The Changing Landscape of Emergency Department Visits in
California
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH, Univesity of California, San Diego
Trends in ED Practice Intensity Among Medicare Beneficiaries
Laura G. Burke, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
OR AL ABSTR ACTS — M AY 10-13, 2016
SAEM16 OR AL ABSTR ACTS
PEDIATRICS AND PSYCHIATRY
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Keri Carstairs, MD, University of California, San Diego, Rady
Children’s Hospital - San Diego
19
20
21
22
Early Lactate Level is Associated with 28-Day Mortality in
Pediatric Sepsis
Halden F. Scott, MD, University of Colorado School of Medicine
National Epidemiology of Pediatric Injuries Related to Two-Wheeled
Motorized Recreational Vehicles Presenting to U.S. Emergency Departments
Courtney M. C. Jones, PhD, MPH, University of Rochester School of Medicine
and Dentistry
Prospective Evaluation of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied
Research Network (PECARN) Cervical Spine Injury Risk Factors
Julie C. Leonard, MD, MPH, Nationwide Children’s Hospital
ED Utilization Prior to a Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury Related
ED Visit
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH, Univesity of California, San Diego
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University College of
Human Medicine
23
24
25
26
Time-to-Antibiotics for Critically Ill Patients with Suspected Severe
Sepsis is Significantly Longer for Pediatric Patients than Adults
Erin Tromble, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
Survival Benefit and Cost Savings from Emergency Department
Compliance with a Basic 3-Hour Sepsis Bundle in a Multisite,
Prospective, Observational Study
Daniel Leisman, BS, North Shore University Hospital
Evaluation of Intravascular Volume Status Using Dynamic Respiratory
Induced Bioimpedance of the Limb
Mohamad Hakam Tiba, MD, MS, University of Michigan
Early Epinephrine in In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with an Initial
Shockable Rhythm: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis
Lars W. Andersen, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
Moderator: Jody Vogel, MD, Denver Health Medical Center
13
Identification of Frequent Emergency Department Users Increases
with Increased Health Information Exchange Size
Xiao Han, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
*Disclaimer: Abstracts are placed in the program how they were submitted to SAEM.
53
OR AL ABSTR ACTS — M AY 10-13, 2016
THURSDAY, MAY 12
EMS AND TRAUMA
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jody Vogel, MD, Denver Health Medical Center
27
28
29
30
Pre-Hospital Midazolam for Treatment of Status Epilepticus Before
and After RAMPART: A National Observational Cohort Study
Eytan Shtull-Leber, BS, University of Michigan
The Association of CT Findings with Repeated Measurements of
Serum Biomarker Levels in Patients with Acute Mild to Moderate
Traumatic Brain Injury
Morgan M. Ellis, MS, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center
Factors Associated with Discharge Home After Interhospital ED to ED
Transfer for Trauma
Laura N. Medford-Davis, MD, University of Pennsylvania Health System Hospital of
the University of Pennsylvania
A Randomized Controlled Trial of the FAST Examination in Children
with Blunt Torso Trauma
James F. Holmes, MD, MPH, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH AND AIRWAY/
ANESTHESIA/ANALGESIA
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Colleen Marie McQuown, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
31
32
33
34
Facilities and Operational Characteristics of U.S. Freestanding EDs:
Results of a National Survey
Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School
State Regulations of Freestanding Emergency Departments Vary
Widely
Catherine Gutierrez, BS, Harvard Medical School
Opioid Prescriptions by Emergency Physicians in Ohio, 2010 to 2014
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Emergency Departments Demonstrate Large Provider and Facility
Variation in Opioid Prescriptions for Discharged Patients
Michael J. Ward, MD, MBA, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION AND NEUROLOGY
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Joseph Miller, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
35
36
37
38
The Clear Trials: A Pooled Analysis of rt-PA Plus Eptifibatide for
Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke
Danielle Cornwall, BIS, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Efficacy of Tranexemic Acid at a Wide Range of Concentrations in the
Setting of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induced Hyperfibrinolysis
Deep Patel, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
The Association of Blood Pressure Changes During the First 24 Hours
Post-Acute Ischemic Stroke with 90-Day Functional Outcomes
Valerie H. Mika, MS, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center
Patient and Environmental Factors Associated with Delayed
Presentations to Emergency Department After Onset of Stroke
Symptoms
Stacy A. Trent, MD, MPH, Denver Health Medical Center
INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Edward Panacek, MD, MPh, South Alabama
39
54
Antibiotic Stewardship of Acute Respiratory Infections in the
Emergency Department
Christie Sun, MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
40
41
42
CURB-65 Performance Among Admitted and Discharged Emergency
Department Patients with Community Acquired Pneumonia
Adam L. Sharp, MD, Kaiser Permanente Southern California Los Angeles Medical Center
Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Point-of-Care Lactate Testing in
the Emergency Department
Michael J. Ward, MD, MBA, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Utilization of Single Dose of Oral Prednisone in the Treatment of Cellulitis
Scott I. Goldstein, DO, Albert Einstein Healthcare Network
IMAGING
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey Chien, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital &
Methodist Hospital
43
44
45
46
Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism Using Tricuspid Annular Plane
Systolic Excursion on Bedside Echocardiogram
James Daley, MD, MPH, Yale-New Haven Medical Center
The Effect of Clinical Decision Support on the Use and Yield of
Computed Tomography for Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in the
Emergency Department: A Multi-Center Trial
Angela M. Mills, MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine,
Department Of Emergency Medicine
Inter-Observer Variability and Visual Estimation of Tricuspid Annular
Plane Systolic Excursion in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary
Embolism in the Emergency Department
James Daley, MD, MPH, Yale-New Haven Medical Center
Radiation Dose Index for Pulmonary Embolism CT Exams in the
United States
Angela M. Mills, MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
CLINICAL DECISION GUIDELINES AND HEALTH POLICY AND
HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Yale University School of Medicine
47
48
49
50
Optimizing Clinical Decision Support in the Electronic Health Record:
Clinical Characteristics Associated with the Use of a Decision Tool for
Disposition of ED Patients with Pulmonary Embolism
Dustin W. Ballard, MD, MBE, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals
Validation of a Prediction Rule for Adverse Cardiovascular Events from
Drug Overdose
Alex F. Manini, MD, MS, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Emergency Physician Adherence to Guideline-Based Therapy in a High
Fidelity Simulation of Hypertensive Neurologic Emergencies
Taneisha Wilson, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
Impact of Hospital Ownership and Expected Payer on Admission and
Workup for Emergency Department Patients with Chest Pain
Carl T. Berdahl, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Keck School of Medicine
of USC
EMS
Thursday, May 12 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: James Paxton, MD, Wayne State University
51
52
53
54
Prehospital Provider Assessment of “Chest Pain” Chief Complaints as
Non-Cardiac Events
Robert Edmonds, MD, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine
Prehospital ProvidersÕ Performance in Identification of ST-Segment
Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI)
Justin Steinberg, MD, MBA, Hennepin County Medical Center
EMS Trends in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Trials Since 1975
Derick David Jones, MD, MBA, Mayo Clinic
Regionalization af Acute Stroke Care and Treatment Outcomes:
Trends Over a Five Year Period
Prasanthi Govindarajan, MD, MBBS, MAS, Stanford University School of Medicine
Moderator: William Toon, EdD, NRP, Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue and Emergency Management
55
56
57
58
Assessing Factors Associated with Pediatric Frequent Emergency
Department Utilization
Benjamin Supat, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of California San Diego
Potentially Avoidable Pediatric Transfer is Common for High-Risk
Conditions in Rural Emergency Departments
Karisa K. Harland, PhD, MPH, University of Iowa College of Medicine
Adverse Events in the Pediatric Emergency Department
Lisa Calder, MD, MSc, University of Ottawa
Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and
Endotracheal Intubation
William Loker, MD, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
68
69
70
CARDIOVASCULAR AND DISEASE/INJURY PREVENTION
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Karisa Harland, University of Iowa
71
72
EMS AND GERIATRICS
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
73
Moderator: Colleen Marie McQuown, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
59
60
61
62
A Prospective Study of Patients Receiving Prehospital Ketamine for
Profound Agitation
Jon B. Cole, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
Incidence of Outcomes Based on Field Triage in Older Adults with
Blunt Head Trauma Transported by EMS
Daniel K. Nishijima, MD, MAS, UC Davis, School of Medicine
Diagnosis of Elder Abuse in U.S. Emergency Departments
Christopher Scott Evans, BS, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings
School of Global Public Health
Health Care Utilization in Older Patients Visiting the ED for Mental
Health Conditions
Ana Castaneda-Guarderas, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic
74
Moderator: Nicholas M. Mohr, MD, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
75
77
Moderator: Richard H. Sinert, DO, SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn
63
64
65
66
High Sensitivity Troponin Measurements in Patients with Acute NonACS Cardiac and Non-Cardiac/ Unknown Origin Diagnoses: Results
from the TRAPID-AMI Trial
Richard M. Nowak, MD, Henry Ford Health System
Derivation of a 2-Hour High-Sensitivity Troponin T Algorithm for Rapid
Rule-Out of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Emergency Department
Chest Pain Patients
Andrew McRae, MD, PhD, University of Calgary
Predicting Short-Term Arrhythmia or Death Among Emergency
Department Patients with Syncope: The Canadian Syncope
Arrhythmia Risk Score
Venkatesh A. Thiruganasambandamoorthy, MBBS, CCFP-EM, Department of
Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa
Short-Term Risk of Arrhythmias Among Emergency Department
Syncope Patients with Atrial Fibrillation
Venkatesh A. Thiruganasambandamoorthy, MBBS, CCFP-EM, Department of
Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 2
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: M. Kit Delgado, MD, University of Pennsylvania Health System
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
67
Short-Term Clinical Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients Discharged
from the ED Within an Integrated Healthcare Delivery System
Dana Sax, MD, MPH, The Permanente Medical Group
Comparison of the Rate of Missed Myocardial Infarctions in ED
Patients Categorized as Low-Risk by Heart, TIMI, and Grace Scores
Adam J. Singer, MD, Stony Brook University
Medication Adherence in the Emergency Department: What are the
Barriers?
Christopher J. Coyne, MD, University of California San Diego
Does a Brief Intervention Reduce Drug Use and Increase Drug
Treatment Utilization Among Adult Emergency Department Patients
Over a One-Year Period?
Roland Clayton Merchant, MD, MPH, ScD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
AEM/HEALTH POLICY/PULMONARY/INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
76
CARDIOVASCULAR
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Hospital Selection Changes Case-Mix for Rural Hospitals Among
Patients with Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock
Nicholas M. Mohr, MD, University of Iowa College of Medicine
Cost-Implications of Hospital Variation in Observation Service
Utilization for Suspected Acute Coronary Syndromes
Arjun K. Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Yale University School of Medicine
Emergency Physician Attitudes and Knowledge of ACEP’s Choosing
Wisely Recommendations
Michelle P. Lin, MD, MPH, SM, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
OR AL ABSTR ACTS — M AY 10-13, 2016
PEDIATRICS
Thursday, May 12 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
78
Physician Perceptions of Disease States and Death
Ryan Kindervater, DO, Albany Medical College
ED Visits and Patient-Reported Quality of Life
Donna L. Carden, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville
Comparison of Biomarkers in Patients with Acute Submassive
Pulmonary Embolism Treated With Fibrinolysis vs. Placebo at ThreeMonth Follow-Up
Lauren K. Stewart, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) as a Negative Regulator of
Innate Immunity
Shu Zhu, M.D., Ph.D., North Shore University Hospital
RESEARCH DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/STATISTICS/SIMULATION/
TOXICOLOGY/ENVIRONMENTAL
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: William Toon, EdD, NRP, Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue and Emergency Management
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80
81
82
Scholarly Productivity and Impact: Developing a Quantifiable, NormBased Benchmark for Academic Emergency Departments
Stephen E. Higgins Jr., BS, University of Massachusetts Medical School,
Department of Emergency Medicine
Emergency Medicine Milestones: Statistical Approaches to Agreement
Kerry K. McCabe, MD, Boston University School of Medicine
Development of an Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellowship
Consensus Curriculum: Initiative for the Society of Academic
Emergency Medicine Simulation Academy
Alise Frallicciardi, MD, Hartford Hospital
A Novel Adsorbent System Rapidly Clears Amlodipine from
Human Blood
Vincent Capponi, MS, CytoSorbents Corporation
Presentations for Hypoglycemia Associated with Diabetes Mellitus
to Emergency Departments in a Canadian Province: A Database and
Epidemiological Analysis
Chris Alexiu, BSc, University of Alberta
55
OR AL ABSTR ACTS — M AY 10-13, 2016
FRIDAY, MAY 13
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 3
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Colleen Marie McQuown, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
83
84
85
86
Associations of Emergency Department Length-of-Stay with Publicly
Reported Quality-of-Care Measures
Benjamin Sun, MD, MPP, Oregon Health & Science University
Why Wait? An Econometric Analysis of the Supply of Emergency
Department Care
Ari Benjamin Friedman, PhD, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics,
University of Pennsylvania
Emergency Department Visits Post-Joint Replacement in an Era of
Mandatory Bundled Payments
Susan M. Nedza, MD, MBA, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
TeleHealth in Emergency Medicine: A Descriptive Analysis
Sarah A. Sterling, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
PEDIATRICS AND ULTRASOUND
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Nottoway/4th Floor
Moderator: TBA
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88
89
90
Is Ultrasound Non-Inferior to Computed Tomography for
Pediatric Appendicitis?
Mamata Kene, MD, MPH, The Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente
Fremont Medical Center
The Outcome Predictive Power of Focused Echocardiography in
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis
Eric Chou, MD, Maimonides Medical Center
The Diagnostic Utility of Carotid Flow Time Before and After Passive
Leg Raise in Identifying Volume Status
Murteza Shahkolahi, MD, George Washington University School of Medicine and
Health Sciences
A Prospective, Randomized Control Trial of Ultrasound Guided
Radial Arterial Catheter Placement Versus the Standard Technique
by EM Residents
Casey Wilson, MD, Johns Hopkins Hospital
IMAGING/HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Waterbury Ballroom/2nd Floor
Moderator: Christopher Kabrhel, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
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92
93
94
56
Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Hydronephrosis in Emergency
Department Patients with Acute Renal Colic
Grant Innes, MD, Foothills Hospital/University of Calgary
In Support of Choosing Wisely: Variation in CT Ordering for Patients
Presenting to Emergency with Minor Head Injury
Daniel Grigat, MA, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary
Risk Adjustment Substantially Impacts Emergency Physician CT
Utilization Profiling
Arjun K. Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Yale University School of Medicine
Condition Specific Variation in Emergency Physician CT Utilization:
Implication for Quality Improvement
Richard Andrew Taylor, MD, MHS, Yale University School of Medicine
INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND PEDIATRICS
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Nottoway/4th Floor
Moderator: TBA
95
96
97
98
Effect of Epithelial Cell Contamination on Urine Culture Prediction
Patrick J. Maher, MD, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
Can Clean-Catch Urine in Infants Really Be Caught... And Clean?
Arielle L_vy, MD, MEd, CHU Sainte-Justine
The Predictive Value of Fever in Diagnosing Bacteremia in the
Pneumococcal and HIB Vaccine Era
Eric Boccio, BS, Stony Brook University
Risk of Bacterial Co-infections in Febrile Infants _ 60 Days Old with
Documented Viral Infections
Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA, Children’s Hospital of Michigan / Wayne State
University
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH/DISEASE/
INJURY PREVENTION
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Waterbury Ballroom/2nd Floor
Moderator: Zachary Franklin Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc, Penn MedicineDepartment Of Emergency Medicine
99
Cost Effectiveness of Emergency Department-Initiated Treatment for
Opioid Dependence
Gail D’Onofrio, MD, Yale School of Medicine
100 Predictors of Emergency Department Discharge with an Opioid
Prescription: Prescribing Opioids Safely in the Emergency Department
(POSED) Study
Kathryn Hawk, MD, Yale University College of Medicine, Department of Emergency
Medicine
101 Prescription Opioid and Benzodiazepine Overdose: Are Prescribers
Being Informed?
Benjamin Graboyes, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
102 The Effect of Physician Workload on Prescription of Opioids at
Discharge in Five Emergency Departments
Michael J. Ward, MD, MBA, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
HEALTH POLICY/HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH/PEDIATRICS/ABDOMINAL/GASTROINTESTINAL/GENITOURINARY
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Nottoway/4th Floor
Moderator: Ari B. Friedman, PhD, University of Pennsylvania
103 To Intubate or Not to Intubate: Emergency Medicine Physicians’
Perspective on Intubating Critically Ill, Terminal Cancer Patients
Kenneth Kim, MD, University of California, Irvine
104 A Randomized Controlled Trial on Oral Analgesic Utilization for
Children Presenting with a Musculoskeletal Trauma in the Emergency
Department
Amy Drendel, DO, MSc, Medical College of Wisconsin
105 Trends in CT Utilization for Emergency Department Patients with
Abdominal Pain
Andrew C. Meltzer, MD, George Washington University School of Medicine and
Health Sciences
106 Acute Kidney Injury Following Contrast Enhanced CT in the ED: A
Controlled Retrospective Analysis
Jeremiah S. Hinson, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins Hospital
MAY 10-13 — NEW ORLEANS, LA
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
IMAGING AND ULTRASOUND
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Dave Milzman, MD, FACEP, Georgetown University School
of Medicine
107 CT Risk Disclosure: A Practice in Evolution
Jennifer R. Marin, MD, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
108 Overutilization of Computed Tomography Angiography for Acute
Aortic Dissection: Identifying Additional Need for a Reliable Screening
Biomarker.
Sean Wilson, MD, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
109 Variation in Advanced Imaging for Pediatric Patients with Abdominal
Pain
Kimberly Bogard Horner, MD, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC
110 Portable Chest X-Ray Utilization in the Emergency Department
Ryan Bonner, Medical Student, Loyola University School of Medicine
111 Effect of Incorporating a Risk Stratification Decision Support Tool
into the Electronic Medical Record on the Utilization and Accuracy of
CT Angiogram in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency
Department
Jeffrey Scott Dubin, MD, MBA, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
112 CT Utilization Among Repeat Visit Patients with Head Injury in the ED
Benjamin N. Garren, Medical Student, Carilion Clinic - Virginia Tech Carilion
113 Patterns of Use of Cervical Spine Decision Rules Installed in EHR
Imaging Order
Bradley D. Gordon, MD, Regions Hospital
114 Variation in Hospital-Level ED Admission is Reduced After Accounting
for Local and Community Factors
Leah S. Honigman Warner, MD, MPH, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Medical Center
115 Clinical Ultrasound Fellowships: A Survey Study of Graduates’
Characteristics and Career Paths
Katja Goldflam, MD, Yale University School of Medicine
CLINICAL OPERATIONS 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jean Sun, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
116 Improved Emergency Department Quality Metrics, Patient Satisfaction
Scores, and Revenue Following Implementation of Lean Flow
Principles and Queuing Theory-Based Operational Changes
Keri L. Carstairs, MD, University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s
Hospital
117 Effect of an Electronic Medical Record Dashboard on Provider
Performance of Select Clinical Efficiency Measures
AJ Kirk, MD, John Peter Smith Hospital
118 A Comparison of Satisfaction Scores for Patients Admitted vs.
Discharged from the Emergency Department
Lindsey Remme, DO, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
119 A Triple Burden of Disease Revealed by Pilot Prospective Registry in a
Major East Africa Accident and Emergency Department
Justin G. Myers, DO, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
120 Assessing the Patient Experience of Care at Freestanding Emergency
Departments Affiliated with Academic Hospitals
Erin L. Simon, DO, Akron General Medical Center - a Cleveland Clinic Hospital/NEOMED
121 Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity
Connie S. Strouse, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
122 Impact of Scribes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Heather A. Heaton, MD, Mayo Clinic
123 Applying LEAN to Improve Throughput Metrics in a Pediatric
Emergency Department
Konstantinos Agoritsas, MD, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/Kings County Hospital
124 Comprehension of Video versus Standard Written Instructions for
Patients Discharged with a Diagnosis of Abdominal Pain from an Inner
City Emergency Department
Brandon Price, MD, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
SAEM16 LIGHTNING OR ALS
Moderator: Ana Marie Navio Serrano, MD, Alcala School of Medicine
125 Are There Differences in Survival Between Neighbourhoods for Outof-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Vancouver, British Columbia?
David Barbic, MD, University of British Columbia
126 Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Monitoring During Cardiac Arrest: A
Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Alexis Cournoyer, MD, Universite de Montreal
127 Comparison of Hydroxocobalamin Versus Norepinephrine Versus
Saline in a Swine Model of Severe Septic Shock
Joseph Maddry, MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center, U.S. Army Institute of
Surgical Research
128 Point-of-Care Cardiac Ultrasound during Advanced Cardiac Life
Support Simulation is Associated with Longer Pulse Check Times.
Jeremy S. Faust, MD, MS, Department of Emergency Medicine, Icahn School of
Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital
129 Association Between Compression Rates During Cardiopumonary
Resuscitation and Clinical Outcomes
J. Hope Kilgannon, MD, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
130 The Effect of Therapeutic Hypothermia on Arrhythmia Substrates
During Resuscitation in a Model of Ischemic Cardiac Arrest
Matthew McCauley, BS, Case Western Reserve University (MetroHealth)
131 Chest Compressions Over the Left Ventricle Improve End Tidal Carbon
Dioxide Levels While Using Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon
Occlusion of the Aorta in a Swine Model of Traumatic Cardiac Arrest
Kenton L. Anderson, MD, Baylor College of Medicine
132 Cytochrome C Levels in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients
Lars W. Andersen, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
133 Remote Ischemic Conditioning To Reduce Reperfusion Injury During
Acute STEMI: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis
Sheldon Cheskes, MD, CCFP-EM, FCFP, University of Toronto
GERIATRICS 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Sanjey Gupta, MD, New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens/
Cornell University Medical College
134 Older Adults and High Risk Medication Administration in the
Emergency Department: Who is at Risk?
Mitchell Kim, MD, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
135 Prehospital and Emergency Department Predictors of Toxicity in
Pediatric Bupropion Exposures
Pieter H. Scheerlinck, MD, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine
136 Rapid Cooling to 34°C is Not Associated with Improved Neurological
Outcome Among Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients
David A. Pearson, MD, MS, Carolinas Medical Center
137 Efficacy of a Clinical Decision Unit in Avoiding 30-Day Hospital
Readmission of Geriatric Patients
Sabrina Rahman, MD, Long Island Jewish Medical Center
138 Depression Screening for Older Adults in the Emergency Department
Sarah A. Levy, BA, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
57
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
139 Screening and Referral for Depression in a New Senior Emergency
Department: A Prospective Pilot Study of 6,317 Patients
Scott Mueller, DO, St. Mary Mercy Hospital/Michigan State University
140 ED Visits Without Hospitalization are Associated with Functional
Decline in the Elderly
Justine M. Nagurney, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale-New Haven
Hospital
141 Factors Associated with Hospital Admissions for Older Adults
Receiving Care in United States Emergency Departments
Alexander X. Lo, MD, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
142 Predictors of Successful Telephone Follow-Up After an ED Visit and
Implications for Geriatrics Research and Clinical Reassessment
Marija Lum, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Yale University School of Medicine
143 Concentration of ED Utilization Among Medicare Beneficiaries
Laura G. Burke, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical
School
144 The Increased Likelihood of 30-Day Emergency Department Revisit
and Hospital Readmission Among Homeless Patients with Mental
Health Conditions
Chun Nok Lam, MPH, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine
145 Primary Care Access for Medicaid Patients with Depression in the
Emergency Department
Cara Bergamo, MD, Denver Health Medical Center
146 Barriers and Service for Frequent Emergency Department Users
Jennifer A. Frey, PhD, Summa Akron City Hospital
147 Health Literacy and Patient Activation in an Urban Emergency
Department
Alexander T. Janke, BS, Wayne State University School of Medicine
148 Patient Activation Among Frequent Users of the Emergency
Department
Justin C. Bedford, BS, Wayne State University School of Medicine
EDUCATION 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jean Sun, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
149 Emergency Medicine Milestones: Longitudinal Agreement Between
Faculty Assessment and Resident Self-Evaluation
Alan H. Breaud, MPH, Boston Medical Center
150 Educational Innovation—Application of the Flipped Classroom to
Pediatric Education in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum
Emily Rose, MD, University of Southern California/LAC+USC Medical Center
151 Resident Education in 2015: National Trends in Clinical Rotation Curricula
Among ACGME Accredited Emergency Medicine Residency Programs
Charlotte C. Lawson, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
152 Assessing Resident Error in the Emergency Department
Jamie L. Adler, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
153 Impact of EMR Discharge Notifications on Rates of Patient Follow-Up
and Treatment of Hypertension: A Retrospective Cohort
Kendal Farrar, MD, Regions Emergency Medicine Residency
154 Relationship Between Feedback Behavior and Faculty Rank
Aleksandr M. Tichter, MD, MS, New York Presbyterian Hospital
EMS 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Colleen Marie McQuown, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
155 Inter-Observer Agreement in Pediatric Cervical Spine Injury (CSI)
Risk Assessment Between Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and
Emergency Department (ED) Providers
Julie C. Leonard, MD, MPH, Nationwide Children’s Hospital
58
156 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Providers’ Beliefs Regarding
Spinal Precautions for Pediatric Trauma Transport
Cindy D. Chang, BS, The Ohio State University College of Medicine
157 EMS Provider Assessment of Comorbid Conditions and Medication
History in Injured Older Adults
Courtney Marie Cora Jones, PhD, MPH, University of Rochester School of Medicine
and Dentistry
158 Early Emergency Outcomes of Patients Attended by Paramedics and
Not Transported to Hospital
Drew Richardson, FACEM, Australian National University
159 Authority for Expanded Scope of Practice for Community Paramedics:
A National Systematic Legal Review
Melody Glenn, MD, Maricopa Medical Center
160 Innovations in Prehospital Delivery Models Incorporating Telehealth:
The City of Houston Emergency Medical Services ETHAN Program
James Robert Langabeer, PhD, EMT, The University of Texas Health Science
Center At Houston Medical School
CARDIOVASCULAR 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Hospital Queens
161 Causes of Elevated Troponins in The Emergency Department and Their
Associated Mortality
Stephen Meigher, BA, Stony Brook University
162 Can Types 1 and 2 Myocardial Infarction be Distinguished Based on
Serial Troponin?
Adam J. Singer, MD, Stony Brook University
163 Miss Rate of Type 1 Myocardial Infarctions When Applying the 2014
NSTEMI Biomarker Guidelines
Nicholas J, Rademacher, MD, Johns Hopkins Hospital
164 Screening Performance of Trigger Criteria for an Early ECG to
Diagnoses STEMI
Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom, MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University
165 The Diagnostic Accuracy of Emergency Physicians And Cardiologists
Interpreting Potential STEMI ECGs
David Barbic, MD, University of British Columbia
166 Decreased Time From 911 Call to PCI Among Patients Experiencing a
STEMI Results in a Decreased One Year Mortality
Patrick M. Jackson, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
THURSDAY, MAY 12
AIRWAY/ANESTHESIA/ANALGESIA
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Nicholas D. Caputo, MD, MSc, Lincoln Medical and
Mental Health Center
167 Bedside Echocardiography and Mitral Valve Inflow Velocity Variation
in the Diagnosis of Elevated Intrapericardial Pressure and Cardiac
Tamponade.
Cristiana L. Olaru, MD, Penn Medicine-Department of Emergency Medicine
168 Derivation of a Bundle to Improve First Attempt Success at Intubation
in the Intensive Care Unit
Melissa Kelsey, DO, University of Arizona
169 First Attempt Success at Intubation is Associated with a Lower Odds
of Adverse Events in the ICU
Jeremy Greenberg, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
170 Reason for Failed Attempts at Laryngoscopy Differs Between Video
and Direct Laryngoscopes
Duncan Johnston, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
171 Derivation and Validation of a Predictive Model of Difficult Intubation
in the Prehospital Setting: Prehospital Difficult Airway Identification
Tool (PreDAIT)
Jestin N. Carlson, MD, St. Vincent Hospital
EDUCATION 2
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Ryan Lafollette, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
173 She Said, He Said - Resident Perceptions of Gender and Leadership in
Acute Resuscitations: A Qualitative Analysis
Jasmine S. Mathews, MD, Boston Medical Center
174 Emergency Medicine Morbidity and Mortality Conference and Culture
of Safety: The Resident Perspective
Kathleen Wittels, MD, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School
175 USMLE Scores Predict Success in ABEM Initial Certification
Elie Harmouche, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
176 Comparisons of Clinical Training in 2015: 3-and-4 Year Emergency
Medicine Programs
Andrea Goode, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
177 The Impact of a Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) on
The Diagnosis, Treatment and Outcomes in Patients with Severe
PE Over Time
Rachel Rosovsky, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
178 Financial Implications of the EM Interview Season
Jeffrey Todd Van Dermark, MD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
at Dallas
ECG RESEARCH/ABDOMINAL/GASTROINTESTINAL/GENITOURINARY
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Dave Milzman, MD, FACEP, Georgetown University
School of Medicine
179 S-Wave Voltage in V1 to V3 is Lower in Left Bundle Branch Block
Patients with Acute Left Anterior Descending Artery Occlusion
Kenneth W. Dodd, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
180 Effect of Electrolytes Other than Potassium on Electrocardiograms of
End Stage Renal Disease Patients
Heba Ramadan Gaber, MD, MSc, PhD (c), Baylor College of Medicine
181 Does a Single Dose Of 4mg IV Ondansetron Cause a Clinically
Prolonged QTc in the Undifferentiated Nauseated ED Patient?
Kai Li, MD, University of California, San Francisco
182 Does Readiness to Change Vary by Reason for Visit: Implications for
Targeted Screening for Risky Drinking in ED Patients
Cameron Crandall, MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine
183 Recent Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Abdominal Pain Younger Patients, More Repeat Visits, More Severe Pain
Andrew C. Meltzer, MD, MS, George Washington University School of Medicine and
Health Sciences
184 Emergency Department Utilization of Opioid Analgesics vs. Non-Opioid
Therapies for Abdominal Pain
Maryann E. Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
EMS 2
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Thomas Merryfield Jarrett, MD PhD, University Hospitals
Case Medical Center
185 Derivation and Validation of a Record Linkage Algorithm Between EMS
and the Emergency Department Using Machine Learning
Colby Redfield, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
186 Prospective Evaluation of an Expert Derived Deterministic Algorithm
to Match EMS Patient Care Reports to Emergency Department Records
Colby Redfield, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
187 Ambulance Utilization and Patient Cost Perceptions
Aamir Hussain, BA, University of Chicago
188 Do EMS Providers Accurately Ascertain Anticoagulant Use in Older
Adults with Head Trauma?
Daniel K. Nishijima, MD, MAS, UC Davis, School of Medicine
189 The Effect of Mechanical Ventilation of TBI Patients in the Prehospital
Setting
B. Woods Curry, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
190 Unstable Vital Signs Before Prehospital Rapid Sequence Intubation
(RSI) are Associated with Post-RSI Cardiac Arrest
Antonio Fernandez, PhD, NRP, FAHA, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 2
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Nicholas M. Mohr, MD, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
191 Factors Predicting 30-Day Revisit Following Discharge from an
Emergency Department Observation Unit
Michael J. Zdradzinski, BA, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
192 Forecasting Emergency Department Patient Admissions Utilizing
Machine Learning
Erkin Otles, BS, University of Wisconsin - Madison
193 The Prevalence of Emergency Department Visits that are Potentially
Treatable in Non-ED Settings
Aamir Hussain, BA, University of Chicago
194 Asymptomatic Hypertension in Urban EDs: Where are We Now?
Kimberly Souffront, PhD, FNP-BC, Mount Sinai Medical Center
195 Feasibility Analysis of Emergency Department Key Performance
Indicators in Ireland: Final Analysis
Abel Wakai, MD, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI)
196 Death in the Emergency Department: National Trends Over 15 Years
Hemal K. Kanzaria, MD, MS, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco
General Hospital
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
172 Use of Apneic Oxygenation in Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI)
Patients in the Emergency Department
Terrence Horan, MS, MPH, Hackensack University Medical Center
ULTRASOUND 1
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Benjamin D. Nicholson, Virginia Commonwealth University
197 Sonographically Measured Diaphragmatic Thickening Ratio is
Predicted by Demographic Parameters and Vital Signs in Healthy
Teenagers and Young Adults
Gabriel Rose, DO, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
198 Feasibility of Pneumoperitoneum Diagnosis using Point-of-Care
Ultrasound. A Pilot study using a Fresh Cadaver Model.
Meghan K. Herbst, MD, Hartford Hospital
199 Sidedness and the Effect of Respiration on the Measured Corrected
Flow Time of the Carotid Arteries
Michael Doctor, MD, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
200 The Waterfall Sign: A Novel Technique to Quantify BLines on M-Mode
Ultrasound
Damali Nakitende, MD, John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County
201 Emergency Physicians are Able to Detect Right Ventricular
Dysfunction
Matt Rutz, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
202 Computerized Detection of Abdominal Free Fluid in FAST Exams - A
Pilot Study
Megan M. Leo, MD, RDMS, Boston University School of Medicine
INFECTIOUS DISEASES 1
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Edward Panacek, South Alabama
203 Reduced Mortality of Emergency Department Patients with Early
Sepsis Stages After Achievement of All Performance Measures of a
Quality Improvement Program.
Bas De Groot, MD, PhD, Leiden University Medical Centre
59
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
204 Silent No Longer: Sepsis Recognition by Electronic Screening in the
Emergency Department
Cassandra A. Schandel, BS, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public
Health
205 Implementation of an Electronic ED Sepsis Screen and Alert: Effect on
Compliance with ED Sepsis Quality Measures
Cassandra A. Schandel, BS, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public
Health
206 Neurologic and Hemodynamic Outcomes in a Head Up Versus Supine
CPR Survival Model Of Porcine Cardiac Arrest
Johanna C. Moore, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
207 Does Use of a Sepsis Order Set Contribute to Unwarranted Antibiotic
Utilization?
Matthew Spanier, MD, Maine Medical Center
208 Usefulness of the Mortality in Severe Sepsis in The Emergency
Department Score in an Urban Tertiary Center
Denise E. McCormack, MD, MPH, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Kelly Klein, MD, UT Southwestern at Dallas
209 Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Receiving Prehospital Care
in Kigali, Rwanda
Naomi George, MD, Brown University
210 Patterns of Injury at a Public Referral Hospital in Ethiopia:
Opportunities for Injury Prevention and Improved Care
Adam Laytin, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
211 Prehospital Care in South Africa: Characterizing Complaints and
Response Type by Western Cape EMS
Zainab Raji, BA, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine
212 Recruitment Of 7,148 Patients For An Injury Registry In Ghana
F. E. Baiden, MBChB, PhD, Ensign College of Public Health
213 The Clinical Presentation, Resource Utilization, and Outcomes of
Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Presenting to the ED of the Muhimbili
National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Hendry R. Sawe, MD, MMED, MBA, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied
Sciences
214 Diagnostic Factors Associated with Constipation in Children
Presenting to the Emergency Department with Abdominal Pain
Hector Vazquez, MD, MSc, Maimonides Medical Center
PSYCHIATRY 1
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Lawrence A. DeLuca, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
215 Direct Cost of Emergency Department Care for Agitated Patients with
Schizophrenia or Bipolar Type I Disorder: A Retrospective Database
Study
Prina Donga, MS, Teva Pharmaceuticals
216 Recipient Hospital Responsibilities: EMTALA Citations for Deficiencies
Related to Psychiatric Emergencies, 2005-2014
Bridgette Wamakima, Medical Student, University of Southern California, Keck
School of Medicine
217 A Brief Assessment and Prognosis of Cognitive and Physical
Disabilities for Elderly ED Patients
Lori Ann Post, PhD, Yale University School of Medicine
218 Active Treatment of Psychiatric Patients in the ED Decreases Inpatient
Psychiatric Admission Rates and ED Length of Stay
Karen Murrell, MD, MBA, Kaiser Permanente
219 An Examination of Risk Factors for the Development of Posttraumatic
Stress Symptoms in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients
Navid Behrooz, MD, MS, New York Presbyterian Hospital of Columbia and Cornell
220 The Effect of Clinician-Patient Communication on Posttraumatic
Stress Symptoms in ACS Patients
Bernard P. Chang, MD, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center
60
PEDIATRICS 1
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Keri Carstairs, MD, UCSD/RCHSD
221 Pediatric Ambulance Use in the United States: The Role of Health
Insurance
Jacqueline Grace Bober, DO, SUNY Downstate / Kings County Hospital
222 Potentially Avoidable Pediatric Transfer is a Costly Burden for Rural
Families
Nicholas M. Mohr, MD, University of Iowa College of Medicine
223 Emergent or Not: Characterizing Adults Transferred Away from a FreeStanding Pediatric Emergency Department
Aaron E. Kornblith, MD, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
224 Primary Language and Return Visits in the Pediatric Emergency
Department
Melissa Schneider, MD, MSPH, Beaumont Health System
225 Pattern of Transfer of Pediatric Patients Within a Healthcare System
Isabel A. Barata, MD, North Shore University Hospital
226 Otitis Media Visits to the Emergency Department in Ages 0 to 21 Years
have Decreased from 1999 to 2015
Dhwani A. Patel, DO, Atlantic Health (Morristown)
INFECTIOUS DISEASES 2
Thursday, May 12 -10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University
227 High-Impact Hepatitis C Virus Testing for Injection Drug Users (HIT
IDU) in an Urban Emergency Department
Erik S. Anderson, MD, Stanford University
228 Urban Emergency Department Patients Lack General Knowledge of
Hepatitis C Virus Infection
Erik S. Anderson, MD, Standford University
229 Cascade of Care for Emergency Department Patients Identified with
Hepatitis C Virus Infection: An Evaluation of Longitudinal Outcomes
Erik S. Anderson, MD, Stanford University
230 HIV Disclosure Context: A Target for Enhancing Linkage to Care
Bijal Shah, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, Grady Memorial Hospital
231 Accuracy of Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in the Emergency
Department
Brent Lorenzen, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
232 Geriatric Observation Unit Protocols
Lauren T. Southerland, MD, The Ohio State University Hospital
TOXICOLOGY/ENVIRONMENTAL
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Mark B. Mycyk, MD, Northwestern Memorial Hospital
233 Propylene Glycol Reduces Acetaminophen Toxic Metabolite
Production in Humans Suggesting a Role for Decreasing Toxicity
Steven D. Salhanick, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical
School
234 Salicylate Poisoning: Risk Factors for Severe Outcome
Rachel M. Shively, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
235 Racial Disparities in the Treatment of Acute Overdose in the
Emergency Department
Marcee McRae, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
236 Cutting to the Chase: Observations on Debridement in Crotalid
Envenomation
Michael Anthony Darracq, MD, MPH, University of California, San Francisco Fresno
Medical Education Program, Department of Emergency Medicine
237 Rattlesnake Envenomation in Pediatric and Adult Patients
Michael Levine, MD, University of Southern California
238 20,000 Person-years Later: Long-term Mortality In A Large,
Population-Based, Regional Drowning Registry
Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
Moderator: Maryann E. Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD,
Penn Medicine-Department Of Emergency Medicine
239 Use of the PERC4 Model to Develop Targeted Suicide Screening Rulers
in the Emergency Department
Laurel C. Dezieck, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
240 Predictors of Hospital Admission for Patients Presenting to the
Emergency Department with Suicidal Ideation
Bernard P. Chang, MD, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center
241 Developing a Computerized Adaptive Suicide Screener
Edwin D. Boudreaux, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
242 Usability of the PROMIS Assessment In an Urban Emergency
Department
Edwin D. Boudreaux, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
243 Do Emergency Department Blood Cultures Influence Antibiotic
Therapy in Patients Diagnosed with Sepsis?
Nathaniel A. LaFleur, MD, HealthPartners Institute for Graduate Medical Education/
Regions Emergency Medicine Residency
244 Involuntary Psychiatric Holds in Young Children
Y. Liza Kearl, MD, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
TRAUMA
Thursday, May 12 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Dave Milzman, MD, FACEP, Georgetown University School of Medicine
245 Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta in Pediatric
Trauma Patients
Tatsuya Norii, MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine
246 The Addition of S100B to Clinical Decision Rules Improves the
Classification Accuracy for the Identification of Patients with Mild
Traumatic Brain Injury
Courtney Marie Cora Jones, PhD, MPH, University of Rochester School of Medicine
and Dentistry
247 Comparative Effectiveness of Etomidate Versus Ketamine for
Rapid Sequence Intubation of Adult Trauma Patients
Cameron P. Upchurch, BS, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
248 Pancuronium Improves Survival in a Rat Model of Severe
Parathion Poisoning
Steven B. Bird, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
249 Risk Factors for Undertriage of Serious Trauma in Patients Aged 65
and Older Presenting to the Emergency Department
Michael S. Radeos, MD, MPH, New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens/
Cornell University Medical College
250 Serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels are Associated with
Intracranial Hemorrhage in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients
Frederick K. Korley, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
AIRWAY/ANESTHESIA/ANALGESIA/INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Thursday, May 12 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Sophia Sheikh, MD, University of Florida
College of Medicine Jacksonville
251 Analysis of the Impact of Cardiopulmonary Comorbidities and
Medications on the Development of Post Intubation Hypotension
Michael Marchick, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville
252 Can We Decrease the Pain of Peripheral Intravenous Line Placement
in Adults by Vapocoolant Spray? A Prospective, Randomized, Blinded,
Placebo-Controlled Trial
Sharon E. Mace, MD, Cleveland Clinic
253 Systematic Review of the Use of Low-Dose Ketamine for Analgesia in
the Emergency Department
Gauri Ghate, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa
254 Effect of Pharmacist Education on Adherence to an Analgosedation
Protocol for Post-Intubation Sedation in the Emergency Department
Arvind Venkat, MD, Allegheny General Hospital
255 Chronic Pain Treatment Plans Reduce Opioid Administration and
Emergency Department Return Visits
Damon Cashman, MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
256 Models to Predict Hospital Admission from the Emergency
Department Through the Sole Use of The Medication Administration
Record
Jordan L. Swartz, MD, MA, New York University School of Medicine
CARDIOVASCULAR 2
Thursday, May 12 -11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Hospital Queens
257 Dyspnea in Acute Heart Failure: Is there an Association with
Neurohumoral Activation?
Peter S. Pang, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
258 The HEART Pathway Randomized Controlled Trial: One-Year Safety
Outcomes
Simon A. Mahler, MD, MS, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
259 Evaluation of Potential Disparities in Testing by Race and Ethnicity in
the Emergency Department Observation Unit
Alison Frizell, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
260 Female Patients are Less Likely to Undergo Cardiac Catheterization in
the Emergency Department Observation Unit
Alison Smith, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
261 Involving Patients with Low-Risk Chest Pain in Discharge Decisions: A
Multicenter Trial
Erik P. Hess, MD MSc, Mayo Clinic
262 Multivariate Analysis of 30-Day Readmission for Acute Myocardial
Infarction
Daniel L. Spinosa, Medical Student, University of California San Diego
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
PSYCHIATRY 2
Thursday, May 12 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
EDUCATION 3
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Ryan Lafollette, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
263 Comparison of Malpractice Claims Involving Emergency Medicine
Residents to Attending-Only Claims
Kiersten Lynn Gurley, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical
School
264 Use of an Interactive Just-in-Time Checklist Tool Improves Technical
Performance and Team Communication During Transvenous
Pacemaker Performance in Simulated Patients: A Randomized,
Controlled Trial
Jeremy B. Branzetti, MD, University of Washington
265 Improving Emergency Department Discharge Through a Simple
Algorithm Designed for Residents in Training: The R2D2 Disposition
Protocol
Jesse Hernandez, BA, UT Southwestern Medical Center
266 Distribution of Honors Grades Across 4<sup>th</sup> Year
Emergency Medicine Clerkships
Matthew Hall, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
267 Is Tolerance of Ambiguity Associated with Emergency Medicine
Clerkship Performance?
Matthew Malone, MD, University of Michigan
268 Asthma and Asthma-Mimicking Pediatric ED Revisit Within Three Days
of an ED Discharge
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH, University of California, San Diego
RESEARCH DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/STATISTICS
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Sunday Clark, ScD, MPH, Weill Cornell Medical College
269 Telemedicine Provides Non-Inferior Research Informed Consent for
Remote Enrollment: An Emergency Department-Based Randomized
Control Trial
Morgan R. Bobb, BS, University of Iowa Department of Emergency Medicine
61
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
270 Factors Influencing Emergency Medicine Patients’ Decision to Participate
in Clinical Research: Do They Vary From Other Clinical Specialties?
Anita Kurt, PhD, Lehigh Valley Health Network/Pennsylvania State University Hospital
271 Exclusion of Non-English Speakers in Emergency Medicine Research:
A Comparison of 2004 and 2014
Michael Brodeur, MD, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
272 Can You Trust Administrative Data? Accuracy of ICD-10 Diagnostic
Codes to Study Pulmonary Embolism
Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary
273 Assessing the Quality of Primary Outcomes for Randomized Controlled
Trials in Emergency Medicine
Lee M. Jablow, MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
274 Computerized Adaptive Depression Screening and Diagnosis in the
Emergency Department
Milkie Vu, MA, University of Chicago
ULTRASOUND 2
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: TBA
275 Effect of Prior Concussion on Sonographic Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter
Measurement After Undergoing Transient Intracranial Pressure Change
Ivan A. Morales, BS, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University
276 Variable Interpretation of Cardiac Standstill Among Physician Sonographers
Kevin Hu, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
277 Operating Characteristics of Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Identifying
Skin and Soft Tissue Abscesses in the Emergency Department
Sathyaseelan Subramaniam, MBChB, SUNY Downstate / Kings County Hospital
278 Retrospective Review of Ectopic Pregnancies Diagnosed by
Emergency Department Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)
Orinthia King, DO, New York Methodist Hospital
279 Competency Assessment of Emergency Medicine Resident Point-ofCare Ultrasound Performance
Viktoria Koskenoja, MD, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School
280 Low-Cost Non-Commercial Ultrasound Gels for use in Resource
Limited Settings
Alexandra M. Vinograd, MD, MSHP, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 3
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Elizabeth Burner, MD, USC Med Center
281 The Triage of Intoxicated Men by Non-Medical Personnel
Otis Warren, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
282 Emergency Prescribers and Rescue Naloxone: Results of a HealthSystem Survey
Tania Denise Shaffer Strout, PhD, Maine Medical Center
283 Emergency Medicine and Active Labor Act 2002-15: Review of Office
of Inspector General Patient Dumping Settlements
Mark I. Langdorf, MD, MHPE, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
284 Patterns in EMTALA Enforcement for Psychiatric Emergencies:
Temporal and Regional Variation Between 2005 and 2014
Sophie Terp, MD, MPH, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine
285 Does EMTALA Improve Hospital Quality? The Effect of EMTALA
Investigations and Citations on Hospital Core Measures
Michael Menchine, MD, MPH, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine
286 What Drives Prep Interest in At-Risk Urban Emergency Department Patients?
Kristi Stanley, MD, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine
EMS 3
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: William Toon, EdD, NRP, Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue and Emergency Management
62
287 EMS Providers Willingness to Respond in a Tactical Environment
Matthew Chovaz, MD, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
288 Factors Associated with the Need for Advanced Cardiac Care in
Prehospital Chest Pain Patients
Adam Jaque, MD, Albany Medical College
289 Prehospital and In-Hospital Chart Agreement for Patients with Chest
Pain
Stephanie Outterson, MSN, RN, The Sage Colleges
290 Prehospital HEART Score Predictive of 30-Day Adverse Cardiac Events
Stirling Harper, MD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
291 The Effect of Obesity and Actual Patient Weights on Prefilled
Medication Syringes Labeled with Color-Coded Volumes Based Dosing
of the Broselow Tape to Conventional Methods of Drug Administration
During Simulation
Hector Chavez, MD, Jackson Memorial Hospital
292 Allowing Treatment of a Subset of Moderate Risk Patients in
Low-Acuity Areas Can Eliminate Mismatch Between Demand and
Segmented Capacity
Elham Torabi, MSIE, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
CLINICAL DECISION GUIDELINES/HEALTH POLICY/
HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
293 Utilizing the EMR to Reduce Unnecessary Ordering of Coagulation
Studies for Patients with Chest Pain
Binoy Mistry, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
294 Not So Fast! Beta-Blockers Blunt Tachycardia in Pulmonary Embolism:
Implications for Clinical Decision Rules?
Cyrus K. Yamin, MD, Kaiser Permanente Division of Research
295 In Very Low Risk Chest Pain Patients, is Discharge from Emergency
Department Without Stress Testing Cost Effective?
Richard Paul, MD, St. John Hospital and Medical Center
296 Emergency Department-Based Assessment of Palliative Care Needs in
Adults with Heart Failure
Alexander X. Lo, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
297 Do Uninsured Patients in Illinois Have Higher Mortality After Trauma?
Paul Logan Weygandt, MD, MPH, Northwestern Medicine
298 Choosing Wisely Canada® : Five Tests, Procedures and Treatments to
Question in Emergency Medicine
Brian H. Rowe, MD, MSc, University of Alberta
PEDIATRICS 2
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Benjamin D. Nicholson, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University
299 Simulation and Web-Based Learning Increases Utilization of Bier
Block for Forearm Fracture Reduction in the Pediatric Emergency
Department
Brett Burstein, MD, PhD, The Montreal Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric
Emergency Medicine
300 Language Barrier Affect on Providing Timely Pain Management for
Long Bone Fractures in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Michelle Gaba, MD, MPH, Maimonides Medical Center
301 Effectiveness of Ultrasound in Identifying Pediatric Hand Fractures
Horton James Lee, MD, Children’s Hospital of New Jersey
302 Current Use of Steroids in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury
Tara Rhine, MD, MS, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
303 Can QuickBrain MRI Detect Acute Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries?
David C. Sheridan, MD, Oregon Health & Science University
304 Optimal Imaging Modality for Suspected Cranial Shunt Failure in
Pediatrics: A Clinical Decision Analysis
Jay Pershad, MD, MMM, University of Tennessee Health ScienceCenter and Le
Bonheur Children’s Hospital
Moderator: James Paxton, MD, Wayne State University
305 The Absence of Fever Predicts Higher Mortality and Decreased
Antibiotic and Intravenous Fluid Administration in Emergency
Department Patients with Septic Shock
Nicholas P. Granzella, MD, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
306 Translational Rat Model Identifies Vocalizations as a Screening Target
and Oxytocin Expressing Neurons as a Treatment Target of CocaineInduced Maternal Neglect
Thomas M. Jarrett, MD, PhD, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
307 Splenic Ultrasound Findings in Patients with HIV and TB: A Systematic
Review of the Literature
Jesse Schafer, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
308 Risk Factors for Isolated Femoral and Deep Femoral Vein Thromboses
Carl Alsup, MD, Thomas Jefferson University
309 A Standardized Handoff Tool in an International Environment:
Encouraging Efficient, Face-to-Face Handoff of Patients from
Emergency Medicine to Internal Medicine
Kamna S. Balhara, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Deptartment
of Emergency Medicine
310 External Validation of the DHAKA Score for Diagnosing Severe
Dehydration in Children with Acute Diarrhea
Adam C. Levine, MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
AEM/SOCIAL EMERGENCY/DISEASE/INJURY PREVENTION
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Kristin L. Rising, MD, MS, Thomas Jefferson University
311 Predictors of Follow-Up in a Transitional Care Clinic After Emergency
Department Discharge
Kailyn Robert Elliott, RN, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
312 Emergency Physician Empathy and Variation in CT Imaging Use
Elizabeth G.J. O’Brien, BS, Yale University School of Medicine
313 Physicians’ Motivations for Using Shared Decision-Making In the
Emergency Department: An Exploratory Qualitative Analysis
Elizabeth M. Schoenfeld, MD, Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of
Medicine
314 Perceptions of Emergency Care by Sexual and Gender Minorities in
Colorado: Assessing Barriers, Quality, and Factors Affecting Identity
Disclosure
William LaPlant, BS, Tufts University School of Medicine
315 Don’t Go Yet: An Analysis of Patients Who Leave Against Medical
Advice Across Emergency Departments in the United States
Taylor Nelp, BA, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
316 ED Utilization 3-Days Prior to a Fall-Related ED Visit Among Elderly
Patients
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH, University of California, San Diego
SIMULATION/ETHICS/OB-GYN/EDUCATION
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Walter L. Green, MD, University of Texas Southwestern
317 Simulation Cases are Less Stressful Only When Both Easy and Familiar
Taylor R. Spencer, MD, MPH, Albany Medical College
318 Simulation Training for the Management of Shoulder Dystocia
Kiel Melkus, DO, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
319 Emergency Physician Preferences for Antihypertensive Agents in a
High Fidelity Simulation of Hypertensive Neurological Emergencies
Moshe A. Stiebel, BSc, Medical Student, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical
Center
320 Presence of a Legally Authorized Representative in a Pre-Hospital
Observational Study of Patients Undergoing Chemical Sedation for Agitation
Johanna C. Moore, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
321 Outcome of an Intervention on Compliance with Recommended Breast
and Cervical Cancer Screenings Among Patients and Their Visitors in
The Emergency Department Utilizing Research Associates
Beau Abar, PhD, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
322 Do Emergency Department Providers Omit Pertinent Patient
Information During Verbal Handoffs?
Jean Elizabeth Sun, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
PEDIATRICS 3
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D2/3rd Floor
Moderator: TBA
323 Evaluation of a Midstream Urine Collection Technique for Infants in
The Emergency Department
Tighe Crombie, MB, BCh, BAO, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario
324 Knowledge, Attitudes and Barriers Regarding Provision of Preventive
Contraception in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Daisy A. Ciener, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin
325 Changes in Opioid Prescribing Patterns in the Pediatric Emergency
Department After the 2014 Food and Drug Administration Rescheduling
Corrie E. Chumpitazi, MD, Baylor College of Medicine
326 Trends in Naloxone Use in Pediatric Patients
Gregory Faris, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
327 The Effect of a Dedicated Psychiatry Team on Pediatric Emergency
Mental Health Care
John S Sheridan, MSW, LCSW, Oregon Health and Sciences University
328 Do Pediatric Patients with High Anxiety Have Behavioral Changes
After ED Procedural Sedation?
Jean I. Pearce, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION/INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY
MEDICINE/PSYCHIATRY
Thursday, May 12 - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 4
Thursday, May 12 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Aaron Brody, MD, Wayne State University
329 Emergency Department Overcrowding: Exploring the Attempts to
Avoid Presentation
Lynette D. Krebs, MPP, MSc, University of Alberta
330 Understanding of the Affordable Care Act by Hispanic vs.
Non-Hispanic Emergency Department Patients
Joni Shriver, DO, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
331 Identification and Referral of Emergency Department Patients with a
Presentation Suspicious for Underlying Malignancy
Renzhong Ran, BA, Baylor College of Medicine
332 Factors Associated with Thirty Day Mortality After an Outpatient
ED Visit
Laura G. Burke, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
333 Patient, Physician, and Environmental Factors Associated with
Adherence to Cardiovascular Clinical Practice Guidelines in the
Emergency Department
Stacy A. Trent, MD, MPH, Denver Health Medical Center
334 Readmission Variability Among Emergency Medicine Physicians
Andrew Lee, MHS, Carilion Clinic - Virginia Tech Carilion
FRIDAY, MAY 13
EMS AND ORTHOPEDICS
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Moira Davenport, MD, Allegheny General Hospital
335 Temporal and Geographic Characteristics of Synthetic Marijuana
Emergencies in a Metropolitan EMS System
Andrea Hearnsberger, MD, University of Texas-Austin Emergency Medicine
63
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
336 Impact of an Electronic Health Record Sepsis Screen on Antibiotic
Stewardship in the Emergency Department
Michael S. Pulia, MD, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and
Public Health
337 Implementation of National Professional Society Position
Statements on Pre-Hospital Termination of Resuscitation in
Statewide Treatment Protocols
David Schoenfeld, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
338 Airway Ultrasound for the Confirmation of Endotracheal Tube
Placement in Military Flight Medic Trainees
Erin Hanlin, MD, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium
339 Post-Splinting X-Rays of Non-Displaced Hand, Wrist, Ankle, and Foot
Fractures are Unnecessary
Jill C. Schuld, MD, Regions Hospital Emergency Medicine Residency
340 Patient Self-Awareness of Ankle Fracture
Colin Kenny, DO, St. Mary Mercy Hospital
TOXICOLOGY/ENVIRONMENTAL/RESEARCH DESIGN/
METHODOLOGY/STATISTICS
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Gillian A. Beauchamp, MD, University of Cincinnati
341 Emergency Department Utilization for Poisoning-Related Visits
Maryann E. Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD, MPH, MedStar Washington
Hospital Center
342 Efficacy of Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin or
Saline for Treatment of Severe Hydrogen Sulfide Toxicity in a Swine
(Sus Scorfa) Model
Joseph Maddry, MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center, U.S. Army, Institute of
Surgical Research
343 Characteristics of United States Emergency Department Visits for
Pediatric Foreign Body Aspirations
Sean Bandzar, Medical Student, Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine
344 CommunityRx: Connecting Health Care to Self Care in an Academic
Emergency Department on Chicago’s South Side
David G. Beiser, MD, University of Chicago
345 Violence Prevention Efforts: Methods to Retain Participants in Youth
Violence Research
Michael Clery, MD, MPP, University of Michigan
346 Intermountain Risk Score is Predictive of Hospital Admission and
Mortality in Emergency Department Patients.
Bradley J. Morris, PA-C, Intermountain Healthcare/University of Utah
PEDIATRICS 4
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Aaron Brody, MD, Wayne State University
347 Predictors of Thoracic Injury After Blunt Torso Trauma in Children
Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations
Robert P. Olympia, MD, Penn State University/Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
348 Management and Outcomes of Spontaneous
Pneumomediastinum in Children
Kathleen A. Noorbakhsh, MD, University of Pittsburgh
349 Reducing Medication Errors and Time in Vasoactive Drug
Preparation and Delivery During Pediatric Resuscitation:
A Randomized Controlled Trial
Johan Nicolas Siebert, MD, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Geneva
Children’s Hospital and University Hospitals of Geneva
350 Pediatric Critical Event Debriefing in Emergency Medicine
Training Programs
Mariann Nocera, MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
351 Utility of a Pediatric Early Warning Score to Identify Disposition of
Potential Septic Patients in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Amir Batman, MD, Beaumont Health System
352 An Emergency Department-Based Creatinine Clearance
Formula for Pediatric Patients
Marie-Carmelle Elie, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville
64
NEUROLOGY
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Orpheus/8th Floor
Moderator: Joseph Miller, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
353 Application of Hemorrhage After Thrombolysis to Predict Intracerebral
Hemorrhage and Outcome After Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic
Stroke in a Community Hospital Emergency Department
Kunal Patel, MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center
354 Time to tPA Administration and Association with 30-Day Readmission
and Mortality.
Anika Backster, MD, Emory University School of Medicine
355 Is tPA Hemorrhage Rate Higher in the “Real World” Setting?
Christopher Sampson, MD, University of Missouri-Columbia
356 Implementing Two Target:Stroke Best Practice Strategies: Effects on
Diagnosis and Treatment Times
Allison Chan, DO, Albert Einstein Healthcare Network
357 Geographic, Demographic and Socioeconomic Analysis of NIH
StrokeNet Research Network Population Coverage
Cemal B. Sozener, MD, University of Michigan
358 Pumping Against Gravity: Cardiac Function Affects Fluctuations
in Cerebral Blood Flow Caused by Head Position Change in Acute
Ischemic Stroke
Christopher Lee Price, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
CLINICAL OPERATIONS 2
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey A. Nielson, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
359 Treatment of Hyperkalemia (HK) in the ED: What Is The Standard?
Insights from the REVEAL-ED Trial
William Frank Peacock, MD, Baylor College of Medicine
360 Does Sepsis Bundle Compliance Really Matter?
Erik Reinold Hofmann, MD, University of Southern California/LAC+USC Medical
Center
361 Utility of Abdominal Plain Films for Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain in
Adult Emergency Department Patients.
Stuart Murray, MD, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
362 Impact of an Online Education Initiative to Reduce Hemolysis in ED
Lab Samples
Michael P. Phelan, MD, Cleveland Clinic
363 Validation and Evaluation of Pre-analytical Factors Associated with
Hemolysis in ED Blood Samples
Michael P. Phelan, MD, Cleveland Clinic
364 Hepatitis C Virus Screening Does Not Increase Emergency Department
Length of Stay for Patients Undergoing Laboratory Testing
Erik S. Anderson, MD, Highland Hospital - Alameda Health System
PULMONARY AND ULTRASOUND
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Vijaya A. Kumar, MD, Wayne State University
365 External Validation of the Hesta Criteria for Identifying Acute
Pulmonary Embolism Patients at Low-Risk of Early Mortality
Craig I. Coleman, PharmD, University of Connecticut
366 Pleuritic Chest Pain Independently Predicts Diagnosis of Pulmonary
Embolism Among ED Patients with Chest Pain
Chad Agy, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
367 Age-Adjusted Turbidimetric D-Dimer for Evaluating
Pulmonary Embolism
Jaclyn Gadbois, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
368 Intubation Rates for Adult Patients Ages 22-64 Have Not Changed
from 1999-2014: A Multicenter Study
Su Nguyen, MD, Texas A&M Health Science Center/Christus Spohn
369 Cost of Hypoglycemia Associated with Diabetes Mellitus:
A Systematic Review of the Literature
Chris Alexiu, BSc, University of Alberta
IMAGING AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Casey M. Clements, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic
371 The Clinical Utility of Routine Chest X-Rays During the Initial
Stabilization of Trauma Patients: A Retrospective Study
David Y. Ong, MD, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium
372 Early Child Care Biosurveillance is Equivalent to Google Flu Trends for
Prediction of Influenza in Michigan
Andrew N. Hashikawa, MD, MS, University of Michigan - Emergency Medicine
373 Low Risk Febrile Neutropenia: Can These Patients be Safely
Discharged from the Emergency Department?
Christopher J. Coyne, MD, University of California, San Diego
374 Can We Predict Severe Sepsis Outcomes Utilizing Shock Index?
Aveh Bastani, MD, Troy Beaumont Hospital
375 Sepsis Mortality: Sensitivities of EWS, AOD and Lactate
Allison Zanaboni, MD, Temple University School of Medicine
376 SAA Domain-Specific Peptide Antagonists Rescue Mice from
Lethal Sepsis
Wei Li, MD, PhD, North Shore University Hospital
NEUROLOGY/HEALTH POLICY/HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
Friday, May 13 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Orpheus/8th Floor
Moderator: TBA
377 The Utilization of Narcotic Analgesia in the Treatment of
Migraine Headaches
Jeremy Berberian, MD, Penn State University/Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
378 Multicenter Prevalence of Opiate Medication Use as Abortive Therapy
in the Emergency Department Treatment of Migraine Headaches
Neil Young, MD, University of Connecticut’s Integrated Residency in Emergency Medicine
379 The Utility of Serum Biomarkers in the Stratification of Mild Traumatic
Brain Injury
Derek T. Schloemann, BS, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
380 A Comparison of Satisfaction with Life and the Glasgow Outcome
Scale After Traumatic Brain Injury: An Analysis of the TRACK-TBI
Pilot Study
Natalie Paige Kreitzer, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
381 Baseline Variables Do Not Predict Poor Low Back Pain Outcomes 3
Months After an ED Visit for Acute, New Onset Low Back Pain
Andrew Yoon, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
382 Asymptomatic Hypertension in Urban EDs: Where Are We Now?
Kimberly Souffront, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
GERIATRICS 2
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: TBA
383 Advanced Illness Management for Hospice Patients in the
Emergency Department
Nancy S. Kwon, MD, MPA, Long Island Jewish Medical Center
384 Can a Simple Patient Flyer Drive Palliative Care Referrals from the
Emergency Department?
David Wang, MD, Stanford University Department of Emergency Medicine
385 Are Geriatric Patients Placed in an Emergency Department
Observation Unit on a Chest Pain Pathway More Likely than NonGeriatric Patients to Re-Present to the Hospital Within 30 Days?
Christopher Gruenberg, MD, Boston Medical Center Emergency Medicine Department
386 Delirium in the Emergency Department and Its Extension into
Hospitalization (DELINEATE) Study: Effect on 6-month Functional
Status and Cognition
Jin H. Han, MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
387 Disparities In The Treatment Of Pain In Cognitively Impaired Versus
Cognitively Intact Older Adults Presenting to the ED with Acute Hip Fracture
Andrew K. Chang, MD, MS, Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Montefiore Medical Center
388 Modifiable Risk Factors for Malnutrition Among Older Adults
Receiving Care in the Emergency Department
Timothy F. Platts-Mills, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
DISEASE/INJURY PREVENTION
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Vijaya Arun Kumar, MD, FAAFP, Wayne State University/
Detroit Medical Center
389 Assessment of Lethal Means Access Among Suicidal Emergency
Department Patients
Marian E. Betz, MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of
Colorado School of Medicine
390 Emergency Department Ultrasound Diagnosis of Small Bowel
Obstruction
Stas’ Haciski, MD, George Washington University School of Medicine and
Health Sciences
391 County Poverty and Unintentional Overdose Mortality: United States,
1999-2012
Rebecca Karb, MD, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
392 Leftover Opioid Analgesics and Prescription Drug Disposal Following
Outpatient Dental Surgery: Results of a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Brandon C. Maughan, MD, MHS, MSHP, Emergency Physicians Integrated Care
393 Long-Term Healthcare Utilization and Mortality Among Victims of Violence
Adam D. Laytin, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
394 ED Revisits Within 3 Days of an ED Discharge Among Elderly Patients
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH, University of California, San Diego
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
370 Test Characteristics of Emergency Ultrasound for Detection of
Fractures in Small Bones Using a Novel Avian Model
Youyou Duanmu, MD, Mount Sinai Beth Israel
ULTRASOUND 3
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Srikar R. Adhikari, MD, MS, University Of Arizona
Health Sciences Center
395 Ultrasound for the Evaluation of Soft Tissue Foreign Bodies Before and
After the Addition of Fluid to the Surrounding Interstitial Space in a
Cadaveric Model
Noah Delone, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
396 Measurement of Carotid Artery Flow Time Via Point-of-Care
Ultrasound in Hemodialysis Patients
Christopher Fung, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan
397 Ultrasound Guided Radial Artery Compression to Assess Blood
Pressure
Leonard Bunting, MD, St. John Hospital and Medical Center
398 DNA Melt Signatures: Singleplex High Complexity Melt for Unknown
Bacterial Species Identification
Samuel Yang, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine
399 Effect of Clinical Overlap on Attending Comfort Evaluating Residents:
A Multicenter Study
Elaine Rabin, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
400 A Second Chance for Droperidol in the Emergency Department?
Abraham Markin, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION/DISEASE/INJURY PREVENTION
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Orpheus/8th Floor
Moderator: Michael A. Puskarich, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
401 Clinical Predictors of Death from Severe Sepsis Within 24 hours of ED
Admission
Adnan Javed, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville
402 Use of Heart Rate Variability to Assess Illness Severity in Emergency
Department Patients with Sepsis
Douglas Barnaby, MD, Montefiore Medical Center
65
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
403 Impact of an ED-ICU on Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock
Joshua M. Glazer, MD, University of Michigan
404 The Effect of an Emergency Department-Based Critical Care Unit
on the Utilization of Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation and
Patient Disposition
Renee Havey, MS, RN, CCRN, ACNS-B, The University of Michigan Health System
405 Super-SIRS: Evaluating the Efficacy of a Modified Approach to Identify
High-Acuity, High-Risk Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients at
Triage
Daniel Leisman, BS, North Shore University Hospital
406 Sentinel Visits in Emergency Department Patients with Diabetes
Mellitus as a Warning Sign for Hyperglycemic Emergencies
Justin W. Yan, MD, The University of Western Ontario
CARDIOVASCULAR 3
Friday, May 13 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: TBA
407 Which Score is Better - HEART vs. EDACS-ADP?
Luis F. Rodriguez, BS, Baylor College of Medicine
408 Reliability of Clinical Assessments in Older Adults With Syncope or
Near Syncope in the ED
Daniel K. Nishijima, MD, MAS, UC Davis, School of Medicine
409 Ibutilide-Induced Ventricular Tachycardia in the Community
Emergency Department Setting: Incidence and Risk Factors
Aaron M. Rome, DO, University of California Davis School of Medicine
410 Prevalence of Renal Dysfunction Among Observation Patients with
Chest Pain and Impact on Patient Outcomes
Julia Ojcius, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
411 Patients on Beta-Blockers Do Not Require More Than One Dose of
Epinephrine for Anaphylaxis
Katie Greger, MD, College of Medicine Mayo Clinic (Rochester)
412 Predictors of Ibutilide Effectiveness in the Cardioversion of Atrial
Fibrillation and Flutter in the Community Emergency Department Setting
Nelya Lugovskaya, BS, University of California Davis
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION/DISASTER MEDICINE
Friday, May 13 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
Moderator: Munish Goyal, MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
413 The Effect of Nebulized Albuterol on Serum Lactate and Potassium in
Healthy Subjects
Tony Zitek, MD, University of Nevada School of Medicine
414 Appropriateness 0f Rapid Sequence Intubation Medication Doses in
Obese vs. Non Obese Patients
Maria Dynin, MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
415 Does Obesity Increase the Rate of Central Venous Catheter-Associated
Mechanical Complications?
Kawthar Yusuf, MS, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
416 The Decision to Admit: Factors Influencing ED Admission
Leah S. Honigman Warner, MD, MPH, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Medical
Center
417 The Gillette Stadium Experience: A Retrospective Review of Mass
Gathering Events from 2010-2015
Jeremy Maggin, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical
School
418 Creating Pediatric Hospital Surge Capacity with Reverse Triage
Ruben Troncoso Jr., MPH, Johns Hopkins Hospital
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 5
Friday, May 13 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Sangil Lee, MD, College of Medicine Mayo Clinic (Rochester)
419 Priorities of Care Among Emergency Department Patients with Low
Acuity Chief Complaints
Stephen M. McBride, BS, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
66
420 Clinical Care at U.S. Freestanding EDs: Results of a National Survey
Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School
421 Emergency Department Utilization and Hospital Readmission
Following Major Surgical Procedures in the United States
Keith E. Kocher, MD MPH, University of Michigan
422 Lack of Association Between ED Opioid Prescribing and Press Ganey
Scores: A Single Center Study
Howard S. Kim, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
423 Recreational Marijuana Legalization and Emergency Department
Visits in Colorado
Howard S. Kim, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
424 Variations in Opioid Prescribing Behavior by Physician Training
Evan L. Leventhal, MD, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard
Medical School
PEDIATRICS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Friday, May 13 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Orpheus/8th Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey A. Nielson, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
425 State Legislation of Naloxone Use by Layperson, First Responders, and
EMT-Bs
Colby Redfield, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
426 A Bibliometric Analysis of Worldwide Research Production in
Emergency Medicine
Krishan Kumar Sharma, BA, Harvard Medical School
427 What Do We Know About Pediatric Palliative Care Patients Who
Consult the Emergency Department?
Nathalie Gaucher, MD, Hopital Sainte-Justine
428 Outcomes Associated with Indeterminate and Negative Appendiceal
Ultrasounds
Jeremiah Duane Smith, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
429 Improving Communication in ED to ED Interfacility Transfers
Shawna Bellew, MD, College of Medicine Mayo Clinic (Rochester)
430 Skills and Knowledge Assessment of Indian Emergency Medical
Technicians (EMTs)
Arhana Chattopadhyay, BS, Stanford University School of Medicine
CARDIOVASCULAR 4
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A1/3rd Floor
Moderator: Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens/
Cornell University Medical College
431 Heart Rate Volatility Predicts ED Disposition Location
YaEl Mandel-Portnoy, M.Sc, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
432 Transesophageal Echocardiography in Simulated Cardiac Arrest
Performed by Emergency Medicine Physicians
Don Byars, MD, Eastern Virginia Medical School
433 A Descriptive Analysis of Ventricular Assist Device Patients
Presenting to an Urban Academic Emergency Department
Eric Shappell, MD, University of Chicago
434 Delta Plasmin: A New Fibrinolytic for Treatment of Submassive and
Massive Pulmonary Embolism
Daren M. Beam, MD, MS, Indiana University School of Medicine
435 Evidence of Right Ventricular Dysfunction Improves the Accuracy of
Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index to Predict In-Hospital Adverse
Events In Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism
Jeffery T. Ruwe, MD, Case Western Reserve University (MetroHealth)
436 Validation of Travel Distance as an Instrumental Variable for
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Regionalized Trauma Care
M. Kit Delgado, MD,, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine,
Department of Emergency Medicine
Moderator: Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University College of
Human Medicine
437 Psychological Effect of Witnessed Resuscitation on Family Members
in the Emergency Department
Christian Fromm, MD, Maimonides Medical Center
438 Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Levels in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients
Carl M. Karlsson, BS, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
439 Shifting with Insulin, Albuterol, or Sodium Bicarbonate in Severe
Hyperkalemia in The ED is Not Associated with a Repeat Dialysis Run
Within 24 Hours
Brian E. Driver, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
440 Reduction of Early VAP After Institution of VAP Prevention for Patients
Intubated in the Emergency Department
Lawrence A. DeLuca, MD, University of Arizona College of Medicine
441 Characteristics of Patients with Subdural Hematoma
Peter Pruitt, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
442 An Emergency Department-Based Intensive Care Unit Decreases
Hospital and ICU Utilization in Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Sage Whitmore, MD, University of Michigan
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 6
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jean Sun, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
443 Is it Time to Standardize the ED Acute Coronary Syndrome Work Up?
Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom, MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University
444 Return Precaution Understanding: A Potential Target for Reducing
Bounce Backs
Charney Burk, Medical Student, University of Southern California,
Keck School of Medicine
445 Reasons for Referral and Hospitalization Among Emergency
Department Patients with Syncope
Venkatesh Thiruganasambandamoorthy, MBBS, CCFP-EM, Ottawa Hospital
Research Institute
446 Association Between Electrocardiography and Tricuspid Annular
Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE) in Assessing Pulmonary Embolism
(PE) Severity
John Grotberg, MS, Yale University School of Medicine
447 Effectiveness of the “Transport Plus” Intervention: Discharge
Comprehension Assessment
Kevin G. Munjal, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
448 Reimbursement is Poor for Emergency Ultrasound Studies Performed
in 3 Large, Urban Hospitals Despite Wide Payer Mix
Aaran B. Drake, MD, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s- Roosevelt
INFECTIOUS DISEASES 3
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom D3/3rd Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey Chien, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
& Methodist Hospital
LIGHTNING OR ALS — M AY 10-13, 2016
CRITICAL CARE/RESUSCITATION 2
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Napoleon Ballroom A2/3rd Floor
449 A Qualitative Analysis of the Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors
Surrounding the Acute Care of the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak
Andreia B. Alexander, MD, PhD, MPH, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
450 ED Physician Adherence to IDSA Treatment Guidelines for Skin and
Soft Tissue Infections: Risks of Deviating From Standard Therapy
Tyler Zeoli, BS, University of Massachusetts Medical School
451 Patterns and Predictors of Antibiotic Treatment for Patients with
Dental Infections in U.S. Emergency Departments
Yomna Nassef, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital
452 Failure of an Emergency Department Observation Protocol for Sickle
Cell Vaso-Occlusive Crisis to Reduce 30-Day Readmission Rates
David M. Cline, MD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
453 Impact of Delayed Second Dose Antibiotics in Sepsis
Andrea Bianculli, BS, BA, North Shore University Hospital
454 Identifying Acute HIV Infections: Unexpected Benefit of HIV Screening
with a 4Th Generation Testing Platform
Kristi Stanley, MD, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine
67
— M AY 10-13, 2016
SAEM16 ePOSTERS
ePOSTERS
SHARED DECISION MAKING AND PATIENT CENTERED CARE
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
May 10-13 — New Orleans, LA
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
3
Monitor Numbers Listed First
Moderator: Kristin L. Rising, MD, MS, Thomas Jefferson University
1
2
3
4
5
6
455 Shared Decision Making for Low-Value Testing in the
Emergency Department
Jonathan D. Porath, BS, University of Michigan Medical School
456 Adaptation af DECISION+: A Training Program in Shared Decision
Making on the Use of Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Infections in
Primary Care, to the Context of an Emergency Department - a Mixed
Methods Study
Jean-Simon Létourneau, MD, Université Laval
457 Informing Patient-Centered Interventions to Reduce AsthmaRelated Pediatric Hospitalizations Through Cluster Analysis of
Administrative Hospital Data
Mahshid Abir, MD, MSc, University of Michigan
458 Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Sepsis Alert Protocol on Key
Patient-Centered Outcomes
Megan Shupp, MD, Carilion Clinic - Virginia Tech Carilion
459 Patient-Centered Definition of the Successful Emergency
Department Discharge: A Potential New Marker of Quality Care
Margaret Samuels-Kalow, MD, MPhil, MSHP, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
460 Identifying Unmet Palliative Care Needs in the ED: Use of the
‘Surprise Question’ in Patients with Sepsis
Tania Denise Shaffer Strout, PhD, Maine Medical Center
PEDIATRICS 1
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
4
5
6
DISEASE AND INJURY PREVENTION
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Moderator: Amy A. Ernst, MD, University of New Mexico
1
2
3
4
5
Moderator: Aaron N. Barksdale, MD, University of Nebraska Medical Center
1
2
3
4
5
6
461 Impact of Total Opioid Prescriptions on Annual Adolescent
Opioid Abuse
David C. Sheridan, MD, Oregon Health & Science University
462 Assessing the Effectiveness of Community Health Workers
(CHW) in the Emergency Department
Muhammad Waseem, MD, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
463 An Intervention to Increase Knowledge and Utilization of the Low
Risk Ankle Rule Among Pediatric Emergency Room Providers
Kirsten V. Loftus, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
464 A Proposed Milestone for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Pointof-Care Ultrasound Competency
Delia L. Gold, MD, Nationwide Children’s Hospital
465 Use of Ultrasound in Pediatric Skin and Soft Tissue Infection
Romolo J. Gaspari, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
466 The Evolution of Appendiceal Ultrasound: Ten Years’ Experience
Within a Pediatric Emergency Department
Devika P. Bagchi, BA, University of Michigan Medical School
EDUCATION
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: Walter L. Green, MD, University of Texas Southwestern
1
2
68
467 Publishing Venues for Education Scholarship: A Needs Assessment
Jaime Jordan, MD, Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
468 An Innovative Quality and Safety Curriculum for Emergency
Medicine Residents
Kiersten L. Gurley, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
469 Exploratory Factor Analysis of Faculty Ability to Differentiate
Individual Core Competencies During Evaluation of Resident Clinical
Performance
James G. Ryan, MD, New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens/Cornell
University Medical College
470 Intern’s Self-Perceived Procedural Competency and the Impact
of a Single Hospital-Wide Procedure Training Session
David Meguerdichian, MD, BWH/MGH Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine
471 Are All Milestones Equal in the Eyes of Residents? A Multicenter
Cross-Sectional Study of Emergency Medicine Residents
Joan Noelker, MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
472 Quality Improvement of Resident Charting: An Online
Educational Approach
James F. Leoni, MD, UT Health Science Center at Houston
6
473 Frequency of Smoking Cessation Counseling and Smoking
Cessation Discharge Instructions in the Emergency Department
Nathan Eikhoff, MD, Case Western Reserve University/MetroHealth/Cleveland Clinic
474 Using Curtailment to Shorten an Opioid Abuse Risk Screening
Tool in the ED
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
475 How Do One-Question Screening Strategies Compare to a More
Comprehensive Substance Use Assessment in Identifying Adult
Emergency Department Patients Who Might Need an Intervention?
Roland Clayton Merchant, MD, MPH, ScD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
476 Hypoglycemia is a Common Complication of Insulin
Administration for Treatment of Hyperkalemia in the ED
Brian E. Driver, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
477 Multiple Previous Visits (MPV) Program: Effectiveness of a
Patient-Centered Coordinated Care Team on Decreasing Frequent User
Visits
Calvin Kong, MD, Mount Sinai Beth Israel
478 Asthma Bouncebacks Emergency Department Discharges who
Return as Admission Within Three Days
Yuko Nakajima, MD, University of California, San Diego
THURSDAY, MAY 12
Monitor Numbers Listed First
CARDIOVASCULAR
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
Moderator: Michael C. Plewa, MD, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center
1
2
3
4
479 A Cost Analysis of the Use of Modified HEART Score to
Determine Early Discharge for Possible ACS Patients Presenting to the
Emergency Department
Richard M. Nowak, MD, Henry Ford Health System
480 Validation of the Heart Score in an Urban Mid-Atlantic
Emergency Department
Eric S. Kiechle, MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, MedStar
Washington Hospital Center
481 The Impact of the HEART Score on Outpatient Advanced Cardiac
Testing at University of New Mexico Hospital
Philip Seidenberg, MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine
482 HEART Score Stratification by Coronary CT Angiography
Lars K. Beattie, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville
6
8
CLINICAL OPERATIONS 1
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: Keri Carstairs, MD, Naval Medical Center (San Diego)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
487 Building Sustainable Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral
to Treatment Within Emergency Departments in an Integrated Hospital
System in New York: An Implementation Model
Sandeep Kapoor, MD, North Shore-LIJ Hospital System
488 The Effect of Triage Chief Complaints on Emergency Department
Room to Provider Time in a Community Tertiary Care Hospital
Dana D. Liu, MD, University of Michigan & St. Joseph Mercy Health System
489 How Much to Buy Down Your Throughput?
Aveh Bastani, MD, Troy Beaumont Hospital
490 Evaluation of a Novel Web-Based Electronic Sign Out Process for
ED to Inpatient Admission in the Community Setting
Jennifer M. Singleton, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical
School
491 Characteristics of Patients Admitted to the Hospital Within 72
Hours of Discharge from the ED
Kjirsten Swenson, MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine
492 The Emergency Department (ED) Admit Request: Conversion
Percentage and Time to Acceptance
Adam E. Nevel, MD, MBA, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center
493 Predictors of Inappropriate Length of Stay and Admission from
Observation in a Clinical Decision Unit
Sabrina Rahman, MD, Long Island Jewish Medical Center
494 Racial and Socioeconomic Disparities in Emergency Department
Care of Patients Presenting with Chest Pain
Ellen D. Sano, DO, MPH, Columbia University Medical Center
PEDIATRICS 2
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: Muhammad Waseem, MD, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
1
2
3
4
5
495 Geriatric Inpatient Admission for Chest Pain and Potential
Impact of the Emergency Department Observation Unit
Timothy Fuller, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine
496 Assessing Parents’ Knowledge of Child Care and Preschool
Disaster Plans
Alan Sielaff, MD, University of Michigan
497 Pediatric Referrals to an Emergency Department From Urgent
Care Centers
Robert P. Olympia, MD, Penn State University/Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
498 Impact of a New Clinical Care Guideline for Acute Gastroenteritis
on the Use of Ondansetron in The Pediatric Emergency Department.
Daisy A. Ciener, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin
499 Inpatient Outcomes and Adequate ED Analgesia in Pediatric
Trauma Patients
Michael K. Kim, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
6
7
8
500 Improving Patient Flow and Satisfaction in a Pediatric
Emergency Department with Direct Bedding
Nicholas Kuehnel, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
501 A Retrospective Comparison of Critical Procedures Performed
for Children in a Combined Adult and Pediatric Level I Trauma Center
and a Tertiary Pediatric Emergency Department
Rebecca L. Kornas, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
502 Radiographic Image Utilization Trends in Children Across a Large
Healthcare System
Jeremiah Duane Smith, MD, Carolinas Medical Center
GERIATRICS
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
— M AY 10-13, 2016
7
483 The HEART Score and Emergency Department Chest Pain
Observation Unit Admissions
Joy M. Mackey, MD, Baylor College of Medicine
484 Sex-Related Differences in High-Sensitivity Troponin Levels in
Patients Undergoing Exercise Stress Testing
Alexander T. Limkakeng, MD, Duke University School of Medicine
485 Optimal Arterial Blood O2 and CO2 Tensions in the Early
Post-Resuscitation Phase for Cardiac Arrest Patients Receiving
Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Wei-Tien Chang, MD, PhD, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine
486 The Use of Regional Cerebral Oxygen and Tissue Oxygenation
Monitoring During and Immediately After Cardiac Arrest in the
Emergency Department
Johanna C. Moore, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
ePOSTERS
5
Moderator: Moira Davenport, MD, Allegheny General Hospital
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
503 The Association Between Cognitive Function and Functional
Status in Older Adults in the Emergency Department Setting
Susheian S. Kelly, BA, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
504 Increased Geriatric ED Visits for Falls Predicted by Schmid Score
Timothy J. Medina, MD, Christiana Care Health System
505 Admission Patterns for Older Adult Patients Presenting to the
Emergency Department After a Fall: How Often is the Trauma Service
Involved and Does it Matter?
Mary R. Mulcare, MD, Weill Cornell Medicine
506 Delivery of Fall Prevention Strategies to Older Adult Fall Patients
Presenting to an Emergency Department
Erica Lash, Medical Student, University of Rochester School of Medicine and
Dentistry
507 Precipitating Events, Types of Ground-Level Falls and Clinical
Outcomes of Older Adult Emergency Department Patients
Courtney M. C. Jones, PhD, MPH, University of Rochester School of Medicine and
Dentistry
508 Characteristics of Blunt Traumatic Injury in Older Adults: A
Statewide Analysis from 2011-2014
E. Earl-Royal, MPH, Medical Student, Perelman School of Medicine, University of
Pennsylvania
509 Information Gaps in Nursing Home Patient Transfer Forms and
the Effects on Emergency Physician Resource Utilization
Ari Lapin, MD, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital Center
510 Skilled Nursing Home Residents vs. Community-Dwelling
Older Adults: A Focused Analysis of Past Medical Histories and ED
Diagnoses
Bao-Thang Anthony Nguyen, BA, Weill Cornell Medical College
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey A. Nielson, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
1
2
3
4
5
6
511 Improving Severe Sepsis Order Set Compliance in the Emergency
Department
Christine N. McBeth, DO, University of California Davis
512 ASCERtain: Automated Sepsis Capture for Emergency
Department Registries
Joshua M. Glazer, MD, University of Michigan
513 Reducing Unnecessary Coagulation Studies in Chest Pain
Patients: A Multicenter CPOE Intervention
Shawn K. Dowling, MD, University of Calgary
514 Consolidation of Information Standards Related to
Emergency Care
James C. McClay, MD, University of Nebraska College of Medicine
515 Predictors of Pediatric Emergency Room Utilization in Santiago,
Dominican Republic
Allison Lockwood, BA, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
516 Pioneering Simulation and Small Group Learning in Tanzania:
East Africa’s First EM Residency
Andrew G. Lim, MD, MS, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
69
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ePOSTERS
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517 Understanding the Medical Needs of a Local Refugee Population
Amidst the Global Refugee Crisis
Katie M. Wells, MD, MPH, University of Utah School of Medicine
518 Epidemiology of Diseases Presenting to One of the World’s
Largest Mass Gatherings
Mark Shankar, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital
HEALTH POLICY AND HEALTH SERVICES
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: Colleen Marie McQuown, MD, Summa Akron City Hospital
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
519 Language Disparity in Health Literacy
Kisa King, BS, University of New Mexico
520 Alternatives to the Emergency Department: ED Patient Usage
and Perceptions of Availability
Sara W. Heinert, MPH, University of Illinois at Chicago
521 ED Visits for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) After
the Establishment of a Pioneer ACO
Stephen K. Epstein, MD, MPP, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
522 Focused Evaluation of Patients Who Self Report Opiate Use in the
Emergency Department
Priya E. Mammen, MD, MPH, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at
Thomas Jefferson University
523 Impact of Health Policy Changes on Emergency Medicine
Practice by Socioeconomic Status
Laura Pimentel, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine
524 Short-Term Death After Discharge From U.S. Emergency
Departments: Analysis of 3.7 Million Visits by Medicare Beneficiaries
Zlad Obermeyer, MD, MPhil, Harvard Medical School
525 Frequent Users of the Emergency Department with Mental
Health Diagnoses
Matthew John Niedzwiecki, PhD, University of California, San Francisco,
School of Medicine
526 Patient Navigation for Patients Frequently Visiting the
Emergency Department
Stanton Elseroad, MD, University of Tennessee College of Medicine
ULTRASOUND 1
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
CRITICAL CARE AND RESUSCITATION 1
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Moderator: Daren M. Beam, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
AIRWAY/ANESTHESIA/ANALGESIA
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
Moderator: Jessica Shackman, MD, Georgetown EM
1
2
3
Moderator: TBD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
70
527 Retrospective Review of Repeat Ultrasounds After Point-of-Care
Ultrasound for Acute Cholecystitis in the Emergency Department
Kevin Stimson, MD, University of Connecticut
528 Cholecystitis Diagnosed by Emergency Department Point-ofCare Ultrasound (POCUS)
Carlos Calaf, MD, New York Methodist Hospital
529 Emergency Department Ultrasound Diagnosis of
Bowel Obstruction
Stas’ Haciski, MD, George Washington University Medical Center
530 How Accurate is Ultrasound in Diagnosing Pneumoperitoneum?
A Meta-Analysis
Srikar R. Adhikari, MD, MS, University of Arizona
531 Grading Hydronephrosis: A Comparison of Accuracy Between
Point-of-Care Sonographers at Various Levels of Training
Mathew Nelson, DO, North Shore University Hospital/NYU School of Medicine
532 Follicular Debris in the Diagnosis of Ovarian Torsion:
A Retrospective Review
Adetunbi T. Ayeni, MD, New York Methodist Hospital
533 Sensitivity of Aortic Outflow Tract Diameter Greater Than 4cm
for Type A Aortic Dissection on CT Angiogram
Aaron Snyder, MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
534 Safety and Efficacy of the Easy IJ: A Novel Approach to Difficult
IV Access
Siamak Moayedi, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine
535 Does Choice of Resuscitative Fluids Impact Mortality and Renal
Function in Septic Patients?
Clark G. Owyang, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
536 The Role of Rapid Bedside Clinic Pharmacy Consult in ED
Sepsis Management
Kenneth Young, MD, University of Chicago
537 Dysfunctional HDL Predicts Poor Outcome in Patients with Severe Sepsis
Faheem Wagid Guirgis, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville
538 The Effect of Patient and Provider Gender on Time to Antibiotics
Among Patients with Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock
Tracy E. Madsen, MD, ScM, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
539 Sepsis Alert Protocol Reduces Inpatient Mortality for Patients
Presenting to the Emergency Department with Sepsis
Christina Cannon, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville
540 Bedside Measurement of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in
Circulating Immune Cells in Sepsis
David H. Jang, MD, MSc, University of Pennsylvania Health System Hospital of the
University of Pennsylvania
541 Hyperlactemia in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock:
Where is the Opportunity for Intervention?
Jeanie Gribben, BS, North Shore University Hospital
542 Do Corrected Flow Time or Carotid Flow Volume Increase in
Septic Patients Who Receive Fluid?
Joseph R. Pare, MD, Yale University School of Medicine
4
5
6
7
8
543 Comparing the Effectiveness of a Novel Suction Set-Up Using
an Adult Endotracheal Tube Connected to a Meconium Aspirator vs. a
Traditional Yankauer Suction Instrument
Jonathan Kei, MD, MPH, Kaiser Permanente-San Diego
544 Comparison of Two Cricothyrotomy Techniques in an Obese Sheep Model
Lauren Klein, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
545 Variation in Emergency Medicine Physician Opioid Analgesic
Prescribing to Patients with Low Acuity Back Pain
Jason Hoppe, DO, University of Colorado-Department of Emergency Medicine
546 Changing Opioid Prescribing Practices in an Urban ED
Phyllis A. Vallee, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
547 An Assessment of the Disposable CMAC System
Mari Cosentino, MD, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine
548 Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Amnesia and Adverse
Respiratory Events Between Moderate and Deep Procedural Sedation
with Propofol in the Emergency Department
Alexandra Schick, MS, Hennepin County Medical Center
549 A Retrospective Evaluation of Rocuronium Versus Succinylcholine
in Rapid Sequence Intubation of Trauma Patients: Does Choice Matter?
Nicholas D. Caputo, MD, MSc, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
550 Is Presence of Pain 1 Week After an ED Visit for Acute Low Back
Pain Associated with Unfavorable Longterm Outcomes?
Rebecca Nerenberg, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
TOXICOLOGY/ENVIRONMENTAL/HEALTH POLICY
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: Jeffrey Chien, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital &
Methodist Hospital
1
551 Accuracy of Acute Kidney Injury Measurements in Multi-Stage
Ultramarathon Runners
Colin Little, MD, Stanford University Hospital/Kaiser Permanente Medical Center
3
5
6
7
8
CLINICAL DECISION GUIDELINES
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: Daren M. Beam, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
559 Performance of the HEART Pathway with High Sensitivity Versus
Contemporary Troponin Assays
Jason P. Stopyra, MD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
560 Factors Associated with Guideline Discordant Antibiotic
Prescribing for Emergency Department Cutaneous Abscesses
Michael Willman, MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
561 Does Cell Phone Use Upon Arrival to the ED Predict Patient Acuity?
David E. Slattery, MD, University of Nevada School of Medicine
562 Risks of Discharging Patients From Emergency Department with
Abnormal Vital Signs
Aiwen W. Liu, BS, Carilion Clinic - Virginia Tech Carilion
563 ED Management of Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: Guideline
Concordant or Overly Aggressive?
Christopher Baugh, MD, MBA, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
564 Age-Adjusted D-dimer Values in D-dimer Units (DDU) to Rule Out
Pulmonary Embolus in the Elderly
Melanie Ruiz, MD, Temple University School of Medicine
565 Attitudes Toward Clinical Trial Participation and Publication
Among Research Subjects in the Emergency Department
Christopher W. Jones, MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
566 Interruptions in the Emergency Department and Their Impact on
Emergency Physicians
Hunter Hawthorne, BS, Mayo Clinic
CRITICAL CARE AND RESUSCITATION 2
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
4
5
6
7
8
FRIDAY, MAY 13
Monitor Numbers Listed First
INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
Moderator: Lawrence A. DeLuca, MD, University of Arizona
College of Medicine
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Moderator: Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University
College of Human Medicine
1
2
3
567 Effect of ED and ICU Capacity Strain on ICU Admission Decisions
and Outcomes for Critically Ill Patients
Kusum S. Mathews, MD, MPH, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
568 The Impact of an ED-Based Critical Care Unit on the Provision of
Palliative Care in the Emergency Department
Carrie Harvey, MD, University of Michigan
569 A Critical Analysis of Unplanned Transfer to the ICU Within 48
Hours of Admission From the ED
Natalia Rumas, MD, Boston University School of Medicine
570 Idarucizumab for Reversal of the Anticoagulant Effects of
Dabigatran in Patients in the Emergency Setting of Major Bleeding,
Urgent Surgery, or Interventions
Charles Victor Pollack, MA, MD, FACEP, FAAEM, Pennsylvania Hospital,
University of Pennsylvania
571 PReDICT: Prognosticate Resuscitation Demands Integrating
Computerized Triage
Joshua M. Glazer, MD, University of Michigan
572 Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization:
Where Are We Now?
Justin J. Hourmozdi, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
573 Analysis of Intraosseous Blood Samples Using an EPOC®
Point-of-Care Analyzer During Resuscitation
Crystal Ives Tallman, MD, University of California, San Francisco,
Fresno Emergency Medicine
574 Engineering a Translational PECAM-1 Targeted Nanoparticle
for Emergent Endothelial Delivery of Therapeutics to the Vascular
Endothelium
Colin F. Greineder, MD, Penn Medicine - Institute of Translational Medicine
and Therapeutics
— M AY 10-13, 2016
4
552 A Novel Adsorbent System Rapidly Clears Verapamil from
Human Blood
Vincent Capponi, MS, CytoSorbents Corporation
553 Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Factors
Predictive of Severe Snake Envenomation in North and South America
Charles J. Gerardo, MD, MHS, Duke University
554 Measurement of Mitochondrial Respiration as a Biomarker in
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
David H. Jang, MD, MSc, University of Pennsylvania Health System Hospital of the
University of Pennsylvania
555 A Comparison of Older Adults with Low-Risk and High-Risk
Alcohol Use in the Emergency Department
Christina Shenvi, MD, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
School of Medicine
556 Delirium’s Arousal Subtypes and Their Effect on 6-Month
Functional Status and Cognition
Jin H. Han, MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
557 Variation in Physician Level Admission Rates for ED Patients
Presenting with Chest Pain
Matthew Hall, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School
558 Effects of Race and Socioeconomic Factors on Emergency
Department Management of Threatened Abortion
Leigh Evans, MD, Yale University School of Medicine
ePOSTERS
2
575 Perspectives on the Early Diagnosis and Management of Severe
Sepsis and Septic Shock in the Emergency Department
Brian Russell Sharp, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine
and Public Health
576 Compel Study: Comparison of Antibiograms for Urinary Tract
Infections Between Hospital-Wide, Inpatients and Emergency
Department-Specific Sampling
Lee Grodin, MD, Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY Health Science Center
at Brooklyn
577 Vancomycin Use in the Emergency Department Remains a Target
for Improved Antibiotic Stewardship
Michael S. Pulia, MD, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine
and Public Health
578 Using Antimicrobial Films on Stethoscopes to Reduce Bacterial
Colony Counts
Amjad Musleh, MD, University of New Mexico
579 A Descriptive Study of the Results of Blood Cultures in
Discharged Emergency Medicine Patients
Irandokht M. Jooniani, MD, MPH, Henry Ford Hospital
580 Atypical Organisms Cause a Clinically Significant Number of
Septic Arthritis Cases in the Emergency Department (ED)
Timothy M. Loftus, MD, University of Cincinnati Department of Emergency Medicine
581 Forecasting Emergency Department Visits During A Disease
Outbreak Using Internet Data
Shama Patel, MD, MPH, Atlantic Health (Morristown)
582 Feasibility of Novel Influenza Interventions in Emergency
Department Settings
Artur Pawlowicz, MD, University of Florida
CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: Nidhi Garg, New York Hospital Queens
1
583 Accuracy of Sonographic CHF Diagnosis Compared to
Conventional CRX in Patients Presenting with Undifferentiated
Shortness of Breath
John P. Gullett, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
71
— M AY 10-13, 2016
ePOSTERS
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
584 Emergency Department Use of Bioimpedance Vector Analysis to
Assess Changes in Body Hydration
Abeer Almasary, MBBS, Baylor College of Medicine
585 Interventions Given During “Door-to-Balloon” Time to
Reduce Reperfusion Injury: Preclinical Testing of Novel Cardiac
Drug Candidates
Craig J. Kutz, BS, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine
586 Acute Aortic Dissection: Inefficient and Wide Variation in CT
Use for Diagnosis
Robert Ohle, MA, MB, BCh, BAO, Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Ottawa
587 Patients with Alcohol Related Emergencies Have Long
QTc Intervals
Timothy Chu, MD, University of New Mexico
588 Standardized Patient-Reported Outcome Measures After Acute
PE Show Decline in Physical and Social Function at 30 Days
D. Mark Courtney, MD, Northwestern Medicine
589 Physician Perception of Patient Affect in Patients with
Suspected Pulmonary Embolism
Jeffrey A. Kline, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
590 A Multidisciplinary Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT):
Initial 30-Month Experience with a Novel Approach to Delivery of Care
to Patients with Sub-Massive and Massive PE
Christopher Kabrhel, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
CLINICAL OPERATIONS 2
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: Benjamin White, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
591 Impact of Increasing Straight Stick Use for Blood Sample
Collection on ED Hemolysis Rates
Michael P. Phelan, MD, Cleveland Clinic
592 Impact of Hemolyzed Blood Specimens on Emergency
Department Patient Throughput
Michael P. Phelan, MD, Cleveland Clinic
593 Getting Fast-Track Patients Out: Implementation of
Point-of-Care iSTAT Testing in a Safety-Net Hospital
Mary L. Cheffers, MD, Los Angeles County - University of Southern California
Medical Center
594 A Systematic Review of Nursing Workload Measures
Elaine Rabin, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
595 What Non-Physician Factors Affect Length of Stay in the ED?
S. Christian Smith, MD, University of Arizona Department of Emergency Medicine
596 The Effects of Shift Work on the Driving Performance of
Emergency Medicine Residents: A Pilot Study
Benjamin Liss, MD, Drexel University College of Medicine
597 Physician Assistant Productivity and Utilization in an Urban ED
Jessica Shackman, MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine
598 Utilization of Lean Healthcare Principles to Improve Emergency
Department Patient Flow in an Intermediate Acuity Area of a
Safety-Net Hospital
Allison Luu, MD, Los Angeles County - University of Southern California
Medical Center
CRITICAL CARE AND RESUSCITATION 3
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Moderator: William Toon, EdD, NRP, Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue and Emergency Management
1
2
72
599 Comparisson of Parasternal Long Axis and Carotid VTI to Apical
5 Chamber VTI for The Assessment of Fluid Responsiveness
Ryan Giorgetti, MD, New York Methodist Hospital
600 Presumption of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Sustaining
Cerebral Oxidation Using Regional Cerebral Saturation of Oxygen:
Observational Cohort Study (Press Study)
Hidenori Higashi, MD, Japanese Red Cross Musashino Hospital
3
4
5
6
7
8
601 Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Bystander CPR in Kent
County, Michigan: A Geospatial Analysis
Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
602 The Effect of Body Habitus on Left Ventricular Volume Changes
During Simulated CPR
Christopher Kao, BS, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Department of
Emergency Medicine
603 A Comparison of Chest Compression Quality During Supraglottic
Airway Placement, Video and Direct Laryngoscopy in Simulated
Cardiac Arrest
Ashley A. Foster, MD, University of California, San Francisco-San Francisco General
Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine
604 Impact of a Standardized Post-Arrest Clinical Pathway and
Quality Improvement Tool on Three Receiving Cardiac Resuscitation
Centers Within a Single Healthcare System
David A. Pearson, MD, MS, Carolinas Medical Center
605 Paramedics Provide a Different Mean Ventilation Rate Compared
to In-Hospital Emergency Providers During Simulated Cardiac Arrest
Michael Halsey, MD, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
606 Impact of an Automated Chest Compression Device on Team
Communication During Simulated Emergency Department Cardiac
Arrest Resuscitations: A Pilot Study
Matthew J. Gittinger, MD, University of Washington
ABDOMINAL/GASTROINTESTINAL/GENITOURINARY
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
Moderator: Richard H. Sinert, DO, SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
607 Predicting Patients at Low Risk of Variceal Bleeding as the
Source of Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
Brian Driver, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
608 Do Urine Cultures in the Emergency Department Change
Management of Young Women with Symptoms of Uncomplicated
Urinary Tract Infection?
Shelley L. McLeod, MSc, University of Toronto
609 Diagnosing Urolithiasis or Nephrolithiasis via Emergency
Ultrasonography and Urinalysis
Elizabeth Abram, MD, SUNY Downstate / Kings County Hospital
610 Emergency Department Management of Renal Colic:
Does Gender Matter?
Grant Innes, MD, Foothills Hospital/University of Calgary
611 A Comparison of Urolithiasis in the Presence And Absence of
Hematuria in The Emergency Department
Jason M. Mefford, MD, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
612 Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) are Associated with a Reduced
Risk for Trichomonas Vaginalis (TV) Infection
Johnathan M. Sheele, MD, MPH, MHS, University Hospitals Case Medical Center
613 Using a Non-Invasive Method to Stage Liver Disease in Chronic
HCV-Infected ED Patients
Danielle Signer, BS, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
614 The Emergency Department Dysphagia Screen is Associated
with Lower Rates of Pneumonia in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients
Jon W. Schrock, MD, Case Western Reserve University (MetroHealth)
EMS 1
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: Steven J. Weiss, MD, University of New Mexico
1
2
3
615 Analysis of Time Between Prehospital Vital Signs
Jennifer Gibson Chambers, DO, MS, Albany Medical College
616 Accuracy of Medical History and Medications Documented by
Emergency Medical Services
Timmy Li, BA, EMT-B, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
617 Body-Worn Cameras Improve EMS Documentation Accuracy
Jeffrey D. Ho, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
5
7
8
EDUCATION AND SIMULATION
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: William Toon, EdD, NRP, Loudoun County Department of Fire,
Rescue and Emergency Management
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
623 Peer Mentors are Non-Inferior to Attendings in Teaching Basic
Ultrasound Guided IV Access
Joshua Kaine, BS, University of Kentucky College of Medicine
624 Predictors of Chief Resident Appointment or the Need for
Remediation of Emergency Medicine Residents
Annette Visconti, MD, New York Methodist Hospital
625 Emergency Medicine Interest Group: Are They Important for
Residency Selection?
John Reynolds, MD, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
626 How Does the Consideration of Other Possible Medical
Specialties and the Reason to Choose Emergency Medicine Affect the
Timing of Specialty Selection?
John Ray, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
627 Soft-Cured Cadavers Versus Fresh Frozen for Procedures
Mark Robert Sochor, MD, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center
628 Low-Cost, Open Source Ultrasound Simulator Enhances Resident
Ultrasound Education
Matthew Staum, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
629 Teaching Chest Tubes: Simulation Task Trainer or
Cadaver Model?
Ting X. Tan, BS, Saint Louis University School of Medicine
630 Validation of Medical Students as Quality Observers During
Emergency Resuscitation Events
Michelle Sergel, MD, Cook County Hospital
IMAGING AND UTRASOUND
Friday, May 13 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Moderator: TBA
1
2
3
4
631 Isolated Positive LOC Status: Is Brain CT Always Necessary?
Muhammad Waseem, MD, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
632 Equivocal Ultrasound Findings for Suspected Appendicitis in
Children: Radiology and ED Provider Factors in Secondary Imaging
Ting Gou, BA, University of Michigan
633 Sonographic Detection of Impacted Esophageal Foreign Bodies:
A Feasibility Study
Jennifer M. Singleton, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
634 Limiting Use of Computed Tomography in Minor Head Trauma:
Improving Compliance with Clinical Decision Guidelines
Kayla Dewey, MD, Medstar Washington Hospital Center/Georgetown University Hospital
5
6
7
8
635 Validation of a Risk Stratification Score as a Predictor of
Neuroimaging in ED Patients with a Headache
Laura Rivera-Reyes, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
636 The Development and Evaluation of an Assessment Tool for
Competency in Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine
Gerhard Dashi, BSc, Queen’s University
637 Emergency Medicine Physician Sonographers Can Identify and
Inject the Regions of the Trigeminal Nerve Foramina in a Cadaveric Model
Turandot Saul, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
638 Ultrasound Guided Fascia Iliaca Block Using a Novel Porcine Model
Don Byars, MD, Eastern Virginia Medical School
PEDIATRICS 3
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A/5th Floor
— M AY 10-13, 2016
6
618 Pre-Hospital Pediatric Care in New York City 2006-2012:
Interventions and Medications
Matthew Harris, MD, Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York
619 Out-of-Hospital Intubation Success Rates by EMS Providers
Using a Low-Cost Disposable Video Laryngoscopy System
Barry J. Knapp, MD, Eastern Virginia Medical School
620 Statewide Prehospital Airway Quality (SPArQ) Program
Assessing Cardiac Arrest Following Prehospital Rapid Sequence
Intubation in North Carolina
Antonio Fernandez, PhD, NRP, FAHA, EMS Performance Improvement Center,
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
621 Should We Be Intubating Obese Patients in the
Pre-Hospital Setting?
Brian William Walsh, MD, MBA, Morristown Medical Center
622 Emergency Department Patient Perception of Stroke:
A Comparison of Elderly and Nonelderly Knowledge of Stroke
David Benaron, MD, University of California San Diego
ePOSTERS
4
Moderator: TBA
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
639 A Comparison of Weight Estimation Tools in an Urban
Pediatric Population
Gabrielle Berlinski Prato, DO, Jackson Memorial Hospital
640 Recognition of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in
Adolescent Females with Symptoms of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)
Kristin Stukus, MD, Nationwide Children’s Hospital
641 Frequency and Characterization of Tracheal Intubation Adverse
Events in Pediatric Sepsis
Sarah Schmidt, MD, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine
642 A Prospective Investigation Validating the Performance of an
Emergency Department Formula for the Diagnosis of Acute Kidney
Injury in Pediatrics
Marie-Carmelle Elie, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville
643 How Well Does Modified Pews Apply to Different Hospital
Departments? Pediatric Early Warning Score at a Community-Based
Teaching Hospital: Evaluation of Implementation
Alyssa Vermeulen, MD, William Beaumont Hospital
644 The Use of Procalcitonin for Prediction of Pulmonary Bacterial
Co-Infection in Children with Respiratory Failure Associated with
Viral Bronchiolitis
Ryan T. Ericksen, DO, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center
645 Comparison of Length-of-Stay and Adverse Events in Children
Undergoing Forearm Fracture Reduction Using Bier Block Versus
Procedural Sedation
Brett Burstein, MD, PhD, The Montreal Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric
Emergency Medicine
646 Increased Severity of Weekend Pediatric Road Traffic Injuries:
A 10-Year Analysis of Trauma Registry Data in South Africa
Brett Burstein, MD, PhD, The Montreal Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatric
Emergency Medicine
ULTRASOUND 2
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Ballroom B/5th Floor
Moderator: TBA
1
2
3
4
647 Critical Care Ultrasound: A National Survey Across Specialties
Jeffrey Stowell, MD, District Medical Group-Maricopa Intergrated Health System
648 Inferior Vena Cava Measurement With Ultrasound: What is the
Best View and Best Mode?
Nathan Finnerty, MD, Ohio State University Hospital
649 Ultrasound vs. Blind Incision and Drainage in Skin and Soft
Tissue Abscesses
Alexandra Sanseverino, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
650 Evaluation of Suspected Skin Abscesses with Ultrasound
Improves Outcome
Romolo J. Gaspari, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
73
— M AY 10-13, 2016
ePOSTERS
5
6
7
8
651 Longevity and Complication Rates of Ultrasound Guided
Versus Traditional Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in a Pediatric
Emergency Department
Krisha Desai, BS, University of Pennsylvania-Perelman School of Medicine,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
652 Standardized Prehospital Provider Training in Sonographic
Detection of Pneumothorax is Feasible and Accurate: A Review of the
Literature and Meta-Analysis
Jeremy Welwarth, DO, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
653 Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist
for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter
Christine F. Jung, MD, Boston Medical Center
654 Use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Non-Academic
Emergency Departments
Richard Amini, MD, University of Arizona
PSYCHIATRY AND SOCIAL EM RESEARCH
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Chenier/5th Floor
Moderator: TBA
1
2
3
4
5
74
655 The Effect of Clinician-Patient Communication on Subsequent
Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Patients Evaluated for Acute
Coronary Syndrome in the ED
Bernard P. Chang, MD, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center, Department of
Emergency Medicine
656 Inter-Rater Agreement of Nurse and Clinical Expert Tremor
Assessments for Patients with Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in the
Emergency Department
Bjug Borgundvaag, MD, PhD, CCFP-EM, University of Toronto
657 Access to Care and Depression Among Emergency Department
Patients
Beau Abar, PhD, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
658 Prospective Validation of an iOS App to Evaluate Tremor in
Patients with Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome
Bjug Borgundvaag, MD, PhD, CCFP-EM, University of Toronto
659 The Change in Stress Biomarkers with Changing Levels of
Agitation in Patients with Agitation in the ED
James R. Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
6
7
8
660 A Systematic Review of the Relationship Between Physician
Implicit (Unconscious) Racial Bias and Clinical Decision Making
Erin Dehon, PhD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
661 Association of Individual Characteristics and Collective Efficacy
with Willingness to Perform CPR in Chicago
Pavitra Kotini-Shah, MD, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago
662 Is There a Disparity an Discharge Narcotic Prescriptions From
the Emergency Department?
Sharmistha Dev, MD, MPH, Henry Ford Hospital
EMS 2
Friday, May 13 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Grand Couteau/5th Floor
Moderator: Steven J. Weiss, MD, University of New Mexico
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
663 EMS Dispatches During Hurricanes Sandy and Irene
Jonathon McCoy, M.D., Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
664 National Assessment of Clinical Quality Programs in EMS
Michael A. Redlener, MD, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Roosevelt
665 A Novel Cooling Method and Comparison of Active Rewarming
of Mild Hypothermia
Joseph Einhorn, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University
School of Medicine
666 Assessing the Validity of Prehospital Identification of Severe
Sepsis Using Two Decision Aids
Jonathan Robert Studnek, PhD, Mecklenburg EMS Agency
667 Pre-Hospital Pediatric Care in a Large Urban American City: The
FDNY Experience
Matthew I. Harris, MD, Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York
668 EP and Surgeon Knowledge of and Training in eFAST at a Level I
Trauma Center
Michael S. Radeos, MD, MPH, New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens/
Cornell University Medical College
669 EMS Cardiac Resuscitation In-Situ Simulation Did Not Improve
Real World Rate of Return of Spontaneous Circulation
Don Byars, MD, Eastern Virginia Medical School
670 Without Informed Consent: How IRBs Assess Community Consultations
Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
MAY 10-13 — NEW ORLEANS, LA
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
MEDICAL STUDENT FOCUSED SPOTLIGHTS
Wednesday, May 11 - 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Borgne/3rd Floor
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Making Clinical Reasoning Visible: Techniques for Preclinical Learners
in the Emergency Department
Regina Royan, MPH, University of Michigan Medical School
Communication and Conflict Management: What Medical Students
Really Need to Lead
Tina S. Wu, MD, MBA, NYU/Bellevue Hospital Center
The Use of “Synthesis Shifts” to Teach Medical Decision Making to
Third Year Medical Students
Kevin M. King, MD, University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio
Development of an Asynchronous Online Learning Community for
Medical Students
David A. Wald, DO, Lewis Katz School of Medicine
Walk Before you Run: A Student-Led Introduction to Clinical
Reasoning in the Emergency Department
Regina Royan, MPH, University of Michigan Medical School
An Anatomy-based Clinical Reasoning Workshop Utilizing Video Cases
David A. Wald, DO, Lewis Katz School of Medicine
The Development of a Milestone-Based EM Elective to Ensure Intern
Readiness
Cynthia G. Leung, MD, PhD, The Ohio State University College of Medicine
ORALS 1
Wednesday, May 11 -2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Borgne/3rd Floor
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A Novel Medical Student Curriculum: Using Bedside Echocardiogram
and IVC Ultrasound to Aid in Determining Fluid Responsiveness
Paul Kukulski, MD, University of Chicago
An Attempt to Standardize Evaluation Scoring
Joseph B. House, MD, University of Michigan
Focusing Your Educational Research: So Much To Do, So Little Time
Sally A. Santen, MD, University of Michigan
Development of a Behaviorally-Anchored Assessment Form for
Bedside Teaching in the Emergency Department
Matthew J. Stull, MD, University of Michigan Medical School
Toxicology Puzzles for Medical Students
Christopher B Zernial, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine
Improving Resident Workload and Satisfaction Through Utilizing the
Electronic Medical Record System to Track Procedures Automatically
Daniel K. Kwan, MD, UCSF Fresno Emergency Medicine
Beyond Asynchronous: A Resident-Produced, Peer-Edited, CaseBased Publication
Ryan LaFollette, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
THURSDAY, MAY 12
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY SPOTLIGHTS
Thursday, May 12 - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Cornet/8th Floor
15
16
17
Use Of Bedside Novel Just-in-Time (JIT) Tool For High-Risk Procedures
To Improve Patient Safety
Jeremy B. Branzetti, MD, University of Washington
App-Based Real-Time Evaluation and Feedback in Clinical Simulation
Arjun Dayal, BS, University of Chicago
Global EM MentorSite: Connecting Mentors and Trainees in the
Digital Age
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
18
19
Asynchronous Crowdsourced Education for Clinical Ultrasound: A
Curated FOAM for CUS Curriculum!
John Field, MD, John H Stroger Hospital of Cook County
The Waterfall Sign: A Novel Technique to Quantify BLines on
M-Mode Ultrasound
Damali Nakitende, MD, John H Stroger Hospital of Cook County
PATIENT SAFETY AND QUALITY IMPROVEMENT SPOTLIGHTS
Thursday, May 12 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Cornet/8th Floor
20
21
22
23
24
INNOVATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
SAEM16 INNOVATIONS
Shared Decision Making Employing HEART Score and a Visual Aid
in Patients Presenting with Chest pain to a Community Emergency
Department
Michael A. Boyd, MD, University of Michigan/St. Joseph Mercy Hospital
Incorporating Patient Safety And Quality Improvement Into Resident
Didactics Using A Multiple Modality “Thread” Approach
Robin Naples, MD, Temple University
ICU Boarders Project
Rachel Burt Kadar, MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center
Identifying Prehospital Sepsis: A Comparison of Four Screening Tools
Anjni Patel, DO, Emory University
Pain Assessment and Management Initiative: A Patient Safety Project
- Addressing Gaps in Emergency Medicine Pain Education
Sophia Sheikh, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville
ORALS 2
Thursday, May 12 - 10:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Cornet/8th Floor
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
TALKS (Timely Assessment of Learners’ Knowledge and Skills): An
Approach to Increase Volume and Quality of Resident Evaluations
Abra Fant, MD, MS, Northwestern
EMRA’s 20 in 6: A National Resident Competition to Promote
Excellence in Lecturing
Jeff Riddell, MD, University of Washington
Using Lean Methodologies to Augment Shadow Shifts of Residents
Noah White, MD, Albany Medical College
A Tool for Resident Productivity Metrics in an Academic Emergency
Medicine Program
Jupin K. Malhi, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital
Deliberate Practice And Asynchronous Video Documentation Of
Procedural Competence And Technical Skill In Emergency Medicine
Residents.
Jeremy S. Faust, MD, MS, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Regional Anesthesia: A Video Guide Tailored to the Emergency
Physician
Aalap Shah, MD, University of Cincinnati
Development and Implementation of a Brief, Structured Trauma
Debrief
Heather Fleming, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Building an ED-Based ICU - A Lean Journey
Cemal B. Sozener, MD, University of Michigan
Streamlining “Door to Needle” Processes in Endovascular Stroke
Therapy
Charissa B. Pacella, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Multimedia Design Education Technology (MDEdTech) Fellowship
Alisa V. Wray, MD, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
ORALS 3
Thursday, May 12 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Cornet/8th Floor
35
Bringing Advocacy and Social Justice into a Medical Student
Curriculum
Charisma Kaushik, MS, The Ohio State University College of Medicine
75
INNOVATIONS — M AY 10-13, 2016
36
37
38
39
Development of a Health Disparities Curriculum for an Academic
Emergency Medicine Residency Program
Holly A. Caretta-Weyer, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
Prospective Study to Test the Benefit of Remote Learning and Quality
Assurance Programs on Retention and Improvement of Limited
Bedside Ultrasound Skills for a Cohort of Fifth Year Medical Students
at the Catholic University of Mozambique in Beira, Mozambique
David Terca, MD, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-Roosevelt
Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Post-Discharge Follow-Up and
Resident Education
Mark Shankar, MD, New York-Presbyterian Hospital
#EMConf Social Media Curriculum
Kenneth Young, MD, University of Chicago
FRIDAY, MAY 13
41
43
44
Low Fidelity High Functionality Inexpensive Ultrasound Guided
Femoral Nerve Block Model
Jonathan D. Porath, B.S., University of Michigan Medical School
A Cost Effective Phantom Model For Ultrasound-Guided Central
Venous Access Training
Julian P. Suszanski, MD, Henry Ford Hospital
An Inexpensive, Rapidly Constructed, Durable, And Realistic Model
For Orthopedic Fracture Reduction
Joshua Seth Broder, MD, Duke University
“CHESTER” The Moderate Fidelity Training Model for Chest Tube Placement
Jared Rich, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital
Novel Priapism Model for Use in Resident Procedural Education
Stephanie N. Stapleton, MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
EXHIBIT PRESENTATIONS 2
Friday, May 13 - 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Grand Foyer/5th Floor
45
46
47
EXHIBIT PRESENTATIONS 1
Friday, May 13 - 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Grand Foyer/5th Floor
40
42
48
49
From CT To 3D: Revolutionizing Airway Training With A 3-D Printer
Zachary Christian Simms, MD, Maimonides Medical Center
Hi-Fidelity Transvenous Pacemaker Simulator with Troubleshooting Mode
Colleen M. Smith, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center/Bellevue Hospital Center
Simulated Field Amputation Of Cadaveric Extremity Utilizing A Novel
Technique For Real Time Lower Extremity Perfusion
with a Blood Simulant
David Wilcocks, MD, University Of Virginia Health Sciences Center
A Paratonsillar Abscess Model
Matthew Fischer, MD, Resident, University of Illinois Peoria College School of Medicine
A Cost-Effective Realistic Interactive Cricothyrotomy Model:
The CRIC Model
Alisa V. Wray, MD, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
TRACK
YOUR
CME
Track
your CME
SAEM
Makes it
Easy.
saem.org/cme
76
Wednesday, May 11: 11:00 am-3:00 pm — Bayside C (4th Floor)
Thursday, May 12: 3:00 pm-4:00 pm — Orpheus Cornet (8th Floor)
IGNITE! SAEM is an exciting, informal event at which your colleagues will address a variety of emergency medicine topics. Each speaker will have 5 minutes to present 20 slides, each of which automatically advances after only 15 seconds,
whether the presenter is ready or not! Come be a part of this fast-paced, action-packed experience.
Wednesday - 1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Wednesday - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
1
Essential Tips in Creating a Memorable Resident Roast Video
Sudhir Baliga, MD
11 Resident Documentation Education
Michael Nauss, MD
2
Patient Centered Outcomes: Top Ten Tips to Make a Difference
Elizabeth Goldberg, MD
12 False-positive Urine Drug Screens
Breanne Jacobs, MD
3Empathy Causes Brain Pain, So Cut It Out Before You Burn Out
(and Learn Compassionate Mindfulness Instead)
Colleen Marie McQuown, MD
13 Traumatic Proptosis and the Vision Saving Procedure
Lindsay Taylor, MD
14 Ultrasound and Bioeffects
Turandot Saul, MD
4
Medical Heroes of War
Thaer Ahmad, MD
5
Physician Marriage: What I Didn’t Learn in Medical School
Seth Lotterman, MD
15Performing Transesophageal Echocardiography in the Emergency
Department: The Future is Here, It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed Yet
Felipe Teran Merino, MD
6
Cognitive Errors in the Emergency Room
Simran Buttar, MD
16 Surviving Midnights: Lessons Learned from Kindergarten
Jumana Nagarwala, MD
7The Approach to the Injured Hand: Lending You a Hand
with the Hand
John Marshall, MD
8
That Time I Gave My Patient a Heart Attack
Farhad Aziz, MD
9
Ultrasound Guided Subclavian Line ?!%#?
Michael Zwank, MD
1015 Rapid Pediatric Emergency Diagnosis by Point-of-Care
Ultrasound in 6 Second Clips
James Tsung, MD, MPH
IGNITE! SAEM — M AY 10-13, 2016
IGNITE! SAEM
17 Ultrasound Guided Care of the Distal Radius Fracture
Michael Zwank, MD
18Practical Treatment of Cancer Pain in the ED: Using the Opioid
Conversion Worksheet to Guide Effective Dosing Strategies for
Cancer Patients in a Pain Crisis
Eashwar Chandrasekaran, MD, MSc
19Dr. Spacelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Go to Mars
Andrew Ketterer, MD
20Getting to Know You: How Knowing Yourself Better Can Help
You Find You the Right Mentor
Tarina Kang, MD
Thursday - 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
21When Being Right Isn’t Always Right - Exploring Physician
Confirmation Bias
Michael Joyce, MD
22Some Simple Economics of Emergency Medicine
Ari Friedman, MD, PhD
23Thinking About Thinking: Biases And Heuristics In the
Emergency Department
Ravindra Gopaul, MD
24 Sorry Mr. Reporter, That Doctor is a She
Namita Jayaprakash, MB, BcH, BAO, MRCEM
25Manual Uterine Aspiration: Adding to the Emergency
Physician Stabilization Toolkit
Kelly Quinley, MD
26Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound: Why No Two are the Same
Joshua Guttman, MD, FRCPC
27 Temporary Protective Custody of a Child
Matthew Pirotte, MD
28 Housing Rx: Stabilizing Your Frequent Fliers
Dennis Hsieh, MD, JD
29M-mode Ultrasound In the Emergency Department:
Wielding the Ice Pick
Melvin Ku, MD
30Sickle Cell Disease: Managing the Pain and
Supporting the Patient
Caroline Freiermuth, MD
77
NEW ORLEANS, LA
SAEM16
FUND 20
RUN 16
MAY 12
B EN EF I T T I N G
The SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair
Open to All Medical Students & Residents
at the SAEM16 Annual Meeting
Friday, May 13 from 3:00 pm–5:00 pm
Armstrong Ballroom (8th Floor)
78
M AY 10-13
CLAIMING CME CREDITS
HAS GONE ELECTRONIC!
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
EXHIBIT
HALL HOURS
Now you can claim your CME credits from
your PC, Mac, or mobile device.
HERE’S HOW:
Go to www.saem.org/cme. You can browse by day
or session, create an itinerary, or enter search
criteria. Evaluate your session(s) in real-time and
print or email your certificate immediately!
Some highlights of the new electronic CME process:
• Print or email your certificate immediately,
no more waiting!
• Evaluate and give feedback on sessions
in real-time!
• Can’t find your CME certificate?
No problem, log back in and reprint!
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with
the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation
Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint
providership of the University of Cincinnati and Society for Academic
Emergency Medicine.
The University of Cincinnati designates this live activity for a
maximum of 26 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim
only the credits commensurate with the extent of their participation
in the activity.
The opinions expressed during the live activity are those of the
faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of the University of
Cincinnati. The information is presented for the purpose of advancing
the attendees’ professional development.
TUESDAY, MAY 10
Exhibit Hall Open: 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Hurricane Party: 4:30 pm-6:00pm
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
Exhibit Hall Open: 7:00 am-9:00 am
Networking Breakfast: 7:00 am-9:00 am
Exhibit Hall Open: 1:00 pm-4:00 pm
Afternoon Break: 2:30 pm-3:00 pm
THURSDAY, MAY 12
Exhibit Hall Open: 7:00 am-1:00 pm
Continental Breakfast: 7:00 am-8:00 am
Walking Lunch: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
79
SAEM16 MODER ATORS
Ack nowledgment of
Abstr act R eviewers and Moder ators
I wanted to personally thank you for the significant time, effort, and resources you devoted to reviewing
and moderating the many abstracts submitted for SAEM16. This was once again a record-breaking
year for submissions in sheer numbers, so your service was appreciated more than ever. It is only
through your efforts that the SAEM annual meeting continues to be the best peer reviewed forum for
research in emergency medicine. The continued success of these important academic achievements
depends on your continued enthusiasm in supporting the SAEM mission.
Thanks again,
Ali Raja, MD
on behalf of the Program Committee, SAEM16
SAEM16 Moderators
80
Srikar R. Adhikari, MD, MS
Walter L. Green, MD
Jeffrey A. Nielson, MD
Aaron N. Barksdale, MD
Sanjey Gupta, MD
Edward Panacek, MD, MPh
Daren M. Beam, MD
Karisa Harland, PhD
James Paxton, MD
Gillian A. Beauchamp, MD
Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, MD, PhD
Michael C. Plewa, MD
Aaron Brody, MD
Thomas Merryfield Jarrett, MD, PhD
Michael A. Puskarich, MD
Elizabeth Burner, MD
Christopher Kabrhel, MD, MPH
Joshua C. Reynolds, MD
Nicholas D. Caputo, MD, MSc
Kelly Klein, MD
Kristin L. Rising, MD, MS
Keri Carstairs, MD
Vijaya Arun Kumar, MD, FA/AFP
Jessica Shackman, MD
Mary Chang, MD
Ryan Lafollette, MD
Sophia Sheikh, MD
Jeffrey Chien, MD
Sangil Lee, MD
Richard H. Sinert, DO
Sunday Clark, ScD, MPH
Maryann E. Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD
Jean Sun, MD
Casey M. Clements, MD, PhD
Colleen Marie McQuown, MD
William Toon, EdD, NRP
Moira Davenport, MD
Zachary Franklin Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc
Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA
M. Kit Delgado, MD
Joseph Miller, MD
Jody Vogel, MD, MPH
Lawrence A. DeLuca, MD
Dave Milzman, MD, FACEP
Muhammad Waseem, MD
Amy A. Ernst, MD
Nicholas M. Mohr, MD
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH
Ari B. Friedman, PhD
Mark B. Mycyk, MD
Steven J. Weiss, MD
Nidhi Garg, MD
Ana Marie Navio Serrano, MD
Benjamin White, MD
Munish Goyal, MD
Benjamin D. Nicholson, MD
John Acerra, MD
Nidhi Garg, MD
Paul Musey, MD
Srikar R. Adhikari, MD, MS
Naomi George, MD
Mark B. Mycyk, MD
Maryann E. Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD
Tadahiro Goto, MD
Ana Marie Navio Serrano, MD
Ryan Arnold, MD
Michael Gottlieb, MD
Steven Nazario, MD
Aaron N. Barksdale, MD
Munish Goyal, MD
Benjamin D. Nicholson, MD
Aveh Bastani, MD
Walter L. Green, MD
Jeffrey A. Nielson, MD
Daren M. Beam, MD
Sanjey Gupta, MD
Patrick Olivieri, MDv
Gillian A. Beauchamp, MD
Barry Hahn, MD
Edward Panacek, MD, MPh
David G. Beiser, MD
Kohei Hasegawa, MD, MPH
Joseph Pare, MD
David Berger, MD
Sara W. Heinert, MPH
James Paxton, MD
Rachel Berkowitz, MD
Jeremiah Hinson, MD, MPH
Michael C. Plewa, MD
Colleen Marie McQuown, MD
Kathryn Hollenbach, PhD
Matthew E. Prekker, MD
Irina Brennan, MD
Jeffrey Hom, MD, MPH
Michael A. Puskarich, MD
Aaron Brody, MD
Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, MD, PhD
Eric F. Reichman, MD, PhD
Elizabeth Burner, MD
Aloysius J. Humbert, MD
Joshua C. Reynolds, MD
Caleb Patrick Canders, MD
Brian Ichwan, MD
Ryan Ribeira, MD
Nicholas D. Caputo, MD, MSc
Kyle Irby, MD
Kristin L. Rising, MD, MS
Holly Caretta-Weyer, MD
Thomas Merryfield Jarrett, MD, PhD
Matthew F. Ryan, MD, PhD
Brendan G. Carr, MD
Christopher Jones, MD
Debjeet Sarkar, MD
Keri Carstairs, MD
Howard S Kim, MD
Lauren Sauer, MS
Edward M. Castillo, PhD, MPH
Kelly Klein, MD
John G. Schumacher, PhD
Mary Chang, MD
Chadd K. Kraus, DO, DrPH
Jessica Shackman, MD
Jeffrey Duke Chien, MD
Vijaya Arun Kumar, MD, FA/AFP
Sophia Sheikh, MD
John J. Cienki, MD
Ryan LaFollette, MD
Richard H. Sinert, DO
Sunday Clark, ScD, MPH
Sangil Lee, MD
Stephanie Stapleton, MD
Casey M. Clements, MD, PhD
Michael Levine, MD
Catherine A. Staton, MD
Kevin Michael Cullison, MD
Michelle Lin, MD,
Sarah Sterling, MD
Moira Davenport, MD
Karen Lind, MD
Jean Sun, MD
Erin Dehon, PhD
David P. Lisbon, MD
William Toon, EdD, NRP
M. Kit Delgado, MD
Marc L. Martel, MD
Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA
Lawrence A. DeLuca, MD
Brandon Maughan, MD, MHS, MSHP
Bandana Vishwakarma, M Tech, PhD
Phillip A. Dixon, MD
James C. McClay, MD
Muhammad Waseem, MD
Kenneth W. Dodd, MD
Denise E. Mccormack, MD
Eric Wei, MD, MBA
Naomi Dreisinger, MD
Shelley L. McLeod, MSc
Lori A. Weichenthal, MD
Phillip A. Dixon, MD
Zachary Franklin Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc
Scott G. Weiner, MD, MPH
Daniel J. Egan, MD
Raina Merchant, MD
Steven J. Weiss, MD
Robert Ehrman, MD
Daniel Migliaccio, MD
Matthew Wong, MD, MPH
Amy A. Ernst, MD
Joseph Miller, MD
Shiming Yang, PhD
Vanessa Suzanne Franco, MD
Dave Milzman, MD, FACEP
Maame Yaa A.B. Yiadom, MD, MPH
Ari B. Friedman, PhD
Nicholas M. Mohr, MD
ABSTR ACT REVIEWERS
SAEM16 Abstract Reviewers
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ABSTR ACT REVIEWERS
Ack nowledgment of
Medical Student A mbassadors
On behalf of the Program Committee, we would like to thank a group of very special people without
whom this conference would not run smoothly: Our Medical Student Ambassadors (MSAs). We had a
record number of extraordinary medical students from across the country apply for the MSA program
this year. The forty who were chosen are the best of the best. We are so thankful to them for taking a
week out of their schedules to make sure each and every didactic session, poster session, workshop
and event goes off without a hitch. Check out the educational pearls that they will be tweeting from
each #SAEM16 session. If you need help during the conference, seek them out in their red or blue
polo shirts - and please remember to also thank them for all of their hard work this week!
Sincerest thanks,
Your Medical Student Ambassador Committee
Ryan LaFollette, MD Co-Chair
David Kim, MD
Jean Sun, MD
Alexis Pelletier-Bui, MD Co-Chair
Ben Ma, MD
Kelly Thomas, MD
Chelsea Dymond
University of Queensland
-Ochsner
Rohan Bansal
NYU School of Medicine
Vidya Eswaran
Baylor College of Medicine
Kregg Laundon
University of Queensland
Ochsner Clinical School
Keith Bernis
Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
Christopher Evans
University of California, San Diego
Aaron Lee
UC San Diego
Cosmin Florescu
UC Irvine School of Medicine
Jesse Lee
Western University of
Health Sciences
Evan Broder
University of Alabama in
Birmingham School of Medicine
Elizabeth Buchanan
Central Michigan University
Suman Gupta
The Ohio State University College
of Medicine
Adriana Coleska
University of Michigan
Michal Halon
Wayne State University School of
Medicine
Andrew Colson
University of Mississippi
Medical Center
Sarah Harris
University of Arizona College of
Medicine - Tucson
Brett Dickens
University of Kentucky
Patrick Herling
Lincoln Memorial UniversityDebusk College of Osteopathic
Medicine
Aryeneesh Dotiwala
LSU Health Sciences Center Shreveport
Edward-Michael Dussom
Louisiana State University School
of Medicine – New Orleans
82
Joshua Kaine
University of Kentucky
Armon Ayandeh
Warren Alpert Medical
School of Brown University
Elizabeth Matheson
The Ohio State University College
of Medicine
Monica Melmer
University of Virginia School of
Medicine
Julia Moon
Cooper Medical School of Rowan
University
Demetrio Munoz
SUNY Upstate
Alex Huh
University of Pittsburgh
Sunny Patel
New York University School of
Medicine
Daniel Ichwan
UCLA
Jerome Rogich
University of Massachusetts
Medical School
Victoria Serven
Louisiana State University
-New Orleans
Eileen Shi
University of California, San Diego
Kyle Stigall
University of Kentucky
Sophia Stone
University of Washington
Ronnie Tisdale
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mt. Sinai
Alexandria Tran
University of Nebraska
Medical Center
Katie VanNatta
Kansas City University of
Medicine and Biosciences
Brandon Wang
NYU School of Medicine
David Yang
Louisiana State University,
School of Medicine, New Orleans
There were over 120 cases and photos submitted to the Program
Committee for presentation at SAEM16. The selected photos and
cases will be displayed either by Visual Diagnosis Unknowns or
Clinical Pearls.
Medical students and residents are invited to participate in the 2016
Visual Diagnosis Contest. The winners in the medical student and
resident categories will be awarded a one-year membership in
SAEM, a subscription to Academic Emergency Medicine Journal
(AEM), a free registration to attend SAEM17 in Orlando, FL, a major
Emergency Medicine textbook, and a subscription to the SAEM
Newsletter. Winners will be announced in the July/August issue of
the SAEM Newsletter.
The Clinical Pearls photos will be displayed alongside the Visual
Diagnosis contest images. These photos will include a case history,
a diagnosis and “take home” points. SAEM is proud to display
original photos of educational value and gratefully acknowledges
the efforts of the individuals who contributed to this year’s Clinical
Pearls and Visual Diagnosis Contest entries as well as the patients
who graciously allowed themselves to be photographed for our
educational benefit.
PHOTOGR APHY EXHIBIT & VISUAL DIAGNOSIS CONTEST
PHOTOGR APHY EXHIBIT & VISUAL DIAGNOSIS CONTEST
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT & VISUAL DIAGNOSIS PARTICIPANTS
Rawan Alosaimi, MD
Emory University
Rebecca Hess, MD
University of Michigan
Devon Peele, MD
Eastern Virginia Medical School
Brittany Betham, MD
University of Cincinnati
Edmond Hooker MD, DrPH
University of Cincinnati
Tom Peterson, MD
University of Michigan/St. Joseph Mercy Hospital
Russell Chan DO
Morristown Medical Center
Jami Jackson DO, MPH
Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics
Lindsey Pryor, MD
SUNY Upstate
Shea Cheney, MD
Denver Health Medical Center
David Jones, MD
University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria (UICOMP)
Joel Ramey, MD
Geisinger Medical Center
Steve Christos MS, DO
Presence Resurrection Medial Center
Juwarat Kadiri MD, MPH
Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency BWH/MGH
Jennifer Rossi, MD
Oregon Health & Science University
James Cunningham, MD
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Maika Dang, MD
University of Cincinnati
Anna Deal, MD
Eastern Virginia Medical School
Lucia Derks, MD
University of Cincinnati
Sean Dyer, MD
John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County
Whitney Faulconer DO
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Sarah Frasure, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Saman Kashani MD, MSc
LAC+USC Department of Emergency Medicine
Yooree Kim
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Grace Lagasse, MD
University of Cincinnati
Katrina Landa, MD
Naval Medical Center San Diego
Robert Kregg Laundon, MD
University of Queensland Ochsner Clinical School
Brian Lehnhof DO
Kent Hospital EMRP
James Saunders, MD
Maimonides Medical Center
Sarah Sebby DO
Naval Medical Center San Diego
Isaac Shaw, MD
University of Cincinnati Department of Emergency Medicine
Julie Teuber, MD
University of Cincinnati
Jacob Thomas, MD
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Alison Thurber, MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University
Molly Tolins, MD
University of Washington
Paul Freeman, MD
Madigan Army Medical Center
Shao-Feng Liao, MD
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
Eric Funk, MD
Mayo Clinic
Katherine Moore, MD
Cooper University Hospital
Jordan Tozer, MD
Virginia Commonwealth University
Benjamin Garrick, MD
Georgia Regents University
Shelley Murphy, MD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
David Tseng, MD
Boston Medical Center
Anita Goel, MD
University of Cincinnati Medical Center
Jonathan Nogueira, MD
Virginia Tech Carilion
Agnes Usoro BSN
University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine
Walter L Green, MD
UTSouthwestern Medical School
David Page, MD
UAB
Kathryn West, MD
Carolinas Healthcare System
Matthew Heimann, MD
University of Alabama - Birmingham
Bart Paull, MD
Denver Health
Stephanie Wilsey, MD
Cooper University Hospital
Peter Toth, MD
University of Cincinnati
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EXHIBITORS
SAEM16 EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
Academic Emergency
Medicine (AEM)
Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) is the
official, peer reviewed journal of the Society
for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).
AEM has over 5,000 individual subscribers,
plus access through medical libraries, universities, hospitals, and academic centers worldwide. Published bi-monthly, AEM’s goal is to
advance the science, education, and clinical
practice of emergency medicine, to serve as
a voice for the academic emergency medicine
community, and to enhance the goals and
objectives of SAEM.
Booth 400
Publication
www.saem.org/publications/aem-journal
Air Force Recruiting Services
Allergan USA, Inc
AHC Media provides critical emergency medicine information and continuing education
to improve patient care and outcomes. CME/
CE is available in various formats, including:
publications, webinars and online modules.
For more than four decades, AHC Media has
fostered professional development through
compelling, practical, award winning content
developed by independent editorial review
boards from top teaching institutions. Emergency Medicine Reports, Pediatric Emergency
Medicine Reports and Trauma Reports are but
a few of AHC Media’s most recognized EM resources.
Air Force Recruiting Service - The world’s
greatest Air Force; powered by Airmen, fueled by innovation. Practice Medicine Instead
of Paperwork. Air Force physicians provide
medical care for our nation’s heroes. They
work with state-of-the-art medicine in a
group practice and participate in humanitarian and aeromedical missions worldwide.
You too, can enjoy career growth with great
benefits, no malpractice insurance worries or
overhead expenses.
Allergan (NYSE: AGN) is a unique, global
pharmaceutical company focused on developing, manufacturing and commercializing
high quality generic and innovative branded
pharmaceutical products for patients around
the world. The Company has approximately
30,000 employees worldwide and maintains
global headquarters in Dublin, Ireland.
Booth 412
Publishing
www.AHCMedia.com
American Academy of
Emergency Medicine (AAEM)
American College of
Emergency Physicians (ACEP)
The American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM) is the specialty society in emergency medicine today. We provide dedicated
support and unparalleled value to over 8,000
emergency physicians, residents, and medical students through our direct advocacy and
educational programs. For over 20 years the
personal and professional welfare of the individual specialist in emergency medicine has
been our primary concern.
ACEP represents more than 33,000 emergency physicians, emergency medicine residents
and medical students. ACEP promotes the
highest quality of emergency care and is the
leading advocate for emergency physicians
and their patients, and the public. The College
continually strives to improve the quality of
emergency medical services through the
development of evidence-based clinical policies, funding emergency medicine research,
providing public education on emergency
care and disaster preparedness, legislative
and regulatory advocacy efforts, continuing
medical education (CME) and publishes Annals of Emergency Medicine, the specialty’s
leading peer-reviewed scientific journal.
Booth 113
Affiliate
www.acep.org
Booth 112
Affiliate
www.aaem.org
CEP America
CEP America is a true democratic multispecialty physician group, and one of the largest in the U.S. With highly satisfying career
opportunities for physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners for over 40
years, CEP America continues to provide the
highest quality of care to patients. We offer
the best practice locations nationwide with
comprehensive practice management support, and education opportunities for career
growth. Learn more at: www.cep.com/careers.
Booth 210
Staffing and Management
www.cep.com/careers
84
ACH Media
Eastern Virginia
Medical School
The Medical and Health Professions Education online master’s degree program prepares
leaders in medical and health professions
educational settings. Courses focus on learning theory, instructional methods, curriculum
design, assessment of learning, leadership
and professionalism, research in medical and
health professions education, and program
evaluation, with an emphasis on real world,
practical applications. Students may select
a concentration in either graduate medical
education or medical and health professions
education.
Booth 205
Educational
www.evms.edu
Booth 108
Staffing and Management
www.airforce.com
Booth 102
Pharmaceutical
www.allergan.com
B-Line Medical
BRC
B-Line Medical provides the most trusted,
easy-to-use web-based platforms for video
capture, debriefing, operations management
and analysis to help healthcare providers
and educators enhance patient safety and
improve the delivery of care. Our platforms
have helped over 450+ top hospitals, medical schools, and nursing programs in 25 countries operate and manage their training and
QI programs.
BRC needs physicians with engineering
degrees who are experienced in practicing
medicine & ideally have some practical engineering work experience. Qualified physicians will have a bachelor’s level or higher
in Biomechanical, Aerospace, Biomedical,
Mechanical, Electrical, or Chemical Engineering areas & will have practiced in Orthopedics, Emergency Medicine, Neurology, Family Practice, Aerospace Medicine or Surgery.
Board certification is required. Relocation to
San Antonio, Texas is required.
Booth 404
Simulation
www.blinemedical.com
Booth 305
Staffing and Management/Recruiting
www.brconline.com
Edelberg and Associates
Elite Medical Scribes
Caral Edelberg founded Edelberg + Associates to reimagine medical coding. By
addressing major deficiencies within emergency medicine departments, E+A has
streamlined the revenue cycle and standards
of care for hospitals, practices and providers.
As the leading name in emergency medical coding, E+A specializes in downcoding
reduction, revenue leak identification, and
groundbreaking education. At Edelberg +
Associates, we strive to provide our partners
with the best and have helped them save millions of dollars annually.
At Elite Medical Scribes, our dedication to
creating a standard of excellence in the scribe
industry is unparalleled. As clinicians seek to
ensure quality health care outcomes, it falls
to Elite to ensure superior levels of service,
customized to meet the unique demands of
every medical specialty, tailored to support
confident _ and most importantly successful
_ patient care. Trusted by some of the most
prestigious health care systems, Elite has the
expertise to deliver superior results.
Booth 317
www.edelberg.com
Booth 116
Scribe
www.elitemedicalscribes.com
EmCare
EmCare is one of the nation’s most integrated,
state-of-the-art, physician-led practice management companies. From academic medical centers to innovative mobile integrated
health opportunities, and everything in between, our coast-to-coast leadership, mentorship and staff physician opportunities enable you to pursue your specific passion (e.g.
academics, EMS, aeronautical, telehealth,
etc.) Enjoy competitive compensation &
benefits with FT, PT & IC flexibility. Call
(855) 367-3650 or search jobs at our website.
Booth 204
Staffing and Management
www.EmCare.com
Emergency Service
Partners LP
Emergency Medicine
Associates (EMA)
Emergency
Medicine Physicians (EMP)
Emergency Medicine
Residents’ Association (EMRA)
Emergency Medicine Associates, P.A., P.C.
(EMA) is a well-established, regional,
democratic, physician-managed group that
provides staffing to twenty suburban, community emergency departments in Virginia,
Maryland, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia. EMA provides practice environments
that emphasize Clinician Satisfaction and
Patient Safety.
EMP is 100% physician owned and managed --and we love it! We enjoy equal equity
partnership, amazing benefits, including outstanding fully funded retirement, equal profit
sharing, and the best med mal around. Six
time recipient of Modern Healthcare’s “Best
Places to Work in Healthcare” thanks in part
to our legendary culture. 65 sites nationwide
and growing with opportunities in: AZ, CA,
CO, CT, FL, HI, IL, KY, MD, MI, NV, NH, NY, NC,
OH, OK, PA, RI, WV.
The Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA) is the premier organization for
emergency medicine physicians-in-training
and medical students interested in emergency medicine. While at SAEM, attend our
Committee and Division meetings to connect
with others with similar interests, cheer on
programs at the EMRA Quiz Show and join
the conversation at our Rep Council meeting.
And don’t miss the EMRA Party! Stop by the
EMRA booth or an EMRA meeting to become
involved!
Booth 114
Staffing
www.emaonline.com
Booth 311
Staffing and Management
www.emp.com
Booth 414
Affiliate
www.emra.org
EMrecruits
GE Healthcare
Greenville Health System
Emergency Service Partners, L.P. is a physician-owned emergency medicine group. For
more than 25 years, we’ve earned an excellent reputation for delivering high-quality
care at more than 35 EDs across Texas. Our
physicians serve as faculty for the UT Austin
EM Residency, as well as the Pediatric EM Fellowship in Austin. If you’re seeking a collegial
working environment in a state favorable to
physicians, look no further! Visit us and learn
why you belong here.
EMrecruits provides physicians and advanced
practice providers a focused, professional,
and effective career changing experience. We
provide direct access to permanent positions
with dynamic, independent private practices
in 28 states across the nation. Our network of
clients offers a choice of pace, relationships,
and compensation models. Whether you are
looking for urban or tertiary care centers,
freestanding EDs or urgent care centers. We
have multiple options waiting for you to discover. 877.379.1088, info@EMrecruits.com
GE is making a new commitment to health.
Healthymagination will change the way we
approach healthcare, with more than 100
innovations all focused on addressing three
critical needs: lowering costs, touching more
lives and improving quality.
Greenville Health System seeks BC/BE Physicians to staff its academic Level I Trauma Center, 5 community hospitals, and Urgent Care
Centers in the Department of EM. Successful
candidates should be prepared to shape the
future EM Residency Program and contribute
to the academic output of the department.
GHS serves as a tertiary referral center for
the Upstate region. Our department includes
a dedicated Pediatric ED, accredited Chest
Pain Center, Comprehensive Stroke Center,
and EMS.
Booth 303
Staffing and Management
www.eddocs.com
Booth 307
Staffing and Management
www.Emrecruits.com
Hays Innovations
Hospital Corporation
of America (HCA)
Hays Innovations is a veteran, minority and
physician owned company that specializes
in the development and production of novel
medical products. Our current featured innovation is the Anchor SoundTM, an innovative solution which allows the user to attach
an ultrasound probe to the sterile field and
thereby avoid ultrasound probe damage, the
device also increases efficiency and decreases
the potential for sterile field contamination.
Our company designs other products involving point-of-care ultrasound and trauma
care.
Booth 315
Medical Supplies
www.haysinnovations.com
HCA owns and operates over 160 healthcare
facilities in 20 states with opportunities coast
to coast. HCA was one of the nation’s first
hospital companies. We are committed to
the care and improvement of human life. We
strive to deliver quality healthcare that meets
the needs of the communities we serve.
Booth 111
Recruiting
www.practicewithus.com
Booth 313
Ultrasound
www.gehealthcare.com
EXHIBITORS
SAEM16 EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
Booth 314
Staffing and Management
www.ghs.org
Infinity Healthcare
Infinity HealthCare is a highly regarded group
practice with strong links to academic Emergency Medicine in Wisconsin and Illinois. A
number of our partners maintain academic
appointments at University of Illinois in Chicago; Rosalind Franklin U; Midwestern University or the Medical College of Wisconsin.
At St Francis Hospital in Evanston, IL “Our
partners are all active core faculty in the Presence Resurrection Emergency Medicine Residency. Since 1977, we have been teaching
Emergency Medicine at various community
hospitals throughout Illinois and Wisconsin.”
Booth 115
www.infinityhealthcare.com
IU School of Medicine
Department of
Emergency Medicine
IUSM EM is seeking qualfied applicants for
adult and pediatric faculty positions with opportunities in education, teaching, research,
program leadership/development, and clinical care. In addition to offering competitive
benefits and salary, we are committed to flexibility and support to facilitate development of
research and educational activities. Clinical or
tenure track appointments are commensurate
with qualifications and experience. Physician
applicants must be board certified (or eligible)
and eligible for licensure in the State of Indiana. Interested candidates should submit CVs
by email to emjobs@indiana.edu (Attn: Dr.
Cherri Hobgood, Department Chair).
Booth 4110
Staffing and Recruiting
www.emergency.medicine.iu.edu
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EXHIBITORS
SAEM16 EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a pharmaceutical company of Johnson & Johnson,
provides medicines for an array of health concerns in several therapeutic areas, including:
mental health, cardiovascular disease and
diabetes. Our ultimate goal is to help people
live healthy lives. We have produced and marketed many first-in-class prescription medications and are poised to serve the broad
needs of the healthcare market from patients
to practitioners, from clinics to hospitals.
Booth 214
Pharmaceutical
www.janssenpharmaceuticalsinc.com
Kaiser Permanente/
The Permanente Medical
Group, Inc.
Through our leadership in the use of advanced
technology, our creation of innovative solutions and our influence on health policy and
reform efforts, Kaiser Permanente is shaping
the future of health care in the nation. We are
proud of our physicians who work collaboratively to create a culture of healing to provide
comprehensive care, achieve superior clinical
outcomes and help each member maximize
his or her total health.
Booth 217
Recruiting
physiciancareers-ncal.kaiserpermanente.org
Metrics Lab
MEP Health
Medtrics Lab, a medical software company
founded by physicians, specializes in building applications that improve efficiency in
clinical training. Medtrics is the company’s
flagship platform which provides advanced
residency management tools for ACGME
accredited institutions. It was developed
by physicians in GME programs and is the
first system developed from the ground up
to meet compliance requirements under
ACGME’s Next Accreditation System (NAS).
Medtrics simplifies the compliance process
on an institutional and program level.
A founding partner in US Acute Care Solutions, MEP is an emergency and outpatient
care provider serving more than 500,000 patients annually in the Mid-Atlantic and New
England. MEP helps hospitals and health systems dramatically improve performance and
outpatient care through an integrated system
of emergency medicine, observation care,
urgent care and skilled nursing care services.
Booth 103
Staffing and Management / Recruitment
www.mephealth.com
Booth 411
Software / Education
www.medtricslab.com
OtoSim
OtoSim, Inc. is the leading innovator in
otoscopy and ophthalmoscopy simulation
training tools. OtoSim 2™, PneumatoSim™,
and OphthoSim™ simulation systems include motion-tracking examination devices,
libraries of clinical scenarios, and a series of
interactive self-examinations to bridge the
training gap between the classroom and
the clinic, enabling trainees to develop skills
to excel in the clinical environment. Clinical
studies have shown a doubling in diagnostic
accuracy with OtoSim™.
Booth 104
Simulation
www.otosim.com
86
Leading Edge
Medical Associates (LEMA)
Mallinckrodt
Pharmaceuticals
Leading Edge Medical Associates is a oneof-a-kind, private, independent group of all
board-certified EM physicians in the piney
woods of northeast Texas. LEMA is unique in
its ability to offer physicians the best of both
worlds, hospital-based and/or free-standing,
academic and community medicine. LEMA is
a group of exemplary physicians who work
as a team, value each member’s input, and
have a level of integrity, honesty and trust
that make this innovative group truly oneof-a-kind.
Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals is an industry
leader in providing specialty biopharmaceutical products used in the treatment of autoimmune and rare disease specialty areas, respiratory therapies, pain and related conditions,
and diagnostic procedures. The company’s
three segments include branded medicines
and devices, generic drugs and medical imaging.
Booth 301
Staffing and Management
www.LEMA-EM.com
National Board of
Osteopathic Medical
Examiners (NBOME)
Since 1934, NBOME has served as the leading assessment organization for the osteopathic medical profession. The NBOME fills
an important role, assuring those who seek
osteopathic medical care in the U.S. receive
care by physicians who have qualified by
virtue of passing a valid, reliable and rigorous examinations designed for the practice of
osteopathic medicine. COMLEX-USA provides
the pathway to licensure for osteopathic physicians and is required for graduation to earn
a DO degree.
Booth 117
Pharmaceuticals
www.mallinckrodt.com
SAEM OnDemand
Learn how to access your FREE SAEM16 OnDemand content. Up to 70 hours of educational
content available. If you missed a session,
no worries view it OnDemand when you get
back to the shop!
Booth 416
Vendor Partner
www.ondemand.saem.org
Booth 402
www.nbome.org
Pain Assessment &
Management Initiative (PAMI):
A Patient Safety Project; UF College of
Medicine/Jacksonville Department of EM
Pain Assessment and Management Initiative
(PAMI) is a free access e-Learning and patient
safety educational project that aims to improve
pain management in ED, EMS, and hospital settings. All materials are multidisciplinary and
can be adapted for your educational training
programs, ED, or hospital. Materials include Pain
Management and Dosing Guides, educational
tools, case scenarios, patient resources and free
CME/CEUs. Learning module topics include: Procedural Sedation, Pain Basics, Pediatric, Pharmacologic, Nonpharmacologic and EMS Pain
Management. Funding provided by FMMJUA
and University of Florida College of MedicineJacksonville Dept. of Emergency Medicine.
Booth 105
Education
www.pami.emergency.med.jax.ufl.edu
Penn State
Hershey Medical Center
As one of Pennsylvania’s busiest Emergency
Departments with 26+ physicians treating
over 70,000 patients annually, Penn State
Hershey Medical Center is a 551- bed Magnet
healthcare organization and the only Level
1 Adult and Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center
in PA. We host state of the art resuscitation/
trauma bays, an incorporated Pediatric Emergency Department, and Observation Unit
along with our Life Lion Flight Critical Care
and Ground EMS Division. Be inspired. Join
Penn State Hershey.
Booth 406
Staffing & Management
www.pennstatehershey.org
Questcare
Questcare is a physician-operated Emergency
Medicine organization with an academic
focus on quality medicine. Questcare is an
entrepreneurial group with a vision and dedication to career growth and development.
Questcare delivers high-quality emergency
care in twenty facilities in Dallas-Fort Worth,
El Paso, and Oklahoma City. Questcare focuses
on supporting and establishing successful
emergency medicine careers for new physicians. Questcare is a subsidiary of Coloradobased Envision Healthcare.
Booth 216
Staffing and Management
www.questcare.com
Rosh Review
ScribeAmerica
Sharp Medical Products, LLC
Sheridan Healthcare
Rosh Review is the go to resource for residents preparing for the ITE and physicians,
preparing for their certification exams. We
combine expert question writers, high-yield
content, comprehensive explanations...all in
a simple, user-friendly interface. We make
Program Directors’ lives easier with our Program Director’s Dashboard, which tracks and
analyzes residents’ performance and serves
as an interface for Individualized Interactive
Instruction. We believe in one rule...everything should be made as simple as possible,
but not simpler.
ScribeAmerica is the nation’s most frequently
used medical scribe company with more than
10,000 employees in 48 states providing professional services for over 1,200 clients. With
a ScribeAmerica scribe program, physicians
can increase their reimbursements, leave
on time and improve job satisfaction, while
delivering more efficient patient care directly
at the bedside, not behind a computer. Let us
show you how ScribeAmerica can help you
increase productivity and spend more time
with your patients.
Chest tube insertions have been around
for more than 100 years with virtually no
change! The Reactor™ may be the first true
minimally invasive device for medium to
large chest tube insertions. Smaller incisions
and faster procedure times are key advantages of the Reactor™. How are you inserting
your rchest tubes? Watch our videos at www.
sharpmedicalproducts.com and visit us at
booth 304!
Sheridan Healthcare, Inc. is a leading hospital-based physician services company in the
country, providing outsourced clinical and
management services in emergency medicine
since 1994. Since then, Sheridan Emergency
Services has been providing metric-driven
solutions to healthcare systems seeking to
integrate the Emergency Department into
the institution’s care delivery model. Operating hospital-based programs in adult and
pediatric emergency medicine, Sheridan is
recognized by the National Committee for
Quality Assurance as a certified physician organization.
Booth 212
Education
www.roshreview.com
Booth 110
Scribe
www.scribeamerica.com
Booth 304
Medical Device
www.sharpmedicalproducts.com
Booth 306
Staffing and Management
www.sheridanhealthcare.com
Shift Administrators
SonoSim
Splash Medical Devices
Shift Admin is a 100% web-based schedule
management system serving over 2,800 facilities and over 30,000 providers. The Shift
Admin system includes an extremely powerful schedule generation algorithm that is
easy to use. The system also allows you to
manage schedules for one or many facilities,
and its features include shift posting/trading/splitting, schedule requests, automatic
syncing with external calendar software, private and public URL options, extensive stats,
payroll, and reporting, and more.
SonoSim, Inc. is dedicated to improving and
transforming medical care by serving as a
global leader in ultrasound education and
training. With its staff of leading ultrasound
educators, instructional designers, content
editors, scientists, and software developers,
SonoSim has created the easiest way to learn
ultrasonography, The SonoSim® Ultrasound
Training Solution.
Products invented by an Emergency Room
physician who is focused on making treatments more efficient and effective. Come
see the SplashCap (wound irrigation), EyeCap
(eye irrigation), AbscessCap (abscess irrigation), Schnozzle (nose irrigation), EarCap
(ear irrigation) and EasiEar (ear curette). Save
time, Save Money, Safety! Stop by our booth
for product demo.
Booth 203
Ultrasound
www.sonosim.com
Booth 316
Medical Device
www.splashcap.com
Booth 202
Software
www.shiftadmin.com
The Society for Academic
Emergency Medicine (SAEM)
The Society of Academic Emergency Medicine
is a global network of 6,000+ emergency
medicine professionals with an interest in
academics. As the premier source for groundbreaking education and research, we provide
our members with the tools they need to continue improving patient care.
Booth 401
www.saem.org
TeamHealth
TrueLearn, Inc.
TTUHSC EL PASO - Dept. of EM
VisualDX
At TeamHealth, our purpose is to perfect our
physicians’ ability to practice medicine, every
day, in everything we do. TeamHealth offers
emergency medicine, hospital medicine,
anesthesia, orthopedic hospitalist, acute care
surgery, obstetrics, and gynecology hospitalist, urgent care, and post-acute opportunities
across the nation in various clinical settings,
Our philosophy is as simple as our goal is singular: we believe better experiences for physicians lead to better outcomes-for patients,
partners and physicians alike.
TrueLearn offers question banks used by
thousands of medical students and residents,
including those preparing for the ABEM’s
Qualifying Exam, In-Training Exam and MOC
ConCert Exam. Train using highly-relevant
ABEM-formatted emergency medicine practice questions powered by a robust technology system. We offer performance analytics
and mobile accessibility for today’s busy
professionals.
TTUHSC EL PASO is seeking Board Certified
Physicians in the area of Emergency Medicine
to become part of its team of professionals.
The Department of Emergency Medicine
staffs the Emergency Room of University
Medical Center El Paso, a level one-trauma
center with approximately 60,000 visits annually. The department also assists in training medical students from the TTUHSC Paul
L. Foster SOM. Appointments will be commensurate with experience, with salary, and
promotional track based on qualifications.
Provide faster, better care at the point of
care with VisualDx. The leading clinical decision support system is now expanded across
general medicine. Used at over 50% of medical schools and more than 1,500 U.S. hospitals, VisualDx improves diagnostic accuracy
through smart search, a powerful differential
builder, the world’s best medical image library, and concise expert information.
See how it’s helping with diagnosis, treatment, and patient engagement.
Booth 106
Staffing and Management
www.teamhealth.com
Booth 302
Software
www.truelearn.com
EXHIBITORS
SAEM16 EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
Booth 215
Staffing and Management / Recruitment
www.ttuhsc.edu/elpaso
Booth 207
Diagnostic
www.logicalimages.com
87
EXHIBITORS
SAEM16 EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
WestJEM
Wolters Kluwer
The Western Journal of Emergency Medicine:
Integrating Emergency Care with Population
Health (WestJEM) is the official Journal of
California ACEP, American College of Osteopathic Emergency Physicians and the California chapter of AAEM and is published by
UC Irvine Health. WestJEM focuses on how
emergency care affects the health of the
community and population, and conversely,
how these societal challenges affect the composition of the patient population who seek
care in the emergency department.
Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global
provider of information and point of care
solutions for the healthcare industry. Our
solutions help professionals build clinical
competency and improve practice so they can
make important decisions on patient care.
Our leading product brands include Lippincott, Ovid®, 5MinuteConsult and others.
Booth 107
Publication
www.westjem.org
Booth 413
Publication
www.wolterskluwer.com
THANK YOU
TO ALL OUR EXHIBITORS
CAREER CENTER
SAEM’s
Career Center
Have an
open position?
Find the
perfect candidate.
careers.saem.org
88
M AY 10-13
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
89
SAEM16
www.HaysInnovations.com
90
KENDALL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER - located in Miami, Florida
• Research Director
• PEM Faculty
• Core Faculty
OCALA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER - located in Ocala, Florida
• Program Director
• Associate Program Director
• Research Director
• Core Faculty
OSCEOLA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER - located in Kissimmee (Orlando), Florida
• Research Director
• Core Faculty
For more information contact
Sherri Golden
NEW ORLEANS, LA
We are seeking dynamic, experienced individuals to join our
Emergency Medicine Residency Program’s Centers of Excellence.
|
Why Consider Sheridan Healthcare? Because the way we practice medicine starts with you.
M AY 10-13
Entrusting you
to make Emergency Medicine better.
that’s our practice.
Emergency Medicine Physician Recruitment Manager
Office
Cell
Email
954.846.5401
954.294.1744
sherri.golden@shcr.com
www.sheridanhealthcare.com
THANK YOU!
For Sponsoring
Our SAEM16
WiFi
91
SAEM16
Position Description
ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN
University of Louisville Hospital is a 400 bed trauma center. The Emergency
Department cares for approximately 60,000 visits/year, educates a three year
residency with 10 per class, and has specialties in EMS, Ultrasound, International
Medicine, and Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety. We are an acute-care
tertiary facility providing a full range of diagnostic, therapeutic, emergency, and
surgical services including an adult burn unit.
Louisville Kentucky is diverse with a metropolitan population of ~600,000,
growing economic infrastructure, multiple sports teams including the University
of Louisville Basketball team, United Soccer League, Louisville FC, as we as
the Triple-A baseball Louisville Bats. Louisville was ranked 8th in Forbes 2014
America’s Most Affordable Cities, has a very active foodie culture, and is a great
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
The University of
Louisville is an
Affirmative Action, Equal
Opportunity, Americans
with Disabilities
Employer, committed
to diversity and in that
spirit, seeks applications
from a broad variety of
candidates.
place for families and singles alike.
The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville Health Science Center in Louisville
Kentucky is recruiting for an ambitious, motivated, emergency medicine residency trained physician to become
a member of a growing group of academic physicians at a premier Level 1 trauma center. Optimal candidates
will perform peer- reviewed research and have an excellent teaching and clinical background. Louisville is one
of the pioneering emergency programs with its inception in 1972. We have 20+ faculty and growing with new
departmental staff and developing fellowships.
Job Requirements
• Board eligible/board certified Physician
• Instructor, Assistant, or Associate Professor Level
• Research, Fellowship, or Publication Experience preferred
• Willing to hit the ground running and develop his/her own teaching and academic niche
The University of Louisville is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity, Americans with Disabilities Employer,
committed to community engagement and diversity, and in that spirit, seeks applications from a broad variety of
candidates.
CONTACT
Ashlee Melendez
ashlee@louisville.edu
Emergency Medicine, University of Louisville
Phone 502-852-7874
Online App. Form
https://highereddecisions.com/uofl/current_vacancies.asp
92
60
Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors
M AY 10-13
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
PURSUE YOUR PASSION FOR DELIVERING HIGHQUALITY, COMPASSIONATE EMERGENCY MEDICINE
From cutting-edge tools and resources to innovative practice opportunities,
Emergency Medicine physicians who work for EmCare enjoy an exceptional quality
of practice.
Our physician-led company means you are supported by leadership on the local,
regional and national level.
From mentorship to leadership positions, EmCare offers the locations, positions
and lifestyle you want nationwide.
CONTACT US TODAY
855.367.3650
recruiting@emcare.com
www.emcare.com
Visit Us!
SAEM 16
Booth 204
Quality people. Quality care. Quality of LIFE.
93
SAEM16
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
ANNUAL MEETING
NEW ORLEANS | MAY 10-13, 2016
What would you do with more time?
It’s All About...
Your Lifestyle!
We provide you with direct access to the best
independent, physician-owned emergency
medicine groups across the country... leaving
you with more time to live the life you wish!
Visit us in the Exhibit Hall Booth #307 to
learn more about the over 60 groups we
represent in 27 states.
877.379.1088 | INFO@EMRECRUITS.COM | WWW.EMRECRUITS.COM
Indiana University School of Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine
IUSM EM is seeking qualified applicants for adult and pediatric faculty
positions with opportunities in education, teaching, research, program
leadership/development, and clinical care. In addition to offering
competitive benefits and salary, we are committed to flexibility and
support to facilitate development of research and educational activities.
Clinical or tenure track appointments are commensurate with
qualifications and experience. Physician applicants must be board
certified (or eligible) and eligible for licensure in the State
of Indiana.
Interested candidates should submit CVs by email to
emjobs@indiana.edu (Attn: Dr. Cherri
Hobgood, Department Chair).
Leading the education, science, and
practice of emergency medicine
Indiana University is an equal opportunity employer committed to
building a culturally diverse intellectual community and strongly
encourages applications from women and minorities,
an EEO/AA employer, M/F/V/D.of Indiana.
INDIANAPOLIS, IN
94
|
A New Journal!
A New Journal!
A New Look!
A New Look!
M AY 10-13
A New
Journal!
A New
Journal!
A New
Look!
A New
Look!
NEW ORLEANS, LA
KLINE
ANDAND
MILNE
LIVELIVE
KLINE
MILNE
PROMES
ANDAND
KLINE
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PROMES
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busting,
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about
everything
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everything
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the sun
all things
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of our
journal,
hear hear
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of new
our new
journal,
her vision,
ask questions,
and and
get helpful
her vision,
ask questions,
get helpful
advice
for submitting
youryour
manuscript.
advice
for submitting
manuscript.
KLINE
AND MILNE
Wednesday,
May May
11,LIVE
7-8:30
am am
Wednesday,
11, 7-8:30
KLINE
AND
MILNE
LIVE
Myth
busting,
storytelling,
and spitballing
Thursday,
May
12,
7-8
am
Thursday,
May
12,
7-8 am
from EIC
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Ken about
everything
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busting,
storytelling,
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under the sun and all things AEM.
Wednesday, May 11, 7-8:30 am
Thursday, May
12,11,
7-87-8:30
am am
Wednesday,
May
Thursday, May 12, 7-8 am
Jeff Kline,
MD, AEM
Editor-inJeff Kline,
MD, AEM
Editor-inChief/Ken
Milne,Milne,
MD, MD,
Senior
Chief/Ken
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EditorEditor
for Social
Media
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PROMESMay
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Wednesday,
11,
2:30-4
pm
Wednesday,
May
11, 2:30-4
PROMES
Qpm
& Apm
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the
editor
of our
new
journal, hear
Thursday,
MayAND
12, KLINE
Noon-1
Thursday,
May
12,
Noon-1
her vision,
ask questions,
get helpful
Meet
the editor
of our newand
journal,
hear
advice
for submitting
yourand
manuscript.
her
vision,
ask questions,
get helpful
advice for submitting your manuscript.
Booth
Booth#400
#400
Jeff Kline, MD, AEM Editor-inChief/Ken Milne, MD, Senior
Jeff Kline, MD, AEM Editor-inEditor for Social Media
Chief/Ken Milne, MD, Senior
Editor for Social Media
Wednesday, May 11, 2:30-4 pm
Thursday, May
12,11,
Noon-1
Wednesday,
May
2:30-4pm
pm
Thursday, May 12, Noon-1 pm
Susan
Promes,
MD, FACEP,
Susan
Promes,
MD, FACEP,
Editor,
AEMAEM
Education
and and
Editor,
Education
Training
Training
Susan Promes, MD, FACEP,
Editor, AEM Education and
Susan Promes, MD, FACEP,
Training
Editor, AEM Education and
Training
Booth
Booth #400
#400
Relevant, Referenced Emergency Medicine CME
Practical and Easy to Use. Offering the Maximum Allowable Credits.
What else do you need in CME?
Need Proof?
Try sample issues and earn up to 14 free CME/CE credit hours:
http://learn.ahcmedia.com/EMSampleIssues
Explore our top titles in
emergency medicine, including:
Emergency Medicine Reports
Trauma Reports
ED Management
And more!
Conveniently available in print and online.
95
SAEM16
Assistant/Associate
Residency Program
Director
The Emergency Medicine Department at Penn State Milton S.
Hershey Medical Center seeks energetic, highly motivated and
talented physicians to join our Penn State Hershey family.
Opportunities exist in both teaching and community hospital sites.
This is an excellent opportunity from both an academic and a
clinical perspective.
Emergency Medicine
Core Faculty
As one of Pennsylvania’s busiest Emergency Departments with 26+
physicians treating over 70,000 patients annually, Penn State Hershey
is a Magnet® healthcare organization and the only Level 1 Adult and
Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in PA with state-of-the-art
resuscitation/trauma bays, incorporated Pediatric Emergency
Department and Observation Unit, along with our Life Lion Flight
Critical Care and Ground EMS Division.
Pediatric Emergency
Medicine Faculty
For additional information, please contact:
Susan B. Promes, Professor and Chair,
Department of Emergency Medicine, c/o
Heather Peffley, Physician Recruiter,
Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Mail
Code A590, P.O. Box 850, 90 Hope Drive,
Hershey PA 17033-0850,
Email: hpeffley@hmc.psu.edu
We offer salaries commensurate with qualifications, relocation
assistance, physician incentive program and a CME allowance. Our
comprehensive benefit package includes health insurance, education
assistance, retirement options, on-campus fitness center, day care,
credit union and so much more! For your health, Hershey Medical
Center is a smoke-free campus.
Applicants must have graduated from an accredited Emergency
Medicine Residency Program and be board-certified by ABEM. We
seek candidates with strong interpersonal skills and the ability to
work collaboratively within diverse academic and clinical
environments.
The Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is committed to affirmative
action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce. Equal Opportunity
Employer – Minorities/Women/Protected Veterans/Disabled.
96
M AY 10-13
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
97
SAEM16
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
is a proud supporter of SAEM
Please visit us at Booth #214
Cardiovascular
SAEM CareerCenter
Where Greater
Opportunities Start
careers.saem.org
98
M AY 10-13
|
Deep
Irrigation
Wax &
Foreign
Bodies
EYECAP
EARCAP
ABSCESSCAP
ABSCESSCAP
TM
MAKE ‘E.R. HAPPEN!
Splash products make it easier to get the job done right.
Our products were designed in the E.R. to provide better
patient care with less effort, less time and lower costs.
Rethink how your department can improve care with our
easy to use devices that standardize process improvement,
and encourage proper patient treatment.
See demos at our booth & get more info at: SplashCap.com.
SCHNOZZLE
Visit us at
Booth 316
S S
S
SPLASHCAP
Instant
Eye Wash
& Decon
NEW ORLEANS, LA
High Pressure
High Volume
8 PSI
splashcap
SplashCap.com
.
Explore the Benefits of
LWW Health Library
Emergency Medicine Collection!
Includes 21 core textbooks in emergency medicine—
plus 280+ video clips and 2,600+ Q&A!
Ideal for residents and physicians.
Visit Wolters Kluwer at Booth #413 today!
99
SAEM16
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100
The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of
Rochester Medical Center is seeking a director for its Emergency
Medicine Ultrasound Program. The ideal candidate will be board
certified in Emergency Medicine and fellowship trained in Emergency
Medicine Ultrasound with qualifications or eligibility for the RDMS
Edelberg.com
certification.
This position will fulfill the role of program director and
fellowship director of the ultrasound program.
Booth
317 Medicine at the University of Rochester
The Department
of Emergency
is an established 3-year residency program with 36 residents. Emergency
ultrasound is featured in the clinical and training programs of our
residents, rotating residents, medical students and fellows. Collaborative
opportunities are present within the hospital and prehospital setting. The
emergency ultrasound rotation is incorporated into the curriculum for all
emergency residents and ongoing certification is offered to faculty.
Would Your Emergency
Department Like To
Dramatically Decrease The
Number Of Days It Takes
For A Completed Chart To
more information
contact:In
Go ToForBilling
Andplease
Bring
Michael Kamali, MD, FACEP
Revenue
Faster?
Chair, Department
of Emergency Medicine
University of Rochester is located in upstate New York and has
faculty from across the nation. Our medical leadership supports the
institutional use of ultrasound, allowing this established modality to be
used throughout the ED and institution. Our department cares for over
100,000 patients yearly at a single tertiary site and has 2 community
affiliates. Our research infrastructure is significant with multiple grants
for technology and innovation.
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, New York 14642
Michael_kamali@urmc.rochester.edu
EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Department of Surgery
Saint Louis University
Saint Louis University, a Catholic,
Jesuit institution dedicated to student
learning, research, healthcare and
service is seeking qualified applicants
for full-time faculty positions in the
Division of Emergency Medicine. These
positions offer both clinical, teaching
and research opportunities.
The Emergency Department sees over 40,000 patients yearly
and is a Level I Trauma Center, staffed by dedicated academic
Emergency Medicine faculty in the School of Medicine. Applicants
must be Emergency Medicine board certified or eligible.
Interested candidates must submit a cover letter, application and
current curriculum vitae to http://jobs.slu.edu. An initial letter of
interest and curriculum vitae should be sent to:
Laurie Byrne, M.D.
Director, Emergency Medicine Division
Saint Louis University School of Medicine
Saint Louis University Hospital
3635 Vista Avenue at Grand Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63110-0250
Saint Louis University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity
employer and encourages applications of women and minorities.
LiveCode, in partnership with ScribeAmerica, is
a real-time coding solution that can save you
hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. By
linking scribes and coders as the patient gets
care, our unique and revolutionary process
reduces the number of hours to complete a chart
from days to mere HOURS…while also dramatically
improving documentation accuracy.
|
NEW ORLEANS, LA
EARN 400K
M AY 10-13
CHOOSE YOUR
IDEAL WORK-LIFE
BALANCE
• WORK IN A VARIETY OF CLINICAL
SETTINGS
• FLEXIBLE FULL AND PART TIME
EMPLOYEE MODEL
• EXCELLENT BENEFITS
• LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
FOR MORE INFO
SUZY MEEK, MD
SMEEK@LEMA-EM.COM
903.235.5546
MY
VOICE
MATTERS
I have a voice in making decisions
about the partnership and how
that affects my practice.
Bryan Chow, MD
Emergency Medicine Partner
Attending SAEM?
Stop by BOOTH # 210
Learn more about a career
with CEP America at:
go.cep.com/saem210
101
DISCLOSURES
Presenters with Relevant Financial Disclosures
Benjamin Abella, MD, Mphil
Ikaria Inc., Cardioready, Advisory Board
PCORI, Medtronic Foundation, stryker
Medical, CR Bard, Marican Heart
Association, NIH, NHLBI, Grant Recipient
Harrison Alter, MD, MS
Gilead, Shareholder
Charles Gerardo, MD, MHS
BTG International Inc, Grant Recipient
CroFab®, Grant Recipient
Snake Envenomation, Grant Recipient
Matthew Gittinger, MD
Physio-Control Inc., Grant Recipient
Eric Gross, MD
Teleflex, Speaker’s Bureau
Jill Baren, MD, MBE, FACEP, FAAP
Data and Safety Monitoring Board, Board
Foster Gross, DO
Member
CareLoop, Inc., Shareholder
Major Extremity Trauma Research
Network, Consultant
Jin Han, MD, MSc
National Institute of Neurological Disorders Novartis Inc., Grant Recipient
and Stroke and the National Heart Lung
Sanos Informed Prescribing Inc., Grant
and Blood Institute, Grant Recipient
Recipient
Tyler Barrett, MD, MSCI
Annals of Emergency Medicine Edidtorial
Board, Board Member
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals
Inc., Red Bull GmbH, Fuschi am See,
Consultant
Vanderbuilt University, Employee
NIH, NHLBI, Grant Recipient
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Alere,
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals
Inc., Other Relationships
Anita Kurt, PhD
The Anne and Carl Anderson Trust, Grant
Recipient
Nancy Kwon, MD, MPA
SAMHSA, Grant Recipient
Wei Li, MD, PhD
Co-inventor of a relevant patent
application, Intellectual Property/Patents
Alexander Limkakeng, MD
Biomerieux, Advisory Board
ZS Pharma, Advisory Board
Abbott Laboratories, Grant Recipient
Department of Defense, Grant Recipient
Jason Haukoos, MD
Hospital Quality Foundation, Grant
Denver Health and Hospital Authority,
Recipient
Employee
Roche Diagnostics, Grant Recipient
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases; Agency for Healthcare Research Siemens Healthcare, Grant Recipient
and Quality, Grant Recipient
Michelle Lin, MD, MPH, SM
Erik Hess, MD MSc
Mayo Clinic, Grant Recipient
Patient Centered Outcomes Research
Institute, Grant Recipient
Jeffrey Ho, MD
Christopher Baugh, MD, MBA
TASER International, Inc., Shareholder
Roche Diagnostics, Advisory Board
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Grant Recipient Andy Jagoda, MD
Pfizer, Astro Zeneca, TEVA, Banyan,
David Beiser, MD
Janssen, Advisory Board
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
(1C1CMS330997-01-00), Grant Recipient Andy Jagoda, MD
Emergency Medicine Practice,
Steven Bird, MD
Foundation for Education and Research
NIH, Grant Recipient
in Neurological Emergencies, Officer or
NINDS, Grant Recipient
Board Member
Edward Boyer, MD, PhD
Christopher Jones, MD
NIDA, Grant Recipient
AstraZeneca, Grant Recipient
NIH, Grant Recipient
Roche Diagnostics, Inc, Grant Recipient
Expert Witness: DePuy, J&J, Other
Relationships
Alan Jones, MD
NIDA, Grant Recipient
NIH, Grant Recipient
Jeremy Branzetti, MD
Christopher Kabrhel, MD MPH
University of Washington Medicine Patient
D-Dimer, Consultant
Safety Improvement Grant, Grant Recipient Janssen, Consultant
Siemens, Consultant
Maggie Breslin
Stago, Consultant
College of Medicine Mayo Clinic, Employee
Xarelto, Consultant
Vincent Capponi, MS
Janssen, Grant Recipient
CytoSorbents Corporation, Employee
Siemens, Grant Recipient
Stago, Grant Recipient
Andrew Chang, MD, MS
NIH K23 award, Grant Recipient
Jeffrey Kline, MD
Johnson and Johnson, Advisory Board
Sean Collins, MD, MSc
Janssen, Consultant
Novartis, Trevena, Medtronic, Consultant
PCORI, NIH, Novartis, Trinity, Cardioxyl,
Jeffrey Kline, MD
Grant Recipient
Mallinkrodt, Roche, NIH, Grant Recipient
Janssen, Consultant
Arjun Dayal, BS
Mallinkrodt, Roche, NIH, Grant Recipient
Co-founder of Monte Carlo Software LLC,
parent company of app described, Other
Keith Kocher, MD MPH
Relationships
Agency for Healthcare Research and
Quality; NIH/National Institute on Aging;
Deborah Diercks, MD, MSc
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan/Blue
Janssen, Medtronic, Novartis, Advisory
Care Network, Grant Recipient
Board
Grant funding for K08, R21, CQI
Roche, Allere, Biodirection, Novartis, Grant
implementation project, Grant Recipient
Recipient
Frederick Korley, MD, PhD
Prina Donga, MS
ImmunArray, Grant Recipient
Teva Pharmaceuticals, Employee
Panel of Brain Injury Biomarkers,
Intellectual Property/Patents
Maria Dynin, MD
Emergency Medicine Foundation, Grant
Terry Kowalenko, MD
Recipient
Genentech, Spouse Employee
Roche, Amgen, Biogen, Spouse
Christopher Gayer
Shareholder
PCORI, Other Relationships
102
Nathan Kuppermann, MD, MPH
InsuCalc, Other Relationships
Emergency Medicine Foundation, Grant
Recipient
John Ma, MD
American Board of Emergency Medicine,
Officer or Board Member
Sharon Mace, MD
Cleveland Clinic, Employee
Janssen, Grant Recipient
Lab testing for influenza, RSV, Grant
Recipient
Roche, Grant Recipient
McGraw Hill, Intellectual Property/Patents
Simon Mahler, MD, MS
proCardio, Roche Diagnostics, Advisory
Board
American Heart Association, Grant
Recipient
Donaghue Foundation, Grant Recipient
NHLBI, Grant Recipient
Abbott, Laboratories, Other Relationships
Siemens Diagnostics, Other Relationships
Priya Mammen, MD, MPH
Gilead Sciences, Inc, Grant Recipient
Jennifer Marin, MD
Venaxis, Inc., Consultant
Kusum Mathews, MD, MPH
Kusum Mathews / Lynne Richardson (PI),
Grant Recipient
NIH/NHLBI 1K12HL109005-01, Grant
Recipient
James McClay, MD
PCORI, Grant Recipient
Henderson McGinnis, MD
The Summit School, Advisory Board
The Appalachian Center for Wilderness
Medicine, Officer or Board Member
Blue Ridge Adventure Medicine, Officer or
Board Member
Same River Solutions, Officer or Board
Member
Candace McNaughton, MD
NIH, NHLBI, Grant Recipient
Andrew McRae, MD, PhD
Roche Diagnostics Canada, Grant
Recipient
Zachary Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc
Teleflex, Consultant
Bayer, Consultant
Teleflex, Spouse consultant for
Bayer, Spouse consultant for
Edward Melnick
Agency for Healthcare Research and
Quality Grant Number K08HS021271,
Grant Recipient
Roland Merchant, MD, MPH, ScD
National Institutes of Health, Grant
Recipient
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, FACEP
StudyCueLLC, Advisory Board
StudyCueLLC, Shareholder
Michael Redlener, MD
AHA Mission Lifeline NYC, Officer,
Committee, or Board Member
Joshua Reynolds, MD
Spectrum Health Foundation, Grant
Angela Mills, MD
Consultant - Acute appendicitis bloodwork Recipient
SAEM Program Committee, Member
diagnostic, Consultant
Elsevier, Inc., Other Relationships
Consultant - Acute vital sign monitoring,
Consultant
Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS
LifeWatch Services, Consultant
Emergency Medicine Foundation, Grant
Venaxis, Consultant
Recipient
Hamburg, Rubin, Mullin, Maxwell & Lupin,
Karen
Sepucha
P.C., Other Relationships
Healthwise, Other Relationships
Vernick & Associates, Other Relationships
Fresenius Medical Care, Spouse Employee
Andrew Monte, MD
Manish Shah, MD, MPH
Universal Studios, ebbu LLC, Consultant
Abbott Point of Care via George
Susan Nedza, MD, MBA
Washington University, Grant Recipient
MPA Healthcare Solutions, Employee
Bijal
Shah, MD
World Wide Speakers Group,
Gilead Sciences, Inc. (FOCUS Program),
Speaker’s Bureau
Other Relationships
Jason T. Nomura, MD
Sophia
Sheikh, MD
Emergency Ultrasound Consultants, LLC,
Florida Medical Malpractice Joint
Consultant
Underwriting Association, Grant Recipient
American College of Emergency
Physicians, Other Relationships
Adam Singer, MD
Normura Consulting LLC, Shareholder
Alere San Diego, Inc., Grant Recipient
Emergency Ultrasound Consultants, LLC,
Karen Spucha
Speaker’s Bureau
Healthwise, Editor
Nomura Consulting, LLC, Owner
Owner of Normura Consulting LLC, Other Karen Spucha
Relationships
Fresenius Medical Care, Spouse Employee
Peter Pang, MD
Intersection Medical, INSYS. Janssen,
Medtronic, Novartis, Trevena,
scPharmaceuticals, Cardioxyl, Roche
Diagnostics, Relypsa, Consultant
Peter Pang, Consultant
William Peacock, MD
Beckman, Boehringer-Ingelheim,
Instrument Labs, Phillips, Portola,
Prevencio, Singulex, The Medicine’s
Company, Alere, Cardiorentis, Janssen, ZS
Pharma, Consultant
Abbott, Alere, Banyan, Cardiorentis,
Janssen, Portola, Pfizer, Roche, The
Medicine’s Company, ZS Pharma, Grant
Recipient
Comprehensive Research Associates
LLC, Emergencies in Medicine LLC,
Shareholder
Robert Strauss, MD
Western Litigation, Consultant
TeamHealth, Employee
AHC, Speaker’s Bureau
Benjamin Sun, MD, MPP
NIH Grant R21 AG044607, Grant Recipient
Jean Sun, MD
Member of SAEM Programming
Committee and Abstract Sub-Committee,
Member
Julian Suszanski, MD
Henry Ford Hospital, Other Relationships
Sophie Terp, MD, MPH
AHRQ, F32 HS022402-01, Grant
Recipient
Mohamad Tiba, MD, MS
Patent Application (61/859,615),
Intellectual Property/Patents
Michael Phelan, MD
Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA
CDC grant U47OE000053 Hemolysis in
the ED: Evidence Based Lab Medicine: Lab Emergency Medicine Foundation, Grant
Medicine Best Practices Systemic Review, Recipient
Quantia MD-CME, Other Relationships
Grant Recipient
CDC grant U47OE000053 Hemolysis in
Jody Vogel, MD, MSc
the ED: Evidence Based Lab Medicine: Lab Agency for Healthcare Research and
Medicine Best Practices Systemic Review, Quality, Grant Recipient
Grant Recipient
Denver Health Medical Center, Employee
AHRQ, Grant Recipient
Timothy Platts-Mills, MD
Agency for Healthcare Research and
NIA K23 AG038548, Grant Recipient
Quality, Grant Recipient
Charles Pollack, MA, MD, FACEP, FAAEM
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals
Inc., BMS/Pfizer Alliance, Daichii Sankyo,
Consultant
Michael Pulia, MD
Cempra, Advisory Board
Thermo Fisher, Advisory Board
Michael Puskarich, MD
NIGMS, Grant Recipient
Stephen Wall, MD, MSc, MAEd
Imagine Health, Advisory Board
Michael Ward, MD, MBA
Abbott Point of Care, Consultant
Richard Wolfe, MD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Srikar Adhikari, MD, MS
SAEM, Planning Committee
Heather Fleming, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
David Kim, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Colleen McQuown, MD, MPH, MSc Ali Raja, MD, MBA, MPH
SAEM, Planning Committee
SAEM, Planning Committee
Richard Sinert DO
SAEM, Planning Committee
Harrison Alter, MD, MS
SAEM, Planning Committee
Barbara Forney
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kelly Klein, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Joseph Miller, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Joshua Reynolds, MD, MS
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jean Sun, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Gillian Beauchamp, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Alise Frallicciardi, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Ryan LaFollette, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Joel Moll, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Rick Ricer
SAEM, Planning Committee
Lorraine Thibodeau, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Calvin A. Brown, III, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Michael Gottlieb, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jo Anna Leuck, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Mark Mycyk, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Rob Rogers, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kelly Thomas, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Elizabeth Burner, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kohei Hasegawa, MD, MPH
SAEM, Planning Committee
Michael Levine, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Steven Nazario, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Sarah Ronan-Bentle, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
R. Jason Thurman, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jennifer Carey, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jason Hoppe, DO
SAEM, Planning Committee
Shawn London, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Lewis Nelson, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Matthew Ryan, MD, PhD
SAEM, Planning Committee
William F. Toon, EdD, NRP
SAEM, Planning Committee
Moira Davenport, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Laura Hopson, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Zheng Ben Ma, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Charissa Pacella, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kinjal Sethuraman, MD, MPH
SAEM, Planning Committee
Eric Wei, MD, MBA
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kevin Ferguson, MD, FACEP
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jonathan Jones, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Brandon Maughan, MD, MHS, MSHP Daniel Pallin, MD, MPH
SAEM, Planning Committee
SAEM, Planning Committee
Sneha Shah, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Janet Young, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Jorge Fernandez, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Gabe Kelen, MD, FRCP(C)
SAEM, Planning Committee
Erin McDonough, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
DISCLOSURES
Program Committee Members — Nothing to Disclose
Alexis Pelletier-Bui, MD
SAEM, Planning Committee
Board of Directors –
Program Committee Members – Relevant Financial Disclosures SAEM Staff –
Nothing
to Disclose
Nothing
to
Disclose
Henderson McGinnis, MD
Jason T. Nomura, MD
Joshua Reynolds, MD
Blue Ridge Adventure Medicine, Officer or
Board Member
Same River Solutions, Officer or
Board Member
SAEM, Planning Committee
Zachary Meisel, MD, MPH, MSc
Teleflex, Consultant
Bayer, Consultant
Teleflex, Spouse is a consultant for
Bayer, Spouse is a consultant for
SAEM, Planning Committee
Emergency Ultrasound Consultants, LLC,
Consultant
American College of Emergency
Physicians, Other Relationships
Normura Consulting LLC, Shareholder
Emergency Ultrasound Consultants, LLC,
Speaker’s Bureau
Nomura Consulting, LLC, Owner
SAEM, Planning Committee
Owner of Normura Consulting LLC, Other
Relationships
Board of Directors — Relevant Financial
Steven Bird, MD
NIH, NINDS, Grant Recipient
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Deborah Diercks, MD, MSc
Janssen, Medtronic, Novartis,
Advisory Board
Spectrum Health Foundation, Grant Recipient Holly Byrd-Duncan, MBA
SAEM Program Committee, Member
Kataryna Christensen
Elsevier, Inc., Other Relationships
George Greaves
Jody Vogel, MD, MSc
MaryAnne Greketis, CMP
Agency for Healthcare Research and
Linda Griffin
Quality, Grant Recipient
Alex Keenan
Denver Health Medical Center, Employee
Ahmed Khater
AHRQ, Grant Recipient
Angela Lasky
Agency for Healthcare Research and
Stanley Migala
Quality, Grant Recipient
Melissa McMillian
SAEM, Planning Committee
Kat Nagasawa, MBA
Mark Nagasawa, MA
Hugo Paz
Disclosures
Doug Ray
Michael Reed
Robert S. Hockberger, MD
Stacey Roseen
Roche, Allere, Biodirection, Novartis,
Megan Schagrin, MBA, CAE, CFRE
Grant Recipient
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Monica Wakulski
Andra L. Blomkalns, MD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Mark D. Courtney, MD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Deborah Diercks, MD, MSc
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Kathleen J. Clem, MD, FACEP
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
James Holmes, MD, MPH
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Kavita Joshi, MD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Amy Kaji, MD, PhD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Ian B. Martin, MD, MBA
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
Richard Wolfe, MD
SAEM, Officer or Board Member
FIND IT
ONDEMAND
Find it OnDemand
Gain cutting-edge education
online from #SAEM16
ondemand.saem.org
103
DISCLOSURES
104
Presenters – Nothing to Disclose
Beau Abar, PhD
Kristin Burles, MSc
Michael Doctor, MD
Katie Greger, MD
Irandokht Jooniani, MD, MPH
Mahshid Abir, MD, MSc
Brett Burstein, MD, PhD
Kenneth Dodd, MD
Colin Greineder, MD
Jaime Jordan, MD
Elizabeth Abram, MD
Rachel Burt Kadar, MD
Shawn Dowling, MD
Maryanne Greketis, CMP
Joshua Joseph, MD
Ife Adabonyan, MD
Simran Buttar, MD
Aaran Drake, MD
Jeanie Gribben, BS
Michael Joyce, MD
James Adams, MD
Don Byars, MD
Amy Drendel, DO, MSc
Mira Grieser,
Christine Jung, MD
Srikar Adhikari, MD, MS
Carlos Calaf, MD
Scott Dresden, MD
Richard Griffey, MD, MPH
Joshua Kaine, BS
Jamie Adler, MD
Lisa Calder, MD, MSc
Brian Driver, MD
Linda Griffin,
Tarina Kang, MD
Konstantinos Agoritsas, MD
Christina Cannon, MD
Youyou Duanmu, MD
Daniel Grigat, MA
Hemal Kanzaria, MD, MS
Chad Agy, MD
Nicholas Caputo, MD, MSc
Jeffrey Dubin, MD, MBA
Lee Grodin, MD
Christopher Kao, BS
Thaer Ahmad, MD
Donna Carden, MD
Patrick Dunn,
John Grotberg, MS
Rebecca Karb, MD
Andreia Alexander, MD, PHD, MPH
Donna L. Carden, MD, FACEP
E. Earl-Royal, MPH, MD Candidate
Corita Grudzen, MSHS, FACEP
Carl Karlsson, BS
Chris Alexiu, BSc
Holly Caretta-Weyer, MD
Robert Edmonds, MD
Christopher Gruenberg, MD
Charisma Kaushik, MS
Abeer Almasary, MBBS
Jestin Carlson, MD
Nathan Eikhoff, MD
Faheem Guirgis, MD
Jonathan Kei, MD, MPH
Carl Alsup, MD
Chrostoper Carpenter, MD, MSc
Joseph Einhorn, MD
John Gullett, MD
Susheian Kelly, BA
Richard Amini, MD
Brendan Carr, MD
Marie-Carmelle Elie, MD
Kiersten Gurley, MD
Melissa Kelsey, DO
Lars Andersen, MD
Keri Carstairs, MD
Kailyn Elliott, RN
Catherine Gutierrez, BS
Mamata Kene, MD, MPH
Erik Anderson, MD
Patrick Carter, MD
Morgan Ellis, MS
Joshua Guttman, MD, FRCPC
Colin Kenny, DO
Jana Anderson, MD
Damon Cashman, MD
Stanton Elseroad, MD
Stas’ Haciski, MD
Andrew Ketterer, MD
Kenton Anderson, MD
Ana Castaneda-Guarderas, MD
Stephen Epstein, MD, MPP
Matthew Hall, MD
Ahmed Khater,
Mark Auerbach, MD
Edward Castillo, PhD, MPH
Ryan Ericksen, DO
Michael Halsey, MD
Eric Kiechle, MD, MPH
Adetunbi Ayeni, MD
Allison Chan, DO
Marcus Escobedo,
Xiao Han, MD
J Kilgannon, MD
Farhad Aziz, MD
Eashwar Chandrasekaran, MD, MSc
Christopher Evans, BS
Erin Hanlin, MD
Howard Kim, MD
Anika Backster, MD
Bernard Chang, MD, PhD
Leigh Evans, MD
Karisa Harland, PhD, MPH
Kenneth Kim, MD
Devika Bagchi, BA
Cindy Chang, BS
Abra Fant, MD, MS
Elie Harmouche, MD
Michael Kim, MD
F Baiden, MBChB, PhD
Wei-Tien Chang, MD, PhD
Gregory Faris, MD
William Harper, MD
Mitchell Kim, MD
Kamna Balhara, MD
Arhana Chattopadhyay, BS
Kendal Farrar, MD
Matthew Harris, MD
Ryan Kindervater, DO
Sudhir Baliga, MD
Hector Chavez, MD
Jeremy Faust, MD, MS
Carrie Harvey, MD
Kevin King, MD
Dustin Ballard, MD, MBE
Mary Cheffers, MD
Antonio Fernandez, PhD, NRP, FAHA
Renee Havey, MS, RN, CCRN, ACNS-B
Kisa King, BS
Sean Bandzar, MS
Esther H. Chen, MD
John Field, MD
Kathryn Hawk, MD
Orinthia King, DO
Isabel Barata, MD
Sheldon Cheskes, MD, CCFP-EM, FCFP
Nathan Finnerty, MD
Hunter Hawthorne, BS
AJ Kirk, MD
David Barbic, MD
Cary Chisholm, MD
Matthew Fischer, MD
Andrea Hearnsberger, MD
Lauren Klein, MD
Douglas Barnaby, MD
Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD
Heather Fleming, MD
Heather Heaton, MD
Barry Knapp, MD
Ben Bassin, MD
Eric Chou, MD
Ashley Foster, MD
Kate Heilpern, MD
Calvin Kong, MD
Aveh Bastani, MD
Matthew Chovaz, MD
Alise Frallicciardi, MD
Sara Heinert, MPH
Rebecca Kornas, MD
Amir Batman, MD
Kataryna Christensen,
Caroline Freiermuth, MD
Meghan Herbst, MD
Aaron Kornblith, MD
Daren Beam, MD, MS
Timothy Chu, MD
Jennifer Frey, PhD
Jesse Hernandez, BA
Viktoria Koskenoja, MD
Lars Beattie, MD
Corrie Chumpitazi, MD
Ari Friedman, MD, PhD 2016
Erik Hess, MD
Pavitra Kotini-Shah, MD
Vikhyat Bebarta, MD
Daisy Ciener, MD
Alison Frizell, MD
Hidenori Higashi, MD
Lynette Krebs, MPP, MSc
Justin Bedford, BS
Michael Clery, MD, MPP
Christian Fromm, MD
Stephen Higgins Jr., BS
Natalie Kreitzer, MD
Navid Behrooz, MD, MS
David Cline, MD
Timothy Fuller, MD
Jeremiah Hinson, MD, PhD
Jennifer Kryworuchko, PhD, RN
Shawna Bellew, MD
Brian Clyne, MD
Christopher Fung, MD
Cherri Hobgood, MD
Melvin Ku, MD
M. Fernanda Bellolio, MD, MS
Jon Cole, MD
Michelle Gaba, MD, MPH
Erik Hofmann, MD
Nicholas Kuehnel, MD
David Benaron, MD
Craig Coleman, PharmD
Heba Gaber, MD, MsC, PhD
Jason Hoppe, DO
Paul Kukulski, MD
Jeremy Berberian, MD
Danielle Cornwall, BIS
Jaclyn Gadbois, MD
Terrence Horan, MS, MPH
Marleen Kunneman,
Carl Berdahl, MD
Mari Cosentino, MD
Fiona Gallahue, MD
Kimberly Horner, MD
Dick Kuo, MD
Cara Bergamo, MD
Alexis Cournoyer, MD
Benjamin Garren, MS
Justin Hourmozdi, MD
Craig Kutz, BS
Gabrielle Berlinski Prato, DO
Christopher Coyne, MD
Romolo Gaspari, MD
Joseph House, MD
Daniel Kwan, MD
Amy Berman,
Cameron Crandall, MD
Nathalie Gaucher, MD
Dennis Hsieh, MD, JD
Nathaniel LaFleur, MD
Marian Betz, MD, MPH
Todd Crocco, MD
Gauri Ghate, MD
Kevin Hu, MD
Ryan LaFollette, MD
Maala Bhatt, MD, MSc
Tighe Crombie, MB, BCh, BAO
Jennifer Gibson Chambers, DO, MS
Aamir Hussain, BA
Chun Nok Lam, MPH
Andrea Bianculli, BS, BA
B. Woods Curry, MD
Adit Ginde, MD, MOH
Grant Innes, MD
Sangeeta Lamba, MD
Dowin Boatright, MD
Gail D’Onofrio, MD
Ryan Giorgetti, MD
Kaoru Itakura,
James Langabeer, PhD, EMT
Morgan Bobb, BS
Cassidy Dahn, MD
Joshua Glazer, MD
Crystal Ives Tallman, MD
Mark Langdorf, MD, MHPE
Jacqueline Bober, DO
James Daley, MD, MPH
Melody Glenn, MD
Lee Jablow, MD
Ari Lapin, MD
Eric Boccio, BS
Michael Darracq, MD, MPH
Delia Gold, MD
Patrick Jackson, MD
William LaPlant, BS
Ryan Bonner, MS2
Gerhard Dashi, BSc
Elizabeth Goldberg, MD
Breanne Jacobs, MD
Erica Lash, MS-3
Bjug Borgundvaag, MD, PhD, CCFP-EM
Arjun Dayal, BS
Katja Goldflam, MD
David Jang, MD, MSc
Angela Lasky,
Edwin Boudreaux, PhD
Bas De Groot, MD, PhD
Scott Goldstein, DO
Timothy Jang, MD
Charlotte Lawson, MD
Michael Boyd, MD
Erin Dehon, PhD
Andrea Goode, MD
Alexander Janke, BS
Adam Laytin, MD, MPH
Joshua Broder, MD
M. Kit Delgado, MD, MD
Ravindra Gopaul, MD
Adam Jaque, MD
Annie LeBlanc, PhD
Michael Brodeur, MD
Noah Delone, MD
Bradley Gordon, MD
Thomas Jarrett, MD, PhD
Andrew Lee, MHS
Aaron Brody, MD
Lawrence DeLuca, MD
Ting Gou, BA
Adnan Javed, MD
Horton Lee, MD
Jeremy Brown, MD
Krisha Desai, BS
Prasanthi Govindarajan, MBBS, MAS
Namita Jayaprakash, MB, BcH, BAO, MRCEM
David Lee, MD
Joshua Bucher, MD
Paul Desandre, DO
Benjamin Graboyes, MD
Micheal Austin Johnson, MD, PhD
Daniel Leisman, BS
Leonard Bunting, MD
Sharmistha Dev, MD, MPH
Nicholas Granzella, MD
Duncan Johnston, MD
Megan Leo, MD, RDMS
Charney Burk, MD Candidate 2018
Kayla Dewey, MD
George Greaves,
Courtney Marie Cora Jones, PhD, MPH
Julie Leonard, MD, MPH
Laura Burke, MD, MPH
Laurel Dezieck, MD
Jeremy Greenberg, MD
Derick Jones, MD, MBA
James Leoni, MD
Jean-Simon Létourneau, MD
James Miner, MD
Matthew Pirotte, MD
Philip Seidenberg, MD
Aleksandr Tichter, MD, MS
Cynthia Leung, MD, PhD
Binoy Mistry, MD
Timothy Platts-Mills, MD
Michelle Sergel, MD
Elham Torabi, MS, IE
Evan Leventhal, MD, PhD
Siamak Moayedi, MD
Jonathan Porath, BS
Jessica Shackman, MD
Stacy Trent, MD, MPH
Adam Levine, MD, MPH
Nicholas Mohr, MD
Lori Post, PhD
Aalap Shah, MD
Erin Tromble, MD
Michael Levine, MD
Victor Montori, MD
Brandon Price, MD
Murteza Shahkolahi, MD
Ruben Troncoso Jr., MPH
Sarah Levy, BA
Johanna Moore, MD
Christopher Price, MD
Mark Shankar, MD
James Tsung, MD, MPH
Philip Levy, MD
Ivan Morales, BS
Marcus Probst, MD, MS
Eric Shappell, MD
Adrian Tyndall, MD
Arielle Lévy, MD, MEd
Bradley Morris, PA-C
Peter Pruitt, MD
Krishan Sharma, BA
Cameron Upchurch, BS
Phillip Levy, MD
Scott Mueller, DO
Erin Quattromani, MD, FACEP
Adam Sharp, MD
Phyllis Vallee, MD
Kai Li, MD
Mary Mulcare, MD
Kelly Quinley, MD
Brian Sharp, MD
J. Scott Van Epps, MD, PhD
Timmy Li, BA, EMT-B
Kevin Munjal, MD
Elaine Rabin, MD
Johnathan Sheele, MD, MPH, MHS
Amy Vandenbroucke,
Andrew Lim, MD, MS
Stuart Murray, MD
Nicholas Rademacher, MD
Christina Shenvi, MD, PhD
Jeffrey VanDermark, MD
Rachel Lindor,
Karen Murrell, MD, MBA
Michael Radeos, MD, MPH
David Sheridan, MD
William Vaughan,
Benjamin Liss, MD
Amjad Musleh, MD
Sabrina Rahman, MD
John Sheridan, MSW, LCSW
Hector Vazquez, MD, MSc
Colin Little, MD
Justin Myers, DO
Ali Raja, MD, MBA, MPH
Rachel Shively, MD
Arvind Venkat, MD
Aiwen Liu, BS
Jumana Nagarwala, MD
Zainab Raji, BA
Joni Shriver, DO
Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA
Dana Liu, MD
Mark Nagasawa, MA
Renzhong Ran, BA
Eytan Shtull-Leber, BS
Alyssa Vermeulen, MD
Alexander Lo, MD, PhD
Katherine Nagasawa, MBA
Megan Ranney, MD, MPH
Megan Shupp, MD
Alexandra Vinograd, MD, MSHP
Allison Lockwood, BA
Justine Nagurney, MD
John Ray, MD
Johan Siebert, MD
Annette Visconti, MD
Kirsten Loftus, MD
Yuko Nakajima, MD
Douglas Ray,
Alan Sielaff, MD
Milkie Vu, MA
Timothy Loftus, MD
Damali Nakitende, MD
Colby Redfield, MD
Danielle Signer, BS
Abel Wakai, MD
William Loker, MD
Robin Naples, MD
Michael Reed,
Zachary Simms, MD
Monica Wakulski, BA
Bernard Lopez, MD
Yomna Nassef, MD
Lindsey Remme, MD
Erin Simon, DO
David Wald, DO
Brent Lorenzen, MD
Michael Nauss, MD
John Reynolds, MD
Richard Sinert, DO
Brian Walsh, MD, MBA
Seth Lotterman, MD
Taylor Nelp, BA
Tara Rhine, MD, MS
Adam Singer, MD
Bridgette Wamakima, MD Candidate 2018
Nelya Lugovskaya, BS
Mathew Nelson, DO
Jared Rich, MD
Jennifer Singleton, MD
Anran Wang, MPH
Marija Lum, MD
Rebecca Nerenberg, MD
Drew Richardson, FACEM
David Skolnik,
David Wang, MD
Joy Mackey, MD
Adam Nevel, MD, MBA
Jeff Riddell, MD
Patricia J. Skolnik,
Michael Ward, MD, MBA
Joseph Maddry, MD
Bao-Thang Nguyen, BA
Kristin Rising, MD, MS
David Slattery, MD
Leah Warner, MD, MPH
Tracy Madsen, MD, ScM
Su Nguyen, MD
Laura Rivera-Reyes, MPH
Alison Smith, MD
Otis Warren, MD
Jeremy Maggin, MD
Matthew Niedzwiecki, PhD
Kenneth Robinson, MD
Colleen Smith, MD
Muhammad Waseem, MD
Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA
Daniel Nishijima, MD, MAS
Luis Rodriguez, BS
Jeremiah Smith, MD
Scott Weiner, MD, MPH
Patrick Maher, MD
Mariann Nocera, MD
Aaron Rome, DO
S. Christian Smith, MD
Gail Weingarten,
Jupin Malhi, MD
Joan Noelker, MD
Emily Rose, MD
Aaron Snyder, MD
Katie Wells, MD, MPH
Matthew Malone, MD
Kathleen Noorbakhsh, MD
Gabriel Rose, DO
Mark Sochor, MD
Jeremy Welwarth, DO
YaEl Mandel-Portnoy, MSc
Tatsuya Norii, MD
Stacey Roseen,
Kimberly Souffront, PhD, FNP-BC, MD
Paul Weygandt, MD, MPH
Alex Manini, MD, MS
Nicole Novotny, BS
Rachel Rosovsky, MD
Lauren Southerland, MD
Noah White, MD
Michael Marchick, MD
Richard Nowak, MD
Brian Rowe, MD, MSc
Cemal Sozener, MD
Sage Whitmore, MD
Abraham Markin, MD
Elizabeth O’Brien, BS
Regina Royan, MPH
Matthew Spanier, MD
David Wilcocks, MD
John Marshall, MD
Zlad Obermeyer, MD, MPhil
Melanie Ruiz, MD
Taylor Spencer, MD, MPH
Michael Willman, MD
Jasmine Mathews, MD
Robert Ohle, MA, MB, BCh, BAO
Matt Rutz, MD
Daniel Spinosa, MD Candidate
Casey Wilson, MD
Amal Mattu, MD
Julia Ojcius, MD
Jeffery Ruwe, MD
Kristi Stanley, MD
Sean Wilson, MD
Brandon Maughan, MD, MHS, MSHP
Cristiana Olaru, MD
James Ryan, MD
Stephanie Stapleton, MD
Taneisha Wilson, MD
Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, PharmD, MD, MPH
Robert Olympia, MD
Annie Sadosty, MD
Matthew Staum, MD
Kathleen Wittels, MD
Gabin Mbanjumucyo, MD
David Ong, MD
Steven Salhanick, MD
Justin Steinberg, MD MBA
Alisa Wray, MD
Christine McBeth, DO
Erkin Otles, BS
Christopher Sampson, MD
Sarah Sterlinf, MD
Tina Wu, MD, MBA
Stephen McBride, BS
Kei Ouchi, MD
Margaret Samuels-Kalow, MD, MPhil, MSHP
Brian Stettler, MD
Kabir Yadav, MDCM, MS, MSHS
Kerry McCabe, MD
Stephanie Outterson, MSN, RN
Ellen Sano, DO, MPH
Lauren Stewart, MD
Cyrus Yamin, MD
Matthew McCauley, BS
Clark Owyang, MD
Alexandra Sanseverino, MD
Moshe Stiebel, BSc, MD Candidate
Justin Yan, MD
Denise Mccormack, MD, MPH
Charissa Pacella, MD
Sally Santen, MD
Kevin Stimson, MD
Samuel Yang, MD
Shelley Mcleod, MSc
Joseph Pare, MD
Genevieve Santillanes, MD
Jason Stopyra, MD
Matthew Yasavolian, MD
Melissa McMillian, CNP
Anjni Patel, DO
Turandot Saul, MD
Jeffrey Stowell, MD
Maame Yaa Yiadom, MD, MPH
Colleen McQuown, MD
Deep Patel, MD
Hendry Sawe, MD, MMED, MBA
Tania Strout, PhD
Andy Yoon, MD
Marcee Mcrae, MD
Dhwani Patel, DO
Dana Sax, MD, MPH
Jonathan Studnek, PhD
Kenneth Young, MD
Laura Medford-Davis, MD
Kunal Patel, MD
Jesse Schafer, MD
Kristin Stukus, MD
Neil Young, MD
Timothy Medina, MD
Shama Patel, MD, MPH
Megan Schagrin, MBA, CAE, CFRE
Matthew Stull, MD
Angela Young-Brinn,
Jason Mefford, MD
Sameer Pathan, MBBS, CABEM, MRCEM
Cassandra Schandel, BS
Sathyaseelan Subramaniam, MBChB
Kawthar Yusuf, MS
David Meguerdichian, MD
Richard Paul, MD
Pieter Scheerlinck, MD
Christie Sun, MD
Allison Zanaboni, MD
Stephen Meigher, BA
Artur Pawlowicz, MD
Alexandra Schick, MS
Benjamin Supat, MPH
Michael Zdradzinski, BA
Kiel Melkus, DO
Hugo Paz,
Derek Schloemann, BS
Jordan Swartz, MD, MA
Tyler Zeoli, BS
Edward Melnick, MD
Jean Pearce, MD
Sarah Schmidt, MD
Kjirsten Swenson, MD
Christopher Zernial, MD
Andrew Meltzer, MD, MS
David Pearson, MD, MS
Melissa Schneider, MD, MSPH
Ting Tan, BS
Shu Zhu, MD, PhD
Michael Menchine, MD, MPH
Craig Pedersen, DO
David Schoenfeld, MD
Lindsay Taylor, MD
Brian Zink, MD
William Meurer, MD
Jeanmarie Perrone, MD
Elizabeth Schoenfeld, MD
Richard Taylor, MD, MHS
Tony Zitek, MD
Farah Michel,
Warren M Perry, MD
Jon Schrock, MD
Felipe Teran Merino, MD
Michael Zwank, MD
Stanley Migala,
Jay Pershad, MD, MMM
Jill Schuld, MD
David Terca, MD
Valerie Mika, MS
Laura Pimentel, MD
Halden Scott, MD
Venkatesh Thiruganasambandamoorthy, CCFP-EM
DISCLOSURES
Presenters – Nothing to Disclose
105
SAEM16
SHER ATON NEW ORLEANS HOTEL
DISCLOSURES
1st Floor
106
2nd Floor
|
3rd Floor
M AY 10-13
SHER ATON NEW ORLEANS HOTEL
NEW ORLEANS, LA
4th Floor
107
SAEM16
SHER ATON NEW ORLEANS HOTEL
5th Floor
8th Floor
108
You are invited to a Breakfast Product Theater Presentation
at the 2016 SAEM Annual Meeting
THROMBOSIS:
AFib & DV T/PE
AN EXPLORATION
IN RISK REDUCTION
FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2016
7:00 am – 8:00 am
Sheraton New Orleans Hotel
Gregory J. Fermann, MD, FACEP
Gallery Room, 1st Floor
New Orleans, Louisiana
Professor and Executive Vice Chairman
Director, Clinical Trials Center
Department of Emergency Medicine
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Cincinnati, Ohio
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This lecture will discuss treatment options for patients with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and how they can reduce the
risk of recurrent thrombotic events. It will also present options for reducing the risk of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.
In adherence with PhRMA guidelines, spouses or other guests are not
permitted to attend company-sponsored programs.
For all attendees, please be advised that information such as your name
and the value and purpose of any educational item, meal, or other items
of value you receive may be publicly disclosed. If you are licensed in any
state or other jurisdiction, or are an employee or contractor of any
organization or governmental entity, that limits or prohibits meals from
pharmaceutical companies, please identify yourself so that you (and we)
are able to comply with such requirements.
Please note that the company prohibits the offering of gifts, gratuities,
or meals to federal government employees/officials. Thank you for
your cooperation.
This promotional educational activity is not accredited. The program
content is developed by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Speakers
present on behalf of the company and are required to present
information in compliance with FDA requirements for communications
about its medicines.
The personal information you provide may be used to contact you about
your request to attend the Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., educational
program using your preferred method of communication as indicated by
you. This information may be shared with Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,
its affiliates, and a third party for the sole purpose of completing your
registration for this program and as required by law.
Supported by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
© Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2016
March 2016
048301-160301
SEE YOU IN
ORLANDO
MAY 16-19, 2017
HYATT REGENCY
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