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CONTENTS
President’s Welcome .................................................................... 2
Welcome From The Local Arrangements Committee.................. 4
National Council for the Social Studies
91st Annual Conference
Washington Resources ................................................................. 5
Speakers/Vital Issue Sessions .................................................. 6–7
On-Site Information ..................................................................... 8
Social Events ............................................................................... 10
Conference Highlights ............................................................... 12
Tours .....................................................................................14–15
Conference Sponsors ................................................................. 16
Thursday
First Timers’ Scholarships.......................................................... 18
NCSS Awards and Grants: Celebrate Excellence ................. 19–24
Certificate of Attendance ............................................................ 28
Associated
Groups
Next Conference (Seattle, WA) .................................................. 29
NCSS Governance/Committees ................................................ 30
Communities/Communities Showcases.................................... 33
Friday
CS4 .............................................................................................. 36
CUFA ....................................................................................37–53
NSSSA ...................................................................................54–57
Saturday
International Assembly ........................................................ 58–61
Thursday Clinics ...................................................................62–67
Sunday
Friday Schedule ..................................................................68–102
Saturday Schedule ............................................................103–132
Sunday Schedule ...............................................................133–136
Exhibits
Exhibit Hall Map ...................................................................... 137
Exhibitors List ..................................................................138–146
Participant Index ..............................................................147–151
NCSS Board, Staff, and Volunteers/Future Conferences ........ 151
Walter E. Washington Convention Center Maps ..................... 152
Renaissance Washington DC Hotel Maps ................................ 152
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
801 Mount Vernon Place, NW
Washington, DC 20001
Look at the outer edge of this
Program to quickly locate the
major sections above.
Welcome
Sue Blanchette
Shannon Pugh
Washington, D.C., is the heart of the United States. We may rail
against people in power or sing the praises of an individual who
has made a difference, but when the dust settles, the city still
reflects our shared past, our common present and our vision for
the future. We welcome you to our nation’s capital and to
Dimensions of Diversity, the 91st Annual Conference of the
National Council for the Social Studies, for a weekend of
thoughtful discussion, collegial exchange, and just plain fun.
The program for the conference has evolved around a number
of concepts that focus on the bedrock issues of social studies
education. There is something for everyone in this rich cornucopia of possibilities.
1. Past–Present–Future: Clinics at several of the Smithsonian
museums and the Library of Congress offer teachers an
opportunity to explore these national treasures and develop
ways to incorporate their resources into the classroom. Dr.
Rex Ellis will speak on Thomas Jefferson and the contradictions inherent in being a Founding Father who owned slaves,
while the Vital Issues session on Teaching East Asia offers
insights into the influences of Confucianism on China,
Japan, and Korea.
2. The World Around Us: The film Beyond Belief offers a poignant insight into the aftermath of 9/11, focusing on how
two young mothers widowed on that day turned their grief
into support for the women of Afghanistan. Philip Zimbardo
continues this reasoning with his exploration of the heroic
actions of ordinary people.
3. Keeping Current: As we plunge into the newest presidential
campaign, we are being inundated with political images.
Broadcast journalist Judy Woodruff, the closing keynote
speaker on Sunday, will offer her insights into this fascinating
time. Clinics on federalism, the evolution of American citizenship, and the civil rights movement demonstrate how
issues of the past remain current. The keynote appearance by
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan provides an opportunity to examine how education policy is shaped.
4. Who? What? How? With more than 400 presentations and
poster sessions available, conference participants will be able
to explore the range of social studies subjects. Speakers like
Diane Ravitch and Larry Husick offer stimulating insights
into the U.S public education system, while practitioners at
all levels offer tried and true classroom activities.
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Dimensions of Diversity
5. Closing the Achievement Gap: The recent release of the NAEP
(National Assessment of Educational Progress) scores in
civics, geography, and U.S. history show that we have not
made much progress addressing the needs of students at risk.
Geoffrey Canada of Harlem Children’s Zone and the Vital
Issues session on the achievement gap offer two opportunities to discuss this challenging topic, while Teta Banks
focuses on non-traditional resources that help prepare students for the future.
This conference could not take place without the work of many
people. Tremendous thanks go to David Bailor, the NCSS
Director of Meetings, whose calm demeanor moved mountains
and made miracles; to Craig Blackman and Karen Muir, cochairs of local arrangements, who all made things flow seamlessly; and to Diane Hart, the godmother of the proposal system,
without whom we might still be wading through 957
proposals!
It’s going to be a great conference. We are glad you are here.
Enjoy!
Sue Blanchette, Chair
Shannon Pugh, Conference Co-Chair
Welcome From The Local Arrangements Committee
WE ARE SOCIAL STUDIES!
Welcome to our nation’s capital for the 91st National
Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference! The
Virginia and Maryland Councils for the Social Studies are
excited to be helping to host the conference in our hometown, the nation’s capital.
What better time is there than now to be in the D.C./
Virginia/Maryland area as we embark on the 2012 presidential campaign, observe the 10th anniversary of 9/11,
the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the 200th of the
War of 1812, and celebrate the opening of the Martin
Luther King, Jr., Memorial?
To help you experience the richness of this area, the
local arrangements committee has provided opportunities
for a number of tours and receptions—candlelight tours
of Mount Vernon and the Washington monuments, tours
of Fort McHenry and Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, Gettysburg and Antietam, as well as receptions at the Newseum,
the National Archives, and National Geographic. The conference location in downtown Washington and the Metro
system allow for easy access to see the many attractions of
our area on your own.
As you participate in the various professional opportunities this conference provides—hearing from national
speakers, attending content sessions, viewing poster sessions, getting materials from the Exhibit Hall, connecting
with other social studies professionals, and visiting the
many historical and cultural places this area offers—the
local arrangements committee will be here to help you.
We hope to make this conference your best professional
experience ever!
—Karen Muir and Craig Blackman,
Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chairs
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Dimensions of Diversity
Washington
Resources
Visitor Information Center
At the Mount Vernon Square
entrance of the Convention
Center, Destination DC has
an information desk that will
provide information and suggestions on what to see, how
to get there, theater and concert ticket information, and
where to eat.
Parking
While the Walter E. Washington Convention Center
does not have a parking
facility, there are more than
3,000 parking spaces in a
three-block radius of the Convention Center, available on a
first-come, first-served basis.
Metrorail
Attendees have direct access
to Washington’s extensive
Metrorail system at the Mount
Vernon Square/Convention
Center station on the Green
Line. For more information,
visit www.wmata.com
Discount Admission
to the Newseum
NCSS conference attendees
can receive half-price admission to the Newseum, the
museum of news, at its new
location on Pennsylvania
Avenue. Tickets must be purchased online at w w w.
newseum.org using the promotion code 90150618.
Discount does not apply for
walk-up ticket sales.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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Conference Speakers
Friday
7:00–8:45am
Ballroom A
Sue Blanchette
President’s Address and Teacher
of the Year Awards
Sue Blanchette is a veteran K-12 classroom teacher with the Dallas Independent School District. She has written
curriculum and done professional
development for Dallas, presented at
state and national conferences and served on the Texas textbook
advisory committee. She has been president of both the Dallas
CSS and the Texas CSS, and also chaired the Texas CSS conference (aptly themed Dimensions of Diversity) when it was held in
Dallas. She has received numerous awards in teaching, including
the Texas Excellence Award given by the University of Texas,
Texas CSS and NCSS Teacher of the Year, and the Teaching
Excellence Award from American Councils for International
Education, a State Department program, which resulted in a
teacher exchange in Kyrgyzstan. She has received two Coe Fellowships, several NEH Fellowships and a Fulbright-Hayes to
India.
10:15–11:15am
Room 206
Jan L. Tucker Memorial Speaker
Guomin Zheng
Guomin Zheng is a Professor and the
Executive Dean of Teachers College at
Beijing Normal University, China. His
research interests focus on teacher education policy in China, Chinese instruction policies, and elementary and middle school curriculum. He
led the implementation of the Evaluating Standards of Chinese
Teachers in the Ministry of Education. He is the editor-in-chief
of Teacher’s Journal, as well as chief editor of a series of Chinese
textbooks that are now being used by more than 10 million students and 300,000 teachers. Dr. Zheng has played a significant
role in Chinese teacher education reform and policy
development.
11:30am–12:30pm
Ballroom A
Diane Ravitch
Diane Ravitch is Research Professor of
Education at New York University and a
senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. From 1991 to 1993, she was Assistant Secretary of Education and Counselor to Secretary of Education Lamar
Alexander. From 1997 to 2004, she was a member of the
National Assessment Governing Board, which oversees federal
testing. She is the author or editor of over twenty books,
including The Language Police, and Left Back. Her latest book is
The Death and Life of the Great American School System.
Dr. Ravitch is the recipient of the 2011 Spirit of America
Award, sponsored by Social Studies School Service.
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Dimensions of Diversity
1:30–2:00pm
Ballroom A
Arne Duncan
Arne Duncan was nominated to be secretary of education by President Obama
and was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on
January 20, 2009. In his confirmation
hearings, Duncan expressed his commitment to work with all those involved in
education “to enhance education in America, to lift our children
and families out of poverty, to help our students learn to contribute to the civility of our great American democracy, and to
strengthen our economy by producing a workforce that can
make us as competitive as possible.” Prior to his appointment as
secretary of education, Duncan served as the chief executive
officer of the Chicago Public Schools, a position to which he
was appointed by Mayor Richard M. Daley, from June 2001
through December 2008, becoming the longest-serving big-city
education superintendent in the country.
2:10–3:10pm
Ballroom A
Geoffrey Canada
Geoffrey Canada is President and CEO
for Harlem Children’s Zone, where he
has become nationally recognized for his
work helping children and families in
Harlem, and as a passionate advocate for
education reform. He launched the
Harlem Children’s Zone, targeting a specific geographic area in
Central Harlem with a comprehensive range of services. The
Zone Project today aims to serve over 10,000 children. The
work of Mr. Canada and HCZ has become a national model and
has been the subject of many profiles, including the 2010 documentary Waiting for “Superman.” Mr. Canada’s appearance is
generously sponsored by Random House, Inc.
3:15–4:15pm
Room 202A
Philip Zimbardo
Philip Zimbardo is one of the most distinguished living psychologists, having
served as President of the American Psychological Association, and designed and
narrated the award-winning, 26-part PBS
series, Discovering Psychology. His many
works include Shyness, The Lucifer Effect, and The Time Paradox.
A professor emeritus at Stanford University, Dr. Zimbardo is
best known for his controversial Stanford Prison Experiment,
which highlighted the ease with which ordinary, intelligent college students could cross the line between good and evil when
caught up in the matrix of situational and systemic forces. Dr.
Zimbardo’s appearance is generously sponsored by Annenberg
Media.
Conference Speakers
Saturday
Sunday
9:15–10:15am
Room 202A
Lawrence A. Husick
Lawrence Husick is a co-director of the
Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI)
Wachman Center Program on Teaching
Innovation. He is also a partner in Lipton,
Weinberger & Husick, and an adjunct
professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the Organizational Dynamics graduate program, at the
Johns Hopkins University in the Whiting Graduate School of
Engineering, and in the Graduate Program in Biotechnology.
He also served as a Senior Fellow of the FPRI’s Center on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism. He is a founder of several entrepreneurial ventures, including Infonautics Inc. (now HighBeam), PocketDoctor.com, and Teraffinity, Inc.
10:15–11:15am
Ballroom A
Judy Woodruff
Broadcast journalist Judy Woodruff has
covered politics and other news for more
than three decades, as White House correspondent for NBC News, anchor and
correspondent for CNN, and currently as
a senior correspondent and co-anchor of
PBS NewsHour. Ms. Woodruff ’s distinguished work includes an
extensive project in 2007 on the views of young Americans
called “Generation Next: Speak Up. Be Heard.” Ms. Woodruff is
the recipient of the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement
Award in Broadcast Journalism/Television and the University
of Southern California Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in
Journalism, among her many distinctions.
11:45–12:45pm
Ballroom A
Rex Ellis
Dr. Rex M. Ellis is Associate Director for
Curatorial Affairs at the National
Museum of African American History
and Culture at the Smithsonian Institution, charged with the responsibility of
planning, developing, directing, and
managing all curation, collections, education and outreach programs, and activities. The museum, the first of its kind on the
National Mall, is due to be completed by 2015. Prior to this
position, Dr. Ellis served for eight years as Vice President of the
Historic Area for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, where
he oversaw all programs and operations. Dr. Ellis was the first
African American Vice President in the Foundation’s history.
2:00–3:00pm
Room 202A
Teta V. Banks
The Honorable Teta V. Banks is the
former Honorary Consul General of the
Republic of Liberia, first appointed in
1993 and serving until 2009, including
time under the leadership of President
Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. Consul Banks represented the Liberian government and assisted in the country’s
rebuilding, addressing human rights issues throughout African
countries, and the establishment of trade, resources, and cultural relations between the U.S. and Liberia, as well as other
African countries. She served as a member of the Advisory
Council of the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission,
the Liberian Scholarship Fund, and the international investors’
forum to assist Liberia in its redevelopment.
Session Speakers
Friday
10:15–11:15am
Room 144A
Timothy J. Magner
Timothy J. Magner is Executive Director
for the Partnership for 21st Century
Skills, the leading national organization
that advocates for 21st century readiness
for every student. Mr. Magner oversees this coalition of education, business, community and government leaders, which
provides tools and resources to help transform the U.S. education system by fusing the mastery of core content with the
four Cs (critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation). Mr.
Magner has had an extensive career in education, serving
most recently as the Vice President of Keystone for KC Distance Learning (KCDL) as well as the Director of the Office
of Educational Technology for the U.S. Department of
Education.
Saturday
3:15–4:15pm
Room 204A
James Loewen
James W. Loewen is an acclaimed historian and best-selling author of Lies My
Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High
School History Textbook Got Wrong.
Loewen’s mission is to overturn myths and misinformation
that too often pass for U.S. history. He engages audiences
with intelligence and humor, honing in on a range of topics
encompassing U.S. history, multicultural education, civil
rights, race relations, voting rights, law and social science.
Loewen’s latest book is The Confederate and Neo-Confederate
Reader: The “Great Truths” about the “Lost Cause” that examines the original reasoning behind secession and subsequent
myth-making in defense of slavery and white supremacy.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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On-Site Information
East Registration
Wednesday 5:00–8:00pm
Thursday
7:00am–6:00pm
Friday
6:30am–5:30pm
Saturday
7:00am–4:30pm
Sunday
7:00–10:00am
NCSS Bookstore
Be sure to make time to visit the NCSS Bookstore, located outside Hall D on level 2 of the Walter E. Washington Convention
Center. You’ll find copies of books from major conference
speakers, among many valuable resources. Book signings will
take place immediately in front of the Bookstore, and you can
pick up a complimentary book of your choice in the NCSS Bulletin series, included with your registration, in the area outside
the Bookstore.
Badges Required
All conference participants must register, including chairs, presenters, exhibitors, and committee members. Badges must be
worn at all times to gain access to conference sessions, exhibits,
and events.
Free Coffee and Tea
Free coffee and tea are available both Friday and Saturday
mornings at designated stations in the Exhibit Hall.
Registration Hours
Coat Check
Coat check is available across from NCSS Registration.
The fee is $3 per item.
First Aid
The first aid station is outside the Exhibit Hall (Hall D)
on Level 2.
Lost and Found
Lost and found items will be turned in to NCSS Registration.
Exhibit Hall Hours
Hall D
Friday
9:00am–5:30pm
Saturday 8:30am–5:00pm
Food Court
Lunch will be available for purchase in the food courts in the
exhibit hall on Friday and Saturday. Look for the food court
signs in the Exhibit Hall.
Business Services
Sack Sitters will provide packing, shipping, photocopying, and
bag checking services for all conference attendees. Lists of
available speaker handouts may also be purchased. Sack Sitters
is in the Exhibit Hall.
Lead Retrieval
Many NCSS exhibitors use lead retrieval (a paperless tracking
system) to receive quicker, more accurate information about
conference attendees who have visited their booth. With the
lead retrieval system, an exhibitor asks to scan your badge as
you visit the booth, capturing the registration information
encoded on your badge. This allows exhibitors to send you
information while the conference is still fresh in your mind.
Stay Connected to the Conference…
There are a variety of ways to keep up with what’s going on at the conference.
Social Studies TV
Be sure to watch the nightly broadcast of the day’s activities on
Social Studies TV, featuring conference highlights and interviews with speakers, NCSS leaders, and attendees. You can
catch the broadcasts at designated stations throughout the
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, and at the NCSS
hotels:
All of the material will be archived and available for viewing
after the conference. Look for a post-conference e-mail with
the details.
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Dimensions of Diversity
Twitter Feeds
Follow the conference on Twitter and send
generic conference tweets to #ncss2011. Updates,
reminders, special offers, and reports from
speakers and sessions will be sent regularly.
connected.socialstudies.org
Connect with colleagues attending the conference, get conference updates and share your experiences at http://connected.
socialstudies.org/annualconference, the new NCSS online
social network for conference attendees and NCSS members.
Conference Social Events
FRIDAY
7:00–8:45am
Ballroom A
President’s Breakfast and Teacher of the
Year Awards
The President’s Breakfast, the official
opening of the 91st NCSS AnnualConference, will feature the presentation of the
NCSS Teacher of the Year awards. Celebrate
excellence as we recognize outstanding
classroom teachers and honor the work of
teachers everywhere. NCSS President Sue
Blanchette will deliver her Presidential
address, recognizing the shared passion of
teachers and looking at teaching, then and
now. This is a ticketed event, generously
sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
Y O U R #1 R E S O U R C E F O R
CURRENT SOCIAL ISSUES
7:00–9:00pm
Newseum, 555
Pennsylvania Ave., NW
President’s Reception
at the Newseum
Join NCSS President Sue Blanchette for an intimate evening of networking and entertainment at the
spectacular Newseum, overlooking
Pennsylvania Avenue and the U.S.
Capitol. Mix and mingle with your
colleagues, friends, and new
acquaintances. This reception is
generously cosponsored by Pearson
and the Newseum. This ticketed
event is sold out.
8:30–11:00pm
Renaissance Ballroom East
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VISIT NCSS BOOTH #229
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10
Dimensions of Diversity
The Herff Jones | Nystrom®
Welcome Dance
Our friends at Herff Jones | Nystrom
host this annual soiree conveniently
located at the Renaissance Washington DC hotel. Enjoy some of the
best live music Washington DC has
to offer. There will be drinks, desserts, dancing and prizes awarded
every 30 minutes to those in attendance. This is one event you won’t
want to miss!
Saturday
5:30–7:30pm
Renaissance Ballroom
NCSS Awards Reception
Join us for the presentation of this
year’s NCSS Awards! Enjoy a wonderful evening of entertainment with
a tropical steel drum band and refreshments as we honor the exceptional
contributions of your colleagues to
social studies education. The NCSS
Awards Reception is generously sponsored by National Geographic
Learning.
“T
he strength of SOLR lies in the richness
of its content and its interdisciplinary
portrayal of U.S. and world history. If only all
historical information for young people took the
same approach. I give Sharpe Online Reference
a solid A.”
– School Library Journal
5:30–8:00pm
National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania
Ave., NW
National Archives Reception
Visit the National Archives at this
special evening reception. Participants will be invited to view the Charters of Freedom, explore the exhibit
spaces, and participate in demonstrations of new education resources
available from across the agency. This
is a ticketed event.
6:00–9:00pm
Shuttle buses start at
5:30pm on L Street
National Geographic,
1145 17th Street, NW
National Geographic Program
and Reception
Visit National Geographic’s Global
Headquarters for a cocktail reception
before sitting down to a private
screening of the incredible YouTubegenerated National Geographic film
Life in a Day. Pick up free giveaways
and classroom resources, and meet
NGS staff in this exclusive behindthe-scenes opportunity. This is a ticketed event.
10,000 authoritative, accessible articles • 3,000 photos,
illustrations, and maps • thousands of primary sources,
chronologies, and glossaries
A unique choice
for your classroom
or library
Now with expanded coverage,
featuring major works available
exclusively from SOLR on:
• One time purchase
• Free annual updates
• Buy only what you need
• Free supplementary
resources for teachers
• World Terrorism
• Civil War Era and Reconstruction
• Sports in America
Visit NCSS booth #343 for conference
specials, coupons, and free gifts.
Take the Guided Tour and sign up for
a 30-day free trial at www.sharpe-online.com
Published by M.E. Sharpe, Inc.
Tel: 1-800-541-6563; Fax: 914-273-2106; [email protected]
AR1113C
91st NCSS Annual Conference
11
NCSS Legislative Day – Thursday, December 1
The 2011 NCSS Annual Conference in Washington D.C. provides a unique opportunity for social studies educators to come
together to “do social studies” and reach out to members of Congress about the issues that are important to the profession.
In light of pending appropriations legislation and the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA),
NCSS is focusing its resources on making Thursday an all-day Legislative Day event that will include a morning orientation, time
to meet with your members of Congress in the late morning and early afternoon and an important debriefing session on information
dissemination strategies in the afternoon. Conference registration is required to participate in Legislative Day
Note: Legislative Day will be replacing the “NCSS Leaders Program” sessions that were listed in the Conference Preview.
8:00–9:30am
Pre-Congressional Visit Briefing
Learn the best strategies to becoming an effective advocate for
your profession. Gain an understanding of how to connect your
talking points to the local and national issues that U.S. congressional leaders care about and the key aspects to developing
ongoing relationships that will make you a trusted source of
information and feedback regarding the effect of national policies on local issues.
Catriona Macdonald, Linchpin Strategies, LLC, Washington,
DC
10:00am–2:30pm
Capitol Hill Visits
After the morning orientation, participants will go to Capitol
Hill for meetings they have scheduled with their members of
Congress.
3:30–4:30pm
Legislative Day Debriefing
Marriott at Metro Center, 775 12th St. NW
Social studies advocacy doesn’t have to stop on the steps of the
Capitol! Join your colleagues in sharing your experiences from
your Hill visits and discuss strategies for next steps and information dissemination.
Catriona Macdonald, Linchpin Strategies, LLC, Washington,
DC; Michelle Herczog, NCSS Board of Directors
Would you like to travel abroad on a deeply discounted trip for
NCSS members and designed specifically for social studies educators?
Founded in 2007, GEEO is a non-profit organization
that runs travel programs for educators. This summer
GEEO and NCSS are collaborating on a program that
will organize two trips (Turkey and Peru) exclusively
for NCSS members.
Detailed information about these programs,
including itineraries, costs, travel dates, and more
can be found at www.geeo.org.
GEEO can be reached 7 days a week, toll free at
1-877-600-0105 between 9am-9pm EST.
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Dimensions of Diversity
Tours
Explore the Region’s History, Culture, and Resources on a Custom Tour
Tickets for all available tours can be purchased at NCSS Registration. All tours require tickets.
Unless noted on your ticket, tours will start on L Street, between the two buildings of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Please plan
to arrive 10 minutes early to facilitate an on-time departure.
7:30am–8:00pm
9:00am–3:30pm
9:00am–1:00pm
11:00am–12:00pm; 2:00–3:00pm;
4:00–5:00pm
7:00pm–11:00pm
8:15am–5:15pm
11:00am–12:00pm; 2:00–3:00pm;
4:00–5:00pm
12:30–4:30pm
Thursday, December 1
Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Battlefield
Fredericksburg’s Colonial, Revolutionary, and Civil War History
The Distinctive DC City Tour
Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office
Night Tour of Washington’s Monuments and Landmarks
Friday, December 2
Fort McHenry and Baltimore Inner Harbor
Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office
The Distinctive DC City Tour
8:15am–3:45pm
Saturday, December 3
Historic Annapolis and U.S. Naval Academy
11:00am–8:00pm
“Humanity on the Battlefield”
5:00PM–9:00pm
7:00PM–11:00pm
Mount Vernon by Candlelight
Night Tour of Washington’s Monuments and Landmarks
Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office
Cost: $5. Maximum of 15 people.
Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office was rediscovered in 1997
when the building was scheduled for demolition. She lived on
the property and stored supplies she received for her work on
the battlefield. At the end of the war, she took up the cause of
grieving families and friends whose sons, brothers, and neighbors were missing. She responded to over 63,000 letters, and
when the office closed in 1867, she had identified the fate of
over 23,000 men.
Restoration of the site, a short walking distance from the
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, has just begun, giving
visitors a rare opportunity to view it as it was following the Civil
War. This private tour will be led by docents from the National
Museum of Civil War Medicine, and participants will receive
new teaching materials.
The Distinctive
DC City Tour
Cost: $32. Minimum of 25
people.
Washington offers an unriv a l e d c o m b i n at i o n o f
museums and cultural institutions, monuments and
memorials, parks and gardens, and diverse neighborhoods. Guests will pass by
some of Washington’s iconic
and most storied sites,
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Dimensions of Diversity
including the U.S. Capitol, U.S. Supreme Court, House and
Senate Office Buildings, National Archives, the White House,
Washington Monument, Pennsylvania Avenue, and more. The
tour will include stops at most of the major monuments.
Fort McHenry and Baltimore Inner Harbor
Cost: $75. Minimum of 25 people.
This exciting day in Baltimore starts with a tour of Fort McHenry,
best known for its role in the Battle of Baltimore during the War
of 1812, and for providing inspiration for “The Star-Spangled
Banner.” Following lunch on their own in Baltimore’s Inner
Harbor, participants will enjoy a guided walking tour of historic
downtown and Inner Harbor, through four centuries of history
and showcasing more than 20 of the city’s most notable landmarks, attractions, and historic sites. Highlights include the Flag
House and Star-Spangled Banner Museum, the Jewish Museum
of Maryland, Carroll Mansion, and the Reginald F. Lewis
Museum of African American History and Culture.
Fredericksburg’s Colonial, Revolutionary, and
Civil War History
Cost: $45.
Visit the homes, museums, shops, buildings, and sites that illuminate the colonial, revolutionary, and Civil War history of
Fredericksburg, Virginia. This tour, conducted by the City of
Fredericksburg Department of Economic Development and
Tourism, will include the influence of George Washington and
the Washington family during colonial times, the city’s Revolutionary history, and its bloody Civil War battles, when the city
changed hands seven times. The tour includes free time for
lunch and shopping in Old Town Fredericksburg.
Gettysburg National Military Park Museum
and Battlefield
Cost: $45.
Experience the history of America’s most famous battle. This
tour, conducted by the Gettysburg Convention & Visitors
Bureau, starts at the new Gettysburg National Military Park
Museum and Visitor Center, which features one of the largest
and most important Civil War collections and the newly conserved Cyclorama. In the afternoon, visitors will tour the battlefield, and then take a walking tour through downtown Gettysburg, stopping at the David Wills House and Shriver House
Museum.
Participants will then travel to Antietam National Battlefield,
site of America’s bloodiest day, to visit the Pry House Field Hospital, considered the birthplace of military and emergency
medicine, and the Memorial Illumination, the annual event
where the battlefield is illuminated at dusk by 23,000 candles—
one for each soldier killed, wounded, or missing.
Mount Vernon by Candlelight
Cost: SOLD OUT
“Mrs. Washington” hosts an enchanting evening of candlelit
tours, fireside Christmas caroling, and hot cider and ginger
cookies. The Mount Vernon by Candlelight Tour includes the
first and second floors, featuring characters from the Washingtons’ world guiding visitors through the home and adding ambiance and authenticity to a traditional Christmas evening at
Mount Vernon.
Historic Annapolis and U.S. Naval Academy
Cost: $70.
Annapolis, Maryland’s capital city, has more existing colonial
buildings than any other U.S. city, as well as architectural gems
from later eras. The day starts with a walking tour of Historic
Annapolis, including Maryland’s State House—the nation’s
oldest capitol building in continuous legislative use—the Government House, historic homes, and more. Following lunch on
their own, participants will tour the campus of the U.S. Naval
Academy, founded in 1845.
“Humanity on the Battlefield”: The National Museum of
Civil War Medicine, Pry House Field Hospital, and Memorial Illumination at Antietam National Battlefield
Cost: $73. Minimum of 25 people.
The National Museum of Civil War Medicine, in Frederick, MD,
is the premier center for the preservation and research legacy of
Civil War medical innovation. Ten galleries of exhibits and Civil
War artifacts interpret the story of Civil War medicine. At the
museum, American Red Cross representatives will present their
“Exploring Humanitarian Law” workshop, where participants
will explore contemporary events highlighting American contributions to the development of humanitarian standards to protect battlefield wounded and sick. The workshop will feature the
American Red Cross’ online curriculum, Exploring Humanitarian Law, and new teaching resources, The American Civil
War—A Humanitarian Perspective.
Night Tour Of Washington’s Monuments and Landmarks
Cost: $32.
There is no better way to experience Washington’s monuments
and landmarks than by moonlight. Guests will see the city in a
different light as they pass by the U.S. Capitol, the National Mall
and Smithsonian museums, Washington Monument, World
War II Memorial, and Jefferson Memorial and Tidal Basin. The
tour will conclude at the Kennedy Center for a panoramic view
from the roof terrace.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
15
Conference Sponsors
NCSS thanks all of the following sponsors for their generous support of the 91st NCSS Annual Conference. Please visit their booths in the
Exhibit Hall and thank them for their contributions.
Sponsor
Event/Item/Service
Annenberg Learner
Friday featured speaker Philip Zimbardo
C-SPAN
Conference tote bags
Farmers Insurance
Early Career Teacher Breakfast
Name badge holders
House of Delegates refreshments
State Council lodging assistance
Celebrating 15 years of partnership in supporting
the social studies community
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
President’s Breakfast
Herff Jones | Nystrom
Friday Dance
National Geographic
Learning
NCSS Awards Reception
Newseum
President’s Reception
Pearson
President’s Reception
Random House, Inc.
Friday featured speaker Geoffrey Canada
Social Studies School Service
Spirit of America Award
Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
Students Living Social Studies
16
Dimensions of Diversity
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1
First-Timers’ Scholarships
NCSS has awarded a record 80 conference scholarships to teachers in DC, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia who have never been
able to attend an annual meeting and join NCSS. These scholarships are enabling teachers from diverse ethnic groups and/or who
teach in high-poverty schools to take advantage of this premier professional development opportunity.
Many individuals and organizations listed below, including a number of state and local councils, made generous donations to
allow these teachers to attend. In many cases, the award was given in honor of an individual.
A special thanks goes to Gayle Thieman for coordinating all aspects of the scholarship program, and to Craig Blackman, who
recruited many Virginia-based donors.
We also thank everyone who contributed to the scholarship fund and welcome all recipients to the conference and to NCSS.
State Councils
Individuals
Central New York Council for the Social Studies
Colorado Council for the Social Studies
Oregon Council for the Social Studies
Tennessee Council for the Social Studies, in honor of
Dr. Charles B. Myers
Texas Council for the Social Studies
Virginia Council for the Social Studies
Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies
Corporations And Organizations
ABC-CLIO
Farmers Insurance
Five Ponds Press
Forrest T. Jones & Company
George Washington’s Mount Vernon
Globe & Map Shop, LLC
Goethe-Institut DC
InspirEd Educators, Inc.
League of Women Voters of D.C. Education Fund,in honor of
Dr. Billie Day
New Life Providence Church, Virginia Beach, VA
Sons of the American Revolution, Ft. Harrison (VA) Chapter
Thomas Jefferson Foundation
United Jewish Federation of Tidewater
Susan Adler
Ronald Adams
Sue Blanchette
Syd Golston, in honor of NCSS President Sue Blanchette
Susan Griffin
Diane Hart
Jack Hoar, in honor of Bob O’Connor
Mert Martens
Mary McFarland
Karen Muir, in honor of Pat and Ron Robeson
Karen Muir, in honor of Dr. Sari Bennett and Peggy Altoff
C. Fred Risinger
Gayle Thieman
JOIN uS
Membership in National Council for the Social Studies is open to any person or institution interested in the social studies.
Comprehensive Membership dues are $79. Regular Membership dues are $66; Student/Retired Membership dues are $37
(instructor certification required for full-time student status). All memberships include the online newsletter The Social Studies
Professional. Members can choose as a benefit either a full subscription to Social Education (six issues) or a full subscription to
Social Studies and the Young Learner, which includes the September and May/June issues of Social Education. Comprehensive
members also receive all bulletins.
Single copies of NCSS jounals are $7.95. Subscriptions to Social Education are $67 and institutional. Subscriptions to Social
Studies and the Young Leaner by institutions are $39.
To join NCSS or subscribe as an institution, send a check to NCSS, PO Box 79178, Baltimore, Maryland 21279-0078, call 1
800 296-7840, or visit www.socialstudies.org/membership.
18
Dimensions of Diversity
2011 NCSS AWARDS AND GRANT RECIpIENTS
NCSS annually recognizes teachers, researchers, and other worthy individuals or programs. This
year’s award and grant recipients are listed below. Please join us in congratulating your fellow educators for their outstanding performance in the social studies by attending their presentation sessions
(where noted) and the two awards receptions where they will be formally recognized.
For updates and changes, please check your conference program addendum on-site.
Outstanding Social Studies Teachers of the Year
Sponsored by Farmers Insurance
Celebrating 15 years of partnership in supporting
the social studies community
These awards recognize exceptional classroom social studies teachers, grades K-12, who teach social studies regularly and systematically or at least
one-half time in a departmentalized school setting. NCSS Teachers of the Year excel in at least six of seven areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Creative and effective development/use of instructional materials
Incorporation of innovative instructional strategies and techniques
Utilization of new scholarship
Utilization of the ten interrelated themes identified in NCSS curriculum standards
Ability to foster a spirit of inquiry and development of information literacy skills
Ability to foster the development of democratic beliefs and values, and skills needed for participation
Professional development
ElEMENTAry
Ruth King
Cedar Ridge Elementary,
Cedar Hills, UT
Friday, 4:20pm,
Room 149A
A “GPS Toolkit” to
Guide Your Social
Studies Teaching
G = Geography P =
Primary Sources S = Strategies & T =
Technology/Other Tools Incorporate
the use of geography, primary sources,
thinking historically, and literacy
strategies in your classroom. Receive
several templates for learning strategies
that intertwine historical thinking skills
with literacy skills, as well as a handout
with instructions for accessing the
presenter’s wiki webpage with templates
and technology links used or referred to
in this session.
Chair: JoAnn Wood, Elementary
Social Studies Supervisor, Cobb
County School District, Marietta, GA
MIDDlE lEVEl
SECONDAry lEVEl
Christine Adrian
Benjamin D. Weber
Jefferson Middle School,
Champaign, IL.
Marc and Eva Stern Math
and Science School (Stern MASS)
Los Angeles, CA
Saturday, 2:00pm,
Room 149A
It Makes a Long
Time Man Feel
Bad
Alarming disproportionate populations of African American males occupy
U.S. prisons. What does history have to
do with it? Participants will explore the
transition from Southern plantation to
Southern prisons. Christine Adrian will
illustrate her classroom teaching
method by exploring how current
issues that touch her students’ lives
have roots in U.S. history. This PowerPoint presentation will incorporate film
and sound clips. Statistical materials on
the U.S. prison system will be
distributed.
Chair: Michael Koren, 2010
Outstanding Middle Level Social
Studies Teacher of the Year, Fox Point,
WI
Friday, 3:15pm,
Room 149A
History as the
Science of
Decision Making
Benjamin will discuss his experiences
teaching at a charter high school in East
Los Angeles and suggest some ways of
connecting student-centered pedagogy
with standardized results by focusing
on debate and similar classroom strategies. Learn to create an online professional teaching portfolio to showcase
your work and your students’ work.
Handouts illustrating strategies and
portfolio instructions will be provided.
Chair: India Meissel,
Lakeland High School,
Suffolk, VA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
19
NCSS AWARDS AND GRANTS
Exemplary Research Award
Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation
Co-sponsored by the NCSS Research Community
Co-sponsored by NCSS Research Community
This award acknowledges and encourages scholarly inquiry into significant issues and possibilities for social studies education. Research
must be published and have a social studies education focus.
The Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award recognizes outstanding research completed in pursuit of a doctoral degree.
Ronald W. Evans
School of Teacher Education,
San Diego State University,
San Diego, CA
Avishag (Abby) Reisman
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Award-winning Dissertation:
Reading Like a Historian: A
Document-Based History Intervention
in Urban High Schools
Award-winning Research: The Hope
for American School Reform: The Cold
War Pursuit of Inquiry Learning in
Social Studies
Friday, 2:10pm, Room 149A
Friday, 10:15am, Room 149A
The Hope for American School Reform: The “New
Social Studies”
Join this award-winning researcher as he examines the
inquiry-oriented “new social studies” movement of the
1960s, exploring its Cold War context; its transition from
a focus on science education to broader involvement in
the social sciences; its theoretical underpinnings, development, and dissemination of new materials; and the
reactions from scholars, teachers, and others. Implications for today’s educators will be discussed.
Reading Like a Historian: A Document-Based History Curriculum Intervention
Learn how students who were reading below grade level
benefitted from an inquiry-based history curriculum
intervention. This presenter takes you through the structure and reasoning behind the “Document-Based Lesson”
and discusses the exciting results of her six-month study
with more than 200 eleventh grade students in urban
public school classrooms. The San Francisco school
system was so impressed that it provided funding to digitize the entire document-based curriculum.
Chair: Lawrence Paska, Social Studies Education, New
York State Education Department, Albany, NY
Chair: Leisa Martin, Curricular and Instructional
Studies, The University of Akron, Akron, OH
Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies
Co-sponsored by the NCSS Research Community
The Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career in Research Award recognizes professionals who have made extensive contributions to knowledge concerning significant areas of social studies education through meritorious research.
Lynne Boyle-Baise
Elementary Social Studies,
Curriculum Theory, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Friday, 9:00am, Room 149A
Composing a Career in Social Studies Research
Research is a process of personally-driven inquiry where one question leads to another, forming a
line of inquiry. The presenter will describe the paths of inquiry that marked her career and consider research as following one’s puzzlements. Imagine your own research journeys, and suggest needs for future inquiries as you identify
significant questions for your own investigations.
Chair: Jeff Passe, Chair, Department of Secondary Education, Towson University, Towson, MD
20
Dimensions of Diversity
NCSS AWARDS AND GRANTS
2011 Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy
Co-sponsored by Herff Jones / Nystrom Inc.
The Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy promotes geography education in schools; enhances the geographic
literacy of students at the classroom, district, and statewide level; and encourages
the integration of geography into the social
studies curriculum/classroom.
Cynthia Resor, April Blakely,
Connie Hodge and Karen Maloley
Eastern Kentucky University,
Richmond, KY
2011 Grant-winning Proposal:
Pre-service Teacher Conference: Geography in the Classroom.
(Project to be presented at the 2012
NCSS Annual Conference)
2010 Geographic Literacy Award
James N. Oigara
Canisius College, Buffalo, NY
2010 Grant-winning Proposal: Enhancing the Teaching of Geographic Standards through Tools of
Technology: A Summer Workshop for K-12 Teachers
Saturday, 9:15am, Room 149A
Teachers Explore Ways to Use GPS Technology
Geospatial technology has great potential for teaching geography concepts. This study describes how K-12 teachers
implemented GPS and geocaching interdisciplinary activities in their lessons. Implications of geospatial technology
are discussed. The researcher will provide examples of GPS and geocaching activities as a model for using geospatial
technologies to engage learners.
Chair: Ellen J. Foster, The University of Mississippi, University, MS
Award for Global Understanding Given in honor of James M. Becker
Made possible with funding from The Longview Foundation
This award annually recognizes a social studies educator (or a team of educators) who has made notable contributions in helping social studies
students increase their understanding of the world.
Mark Johnson
Concordia International School, Shanghai, China
Saturday, 10:30am, Room 149A
“His Death Avenged!” Inquiry and Analysis in the History Classroom
A murder-mystery from the American frontier with global implications inspires inquiry, critical
thinking, and 21st-century research skills by inverting Bloom’s taxonomy and empowering students
as historians. The session is interactive and includes extensive hands-on work with primary
documents.
Chair: J. D. Bowers, Genocide and Human Rights Institute, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
21
NCSS AWARDS AND GRANTS
NDING SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER OF THE YEAR
Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award
Co-sponsored by Fund for Social Studies Education (FASSE)
Christa McAuliffe was an innovative social studies teacher who reached for the stars in an effort to make her
dream a reality. The purpose of the $2,500 grant is to help a social studies educator make his or her dream of
innovative social studies a reality. Grants will be given to assist classroom teachers in developing and
implementing imaginative, innovative, and illustrative social studies teaching strategies; and supporting student
implementation of innovative social studies citizenship projects, field experiences, and community connections.
Kathryn Bauer and Sheila Simpson
Patterson Elementary School, Mesa, AZ
2011 Award-winning Proposal: Historical Firsts! Civil
War Science and Technology.
(Project to be presented at the 2012 NCSS Annual
Conference)
22
Dimensions of Diversity
NCSS AWARDS AND GRANTS
Woodson Book Award
The Carter G. Woodson Book Awards and
Honor Books are chosen as the most
distinguished social science books
depicting ethnicity in the United States
for young readers.
Winning Authors Panel
Discussion
Saturday, 3:15pm, Room 149A
Join this panel for a glimpse at
the “story behind the stories” of
the 2011 Carter G. Woodson
Award and Honor books, as told
by authors. After the session,
which will include Q&A with the
audience, the authors will be
signing their books at the NCSS
Bookstore, where you can meet
them in person!
Chair: Dean Cristol, The Ohio
State University, Columbus, OH
2011 Awards and Grant Receptions
NCSS Teacher of the Year Awards Ceremony
Friday, December 2, 7:00AM, Convention Center Ballroom A
The President’s Breakfast, the official opening of the 91st NCSS Annual
Conference, will feature the presentation of the NCSS Teacher of
the Year awards. Celebrate Excellence as we recognize outstanding
classroom teachers and honor the work of teachers everywhere.
Hear NCSS President Sue Blanchette deliver her Presidential Address,
recognizing the shared passion of teachers and looking at teaching,
then and now. The breakfast is a ticketed event.
NCSS Awards Reception
Sponsored by National Geographic Learning
Saturday, December 3, 5:30pm, Renaissance Hotel Ballroom
Join us for the presentation of the 2011 NCSS Awards. Enjoy a
wonderful evening of entertainment with a tropical steel drum band
and refreshments as we honor the exceptional contributions of your
colleagues to social studies education.
Strategies for the
History Classroom
“Why Won’t You Just Tell Us the Answer?”
nEW!
20
%
Th mE
E A ET
UT
nh
ou hor
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Sh
S!
oW Table
diS
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Ste
7
Teaching Historical Thinking in Grades 7–12
Bruce A. Lesh; Foreword by Edward L. Ayers
History teacher Bruce Lesh shows how to improve student comprehension
of and performance in historical studies by centering historical study on
a question, where students gather a variety of historical sources and then
develop and defend their answers to that question.
Grades 7–12 | GS-0812 | $22.00 paper
Eyewitness to the Past
Strategies for Teaching American History in Grades 5–12
Joan Brodsky Schur; Foreword by James A. Percoco
Eyewitness to the Past examines six types of primary sources, which,
when used together, offer a varied and cohesive structure for
studying the American past that reinforces material in the textbook,
encourages creativity, activates different learning styles, and
strengthens cognitive skills.
Grades 5–12 | GS-0497 | $20.00 paper
See the entire text
of all our new books online
www.stenhouse.com
[800] 988-9812
91st NCSS Annual Conference
• web press
23
Carter G. Woodson Award Books and Honor Books
Elementary
Winner
Secondary
Winner
Sit In: How Four Friends
Stood Up by Sitting
Down
An Unspeakable Crime:
The Prosecution and
Persecution of Leo Frank
by Andrea Davis Pinkney
and Illustrated by brian
Pinkney. Published
by little, brown and
Company (A Division of
hachette book Group,
ork, Ny.
y
y.
Inc.), New york,
by Elaine Marie
Alphin. Published by
Carolrhoda books
(A Division of lerner
Publishing Group, Inc.),
Minneapolis, MN.
Secondary
Honor
Simeon’s Story: An
Eyewitness Account
of the Kidnapping of
Emmett Till
by Simeon Wright with
herb boyd. Published
by lawrence hill books
(An imprint of Chicago
review Press).
Elementary Honor
Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave
by laban Carrick hill and Illustrated by bryan Collier.
Published by little, brown and Company (A Division of
hachette book Group, Inc.), New york, Ny.
There were no awards given for Middle Level books in 2011.
About the Carter G. Woodson Book Awards
About Carter G. Woodson
Woodson books accurately reflect the perspectives, cultures, and values of the particular ethnic or racial group(s)
represented; promote pluralistic values; are informational
or nonfiction (but not textbooks); are well written,
reflecting originality in presentation and themes; and are
published in the United States in the year prior to the
award year. Eligible books are evaluated for readability,
suitability for age/grade level, scholarship, illustrations,
and curriculum enhancement.
The awards are given in honor of Carter G. Woodson
(1875–1950), scholar, educator, historian, and founding
editor of The Journal of Negro History. In 1915, Woodson
founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and
History, and, in 1926, initiated Negro History Week,
which gave rise in 1976 to Black History Month.
24
Dimensions of Diversity
NCSS Committees
NCSS conducts official business at the Annual Conference. Unless otherwise noted, meetings of the House of Delegates, operations
committees, and other NCSS work groups are open to all NCSS members interested in the governance of the Council.
Wednesday, November 30
Board Meeting (Board members only, please)
Renaissance
Meeting Room 2
Thursday, December 1
House of Delegates Steering Committee
Endorsements/Special Projects Committee
House of Delegates Resolutions Committee
House of Delegates Assignment Committee
Select Subcommittee on Social Education
Intergroup Relations Committee
Conference Committee
Archives Committee
Membership Committee
Documents Review Committee
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Room 142
Meeting Room 2
Room 142
Salon D
Room 141
Room 142
Room 141
Salon D
Room 142
Salon D
Publications Committee
Convention Center
Room 141
9:00–11:30am
9:15–11:15am
10:15am–12:15pm
10:15am–12:15pm
11:30am–12:30pm
12:30–1:15pm
12:30–1:30pm
2:10–2:40pm
2:10–4:10pm
2:50–4:20pm
4:20–6:20pm
6:30–8:30pm
Friday, December 2
House of Delegates Resolutions Hearing
Awards Committee
FASSE Governing Board
Public Relations/Government Relations Committee
Social Studies and the Young Learner Editorial Board
Nominations and Elections Committee
House of Delegates New Delegate Briefing
House of Delegates Credentials Committee
Program Planning: 2012—92nd Annual Conference, Seattle, WA
House of Delegates Registration
House of Delegates First Session
NCSS Notable Trade Books Committee
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Room 142
Meeting Room 3
Room 141
Meeting Room 8/9
Room 142
Meeting Room 3
Room 207A
Room 142
Meeting Room 5
Outside 207AB
Room 207AB
Meeting Room 2
7:00–8:00am
8:00–10:30am
9:00am–1:00pm
1:00–2:00pm
3:15–5:15pm
3:15–4:15pm
4:30–5:30pm
Saturday, December 3
House of Delegates Registration
House of Delegates 2nd Session
Carter G. Woodson Committee
Council Presidents Meeting
Program Planning: 2013—93rd Annual Conference, St. Louis, MO
International Visitors Committee
DC Council Meeting
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Renaissance
Outside Room 207AB
Room 207AB
Meeting Room 2
Room 142
Salon D
Meeting Room 3
Meeting Room 4
8:00–10:00am
Sunday, December 4
NCSS Board Meeting (Board members only)
Convention Center
Salon D
6:30–9:00pm
9:00–10:00am
9:15–10:15am
10:00am–12:00pm
10:00am–12:00pm
10:00am–12:00pm
1:00–4:00pm
2:00–5:00pm
3:00-5:00pm
4:00–6:00pm
5:00–7:00pm
5:30–8:30pm
30
Dimensions of Diversity
Join us for the launching of
Rho Kappa
The much acclaimed, long awaited
NCSS National Social Studies
Honor Society
When: Saturday, December 3 at 1:00pm
Where: NCSS Booth 433,
Exhibit Hall D,
Walter E. Washington
Convention Center
This message is brought to you by Farmers Insurance
Celebrating 15 Years of Partnership with NCSS
in supporting the social studies community
Community Meetings
Communities are formal subgroups within NCSS that bring together educators with common interests. Conference attendees are
strongly encouraged to attend any and all community meetings of interest to them.
9:00–10:00am
9:00–10:00am
10:15–11:15am
10:15–11:15am
10:15–11:15am
2:10–3:10pm
2:10–3:10pm
3:15–4:15pm
3:15–4:15pm
3:15–4:15pm
3:15-4:15pm
Friday, December 2
Teacher Education and Professional Development Community
Asia Community
Canada Community
Non-Public Schools Community
Early Childhood/Elementary Community
Technology Community
Instruction Community
National Board of Professional Teaching Standards Community
Citizenship Community
World History Educator Community
Research Community
Renaissance
Convention Center
Renaissance
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Meeting Room 2
Salon D
Meeting Room 2
Meeting Room 5
Room 148
Salon D
Room 305
Room 141
Room 148
Salon D
Meeting Room 8/9
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Renaissance
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Convention Center
Meeting Room 4
Salon D
Room 141
Room 148
Room 141
Meeting Room 2
Room 142
Meeting Room 5
Room 148
Room 142
Room 148
Room 142
Saturday, December 3
10:30–11:30am
10:30–11:30am
10:30–11:30am
10:30–11:30am
1:00–2:00pm
2:00–3:00pm
2:00–3:00pm
2:00–3:00pm
2:00–3:00pm
3:15–4:15pm
3:15–4:15pm
4:30–5:30pm
Academic Freedom Community
Middle East Community
Issues-Centered Education Community
Geography Community
Friends of NCSS Community
African American Educators for the Social Studies Community
Teaching American Indian History, Culture, and Current Events Community
Environmental and Sustainability Education Community
International Activities Community
Preservice Teachers Community
LGBTQ Issues Community
Assessment Community
Community/Council Breakfasts
Community and State Councils also hold breakfast meetings. Tickets for breakfast must be ordered during advance registration;
they cannot be purchased on site. NCSS members without tickets are always welcome to attend the business portion of breakfast
meetings. All breakfasts will be in the Renaissance Washington DC Hotel.
7:00–8:00am
7:00–8:00am
Friday, December 2
Teacher Education and Professional Development Community
Environmental and Sustainability Education Community
Renaissance
Renaissance
Meeting Room 2
Meeting Room 3
Saturday, December 3
7:00–8:00am
7:00–8:00am
Asia Community
Renaissance
Meeting Room 3
Texas Council for the Social Studies
Renaissance
Meeting Room 2
7:00–8:00am
African American Educators Community
Renaissance
Meeting Room 5
7:00–8:00am
Great Lakes Council for the Social Studies
Renaissance
Meeting Room 4
Communities Showcase
Friday, 12:30–3:00pm
Saturday, 12:45–2:00pm
NCSS Communities play a vital role as vehicles for social studies professionals to discuss current topics in the profession, seek advice, share
their knowledge and connect with others with similar interests. Visit the NCSS Community Showcase on the L Street Bridge of the Walter E.
Washington Convention Center at the times listed and talk one-on-one with community members to explore which might be the right fit for
you!
91st NCSS Annual Conference
33
Associated Groups
Local school district social studies supervisors, state social studies specialists, international educators, and college and university faculty members are organized as formal subgroups of NCSS. These groups hold meetings concurrently with the NCSS Annual Conference. All registered
conference attendees are welcome to attend associated group sessions, except where noted. Attendance at associated group sessions requires
a valid NCSS Conference badge, regardless of whether you are a member of that associated group or not.
Council of State Social Studies Supervisors (CS4)
CS4 provides a vehicle for the exchange of ideas among the specialists, consultants, and supervisors who have responsibilities for social
studies education in the various state departments of education/public instruction. CS4 meetings and sessions will take place at the Renaissance Washington DC Hotel, except where noted.
Tuesday, November 29
2:30–4:00pm
CS4 Executive Board Meeting (Board members only, please)
Meeting Rooms 8/9
4:15–9:30pm
Meet in Lobby—Travel to Mount Vernon (Ticketed Event)
Mount Vernon
Wednesday, November 30
6:45–7:45am
Registration & Breakfast (Ticketed event)
Meeting Room 5
7:45–8:30am
Travel to Library of Congress
Library of Congress
8:30–9:00am
Check in at the Library of Congress/Welcome
Library of Congress
9:00am–12:00pm
Library of Congress programs
Library of Congress
12:00–12:45pm
Lunch at Library of Congress (Ticketed Event)
Library of Congress
12:45–1:30pm
Return to hotel
1:30–2:15pm
Business Meeting I
Meeting Rooms 8/9
2:15–2:30pm
Break
Meeting Room 5
2:30–3:45pm
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Meeting Rooms 8/9
3:45–4:15pm
Time Maps of World History
Meeting Rooms 8/9
4:15–5:30pm
Colonial Williamsburg
Meeting Rooms 8/9
5:55pm
Meet in lobby to leave for dinner (Ticketed event)
German Ambassador’s
Residence
Thursday, December 1
7:00–8:00am
Breakfast (Ticketed event)
Meeting Room 5
8:00–8:30am
Travel to National Geographic
National Geographic
8:30–11:30am
National Geographic Programs
National Geographic
11:30am–12:30pm
Lunch at National Geographic (Ticketed event)
National Geographic
Round table discussion of Common State Standards in Social Studies
12:15–1:00pm
Small College and University Faculty Forum
Meeting Room 144A
12:30–1:00pm
Return to hotel
1:00–1:45pm
Business Meeting II ~ Common State Standards in Social Studies
Meeting Rooms 8/9
1:45–2:30pm
Discussion: CS4 Constitution
Meeting Rooms 8/9
2:30–2:45pm
Break
Meeting Room 5
2:45–3:15pm
National History Day
Meeting Rooms 8/9
3:15–3:55pm
The Goethe-Institut
Meeting Rooms 8/9
3:55–4:30pm
The American Red Cross
Meeting Rooms 8/9
4:30–5:00pm
Global Exploration for Educators Organization (GEEO)
Meeting Rooms 8/9
5:00–5:20pm
Wrap-Up
Meeting Rooms 8/9
6:00–9:00pm
Dinner and Gift Exchange (Ticketed event)
Location TBD
Friday, December 2
8:00–10:00am
36
Dimensions of Diversity
CS4 Executive Board Meeting (Board members only, please)
Meeting Rooms 8/9
College and university Faculty Assembly (CuFA)
CUFA serves as an advocacy organization for social studies education and consists of higher-education faculty members, graduate students,
and others interested in working with social educators such as social scientists, historians, and philosophers. CUFA members provide a forum
for communication among professional educators and examine social studies from a theoretical and research perspective. CUFA meetings will
be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.
All CUFA attendees must register for the NCSS Annual Conference. Registration for CUFA sessions is $50, in addition to the NCSS registration fee.
Wednesday, November 30
8:00am–12:00pm
CUFA Board Meeting
(Board members only)
Room 141
12:15–2:30pm
TRSE Editorial Board
(Board members only)
Room 141
1:30–2:15pm
Graduate Student Forum
Room 142
4:00–5:15pm
Concurrent Sessions
Convention Center
5:00–8:00pm
NCSS/CUFA Registration
East Registration
6:00–7:00pm
Opening Speaker: Stephanie Deutsch
Room 206
7:00–8:00pm
Reception
South Pre-Function Area, 3rd Floor
8:00–8:15pm
Membership Meet & Greet
8:00–9:30pm
Small Colleges and University Faculty Forum Business Meetings
Room 148
Thursday, December 1
8:00–9:15am
Concurrent Sessions 1
9:30–10:45am
Concurrent Sessions 2
Convention Center
11:00am–12:15pm
Concurrent Sessions 3
Convention Center
12:15–1:15pm
Lunch
Convention Center
12:15–1:00pm
Small College and University Faculty Forum Meeting
Room 144A
1:15–2:00pm
Alternative Sessions (Please feel free to bring lunch with you to alternaConvention Center
tive format sessions.)
2:15–3:30pm
Concurrent Sessions 4
Convention Center
3:45–5:00pm
Concurrent Sessions 5
Convention Center
5:15–6:15pm
Panel Discussion:
Can We Move Beyond Scholarship That is “Weak, Isolated, and
Incestuous”? Creating a More Viable Future for Social Studies
Research
Room 206
Convention Center
Cynthia Tyson, J.B. Mayo, Li-Ching Ho, Carole Hahn, Keith Barton, Jennifer
Hauver James, Cinthia Salinas
6:15–7:00pm
Business Meeting
Room 206
7:00–9:00pm
Joint Reception with International Assembly
South Pre-Function Area, 3rd Floor
8:00–10:00am
CUFA Business Meeting
(Board members only)
Room 141
9:00am–6:00pm
Research into Practice Sessions
Room 304
10:00am–12:00pm
SIRC Meeting
Salon D
Friday, December 1
91st NCSS Annual Conference
37
C U F A • November 30 • Wednesday, 2:30–3:45pm
Wednesday, 2:30–3:45PM
Graduate Student Roundtables
Room 201
Tables:
1. Theme: Citizenship Education
Discussant: Kathryn Obenchain
Civil Talks: Analysis of Online Discussions in Social
Studies Classrooms
Jeffrey P. Drake, Kent State University
Power Plants are for Fifth Graders: Teaching (social
studies) for Ecoliterate Citizenship
Mark Kissling, Michigan State University
2.Theme: Media Literacy/Film
Discussant: Jeremy Stoddard
Romanian Students’ (Mis)Perceptions of U.S. Culture:
Making the Case for Critical Media Literacy
M. Elizabeth Bellows, Sorana Necula, The University of Texas
at Austin
Teaching the Cold War with Film
Barbara Houser, University of Central Florida
Using Historical Films to Promote Gender Equity in
the History Curriculum
Cicely Scheiner-Fisher, University of Central Florida
3. Theme: History Education
Discussant: Keith Barton
What Difference Does Interdisciplinary Teaching
Make? An Inquiry of Fifth Graders’ Learning of
History Through the Use of Literacy, and Visual Arts
Skills
Kristy Brugar, Michigan State University
Connecting History with a Small h to History with a
Big H: Designing Interventions to Promote Students’
Engagement with History
Liz Dawes Duraisingh, Harvard University
Reconstructing History Through Theater Arts
Sarah Hartman, The University of Alabama
4. Theme: Social Media in the Social Studies
Discussant: David Hicks
Approaches of Social Studies Teachers Towards
the Integration of Social Network Tools into the
Classroom
Emin Kiline, Russell T. Evans , Texas A&M University
Encouraging Corroboration with a Historical Inquiry
Web-Based Application
Jonathan S. List, North Carolina State University
Power, What’s the Point: A Case Study of U.S.
Government Teachers’ Perception and Use of
38
Dimensions of Diversity
Technological Tools.
Erin O. Wigginton, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University
5. Theme: Global Education in the Social Studies
Discussant: Diana Hess
Resisting Neoliberalism and Building Liberal
Democracy through Critical Pedagogy in
Postcommunist Ukraine and Arab Spring Countries
Serhiv Kovalchuk, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,
University of Toronto
Teaching for Active Citizenship in Social Studies
Classes: The Case of Israeli Arab High Schools
Najwan Saada, Michigan State University
Citizenship Education and Foreign Language
Learning: (De)constructing the Concept of Good
Citizen Embedded in Current Elementary Foreign
Language Curricula in China and America
Juanjuan Zhu, Utah State University
6. Theme: Critical Issues in the Social Studies
Discussant: John Lee
Why Go Digital? Digital Curriculum and the Social
Studies
Sarah Lundy, Portland State University
Is Social Studies Still on the Educational Backburner?
Holly McBride, University of South Florida
Outsourcing Elementary Social Studies: The
Influence of Critical Friendship on Learning to Teach
Elementary Social Studies
Kimberly Logan Murphy, University of Georgia; Brandon M.
Butler, Old Dominion University
7. Theme: Exploring Diversity in the Social Studies
Discussant: Steven Camicia
A Culturally-Relevant Pedagogy for K-12 Online U. S.
History Courses
Jamie L. Lathan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Why Do Minority Students Find Social Studies
Boring?
Crystal Simmons, North Carolina State University
Exploring Student Engagement in the Social Studies
Classroom Inclusion in Peacebuilding Education:
Diverse Students’ Experiences with Critical Reflection
about Social Conflicts
Christina Parker, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,
University of Toronto
8. Theme: “Catching” and “Holding” Students’
Discussant: Todd Hawley
Motivation to Learn: Implications for Social Studies
Curriculum and Instruction
Audrey Schewe, Georgia State University
C U F A • November 30 • Wednesday
Service Learning and Undergraduates: Exploring
Connections between Ambiguity Tolerance,
Empathy, and Motivation in the Context of Service
Trips
Sara Stanlick, Thomas Hammond, Lehigh University
Discussant: Jeff Passe, Towson University
Do Classroom Discussions Using the Standards of
Accountable Talk Lead to Student Engagement in
the Middle School Social Studies Classroom?
James Volkland, Queens College
Educating for a Sustainable Future: Embedded yet
Unframed Sustainability Principles in the Social
Studies Classroom
Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, The Ohio State University
9. Theme: Teacher Perception, Curricular Tensions, and
Teacher Education in the Social Studies
Social Studies, Social Action, and Sustaining the City
Farm
Shaun Johnson, Towson University
Discussant: Stephanie van Hover
“It’s a Magical Thing”: Two Veteran Middle School
Social Studies Teachers’ Beliefs about Simulations
Cory Wright-Maley, University of Connecticut
Reflection, Resistance, and (Re)Formation: The Three
R’s of Critical Social Studies Teacher Education
Scott Wylie, Teachers College, Columbia University
The Intersection Between Professionalism and
Agency: Curriculum Tensions in Social Studies
Departments
Claire Yates, Michigan State University
Wednesday, 4:00–5:15pm
Session 0-5
Room 145A
Small College and University Faculty Forum
Teaching In and Out of the School of Education
Kathy Hintz, Minot State University; George Lipscomb,
Furman University; Bethany Hill-Anderson, McKendree
University; James Daly, Seton Hall University; Jill Gradwell,
Buffalo State College; Joseph Nichols, Georgia Southwestern State
University; Dan Stuckart, CUNY Lehman College
Session 0-6
Room 140A
Symposium
Chair: Nancy Patterson, Bowling Green State University
Discussant: Greg Hamot, University of Iowa
How Universal is Democracy? Explorations of
the Promises and Challenges of Education for
Democratic Citizenship
Binaya Subedi, The Ohio State University, Newark; John
Fischer, Bowling Green State University; Sharon Subreenduth,
Bowling Green State University; Vance Patterson, Bowling Green
State University; Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University
Session 0-7
Room 140B
Paper Session
Chair: Chara Haeussler Bohan, Georgia State University
Sustainability and the Social Studies Classroom: An
Inquiry into an Ecojustice Pedagogy
Jay Shuttleworth, Columbia University, Teachers College
Elementary Teachers’ Views on Teaching InquiryBased, Interdisciplinary Social Studies and Science in
Urban Settings
Jason Ritter, Alexandra O. Santau, Duquesne University
Session 0-8
Room 145B
Symposium
Chair: William Russell, University of Central Florida
Discussant: Keith Barton, Indiana University
Contemporary Social Studies: An Essential Discussion
Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University; Elizabeth Yeager
Washington, University of Florida; Jesus Garcia, David To, Paula
S. Millen, University of Nevada at Las Vegas; JB Mayo Jr.,
University of Minnesota; Tina L. Heafner, Paul Fitchett, University
of North Carolina, Charlotte; Christine Draper, Georgia Southern
University; Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina at
Aiken; Kyle Greenwalt, Patrick Leahy, Anne-Lise Halvorsen,
Michigan State University; Beverly (Lee) Bisland, Queens College;
Prentice T. Chandler, Athens State University; Douglas McKnight,
The University of Alabama; John Lee, North Carolina State
University; Stephanie Van Hover, Kevin Hessberg, University of
Virginia; Lydiah Nganga, John Kambutu, University of Wyoming;
Anatoli Rapoport, Purdue University; Michelle Reidel, Georgia
Southern University; Ellen Durrigan Santora; Joe O’Brien,
University of Kansas; Stewart Waters, University of Central
Florida; John Sturtz, Keene State University; Cameron White,
University of Houston; Trenia L. Walker, Texas Tech University;
Brad Burenheide, Kansas State University; David Hicks, Virginia
Tech University
Session 0-9
Room 144B
Symposium
Chair: Amy Mulholland, University of Houston
Sites of Empowerment: Exploring Action Research in
Teacher Education Courses
Amy Mulholland, Sabrina Marsh, Traci Jensen, Cameron
White, Sam Brouwer, Christine Beaudry, University of Houston
91st NCSS Annual Conference
39
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Thursday, 8:00–9:15am
Session 1-1
Room 144B
Paper Session
Chair: Thomas Lucy, Illinois State University
Discussant: Todd Hawley, Kent State University
Voices of Student Teachers and Transformative
Pedagogy in the Social Studies
Omiunota Ukpokodu, University of Missouri, Kansas City
Candidates’ Construction of their Field Placements as
“Community”
Mary Shelley Thomas, University of Louisville
Interrogating Whiteness in Pre-service Social Studies
Teacher Education
Ryan Crowley, Billy Smith, The University of Texas at Austin
The Problems of Recontextualizing the Aims of Social
Studies Teacher Education During Student Teaching
Alexander Cuenca, Saint Louis University
Session 1-2
Room 143B
Symposium
Chair: Todd Kenreich, Towson University
Discussant: Binaya Subedi, The Ohio State University
Global Education in the East and the West:
Perspectives from Japan and the United States
Susumu Oshihara, Ehime University; Yoriko Hashizaki, Kobe
University; Todd Kenreich, Towson University; Misato Yamaguchi,
The Ohio State University
Session 1-3
Room 143C
Paper Session
Chair: Sara Levy, University of Minnesota
Discussant: Yonghee Suh, Old Dominion University
What Happens When Prospective Teachers Attempt
to “Teach With Historic Places”? Some Modest
Lessons for Website Designers and Methods Course
Instructors
Bruce VanSledright, Stephanie Lee Rizas, University of
Maryland, College Park; Beth Boland, U.S. National Park
Service
Authentic History Pedagogy: The Case for Museums
and Historic Sites
Alan Marcus, Walter Woodward, University of Connecticut;
Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary
Teachers Delve into Diversity Through Archival
Research
Deborah L. Morowski, Theresa McCormick, Auburn
University
40
Dimensions of Diversity
An Ecological Systems View of School-Museum
Partnership
Chrystal Johnson, Purdue University
Session 1-4
Room 145A
Symposium
Chair and Discussant: Walter Parker, University of
Washington
New Work from “Research and Practice”: Purpose,
Perspective, and Intellectual Challenge in Social
Studies Education
Hilary Conklin, DePaul University; Kathy Bickmore, University
of Toronto; Beth Rubin, Rutgers University; Joel Westheimer,
University of Ottawa
Session 1-5
Room 145B
Paper Session
Discussant: Brian Lanahan, College of Charleston
Chair: Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at
Greensboro
Authentic Intellectual Challenge in Social Studies
Classrooms and Its Relationship to Student Learning
Principal Investigators
Alabama: John Saye, Jada Kohlmeier, Lamont E. Maddox,
Theresa McCormick, Auburn University; Prentice Chandler,
Rosemary Hodges, Athens State University; Michael Lovorn,
Elizabeth Wilson, The University of Alabama; Susan Santoli,
University of South Alabama
Georgia: Caroline Sullivan, Audrey Schewe, Georgia State
University
New York: David Gerwin, John Gunn, Queens College/
CUNY; Lorrei DiCamillo, Canisius College; Jill Gradwell, Buffalo
State College; Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University; Phyllis
Tashlik, Center for Inquiry -NY Performance Standards
Consortium
Ohio: Nancy Patterson, Bowling Green University
Virginia: Jeremy Stoddard, William & Mary University;
Michelle D. Cude, Barbara Slater Stern, James Madison
University
Texas: Cinthia Salinas, Whitney Blankenship, The University
of Texas at Austin; Brooke Blevins, Baylor University
Statistical Analysis: David Shannon, Auburn University—
Main Campus
Are Small Learning Communities Civic Laboratories?
Examining Civic Education Models in a Real-World
Context
Kristal Curry, Coastal Carolina University
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The Inauguration of John OUR PATCHWORK
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The Surprising Truth
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About the “Real” America
Gotham • 978-1-59240-670-8
H. W. BRANDS
AMERICAN DREAMS
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THE PENGUIN
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The Search for Community
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NOW YOU SEE IT
How the Brain Science
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WHO DO YOU
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The Essential Guide to
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DAN KOEPPEL
LARRY SCHWEIKART
WHAT WOULD THE
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A Patriot’s Answers
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SEVEN EVENTS
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LARRY SCHWEIKART &
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A PATRIOT’S
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Sentinel • 978-1-59523-032-4
BANANA
The Fate of the Fruit
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MICHAEL BLANDING
THE COKE MACHINE
The Dirty Truth Behind the
World’s Favorite Soft Drink
KAZUKI EBINE
KHALED HOSSEINI
GANDHI: A Manga Biography
THE KITE RUNNER
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CHIE SHIMANO & KIYOSHI KONNO
CHE GUEVARA: A Manga Biography
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DAVID AXE & MATT BORS
WAR IS BORING
TETSU SAIWAI
THE 14TH DALAI LAMA
Bored Stiff, Scared to Death
in the World’s Worst War Zones
A Manga Biography
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MARK KURLANSKY
THE EASTERN STARS
How Baseball Changed
the Dominican Town
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NAL • 978-0-451-23011-9
TYLER COWEN
THE GREAT
STAGNATION
How America Ate
All the Low-Hanging
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Riverhead • 978-1-59448-505-3
TED GUP
A SECRET GIFT
How One Man’s
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Riverhead • 978-1-59448-787-3
CAROLINE HULL
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TUESDAY’S CHILDREN
Penguin • 978-0-14-102687-9
Viking • 978-0-670-02293-9
THE LEGACY LETTERS
Edited by Brian Curtis
Perigee • 978-0-399-53708-0
DR. ROBIN STERN & COURTNEY E. MARTIN
PAUL GREENBERG
PROJECT REBIRTH
The Future of
the Last Wild Food
Dutton • 978-0-525-95226-8
FOUR FISH
1939: Countdown to War
CITIZEN U.S.A.
A 50 State Road Trip
NAL • 978-0-451-23539-8
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Stories of Grief and
Endurance from 9/11
Families and Friends
THE PENGUIN
HISTORICAL ATLAS
OF THE BIBLE LANDS
RICHARD OVERY
ALEXANDRA PELOSI
A DECADE OF HOPE
UNFAMILIAR FISHES
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EDWIN WILLIAMSON
DENNIS SMITH
SARAH VOWELL
A History of Latinos in
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HARVEST OF EMPIRE
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Survival and the Strength of
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IT GETS BETTER
Coming Out, Overcoming
Bullying, and Creating
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C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
How do States Implement Civics Courses for
Graduation?
Robert Waterson, Carolyn Brejwo, West Virginia University
Project-Based Learning in History: Effects on
Historical Empathy for Students with and without
Learning Disabilities
Susan De la Paz, University of Maryland at College Park;
Pedro Hernandez-Ramos, Santa Clara University
The Relationship of Middle School Instructional
Scheduling and Social Studies Achievement
Ken Vogler, Susan Schramm-Pate, University of South Carolina;
Audrey Allan, York County Public Schools
Technology and Social Studies Education: Where are
We?
Cheryl Bolick, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
Cheryl Torrez, University of New Mexico
SeSSion 1-7
SeSSion 1-6
Room 143A
Paper Session
Chair: Jennifer Cutsforth, University of Scranton
Discussant: Robert Green, Clemson University
Room 144A
Paper Session
Chair: John Sturtz, Keene State College
Discussant: Spencer Clark, Utah State University
Windows into Teaching and Learning [WiTL]:
Exploring Online Clinicals for a Distance Education
Social Studies Methods Course
Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Intercollegiate Collaboration: Two Social Studies
Methods Instructors Integrating Technology to
Connect Pre-Service Teachers
Brad Maguth, Hiram College; Jeremy Hilburn, University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A History of Teacher Education in the Social Studies:
Early Beginnings
Benjamin Jacobs, New York University
What Did Historical Thinking Mean to John Dewey?
Thomas Fallace, William Patterson University
Exploring the Link between Professional
Development and Student Achievement in Teaching
and Learning U.S. History
Mimi Coughlin, California State University at Sacramento;
Mimi Lee, Placer County Office of Education
WWW.PEACHTREE-ONLINE.COM
BOOTH 728
Cynthia
Levinson
WE'VE GOT A JOB:
THE 1963 BIRMINGHAM CHILDREN'S MARCH
Friday, December 2nd
10:15 - 11:15am in room #140A
Presentation: “We Might Be Heroes”
11:30am - 12:30pm in Peachtree booth #728
“Readers will be riveted by the true stories of
children...and be reminded that just like them,
they are never too young to stand up and
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Signing WE’VE GOT
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3:15 - 4:10pm in Level 2, L St. Bridge
Presentation:“So, How Many of Your Friends
Belonged to the KKK?”
Visit booth 728 to see our new titles—perfect for your classroom!
A Storm Called Katrina
42
Marching with Aunt Susan
Jingle Bells: How the
Holiday Classic Came to Be
Dimensions of Diversity
I Am Tama, Lucky Cat:
A Japanese Legend
The Cheshire Cheese Cat: Chasing the Nightbird
A Dickens of a Tale
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Pestalozzian Influences on Mary Sheldon Barnes’s
Teaching Methods
Jim Chisholm, Chara Haeussler Bohan, Georgia State
University
SeSSion 1-8
Room 140A
Symposium
Chair: Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina at Aiken
Professional Dispositions, Teacher Preparation, and
the Role of Social Studies Professors: Perceptions,
Practices, and Pitfalls
Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina at Aiken;
Thomas Misco, James Shiveley, Miami University; David Vawter,
Winthrop University; Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh at
Johnstown; Barbara Cruz, James Duplass, University of South
Florida; Edric Johnson, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
SeSSion 1-9
Room 140B
Symposium
Chair: Gayle Thieman, Portland State University
Discussant: Jeff Passe, Towson University
Comparative State Results from National Study on
the State of Social Studies Teachers
Gayle Thieman, Portland State University; Michael Berson,
University of South Florida; Paul Fitchett, University of North
Carolina at Charlotte; Joe O’Brien, University of Kansas; Patrice
Grimes, University of Virginia; Jeff Passe, Towson University;Jessica
Shiller, Towson University; Ashley Lucas, Towson University;
Shaun Johnson, Towson University
Thursday, 9:30–10:45aM
SeSSion 2-1
Room 145A
Symposium
Chair: Sandra Schmidt, Columbia University, Teachers College
Discussant: Margaret Crocco, University of Iowa
Pedagogical Lessons for Social Studies Teacher
Education through an Exploration of Museums as
Pedagogical Endeavors
Avner Segall, Michigan State University; William Gaudelli,
Columbia University, Teachers College; Brenda Trofanenko,
Acadia University; Jim Garrett, University of Georgia
91st NCSS Annual Conference
43
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Session 2-2
Room 143A
Paper Session
Chair: LaGarrett King, University of Texas-Austin
Discussant: Maia Sheppard, George Washington University
Maintaining Cultural Identity in a Small American
City on the Great Plains
Di Ryter, University of Nebraska at Lincoln
Marginalized Students’ Uneasy Learning: Korean
Immigrant Students’ Experiences of Learning Social
Studies
Yoonjung Choi, Columbia University, Teachers College; Sohyun
An, Augustana College; Jae Hoon Lim, University of North
Carolina, Charlotte
Conflicted Citizenship: Mohawk Students’
Experiences with the United States Pledge of
Allegiance
Leisa Martin, University of Akron; Glenn P. Lauzon, Indiana
University, Northwest
Analysis of Social Studies Teachers’ Narratives about
their School Curricular Experiences and the Impact
on their Multicultural Literacy Development and
Pedagogy
Omiunota Ukpokodu, University of Missouri at Kansas City
Session 2-3
Room 145B
Symposium
Chair: Thomas Levine, University of Connecticut
Discussant: Stephen Thornton, University of South Florida
What Methods Instructors Can Learn and Do to
Prepare Social Studies Teachers for English Learners
Jason O’Brien, University of Alabama at Huntsville; Barbara
Cruz, University of South Florida; Cinthia Salinas, The University
of Texas at Austin; Thomas Levine, University of Connecticut;
Margarita Jimenez-Silva, Arizona State University
Session 2-4
Room 143B
Paper Session
Chair: Whitney Blankenship, The University of Texas at Austin
Discussant: Derek Anderson, Northern Michigan State
Teaching in History under NCLB: Policy and Pitfalls
Judy Pace, University of San Francisco
44
Revitalizing Social Studies: A Case Study of Expert
and Novice Teachers’ Use of Curriculum Integration
in Elementary Classrooms
Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University; Sherry L. Field,
University of Texas at Austin
Session 2-5
Room 140A
Paper Session
Chair: Caroline Sheffield, University of Louisville
Discussant: Steven Camicia, Utah State University
International Experience and Global Education: An
Instrument Validation Study
Timothy Patterson, Columbia University, Teachers College
“Student Teaching Abroad Will Help You Get a Job”:
Exploring Administrator Perceptions of International
Experience Value for Preservice Teachers
James Shiveley, Thomas Misco, Miami University
International and Cross-cultural Learning in an
Online Simulation: Secondary Students’ Experiences
with ICONS
John Myers, University of Pittsburgh
Service Learning: From Appalachia to Africa
Frans H. Doppen, Ohio University
Session 2-6
Room 140B
Symposium
Chair and Discussant: Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois
University
Applying Classic Models for Teaching Social Issues: A
Panel Discussion
Mary Beth Henning , Northern Illinois University; Teresa
Kruger, Belvedere North High School; Ron Evans, San Diego State
University
Barbara Slater Stern, James Madison University; Bill Fernekes,
Rider University; Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh at
Johnstown
Session 2-7
Room 143C
Paper Session
Chair: Alexander Cuenca, St. Louis University
Discussant: Jim Garrett, University of Georgia
Social Studies Marginalization: Examining the Effects
on K-6 Pre-service Teachers and Students
Janie Hubbard, Sharon Ross, The University of Alabama
Teaching About the Federal Budget, National Debt,
and Budget Deficit: Findings From High School
Teachers and Students
Anand Marri, Columbia University, Teachers College
Examining Elementary Social Studies
Marginalization: A Multilevel Model
Paul Fitchett, Tina Heafner, Richard Lambert, University of
North Carolina at Charlotte
The Lingering Pedagogy of “Guns and Butter”: The
Dominant Discourses of Economics Education and
the Absence of Curricular Counternarratives
Mark Helmsing, Michigan State University
Dimensions of Diversity
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Do You See What I See? Using Video-Based
Assessment to Measure Preservice Teachers’ Ability
to Recognize Effective Teaching
Peter Wiens, Kevin Hessberg, University of Virginia
What Work Samples Reveal about Secondary Preservice Social Studies Teachers’ Use of Literacy
Strategies in Student Teaching
Gayle Thieman, Susan Lenski, Portland State University
A Qualitative Look at the Effect of Teacher Disclosure
on Classroom Instruction
Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Reading Practices in Secondary Social Studies
Classrooms: A Snapshot of High School Social
Studies Instruction in Southeast Georgia
Michelle Reidel, Georgia Southern University
SeSSion 2-8
Room 144A
Symposium
Chair: James Schul, Ohio Northern University
Discussant: Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky
The Implications of Current Research on Desktop
Documentary Making in History Classrooms
Mark Hofer, College of William & Mary; Bruce Fehn, University
of Iowa; Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University;
Thomas Hammond, Lehigh University; James Schul, Ohio
Northern University
SeSSion 2-9
Room 144B
Paper Session
Chair: Lawrence Paska, University at Albany
Discussant: Alicia Crowe, Kent State University
46
Dimensions of Diversity
Exploring Climate Change in the Social Studies and
Science Curriculum
Casey Meehan, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Sources of Historical Evidence in High School U.S.
History State Standards: Oh the Tale They Tell!
Joe O’Brien, Tom Barker, Robert Nichols, University of
Kansas
Thursday, 11:00aM–12:15PM
SeSSion 3-1
Room 140A
Paper Session
Chair: Michelle Cude, James Madison University
Discussant: John Myers, University of Pittsburgh
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
The Ethics of Recognition in Curriculum
Development between the Colonizer and the
Colonized: Complexities, Contradictions, Challenges,
and Possibilities of Global Alliances
Steven Camicia, Utah State University; Alfredo Bayon,
Southern Leyte State University
The Power of Personal Perceptions: Becoming a
Global Educator
Kenneth Carano, Western Oregon University
Integrating Global Citizenship Education into Social
Studies Curriculum: Development of Teaching Device
Inventory for Secondary Social Studies
Anatoli A. Rapoport, Purdue University; Brett Blacketter, Lou
Camilotto, Todd Golding , Scott P. Royer, McCutcheon High
School
Narratives in Social Studies Teaching and Research
for Justice and Human Rights
Audrey Osler, Juanjuan Zhu, Utah State University
Session 3-2
Room 145A
Symposium
Chair: Meira Levinson, Harvard University
Discussant: Justin Reich, Harvard University
Quantity, Quality, and Equality in Civic Engagement
and Education: Divergent or Convergent Goals in a
Diverse World?
Meira Levinson, Harvard University; Judy Pace, University of
San Francisco; Li-Ching Ho, Nanyang Technologic University;
Joseph Kahne, Ellen Middaugh, Mills College
Session 3-3
Room 140B
Paper Session
Chair: Ashley Taylor, Columbia University, Teachers College
Discussant: Ceola Ross Barber, North Carolina A&T State
University
The Civil Rights Movement and Racial
Representation in U.S. History: An Analysis of Nine
States’ Academic Standards
Carl Anderson, Penn State University
Is It about Race or Is It about History? Unpacking
White Elementary Teachers’ Knowledge in Relation
to Teaching the Civil Rights Movement
Kathryn Obenchain, Purdue University; Julie Pennington,
University of Nevada at Reno
Representing Women of Color in U.S. History
Textbooks
Christine Woyshner, Temple University; Jessica Schocker, Penn
State University, Berks County
Georgia on My Mind: Writing the “New” State History
Textbook in the Post-Loewen World
Scott Roberts, Piedmont College/Gwinnett County Public
Schools
Session 3-4
Room 143A
Symposium
Chair: Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University
How Is Citizenship Education Responding to
Globalization? A Discussion of Research Strategies
and Understudied Populations
Mavis Mhlauli, University of Botswana; Lisa Duty, Knowledge
Works Foundation; Aleksandr Kvasov, Philadelphia University;
Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University
Session 3-5
Room 143B
Paper Session
Chair: Gayle Thieman, Portland State
Discussant: Hilary Conklin, DePaul University
Claiming our Turf: Learning Democratic Practices in
Student Spaces
Sandra Schmidt, Columbia University, Teachers College
“I Will Stick to My Guns”: Preservice Social Studies
Teachers’ Ideas about Agency
Spencer Clark, Indiana University
Silence as Power: Resistance to Deliberative
Participation
Carolyn Weber, Indiana University
Romanticizing Deliberation: How Preservice Teachers
Understand Skills for Citizenship
Antonio Castro, Emily Mark, Linda Bennett, University of
Missouri
Session 3-6
Room 143C
Symposium
Chair: Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois University
Discussant: Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida
Teaching Social Issues Across the Curriculum: A Panel
Discussion on Contemporary Practices and Research
Jon Pedersen, University of Nebraska at Lincoln; Mindy
Spearman, Clemson University; Jack Zevin, Queens College of the
City University of New York
Session 3-7
Room 144A
Paper Session
Chair: Brooke Blevins, Baylor University
Discussant: Deborah Morowski, Auburn University
Exploring Kindergarteners’ Concepts of Peace
Cynthia Sunal, Denis Sunal, The University of Alabama
91st NCSS Annual Conference
47
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Teaching Preservice Teachers: Approaches to Practice
in a Secondary Social Studies Methods Course
Jennifer Cutsforth, University of Scranton
Elementary Teacher Candidates’ Self-Efficacy: A
Comparison with and among the Social Studies
Derek Anderson, Northern Michigan University
Preservice Teachers Beliefs about Elementary Social
Studies Instruction—A Rationale for and Case Study
of Reflection
Brian Lanahan, Michele S. Phillips, College of Charleston
Session 3-8
Room 145B
Symposium
Chair: Alicia Crowe, Kent State University
Discussant: Todd Hawley, Kent State University
Will a Real Self-Study Please Stand Up? Exploring
Self-Study Methodology in Social Studies Education
Research
Todd Hawley, Kent State University; Alicia Crowe, Kent State
University; Todd Dinkelman, Alexander Cuenca, St. Louis
University; Jason Ritter, Duquesne University; David Powell,
Gettysburg College; Cinthia Salinas, The University of Texas at
Austin; Michelle Reidel, Georgia Southern University; Andrew
Hostetler, Bryan Ashkettle, Kent State University
Session 3-9
Room 144B
Paper Session
Chair: Brandon Butler, Old Dominion University
Discussant: Keith Barton, Indiana University
A Comparative Study of Social Studies Education
Research in Japan and the United States
Masato Ogawa, Indiana University at Kokomo; Kazuhiro
Kusahara, Hiroshima University
Between History and Collective Memory: History
Textbook Controversies, Technology and How
Students in Japan and Korea Make Sense of World
War II
Yonghee Suh, Old Dominion University; Makito Yurita,
Shimane University
Korean-American High School Students’ Perspectives
on U.S. History
Sohyun An, Augustana College
What Happens When Secondary Social Studies
Teachers in Singapore Use a Web-Based Tool to
Re-Imagine Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning?:
Inquiry and New Literacies Chart New Terrain
Mark Baildon, National Institute of Education, Singapore;
James Damico, Indiana University
48
Dimensions of Diversity
Thursday, 1:00–2:00pm
Alternative Format Sessions
Please feel free to bring lunch with you to
alternative format sessions
Alternative Format Session 1
Room 145A
Chair: Thomas Fallace, William Patterson University
Book Talk: Dewey and the Dilemma of Race: An
Intellectual History 1895-1922
Thomas Fallace, William Patterson University; William Stanley,
Monmouth University; Margaret Crocco, University of Iowa,
Teachers College; Patrice Grimes, University of Virginia; Ronald
Evans, San Diego State University
Alternative Format Session 2
Room 143A
Increasing Teacher Candidates Social Studies
Content Knowledge Using Place-Based Education
Carol McClain, Francis Marion University
Alternative Format Session 3
Room 140A
Chair: Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky
Whose Sandbox Is It, Anyway? Making Social Studies
Standards Meaningful Through Children’s Books
Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky; S. G. Grant, Binghamton
University; Emma Tacker, University of Kentucky
Alternative Format Session 4
Room 143B
Chair and Discussant: Timothy Slekar, Pennsylvania State
University at Altoona
Social Studies Educators Engaged in Social
Discourse: Role Models or Ignorant Activists?
Shaun Johnson, Towson University; Daniel Thompson, Ann
Angell, Pennsylvania State University at Altoona
Alternative Format Session 5
Room 145B
Chair: Jim Garrett, University of Georgia
Discussant: Avner Segall, Michigan State University
Research in the Round: Researchers Examining
the Same Data from Various Methodological and
Theoretical Positions
Jim Garrett, University of Georgia; Kyle Greenwalt, Michigan
State University; Mardi Schmeichel, Jennifer Hauver James,
University of Georgia; William Gaudelli, Sandra Schmidt,
Columbia University, Teachers College; Keith Barton, Indiana
University
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday
Alternative Format Session 6
Room 140B
Chair: Caroline Sheffield, University of Louisville
“We Don’t Have Much History”: New Zealand
Students and the Study of the National Past
Keith Barton, Rhonda Gambill, Heather Hagan, Indiana
University
Holocaust Education: Instructional Implications and
Opportunities
Caroline Sheffield, University of Louisville; Todd Dinkelman,
University of Georgia; Thomas Hammond, Lehigh University;
Patrice Grimes, University of Virginia; Anand Marri, Columbia
University, Teachers College; Michael Berson, University of South
Florida; Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University
Kenyan Students’ Perception of Civic Engagement
During a Period of Transitional Democracy:
Photovoice as Critical Consciousness-Raising
Sarah Mathews, Florida International University
Alternative Format Session 7
Civic Education as Empowerment or
Disempowerment in a Globalized World: Examples
from China and the United States
Steven Camicia, Juanjuan Zhu, Utah State University
Room 143C
What Do These Web Sites about Climate Change
Have to Do with Social Education?: An Interactive
Viewing, Analysis, and Group Discussion
James Damico, Indiana University; Mark Baildon, National
Institute of Education, Singapore
Alternative Format Session 8
Room 144A
Re-Framing Financial Literacy: Exploring the Value of
Social Currency
Thomas Lucey, Illinois State University; Jim Laney, University
of North Texas; Mary Frances Agnello, Texas Tech University;
Vicki Green, University of British Columbia
Alternative Format Session 9
Room 144B
Teaching About International Humanitarian Law:
Educating Global Thinkers and Citizen Leaders
Laurie Fisher, American Red Cross; Rosemary Blanchard,
California State University at Sacramento; David Smith, United
States Institute of Peace; Jennifer Khurana, American Red Cross
Thursday, 2:15–3:30pm
Session 4-1
Room 145A
Symposium
Chair: Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University
Discussant: Margaret Crocco, University of Iowa
Histories of Social Studies and Race, 1890-2000
Thomas Fallace, William Patterson University; Christine
Woyshner, Temple University; Sarah D. Bair, Dickinson College;
Chara Haeussler Bohan, Georgia State University; Joseph Watras,
University of Dayton
Session 4-2
Room 140A
Paper Session
Chair: Robert Waterson, West Virginia University
Discussant: Charles White, Boston University
A More Perfect Union—Pathways to Citizenship
Through International Education
Shawna Rosenzweig, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Session 4-3
Room 140B
Symposium
Chair: Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina at Aiken
Discussant: Jeff Passe, Towson University
Social Studies and Special Education: Reflections on
the Past, Present, and Future
Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina at Aiken; Jeff
Passe, Towson University; Ashley Lucas, Towson University;
Darren Minarik, Radford University; David Connor, Christopher
Legares, Hunter College, City University of New York; Amy
Matthews, Lakeside High School, Columbia County Georgia; Kay
Usher, Radcliffe Elementary, Aiken, SC
Session 4-4
Room 143A
Paper Session
Chair: Shelley Thomas, University of Louisville
Discussant: Kevin Meuwissen, University of Rochester
So You Say You Want a Revolution?: Conceptions of
Agency in an Online Discussion Forum on Revolution
Whitney Blankenship, The University of Texas at Austin; Nicole
Arnesmeyer, The University of Texas at Austin
“We have Google but…”: Exploring Students’
Social Media Literacy Skills through the Use of
Videoconferencing
James Brown, Indiana University at Bloomington; Spencer
Clark, Utah State University
Using Online Social Networks to Foster Preservice
Teachers’ Membership in an Online Community of
Praxis
Justin Reich, Meira Levinson, William Johnston, Harvard
University
91st NCSS Annual Conference
49
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday, 3:30–4:45pm
Reconceptualizing Media Literacy through the
Creation of Reflective Space: A Pragmatist Approach
to Media Literacy in the Social Studies
Lance Mason, Scott Metzger, Pennsylvania State University
Session 4-5
Room 143B
Paper Session
Chair: Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois State University
Discussant: Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University
Designing More Effective Educative Curriculum
Materials for the Social Studies
Cory Callahan, John Saye, Auburn University
The Impact of a Mobile Technology Application on
Achievement and Engagement in a United States
History Classroom
Adam Friedman, Emily Garcia, Wake Forest University
Toward Deeper Learning in Advanced High School
Social Studies Courses
Walter Parker, Diem Nguyen, John Bransford, University of
Washington
Session 4-6
Room 143C
Paper Session
Chair: Lara Willox, University of West Georgia
Discussant: Jennifer Hauver James, University of Georgia
A Quantitative Analysis of the Phenomenology
of Time and the Divergence between Elementary
School Principals and Teachers Perceptions of Time
Tina Heafner, Paul Fitchett, University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
Elementary Education Students’ Perceptions of
“Good” Citizenship
Jason O’Brien, University of Alabama, Huntsville; Sara Fry,
Boise State University
Conceptualizing and Fostering Civic Efficacy as
Action in the Elementary Years
Stephanie Serriere, David Fuentes, Dana Mitra, Pennsylvania
State University
Pockets of Promise
Chrystal Johnson, Purdue University
Session 4-7
Room 144A
Paper Session
Chair: Ronald Helms, Wright State University
Discussant: Carl Anderson, Penn State University
Rethinking the Multi-Cultural Paradigm for Teaching
about Religion in Global History Textbooks
Janet Bordelon, New York University
50
Dimensions of Diversity
Generous Thinking and Critical Thinking in the Social
Studies
Lynn Brice, University of Minnesota at Duluth
Learning to Use Authentic Intellectual Work in High
Schools of Color
Christopher Brkich, University of Florida
The War for America: Politicizing Social Studies and
State Level Curriculum
Sarah Shear, Antonio Castro, University of Missouri
Session 4-8
Room 145B
Symposium
Historical Perspectives on Social Education:
Tuskegee, the Great Depression, East Texas Oil Fields,
African American History and Textbooks, and the
New Social Studies
Sherry Field, Elizabeth Bellows, LaGarrett King, Christopher
Davis, Anthony Brown, University of Texas at Austin; Janet
Alleman, Michigan State University; Deborah L. Morowski,
Auburn University; Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University;
Karon LeCompte, Baylor University; Ron Evans, San Diego State
University
Session 4-9
Room 144B
Paper Session
Chair: Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, The Ohio State University
Discussant: Paulette Dilworth, Auburn University
Culturally Relevant Political Education: Using
Immigration as a Catalyst for Civic Understanding
Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
Erin Castro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Preservice Teacher Talk Surrounding Gender in the
Formal Curriculum
Kathryn Engebretson, University of Minnesota
Promoting Social Justice through a Multicultural Arts
Education Course: A Critical Action Research Study
Rachel Province, Nina Coerver, University of Oklahoma
“Knowledge is Power:” Toward a Framework of
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy for Latino/a Newcomer
Students in the Secondary Social Studies Classroom
Ashley Taylor, Columbia University, Teachers College
Thursday, 3:45–5:00pm
Session 5-1
Room 145A
Symposium
Chair: Kevin Meuwissen, University of Rochester
Discussant: Keith Barton, University of Indiana
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday, 3:30–4:45pm
What Happens When New Teachers Study Students’
Learning? Challenges and Opportunities
Hilary Conklin, DePaul University; Kevin Meuwissen,
University of Rochester; Andrew Thomas, University of Rochester;
Jennifer Hauver James, Seung-Yun Lee, Shujuan Pan, University of
Georgia
Session 5-2
Room 143A
Paper Session
Chair: Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University
Discussant: Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia
Exploring Stories of Democratic Curriculum Making
Using Narrative Inquiry
Lynette Erickson, Brigham Young University; Amy Miner, Utah
State University
“It’s Scary to Try Something New When You’re
Already Trying Something New”: Helping a Novice
Teacher Build a Democratic Social Studies Classroom
Jeff Nokes, M. Winston Egan, Chiara Casebolt, Brigham Young
University
Teachers’ Perspectives on the Aims of the Social
Studies and the Status of the Field
Neil Houser, Neil Coerver, Dan Krutka, Rachel Province,
University of Oklahoma
Modeling the Model: The Use of Classroom Talk in
Social Studies Teacher Education
Caroline Sullivan, Georgia State University
Session 5-3
Ethical Reasoning of High School Seniors Exploring
Just v. Unjust Laws
Jada Kohlmeier, John Saye, Auburn University
Session 5-5
Room 144A
Paper Session
Chair: George Lipscomb, Furman University
Discussant: Scott DeWitt, University of Cincinnati
The New Tech Network Model and PBL: A More
Equitable Pedagogy
D. Kelvin Bullock, North Carolina State University
Media Construction as a Barrier to Religious Literacy
in Public School Classrooms
Erica K. Johnson, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Social Studies, Social Justice, and Technology in
Practice: An Exploration of Neophyte Teachers’
Support Structures
Lara Willox, University of West Georgia; Cheryl Bolick,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Applying Media Literacy to Social Studies Education
Vincent Youngbauer, University of South Dakota
Session 5-6
Room 143B
Symposium
Chair: Annette Simmons, University of Minnesota
Discussant: Terrie Epstein, Hunter College, City University of
New York
Room 145B
Symposium
Chair: Linda Levstik, University of Kentucky
Discussant: SG Grant, SUNY Binghamton
Negotiated Identities and Social Studies Education
Sara Levy, University of Minnesota; Annette Simmons,
University of Minnesota; Maia Sheppard, George Washington
University
Beyond Documents: Sources for Historical Inquiry
Linda Levstik, University of Kentucky; Stephen J. Thornton,
University of South Florida; Alan Marcus, University of
Connecticut; Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary
Session 5-4
Session 5-7
Room 143C
Paper Session
Chair: Eui-kyung Shin, Northern Illinois University
Discussant: Shaun Johnson, Towson University
Are They “American” Enough to Teach Social
Studies?: Korean American Teachers’ Experiences of
Teaching Social Studies
Yoonjung Choi, Columbia University, Teachers College
“We Don’t Talk About These. We Just Focus on
Studying Marx”: The Problems and Challenges
of Reflective Thinking and Controversial Issue
Discussions in Chinese High Schools
Thomas Misco, Miami University
52
“Too Much Democracy is Also Not Good”:
International Teachers’ Perspectives on Democracy in
U.S. Classrooms
Sarah Mathews, Florida International University; Mindy
Spearman, Megan Che, Clemson University
Dimensions of Diversity
Room 144B
Paper Session
Chair: James Brown, Indiana University
Discussant: Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University
Gender Drought: Examining the Discourses around
Women and Gender in Social Studies Education
Research
Mardi Schemichel, University of Georgia
Teacher Research in the Social Studies Classroom:
In-service and Pre-service Outcomes
Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University; Thomas
Hammond, Lehigh University
C U F A • December 1 • Thursday, 3:30–4:45pm
Undoing the Divide: Teachers and Teacher Educators
as Multidimensional Citizens
Kyle Greenwalt, Michigan State University; Ben Pineda, Haslett
Middle School; Daniel Birmingham, Michigan State University
Session 5-8
Room 140A
Symposium
Chair: Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker, Florida State University
Discussant: Hilary Landorf, Florida International University
The Worldmindedness of Graduating Seniors from
High School
Jeannine Turner, Erik Rawls, Danielle Lyew, Florida State
University
Thursday 5:15–6:15pm
Room 206
Panel Discussion
Can We Move Beyond Scholarship That is “Weak,
Isolated, and Incestuous”? Creating a More Viable
Future for Social Studies Research
Cynthia Tyson, The Ohio State University; J.B. Mayo, University
of Minnesota; Li-Ching Ho, National Institute of Education,
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Carole Hahn,
Emory University; Keith Barton, Indiana University; Jennifer
Hauver James, University of Georgia; Cinthia Salinas, The
University of Texas at Austin
Session 5-9
Room 140B
Symposium
Chair: Brian Girard, The College of New Jersey
Discussant: Bruce VanSledright, University of Maryland
Tools of the (Disciplinary Literacy) Trade: Exploring
Cases of Social Studies Teaching
Chauncy Monte-Sano, Susan De La Paz, University of
Maryland; Mark Felton, San Jose State University; Brian Girard,
The College of New Jersey; Lauren McArthur Harris, Arizona
State University; Melissa Stull, University of Michigan
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting Welcomes
Social Studies Educators to the 91st Annual NCSS Conference
New Digital History Games!
Come see public media’s new suite of free online teaching tools. See a demonstration of
CPB’s latest interactive games and learn how teachers and students are already using these
innovative tools. Participate in a discussion with education experts and the game developers.
CPB has more than 40 years of leadership in funding the development of lifelong educational
resources and public media content for American viewers and listeners of all ages. Visit us at
Table #19 in the Exhibition Hall.
Teaching American History in the Digital Age
Friday, 12/2/11, 3:15–4:10 p.m., Room 204A
MISSION US: Understanding History Through Interactive Gaming
Saturday, 12/3/11, 8 a.m., Room TBA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
53
National Social Studies Supervisors Association (NSSSA)
NSSSA promotes the common interest of social studies supervisors in instruction, curriculum materials, research, teacher training, and
social action. Based on the belief that interaction between teachers and students is the most vital element of an education system, NSSSA
encourages and assists in the development of social studies instruction. It extends its services and assistance to supervisors at state and local
levels in their efforts to initiate similar organizations.
Registration for NSSSA sessions is $25 for NSSSA members, $75 for non-members, in addition to the NCSS registration fee. NSSSA
members who are registered with NCSS are asked to please check in with NSSSA on Thursday. NCSS attendees who are not members of
NSSSA may join NSSSA and attend the members-only events by paying the NSSSA membership and registration fees on the day of the
conference. All NSSSA meetings will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington, DC at Washington, DC Convention Center.
Wednesday, November 30
3:30–7:30pm
NSSSA Board Meeting (Board members only, please)
Room 141
7:30–10:00pm
Board Dinner
Location TBD
Thursday, December 1
7:00am–7:00pm
NSSSA Registration
Outside Room 202
8:00–9:15am
Breakfast (NSSSA registered participants only)
Room 202
9:30–10:30am
Sessions I
Convention Center
10:45–11:45am
Sessions II
Convention Center
11:45am–1:30pm
Lunch (NSSSA registered participants only)
Room 202
1:45–2:45pm
Sessions III
Convention Center
2:45–3:30pm
Coffee Break—3rd Annual Conference Giveaway
(NSSSA registered participants only)
Room 202
The following events are open to NSSSA registered participants only, who must arrive by 4:00PM
3:30–4:00pm
Transfer on own to Smithsonian National
Museum of the American Indian (NMAI)
4th St. &
Independence Ave., SW
4:00–6:00pm
Special Session: “Our Warrior Spirit: The Legacy of American Indian Heroism”
NMAI
with Dr. Herman Viola, featuring a panel of American Indian veterans
6:00–7:00pm
Book Signing and Museum Tour
NMAI
7:00–8:00pm
Reception and Museum Tour
NMAI
8:00–10:00pm
NSSSA Board Meeting (Board members only, please)
Salon D
Please wear your conference badge and NSSSA ID for entry into all NSSSA Conference events.
54
Dimensions of Diversity
N S S S A • December 1 • Thursday • NSSSA Sessions
21st Century Skills—Introducing Choices into
District Professional Development
Creativity, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Collaboration,
Media Literacy: Brown University’s Choices Program uses a
range of 21st century skills to teach international issues. Learn
about the program and leave with access to webinars and
resources to introduce the Choices Program’s approach and
resources to your district teachers.
Presenters: Susan Graseck, Director, Brown University,
Choices Program, Providence, RI; Mimi Stephens, Professional
Development Director, Brown University, Choices Program,
Providence, RI
Facilitator: Susan Graseck, Director, Brown University,
Choices Program, Providence, RI
Audience: Secondary
Are You Prepared for the History Wars?
What should—or shouldn’t—be taught about U.S. history?
Battles on this topic pop up constantly, usually started by
ideologues who dislike teaching that recognizes diversity,
encourages critical thinking, or recounts shameful episodes of
our past. The session will equip participants to respond in
their own schools or districts.
Presenter and Facilitator: Maureen Costello, Director,
Teaching Tolerance, Southern Poverty Law Center, Montgomery,
AL
Audience: General
Best Practices for Integrating the Internet and
Technology into the Social Studies Curriculum
The workshop will be a presentation of Internet and technology
resources that enhance the learning of social studies, and
inspiring examples of educators who are effectively integrating
the Internet and technology into social studies classes.
Participants will then create lesson plans and student
assignments that leverage Internet and technology resources.
Presenter and Facilitator: Mark E. Moran, CEO, Dulcinea
Media, Inc., Lynbrook, NY
Audience: General
Building Academic Vocabulary
Do your educators struggle with student acquisition of difficult
vocabulary? Discover the importance of teaching and building
vocabulary to student success. Experience strategies to teach,
reinforce and help students retain difficult vocabulary.
Experience Marzano’s theory put to practical application.
Presenters: Steve Beasley, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX; Sherry
Owens, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX
Facilitator: Steve Beasley, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX
Audience: General
Creating a System-wide DBQ Instructional Plan
that Works
Social Studies Supervisors will discuss how they built a multiyear, multi-grade level (4-12), document-based question
initiative based on the DBQ Project methodology. Through
extensive training, district and school-based mentoring, and
sustained leadership, the Lake County School district has
made measurable gains in state reading and writing exams.
Data and strategies for implementing the DBQ in a district
will be shared.
Presenters: Jackie Migliori, Social Studies Supervisor 6-12,
Lake County School, Tavaras, FL; Amie Polcaro, TAH Grant
Coordinator and K-5 SS Specialist, Lake County School, Tavaras,
FL; Chip Brady, Co-Founder, DBQ Project, Evanston, IL
Facilitator: Chip Brady, Co-Founder, The DBQ Project,
Evanston, IL
Audience: General
Differentiation Strategies for Social Studies
Learn the nuts and bolts of differentiation while experiencing
how to differentiate social studies content to meet the varying
learning needs, styles, and levels of your students. Attendees
will receive a CD handout with digital copies of templates and
activities from the presentation.
Presenters: Wendy Conklin, Author, Teacher Created
Materials; Larry Zimmerman, Academic Office, Teacher Created
Materials, Alpharetta, GA
Facilitator: Larry Zimmerman, Academic Office Teacher
Created Materials, Alpharetta, GA
Audience: General
History Education Byte by Byte: Online Teaching
Resources with Teachinghistory.org
Using Teachinghistory.org, the nation’s premiere history
education website, participants will learn about free teaching
materials, history content, and best practices for improving
the teaching of American history. Through demonstration and
discussion, participants will discover professional development
materials focused on primary sources, digital tools, and best
practices resources. Presenters: William F. Brazier, Instructional Supervisor,
Social Sciences, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn,
Virginia; Elizabeth Glynn, TAH Project Coordinator, Loudoun
County Public Schools, Ashburn, Virginia; Jennifer Rosenfeld,
Outreach Director, Roy Rosenweig Center for History and New
Media at George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Facilitator: Jessica Monge, Outreach Director, Roy Rosenweig
Center for History and New Media at George Mason University,
Fairfax, VA
Audience: General
Integrating Economics & History: Who
Desegregated Baseball—Jackie Robinson or
Adam Smith?
In 1947, Branch Rickey signed Jackie Robinson to be the first
African American major league baseball player. It took real
courage on Rickey’s part and Robinson’s. But could Adam
Smith’s invisible hand have also played a role? This session
shows curriculum leaders a way to effectively improve the
implementation of history and economics standards.
Presenter and Facilitator: Mark Schug , Professor Emeritus,
Jupiter, FL
Audience: Secondary
91st NCSS Annual Conference
55
N S S S A • December 1 • Thursday • NSSSA Sessions
iPads and Other Mobile Devices in the Social
Studies Classroom
Schools across the country are using devices such as the iPod
Touch, iPad and cell phones as learning and teaching tools.
But questions still remain concerning the best apps,
appropriate policies and practical classroom management.
Come be part of the conversation as we address these issues.
Presenter and Facilitator: Glenn Wiebe, Technology
Integration Specialist, ESSDACK, Hillsboro, KS
Audience: General
“Let Me Into the Elementary Curriculum!”
This session will explore one school district’s effort to expand
social studies instruction in the elementary school day by
creating engaging teacher training designed to assist teachers
in utilizing effective expository reading strategies, integrating
Webb’s DOK , and tapping into a variety of district
resources—all the while focusing on social studies content
learning.
Presenter and Facilitator: Debbie Gallagher, Elementary
Social Studies Curriculum Specialist, Alachua County Public
Schools, Gainesville, FL
Audience: Elementary
Making Geography An Essential Part of Your
Social Studies Program
This session will provide a detailed approach to making
geography an integral part of social studies offerings from
grades 6 to 12. The presentation will provide a plan to make
geography a focus at all levels of learning with helpful ideas on
how to emphasize skill building, Understanding by Design
(UbD) and Response to Intervention (RtI).
Presenters: John D. Roncone, AP Teacher, Barrington High
School, Barrington, IL; Nate Newhalfen, AP Teacher, Barrington
High School, Barrington, IL
Facilitator: Ty Gorman, AP Teacher, Barrington High
School, Barrington, IL
Audience: General
Supporting Social Studies in the Elementary
Classroom
This session will assist coordinators in making social studies
more accessible in the elementary classroom. We will provide
lessons focused on national standards that can be taken back
and presented to teachers. Understanding that time is a major
factor, each lesson will be packaged to support multiple
standards.
Presenters: Teresa Francis, K-12 Social Studies Coordinator,
Mansfield ISD, Mansfield TX; Kourtney Ragsdale, AP Govt/US
History Teacher, Mansfield TX
Facilitator: Teresa Francis, K-12 Social Studies Coordinator,
Mansfield ISD, Mansfield TX
Audience: Elementary
56
Dimensions of Diversity
Thriving, Not Just Surviving: Supporting Great
Elementary Social Studies
How do we shape professional development in the elementary
grades in order to meet this level’s unique concerns and needs?
What are our challenges and how can we overcome them?
This interactive session will provide some ideas and insights as
well as the chance to share your own effective strategies.
Presenters: JoAnn Wood, Elementary Social Studies
Supervisor, Cobb County School District, Marietta, GA
Facilitator: Eddie Bennett, 6-12 Social Studies Supervisor,
Cobb County School District, Marietta, GA
Audience: Elementary
Using Webb’s Depth of Knowledge to Guide
Social Studies Instruction and Assessment
This session will provide social studies leaders with information
on Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and how to implement it in
the social studies classroom to improve instruction and
assessment. Participants will be provided with activities and
information for use in all levels of instruction and assessment.
Presenter: Debbie Daniell, K-12 Social Studies Director,
Gwinnett County Public Schools, Suwanee, GA
Facilitator: Patricia Guillory, Teaching American History
Grant Director, Fulton County Schools, Atlanta, GA
Audience: General
N S S S A • December 1 • Thursday
Our Warrior Spirit: Native Americans
in the U.S. Military
NSSSA is pleased to announce a special session to be held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.
The session, Our Warrior Spirit: Native Americans in the U.S. Military, will begin at 4:00pm and will be followed by a book
signing. Warriors in Uniform: The Legacy of American Indian Heroism by Herman Viola and for Counting Coup: Becoming a
Crow Chief on the Reservation and Beyond by Joseph Medicine Crow, will be on sale at a reduced price for NSSSA members.
A reception hosted by Pearson will be held in the museum’s Potomac Atrium. This special session is open to NSSSA
registered participants only. Because events will be held after the closing of the museum, all participants must be in the
museum by 4:00pm.
Thursday, December 1, 2011
4:00–6:00pm
National Museum of the American Indian
Rasmuson Theater
4th Street & Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20024
Book Signing and Reception to follow
The Museum galleries will be open after the session for
NSSSA members ONLY.
Native Americans have served in the U.S. military since the
American Revolution, and by percentage serve more than
any other ethnic group in the armed forces. Join us to learn
about their heroic and unforgettable stories at a special
program hosted by noted historian Herman J. Viola, curator
emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution. The program
features a panel of American Indians who have served our
country in the armed forces, including:
Debra Kay Mooney, Iraq Veteran
Debra Mooney (Choctaw) organized and hosted a powwow
in a war zone in Iraq in 2004. Her goal was to bring a piece
of home to Native Americans serving in Iraq while sharing
their cultural heritage with her fellow soldiers, marines, and
sailors. Objects from the powwow will be on display at the
museum during the program.
Chuck Boers, Iraq Veteran
Chuck Boers (Lipan Apache/Cherokee) is the recipient of
two Bronze Star and three Purple Heart medals. A career
soldier and combat photographer, Boers was injured in Iraq
before being discharged. His Lipan Apache tribe recently
honored him by naming him an Apache war chief.
John Emhoolah, Korea Veteran
John Emhoolah (Kiowa) joined the Oklahoma Thunderbird
Division when he was still in high school. He and five of his
six brothers served in the armed forces and saw combat in
either Korea or Vietnam. Upon his return, he took up a
career with the American Indian Higher Education
Consortium lobbying for religious freedom. The result was
passage of the Native American Religious Freedom Act.
Joseph Medicine Crow, World War II Veteran
In Germany, Joseph Medicine Crow (Crow) placed an eagle
feather inside his helmet, painted red symbols on his arms,
and prayed before each battle. He believes that this medicine
protected him despite a number of close encounters with
the Germans. Unknowingly Medicine Crow completed all
four tasks required of becoming a war chief. For his courage,
he was awarded the Bronze Star and the French Legion of
Honor. In August 2009, President Obama awarded him the
Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Workshops held at the Newseum
The Newseum is hosting workshops at the Newseum and the convention center for NSSSA members—attendees will
receive free Newseum admission and resource materials.
Friday, December 2
Workshops held at the Newseum
Please pre-register via [email protected]
The Civil War: From the Front Lines to the Front Pages,
8:30am to 10am
Saturday, December 3
Global Nation: Freedom of the Press in an Interconnected
World, 2pm to 3pm (see page 122 )
Sunday, December 4
Fact or Fiction? Teaching Media Literacy to Digital
Natives, 8am to 10am (see page 135)
Covering a Catastrophe, 2:30pm to 4pm:
You Can’t Say That in School?!, 5pm to 6:30pm:
91st NCSS Annual Conference
57
International Assembly
The International Assembly (IA) provides a forum for collaboration and interchange of ideas among NCSS members from the United
States and foreign countries. The Assembly promotes linkages among NCSS educators to enhance professional development, enrich social
studies learning, and share research, learning activities, and teaching methods with global perspectives. All NCSS members are welcome to
attend these events. All IA Sessions will be at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, except where noted.
Thursday, December 1
4:30–6:30pm
International Assembly Executive Board Meeting
Renaissance Meeting
Room 2
7:00–9:00pm
Joint Reception with College & University Faculty Assembly
South Pre-Function Area,
3rd Floor
8:00–8:30am
Breakfast, Welcome, and Introductions
Room 206
8:30–9:00am
Welcome and Introductions
Room 206
9:00–10:00am
Roundtable Sessions—Round 1
Room 206
10:15–11:15am
Jan L. Tucker Memorial Lecture Speaker: Guomin Zheng, Dean, Faculty of Teacher
Education, Beijing Normal University. Teacher Education Reform in the People’s
Room 206
Republic of China
11:30am–12:30pm
Roundtable Sessions—Round 2
Room 206
12:30–1:15pm
International Assembly Business Meeting (Elections)
Room 205
1:30–2:30pm
Luncheon and Distinguished Global Scholar Award—Dr. Kenneth Tye (Invitation
only) Made possible by the generous support of the Eleanor and Elliot Goldstein
EGEG Family Foundation
Room 206
Friday, December 2
Roundtable Sessions—Round 1
9:00–10:00am
Table 1—Global Aspects of Religion
American Muslims: How a Commitment to
Pluralism and Democracy Fosters Positive
Relations
James Moore, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH
A Comparative Study of Confucian Influences on
Satisfaction with Democracy
Ryan Knowles, University of Missouri, MO
Turkey: Guardian of Islam’s Past—Guidepost for
Islam’s Future?
Nancy Maguire, Nancy Larkin, Cornwall Central High School,
Vails Gate, NY
Table 2—Developing Global Networks
Sister Cities International: A Global Citizen
Diplomacy Network
Ronald G. Helms, Wright State University, Centerville, OH
Culturally Responsive Teaching for 21st Century
Learners with Immersive World Learning
Technology to Facilitate Continuous Professional
Development
Maryanne Maisano, University of North Carolina at Pembroke,
Aberdeen, NC; Randy Olsen, Crescent View Middle School,
Canyons School District, Sandy, UT
58
Dimensions of Diversity
Civic Voices: An International Democracy
Memory Bank Project
Tim Evans, Academy of Urban Planning, Brooklyn, NY
Table 3—Creating the Global Classroom
Methods and Procedures for the Global
Classroom
Kenneth Carano, Robert Bailey, University of South Florida,
Sarasota, FL
Experiences that Help Learners Develop a Global
Perspective
Lydiah Nganga, University of Wyoming/Casper Center, Casper,
WY
Infusing Global Awareness into Social Studies
Curricula: Suggestions for Educators
Denise R. Ames, Center for Global Awareness, Albuquerque,
NM
Table 4—Human Rights: Teaching about Genocide
Journalism in the 21st Century: An Examination
of Nicholas Kristof’s Role as a Journalist in the
Prevention of Modern Genocide and Human
Rights Abuses
Mary Johnson, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and
Columbia College, SC
International Assembly • December 2 • Friday • Roundtable Sessions 9:00-10:00am
An Examination of Integrating the Holocaust
and Comparative Genocide across the
Curriculum
Robert A. Waterson, West Virginia University, Morgantown,
WV
Making Holocaust Studies Curricula Accessible
for English Language Learners
Rosanna M. Gatens, Shoba Thachil, Florida Atlantic
University, Boca Raton, FL
Table 5—International Perspectives on History Education
Commemorating Our Veterans: Students in Two
Countries Remember
Martin Kerby, St. Joseph’s Nudgee College, Boondall,
Queensland, Australia; Julie Albrecht, St. Paul’s Episcopal School,
Mobile, AL; Susan Santoli, University of South Alabama, Mobile,
AL
A Quest for Diversity in Ontario’s Canadian
History Curriculum: Two Case Studies
John Myers, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,
University of Toronto, Canada
Table 6—International Assembly: Going Global
Journal of International Social Studies
Beverly Milner (Lee) Bisland, Queens College/City University
of New York, Flushing, NY
Adopt-A-Well: The Mwanje School
Table 8—A Comparative Analysis: Global Teaching Resources
Slavery in Two Nations: Examining the
Presentation of Slavery in Secondary U.S. and
Brazilian History Textbooks
Nafees M. Khan, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Moving Beyond a Peace Education Based on
Sympathy: How to Use American Teaching
Resources on the Atomic Bomb in Japan
Toshinori Kuwabara, Hidekazu Yamada, Okayama University,
Japan
Exploring Afghanistan through Children’s and
Young Adult Literature
Rachel Weiss, Nancy Heingartner, University of Wisconsin at
Madison, WI
Table 9—Creating Global Citizens
Unification Education: Toward a Global
Education Practice on a National Level
Sung Choon Park, Changwoo Jeong , Seoul National
University
Study Abroad for What Kind of Citizen?
Sohyun An, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL
Citizenship Education in the Global Age: The
Early 20th Century Perspective.
Jin’ichiro Saito, Tohoku University, Japan
Table 10—Promoting Global Awareness
Frans H. Doppen, Ohio University, Athens, OH; Jennifer E.
Tesar, Davis & Elkins College, Elkins, WV
Promoting Pre-service Teachers’ Global
Awareness
A Tale of Two Countries: Comparing Civic
Education Policy in the Philippines and
Singapore
Understanding, Teaching, and Promoting
Universal Values in Global Civic Education
Jasmine Sim, Agnes Paculdar, Mark Baildon, National Institute
of Education, Singapore
Table 7—Globalizing Teacher Education
Negotiating Transformative Social Studies
Teaching in Student Teaching
Omiunota N. Ukpokodu, University of Missouri at Kansas
City, Kansas City, MO
Impact of International Internship on Pre-service
Teachers in Promoting Global Education
Lin Lin, SUNY at Cortland, Cortland, NY
Han Liu, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania,
Shippensburg, PA; Zhongtang Ren, Old Dominion University,
Richmond, VA
Authentic Aspen, Angola, Arabia and Beyond:
Teaching Global Realities
Robert Mitchell, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Table 11—Across the Globe: Breaking Barriers
LGBTQ Issues in Global Perspective: Teaching
Taboo Topics
Gloria T. Alter, DePaul University, DeKalb, IL
Yali Zhao, Laura Meyers, Georgia State University, Atlanta,
GA
New Zealand: “We Just Teach History”
A Preliminary Study on the Development
of Pedagogical Content Knowledge among
Economics and Primary Social Studies Teachers
in Singapore
Students’ Perceptions of Civic Participation,
School Participation, and Classroom Climate in
Three Elite Singapore Schools
Ng Siew Fong, Chan Oi Khum Karen, National Institute of
Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Theresa Alviar-Martin, Li-Ching Ho, National Institute of
Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Ashley G. Lucas, Towson University, Towson, MD
91st NCSS Annual Conference
59
International Assembly • December 2 • Friday • Roundtable Sessions 11:30am–12:30pm
Table 12—Global Citizenship Education
Research from Diverse Classrooms and Teachers
Merry Merryfield, The Ohio State University; Lisa Duty,
Knowledgeworks Foundation; Aleksandr Kvasov, Philadelphia
University; Mavis Mhlauli, University of Botswana
Roundtable Sessions—Round 2
11:30am–12:30pm
Table 1—Global Perspectives on Sustainability
Environmental Education and Global
Citizenship
Matthew Hollstein, Ohio University, Athens, OH
Sustainability of Teacher International
Programs’ Results
Anatoli Rapoport, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Educating for a Sustainable Future: Social
Studies’ Role in the System
Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, The Ohio State University, Columbus,
OH
Table 2—Issues in Education in Asia and Australia
From Retention to Promotion: Where Are We
Heading?
Jing An, Ohio University, Athens, OH
Student-Centered Teaching: Moving from Policy
to Practice
E-von Lai, Marilyn Lim So-San, National Institute of Education,
Singapore
Asia-engaged Australians: Are We There Yet?
Rose Mulraney, Unley, South Australia
Table 3—New Concepts of Global Citizenship
Re-thinking and Re-visioning Global Education
Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker, Florida State University,
Tallahassee, FL
Worldmindedness: Experiences with Malian
Teachers Expand a Community Perspective
Nancy E. Cardenuto, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA
Table 5—Teaching and Learning about Global Justice
My Moroccan Civic Education in a Justiceoriented and Tolerant Islam
Nancy C. Patterson, Bowling Green State University, Bowling
Green, OH
Quest for Justice: Martin Luther King and Hrant
Dink
Sara Cohan, The Genocide Education Project, San Francisco,
CA
Teaching U.S. Foreign Polices in Malaysia,
Mexico, and Canada
Timothy Cashman, University of Texas at El Paso, TX
Table 6—Service Learning and Global Justice
Service Learning in Teacher Education in Japan
Takeshi Miyazaki, Soka University, Tokyo, Japan; Masato
Ogawa, Indiana University Kokomo, IN
Service Learning: Human Rights Education in
Action!
Sarah Herder, The Advocates for Human Rights, Minneapolis,
MN
Knowing and Doing Social Studies: Expanding
Historical Thinking and Citizenship Thinking with
the Work of Sylvia Wynter
Christopher R. Davis, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin,
TX
Table 7—Developing a Global Curriculum
Sadiq A. Abdullahi, Florida International University,
Homestead, FL; Mohammed K. Farouk, Federal University
Kashere, Nigeria
Education and Social Responsibility.
Preparing “Glocal” Citizens: Engaging Students
and Neighbors with Collaborative and Reciprocal
International Service Learning
A Survey Study: How Much Do They Know about
Each Other’s Country?
Chris Harth, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, Ridgeland, MS
The Teachers of Táchira: Connecting Students to
the Multicultural World
Mercedes Perleche, Lisbeth Valero, Dirección de Educación del
Estado Táchira– Venezuela
Table 4—Quest for Worldmindedness
A Comparative Look at Social Education in
Norwegian Lower and Upper Secondary Schools
David C. Virtue, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC;
Geoffrey Scheurman, University of Wisconsin—River Falls, River
Falls WI
60
The Worldmindedness of Graduating Seniors
from High School
Dimensions of Diversity
Hans Hooghoff, Jeroen Bron, Netherlands Institute for
Curriculum Development, The Netherlands
Xinmin Ji, Xinzhou Teachers College, China; Han Liu,
Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, Shippensburg, PA
Rethinking Teaching about East Asia and South
Asia in the Era of Globalization
Sarasij Majumde, Guichun Zong, Kennesaw State University,
Suwannee, GA
Table 8—New Responses to Global Learning
Responding to the Crisis in Japan: Using Social
Networking in Social Studies Education for
Global Citizenship
Misato Yamaguchi, Augusta State University, Dublin OH; Brad
Maguth, University of Akron, Twinsburg, OH
International Assembly • December 2 • Friday • Roundtable Sessions 11:30am–12:30pm
The Stickiness Factor in University-Wide Global
Learning Initiatives
Hilary Landorf, Florida International University, Miami, FL
table 9—thinking globally
Fostering Students’ Global Citizenship through
Geography Education
Eui-kyung Shin, Northern Illinois University, Cortland, IL
Creating an Institutional Culture of Global
Thinking and International Mindedness
Carolyn O’Mahony, Oakland University in Rochester, MI
Global Partnerships: One Senegal School at a
Time
Denise Dallmer, Northern Kentucky University, KY
table 10—pluralistic global citizenship
Fair Trade Certification by Government:
Economic Justice or Unwarranted Intervention?
IL
Nisan Chavkin, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Chicago,
table 11—promoting global inquiry
The Power of Narrative and Inquiry for
Developing Young Children’s Academic
Language
Margit E. McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA; Bronwyn
Cole, School of Education, University of Western Sydney,
Australia
As-Salaam-Alaikum! Changing the World One
Student at a Time
Marilyn Lees-Yensick, Slippery Rock University
A Day in the Life of a Child: Summer Rwanda
2010
Melissa Collum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC; Jennifer
Morgan, West Salem Middle School, West Salem, WI
Community Citizenship as a Path to Pluralistic
Citizenship: Using a Lesson on the Earthquake/
Tsunami Disaster Issue
Ken’ichi Nagata, Tohoku University, Japan
Citizenship Education in Singapore
Bee Kee Lim, Dunman High School, Singapore
invites you to meet
Larry Dane Brimner
Friday, December 2
10:00 – 11:00 am
Saturday, December 3
1:30 – 2:30 pm
• Booth 233 •
An Imprint of Boyds Mills Press, Inc.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
61
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
Content Overview
Type
When
Length
Clinics
(Tickets required)
Thursday
Full-day or half-day
Convention Center meeting rooms and
off-site locations
Sessions
Friday, Saturday
One hour
Convention Center meeting rooms
Poster Presentations
Friday, Saturday
One hour
Convention Center meeting rooms
Exhibitor Sessions
Friday, Saturday
One hour
Convention Center meeting rooms
Workshops
Sunday
Two hours
Convention Center meeting rooms
Schedule Information
THU
Where
This program book was printed in November. Some schedule
information may have changed. Please check the Program
Addendum flyer for last-minute updates. The addendum is
available at NCSS Registration.
Conference Evaluation
Be sure to check your e-mail inbox after the conference for a
link to our conference evaluation survey.
Audiovisual Needs
NCSS will fulfill audiovisual needs originally requested on the
program proposals as long as the request is within the limits of
equipment that NCSS provides. For any last-minute AV needs,
presenters must arrange and pay for their own equipment at
the daily rates established by Freeman (the designated AV
company), not the advance rates that NCSS charged during
the proposal process.
During the conference, the Freeman AV offices are in Room
210 of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.
Meeting Room Capacities
The Walter E. Washington Convention Center strictly enforces
the capacity of all meeting rooms. Sessions will be closed once
all seats are occupied. No standing will be allowed, and
standees will be asked to leave. Arrive early to sessions to
ensure you can find a seat.
Graduate Credit
One graduate-level semester credit is available through Adams State College. Applicants must attend at least 15 hours of
sessions, workshops, and speakers, and keep a log of everything attended. The credit requires a short paper or lesson plan
incorporating information learned at the conference. The fee is $65.
Full details are available at www.socialstudies.org/conference/credit
International
Alley
International
Alley
NCSS Washington DC 2011
400
404
408
409
410
411
412
416
417
418
419
420
421
62
Choices Program – Brown University
National Peace Corps Association
iEarn
Sultan Qabboos Cultural Center
Consortium on Latin American
Studies
Middle East Outreach
Klett International & eMapshop
African Studies Outreach Council
Concern Worldwide
Genocide Education Project
International Debate Education
Association
EU Centers of Excellence Network
UNICEF
Dimensions of Diversity
424
425
426
427
428
429
432
434
436
440
441
442
visit
Population Connection
American Red Cross
GEEO
Dar al Islam
Jewish Partisan Education
Foundation
Polish Perspectives
NCTA
The Laurasian Insititute
Peace Corps-Coverdell World Wise
Schools
Transatlantic Outreach Program/
Goethe Institut
German Information Center
UNHCR
443 AFT International Program
444 U.S. Institute of Peace
445 U.S. Dept of State – Office of the
Historian
448 Keizai Koho Center Fellowship
449 Heifer International
450 BeadforLife
451 H2O for Life
452 NRCs on Canada
453 1812: Who Won the War?
456 International Spy Museum
457 Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting
459 Saudi Aramco World
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
Full-Day Clinics
8:00am–6:00pm
Evolution of American Citizenship from James
Madison’s Constitution to Today
Host: Montpelier, Orange VA
Bus picks up at Convention Center, on L Street
Using James Madison’s home, Montpelier, as the classroom, this
seminar will explore how the meaning of citizenship has changed
over the generations, from the American Revolution to the recent
past.
Kelly Carmichael Booz, Sean O’Brien, Andrew Washburn, Center for
the Constitution at James Madison’s Montpelier, Orange VA
8:00am–3:30pm
Canada: Looking Beyond the 49th Parallel
Host: Embassy of Canada, 501 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Gain a foundation for teaching about Canada, and learn methodologies for aligning Canadian content to history, geography,
government, economics, and culture curricula. Instruction
and curriculum resources provided by US National Resource
Centers on Canada and Canadian Embassy officials. Refreshments, lunch, and 8 clock hours included.
Amy Sotherden, Chris Kirkey, SUNY Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh,
NY; Betsy Arntzen, University of Maine, Orono, ME; Tina Storer,
Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA; Nadine Fabbi,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Daniel Abele, Embassy of
Canada, Washington, DC; Ruth Writer, Michigan State
University, East Lansing, MI
8:00am–4:00pm
the Embassies of the United Arab Emirates and the Republic
of Turkey, the Sackler Museum, and the Kahlil Gibran Memorial. Participants will also be able to attend the Middle East
Studies Association Film Fest on Sunday, December 4.
Barbara Petzen, Middle East Policy Council, Washington, DC;
Chris Rose, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, The University of
Texas at Austin, TX; Zeina Azzam Seikaly, Center for
Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University, Washington,
DC
9:00am–3:00pm
Letting the Objects Speak: Civil War Stories from
the Smithsonian
Join educators from five Smithsonian museums to explore this
dynamic period in American history through gallery tours,
demonstrations of primary source-based lessons and online
resources, and more! By the end of the program, teachers will
be energized to teach this dynamic period in American history
using the resources of the Smithsonian American Art Museum,
National Portrait Gallery, National Air and Space Museum,
National Postal Museum, and National Museum of American
History. Lunch is included.
Naomi Coquillon, Jenny Wei, National Museum of American
History, Washington, DC; Suzannah Niepold, Smithsonian
American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Briana White, National
Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC; Motoko Hioki, National Postal
Museum, Washington, DC
9:00am–4:00pm
Bringing International Conflict and Peace
Building Alive in the Classroom
Library of Congress: Teaching with Primary
Sources
Host: United States Institute of Peace,
2301 Constitution Ave., NW
Host: Library of Congress, 10 First St., SE
The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) hosts this clinic to
prepare teachers to deliver dynamic classroom experiences on
international conflict issues. Participants will hear from a witness to international conflict, tour with Global Peacebuilding
Center at the new USIP headquarters, and participate in activities from USIP’s educator toolkit. You’ll leave with renewed
enthusiasm, a kit filled with lesson plans, and exciting
resources.
Alison Milofsky, Ann-Louise Colgan, Jeff Helsing, United States
Institute of Peace, Washington, DC
9:00am–5:00pm
Discovering Hidden Treasures of the Middle East
in Washington, DC
Host: Middle East Outreach Council
Bus picks up at Convention Center, on L Street
Let’s explore the Middle East in DC together, finding hidden
treasures of art, culture, history and food in museums, embassies, and other sites throughout the city. Stops include visits to
THU
Hosts: Smithsonian American Art Museum and National
Museum of American History, 8th & F Sts., NW
Engage students and build critical thinking skills! Join Library
of Congress staff for a mini-institute based on the curriculum
of the Library’s four-day Summer Institutes. Participants will
see how using primary sources in instruction can engage students and help them develop critical thinking skills and build
content knowledge. Participants will also learn how they can
take back the Library’s professional development activities to
deliver to their colleagues. Lunch is included.
Kathleen McGuigan, Library of Congress, Washington, DC
9:00am–4:00pm
Time Travel with Extraordinary Maps from the
Library of Congress
Host: Library of Congress, 10 First St., SE
Transport your classroom to the 1500s with rare maps from
the vaults of the Library of Congress. Investigate facsimiles,
see the real thing, bring lessons to 2011 with Google Earth.
Participants will travel by Metro to the Library of Congress.
Sharon Metzger-Galloway, Sara Suiter, Library of Congress,
Washington, DC
91st NCSS Annual Conference
63
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
9:00am–3:00pm
Using Artworks as Primary Sources
Host: Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th & F Sts., NW
Discover how works of art can serve as primary sources for
studying U.S. History and the American experience. Only a
few blocks from the Washington Convention Center, the
Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection captures the
aspirations, character and imagination of the American people
throughout three centuries and is one of the largest and most
inclusive collections of American art in the world. Museum
staff will lead you through engaging learning activities that
may be easily adapted for students in grades 5–12 with varying
learning styles and needs. Learn how to bring the Museum’s
collection into your classroom, practice visual literacy techniques, and explore the collections for connections with your
curriculum. The workshop will include sessions on using
Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), collaborative writing projects, group discussions about learning with objects, and a special tour before the Museum is open to the public. Each participant receives lunch and learning resources from the
Museum.
Elizabeth Eder, Victoria Lichtendorf, Adrienne Gayoso,
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC
THU
9:00am–4:30pm
Archaeology and Diversity in American History
Hosts: Project Archaeology and Smithsonian National
Museum of Natural History, 10th St. & Constitution Ave., NW
Human remains show that Africans lived and died alongside
English colonists during early colonial settlement in the Chesapeake Bay region, which includes parts of Maryland, Virginia,
and the District of Columbia. Join us at the Smithsonian and
experience archaeological inquiry through a classroom-ready
curriculum and exhibits at the National Museum of Natural
History. Participants will receive a copy of Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter, a supplemental social studies and
science curriculum. This clinic will be completely hands-on
and interactive and will closely model classroom instruction.
Jeanne Moe, Project Archaeology, Bozeman, MT; Maureen
Malloy, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History,
Washington, DC
Visitor Center, the clinic will offer a variety of instructional
activities, educational tutorials led by experts in the field, and
a special guest speaker.
Kathleen Johnson, Matthew Wasniewski, Office of the Historian,
U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC; Betty Koed, Kate
Scott, Senate Historical Office, Washington, DC; Maria MarableBunch, Andrea Lewis, Capitol Visitors Center, Washington, DC;
Christine Blackerby, Center for Legislative Archives, National
Archives, Washington, DC
9:30am–3:30pm
Discover Your National Archives
Host: National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Explore interactive exhibits, participate in simulated research
exercises, learn about nationwide and online resources, gather
primary sources for use in your classroom, and discover
engaging ways to teach with documents! A light breakfast,
lunch, and take-home resources are included.
Lee Ann Potter, Stephanie Greenhut, Michael Hussey, National
Archives, Washington, DC; Christine Blackerby, Center for
Legislative Archives, National Archives, Washington, DC
10:00am–4:00pm
The 18th-Century World of George Washington
and Mount Vernon
Host: Mount Vernon
Bus picks up at Convention Center, on L Street
Mount Vernon remains an iconic image of America. But what
does it tell us about the man who commanded the world stage
from 1753 until his death in 1799? Participants will meet
Mount Vernon educators, curators, and archaeologists in a
unique and intense day of discovery, exploring what Washington’s home reveals about our nation’s first president.
Nancy Hayward, Jamie Bosket, Esther White, Laura Simo,
Meaghan Rafferty, George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Mount
Vernon, VA
11:00am–5:00pm
The Secret History of History:
International Spy Museum
Host: International Spy Museum, 800 F St., NW
9:30am–3:30pm
Breaking Barriers, Making History:
African Americans and Women in Congress
Hosts: Office of the Historian, U.S. House of Representatives;
Senate Historical Office; Capitol Visitors Center, 1st St., SE &
East Capitol St., NE
The House Historian’s Office, the Senate Historical Office, the
Capitol Visitor Center Exhibits and Education Division, and
the Center for Legislative Archives are pleased to offer this
full-day educational clinic for teachers interested in learning
more about the history of Congress. Hosted at the Capitol
64
Dimensions of Diversity
Teaching history through the lens of intelligence is not only
timely but timeless. In a post-9/11 world, a focus on intelligence and its role through history is critical. Join International
Spy Museum staff for a 2,000 year journey through the secret
history of history. Enter the shadow world of espionage in this
clinic which will provide a keynote presentation with a former
spy, a behind the scenes exploration of the Museum’s artifacts
and stories with the Museum’s Historian and former CIA analyst, and hands-on simulation and lesson demonstrations with
the Museum’s educators. Each participant will leave with a
comprehensive packet of resources, the Museum’s Cuban Missile Crisis simulation publication, and a newfound apprecia-
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
tion for how spying has often changed the course of history.
Participants will be served a gourmet sandwich lunch and as
only the Spy Museum can, a celebratory martini at the end of
the clinic…shaken, not stirred.
Jacqueline Eyl, Mark Stout, Peter Earnest, International Spy
Museum, Washington, DC
Half Day
8:30am–12:00pm
Five Freedoms: A New Perspective on the Civil
Rights Movement
Host: Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
See the Civil Rights Movement from a fresh angle through
rare primary source news footage, and learn how the First
Amendment has empowered social movements then and now.
Includes a guided tour of the clinic-related content in the
Newseum galleries and continental breakfast.
Kim Ash, Newseum, Washington, DC
Amendment, from founding their own newspapers to rallying
at the White House. Includes a guided tour of the clinic-related
content in the Newseum galleries and lunch.
Kim Ash, Newseum, Washington, DC
1:00–4:00pm
Diplomacy at the Department of State—and in
Your Classroom
Host: United States Department of State, 2201 C St., NW
In a dangerous world, diplomacy is our first line of defense.
The United States Department of State hosts this clinic to
show how to weave “diplomacy” into your social studies curriculum through rotating sessions involving the Department’s
Historians and a tour of the Diplomatic Reception rooms. Participants will receive the new CD-ROM, “Key Documents and
Lessons in U.S. Foreign Policy,” other recent DVD/Curriculum packages, and a poster game board. Some prizes will be
distributed in “diplomatic pouches.”
Susan Holly, Ambassador Edward Brynn, Lynda Wagner,
Carol Vogler, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC
9:00am–12:00pm
Become a City Planner at the
National Building Museum!
Host: National Building Museum, 401 F St., NW
Learn about the National Building Museum’s educational programs, tour the Museum, and participate in a hands-on school
program about city planning, plus receive ready-to-go lessons
for your classroom
Lara Marks Finder, Mary Hendrickse, National Building
Museum, Washington, DC
10:30am–1:30pm
Japan and the Environment: Geography, Climate,
Culture, and Art
Host: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery,
Smithsonian Institution, Jefferson Drive & 12th St., SW
Cosponsored by National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.
Explore Japan’s geographical features and climate conditions
and their connection to Japanese culture, religion, and art.
Includes examination of artworks and learning ikebana ( Japanese flower arranging).
Elizabeth Benskin, Freer Gallery of Art-Smithsonian Institution,
Washington, DC; Mary Hammond Bernson, East Asia Resource
Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Anne Prescott,
Five College Center for East Asian Studies, Northampton, MA
12:30–4:00pm
From Words to Actions: How Suffragettes
Reinvented the First Amendment
Host: Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Use primary sources to uncover how the women’s suffrage
movement pioneered our modern understanding of the First
THU
1:00–4:00pm
Teaching Civil War to Civil Rights
Host: African American Civil War Museum,
1925 Vermont Ave., NW
Explore the meaning of freedom and equality in American history through the context of the Civil War and the Civil Rights
Movement. This clinic focuses on historical events, themes,
and the historian’s task in interpreting history. This includes
engaging participants in historical investigation, examination
of primary sources, writing, analysis and problem solving. To
complement their historical study, participants will discuss
successful strategies for delivering historical knowledge and
encouraging active learning in the K-12 classroom.
Dawn Chitty, Frank Smith, Hari Jones, African American Civil
War Museum, Washington, DC
On-Site Clinics at the Convention Center
Full Day
9:00am–3:00pm
Room 149A
The National World War II Memorial: An
Opportunity for Learning
Friends of the National World War II Memorial present
dynamic web-based learning activities developing historical
thinking and service learning skills in context to the American
legacy of World War II. Meet and hear New York Times bestselling author Andrew Carroll discuss his book, War Letters:
Extraordinary Correspondence from America’s War, get an up
close and personal tour of the National World War II Memorial by the sculptor, Ray Kaskey, and learn about the myriad
91st NCSS Annual Conference
65
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
ways that the Friends of the National World War II Memorial
can help you to expand and develop your teaching of the
Second World War by receiving hands-on training with their
new educational feature on their web site.
James Percoco, George Kerestes, Rolland E. Kidder, Friends of
the National World War II Memorial, Washington, DC; Ronald
Grosso, American Battle Monuments Commission, Arlington, VA;
Andrew Carroll, Washington, DC
9:00am–3:00pm
Room 209B
Digital Field Trips: National Parks, Social Media
and Student-Generated Content
THU
Pearson and the National Park Service are teaming up to provide you with a feet-on-the-ground workshop designed around
using social media and digital tools to develop lesson plans
and examples that help students create 21st century projects
based on Essential Questions for the social studies classroom.
Wendy Davis, National Park Service, Washington, DC; Glenn
Diedrich, Greg Slook, Pearson
10:00am–4:00pm
Room 208A
Use Technology to Supercharge
Student Engagement
Join TCI to discover how to integrate meaningful technology
into your instruction. We’ll show you web tools and classroom
technology and how to apply them in the one-computer
classroom.
Bert Bower, Brian Thomas, TCI, Sacramento, CA
10:00am–4:00pm
Room 209C
If I Had Learned Social Studies Like This: ThoughtFilled Projects
When pre-service teachers experience intellectually and emotionally rich project work, they understand its importance for
diverse students. An urban teacher education program prepares teachers to plan and teach project-based curriculum.
Teacher educators, professional developers, administrators,
classroom teachers and coaches will learn how an urban
teacher education program is preparing teachers to integrate
the teaching of social studies content with thinking and emotional processes through complex project-based curriculum.
Christy Folsom, City University of New York, NY
10:00am–4:00pm
Room 201
Pre-AP Strategies in History and the
Social Sciences
This interactive workshop presents teachers at the Pre-AP
level with strategies to improve students’ historical thinking
skills, specifically interpretation and analysis, through the
exploration of primary and secondary sources.
66
Dimensions of Diversity
10:00am–4:00pm
Room 209A
AP Comparative Government and Politics:
Democratization Update: Nation States in
Transition
This workshop focuses on three lessons that facilitate student
exploration of the concept of democratization as a basis for
comparing six nation-states and improving the interpretation
of political data.
10:00am–4:00pm
Salon C
AP Human Geography: Urban Geography
This workshop presents teachers with resources and ideas for
addressing the following Urban Geography topics: “Urban
Models,” “Case Study of Pittsburgh,” “Ghettoization and Gentrification,” and “Megacities in Less-Developed Countries.”
10:00am–4:00pm
Room 304
AP World History: Course and Exam Changes
This workshop will provide a comprehensive understanding
of changes to the course and the 2012 exam; concrete classroom strategies for addressing those changes; and guidance on
completing the AP course audit.
Half Day
10:00am–1:00pm
Room 103A
Discovering the Hidden Treasures of
Washington, DC
Veteran teachers will provide hands-on strategies and lesson
plans concerning GPS, Global Positioning Systems, using 21st
Century tools for learning to enhance students’ geographic
understanding utilizing geocaches.
Paul Nagel, Louisiana Geography Education Alliance,
Natchitoches, LA; David Faerber, Tara High School, Baton Rouge,
LA
10:00am–1:00pm
Room 305
Giving Diversity a Voice: Allowing Our Nation’s
Capital to Speak
Explore the unique situation in our nation’s capital of taxation
without representation. Examine historical factors, current
efforts and future prospects for achieving equality. Learn strategies for teaching and becoming involved.
Anise Jenkins, Stand Up for Democracy, Washington, DC;
Patricia Brown, DC Public Schools, Washington, DC; Michael
Brown, Washington, DC
Thursday, December 1 • Clinics
10:00am–1:00pm
Room 147A
Teaching About Federalism through Health Care
and Immigration Laws
Join Street Law for an interactive exploration of the Commerce and Supremacy Clauses and their application to current
issues like federal health care reform and state laws that affect
immigration.
Megan Hanson, Lee Arbetman, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring,
MD
2:00–5:00pm
Room 208B
Google: Tricks and Tips for Using Google Apps
Maximize Google’s free products. Learn the tips and tricks for
maximizing Google searching and Google apps. Using the
cloud can expand your instruction for 21st -century students.
Brenda Barr, National Geographic, Washington, DC
2:00–5:00pm
Room 305
Engaged Learning: When Primary Sources and
Social Media Collide
Social media is changing the way students learn. Take this
clinic to purposefully engage learners and promote higher
order thinking by combining the power of social learning and
primary sources.
Peggy O’Neill-Jones, Metropolitan State College of Denver, CO;
Kelly Jones-Wagy, Overland High School, Aurora, CO; Michelle
Pearson, Hulstrom Options School, Northglenn, CO; Cynthia
Stout, Littleton, CO
2:00–5:00pm
Room 147A
Geospatial Thinking and GIS in the
U.S. History Classroom
Enliven your social studies classroom through the use of
online GIS programs that encourage higher-order thinking
skills and allow students to explore how geography affects
history.
Patti Winch, Diane Harazin, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Fairfax, VA; Erin Poppe, Hayfield Secondary School, Alexandria,
VA
2:00–5:00pm
Room 103A
Problem-Based Learning to Integrate Elementary
Social Studies and Literacy Learning
Storypath uses setting, character and plot to organize the curriculum. This integrative approach is highly successful in
engaging learners in social studies understanding while
applying literacy skills in real-life contexts.
Margit McGuire, Seattle University, WA; Bronwyn Cole,
University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia
2:00–5:00pm
Room 149A
Teaching about Japan: A JOI-Ful Experience
Enhance teaching about Japan in the elementary classroom
through cross-curricular lessons, native Japanese teacher, children’s literature, authentic resources, and professional development opportunities! The first thirty teachers receive classroom-ready resources.
Mari Maruyama, Kana Morishita, The Laurasian Institution,
Seattle, WA; Linda Wojtan, National Consortium for Teaching
about Asia, Omaha, NE; Lynn Parisi, University of Colorado at
Boulder, CO; Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL
THU
2:00–5:00pm
Room 103B
Teaching History as Mystery
Teaching history as mystery engages participants in problems
and issues embedded in doing history as detectives, grappling
with evidence, developing interpretations, and making judgments, within a framework of global connections.
Jack Zevin, David Gerwin, Robert Dytell, Jeffrey Feinberg ,
Queens College/City University of New York, Flushing, NY
2:00–5:00pm
Room 149B
Using Global Nonfiction Texts in the
Elementary Classroom
This session will provide elementary teachers with resources
and teaching strategies that use nonfiction texts and primary
sources to enhance students’ literacy skills and global content
knowledge
Jennifer Hanson, Ann Marie Gleeson, Marcy Prager, Primary
Source, Watertown, MA
2:00–5:00pm
Room 147B
The War of 1812—Other Perspectives
A re-examination of the War of 1812 and its impact on Native
cultures, including new insights on Andrew Jackson from the
latest research involving his papers.
Mark Finchum, Jefferson County High School, Dandridge, TN;
Dean June, Attica Schools, Attica, NY; Mike Clare, University of
Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON; Frances Hagemann,
Hometown, IL; Barbara Johnson, Evanston, IL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
67
December 2, Friday • Concurrent Sessions 1
Friday, December 2
Concurrent Sessions 1
Time
Event
Speakers
Pages
7:00–9:00am
President’s Breakfast and Teacher of
the Year Awards (Ticketed event)
NCSS President Sue Blanchette
pp. 6, 10
9:00–10:00am
Concurrent Sessions 1
Vital Issue: NAEP 101
p. 69
10:15–11:15am
Concurrent Sessions 2
Vital Issue: Teaching East Asia
p. 75
11:30am–12:30pm
Keynote Speaker
Diane Ravitch
pp. 6, 81
12:30–1:30pm
Break
12:30–3:00pm
Communities Showcase
1:30–2:00pm
Keynote Speaker
Secretary Arne Duncan
pp. 6, 81
2:10–3:05pm
Concurrent Sessions 3
Featured Speaker: Geoffrey Canada
pp. 6, 82
3:15–4:10pm
Concurrent Sessions 4
Featured Speaker: Philip Zimbardo
pp. 6, 87
4:20–5:15pm
Concurrent Sessions 5
p. 94
5:25–6:20pm
Concurrent Sessions 6
p. 100
7:00–9:00pm
President’s Reception at the Newseum
p. 10
8:30–11:00pm
Herff Jones | Nystrom Dance
p. 10
FRI
p. 33
Friday Featured Sessions
Room 144A
10:15–11:15am
Preparation for Citizenship: The Partnership for
21st Century Skills
Learn how the P21 Framework prepares all students for citizenship in the 21st century by promoting critical thinking,
collaboration, creativity and communication skills across all
subject areas.
Timothy J. Magner, Partnership for 21st Century Skills,
Washington, DC; Michelle Herczog, Los Angeles County Office
of Education, Downey, CA
2:30–4:30pm
E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse,
333 Constitution Avenue, NE
68
room-ready activity. Teachers will leave the program with
everything they need to do the simulation the first day they
return to the classroom.
Location: E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse, 333
Constitution Avenue, NW.
One block from the Judiciary Square Metro stop on the
Red Line. Use the side entrance in the middle of the block
on Third Street near Constitution Avenue. For more information, contact the Federal Courts’ National Outreach
Manager Rebecca Fanning at [email protected]
ao.uscourts.gov
A Real Federal Judge, A Real Courtroom, and
Very Real School Issues
3:00–5:00pm
Smithsonian National Museum of the
American Indian, 4th St. & Independence Ave., SW
Rasmuson Theatre
This highly interactive program combines the vampire craze
and social media to give participants a novel way to apply
and teach the precedent set in a landmark Supreme Court
case as they involve themselves in a realistic trial and jury
deliberations—in an actual courtroom with a judge. The First
Amendment and Social Media: Student Rights, Wrongs, and
Responsibilities, is based on a fictional scenario that mirrors
Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier. A federal judge presides over this
true-to-life trial simulation and attorneys coach the participants throughout the process so that they can do the program in their classrooms or in their local federal courthouses.
No preparation is necessary for this classroom-ready/court-
Native Americans have served in the U.S. military since the
American Revolution, and by percentage serve more than
any other ethnic group in the armed forces. Join us to learn
about their heroic and unforgettable stories at a special program hosted by noted historian Herman J. Viola, curator
emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution. The program features a panel of American Indians who have served our
country in the armed forces.
Debra Kay Mooney, Chuck Boers, John Emhoolah, Joseph
Medicine Crow
Dimensions of Diversity
Our Warrior Spirit: The Legacy of American
Indian Heroism
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00am • Concurrent Sessions 1
7:00–8:45am
Room 143A
President’s Breakfast and Teacher of the Year
Awards— “A Celebration of Teachers”
Educators are, first and foremost, teachers. The audience may
differ, the conditions are not the same, but our desire to share
what we know to make the world a better place is an integral
part of what we do. The President’s breakfast celebrates
teachers, those individuals who give of themselves every day,
with a great deal of stress and very little acknowledgement. It
is recognition of our shared passion and a look at teaching,
then and now. The President’s Breakfast is generously sponsored
by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
9:00am–4:00pm
Intensive
Room 145A
NCSS/NCATE Reviewer Training and Update
This clinic prepares participants to review teacher preparation programs in social studies or related disciplines and to
update current reviewers in applying NCSS Standards in
the NCATE Program Review process.
Alberta Dougan, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape
Girardeau, MO
9:00–10:00am
Room 202A
Vital Issue Session
National Assessment of Educational Progress
(NAEP) 101: Learning More about the NAEP 2010
Civics, Geography, and U.S. History Reports
The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) will
assemble a panel of NCES report specialists to explore the
results of the NAEP 2010 social studies reports. Panelists will
lead attendees through the fundamentals of NAEP, highlight
differences in students’ performance based on demographic
characteristics, and explore how NAEP can be used in the
classroom. The session includes a Q&A segment.
Concurrent Sessions 1
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Social Sciences
Global Connections
Room 143B
Bring Japan to Your Classroom: Through Kids’
Eyes and Voices
Experience new approaches to introducing Japan to your students through an interactive presentation, engagement in
hands-on activities, and take-home materials designed by
museum educator, author, and long-time resident of Japan.
Willamarie Moore, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Thinking about Thinking Skills: Not What, but
How
Thinking skills are critically important for students. Do you
struggle with how to teach them? Come and learn about the
patterns to our thinking and how to teach them!
Meghan Callahan, Jennifer Orr, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Fairfax, VA
Elementary U.S. History
Rooms 209A, 209B, 209C
Culturally Relevant Literature:
Notable Trade Books and Lessons!
ECE Community proudly presents the 6th annual NTB concurrent sessions (K-2,3-4, 5-6) emphasizing Dimensions of
Diversity. Participants receive all lessons on CD and are eligible to win a NTB!
Ruth Busby, Troy University, Troy, AL; Mary Haas, West
Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Blythe Hinitz, College of
New Jersey, Ewing, NJ; Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL; Lynn Kelley, University of West Alabama,
Livingston, AL; Melinda Odom Staubs, Jacksonville State
University, Jacksonville, AL; Patricia Palmer, University of
Missouri-Kansas City, MO; Cynthia Sunal, The University of
Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Dennis Sunal, The University of
Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Sharon Ross, The University of
Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; M. Gail Hickey, Indiana UniversityPurdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN; Sarah
Montgomery, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA; Erica
Christie, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Carolyn A. Weber,
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Diane Brantley, California
State University, San Bernardino, CA; Leslie Perfect Ricklin,
Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT; Judy
Butler, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Lois M.
Christensen, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL; Misty
Rodeheaver, Buffalo State University, SUNY, Buffalo, NY; Heather
Hagan, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Deborah Morowski,
Auburn University, Auburn, AL; Marilyn Friga, University of
Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Janet Strickland, University of
West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Michelle L. Horne, Rosewood
International Elementary School, Rock Hill, SC; Adele F. Moriarty,
University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL; Jodie M. Winship,
University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL; Melissa Whetstone,
University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL; Andrea Minear,
University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL
Concurrent Sessions 1
Ballroom A
Elementary FRI
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Economics
Room 147B
Learn Economics with Eleanor, Caesar, Rosie and
Other Famous Americans
Come star in a readers theater about Eleanor Roosevelt or
Rosie the Riveter. You’ll engage in more exciting activities
blending reading, history and economics and take home classroom-ready lessons.
Suzanne Gallagher, Virginia Commonwealth University,
Richmond, VA; Sherie Surbaugh, University of Kansas, Lawrence,
KS
91st NCSS Annual Conference
69
TIME
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00
am • Concurrent Sessions 1
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolGeography
Room 208B
Geography as a “Novel” Idea!
World Geography textbooks could be challenging for students
who struggle with reading. Novels like “Facing the Lion” captivate student interest. Students could improve reading and
comprehension and also geographic literacy.
Lisa Draper, Pennsylvania Alliance for Geography Education,
Macungie, PA
Concurrent Sessions 1
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 203A
The Anticipatory Set: Capturing Student
Attention
First impressions are everything! How can teachers use the
Anticipatory Set to capture students’ attention and boost their
achievement?
Paul Francis, Eritt Sinkko, Ruffner Academy, Norfolk, VA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 202B
Students as Local, Digital History Creators: The
GeoHistorian Project
FRI
Learn how to teach your students to create digital, local, historical content for audiences beyond your classroom. Bring
your smartphone for hands-on participation!
Thomas McNeal, Mark van’t Hooft, Kent State University,
Kent, OH
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 140A
Understanding Fiscal Responsibility: Teaching
National Debt Through Social Studies Courses
Social studies courses present opportunities to teach the
national debt, federal budget, budget deficit, fiscal responsibility, and civic engagement. Lesson plans and resources provided for teaching students about these topics.
Anand Marri, Maureen Grolnick, Scott Wylie, Teachers College,
Columbia University New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 145B
Preserving the Past, Inspiring the Future with
Civic Voices
Students around the world are preserving the history of iconic
democratic struggles. Participants will learn how to inspire
their students by collecting and using oral history narratives.
Free materials included.
Timothy Evans, Academy of Urban Planning, Brooklyn, NY;
Karen Lee, Thurgood Marshall Academy, Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Secondary Level-High School Room 208A
Room 143C
By comparing sets of Newsweek/Time magazines published at
different times, this presentation demonstrates how to use
popular publications to teach U.S. and world history with
comparative and interdisciplinary approaches.
Han Liu, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, PA
PBS documentary and Facing History and Ourselves’ study
guide “Worse than War” explore the phenomenon of genocide. Participants explore strategies for teaching global justice
with students. Free study guides.
Jennifer Jones-Clark, Facing History and Ourselves, Boston,
MA
“Smoking Was So Cool Then!” Comparative
Approaches for History Instruction
Secondary Level/High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 103B
Wartime Press Freedoms: From the Pentagon
Papers to Wikileaks
Freedom of the press illuminates the inner workings of government. Its limits are most challenged during wartime, when
the interests of national security collide with citizens’ cherished right to information.
Shawn Healy, McCormick Foundation Civics Program,
Chicago, IL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 203B
Using Technology to Engage Students and
Promote Inquiry
Learn how to use technology resources such as wikis, blogs,
70
and podcasts to increase student engagement in the classroom
while pushing the students towards being lifelong learners.
Materials provided.
Kelly Jones-Wagy, Overland High School, Denver, CO; Peggy
O’Neil-Jones, Library of Congress, Teaching with Primary Sources,
Western Region, Denver, CO
Dimensions of Diversity
Global Connections
“Worse Than War”
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 201
Getting “Psyched” About Learning: Web2.0
Applications and Differentiated Student
Expression
Session explores how the latest Web2.0 applications greatly
increase the tools available to demonstrate learning in innovative ways. Two practicing psychology teachers discuss use of
these technologies and share resources.
Kerry Poole, David Valdez, University of South Florida, Tampa,
FL
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Salon C
From Dick and Jane to Sneetches: The Future is
Acceptance!
Use the works of Dr. Seuss and other books to give students an
opportunity to see the world as what it can be. The strategies
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00am • Concurrent Sessions 1
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 147A
Records in Record Time: Bringing the Archive to
Busy Teachers
Encourage students to enjoy history through interaction with
primary source Presidential records! Our free online modules
bring history alive and are applicable to students of all learning
levels and styles.
Heather Nice, George W. Bush Presidential Library, Lewisville,
TX; Marsha Sharp, Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library,
Austin, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
OUTRAGEOUS Teaching: U.S. History Edition
A high-energy, entertaining session filled with magic, mayhem,
and most importantly, methods to capture and engage your
hard-to-motivate students through interactice and creative
approaches to teaching history.
Dave Burgess, West Hills High School, San Diego, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
Visualizing Social Justice: Using Images to
Promote Social Change
Controversial images are often connected to the movement
for social justice. This session will present example lessons on
the use of controversial images to promote social justice in history classrooms.
Alicia Crowe, Todd Hawley, Kent State University, Kent, OH
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
1812: Who Won the War?
The Americans; the British; the Amerindians? Utilizing an
eScrapbook produced in partnership with NCSS and proven
21st-century pedagogy, participants will draw their own conclusions about the outcome. Grades 7–12.
Michael Clare, University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
Oshawa, ON; Brian McClean, President: Epoch Multimedia Inc.,
Ottawa, ON
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103A
Teaching Skills: The Keys to Unlocking Social
Studies Content
This session will provide instructional strategies and classroom ready lessons demonstrating how an emphasis on skills
such as literacy, writing and critical thinking, can enhance any
social studies content.
Liza Doty, Smoky Hill High School, Aurora, CO; Erica Schnee,
Bozeman High School, Bozeman, MT
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 140B
Interpreting Cold War Origins: Past, Present and
Future
This session will examine the politicized nature of looking for
the “causes” of the Cold War (1945-1991). Attendees will
delve into the arguments and take away teaching strategies
and materials.
Lee Eysturlid, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy,
Aurora, IL
Higher Education Sessions
Higher EducationCUFA Research into Practice Session
Room 304
Scaffolding Inquiry and Literacy in Social Studies
Classrooms
Concurrent Sessions 1
of Robert J. Marzano can teach culture, diversity and social
strata.
Gloria Freels Mc Elroy, Tennessee Council for the Social Studies,
Knoxville, TN; Dorothy Hendricks, University of Tennessee,
Knoxville, TN
The session will provide an integrated framework of new literacies and inquiry in social studies and strategies, scaffolds,
and suggestions that can be used to support diverse learners in
developing analytic, interpretive, and evaluative skills during
inquiry-based instruction. These scaffolds include different
kinds of guiding questions, procedural heuristics, tips, graphic
organizers, technology tools, and teaching strategies to guide
learners’ work with information sources.
Mark Baildon, Chelva Rajah, Suhaimi Afandi, Agnes Paculdar,
National Institute of Education, Singapore; James Damico,
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
FRI
Award SessionHigher Education
Room 149A
Composing a Career in Social Studies Research
Research is a process of personally-driven inquiry where one
question leads to another, forming a line of inquiry. The presenter will describe the paths of inquiry that marked her career
and consider research as following one’s puzzlements. Imagine
your own research journeys, and suggest needs for future
inquiries as you identify significant questions for your own
investigations.
Lynne Boyle-Baise, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research
in Social Studies Research
Higher Education
Social Sciences
Room 306
Charm City: Down to the Wire
Baltimore’s notoriety has only increased since “The Wire”
debuted. This presentation demonstrates how one secondary
teacher developed a course, “Charm City: Down to the Wire,”
where students explored community civics.
Julie Clark, Bryn Mawr Upper School, Baltimore, MD; Ashley
Lucas, Towson University, Towson, MD
91st NCSS Annual Conference
71
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00am • Concurrent Sessions 1
Higher Education
U.S. History
Room 305
The Local History Wiki: Students Investigating
Race for Public Value
Students in Indiana write local history articles published at
WikiMarion.org. This presentation reports on a project where
students created a web exhibit on a 1930 lynching in their
community.
Robert Lucas, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Concurrent Sessions 1
Supervisory-Administrative Session
FRI
Supervisory-Administrative Civics and Government
Room 149B
Our Voice and Vote Matter
The 2012 Presidential Election Year is almost here. Get students engaged by joining the Kids Voting program. Learn
about the Civics Alive curriculum and opportunities for an
authentic voting experience.
Richard Coe, Kids Voting Southeast Pennsylvania, Washington
Crossing, PA; Bobby Fox, Kids Voting Tampa Bay, Brooksville,
FL; Lisa Rodgers, Central Bucks School District, Doylestown, PA
Exhibitor Sessions
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
Constructing LGBT Inclusive Curriculum—
Resources and Instructional Strategies
How do you construct a curriculum that includes positive representations of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) people, history and events? This session will provide
guidance on content development as well as examples of available resources and instructional strategies.
Robert McGarry, Jenny Betz, GLSEN—The Gay, Lesbian &
Straight Education Network, New York, NY
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Using Coins in Your Classroom
The United States Mint H.I.P. Pocket Change website www.
usmint.gov/kids introduces students to the world of coins
and offers educators free educational resources, fun activities,
and cross-curricular K-12 lesson plans.
Debbie Dawson, Chris Rower, The United States Mint,
Washington, DC
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 144 C
EDSITEment 2.0 #HistoryTeacher
EDSITEment, the prize-winning fourteen-year-old partnership of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the
Verizon Foundation, offers lessonplans, student interactives
and reviewed websites for K-12 teachers. Find out about our
interdisciplinary history and social studies resources to supplement, extend and enrich the standard curriculum.
Joseph Phelan, National Endowment for the Humanities,
Washington, DC
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Dimensions of Diversity
Poster Presentations
Tables 1-20 in Exhibit Hall; Tables 21-31 on L Street Bridge
Elementary Civics and Government
Table 1: Developing 21st-Century Citizens of Char-
acter with Film
This session will discuss how to actively develop students into
21st-century citizens of character using film. Handouts will be
provided to all participants.
Joshua Kenna, Leesburg High School, Leesburg, FL; William
Russell, Stewart Waters, University of Central Florida, Orlando,
FL
Elementary Social Sciences
Table 2: A Monumental Lesson: Learning Social
Studies by Studying Historical Structures
Historical structures represent culture, history, geography,
people, and unique experiences. Studying monuments can
illuminate the interdependent relationships among these
topics and other content areas such as art and math.
Jacqueline S. Craven, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS
Elementary U.S. History
Table 3: “How Much Did a Slave Cost?”
This question is often asked by students when teaching U.S.
slavery. Using primary sources, have your students learn how
historians learn this answer.
Sheila Arnold, Hampton, VA
Elementary U.S. History
Table 4: Elementary Literature and Primary
Sources: Building a Standards-based Wiki
Today’s elementary teachers use literature and primary
resources to illustrate America’s story. This session shares a
Library of Congress grant that features a standards-based wiki
and primary source lessons.
Judy Britt, Dave Vawter, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
Table 5: Station to Station
Stations engage students while introducing new content,
reviewing content, combining objectives, and preparing for
assessments. This session will provide a hands-on look at using
stations in any classroom.
Elizabeth Pickett, Andrea Schwartz, Kelly Stead, Norfolk
Public Schools, Norfolk, VA
Middle Level-Jr. High School Geography
Table 6: Rivers of Opportunity: The Diverse Dimensions of Africa’s Landscape
Principles of Adult Learning Theory strategies that blend
interactive, audience driven, and entertaining education are
demonstrated through the interdependence of Africa’s diverse
geographical landscape and socio-economic/socio-cultural
development .
LaQuita Staten, Corey Staten, Atumpan-The Talking Drums,
Portsmouth, VA
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00am • Concurrent Sessions 1
Global Connections
Table 7: Like Watering Trees: The Story of
Abanyamyrava’s Well
Walk two hours, pay with sex, get 50 lbs of water, walk home.
Learn how one group of Rwandan women provides water and
a new way of life for their community.
Melissa Collum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC; Jennifer
Morgan, West Salem Middle School, West Salem, WI
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 8: Teach Your Students How to Think, Not
What to Think
Deepen content understanding and practice historical thinking
using a simple critical thinking strategy, ready-to-use role
playing scenarios, and an engaging online tool.
Sandra Wozniak, Trego ED, Skillman, NJ
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 9: Closing the Achievement Gap by Con-
necting Social Studies and Literacy
Observe critical thinking and test scores improve when you
implement this process teaching method that integrates diversity, reading, writing, language, and social studies.
Nancy Laws, Midtown Elementary School, Harriman, TN;
Suzi Schmidt, Clinton, TN; Amanda Vining , Clinton Middle
School, Clinton, TN; Deborah Wooten, University of Tennessee,
Knoxville, TN
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Table 10: Getting Students Excited About Writing
in History With Graphic Organizers
Explore how to make effective use of graphic organizers to
support and encourage students to get excited about writing
historical fictional narratives, persuasive essays and research
papers.
Ruth Luevanos, Pacoima Middle School, Pacoima, CA
Secondary Level High-School
Civics and Government
Table 11: Prayer in Schools: What’s Constitutional
and What’s Right?
This presentation will examine constitutional issues and provide lesson ideas concerning the religion clauses of the 1st
amendment and what they mean for our schools and society
today.
Dan Krutka, Westmoore High School, Oklahoma City, OK
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 12: Teaching in the Cloud: The Convergence
of Collaboration and Creativity
In a standards driven high stakes testing environment, social
studies collaborations between college and university students
infusing emerging technologies while preparing students to
address real world challenges yield results.
Greer Burroughs, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ;
James Daly, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ; Steven
Missal, Perth Amboy Public Schools, Perth Amboy, NJ
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 13: Gradual Release Model: The Effective
Teaching Method for All Learners
The G.R.M. is the latest teaching method that moves away
from explicit instruction to independent practice and application which is currently showing signs of accommodating all
students in diverse classrooms.
Teresa Bergstrom, Holly McBride Jung , University of South
Florida, Tampa, FL and Pinellas County Schools, Clearwater,
FL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 14: Experiencing Government: Pedagogical
Lessons from Malden High School
Help your students engage their government! Action civics
helps students be active and informed citizens. Work with
experienced educators to brainstorm implementing an action
civics curriculum in your school!
Judi Allen, Malden High School, Malden, MA; Alison Cohen,
Scott Warren, Generation Citizen, Boston, MA; Alexander Pope,
Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY; Laurel
Stolte, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 1
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
FRI
Table 15: More than Words on a Page!: Literacy and
Social Studies
How can you support literacy learning in social studies?
Adolescent literacies include the tools students use everyday.
Learn how to use music, art, and literature to promote social
studies learning.
Elizabeth K. Wilson, Tracy Windle, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 16: Citizenship Education in the Lion City: A
Singaporean Approach
Designing a citizenship education curriculum for high ability
students poses unique challenges in tiny Singapore, given the
state’s pervasive influence. This presentation shares our experience in addressing it.
Victor Yang, Raffles Institution, Singapore
Secondary Level-High SchoolEconomics
Table 17: The Story of Gold—Mystery, Money and
Magic!
A shroud of mystery and intrigue surrounds the gold standard
and US currency. Together, we will explore the history of gold
in the US and examine current issues and concerns.
Susan Kizer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Houston Branch,
TX
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Table 18: Let PBS Economics Commentator Paul
Solman Team Teach with You!
Find out how Paul Solman’s “Making Sense” segments from
the PBS Newshour (see Econedlink) are being used in high
school classes and in economic education programs for high
school teachers.
Suzanne Gallagher, VCU Center for Economic Education,
Richmond, VA; Kathryn Peyton, George C. Marshall High School,
Falls Church, VA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
73
December 2, Friday 9:00–10:00am • Concurrent Sessions 1
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Table 19: Technology to Take; Amazing and Free
Social Studies Tech Tools
Learn to capture video using Firefox helpers and explore
Animoto, use advanced techniques to find pre-made, editable,
social studies powerpoint presentations, discover the coolest
Google tools and learn about glogging!
Kristi Stricker, Concordia University Chicago, IL; Lara Willox,
University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
Concurrent Sessions 1
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 20: Live! On-Air: Using Internet Talk Radio
Shows
This session will familiarize teachers with constructing free
Internet Talk Radio Shows in social studies. Besides serving as
a how to guide, lessons, activities, and best practices will be
discussed.
Jeremy Hilburn, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
NC; Brad Maguth, Hiram College, Hiram, OH
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 21: Face to Faith: Creating Global Dialogue
Using video-conferencing and online community, Face to
Faith provides opportunities for students of diverse religions,
cultures and beliefs to learn directly from and about each
other. Curriculum will be shared.
Charles Haynes, The Freedom Forum, Washington, DC;
Monica Ward, Face to Faith, Riverside, CA
FRI
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 22: The Perpetuation of Homophobia:
Hidden Curriculum in Social Studies Education
Homophobia is a challenge in our schools. Through examining hidden curriculum in social studies education, we can
begin discussing how this curriculum perpetuates homophobia
and intolerance in our classroom and schools.
Joseph Jones, Radford University, Radford, VA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 23: Social Studies Goes to the Movies
Learn to merge Hollywood entertainment with innovative
film viewing skills.
Margaret Ferrara, Greg Nielsen, University of Nevada, Reno,
NV
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 24: Beyond Rosie: Teaching about Women in
the Military During World War II
This poster presents an amalgamation of resources compiled
to successfully teach about American military women during
World War II. These important perspectives add complexity
to the “female experience”.
Brian Forte, Rockville High School, Vernon, CT; Meg
Monaghan, Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, CT
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 25: Differentiating Assessments in Social
Studies to Include All Learners
Learn how to develop differentiated assessments for U.S. history that encourage meaningful learning and address the needs
74
Dimensions of Diversity
of diverse learners.
Lisa Bardon, Paula DeHart, University of Wisconsin-Stevens
Point, WI
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 26: Words, Terms, Concepts, and Social
Studies Learning: Targeted Vocabulary Instruction
Learn strategies and techniques to improve student academic
knowledge and achievement through targeted vocabulary
instruction in secondary social studies.
Eric Groce, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; Tina
Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte,
NC; Dixie Massey, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 27: Teaching Global Studies Using Student
DNA Researched Family History
This proposal discusses global connections of the search for
individual family origins using DNA testing, historical
research, and anecdotal familial storytelling, that were integrated into local secondary school global studies.
Robert E. Vadas, State University of New York Potsdam, NY
Supervisory-Administrative Social Sciences
Table 28: Reading Together: How Discipline Book
Clubs Create a Strong Department
This session will investigate the structures to running an effective book club as a form of ongoing professional development.
Strategies for creating curricular and discipline based thinking
are included.
Claire Yates, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Higher Education
U.S. History
Table 29: Teaching Diversity: Louisiana through
Music and Food
This session will demonstrate how to teach about diversity
through Louisiana history. Family histories, recipes, and music
are used to help students make personal connections.
Matthew Hollstein, Columbus Alternative High School,
Columbus, OH
Higher Education
U.S. History
Table 30: Library of Congress Teaching with Pri-
mary Sources Regional Grant Program
Participants will learn about an exciting grant program that
helps professional development providers and teacher educators help pre- and in-service teachers to use primary sources
more effectively.
Vivian Awumey, Library of Congress, Washington, DC;
Barbara Kirby, Waynesburg University, Waynesburg, PA
Higher EducationWorld History
Table 31: National History Day: A STEM-Education
Initiative?
Did you know NHD projects, “the gold standard in history
education,” also support STEM-learning? Come find out how
you can integrate this program into your own classroom.
David Blacketer, Jenny Rodriquez, Delta High School, TriCities, WA
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
10:15–11:15aM
Teaching East Asia
Richard Shek, Mark Peterson
Two prominent East-Asian studies scholars will present a
seminar on Confucianism, a cultural thread common to EastAsian civilizations. The speakers will examine the influence of
Confucian thought on the history, literature, and societies of
China, Japan, and Korea, and provide teachers with a better
understanding of the socio-cultural foundations of East Asia
and the primary sources available to introduce East Asia to
their classrooms.
Concurrent Sessions 2
awarD SeSSion
Room 149A
Reading Like a Historian: A Document-Based
History Curriculum Intervention
Learn how students who were reading below grade level benefitted from an inquiry-based history curriculum intervention.
This presenter takes you through the structure and reasoning
behind the “Document-Based Lesson” and discusses the
exciting results of her six-month study with more than 200
eleventh grade students in urban public school classrooms.
The San Francisco school system was so impressed that it provided funding to digitize the entire document-based
curriculum.
Avishag (Abby) Reisman, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation
elementary
civicS anD Government
Room 209C
Mastering the “We” Game: Teaching the
Fundamentals of Civic Competence
Civic competence improves student behavior and increases
achievement. It is based on the concept of “we” and mastery of
fundamental civic dispositions, skills, and behaviors taught in
the early grades.
Karen Williams, Rainbow Days, Inc., Dallas, TX
elementary
u.S. hiStory
Room 140B
Trading Places: Putting Education in the Hands of
the Students
Using children’s interests to guide planning and teaching isn’t
a new idea. This interactive session invites participants to
create a project approach unit where the resource guides leave
off.
Attillah Brookshire, Carey Hory, Shonneka Smith-DuPriest,
Jewel C. Anderson Elementary School, Conley, GA
Concurrent Sessions 2
Room 202A
Vital Issue Session
Elementary Sessions
FRI
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
miDDle level-Jr. hiGh School
civicS anD Government
Room 149B
Practice Historical Thinking and Civil Discourse
with SCAN
Teach your students a four step critical thinking strategy to
help them evaluate multiple points of view and practice civil
discourse as they work to resolve past and current dilemmas.
Sandra Wozniak, TregoED, Skillman, NJ
91st NCSS Annual Conference
75
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Room 145B
Concurrent Sessions 2
Explore Geography, Environment, and Global
Challenges With Webquests That Inspire!
FRI
Discover how World Wise Schools’ webquests, based on the
experiences of Peace Corps volunteers, will engage your students in investigations of geography, culture, the environment,
and 21st-century global challenges.
Marjorie Anctil, Emily Hestness, Peace Corps Coverdell World
Wise Schools, Washington, DC; Sarah Whelan, Alexandria City
Public Schools, Alexandria, VA
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolU.S. History
Room 140A
We Might Be Heroes
Headline, May 3, 1963: “Dogs and Hoses Repulse Negroes at
Birmingham.” Back-story: 3,500 children jailed. Outcome:
Civil Rights Movement saved. Your classroom: Students play
everyday heroes and let freedom ring!
Sherelle Ferguson, Cambridge Community Charter School,
Cambridge, MA; Cynthia Levinson; Meira Levinson, Harvard
Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 203A
Marching with the Civil Rights Movement
Get out of that chair! With this kinesthetic workshop, participants will learn how to make the complex struggles and emotions of the Civil Rights Movement come to life for students.
Matthew Foglino, The Urban Institute of Mathematics, The
Bronx, NY; Michael Freydin, Halsey Junior High School, Queens,
NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 202B
George Washington Slept Here! WHAT? Reaching
and Teaching Exceptional Learners
Hook exceptional learners using pictures and accessible text.
George Washington’s life is a great place to start. Washington
faced challenges throughout his lifetime. Students can relate
to his struggles.
Cindy Plummer, Pershing County High School, Lovelock, NV
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Room 203B
Making Ancient History Relevant in Today’s
World
Participants will come away from this engaging session armed
with unique teaching strategies and ready-to-use lesson plans
that bring ancient history alive and make it relevant to 21stcentury learners.
Robert Cousineau, Red Lion, PA; Andrew Warren, York, PA
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Dimensions of Diversity
Secondary Level/High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209A
Students and Freedom of Conscience:
Religious Rights in the Classroom
How does the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment protect
students’ freedom of religion? Explore this question with
ready-to-use lessons in this interactive session featuring
Supreme Court case studies.
Gennie Westbrook, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 144A
Preparation for Citizenship:
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills
Learn how the P21 Framework prepares all students for citizenship in the 21st century by promoting critical thinking,
collaboration, creativity and communication skills across all
subject areas.
Michelle Herczog , Los Angeles County Office of Education,
Downey, CA; Timothy J. Magner, Partnership for 21st Century
Skills, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 306
Money for Life:
A Case Study in Financial Planning
A classroom teacher presents an original unit using money
market, bond and stock mutual funds. Lessons, revised annually, teach lifetime investing strategies, rather than the gambling of stock market games.
James D’Acosta, Fairfield Warde High School, Fairfield, CT
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Room 208B
Uptown Classroom:
Urban Geography for the New Century
Most of our students are urban dwellers, but traditional
instruction doesn’t include the urban sphere. This session will
show how a suburban high school integrated urban geography
for all students.
Scott Allen, Deann Bucher, Monarch High School, Louisville
CO
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 209B
Germany Opens Doors: Exploring Cross-Cultural
Dialogue through TOP!
Participants will learn how to internationalize curriculum and
open classrooms to cross-cultural dialogue through the Transatlantic Outreach Program (TOP). New instructional materials will be introduced by the curriculum developers. Complimentary materials and information about study tours will
be provided.
Wood Powell, Transatlantic Outreach Program, Washington,
DC; Steve Goldberg, New Rochelle High School, New Rochelle,
NY; Kim O’Neil, Liverpool Elementary School, Liverpool, NY
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
Global Connections
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 143C
Room 144C
How do social entrepreneurs advocate for change in the global
economy and help consumers and workers find their voice
while teachers help students find their voice and take action?
Elizabeth Devine, Hall High School, West Hartford, CT; Tracey
Wilson, Conard High School, West Hartford, CT
Digital technologies provide teachers and students unprecedented ways to reach across time and place. We’ll use the
Internet, digital whiteboards, and new e-texts to make American history classrooms interactive.
Michal Howden, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ;
Barbara Lundberg , Colonial Williamsburg Foundation,
Williamsburg, VA; India Meissel, Battery Park, VA
Who Makes Your Chocolate? What Can Students
Do About It?
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 208A
Teaching Diversity and Tolerance Using Muslim
Youth Oral Histories
In “This is Where I Need to Be,” Muslim students address religious and ethnic identity in public schools. Use these stories
to promote tolerance in diverse classrooms. Teaching resources
provided.
Amy Mungur, Ashley Taylor, Scott Wylie, Teachers College,
Columbia University, New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 147B
Using Pop Culture, Film, and Media to Teach
Social Psychology
Lesson plans for films that cover topics such as racism, conformity, and aggression. Lessons involve shows such as, What
Would You Do? and several social psychology project ideas.
Sean Tischler, Salesianum School, Wilmington, DE
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 201
Sociology and the 21st-Century High School
Student
This session focuses on active simulations and technology that
excite student learning. The session offers proven strategies as
to how high school teachers have increased collaboration in
the 21st century.
Hayley Lotspeich, Wheaton North High School, Wheaton, IL;
Chris Salituro, Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL
Secondary Level-High School The Great Debate: Digital Technology for the
American History Learner
Room 144B
Going Graphic:
Using Graphic Novels to Teach History
This session will explore how high school social studies educators can utilize graphic novels to teach history and important
literacy skills such as inferencing, sequencing, and cause and
effect.
Christine Draper, Michelle Reidel, Georgia Southern University,
Statesboro, GA; Ashleigh Wright, Southeast Bulloch High School,
Brooklet, GA
Concurrent Sessions 2
Secondary Level-High School FRI
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
Lies, Secrets, and Sex: J. Edgar Hoover’s AntiCommunist Crusade
The Civil Rights Movement is the focal point and adolescent
literature is the vehicle as evidence is presented illustrating J.
Edgar Hoover’s attacks against gays, activists, and immigrants.
Materials distributed.
Marc Aronson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NY; Jesus
Garcia, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV; Jason O’Brien,
University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 143A
Effective 21st Century Skills to Teach about 18thCentury Men
Special needs students are an “At Risk” diverse population and
challenging to motivate. The presentation incorporates 21stcentury skills necessary to help students relate to the lessons
of George Washington.
Susan Miller, Middleboro High School, Middleboro, MA
Social Sciences
Room 103B
Teachers’ Fears: Including Gay Perspectives in the
Social Studies Classroom
Teachers fear including gay students and families in their curriculum despite ethical and legal mandates. This presentation
provides a comprehensive K-12 framework for creating a safe,
inclusive classroom environment.
Aimee Alexander-Shea, Eastern Oregon University, La Grande,
OR; Robert Bailey, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103A
Revising the Revisionist: Using Howard Zinn in
the AP U.S. History Classroom
Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States is the
paradigm for revisionist history. Use it as a supplementary text
with study questions, discussion/essay prompts, primary
sources and chapter quizzes.
Terrence Miller, Commerce High School, Commerce, GA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
77
TIME
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15
am • Concurrent Session 2
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 147A
Concurrent Sessions 2
Dramatic Trials that Enrich the Teaching of
History and Government
FRI
The Teaching Judicial History project offers on-line historical
narratives, primary source documents, and classroom strategies that enable teachers to incorporate the history of the federal courts in their existing curriculum.
Howard Kaplan, Mabel McKinney-Browning, American Bar
Association Division for Public Education, Chicago, IL; Bruce
Ragsdale, Federal Judicial Center, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School World History
Salon C
The Asperger Student in the Social Studies
Classroom
Teaching social studies to students with Asperger Syndrome
(AS) presents a myriad of challenges. This session will provide
teachers with strategies to allow their AS students to meet
with success.
Elizabeth Organt, Hill Top Preparatory School, Rosemont, PA
John Moore, University of Western Kentucky, Bowling Green,
KY
Exhibitor Sessions
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Archaeology and Social Studies:
Making the Past Come Alive in Your Classroom!
Most social studies topics incorporate archaeological information. Learn about standards-based educational resources
offered by the leading international archaeology organizations.
Lesson plans, classroom resources, and recommended electronic media provided.
Meredith Anderson, Archaeological Institute of America,
Boston, MA; Sarah Miller, Archaeology Education Clearinghouse,
St, Augustine, FL; Christy Pritchard, Archaeology Education
Clearinghouse, Elizabethtown, KY
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 143B
Higher Education Sessions
Higher EducationCUFA Research into Pratice Session
Room 304
Using Primary Historical Sources to Engage in
Inquiry: From Theory to Practice
The use of historical sources as part of the process of fostering
historical inquiry in the classroom has long been recognized
and valued as the type of authentic intellectual work that can
scaffold a deep understanding of historical content knowledge.
For this to take place, social studies teachers need support to
access, identify, and use compelling historical sources to facilitate the active investigation of history. This session will focus
on materials from the Library of Congress, along with specific
strategies to scaffold material for students, particularly
SCIM-C (for more see http://historicalinquiry.com). The
instructors will provide some direct instruction to introduce
content and strategies, but the bulk of the session will be
hands-on, and as a result, will be immediately useful and practical for the classroom.
Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC;
David Hicks, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg , VA; John Lee, North
Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Stephanie van Hover,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Higher EducationGlobal Connections
Room 305
Who? What? And How? for University-Based
NCSS Student Affiliates
This session will continue discussion of organizing, implementing, and maintaining university-based NCSS affiliate
chapters. Intended audience groups are pre-service teachers,
higher education faculty, and state Council members.
78
Dimensions of Diversity
izzit in Your Classroom?
Izzit.org provides compelling educational DVDs, current
events lessons, unique games and contests to over 300,000
teachers, 44,000 schools and 29 million students. Attend to
receive free membership and free videos!
David Truhett, Central High School, Tuscaloosa, AL
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
Democratizing the DBQ: Critical Thinking and
Historical Writing, Grades 4-12
The DBQ Project will overview their materials and professional development, and discuss how they have helped
teachers and students in grades 4-12 handle the rigorous
document analysis and evidence-based writing in world and
U.S. history.
Chip Brady, The DBQ Project, Evanston, IL
Poster Presentations
Tables 1-20 in Exhibit Hall; Tables 21-32 on L Street Bridge
Elementary Geography
Table 1
Going Beyond “Just Good Teaching” for ELLs:
Some Classroom Examples
“Just good teaching” ( JGT) does not suffice in helping close
the achievement gap for ELLs. Examples from geography lessons of going beyond JGT to help ELLs achieve will be
shared.
Margarita Jimenez-Silva, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
Global Connections
Table 2
A Wider Lens: Broadening Perspectives of People,
Places and Events
This presentation will assist elementary educators in teaching
about the world around us by providing lessons and strategies
to broaden students’ perspectives of people, places and
events.
Niki Cooper, The Japanese Exchange and Teaching Programme,
Kobe, Japan; Carolyn Ledford, Betty Peel, East Carolina
University, Greenville, NC
Elementary Social Sciences
Table 3
Connecting Local, Global and Historical Issues in
the Social Studies Classroom
This session discusses how issues discussions were used in
diverse elementary classrooms to reflect students’ identities,
experiences, and migration histories and to engage them in
democratic dialogue about these issues.
Christina Parker, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
(OISE), University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
Elementary U.S. History
Table 4
Click Clack Moo and Martin Who?
Need time to fit U.S. History into your elementary class?
Come participate and find out how to use Readers’ Theatre to
do just that! Handouts go home with you.
Stephanie Richards, Julie Stepp, Tennessee Technological
University, Cookeville, TN
Elementary U.S. History
Table 5
Discourse Flapping Overhead: Looking Critically
at a State Flag
State flags are seemingly innocuous, colorful representations
of individual states. Seen through a critical lens, state flags may
reveal where we have been but might not reflect our diverse
present.
Judith Harrington, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Elementary World History
Table 6
Hang Tough: Memorial Day Must Be Every Day
An eleven year old is inspired by a real Band of Brothers.
Believing that they must not be forgotten, he is raising
$100,000 to commemorate World War II heroes through his
Hang Tough Project.
Jordan Brown, John Mohn, South Lebanon Elementary School,
Lebanon, PA
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
Table 7
The Rule of Law as the Foundation of Good
Citizenship
Using primary documents, case studies and technology, The
Rule of Law Project teams lawyers and teachers who teach
students this concept as the foundation of citizenship in a
democratic society.
Timothy Isaacs, The Virginia Bar Association/The Virginia
Law Foundation, Richmond, VA
Higher Education Geography
Table 8
Methods Classes Mixed! A Thematic Approach:
Teaching Initial Certification Students
Higher education faculty will learn how four methods instructors collaborated on a unit on geography to model for students
thematic instruction.
Sister Bridget Connor, Betty Kansler, Lisa Pallett, Evelyn Spratt,
The College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Table 9
Dinner Club: Where Culture, Friends and
Economics Meet
Concurrent Sessions 2
Elementary Learn how to use restaurants to teach middle school students
appreciation of world cultures through food, manners, and
basic economics.
Amy Trenkle, Stuart-Hobson Middle School, Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High School FRI
U.S. History
Table 10
Theme-Based Instruction: Connecting Content
and Literacy Skills
Teaching reading and writing skills using a social studies
theme ensures productive instructional time spent with both
language arts and content skills. Learn how to create innovative, inspiring, theme-based units.
Bruce Miller, Landmark Elementary-Middle School,
Manchester, MA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 11
The U.S. Constitution in Our Changing World
James Madison Fellows share innovative, dynamic, and effective classroom teacher-developed lessons designed to engage
students in thinking critically about the U.S. Constitution in a
rapidly changing world.
Kenneth de Masi, James Madison Memorial Fellowship
Foundation, Chandler, AZ
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 12
Developing Patriotic Understanding through
Reflection Rather than Rote Memorization
Citizenship education can be improved by understanding how
students define patriotism and how this compares to other
nations. This presentation contrasts student understanding of
patriotism between the USA and England.
Andrew Worthington, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
91st NCSS Annual Conference
79
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 13
Table 19
We’ll examine the last major restriction on voting rights in
America, the number of America’s felons ineligible to vote,
and the states’ differences concerning voter qualifications.
Free DVD provided.
John Dunn, Ferris School for Boys, Wilmington, DE
Circular Collaboration holds students accountable through
cooperative learning that divides a task into different stages
that build on each other. Learn how to increase participation
and results.
Brian Adam, Catherine Dobkin, Parkway Central High School,
Chesterfield, MO
Concurrent Sessions 2
Taking Away an American’s Most Important
Right: Disenfranchising Felons
FRI
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 14
Engaging 21st Century Learners in History
Classrooms with Innovative Technologies
This workshop will actively involve participants in an exploration of innovative, Web 2.0 technology tools to support the
teaching and learning of 21st century skills in all social studies
classrooms.
Sara McNeil, Cameron White, University of Houston, Houston,
TX; Angela Miller, Houston Independent School District, Houston,
TX
Circular Collaboration:
A Different Kind of Cooperative Learning
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 20
The “Just War” Doctrine:
A Moral Method for Teaching War
Do teachers teach war as moral or immoral? Inevitable or
avoidable? This presentation offers an alternative framework
for teaching about war that allows students to critically
examine U.S. war policy.
Mark Pearcy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 15
“How Many Points Is It Worth?”—End the
Annoying Question
How do you end this question and grade more fairly? The
Four Point grading system! Hear from a veteran teacher who
converted and won’t ever go back.
Cindy Martinez, San Lorenzo Valley High School, Felton, CA
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 17
The Genocide Teaching Project
This poster presentation provides resources on The Genocide
Teaching Project which offers students opportunities for critical investigations into the atrocities surrounding genocide
and suggestions for collective action towards change.
Amelia Parker, SOCM (Statewide Organizing for Community
Empowerment), Knoxville, TN; Alexander Parks, The University
of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
Table 21
Literature: A Critical and Creative Response to
History
Literature is inspired by history. In order to effectively teach
history, a variety of literature (novels, short stories, and poems)
must be utilized to captivate the minds of youth.
April Vela, Rivera Middle School, Pico Rivera, CA
Secondary Level-High School Monumental Inquiry: Using Historic Sites to
Promote Critical Thinking
This session will discuss how to dynamically engage students
in inquiry, discussion, and critical thinking activities using a
variety of U.S. monuments and memorials. Handouts will be
provided to participants.
Joshua Keena, Leesburg High School, Leesburg, FL; William
Russell, Stewart Waters, University of Central Florida, Orlando,
FL
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 18
Sri Lankan Women in the Global Factory: A
Lesson Plan
This session explores women’s work in Sri Lankan garment
factories, to examine current debates on globalization, and
demonstrate how countries around the world are linked politically, economically and culturally.
Rachel Meyer, South Asia Institute, The University of Texas at
Austin, TX; Heather Norris, McNeil High School, Austin, TX
80
Dimensions of Diversity
U.S. History
Table 22
U.S. History
Table 23
WAKE UP! Integrating Multimedia and Popular
Culture into Social Studies
This interactive session explores strategies for engaging at-risk
students in social studies by integrating multimedia and popular culture. We will provide teaching ideas including using
music and Web 2.0 technologies.
Daniel Kelvin Bullock, Meghan Manfra, Crystal Simmons,
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Jennifer Levitt, The
Madeline English School, Melrose, MA
December 2, Friday 10:15–11:15am • Concurrent Sessions 2
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Higher Education Table 24 : Get Educated! Disability Has a Past,
Present, and Future
Table 30: Enhancing Preservice Teachers’ TPCK
Does your state celebrate disability history and awareness?
This session shares how Virginia youth developed legislation
and advocated to include disability history in social studies
classrooms. Classroom activities are modeled.
Adam Amick, Virginia Wesleyan College, Norfolk, VA; Darren
Minarik, Radford University, Radford, VA
Using authentic student-created projects and feedback, contemporary Web 2.0 technologies’ affordances and constraints
relative to teaching and learning elementary grades social
studies content will be explored.
Elizabeth Crawford, University of North Carolina Wilmington,
NC
U.S. History
History Assessment
Having difficulty writing high level engaging student assessments aligned to your standards? In this session, learn how to
improve alignment and increase assessment rigor through the
use of primary sources.
Jolana Rivas, Leslie Ruff, Pearson, Austin, TX
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 26: Role-Play, Deliberation and Paris!
We will focus on an experiential lesson designed around the
Paris Peace Conference of 1919. We will share best practices
to successfully implement the lesson in a history class.
Christopher Lee, Pasco E-School, Wesley Chapel, FL; Anthony
Pellegrino, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 27: Teaching with the News: Piquing Interest
through Web 2.0 Technologies
Higher Education U.S. History
Table 31: Sure Fire Ways to Get Pre-Service Teachers
to Think Critically
I will share my experience with the Paul and Elder Model for
Critical and Creative Thinking, before and after samples of
student work, and a rubric to evaluate student reflections.
Karen Maloley, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY
Secondary Level-High School
Table 32: War and Remembrance: How Countries
Interpret a Conflict’s Meaning
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 28: The Future is Here: A Technology-Based
Social Studies Classroom
Learn about simple and FREE online resources you can use in
your classroom. Take advantage of students’ technological
savvy to improve peer feedback, formative assessment, and
information dissemination.
David Blacketer, Jenny Rodriguez, Delta High School, TriCities, WA
Higher Education Civics and Government
Table 29: Project Citizen: Integrating Civics and Lit-
eracy into the Preservice Classroom
This session provides preservice educators with tools to
develop a quality professional development experience incorporating 21st century skills, literacy and pedagogy into the
preservice classroom using the Project Citizen curriculum.
Sarah Sumners, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus,
MS
FRI
What stories do the monuments and memorials around us
tell? This session presents a lesson in which students are
helped to think critically about how conflicts are remembered
in history.
Lisa Adeli, University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern
Studies, Tucson, AZ
in the Iranian Revolution
Using 21st century skills, participants role play multiple perspectives during the Iranian Revolution and discuss methods
for using current events in the Middle East to stimulate interest
in the region.
Mimi Stephens, Choices Program, Brown University, Providence,
RI
Global Connections
Concurrent Sessions 2
Secondary Level-High School Table 25: Mining the Past: Primary Sources in U.S.
Social Sciences
11:30am–12:30pm
Ballroom A
Keynote Speaker
Diane Ravitch
Research Professor of Education, New York University
Dr. Ravitch will speak about the role of public education in a
democracy and about the challenges to that role. In particular,
she will discuss the corporate reform movement that promotes privatization of public education, and the accountability movement, which challenges education itself.
1:30–2:00pm
Ballroom A
Keynote Speaker
The Honorable Arne Duncan
U.S. Secretary of Education
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will, for the first time,
address NCSS Annual Conference attendees, providing an
update on current policy and program happenings at the
Department of Education, including the continued focus on
providing flexibility with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and other initiatives targeted to improving
teaching and learning.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
81
December 2, Friday 2:10–3:05pm • Concurrent Sessions 3
2:10–3:10pm
2:10–3:05pm
Featured Speaker
Concurrent Sessions 3
Ballroom A
Elementary Sessions
Concurrent Sessions 3
Geoffrey Canada
President and CEO, Harlem Children’s Zone
The Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ) attempts to create a “tipping point” in 100 blocks of central Harlem by surrounding
children with an enriching environment of college-oriented
peers and supportive adults, and by providing a network of
in-school, after-school, social service, health, and community
building programs. Mr. Canada will discuss HCZ’s innovative
approach to developing a pipeline of services that track children from birth through college, and the national initiative to
replicate the work of the Harlem Children’s Zone across the
country.
2:30–4:30pm
E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse,
333 Constitution Avenue, NE
A Real Federal Judge, A Real Courtroom, and
Very Real School Issues
This highly interactive program combines the vampire craze
and social media to give participants a novel way to apply and
teach the precedent set in a landmark Supreme Court case as
they involve themselves in a realistic trial and jury deliberations—in an actual courtroom with a judge. “The First
Amendment and Social Media: Student Rights, Wrongs, and
Responsibilities” is based on a fictional scenario that mirrors
Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier. A federal judge presides over this
true-to-life trial simulation and attorneys coach the participants throughout the process so that they can do the program
in their classrooms or in their local federal courthouses. No
preparation is necessary for this classroom-ready/courtroomready activity. Teachers will leave the program with everything
they need to do the simulation the first day they return to the
classroom.
Location: E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse,
333 Constitution Avenue, NE.
One block from the Judiciary Square Metro stop on the Red
Line. Use the side entrance in the middle of the block on Third
Street near Constitution Avenue. For more information, contact the Federal Courts’ National Outreach Manager Rebecca
Fanning at [email protected]
82
Common Core State ELA Standards for
Citizenship, College, and Career
This newly developed resource/matrix demonstrates how
civic education can be utilized to meet the Common Core
State Standards for English Language Arts in preparing all students for College, Career, and Citizenship!
Michelle Herczog , Los Angeles County Office of Education,
Downey, CA; Cricket Kidwell, Trinity County Office of Education,
Weaverville, CA
Elementary Off-Site Session
FRI
Civics and Government
Salon C
Dimensions of Diversity
Civics and Government
Room 209C
Best Practice in Meaningful Elementary Social
Studies
Social Studies & the Young Learner Editorial Board-sponsored
session on best practices in elementary school social studies.
Jeannette Balantic, Garden City Public Schools, Floral Park,
NY; Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Elementary Geography
Room 201
The World Around Us: Learning through
Children’s Literature
Are you an elementary teacher looking for a way to teach your
students about the world? This session will feature exciting,
hands-on, active lessons to teach geography through children’s
literature.
Sandra Goldich, Paul Nagel, Louisiana Geography Education
Alliance, Natchitoches, LA
Elementary Global Connections
Room 143C
Strategies for Teaching Diversity from Early
Childhood through Elementary School
This session will share a number of field-tested and researchbased teaching strategies to develop an appreciation of diversity in early childhood and elementary-aged children.
Alison Dobrick, Victoria Fantozzi, William Paterson University,
Wayne, NJ
Elementary U.S. History
Room 208B
We the People: Who are the “We” in the People?
Explore how “the people’s” rights have expanded or been limited since the Founding by analyzing primary sources using
engaging instructional strategies. Participants will receive
lesson plans and content resources.
Bev Paeth, Maria Teepe, Covington Independent Schools,
Covington, KY; Donna Shouse, Univ. of Missouri-St. Louis, MO
December 2, Friday 2:10–3:05pm • Concurrent Sessions 3
U.S. History
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Room 209A
Room 140A
Learn about the WIDA standards and effective ways to engage
English Language Learners through visual, graphic and interactive support. Think “Can Do” and the possibilities are endless. Handouts.
Stephanie Wasta, James Madison University, Harrisonburg ,
VA
This presentation provides a clear guide for teaching students
to become historians using literature. Attendees will be provided materials including student guides, a list of books, and
assessment rubrics.
Janet Hammer, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Scaffold, Scaffold, Scaffold:
Tweaking Social Studies Plans to Benefit ELLs
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School
Geography
Room 147A
Student Learning Through Digital Literacies And
World Understanding
By giving students freedom to collaborate and create digital
projects, they gain understanding of their relationship to their
diverse world and its cultures. Student projects will be
shared.
Kay Conners, Auburn Middle School, Warrenton, VA
Step by Step: Teaching Students To Become
Historians Using Literature
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School
Room 144C
Powerful Texts: Building Student Literacy Across
the Curriculum through Enabling Texts
Apply the principles of identity-centered literacy instruction
across the disciplines to empower students through reading
complex and powerful texts.
Antira Butler, Juliet Mohnkern, Krista Fantin, Sheron Brown,
Cesar Chavez Charter School, Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolU.S. History
Secondary Level-High School Room 208A
Room 209B
Yelling, Screaming, Acting Out: Dramatic Ways to
Teach Social Studies
The presentation will focus on four drama-based teaching
activities to teach about the American Revolution. Emphasis
will be on process drama, student interaction, and content
engagement.
Dorothy Blanks, Jeremy Clabough, Shannon Hamblen, Lance
McConkey, Sarah Philpott, Thomas Turner, University of
Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 203A
What Justifies War? Engaging At-Risk Students in
Online Discussions
Learn how middle schoolers participate in multi-state, online
discussions to justify war and apply their thinking throughout
U.S. history. Presenters will share instructional material, alignment with standards, and logistics.
Nicholas Lawrence, East Bronx Academy for the Future, Bronx,
NY; Joseph O’Brien, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Middle Level-Jr. High School Concurrent Sessions 3
Elementary FRI
Civics and Government
We Can’t Talk about THAT! Analyzing LGBTQ
Issues in Classrooms
There are a myriad of social issues dealt with by social studies
teachers. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender issues are
among the most complicated. Create a safe, validating atmosphere for deeper reflection.
Lynne Carlson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 103B
How a Bill Really Becomes a Law: Part One
Ready-made lesson plans on moving a bill through the House
of Representatives: assigning bills to committees, the workings of the Appropriations committee and the role of the Rules
committee.
Darrick Hayman, Lake Stevens High School, Lake Stevens,
WA; Cindy Martinez, San Lorenzo Valley High School, Felton,
CA; Shirley Riefenhauser, Newburgh Free Academy, Newburgh,
NY; Nicholas Santana, Southwest High School, El Centro, CA;
Benjamin Snedeker, Northridge High School, Johnstown, OH
U.S. History
Room 203B
Helping Students Understand and Appreciate
the Contract Theory of Government
Through activities and discussions, participants explore two
free downloadable lessons by the Bill of Rights Institute that
help students understand the development and impact of the
contract theory of government.
Gennie Westbrook, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 147B
Financial Crises 101: A Resource for High School
Teachers
Eight activity-filled lessons designed to teach about financial
crises in the high school classroom. Bubbles, panics, manias,
swaps, the Great Recession, housing, Japan, J.P. Morgan, etc.
Rich MacDonald, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN
91st NCSS Annual Conference
83
December 2, Friday 2:10–3:05pm • Concurrent Sessions 3
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 145B
“Gen-I-Revolution”: An Interactive Economics
and Personal Finance Simulation for Students
Students need to graduate understanding financial and economic literacy. This engaging, standards-based online game
has students competing and learning these skills, and it allows
teachers to assess student learning.
Doug Young, Council for Economic Education, New York, NY
Concurrent Sessions 3
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
FRI
Room 140B
Teaching East Asia Using Cultural Artifacts and
Primary Sources
Infuse your history and world culture courses with cultural
artifacts and primary sources to teach about East Asia. CD
with lesson plans and audio/visual resources will be
provided.
Yong Jin Choi, The Korea Society, New York, NY; Yoonjung
Choi, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY;
Kevin Richins, Lynden High School, Lynden, WA; Eui-kyung
Shin, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL; Greg Sill,
Smithtown High School Western Campus, Smithtown, NY
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
Google provides teachers with many free resources to make
the classroom more technology-friendly. This session will
show teachers how to close the achievement gap using a variety
of Google tools.
Kourtney Bostain, Mike Duanvant, Mike Hasley, Kelly Jessup,
Doug Saunders, Henrico County Public Schools, Henrico, VA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
It’s Showtime! Student Directors Present Civil
Rights Leaders
Participants will explore a cooperative biography lesson
enhanced by digital storytelling. Small groups will share strategies for using this tool as a culminating activity of a Civil
Rights unit.
Heather Hagan, Carolyn Weber, Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN
U.S. History
Room 202B
“A Negro in the White House”:
“Shock”“Outrage” in 1901
On October 20, 1901, southern newspapers denounced President Roosevelt’s White House dinner with Booker T. Washington. This session explores the context and significance of a
“Negro in the White House.”
Cathy Cocke, E. Thomas Ewing, David Hicks, Matthew Walker,
Erin Weiss, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
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Dimensions of Diversity
U.S. History
Room 149B
Primary Sources Plus Geography! National
Archives Meets Google Geo Tools
Combine National Archives’ online resources, including
DocsTeach.org, with Google Geo tools such as Google Earth
and Google Maps, to create customized, engaging activities
that teach historical and geographical thinking skills.
Stephanie Greenhut, National Archives and Records
Administration, Washington, DC; Tina Ornduff, Google Geo
Education, Mountain View, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Sustaining Programs after the Teaching
American History Funds End
All good things must end. Teaching American History Grant
funds will probably do so too. Yet, options for sustaining professional development and learning opportunities for history
teachers without TAH funds are endless.
Dawn Marie Baletka, Pam Kniffin, Navasota ISD, Navasota,
TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103A
How Google Tools Can Help Close the
Achievement Gap
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Differentiation and Engagement: Simple Tools
and HOT Methods
Engage and challenge students using simple, effective methods.
Create leveled questions and assessments, access easy differentiation tools and free resources to raise scores and higher order
thinking in social studies.
Debbie Peters, Deer Valley Unified School District/ Academy of
American Studies at OHS, Phoenix, AZ; Suzanne Wooton,
Sandra Day O’Connor High School, Phoenix, AZ
Higher Education Sessions
Higher Education CUFA Research into Practice Session
Room 304
Once More unto the Breach: Moving from
Digital Encyclopedia Entries to Documentary
Filmmaking in a High-Stakes U.S. History
Classroom
This interactive session explores ongoing research and development related to supporting K-12 students in developing
effective (and efficiently produced) documentary films in the
history classroom. A variety of scaffolds, supports, and assessments are offered in the context of an eighth grade U.S. history
filmmaking experience on Westward Expansion.
Mark Hofer, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA;
Kathy Swan, Emma Thacker, University of Kentucky, Lexington,
KY; James Walsh, Lexington Traditional Magnet School,
Lexington, KY
December 2, Friday 2:10–3:05pm • Concurrent Sessions 3
Room 149A
The Hope for American School Reform: The “New
Social Studies”
Join this award-winning researcher as he examines the inquiryoriented “new social studies” movement of the 1960s,
exploring its Cold War context; its transition from a focus on
science education to broader involvement in the social sciences; its theoretical underpinnings, development, and dissemination of new materials; and the reactions from scholars,
teachers, and others. Implications for today’s educators will be
discussed.
Ronald W. Evans, San Diego State University, CA
Exemplary Research Award
Higher Education
Room 143A
Notable Trade Book Authors 2011
Award-winning authors Cynthia Pon and Donna Jo Napoli
discuss their writing processes and selected work. Sponsored
by the Notable Social Studies Trade Book Review Committee,
a co-sponsored project of NCSS and the Children’s Book
Council.
2011 Book Review Committee Members:
Isaac Willis Larison, Chair; Cynthia Grady, Sidwell Friends
Middle School, Washington, DC; Gregory M. Imbur, Goshen
College, Goshen, IN; Kathleen Kavet, North High School, Denver,
CO; Jennifer Lawless, Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, OH; Andrea
Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY; Doug Selwyn,
SUNY Plattsburg, NY; Scott Waters, Emporia State University,
Emporia, KS
Higher Education gral to social studies education and preparing young citizens
for our increasingly interconnected and dynamic world.
Diane Brantley, California State University at San Bernardino,
CA; Cathy Covington, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Chris
Harth, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, Ridgeland, MS; Maureen
McLaughlin, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC
Exhibitor Sessions
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Using The Week Magazine in the Classroom
Wondering how to integrate real world news into your curriculum? In this interactive session, you’ll meet the editor of The
Week and learn how unique features can help you engage students and meet curricular objectives.
Robin Porter, Porter Education Productions, Gaithersburg ,
MD, Bill Falk, The Week Magazine, New York, NY
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
FRI
Teaching Government and Economics Using
Digital Technology
This presentation will focus on teaching government and economics using the latest digital technology. We will learn how
to integrate a digital textbook, ancillary materials, a Smartboard, hand-held remotes, multi-media and the Internet to
engage the students in the learning process. Sample digital
materials will be available.
Laurence Christopher, Christopher Productions, LLC, Portage,
MI
Poster Presentations
U.S. History
Exhibit Hall
Room 306
Did That Really Happen? Connecting Historical
Fiction and Nonfiction Texts
Historical fiction and nonfiction are powerful tools in the
social studies classroom. In this interactive session, I will
model my use of a transactional journal assignment.
Jodi Bornstein, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA
Supervisory-Administrative Sessions
Supervisory-Administrative Concurrent Sessions 3
Award Session Higher Education
Civics and Government
Room 143B
International Benchmarking, Global
Competencies, and Citizenship Preparation
How can we best prepare students for their futures, how well
are we doing, and how do we know? More specifically, how
do American students perform relative to their international
counterparts, what does this tell us, and what can we learn
from others? Sponsored by the Assessment Community,
this session will feature Maureen McLaughlin, the Director of
International Education at the U.S. Department of Education,
who will address these and related questions, which are inte-
Elementary Economics
Table 1: Using “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs”
to Teach Economics
This interactive session features classroom-ready lessons based
on a classic children’s picture book. Instructional concepts
include productive resources, goods and services, and costs
and benefits. Handouts and door prizes!
Barbara Haynes, Virginia Council for Economic Education,
Reedville, VA; Lynne Stover, James Madison University Center for
Economic Education, Harrisonburg, VA
Elementary Global Connections
Table 2: Exploring the Diverse Geographic and
Cultural Backgrounds That Comprise America
Presenter will offer an instructional model focusing on the
geographical and cultural diversity in America. Literacy strategies, suggested resources, and instructional techniques will be
offered. Handouts provided.
Donna Knoell, HigherSchool Instructional Services, Shawnee
Mission, KS
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 2, Friday 2:10–3:05pm • Concurrent Sessions 3
Elementary Social Sciences
Table 3: Who? What? How to Teach Social Studies?
Survival Kit
Concurrent Sessions 3
Based on Teacher Effectiveness Research literature, this presentation features only “the best!” recommendations and highlights for delivering outstanding social studies educational
experiences in the classroom. Multiple Source Handouts/
Videos/Open Forum
Frederick Isele, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, Moline,
IL
Elementary U.S. History
Table 4: Elementary Excitement: Puppetry with
Historical Characters
As puppets have been used throughout history to entertain,
puppetry can be used as a teaching tool for elementary students
to gain deeper meaning in the study of historical characters.
Rina Bousalis, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 5: Teaching U.S. History to Urban Students
with Diverse Learning Styles
FRI
This discussion will focus on how to engage students and get
them to think critically about social studies topics. We will then
briefly review the research on these issues.
Jennifer Hacker, Stephanie Hooks, La’Chaunne Perry, Richmond
Public Schools, Richmond, VA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 6: Teaching Politics in Secondary Education
through Television Drama
Attendees will learn how to make their political instruction
more authentic and engaging using The West Wing, a television
drama that aired on NBC from 1999-2006.
Lisa Buchanan, Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at
Greensboro, NC
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 7: Get in the Game!
Looking for a creative way to engage students in content while
teaching teamwork? Learn how to create board games that will
excite any student.
Tina Ellsworth, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 8: The Pledge of Allegiance: Should It Be
Required in Schools?
U.S. government teachers will lead participants in a Socratic
seminar on the Pledge of Allegiance and illustrate its place in a
broader unit on the focus question for this session.
William Busbin, Andrea Elliott, Auburn High School, Auburn,
AL; Jada Kohlmeier, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 9: Using Yoga to Teach History
This research used Yoga as a means to teach Western Civilization. I developed a type of Yoga that helps students recount
historical connections.
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Dimensions of Diversity
Juan Walker, Shelton State Community College, Tuscaloosa,
AL
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Table 10: Universal Design for Learning, Special
Education, and Social Studies Instruction
This session will use the Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
model as a means of providing multiple learning opportunities
for all students within K-12 social studies classrooms.
Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina Aiken, SC;
Darren Minarik, Radford University, Radford, VA
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Table 11: Value Dilemmas and Persisting Issues
Associated with the Holocaust
During World War II, civilians and soldiers alike experienced
value dilemmas directly associated with the Holocaust. Participants will learn different techniques to promote discussions on
such dilemmas. Handout provided.
Jeffrey Byford, University of Memphis, TN
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 12: Teaching History in a Digital Era
This seminar is designed to help teachers bring the past to life
by incorporating multimedia resources into their teaching. Participants will learn new digital technologies to make history
come alive.
William Flaherty, Melissa Seideman, South Western School
District, Hanover, PA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 13: Historical Interviews Made Easy
Using digital recorders, students gain a new perspective on
modern American history by interviewing relatives and community members who lived through key historical events.
Sample lesson plans and rubrics provided.
Amy Dixon, Deeann Skov, Fruitport High School, Fruitport,
MI
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 14: Entering a New Dimension:
The Student’s I—iPad, iPod, iMovie
Participants will think about the limited diversity of past
teaching practices and the current move toward the multiple
dimensions that are possible with high-technology classrooms
that challenge modern students.
Gina Hogue, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR; Marjorie
Hunter, West Memphis High School, West Memphis, AR
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 15: Tweeting and Texting and
Friending, Oh My!
How can we meet the needs of diverse learners in the 21st century? Together, we’ll explore how Web 2.0 and mobile technology enable collaborative, active learning in the secondary
classroom.
Michelle Cottrell-Williams, Colette Fraley, Wakefield High
School, Arlington VA
December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
3:15–4:15pm
Featured Speaker
Philip Zimbardo
Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Stanford University
“My Journey from Evil to Heroism”
Growing up in the South Bronx, Philip Zimbardo wondered
why good friends turned bad. As a research psychologist, he
framed that curiosity as a testable research question: When
good people are put in a bad place, does their good personality
and character dominate, or are they dominated by powerful,
subtle situational forces? His Stanford Prison Experiment generated the negative conclusion about bad barrels corrupting
good apples. Decades later, he served as an expert witness for
an Abu Ghraib prison guard, to show that he was not a “bad
apple,” but rather a good one immersed in a horrible barrel. In
the twilight of his career, Dr. Zimbardo’s vision has shifted 180
degrees to wondering if ordinary people can become “Everyday
Heroes,” and starting a nonprofit corporation whose mission
is to explore and encourage heroic action from people of all
ages and nations by internalizing and acting on a vibrant heroic
imagination.
3:00–5:00pm
Off-Site Session
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian,
4th St. & Independence Ave., SW. Rasmuson Theatre
Our Warrior Spirit: The Legacy of American Indian
Heroism
Native Americans have served in the U.S. military since the
American Revolution, and by percentage serve more than any
other ethnic group in the armed forces. Join us to learn about
their heroic and unforgettable stories at a special program
hosted by noted historian Herman J. Viola, curator emeritus at
the Smithsonian Institution. The program features a panel of
American Indians who have served our country in the armed
forces.
Debra Kay Mooney, Chuck Boers, John Emhoolah, Joseph
Medicine Crow
3:15–4:10pm
Concurrent Sessions 4
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Social Sciences
Room 143B
Developing Children’s Social and Cultural
Understandings: Pathways to Student
Engagement
A presentation of the research findings from the “Fair Go
Project” on Australian and American students in low socio-
Elementary U.S. History
Room 208B
Reaching Learners: Innovative Practices to Infuse
Diversity into Elementary Classrooms
Employing a variety of hands-on strategies (both high- and
low-tech), this session will use audience participation to
present techniques to infuse multicultural curriculum into
elementary classrooms. Handouts provided.
Melissa Marks, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg , PA;
Cate Reagan, McKeesport, PA; Rebecca Semo, Saint Vincent
College, Youngstown, PA ; Jennifer Shannon, Saint Vincent College,
Youngstown, PA; Allyson Ulicne, Saint Vincent College,
Youngstown, PA
Elementary Concurrent Sessions 4
Room 202A
economic schools, highlighting their learning gains when
engaged in the Storypath approach.
Bronwyn Cole, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW;
Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA
U.S. History
Room 147B
FRI
Academic Vocabulary: Breaking Barriers to
Comprehension
Take vocabulary instruction to the next level to increase student comprehension and achievement. Experience how to
help students understand and internalize social studies vocabulary, and leave with digital resources/lessons.
Pam Gothart, Madison County Board of Education, Huntsville,
AL; Larry Zimmerman, Teacher Created Materials, Alpharetta,
GA
Elementary U.S. History
Room 209A
What?! The Underground Railroad Isn’t a
Subway???
The Underground Railroad as “tunnel train” is only one of
many student misconceptions. This session will highlight
methods to identify/address historical misconceptions and
offer a content-integrated example unit and resources.
Carol Watson, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Geography
Room 201
Authentic Geography in a Middle School
Classroom
Authentic geography encourages students to ask and answer
geographic questions. National Geographic’s GEO program
uses authentic tools and content, including NG Explorers, to
facilitate understanding of other places and cultures.
Mark Bockenhauer, St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI; Janet
Smith, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
87
December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Room 145B
A Teacher’s Hands-on Guide to the European
Union
Concurrent Sessions 4
Prepare K-12 students to become global citizens by discovering the EU! This session will provide free teaching resources,
including ready-to-go lesson plans and games, helping integrate technology into the classroom.
Gali Beeri, UNC European Union Center of Excellence,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 209B
Bring Your Government Class to Life
Turn your government classroom into an exciting civics lab to
teach the standards and help students research, experiment,
and learn about the workings of government....Tested, effective, and easily done!
Keri Doggett, Gregorio Medina, Constitutional Rights
Foundation, Los Angeles, CA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 208A
Digital resources are poised to replace the traditional textbook
in your classroom. Come to learn about options available to
you in the areas of U.S. and World History.
Aaron Willis, Social Studies School Service, Culver City, CA
One key standard involves the parliamentary system of government. Why not compare two neighboring democracies
(Canada and the U.S.) and their historic leaders before
upcoming elections? Materials and strategies provided.
Dean June, SUNY Geneseo, NY; Stephen Marcotte, Beaconsfield
QC High School, Beaconsfield, QC; Ruth Writer, Michigan State
University, East Lansing, MI
Beavers and Eagles: Prime Ministers and
Presidents
Digital Alternatives to Textbooks:
What Are My Options?
U.S. History
Room 203B
Middle School: Closing the AP Gap Starts Here
Narrow the gap by preparing students for Advanced Placement history classes in middle school. Resources for making
historical thinking and advanced writing accessible for heterogeneously grouped students will be shared.
Tiferet Ani, Parkland Middle School, Rockville, MD; Craig
McKee, Robert Frost Middle School, Rockville, MD; Tara Kelly,
Thomas W. Pyle Middle School, Bethesda, MD; Angela Stevenson,
Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD; Jack Wooden,
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School, Germantown, MD
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Award Session
Secondary Level-High School
Room 149A
History as the Science of Decision Making
The presenter will discuss his experiences teaching at a charter
high school in East Los Angeles and suggest some ways of
connecting student-centered pedagogy with standardized
results by focusing on debate and similar classroom strategies.
Learn to create an online professional teaching portfolio to
showcase your work and your students’ work. Handouts illustrating strategies and portfolio instructions will be provided.
Benjamin D. Weber, Marc and Eva Stern Math and Science
School, Los Angeles, CA, Secondary Teacher of the Year
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Civics and Government
Room 209C
Middle Level-Jr. High School FRI
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 147A
How Can Students Know What to Believe?
News Literacy Project teachers and journalists provide students the tools to discern and produce credible information in
the digital age, fostering the development of lifelong critical
thinkers and engaged citizens.
Bob Mathis, Walt Whitman High School, Bethesda, MD; Alan
Miller, The News Literacy Project, Bethesda, MD; Colin O’Brien,
Walt Whitman High School, Bethesda, MD
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Salon C
Diversity and Reality: The Issues of the Japanese
Internment
This interactive session examines the causes of the incarceration, including race prejudice, wartime hysteria, political leadership, ethics, and legal actions. Primary source packets, lessons and resources will be provided.
Phyllis Henry, Benedictine University, Lisle, IL; John Tateishi,
Japanese American Citizens League, Chicago, IL; Bill Yoshino,
Japanese American Citizens League, Chicago, IL
Secondary Level-High SchoolCivics and Government
Secondary Level-High School Room 140A
Room 140B
Use Participatory Democracy to Improve a
Community’s Quality of Life
Balancing the Budget: Coping with Global
Factors on National Economies
Unlike a textbook’s approach to democracy, The American
Promise (written by NCSS), encourages local issue involvement, increases citizenship knowledge, understanding diverse
viewpoints, and local quality of life. Free DVDs, lessons!
Walt Herscher, Celebration, FL
This engaging economics simulation puts students into the
role of cabinet officials as they balance a national budget. Real
life examples show the impact of current global interdependence and trade.
Brent Chowen, Brigham Young University-Hawaii, Laie, HI
Dimensions of Diversity
Economics
December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
Geography
Room 143A
Shattering Stereotypes About Africa: How
Geography Explain’s Africa’s Underdevelopment
This presentation examines the influential role of geography
and diseases on the socioeconomic conditions that characterize much of Africa; a realm stigmatized by ignorance, myths,
stereotypes, and neglect.
James Moore, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 143C
Past, Present, and Future in National History Day
Projects
Come and see how to make connections between past events,
present issues/current events, and future problems using
National History Day projects. See how you can fashion a
student-centered classroom.
Nicole Roper, West Philadelphia Catholic High School,
Philadelphia, PA
Secondary Level-High School
U.S. History
Room 144C
Using Web 2.0 Tools to Engage Students
Join TCI to discover the best of the free Web 2.0 tools and
how they can bring learning alive in your classroom. Come
prepared to get and share great ideas!
Brian Thomas, TCI, Sacramento, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 202B
Murals: A Window to a Multi-Cultural America
Murals offer multiple methods of engaging all students in
exploring culture, issues, and struggles of diverse American
populations. Online assessment and art interpretation techniques make your classroom an interactive museum.
Cara Luchies, Silver Creek High, Longmont, CO; Kent
Willmann, University of Colorado Boulder, CO
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
Reading Lincoln
This presentation will assist teachers in sorting out the hundreds of books published about our 16th president. Classroom-tested lessons, thought-provoking topics, and an extensive annotated bibliography are included.
David Keck, Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare, Columbus,
OH; Tom Peet, Westerville North High School, Westerville, Ohio
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 203A
Where are the Women of Color in Secondary
History Classes?
See where and how to access thousands of images of women of
color throughout history. Strategies for strengthening social
studies curriculum by using images in provocative ways will be
discussed.
Jessica Schocker, Penn State University - Berks Campus, Berks,
PA; Christine Woyshner, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Manifest your Destiny with Historical Habits of
Mind
Manifest Destiny is re-examined using multiple perspectives
and historical habits of mind. Participants receive new strategies to teach Westward Expansion and other historical events.
Cindy Renner, Larry Wright, Lincoln, NE
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
The Latino Southwest in American History
MIA in the American History curriculum: stories of the
Southwest, the first colonial America. Here are secondary
materials from literature and primary sources from the 16th19th centuries.
Monique Mogro, MetroTech High School, Phoenix, AZ; Maria
Chacon, Central High School, Phoenix, AZ; Charles Diaz, South
Mountain High School, Goodyear, AZ; Syd Golston, Phoenix
Union High School District, Phoenix, AZ; William Kibler, Cesar
Chavez High School, Phoenix, AZ; Christopher Oglesby, Phoenix
Union High School District, Phoenix, AZ; Donna Schell, Arizona
Historical Society, Scottsdale, AZ
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 4
Secondary Level-High School FRI
U.S. History
Room 103A
Tested Strategies to Teach Civil Rights Advocacy
through Popular Culture
Using popular culture tools that appeal to students, teachers
will learn strategies to demonstrate the need for civil rights
advocacy in our country.
Marcy Grayson, Grand Haven High School, Grand Haven,
MI
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 306
Digitizing Diversity: Web 2.0 Tools for All
Learners
Come actively explore Web 2.0 tools designed to increase
engagement and understanding among diverse learners with
an emphasis on how to use these tools to promote literacy and
document analysis.
Christine Beaudry, Samuel Brower, Cameron White, University
of Houston, TX; Angela Miller, Houston ISD, Houston, TX
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 149B
Mining the Past: Primary Sources in World
History Assessment
Having difficulty writing high level engaging student assessments aligned to your standards? In this session, learn how to
improve alignment and increase assessment rigor through the
use of primary sources.
Jolana Rivas, Leslie Ruff, Pearson, Austin, TX
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
Higher Education Sessions
Higher EducationCUFA Research into Practice Session
Room 304
Concurrent Sessions 4
A Digital View of History: Drawing and Discussing
Models of Historical Concepts
In this hands-on session, we will demonstrate strategies for
integrating active learning pedagogies into the history classroom by encouraging students to use a variety of digital technologies to create models of historical concepts. We will share
classroom-based research that explores student outcomes
using these methods.
Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University, Raleigh,
NC; Robert Coven, Cary Academy, Cary, NC and North Carolina
State University, Raleigh, NC
Supervisory-Administrative Session
Supervisory-Administrative U.S. History
Room 305
Classroom-Tested Lessons and Strategies that
Motivate Students at All Levels
FRI
The Instruction Community shares “teacher-tested” best practice methods for delivering meaningful, active learning experiences to K-12 students, with special emphasis on differentiation techniques for diverse learners.
Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL;
Melinda Staubs, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL;
Lorena Ortiz, Wiregrass Ranch High School, Wesley Chapel, FL;
Joel Rothblatt, Emerson Middle School, Los Angeles, CA; Mark
Stephens, Germantown Academy, Fort Washington, PA
Exhibitor Sessions
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 103B
Can Your Students Be Budget Heroes?
The new online computer game, Budget Hero, is a fun way to
learn about, and teach, the challenges of balancing the federal
budget. And it’s free! Learn how you can use this game in your
classroom.
David Rejeski, The Wilson Center, Washington, DC
Poster Presentations
(Location TBD)
Elementary Global Connections
Table 1
Transforming Classrooms through Human Rights
Education!
This interactive workshop will introduce the pedagogy of
human rights education, demonstrate teaching methodologies, and provide participants with data on its effectiveness at
reducing bullying and closing the achievement gap.
Sarah Herder, The Advocates for Human Rights, Minneapolis,
MN
Elementary U.S. History
Table 2
Improving Elementary Social Studies: From Zero
to HEROES!
This presentation will provide attendees with the ideas and
tools to creatively integrate the study of heroes throughout the
elementary curriculum, despite the shrinking time allotted for
teaching social studies.
Georgette Hackman, Denver Elementary School, Denver, PA
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Teaching American History in the Digital Age
See a demonstration and discuss new educational technology
tools for teaching American History developed with funding
from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the
National Endowment for the Humanities.
Christopher Czajka, Thirteen (WNET), New York, NY;
Danielle Shapiro, National Endowment for the Humanities,
Washington, DC; Michael Fragale, Corporation for Public
Broadcasting, Washington, DC
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
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Elementary U.S. History
Table 3
Integrating History, Learning, Discovery, and GPS
Technology
Learn how our modern day classroom archeologists collaborate, learn, and teach each other about historical regions and
hidden artifacts using GPS technology.
Kathryn Bauer, Sheila Simpson, Patterson Elementary, Mesa,
AZ; Anita Pena, Entz Elementary, Mesa, AZ
Secondary Level-HighSchool U.S. History
Empowering Youth to Take Global Action
Table 4
Global Concerns Classroom (GCC) is a global education
program for U.S. secondary schools. This session will provide
educators with free resources and tools to inspire global citizenship in their schools.
Sylvia Wong, Concern Worldwide US, New York, NY; Sinead
Naughton, Trevor Day School, New York, NY
Publications with authentic information on 11 religions; to be
used as supplemental resources in history and religion courses
at middle/high schools.
Thomas Wolfe, Washington, DC
Dimensions of Diversity
Inter Faith Conference of Metropolitan
Washington—Teaching About Religion
December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
Civics and Government
Table 5
to enhance the lives of ordinary Singaporeans.
Bryden Chew, Aliah Shariff, Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary),
Singapore
Participants will explore the impact of students in making
social change. Diversity in public institutions was accomplished through students who challenged resistance to rulings
by the United States Supreme Court.
Camille Hodges, Liberty Middle School, Clifton, VA
Table 11
The Power of Students in Making Social Change
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 6
Highlights in History: Differentiated Instruction
in Middle School Social Studies
This poster session describes three instructional strategies for
differentiating instruction in U.S. history using NCSS Notable
Trade Books. Participants will learn to differentiate according
to readiness, interests, and learning preferences.
Kay Chick, Penn State Altoona, PA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 7
Crafting Freedom: Reach Beyond the Black
History You Already Teach
In this session participants will be introduced to free educational resources to teach about the lives and legacies of nine
African American “freedom crafters.”
Lara Willox, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 8
So, How Many of your Friends Belonged to the
KKK?
There’s interviewing—and then there’s asking the questions
that get sources to confess deeper details. Your students’ oral
research techniques will never be the same. Just beware what
they might learn!
Cynthia Levinson, Austin, TX
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Table 9
The French in North America:
Quebec’s Past, Present and Future
This session will investigate how the history of New France
has impacted present-day Quebec. Changing roles of religion,
class, race and gender will be explored. Teaching resources
provided.
Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of
Maine, Orono, ME; Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of
Canada, SUNY Plattsburgh, NY
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 10
Civil Society in the Singapore Classroom Dispelling the Myth!
High ability 15-year-olds in Raffles Girls’ School, Singapore
assumed an authentic learning experience (Performance Task)
proposing amendments to an existing policy/law that sought
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Talking through Technology: Deliberating Online
Using Web 2.0
Teachers interested in using Web 2.0 technology to facilitate
discussions will be introduced to best practices in using this
technology, such as assessment, structure, and facilitation.
William Busbin, Auburn High School, Auburn, AL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 12
Professional Development in the 21st Century:
Your Personal Learning Network
This session will actively involve participants in a hands-on
exploration of innovative, Web 2.0 technology tools to create
PLNs (personal learning networks) for professional development in social studies programs.
Sara McNeil, Cameron White, University of Houston, Houston,
TX; Angela Miller, Houston Independent School District, Houston,
TX
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 4
Middle Level-Jr. High School FRI
Economics
Table 13
Viral Videos Can Be Catchy!
Explore how short videos (less than one minute) can engage
students in the classroom. Learn how to use a video contest to
foster student creativity and to develop lessons/activities.
Nicholas Haltom, Karen Kokernak, Federal Reserve Bank of
Richmond, VA
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Table 14
Dimensions of Geography: A New High School
Curriculum
Explore a new interactive geography curriculum for human
and physical geography developed by a public school educator.
Resources include SMART activities and links to the entire
curriculum on Wikispaces.
Andrea Kohutek, Debbie Kuykendall, Causey Middle School,
Mobile, AL
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 15
The Transformative Learner: An Instructor’s
Guide to Global Education
Drawing upon Robert Hanvey’s five dimensions of a global
perspective, this interactive session delivers activities that provide students with skills to thrive in an interconnected world.
Classroom handouts are provided.
Robert Bailey, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Kenneth
Carano, Western Oregon University, Monmouth, OR; Jennifer
Orjuela, Jefferson High School, Tampa, FL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 21
Concurrent Sessions 4
Table 16
FRI
Perspectives on Teaching Citizenship and the
Influence of Global Society
An Introduction to the Create Your Own Timeline
Application
The focus of this presentation is blending citizenship perspectives as a global imperative and the influence of global society.
It uses footage of the Egyptian activism and other movements
to create lessons.
Andrew Hostetler, Evan Mooney, A. Robert Pifel, Kent State
University, Kent, OH
The Create Your Own Timeline application is a web-based
resource that allows users to create timelines, upload digital
objects to their timelines, and engage in social networking
around user timelines.
Ryan Crowley, Cinthia Salinas, Ken Tothero, The University of
Texas at Austin, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 17
Social Networking in the Social Studies
Classroom
This presentation will highlight the usage of social networking
resources in the social studies classroom (e.g. Facebook,
Twitter). These social mediums foster global citizenship by
encouraging communication through cross-cultural
dialogues.
Russell Evans, Emin Kilinc, Texas A&M University, College
Station, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 18
Having Fun With Senses in the History Classroom
When students use multiple senses they form stronger connections. We will share ideas for including all five senses in the
classroom. Bring your eyes, ears, fingers, nose, and tongue!
Denise Meadows, Erin Wolfe, Northern High School, Owings,
MD
Table 22
Bridging the Achievement Gap: Gaining Access
to Honors Classes
The focus of this session, which draws attention to the achievement gap among low-income students, examines issues related
to how social studies teachers recommend students for honors
classes.
Philip Bernhardt, The George Washington University School of
Education and Human Devleopment, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 23
By Land and By Sea....Cross-Curricular Routes to
Navigating History
Two seemingly different organizations—a retired aircraft carrier turned museum (and revered national landmark) and one
of thirteen presidential libraries—come together to share
experiences of building successful history programs.
Anthony Pennay, Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, Simi
Valley, CA; Sheri Levinsky-Raskin, Intrepid Sea, Air, & Space
Museum, New York, NY; Janet Tran, Ronald Reagan Presidential
Foundation, Simi Valley, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High SchoolU.S. History
Table 19
Table 24
Bracketing: Instilling a Sense of Chronology in
Your Students!
Economics in History: Looking at History through
a Different Lens
Bracketing teaches 26 landmark historical events/eras in a
skeletal narrative of our 5,000 years of recorded history and
helps the student develop a sense of chronology.
William (Bill) Ross, American Institute For History Education,
Swedesboro, NJ
The Great Recession or the Great Depression—economics
provides a critical perspective in every age. Examine important economic concepts and learn creative ways to integrate
them into classroom instruction.
Susan Kizer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Houston Branch,
TX; Princeton Williams, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 20
Table 25
America’s Wildlife: Integrating Science and
Conservation into American History
The story of America’s wildlife is an amazing tale of national
and natural history. Experience standards-based lessons that
explore wildlife conservation through American history. Participants will receive the free lessons.
Eric Proctor, Kellie Tharp, Arizona Game and Fish Department,
Phoenix, AZ
92
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Dimensions of Diversity
Teaching about Rights: Historical Context,
Contemporary Challenges
We will present a new curriculum unit using primary sources
to explore the historical development of human rights, human
rights crusaders, and the expansion of rights around the world
today.
Natalie Arsenault, Rachel Meyer, Christopher Rose, The
University of Texas at Austin, TX
December 2, Friday 3:15–4:10pm • Concurrent Sessions 4
worlD hiStory
Checkmate! Evaluating Social Injustice In Feudal
Europe Using Chess
Get students excited to learn about the complex class relationships and the inherent injustice of Feudal Europe during the
Middle Ages using the game of chess.
John Pagnotti, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
civicS anD Government
Table 27
“Skipping Social Studies” in the NCLB Era
In response to the call from previous researchers for more
qualitative data, the presenter will share the findings of a multicase study of elementary teachers and their social studies
experiences.
Cara Ward, University of North Carolina—Wilmington, NC
hiGher eDucation
Global connectionS
Table 29
Table 26
hiGher eDucation
hiGher eDucation
GeoGraphy
Table 28
Using GPS Technology and Geocaching to Teach
Social Studies Curriculum
The study focuses on mentoring pre-service teachers to use
Global Positioning System (GPS) and geocaching activities to
engage students in learning process. Participants learned
important skills including map-reading and GPS navigation.
James Oigara, Canisius University, Buffalo, NY
Teachers Who Recognize Social Injustice Become
Social Justice Advocates
A teacher educator and a media specialist lead preservice
teachers in researching social injustices; students teach peers
with presentations and handouts, reflecting further on integrating social justice into practice.
Russell Binkley, Beth McDonough, Western Carolina University,
Cullowhee, NC
hiGher eDucation
Social ScienceS
Table 30
Teaching with Technology: Preparing Social
Studies Educators with TPACK
This poster session describes the integration of an instructional technology lesson, based on the Technology, Pedagogy,
and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework, in an elementary social studies methods course.
Erik Byker, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
hiGher eDucation
Concurrent Sessions 4
SeconDary level-hiGh School
u.S. hiStory
FRI
Table 31: Place Matters: Exploring History through
Existing Slave Cabins
Existing slave dwellings in South Carolina were documented
through a summer research project. A collaborative partnership between a South Carolina public university and the
National Trust for Historic Preservation will be highlighted.
Cheryl Lane, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC; Joseph
McGill, Southern Office of the National Trust for Historic
Preservation, Charleston, SC
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 5
4:20–5:15pm
Elementary Room 209C
Concurrent Sessions 5
Empowering and Engaging All Students through
Simulated Congressional Hearings
Elementary Sessions
Award SessionElementary
Room 149A
Concurrent Sessions 5
A “GPS Toolkit” to Guide Your Social Studies
Teaching
FRI
G = Geography
P = Primary Sources
S = Strategies
T = Technology/Other Tools
Incorporate the use of geography, primary sources, thinking
historically, and literacy strategies in your classroom. Receive
several templates for learning strategies that intertwine historical thinking skills with literacy skills, as well as a handout
with instructions for accessing the presenter’s wiki webpage
with templates and technology links used or referred to in this
session.
Ruth King, Cedar Ridge Elementary School, Pleasant Grove,
UT
Elementary Teacher of the Year
Elementary Economics
Room 306
Planning, Producing and Publishing:
Creating an Economic Children’s Book
Creating and “publishing” a children’s book with students can
infuse social studies topics into reading. A lesson plan and
timeline for book completion, along with publishing options,
will be shared.
Michele Wulff, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City—Omaha
Branch, NE
Elementary Global Connections
Room 143C
Happy New Year! Exploring Global Celebrations
and Diverse Cultural Traditions
Participants will learn creative ideas for teaching about New
Year’s celebrations and traditions in the United States and
around the world. Strategies will include critical literacy, service learning, and inquiry.
Erica Christie, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Sarah
Montgomery, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
Elementary Social Sciences
Learn how to empower and engage your intermediate students
through an authentic, performance-based assessment. After
the session, you will be ready to implement a simulated congressional hearing with your students!
Michelle Ranker, Howard County Public School System,
Howard County, MD
Elementary U.S. History
Room 208A
Tobacco, Toil, Trade: The Cost of Profit in Colonial
America
Explore the profit motive for colonization, the rise of tobacco
as a cash crop, and the influence of tobacco on the economies
and cultures of colonial America. Take away resources!
Michael Crookshank, Sandy Key, Stephen Phillips, JamestownYorktown Foundation, Williamsburg, VA
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
Room 208B
So You Want to Testify Before Congress?
A down-and-dirty guide to utilizing a congressional hearing
simulation in your classroom: this performance-based assessment develops research, writing, cooperative learning, and
public speaking skills and can involve community leaders.
Marion Broglie, Lynnhaven Middle School, Virginia Beach,
VA
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolU.S. History
Room 201
“If These Walls Could Talk”: Nonfiction, Research,
and Virtual Travels
Explore how to use digital artifacts, nonfiction trade books,
historic sites, and the Common Core Standards to prompt
inquiry, scaffold instruction, explore multiple perspectives,
and deepen students’ content knowledge.
Marc Aronson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ; Mary
Ann Cappiello, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 143B
Room 140A
This session combines archeology with sustainability. The presentation demonstrates an inquiry-based learning strategy to
explore the interaction between a civilization and human
needs with the natural physical environment.
Daniel Qualls, University of Maine at Machias, ME
Promote literacy in the social studies classroom through tiered
assignments including leveled texts, tiered graphic organizers,
leveled questions, tiered activities, and tiered products. Strategies will be modeled and thoroughly discussed.
Wendy Conklin, Teacher Created Materials, Round Rock, TX
Sustainability and Archeology:
An Inquiry-Based Lesson
94
U.S. History
Dimensions of Diversity
Promoting Literacy in the Social Studies
Classroom through Differentiation
December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 5
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209B
Closing the Civic Empowerment Gap:
The Pedagogy of Action-Civics
We discuss the civic empowerment gap—that marginalized
youth are less engaged civically—and present action civics, an
applied, student-centered, standards-aligned approach, as a
pedagogical strategy to close this gap.
Alison Cohen, Generation Citizen, Boston, MA; Peter Levine,
CIRCLE, Medford, MA; Meira Levinson, Harvard Graduate
School of Education, Cambridge, MA; Scott Warren, Generation
Citizen, Boston, MA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 147B
Teaching Siddhartha: Updates on Freedom to
Choose Content and Methods
A recent court case that originated in Ohio has significantly
curtailed teachers’ rights to choose the appropriate content.
This session will provide a legislative update and suggested
responses.
Jim Daly, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ; Carole
Hahn, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Fritz Mulhauser, ACLU,
Washington, DC; Nancy Patterson, Bowling Green State
University, Bowling Green, OH; Michael Simpson, NEA ,
Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209A
Cyberbullying and the Law:
Engaging Students on the First Amendment
Explore the First Amendment freedoms of and limitations on
student speech, including cyberbullying and internet-based
speech. Receive interactive lesson plans to explore this topic
and Supreme Court precedents in class.
Wendy Ewbank, Seattle Girls School, Seattle, WA; Megan
Hanson, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring, MD
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Salon C
“I, too, Sing America”: Increasing the Relevance
of U.S. History/Government
Teachers and students from a local high school share easily
adaptable strategies for increasing relevance and motivation
for studying U.S. history and government among African
American and Latino youth.
Ayo Heinegg, Julie Stern, Cesar Chavez Public Charter Schools,
Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 140B
U.S.-China Trade Relations: Using Current Events
to Teach International Economics
This presentation uses U.S.-China trade relations to teach
international trade and foreign exchange models and provides
lessons and activities that use the models to explain recent
data and current events.
Margaret Ray, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg,
VA
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Room 143A
Contemporary World Issues as Geography—
Lessons from the IB
Interested in International Baccaleurate Geography? Or new
approaches in teaching global issues? Join us for a practical
tour of strategies integrating geography skills with the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) and pressing contemporary international topics.
Sage Borgmästars, St. Johns International School, Waterloo,
Belgium
Secondary Level-High School
Global Connections
Concurrent Sessions 5
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Room 147A
Islam and Africa: From Stereotypes to Knowledge
FRI
Student stereotypes of Islam and Africa abound. Fulbright
teachers who recently returned from Egypt and Tanzania
showcase classroom-ready activities and resources designed to
involve grade 6-12 students in challenging their perceptions.
Barbara Brown, African Studies Center, Boston University,
MA; Leslie Kogan, Boston College High School, Boston, MA;
Amy Lake, Lee H. Kellogg School, Falls Village, CT; Katy Rees,
Winchester High School, Winchester, MA; Jennifer Sears, John F.
Kennedy School, Somerville, MA
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 149B
Using Technology to Increase Cultural
Understanding through International
Collaboration
Experience hands-on activities and a showcase of how technology is being used for global project-based learning to help
students develop the skills and knowledge to become global
citizens.
Nicolle Boujaber-Diederich, Cypress Creek High School,
Orlando, FL; Freda Goodman, Benjamin Banneker High School,
Atlanta, GA; Lisa Jobson, iEARN-USA, New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 145B
Sociology Off the Leash: Student-Centered
Projects
Student evaluated and certified projects, guaranteed to spark
the sociological imagination. Walk away with access to readymade curriculum that allows for the option of incorporating
technology tools in your classroom.
Reuben Hoffman, West Hills High School, Santee, CA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
95
December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 5
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103A
Up From the Bottoms:
The Search for the American Dream
Concurrent Sessions 5
Explore the larger story of African-American migration—
causes, community and consequence—through the lens of
one local community: Muskegon, Michigan. Engaging online
materials are adaptable to other locations.
David Klemm, Muskegon Area Intermediate School District,
Musekgon, MI
FRI
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
Gender Discrimination: The Continuing Journey
Toward Equity
Supreme Court decisions have impacted the struggle for constitutional protection from gender discrimination. More
women justices could help accelerate the societal shift from
stereotype to equity. Teaching materials included.
James Lopach, Jean Luckowski, University of Montana,
Missoula, MT
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144C
Pump Up the Volume:
Historical Inquiry through Modern Music
Help students develop inquiry skills and habits by studying
history through music! Modern music is full of historical
information and metaphor—get students hooked with this
memorable lesson model.
Jeremy Gypton, Tucson, AZ
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
Pinning Down History:
Maps and Mobile Technology as Teaching Tools
With so much focus on the “who” and the “when” of history
this presentation will address strategies to bring the “where”
back into focus.
Matthew Gibson, Peter Hedlund, Encyclopedia Virginia,
Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, Charlottesville, VA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Not Your Father’s Civil War:
Engaging Students through Social History
In this 150th anniversary of its beginning, learn more about
teaching the Civil War as social history with lesson ideas
focused on the experiences of African Americans, women, and
civilians.
Kay Ackerman, Wilson College, Chambersburg , PA; Sarah
Bair, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA
U.S. History
Room 202B
Substantive Conversations with Students:
Harness Teaching to Enhance Critical Thinking
96
Dimensions of Diversity
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 203B
Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace
Process
Get tools and tips for teaching major historical developments,
including previous successes and current issues to be negotiated in the peace process. Participants will experience student
activities. Resource packet provided.
Ben Chaika, Institute for Curriculum Services, San Francisco,
CA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 203A
Social Studies and the New Literacies: Facilitating
Collaboration and Inquiry
Promoting inquiry through the responsible use of technologies is essential for 21st-century education. By effectively collaborating with diverse audiences, students can better understand multiple perspectives while developing historical
literacy.
Joseph Marangell, East Haven High School, East Haven, CT;
Regine Randall, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 103B
Viva La Revolution! Understanding the Patterns
of World Revolutions
Help your students understand the phenomenon of revolutions by using primary sources, videos, songs, and political
cartoons. Many resources will be provided and a wide variety
of teaching methods demonstrated.
Michael Sandberg, The Seven Hills School, Walnut Creek, CA
Higher Education Sessions
Higher EducationCUFA Research into Practice Session
Room 304
Room 144A
Secondary Level-High School This session is designed to provide attendees with ideas and
sample lessons that they can use to employ conversation
among students as a tool for effective learning.
Noah Rachlin, Scott Silk, Pacific Ridge School, Carlsbad, CA
Historical Empathy: From Research to Practice
This session explores how the growing body of theory and
research on historical empathy might be made useful to elementary and secondary social studies teachers. The presenters
will offer a research-based description of the essential elements of any effort to foster historical empathy and provide an
overview of the multiple instructional methods that have been
demonstrated to encourage empathy. They will also discuss
how the promotion of historical empathy can be a reasonable
endeavor in the K-12 social studies classroom in light of current curricular realities.
Sarah Brooks, Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, IL; Scott Endacott,
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 5
GeoGraphy
Room 305
Finding Your Face in the World
This autobiographical project integrates social studies disciplines with students’ own personal narratives through selected
topics. It increases identity awareness and connects them to
their histories, geographies and a larger world.
Laura Marasco, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD
Exhibitor Sessions
***ExhIbITOr SESSION***
Room 204A
RESIST: Challenging the Myth of “Sheep to the
Slaughter”
Transform stereotypes and inspire your students with the
hidden history of the Jewish partisans: men, women and teens
who fought back during the Holocaust. Includes free curriculum and DVDs.
Jonathan Furst, Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation
***ExhIbITOr SESSION***
Room 204B
Glenna Gustafson, Tamara Wallace, Radford University,
Radford, VA
miDDle level-Jr. hiGh School
Table 3
Using “The Hunger Games” to Teach Economics,
Ethics, and Ecology
Suzanne Collins’ best-selling trilogy, a cautionary tale of survival, is filled with social commentary that encourages interdisciplinary instruction. This session includes handouts of
interactive classroom-ready lessons and door prizes.
Barbara Haynes, Virginia Council on Economic Education,
Richmond, VA; Lynne Stover, James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, VA
miDDle level-Jr. hiGh School
Think, Care, Act: Teaching for Global Connection
Develop active learning projects that empower students to
think critically and creatively, and to care and act for global
connection. Debate, negotiation, re-imagining history, and
social action projects are demonstrated.
Susan Cannon, Episcopal Academy, Newtown Square, PA
miDDle level-Jr. hiGh School
Founded in 1971, Close Up is a nonprofit that educates and
inspires young people to become informed and engaged citizens. We fulfill our mission mainly by providing challenging,
hands-on civic education programs for students and teachers
in Washington, DC. These programs are known for their positive impact on student attitudes and for giving teachers valuable insights to take back to classrooms nationwide. Using the
nation’s capital as a living classroom, participants get a “close
up” view of government and democracy in action. Learn how
you can adapt some of our teaching methods to make teaching
Current Issues come alive in the Classroom.
Jodi Stewart Miteva, Eric Adydan, Close Up Foundation,
Alexandria, VA
Table 6
Tables 1-20 in Exhibit Hall; Tables 21-30 on L Street Bridge
elementary
GeoGraphy
Table 1
Global connectionS
Table 4
Close Up and Current Issues in the Classroom
Poster Presentations
economicS
Concurrent Sessions 5
hiGher eDucation
FRI
Social ScienceS
Destroying the Barriers of Language in the Social
Studies Classroom
Learn how Project Open Horizons trained teachers to break
down the barriers to learning for English Language Learners
in their classrooms through engaging interactions and 21st
century literacies.
Leticia De Leon, Janine Schall, The University of Texas - Pan
American, Edinburg, TX
miDDle level-Jr. hiGh School
u.S. hiStory
Table 7
The Humanity of Those Enslaved—Lessons from
the Past
Embrace the humanity of those enslaved. An interpretive
analysis of South Carolina slave narratives. The lesson plans
provided focus on the homes, artisanship, religion, marginalization and eventual freedom of slaves.
Rénard Harris, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
Making Social Studies Time Count with Our
Elementary Students
Learn to incorporate Notable Trade Books across the curriculum and develop creative hands-on activities as well.
Cynthia Rickman, Ki-Be Elementary School, Benton City, WA
elementary
u.S. hiStory
Table 2
Reaching All Learners: UDL in the Elementary
Social Studies Classroom
Participants will learn how Universal Design for Learning can
be utilized in their instruction to create learning experiences
that meet the needs of all of the learners in their classrooms
91st NCSS Annual Conference
97
December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 5
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 8
Active Learning Projects Differentiate the Diverse
Classroom: English Language Learners
Concurrent Sessions 5
Differentiation strategies for instructional delivery and assessment to reach every student in our diverse classrooms,
including English Language Learners, will be demonstrated
with a lesson on the Declaration of Independence.
Lanore Larson, Interact, Culver City, CA
Middle Level-Jr. High School Table 9
Reaching and Teaching Children with LanguageBased Learning Difficulties
Language-based techniques enable struggling students to learn
effectively. Specific strategies to structure reading and writing
reinforce language skills as well as provide children access to
social studies content.
Bruce Miller, Landmark School, Manchester, MA
Secondary Level-High School FRI
World History
Civics and Government
Table 10
Politics is Not a Spectator Sport: Engaging
Students in Elections
Even if they cannot vote, there are many reasons why students
should care about elections and many ways they can participate. Examine and take home a series of interactive lessons.
Jill Bass, Brenan Smith-Evans, Mikva Challenge, Chicago, IL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 11
Local Government: The Forgotten Magic Weapon
for Engaging Government Classes
Local government is rich in engaging real world civic lessons
for students. Learn how to access local issues, resources and
leaders through simulations, classroom visits and virtual field
trips.
Ken Bickers, University of Colorado Boulder, CO; Kent
Willmann, Longmont, CO
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 12
Power to the People! Engaging Diverse Learners
through Interactive Lessons
This presentation will provide social studies educators with a
wide variety of interactive lessons and student-centered classroom simulations in United States Government.
Michael Palermo, Yorktown High School, Arlington, VA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 13
The Web 2.0 Playground: Collaborative Learning
in Practice
Tweet the Constitution. Uncover the power of social bookmarking. Zoom around a non-linear playground. Explore and
98
Dimensions of Diversity
discover how Web 2.0 tools foster meaningful learning and
effective practice.
Jeffrey Pedersen, Brooke Point High School, Stafford, VA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 14
Using and Assessing Effective Discussion in the
Classroom
Tired of teacher-dominated question and answer in your classroom? This session will explore how to use and assess discussion with a focus on government and civics classes.
John Baran, Kevin Hessberg , University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, VA
Secondary Level-High SchoolCivics and Government
Table 15
Conflict! Collaboration! Increasing Engagement
and Achievement through the Civic Mirror
The Civic Mirror provides students the challenge to keep a
family alive in a simulated society. This session will demonstrate how this simulation engages all learners and increases
student achievement.
Kelly Devenish, Cheryl Payne-Stevens, The Woodlands School,
Ontario, ON
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Table 16
Bringing Financial Literacy to Life with Online
Gaming!
Create an avatar, set your budget, and receive mission objectives. Next, launch into a 3D virtual world where you earn
points for navigating through the financial complexities of real
life.
Jessica Bartlet, Tom Parisi, EverFi, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 17
Other Lives: Improving Literacy Skills to Enhance
Global Awareness
This session presents strategies and ideas for using memoirs,
newspaper articles, non-fiction resources, and technology to
enhance literacy skills, content understanding, and students’
growing sense of global awareness.
David Bosso, Berlin High School, Berlin, CT
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Table 19
Primary Source Activities in the Social Studies
Classroom
This presentation highlights the usage of primary source documents and images in the social studies classroom. These primary sources aid in communicating curricular goals to
students.
Russell Evans, Emin Kilinc, Texas A&M University, College
Station, TX
December 2, Friday 4:20–5:15pm • Concurrents Session 5
U.S. History
Table 20
Hooking and Engaging ELL Students in the Social
Studies Classroom
To effectively engage and teach ELL students, see how creative
teaching ideas, the right use of new and older technology, and
practical differentiation methods will enhance your class.
David Jacobson, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire,
IL
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 21
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 25
Create Your Own Historical Facebook for Free
Students make history come alive by participating as historical
figures in your own created social network. Receive instructions and resources to create, implement, and follow-up on
your own network.
Brian Adam, Catherine Dobkin, Parkway Central High School,
Chesterfield, MO
Supervisory-Administrative U.S. History
Political Cartoons: The Art of Controversy
Table 26
Political cartoons can be used to engage students in the
instructional process, teach history, and increase students’
interest in the subject. They also prepare students to analyze
and interpret information.
Bill Fetsko, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Williamsburg,
VA
Essential standards are gaining popularity as a way to ensure
coverage of core content. In the process, they may be reducing
history instruction to lists of names, dates, and facts.
Paul McHenry, University of California, Riverside, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 22
U.S. Constitution: Principles in Four Worlds, Past
to Present
Using the U.S. as a critical point of reference, students examine
political, economic, social, and cultural dynamics—and their
relative importance to successful nation building for today’s
failed states.
Renee Basford, Rebecca Flynn, Trish Hanson, Gloria
Hernandez, Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, CA; Teresa
Hudock, USC—CALIS, Los Angeles, CA
Essential Standards: Removing the Social from
Social Studies?
Higher Education Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Doing History: “Project-based” Learning to
Engage the Civil Rights Era
This session demonstrates project-based learning and research
skills to engage students’ historical thinking. The context is the
segregated and closed school era of Prince Edward County,
Virginia in the 1950’s and 1960’s.
Helen Stiff-Williams, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA;
John Sturtz, Keene State College, NH
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 24
Waves of Global Change: A Holistic World History
Five waves of historical change provide the organization for
this “big picture,” holistic world history teaching model. Easily
grasped by students and teachers, and readily adapted to the
classroom.
Denise Ames, Center for Global Awareness, Albuquerque, NM
FRI
Civics and Government
Table 27
Learning Active Citizenship in an Ever-Changing
World
Engage elementary education teacher candidates in current
event research and service learning projects in order to experience active citizenship and effective social studies teaching
strategies in an ever-changing world.
Anneliese Mueller-Worster, Salem State University, Salem, MA
Higher Education Table 23
Concurrent Sessions 5
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Table 29
When East Meets West: Crafting Cross-Discipline
Courses
This session reports findings from an experimental cross-discipline approach to teaching pre-professional English and social
science education majors in a field/classroom management
methods course.
Clarissa West-White, Headley White, Florida State University,
Tallahassee, FL
Higher Education World History
Table 30
Maybe It’s Old School Technology, But It’s All
They Had
Pictures are worth a thousand words, but today’s students live
in “instant” worlds. How can pre-service and novice teachers
spark student interest in images from a less digital past?
Brent Chowen, Brigham Young University, Hawaii, Laie, HI
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 2, Friday 5:25–6:20pm • Concurrent Sessions 6
5:25–6:20pm
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Concurrent Sessions 6
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Civics and Government
Room 209C
Concurrent Sessions 6
Sowing Seeds, Sowing Action: Service-Learning
and Community Agriculture
FRI
Fifteen pre-service elementary teachers completed a semesterlong service project for a community vegetable garden during
a social studies methods course. Ultimately, how can service
learning transform into social action?
Shaun Johnson, Towson University, Baltimore, MD
Elementary Geography
Room 306
X Marks the Spot: Integrating Geocaching in the
Classroom
Unearth the benefits of Geocaching in the classroom. Engage
your students through a high-tech treasure hunt that will make
social studies come alive!
Lucy Bush, Jeffrey Hall, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA
Elementary U.S. History
Room 209A
Past Meets Future: An Interconnect on the
Internet
Take a virtual step back in time to navigate through cyberspace! You will interact with authentic historical characters as
you expand your ability to teach social studies with technology
resources.
Jen Dowd, Vivien Geneser, Michele Maldonado, Texas A&M
University-San Antonio, TX
Elementary Economics
Room 145B
U.S. History
Where Financial Literacy Meets Media Literacy:
Integrate, Don’t Isolate
Financial and media literacy are really two ends of the same
spectrum. Innovative projects and integrated lessons can target
that in-between place of money and messaging where today’s
students operate.
Mercer Hall, Patricia Russac, Buckley Country Day School,
Roslyn, NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School Geography
Room 143C
7 Billion and Counting: Lessons for Our Planet’s
Future
Engage in innovative activities for grades 6-12 to explore connections between human population growth, resource consumption, economic development and the changing face of
our planet. Free CD-ROM of activities.
Pamela Wasserman, Population Connection, Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High School Geography
Room 201
3-D Maps and More! Hands-on Lessons GALORE
for Diverse Learners
3-D Maps, salt-dough maps, interactive geography games,
Econo-masks, Geo-Bingo, Culture Pizzas, Culture Passports,
Geo-mazing Links, timeline mobiles, and more, reach students
regardless of academic capability. Participants will receive a
CD with lessons.
Patricia Lewis, Mary Trichel, Humble ISD, Humble TX
Middle Level-Jr. High School
Global Connections
Room 208A
Room 140B
This session will explain the diverse nature of the Abolitionist
Movement using Henry “Box” Brown’s struggle to obtain
freedom.
Kisha Christian, Oak Grove Elementary School, Richmond,
VA; Matthew Kirkby, Blackwell Elementary School, Richmond,
VA
We will present new resources to teach about the trans-Atlantic
slave trade and the practice of slavery in Brazil, as well as one
of its cultural legacies: the art form of capoeira.
Natalie Arsenault, The University of Texas at Austin, TX;
Colleen Devine, Atlanta Charter Middle School, Atlanta, GA;
John Fernandez, Fort Worth Independent School District, Fort
Worth, TX
Using Literature Circles to Teach the Diversity of
the Abolitionist Movement
Africa in Brazil: Teaching about Slavery and its
Effects
Middle Level-Jr. High School Social Sciences
Room 147A
Creating Student Change Agents: The Not in Our
School Model
For those who see bullying in their classrooms and say
ENOUGH. Learn about Not in Our School and the online
tools we provide to help school communities develop antihate activities.
Beck Cohn-Vargas, The Working Group, Oakland, CA
100
Dimensions of Diversity
December 2, Friday 5:25–6:20pm • Concurrent Sessions 6
U.S. History
Room 203A
Using Oral Histories to Develop Historical
Understanding and Literacy Skills
The purpose of this presentation is to share four case studies of
teachers’ experiences in using oral histories with students in
order to develop social studies knowledge and literacy skills.
Susan Allen, Nichols School, Buffalo, NY; Michael Cambria,
Buffalo Public Schools, Buffalo, NY; Karen Dutt-Doner, Shaheen
Qandt, Lisa Sanders, Canisius College, Buffalo, NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School PreAP/AP Vertical Alignment: Aiming for a 5!
This session addresses improvement strategies for minority
student AP scores through strong PreAP/AP vertical alignment of writing and critical thinking strategies. Participants
will engage in selected strategies and receive handouts.
Douglas Edwards, Cynthia Fairbanks, Montra Rogers, Mark
Samuel, Elena Silva-Leal, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Civics and Government
Salon C
Democracy Class Powered by Rock the Vote: The
2012 Election
Prepare your students for the 2012 presidential election with
Rock the Vote’s Democracy Class. This free, nonpartisan program teaches students how to register to vote, and why their
voice matters.
Chrissy Faessen, Rock the Vote, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209B
Ignite Student-to-Student Talk! An International
Deliberation Format
Encourage students to think critically and voice their views
constructively! Participants will practice teaching strategies
and receive reproducible deliberation materials which engage
students in weighing issues from multiple perspectives.
Kevin Zupin, Center for the Study of Global Change, Indiana
University, Bloomington, IN
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 204C
All Rise! Courtroom Trials for Law and Core
Classes
Drama, intrigue and engaged students—courtroom trials
create a dynamic environment for learning. The presenters
demonstrate economics and history classroom tested trials
that offer diverse points of view.
Suzanne Litrel, Jeanne-Marie Marziliano, Bay Shore High
School, Bay Shore, NY
U.S. History
Room 203B
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 149B
Coming to Your School: The Classroom Economist
This session will introduce the Federal Reserve Sixth District’s
new online professional development tool, the Classroom
Economist. Learn how to make the most of this lesson-in-abox resource.
Amy Hennessy, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA;
Lesley Mace, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta- Jacksonville
Branch, Jacksonville, FL
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 140A
Pulitzer Center’s Downstream Gateway: Water
Resources and the Global Community
Using as examples the global water crisis and the tuberculosis
epidemic, learn how to bring Pulitzer Center multimedia journalism resources into your classroom.
Peter Sawyer, Mark Schulte, David Rochkind, The Pulitzer
Center on Crisis Reporting, Washington, DC
Concurrent Sessions 6
Middle Level-Jr. High School Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 147B
Using National Standards to Teach Psychology
and AP Psychology
The new National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula can be a great tool to decide scope and sequence for
both regular and AP Psychology.
Amy Fineburg, Oak Mountain High School, Trussville, AL
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 103B
Practical Advice for Teaching about the
Treatment of Psychological Disorders
Participants explore the evolution of psychotherapy, engaging
in active learning exercises, which they can use to promote
student understanding of the treatment of psychological disorders from five different psychological perspectives.
Angela Gillem, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA; Kristin
Habashi Whitlock, Viewmont High School, Bountiful, UT
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 103A
Digital Activism: Literature, Blogs, and
Revolution in the Middle East
Find out how young activists have adapted social media to
engage traditional forms of criticism to revolutionize the fight
for social justice and rights in the Arab world.
Tarek El-Ariss, Christopher Rose, Center for Middle Eastern
Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, TX
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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FRI
December 2, Friday 5:25–6:20pm • Concurrent Sessions 6
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School Room 149A
Room 143B
Research shows that effective learning takes placer when content is relevant and students are engaged. This session offers a
practical demonstration of how high quality, standards-aligned
content from NBC Learn can enable students to develop their
analytical and critical thinking skills.
Mark Miano, NBC News/NBC Learn, Washington, DC
The U.S. Department of Education’s Teaching American History program funds the design and delivery of high-quality
teacher professional development. This presentation will discuss findings from the national evaluation.
Marilyn Gillespie, Daniel Humphrey, SRI International,
Arlington, VA; Phyllis Weinstock, Berkeley Policy Associates,
Oakland, CA
Concurrent Sessions 6
First Drafts of History: Using NBC Learn
Resources to Teach and Engage Students
FRI
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Teaching America’s Past: Evaluating the Teaching
American History Program
U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 144A
Teacher in Pajamas: Designing and Teaching a
Meaningful Online Course
Join an online curriculum designer and a United States History online teacher to discover how to create and implement
courses that promote meaningful exchange, interactive technology, and an emphasis on diversity.
Laura Lay, Richmond, VA; Zak McNamara, Fairfax County
Public Schools Online, Annandale, VA
Room 144C
Trade in Tropical Treasures:
Diverse Roots of Consumer Culture
From ancient to modern eras, goods from the tropics have
shaped consumption. The session traces clothes, foods, medicines and furnishings that have given us ideas of beauty and
luxury today.
Susan Douglass, Georgetown University, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 143A
Room 208B
Diplomacy and Documents: Lessons in U.S.
Foreign Policy
Reading Made Easy: Literacy Strategies for High
School History
Interact with the U.S. Department of State to incorporate over
250 primary documents into existing course frameworks.
Newly published materials and prizes will be available!
Nancy R. Cope, Susan Holly, Carol Vogler, U.S. Department of
State, Washington, DC
Learn strategies to boost high school student literacy without
sacrificing content. Teachers will participate in skillbuilding
reading activities that are easily translatable to any social
studies content area.
Lindsey Cafarella, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
Decisions, Decisions: Infusing Choice and Action
into History Classrooms
Engage in presenting history content as a series of choices and
consequences. Challenge students to examine decisions of the
past to make meaningful connections to the present and
future.
Melissa Lisanti, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg , VA; Sharon
Zuckerwar, Strategies for Action, Christiansburg, VA
Secondary Level-High School Industrialization Through Two Lenses: Teaching
with Documents and Art
National Archives and Records Administration and Smithsonian American Art Museum will provide classroom techniques
and resources that utilize artwork and primary source documents to teach about the industrialization of America.
Adrienne Gayoso, Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Washington, DC; Michael Hussey, National Archives and Records
Administration, Washington, DC
Dimensions of Diversity
Higher EducationCUFA Research into Practice Session
Room 304
Religious Diversity: Scholarship and Teaching
Two researchers and teacher educators (pre-K-12) will share
their work on religion and education, and on religion and
social studies in particular. They will explain how practice
guided and inspired their research and how their research has
in turn changed and guided their practice.
Sandra Oldendorf, Connie Green, Appalachian State University,
Boone, NC
U.S. History
Room 202B
102
Higher Education Sessions
Higher Education
Global Connections
Room 305
Comparing Pedagogical Approaches: U.S. and
Japanese Teaching on Hiroshima/Nagasaki
This session compares ways teachers in the U.S. and Japan
teach about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during
World War II. Recommendations are provided for fostering
informed and active global citizens.
Yoriko Hashizaki, Japan; Brad Maguth, Hiram College, Hiram,
OH; Misato Yamaguchi, Augusta State University, Augusta, GA
TIME
December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00
am • Concurrent Sessions 7
Saturday Schedule
Events
Speakers
Page
7:00–8:00am
Community/Council Breakfasts
p. 33
8:00–9:00am
Concurrent Sessions 7
p. 105
9:15–10:15am
Concurrent Sessions 8
Featured Speaker: Lawrence Husick
pp. 7, 109
10:30–11:30am
Concurrent Sessions 9
Vital Issue:
Closing the Achievement Gap
p. 114
11:45am–12:45pm
Keynote Speaker
Rex Ellis
pp. 7, 120
12:45–2:00pm
Break
12:45–2:00pm
Communities Showcase
2:00–3:00pm
Concurrent Sessions 10
Featured Speaker: Teta V. Banks
pp. 7, 120
3:15–4:15pm
Concurrent Sessions 11
Beyond Belief
p. 125
4:30–5:30pm
Concurrent Sessions 12
p. 130
5:00–9:00pm
Mount Vernon by Candlelight
p. 15
5:30–7:30pm
NCSS Awards Reception
p. 11
5:30–8:00pm
National Archives Reception
p. 11
6:00–9:00pm
National Geographic Reception
p. 11
p. 33
Concurrent Sessions 7
Time
SAT
Exhibit Hall 9:00–11:30am, 2:30–4:30pm
The ultimate assessment of social studies education is found in the lives of our students. This showcase of knowledge
application and engaged citizenship highlights a diverse collection of projects in which student learning has moved far
beyond the confines of the classroom walls and into the community and the world.
Educators will have an opportunity to walk through a social-studies-in-action gallery, examine artifacts and student work,
and visit with students and teachers from the Washington area about their efforts. You’ll meet students who have established relationships with leaders and students in other nations, forging new partnerships and motivating students to stay
involved long past assigned due dates. You’ll learn about unique relief and fundraising efforts. You’ll discover how students
have actively worked for change in their schools and community, and what they’ve gained through their interaction with
local representatives, councils, boards, civic groups, businesses, and many others.
Special thanks goes to all participating students and teachers, and to Mary Davis and Laura Pinto, who recruited, coordinated, and organized the school groups.
Students Living Social Studies is generously sponsored by Teachers’ Curriculum Institute.
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00am • Concurrent Sessions 7
Elementary Today’s Featured Session
Room 202B
History Labs: Boosting Student Achievement
through Guided Historical Inquiry
2:00–3:00pm
Room 204B
Using the Nation’s Report Card: Online Tools
to Raise Achievement and Close Gaps in U.S.
History, Civics, and Geography
Concurrent Sessions 7
Nationally recognized Los Angeles teacher Shannon
Garrison will share information and practical tools from
the Nation’s Report Card at grades 4, 8, and 12, including
a demonstration of complimentary, online resources
teachers and policymakers can use to improve achievement in these key social studies disciplines.
SAT
Elementary Sessions
Civics and Government
Room 144A
Every Picture Book is a Social Studies Book
Presenters will share essential questions and activities to incorporate children’s literature into social studies lessons. They will
also share a diverse selection of picture books that address
social studies concepts.
Jeannette Balantic, Garden City Public Schools, Garden City,
NY; Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Geography
Salon C
Sharing a Small World: Activities on People and
the Environment
Introduce elementary students to connections between people
and the environment in this interdisciplinary, hands-on session. Engage in lively activities on population and natural
resource use. Free materials on CD-ROM!
Carol Bliese, Population Connection, Washington, DC
Elementary Global Connections
Room 145A
Curriculum: A Launch Pad for Powerful
21st-Century Learning
Understanding by Design research will be introduced as a
framework for creating integrated social studies curriculum.
Rigorous interdisciplinary instructional challenge models will
be explored through interactive and participant-centered
activities.
Jesse Orth, Washington County Public Schools, Hagerstown,
MD
104
Dimensions of Diversity
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
iCivics: Free Interactive Civics Education for the
Digital Generation
8:00–9:00am
Elementary How can teachers increase engagement and achievement in
U.S. history, particularly with at-risk students? History Labs,
an innovative, inquiry-based instructional process, will be
modeled and classroom-ready resources will be shared.
Tina Nelson, Coralea Tarlton, Baltimore County Public
Schools, Towson, MD
Room 201
Concurrent Sessions 7
Elementary U.S. History
iCivics engages students through online, interactive, and
problem-based learning. Participants will explore iCivics.org
through an interactive tour— previewing new games and site
features not yet available publicly.
Jeff Curley, Carrie Ray-Hill, iCivics, Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Room 203A
H2O for Life—Water! Putting Social Justice into
Action!
H2O for Life provides the opportunity to study the global
water crisis through global partner connections, while taking
action locally and globally that will change the lives of your
students!
Patricia Hall, H2O for Life, White Bear Lake, MN
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 209B
Tracking Perspectives: Investigating Civil War
and Immigration through Case Study
Help students find out what really went on in history by
leading them to the source...maps, photographs, cartoons and
more. Participants receive two case studies filled with primary
materials.
Julie Daniels, The New York State Archives, Albany, NY; Kristi
Fragnoli, The College of Saint Rose, Albany, NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 145B
MISSION US: Understanding History through
Interactive Gaming
MISSION US is a series of free online games developed by
public television to engage students in American history. This
session will orient teachers to the game and materials.
Christopher Czajka, Robin Gold, WNET, New York, NY
December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00am • Concurrent Sessions 7
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Secondary Level-High School Room 208B
Tools and Lessons for Deliberating Controversial
Issues in the Classroom
Learn how to access and use free on-line materials and methodology that engages students in deliberations about controversial public issues. We’ll also present research on the program’s effectiveness.
Bebs Chorak, Lena Morreale Scott, Street Law Inc., Silver
Spring, MD; Katie Moore, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los
Angeles, CA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 208A
Indian Mascots: Honor or Acceptable Racism and
Deculturalization of People?
Honor or Insult? A critical examination of American Indian
mascots using case law, tribal responses and media’s influence.
Materials will be given to help dissect this complex social
issue.
Cindy Renner, Larry Wright, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln,
NE
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 149B
Analyze This! Library of Congress’ Digital
Collection Demystifies Environmental Economics
Analyze Library of Congress primary sources in this hands-on
session for deeper student engagement in the debate over
environmental decisions under conditions of scarcity. Leave
with classroom-ready materials!
Jill Beccaris-Pescatore, Montgomery County Community
College, Blue Bell, PA
Secondary Level-High School
Global Connections
Room 144B
Get It! Global Education to Improve Tomorrow
Heifer International’s Get It! curriculum uses investigative
journalism, critical thinking, and hands-on experiences to
engage students in learning about global trade, social and environmental issues, and how to enact change.
Kim Machnik, Heifer International, Little Rock, AR
Secondary Level-High School Barbara Segnatelli, Severna Park High School, Severna Park,
MD
Global Connections
Room 209A
Clashing Cultures: Understanding International
Cooperation and Competition through
Experiential Learning
Experience the diverse socio-economic, political, and geographic interests of China, Great Britain, Russia, Mexico, Iran,
and Nigeria as learners negotiate a sustainable oil policy in an
interactive role-play simulation.
Psychology
Room 147B
What are the Essential Questions in Introductory
Psychology?
Wiggins/McTighe (1998) propose that teachers discuss
“essential questions” behind standards. This process will be
used to develop an understanding of what the “essential questions” might be behind psychology standards.
Rob McEntarffer, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 209C
Looking Beyond the Board: Technology and
Collaboration for Psychology Classes
This session considers innovative projects that integrate the
21st century skills of collaboration, leadership, critical
thinking, and technological competence, which can be used in
the face-to-face and virtual classrooms.
David P. Brooks, Leah E. Greene, Broughton High School,
Raleigh, NC
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Concurrent Sessions 7
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Room 143B
SAT
ExPSYCHting Lessons for Psychology!
Seeking new ways to make psychology relevant to your students? Look no further for hands-on, creative lessons and
projects to enhance your general or AP psychology course.
Handouts provided!
Joe Geiger, Carl Sandburg High School, Orland Park, IL; Daria
Schaffeld, Prospect High School, Mt. Prospect, IL; Jennifer
Schlicht, Bonner Springs High School, Bonner Springs, KS; Sejal
Schullo, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 140A
Standards and Essential Questions for
Psychology Today!
Update your Psychology course to address the APA National
Standards for High School Psychology Curricula with Essential Questions that promote active learning and authentic
assessment.
Debra Park, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ; Hilary
Rosenthal, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
Drowning in History: Teaching about Segregated
Beaches and Pools
Students often do not know about the segregated history of
America’s public waters. Using Florida as a case study, this
important topic in history is explored. Strategies and resources
are distributed.
Michael Berson, Barbara Cruz, University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL
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December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00am • Concurrent Sessions 7
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 203B
Civil Strife: The Uncivil America
Making History Matter: Using Projects to Entice
Disengaged History Students
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 147A
Become a Digital Historian! Using Teachinghistory.org, the
nation’s premiere history education website, learn about digital
resources and best practices for teaching American history
with technology.
Jennifer Rosenfeld, Center for History and New Media, George
Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Secondary Level-High School Participants will walk away from this session with over a dozen
ready-to-use projects that have successfully engaged Bronx
world history students while developing them as critical, historical thinkers.
Stephen Lazar, New York City Schools, Brooklyn, NY; Frank
McCaughey, Bronx Lab School, The Bronx, NY
Secondary Level-High School
World History
Room 143C
The Digital History Teacher’s Toolkit
Concurrent Session s7
World History
Room 103A
Civil strife has been a recurring feature of our nation’s history.
Can the study of such events assist citizens as they debate the
divisive issues confronting society today?
Bill Fetsko, Bill White, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation,
Williamsburg, VA
U.S. History
Room 140B
American Wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan
SAT
Secondary Level-High School We will compare and contrast three American wars using your
own package of duplicate primary documents. Participants
will discover new insights and resources into the past, present,
and future.
Ted Engelmann, Denver, CO
Diverse Vocabulary Strategies to Maximize
Achievement for All Learners
Experience high return vocabulary strategies—Robert J.
Marzano’s theory put to practical application. Unique strategies teach, reinforce and increase retention of academic vocabulary for the 5-12 audience, all content. Materials download.
Steve Beasley, Sherry Owens, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 206
Conquering the Dimensions of Global Diversity
Empower your students to conquer the dimensions of global
diversity with the power of the P.E.R.S.I.A.N. model!
Jennifer Chandler, Nicole Fagundes, Carson High School,
Carson City, NV
Supervisory-Administrative Session
Supervisory-Administrative Civics and Government
Room 306
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103B
African Americans and Native Americans in the
American Revolution
Thousands of African Americans and Native Americans fought
as patriots in the American Revolution. This is a historical
reconstruction of many of the patriots from Rhode Island and
other states.
Eric Grundset, National Society of the Daughters of the
American Revolution, Washington, DC; Louis Wilson, Smith
College, Northampton, MA
Richard Theisen: Experiences and Vision of an
NCSS President
The Archives Committee welcomes all conference attendees
to their annual Past President interview. Special guest Richard
Theisen (1999-2000) will discuss NCSS policies and his experiences during his time in office.
Michael Lovorn, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL;
Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, Johnstown,
PA
Higher Education Session
Higher Education
Civics and Government
Room 304
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 143A
Help Students Understand Diversity: Incorporate
African-American History into your U.S. History
Course
Help students learn diversity by incorporating an African
American history component into a “standard” U.S. History
curriculum. Innovative techniques, take-home materials make
your diverse classroom a haven, not a heartache.
Lisbeth Gant-Britton, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
106
Dimensions of Diversity
Learning About and Writing for Journals in the
Social Studies
Editors of six major journals in social studies education will
provide overviews of their respective journals (purpose, audience, circulation, publication guidelines, etc.) for readers and
prospective authors. Audience: General
Patricia Avery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Ronald Banaszak, Aurora University, Aurora, IL; Andrea
Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY; Kathy Swan,
University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; Cynthia Szymanski Sunal,
The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00am • Concurrent Sessions 7
Elementary Exhibitor Sessions
Global Connections
Table 4
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Using Academic Scrapbooking to Motivate
Students to Remember Teachers Lessons
A “serious fun” hands-on workshop sharing the motivation-toretention best practice technique: personalizing the curriculum with academic scrapbooking. Leave with ready for the
classroom sample lesson plan (showing differentiation).
Heidi Willard, Scrapbooks That Teach, North Bethesda, MD
Classroom Instruction that Creates Caring
Citizens
Caring classrooms integrate social studies and language arts,
consider students’ needs, and connect students to the world
around them. Come see how one thoughtfully prepared lesson
can transform your class.
Mary Ledbetter, University of Texas Elementary School, Austin,
TX
Elementary ***Exhibitor Session***
U.S. History
The Euro: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Take part in an FTE activity that helps teach about the origins
of the Euro and hear analysis of the current European crisis.
Thirty participants will receive an Izzit “Free Trade” DVD.
Deborah Henney, Ken Leonard, Foundation for Teaching
Economics, Davis, CA
Poster Presentations
Exhibit Hall
Gullah: New Dimensions of a Diverse Cultural
Heritage
Examine historic artifacts, maps, photos, and literature to discover how and why the Gullah culture survived and continues
to influence and contribute to our history and economy.
Susan Dawkins, Debra Templin, Newberry County Schools,
Prosperity, SC; Mary Kennerly, Lexington Richland School
District Five, Columbia, SC
Middle Level-Jr. High School Elementary Civics and Government
Table 1
Teaching Power, Authority and Governance to
Elementary Children
Social Sciences
SAT
Table 6
The African Diaspora in Latin America:
Capoeira in Brazil
Useful, easily adapted activities for teaching Government and
civic responsibility to elementary children in fun, interesting
and hands-on ways.
Karl Matz, Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN
Participants will learn about the history, current practice, and
continued development of African based cultural traditions in
Latin America through the exploration of capoeira, an AfroBrazilian art form.
Aimee Green, Mary Risner, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL
Elementary Economics
Middle Level-Jr. High School Table 2
Banking on Citizenship:
Lessons from the Economy of a MicroSociety
Attendees will be exposed to methods for the teaching of elementary economics by using money to engage students in
real-life activities that teach children how to be productive
citizens.
James Brown, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Barbara
Guthrie, Oregon, OH
Elementary Geography
Table 3
MAPS: Mnemonics Are Powerful Strategies!
Remembering the 50 States
Did you know the MVP states protect the NEW states? Where
are the COW states? Come and learn many fun strategies to
assist your students in remembering the USA.
Robin Kapavik, Texas A&M University-San Antonio, TX
Concurrent Sessions 7
Table 5
Room 204B
U.S. History
Table 7
A Practical Approach to Differentiation
All students can learn if we engage them. This helpful session
presents a simple approach to meeting the needs of a wide
range of learners in the classroom. It works!
Sharon Coletti, InspirEd Educators, Inc., Roswell, GA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 8
John Hewson’s Revolution: Ready! Aim! Print!
Students Love Art! Three teaching styles introduce cross-curriculum connections into the study of U.S. history in the classroom. Students learn and understand through reading, writing,
technology, and ART!
Catherine Dixon, Avalon Middle School, Orlando, FL; Maribel
Lopez, Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, FL; Barbara
Shackelford, Carver Middle School, Orlando, FL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 3, Saturday 8:00–9:00am • Concurrent Sessions 7
SeconDary level-hiGh School
civicS anD Government
SeconDary level-hiGh School
worlD hiStory
Table 9
Table 16
Raise Every Voice and Sing:
Diversity in the Civics Classroom
France and the Holocaust:
Before, During, and Since Vichy
Discover exciting new ways to bring diverse voices into your
classroom using the Youth Leadership Initiative’s innovative
materials.
Steven Adkins, Meg Heubeck, University of Virginia Center for
Politics—Youth Leadership Initiative, Charlottesville, VA
From the Middle Ages to Dreyfus to the recent deportation of
the Gypsies, France has an interesting and often neglected history. Look at France’s future by looking at her past.
Tom Glaser, Mater Academy Charter High School, Overland
Park, FL
SeconDary level-hiGh School
civicS anD Government
Table 10
Concurrent Sessions 7
Community Connections: Facilitating Meaningful
Community Experiences for Students
Effective community engagement promotes civic responsibility, but achieving authentic engagement can be challenging
for educators. Come discuss various curriculum models and
lesson ideas to promote community engagement in your
classroom.
Sarah Brown, Northern Nevada Council for the Social Studies,
Reno, NV; Margaret Ferrara, Marlene Rebori, University of
Nevada Reno, NV
SeconDary level-hiGh School
SAT
Global connectionS
Table 12
A Global Gathering: Video Conferencing in Social
Studies Classrooms
Video conferencing will play a role in the 21st century classroom like never before. This technology allows students to
collaborate and learn cooperatively while examining social
studies in various perspectives.
Brandon Haas, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Tracy
Tilotta, Pasco County Schools, Land O’ Lakes, FL
SeconDary level-hiGh School
Global connectionS
Table 13
Just Say No: Acts of Dissenting Citizenship
This inquiry session demonstrates diverse methods of dissent
within the context of various world conflicts where women
embraced their basic human rights to rise up and “just say
no.”
Karon LeCompte, Tony Talbert, Sunny Wells, Baylor University,
Waco, TX
SeconDary level-hiGh School
Social ScienceS
Table 14
Copyright Clarity: How Fair Use Supports Digital
Learning
With the ease of accessing digital media, how can educators
and their students make sense of what constitutes the “fair use”
of copyrighted material? What you CAN do is highlighted.
Spiro Bolos, Media Education Lab of Temple University,
Philadelphia, PA
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Dimensions of Diversity
Future NCSS Conference Dates
2012 ............Seattle, Washington, November 16–18
2013 ..............St. Louis, Missouri, November 22–24
2014 ..... Boston, Massachusetts, November 21–23
2015 ...New Orleans, Louisiana, November 13–15
2016 ........................Washington, DC, December 2–4
2017 .............. San Francisco, CA, November 17–19
December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
9:15–10:15am
students make social studies connections and develop literacy
skills.
Kathryn Engebretson, Judith Harrington, Jessica Winkelaar,
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Lawrence A. Husick
Co-Director, Foreign Policy Research Institute, Wachman Center
Program on Teaching Innovation
“Failure is the Only Option! Teaching the Next
Generation of Innovators”
The American system of education is allergic to failure. As a
result, it fails to adequately produce innovators. Parents want
their children to attend the most competitive colleges, and fear
that any grade below “A” will dash this hope. Students, teachers,
and schools are constantly being tested, and fear that low proficiency will doom them to “on-level” instruction, budget cuts,
student exodus, or job loss. We have institutionalized riskaversion. We now simply never attempt anything that may
result in failure. Our comfort zones now define our intellectual
horizons.
Concurrent Sessions 8
Geography
Award Session
Room 149A
Teachers Explore Ways to Use GPS Technology
Geospatial technology has great potential for teaching geography concepts. This study describes how K-12 teachers
implemented GPS and geocaching interdisciplinary activities
in their lessons. Implications of geospatial technology are discussed. The researcher will provide examples of GPS and geocaching activities as a model for using geospatial technologies
to engage learners.
James N. Oigara, Canisius College, Buffalo, NY
2010 Geographic Literacy Award
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Civics and Government
Room 144B
Bullying: Stop It Early!
Dr. Phil says teachers and parents should know about bullying.
Linking both theory and human rights, this session presents
practical strategies for stopping bullying in primary and elementary schools.
Mary Haas, Matthew Anderson, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV; Blythe Hinitz, The College of New Jersey,
Ewing, NJ
Elementary Civics and Government
Room 140B
What’s the Big Idea? Reading to Teach
Elementary Social Studies
Big ideas can turn interactive read-alouds into significant social
studies. Learn to use almost any trade book to help elementary
Elementary Economics
Room 209C
Using “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” to
Teach Economics
This interactive session features classroom-ready lessons based
on a classic children’s picture book. Instructional concepts
include productive resources, goods and services, and costs
and benefits. Handouts and door prizes!
Barbara Haynes, Virginia Council on Economic Education,
Richmond, VA; Lynne Stover, James Madison University, Center
for Economic Education, Harrisonburg, VA
Elementary Geography
Room 208A
It’s Always Earth Day: Hands-on Activities to
Make it Meaningful
This fun and interactive session will examine the role of geography and environment on societies, both past and present.
Workshop participants will leave with a full resource kit.
Lynn Black, Agriculture in the Classroom, Richmond, VA
Elementary Concurrent Sessions 8
Featured Speaker
Room 202A
Global Connections
Room 208B
Gear Up for Universal Design for Learning
Create engaging lessons for students in general education,
gifted and talented, English language learners, and special education with a Universal Design for Learning unit planner.
John George, Hood College, Frederick, MD
Elementary U.S. History
Room 203A
Rescuing Social Studies from the Back Burner
Participants will discover the power of integrating social
studies with core curricular areas by examining classroomtested lesson plans, to help students function as responsible
citizens in a diverse society.
Rebecca Bland, Sandra Burger, Salem Avenue Elementary
School, Hagerstown, MD
Elementary U.S. History
Room 202B
No Gifted Children Left Behind: Teacher-Created
Social Studies Assessments
Participants will learn how to adapt existing and create original
assessments that enable all students, particularly gifted
learners, to appropriately demonstrate content mastery. Classroom-tested examples will be distributed.
Lena Bauer, Estelle Kampmeyer School, O’Fallon, IL; Bethany
Hill-Anderson, McKendree University, Lebanon, IL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Civics and Government
Room 203B
The “Other Now”: Today as a Logical
Consequence of Yesterday
We read the headlines every day, but how do we connect the
world around us to our curriculum? Middle School students
will engage participants, showing how easy the connections
are.
Emily Rubinfield, Mark Stephens, Germantown Academy, Ft.
Washington, PA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Concurrent Sessions 8
Room 145B
SAT
Now That I’m a History Teacher - Help!!
New teachers are empowered by text-book knowledge and
one semester of student-teaching, plus the excitement of
teaching; then comes the first days of the contact sport:
Teaching. Here’s help!
Maureen Carroll, Amy Davis, Shaker Middle School, Shaker
Heights, OH
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 143C
Social Studies Live and on the Web!
Students can create impressive learning artifacts that demonstrate their understanding of important social studies concepts
by using free and entertaining Internet-based applications
such as Wordle, Prezi, Voki, timetoast, and Xtranormal.
Glenna Humphries, South Plantation High School, Plantation,
FL; Jennifer Jolley, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School,
Parkland, FL
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 140A
Comparing Democracies: New Materials for
Getting to Know Europe
Today 500 million Europeans experience peace and democracy. Comparative lessons that provide students with a deeper
understanding of European democracies and enhance their
understanding of their own will be demonstrated.
Jackie Johnson, Barbara Miller, Center for Education in Law
and Democracy, Denver, CO; Mark Pituch, Delegation of the
European Union to the U.S., Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 149B
Myths, Tall Tales, and Urban Legends: Facts
Behind the Fed
Learn how to dispel common myths about the Federal Reserve
System. Leave with free resources and lessons that will help
your students think critically.
Amy Hennessy, Gary Tapp, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta,
GA; Scott Wolla, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, MO
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Dimensions of Diversity
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 209B
Good Work Sister! Integrating U.S. History and
Economics in World War II
Use World War II propaganda posters and the principles of
economics to help your students better understand the issues
of the homefront.
Ruth Cookson, Old Dominion University Center for Economic
Education, Richmond, VA
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Salon C
Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue in the
Arctic
The Arctic is a barometer of global environmental health. This
session applies a human rights lens to the issue of climate
change by examining environmental and cultural experiences
of Inuit.
Betsy Arntzen, University of Maine, Orono, ME; Amy
Sotherden, Plattsburgh State University, NY
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 103B
Go Abroad! The Benefits of Teaching Social
Studies Overseas
This session will highlight the benefits that teaching abroad
has on one’s social studies instructional design and overall
pedagogical knowledge. It will also provide guidance for
securing teaching positions overseas.
Jason Schipper, Ruamrudee International School, Bangkok,
Thailand
Secondary Level High-School
Global Connections
Room 306
Postwar Reconstruction: What Happens After the
Conflict
Today, peacebuilding is an important U.S. concern. In this session, we will explore six elements of postwar reconstruction,
look at historical case studies, then analyze efforts in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Lisa Adeli, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of
Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 209A
Studying Natural Disasters: A Global Imperative
for the Social Studies
Employing perspectives from history, the social sciences and
diverse cultures, content, strategies and instructional resources
are introduced to facilitate the study of natural disasters and
their impact on human rights worldwide.
William Fernekes, Rider University, Lawrenceville NJ; Jeff
Helsing , United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC;
Jack Nelson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick NJ; Valerie Ooka
Pang, San Diego State University, CA
December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
Psychology
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 147B
Room 201
Psychology: Promoting Dimensions of Diversity
and Cultural Literacy
Active Learning! Active Choices! Beyond
Interactive Tech? Tech, Yes!
Attendees will participate in hands-on, active learning demonstrations designed to address issues related to diversity and
increase individual cultural literacy. Intended audiences
include high school introductory and AP psychology
teachers.
Charlie Blair-Broeker, Cedar Falls Public Schools, IA; Randy
Ernst, Lincoln Public Schools, NE
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 143B
Mind the Gap: Increasing Access to Advanced
Placement (AP) Classes
Learn how to support students from underrepresented and
disadvantaged backgrounds in AP classes. This presentation
includes practical strategies to increase participation and
achievement in AP classes and on AP tests.
Marika Manos, California State University, Long Beach, CA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 145A
Targeted Vocabulary Instruction in Social
Studies: Tools for Academic Achievement
This interactive session will include modeling of teacher techniques and student strategies for scaffolding learner comprehension and understanding of complex content-specific terms
and concepts essential for learning secondary social studies.
Eric Groce, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; Tina
Heafner, UNC Charlotte, NC; Dixie Massey, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144C
Free Professional Development Tools from The
Library of Congress
Learn how you can bring the Library’s primary-source-based
PD program and its millions of digitized items to your school
or district for free.
Kathy McGuigan, Anne Savage, Library of Congress,
Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
Calling All History Detectives!
Who are “We the People”?
Play History Detective: examine the diversity of citizens found
on First Day Covers; collect supporting evidence from letters,
then draw conclusions. An envelope is small but contains a big
message.
Kris McIntosh, FDC Lessons, Ft. Worth, TX
The Wizard is Within You…Plus 3! Use Interactive Tech
activities as a springboard to extend instructional options and
student choices for differentiation in active history
classrooms.
Lucy Amarillo, Pearson Prentice Hall, Duluth, GA; Wanda
Boyd, Pearson Prentice Hall, Albemarle, NC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 103A
Real Stories, Real Stuff: Teaching with Resources
from the Smithsonian
Discover ways to use Smithsonian artifacts and everyday
objects to unlock stories of the past. Engage in classroom
activities and explore free web-resources from the National
Museum of American History.
Carrie Kotcho, Jenny Wei, National Museum of American
History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Concurrent Sessions 8
Secondary Level-High School 1776 in California: the De Anza Expedition and
Colonial “America”
In 1776, the De Anza Expedition established San Francisco as
the northern-most outpost of the Spanish-American empire.
This session provides a comparative view of colonization and
nation-building beyond standard Eastern narratives.
Mimi Coughlin, Sacramento State University, CA; Erika
Gasser; Mimi Lee
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 143A
The Holocaust: Rescuers and the Righteous
Expand your knowledge of one of the most horrific times in
history. Explore the altruism and caring of ordinary people
during the worst of times. Research, strategies, primary
sources to be distributed.
Barbara Bernard, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY/SUNY
Oneonta, Oneonta, NY; Vincent E. Marmorale, NYSCSS Human
Rights Committee, Rockville Centre, NY
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 206
Inservice Professional Development for Teachers
with English Language Learners
The impact of a school-university, inservice professional development program for best practices in teaching English language learners is explored from perspectives of three social
studies teacher participants and program staff.
Gordon Gibson, West Carrollton High School, West Carrollton,
OH; Karen Newman, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;
Gina Pullin, Hilliard Bradley High School, Hilliard, OH; Darryl
Sycher, New Albany High School, New Albany, OH
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
Secondary Level-High School World History
Mary Frank, Perfectly Frank Papers, Sugar Land, TX
Room 147A
Using Multimedia to Enhance Teaching in the
Social Studies Classroom
Today’s surge in interactive multimedia makes it an exciting
time to be in education! Get concrete suggestions and see new
resources to enliven the social studies classroom.
Melissa Counihan, Elizabeth Murphy, Kate Weber, Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt, Austin, TX; David Lawson, Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt, Geraldine Stevens, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt,
Evanston, IL
Higher Education Sessions
Concurrent Sessions 8
Higher Education Global Connections
Room 304
Investigative Questions and Teaching Resources:
A New Lesson Plan Approach
The IQTR is a new model for constructing lessons, combining
the best elements of active learning with need-based teaching
and in-depth content, putting the teacher in command while
engaging students.
J.D. Bowers, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Higher Education SAT
Social Sciences
Room 305
Poster Presentations
Exhibit Hall
Elementary Geography
Table 1
Social Studies and Science: A Match Made on
Earth
Intertwining Geography, Geology, and Environmental Science concepts empowers students to apply the study of landforms, watersheds, and the economics of land use to their
community, region, or state.
Susan Bardenhagen, Virginia Council for the Social Studies,
Manassas, VA
Elementary Global Connections
Table 2
Global Studies 101 Bags Packed, $0 Budget
Get your boarding passes ready! Come experience global
travel and learn how to integrate the subject areas. Help your
students develop an appreciation and understanding for the
world/people/cultures around them.
Kathy Balek, MaryJane Cassette, San Jose Episcopal Day
School, Jacksonville, FL
Elementary Social Sciences
Modeling Collaboration: Developing Strong
Service-Learning Partnerships
Table 3
This session focuses on teacher/community partner communication and collaboration as an important first step for successful service-learning projects. Resources will be included.
Most beneficial for teachers relatively new to servicelearning.
Meghan Duff, University of Maine at Machias, ME
This session will discuss and demonstrate ways in which elementary teachers can promote tolerance and diversity through
the use of “exceptional” children’s literature.
Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina Aiken, SC
Promoting Diversity through “Exceptional”
Children’s Literature in Elementary Classrooms
Elementary Exhibitor Sessions
***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204A
Student Travel Planning 101
A basic overview of student travel, including trip planning
timelines, how to get the most out of your hotel stay, choosing
a tour operator, student discipline, choosing chaperones, and
some overall statistics of the industry.
Sandra Murphy, Globus Family of Tours, Littleton, CO
Table 4
Mind Mapping: Integrating Social Studies/
Language Arts in Elementary Schools
This presentation will focus on how mind mapping can be
used to help teachers as well as teacher educators integrate the
social studies and language arts curriculum in elementary
schools.
Joseph Nichols, Rebecca Short, Georgia Southwestern State
University, Americus, GA
Middle Level-Jr. High School ***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
Differentiating with Stations in the Secondary
Grades
A hands-on look at interactive stations for social studies.
Experience stations, then learn about their impact on learning
and how to create them on your own. Suitable for all grade
levels.
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U.S. History
Global Connections
Table 5
Pro Se Court: Does Egypt Have
the Right to Rebel?
What caused the Egyptians to protest their leader and thrust
him from his position? Students will observe facts to determine whether Egyptians have a right to change their
government.
Anita Pena, Jodi Smith, Mesa, AZ
December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
Social Sciences
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 6
Table 11
Introduce AFRICA to Middle School Students
Using Award Winning Novel
Key Concepts in Teaching about Latin America
Teaching module encapsulated in an adventure: Marco, age
12, earns half a million dollars trading on the Internet, and
saves an African village with help from his friends from six
continents.
Ginger Heller, Vico Educational Co., Greenwich, CT
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 7
Salute My Bicycle! How the Two-Wheeler
Changed America Forever
Teachers will gain insights—and lesson ideas—about the dramatic impact of the bicycle in the 1890s on road development,
social mores, fashion, women’s rights, and the growth of
advertising.
Sue Macy, Englewood, NJ
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 8
Doing and Learning History Through Literacy,
Interdisciplinary, and Digital Strategies
This presentation will use primary sources, literature, and
technology as tools to engage students in the study of history
through content examples such as Underground Railroad
escape stories. Materials provided!
Montra Rogers, Houston Independent School District, Houston,
TX; Lynne Zalesak, Jackson Middle School, Houston, TX
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Need a refresher on Latin America? A panel of regional experts
and educators will discuss how to cover important concepts
and current trends in geography, history, economics, culture,
and government.
Jordan Adams, University of Miami, Miami, FL; Natalie
Arsenault, The University of Texas at Austin, TX; Claire González,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Margherita Tortora, Yale
University, New Haven, CT; Denise Woltering-Vargas, Tulane
University, New Orleans, LA
Secondary Level-High School Table 12
Using Counterfactual History to Enhance
Students’ Historical Understanding
The question “what if?” has been asked by historians for generations. This lesson explains how history teachers can use
their students own “what if ” question to enhance students’
historical understanding.
Scott Roberts, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Athens, GA
Secondary Level-High School SAT
Taking the Mystery out of Advanced Placement
U.S. History
This study offers suggested best practices to assist Advanced
Placement U.S. History teachers in their attempts to close the
achievement gap for minority students and those from low
socioeconomic backgrounds.
Mark Rowland, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary Level-High School What is an American? Examining Legal Standards
of National Identity
Table 14
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 10
Teaching Government with Online Primary
Sources
Explore online resources from the Center on Congress’s
Teaching with Primary Sources Project. They are designed to
engage students in real-life examples of how government
works in a changing world.
Elaine Larson, Center on Congress at Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN
U.S. History
Table 13
Table 9
What is an American? How has American identity changed
over time? This session will use primary sources to explore
ways diverse values and beliefs influence national identity and
American law.
Howard Kaplan, Tiffany Middleton, American Bar Association
Division for Public Education, Chicago, IL
U.S. History
Concurrent Sessions 8
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Twittering through History: Social Networking to
Reach All Learners
Come learn how to reach the diverse learners in your classroom by integrating Facebook and Twitter. Teachers will learn
online and offline ways to use social networking to increase
engagement.
Christine Beaudry, Samuel Brower, University of Houston, TX
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 15
Video, Text, or Both: The Most Powerful
Holocaust Learning Impact?
A researcher helps unravel a question that teachers face when
selecting material to teach the Holocaust: Which media—
text-only, video-only, or mixed-media—elicits students’ strongest connection? Answer in poster presentation.
Margaret Ferrara, University of Nevada Reno, NV; Shawn
Pennell, Raggio Research Center, University of Nevada Reno, NV
91st NCSS Annual Conference
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December 3, Saturday • 9:15–10:15am • Concurrent Sessions 8
Secondary Level-High School 10:30–11:30am
World History
Table 16
Yes, They Can! World History DBQs For All
Secondary Students
Concurrent Sessions 9
Participants will examine how the same DBQs that are used to
teach advanced placement students can also effectively transform the learning environment for all non-AP World History
students.
Kimberly Champagne, South River High School, Edgewater,
MD
SAT
Closing the Achievement Gap
Robert Edison, Mark Finchum, Rosa DeVarona, MaryAnn
Rinaldi, Michael Boucher
Moderated by Loraine Stewart
Urban educators have always dealt with the issues surrounding
the achievement gap between minority students and white
students; however, rural areas and suburbs also struggle with
the same problems. This panel, comprised of classroom
teachers, administrators, and university faculty, will consider
approaches that have been successful in closing that achievement gap, and how they can be duplicated.
The NCSS Membership Drive
Stronger Together!
• Membership Raffle at NCSS Booth
Visit the NCSS booth (booth #433) in the Exhibit Hall in
Washington, DC and sign up to become a new member. Join
now and your name will be entered into a raffle to win a second year free. Three names will be drawn each day December
2–4. You do not need to be present. Winners’ names will be
published in The Social Studies Professional newsletter.
Extra Rewards and Prizes for Joining Now!
• Each One, Reach One
Write your sponsor’s name and member number on your
membership application form. That will enter him or her in the
Each One, Reach One drawing. For signing up 1-10 new members
your sponsor will be eligible for annual conference registration
and 1-night hotel reservation; for signing up 11 or more new
members, your sponsor will be eligible for two free airline tickets;
details at www.socialstudies.org/membership). Winners’ names
will be published in The Social Studies Professional newsletter.
(Enter the Each One, Reach One raffle at any time of the year.)
Member Services and Benefits!
• A Conference Goal: Welcome Newcomer!
Look throughout this Conference Program to read about
sessions separated by Grade Level.
• The Online U.S. History Collection
Check out the U.S. History Collection at www.socialstudies.
org/teacherslibrary. Search the collection by historical period
(Pre-colonial and Colonial; Independence; The New Nation;
Civil War; etc.) and by academic level (elementary; middle;
secondary; college). Then see what pops up! Search results show
titles, authors, and abstracts. Call up (in Adobe pdf format) and
print out the article—or articles—that you want. The collection
consists of hundreds of articles from our peer-reviewed journals
Social Education (with Middle Level Learning) and Social Studies
and the Young Learner, that have been published over the last 15
years.
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Vital Issue Session
Room 202A
Dimensions of Diversity
Rewards &
Prizes Join
Now!
• TSSP is the official newsletter of NCSS, featuring the
latest news, new resources and professional development listings, as well as information on local and state
meetings. TSSP, a benefit of membership in NCSS, is now published exclusively online 8 times per year (September, October,
November/December, January/February, March, April, May/
June, and July/August). That means more information for NCSS
members more often! Be sure we have your up-to-date e-mail
address so that we can send you an alert that an online issue
of TSSP has been published. Update your membership record
online at www.socialstudies.org/membership.
• Get Connected!
In the fall of 2010, NCSS introduced connected.socialstudies.
org—an online network for members of NCSS. The site includes
improved websites for NCSS Communities; allows members
to meet and communicate with one another online through
discussion e-groups; and allows conference attendees to stay
connected during and after the meeting. As an NCSS member,
you will be able to use the site to:
• post your profile or search the member networking
directory;
• search and connect with people you’ve met so that
you can stay in touch;
• post messages to discussion lists to keep topical
conversations going; and
• share presentations, pictures, documents, videos
or other content you feel will help other NCSS
members.
• Award Winning Journals!
Social Education and Socials Studies and The Young Learner. Stop
by the NCSS Booth #433 to receive a sample copy of the latest
issue of both journals and other materials.
Check out www.socialstudies.org for updates.
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
10:30–11:30am
Elementary Room 306
Global Connections
Room 149A
“His Death Avenged!” Inquiry and Analysis in the
History Classroom
A murder-mystery from the American frontier with global
implications inspires inquiry, critical thinking, and 21st-century research skills by inverting Bloom’s taxonomy and
empowering students as historians. The session is interactive
and includes extensive hands-on work with primary
documents.
Mark Johnson, Concordia International School, Shanghai,
China, Award for Global Understanding
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Civics and Government
Room 208A
Freedom to Express: Closing the Civic
Achievement Gap for English Language Learners
Learn how to contextualize English Language Development
strategies with civic education to help ELLs develop academic
vocabulary, writing skills and conceptual understanding to
realize “freedom of expression” as effective citizens.
Michelle Herczog , Los Angeles County Office of Education,
Downey, CA; Michael Long, South Whittier (CA) School District,
Los Angeles County Office of Education, and Biola University, La
Mirada, CA
Elementary Economics
Room 143A
How to Succeed in Business:
First-Grade Entrepreneurs in Action
Teaching about entrepreneurship is easier than you think. Students delight in developing a product with their classmates,
while learning about capital, collateral, business plan, market
research, production, advertising, and pricing.
Jenn Cornell, Powell Center for Economic Literacy, Richmond,
VA; Susan Leahy, Sallie Tinney, Collegiate School, Richmond,
VA
Elementary Geography
Salon C
Food & Geography: What a Match!
Food production around the world lends itself to geographic
inquiry. Hands-on activities focused on food crops of the
Americas are shared and linked to children’s literature. CD
provided.
Sari Bennett, UMBC, Baltimore, MD; Pat Robeson, MD
Geographic Alliance, Odenton, MD
Dance! Draw! Sing! Say! Let Students Show What
They Know
Come participate in four activities designed to enhance children’s understanding of culture, identity, and civic practices
through participation in the fine and performing arts. Learn
more about assessing arts-related activities.
Lynnette Erickson, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT; Judi
Neufeld, Lander University, Greenwood, SC
Elementary U.S. History
Room 203B
Marry Social Studies to Language Arts in Your
Elementary Classroom
Is social studies considered a second-class subject in your elementary classroom? Learn how to raise social studies concepts
up, to live with and support the skills of language arts.
Denise Darrah, Mary Ann O’Neil, Kutztown University,
Kutztown, PA
Elementary U.S. History
Room 201
Literacy, Loot and Links
How can elementary teachers infuse American history into
language arts for their students? This energizing, make-andtake workshop provides the answers. Requires some copy
paper and pencil.
Laureen Hungo-Brady, The American Institute for History
Education, Swedesboro, NJ
Elementary Concurrent Sessions 9
Concurrent Sessions 9
Award Session
Social Sciences
U.S. History
Room 206
Diversity, Depth, and Detail: Purposeful
Integrative Elementary Social Studies
Elementary school teachers and teacher educators partner to
present strategic models for purposeful diverse integrative
elementary social studies content, strategies, and resources.
Janet Alleman, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;
Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX;
Linda Bennett, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Sherry Field, The University of Texas at Austin, TX; Rae Finnie,
Whitsitt Elementary School, Nashville, TN
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Geography
Room 149B
Diverse and Engaging Activities for Interactive
Middle School Geography Classrooms
Participants will learn about ways to enrich traditionally printbased classrooms, including web and print-based strategies, an
interactive world atlas, mapping tools, videos, digital images,
whiteboard activities, and online vocabulary notebooks.
Peggy Altoff, Colorado Springs, CO; Andrew Milson, University
of Texas at Arlington, TX
91st NCSS Annual Conference
115
SAT
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Concurrent Sessions 9
Civics and Government
Room 209A
Room 140A
Global Citizenship, State Standards and Canada:
The Country Left Behind
AP U.S. Government & Politics: A Campaign
Simulation
American students seldom study Canada yet we are “children
of a common mother.” This session illustrates curriculum connections and reviews state/national efforts to include Canada
within current standards. Materials provided.
Christopher Kirkey, Amy Sotherden, SUNY Plattsburgh, NY;
Tina Storer, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA;
Ruth Writer, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Explore a campaign simulation based upon state and national
results from the 2008 and 2010 U.S. elections. Curricular
materials and strategies for implementing the simulation will
be provided.
Andrew Potter, David Strittmatter, LeadAmerica, Boca Raton,
FL
Middle Level-Jr. High School Room 209B
U.S. History
Room 144A
Learning the Language of History: Academic
Language for English Language Learners
Break the language barrier in your history classroom. Engage
ELLs to promote higher level thinking, language learning, and
achievement through explicit academic language instruction.
Karen Kleiber, Darina Walsh, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Fairfax, VA
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Room 143C
SAT
Secondary Level-High School Using the Grid of Nine to Support Diverse
Student Needs
We will discuss how to use the “Grid of 9” to meet the needs
of English language learners and special education students.
Examples from world history classrooms will be presented.
Margarita Jimenez-Silva, Arizona State University, Tempe,
AZ
Middle Level-Jr. High School
World History
Room 145B
Museum in Your Classroom: Teach History
through Art and Technology
Both art and technology are tools! A museum educator and
middle school teacher present the hands-on realities of using
online technology to incorporate art into the world history
curriculum.
Frank Lenz, Wayland Middle School, Wayland, MA;
Willamarie Moore, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 144C
C-SPAN Classroom: Your Connection to Civics,
Government, and Campaign 2012
Discover how C-SPAN’s programs deliver the people, policies, and events that shape our world. C-SPAN Classroom
provides middle and high school educators with free primary
source materials to enhance curriculums.
Pamela McGorry, Joanne Wheeler, C-SPAN, Washington, DC
116
Dimensions of Diversity
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Understanding Afghanistan: Culture, History and
U.S. Policy Options
Using 21st-century skills, teachers examine Afghanistan’s culture, U.S.—Afghan relations, and strategies for engaging students in a role play of U.S. policy towards Afghanistan.
Mimi Stephens, Choices Program, Brown University, RI
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 147B
Using the “Teaching High School Psychology”
Blog in Your Classroom
The “Teaching High School Psychology” blog, a website
written by high school teachers, can be used to access and
organize current events and research related to psychology
content.
Steve Jones, City of Medicine Academy, Durham, NC; Kent
Korek, Germantown High School, Germantown, WI; Rob
McEntarffer, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE; Chuck
Schallhorn, San Benito High School, Hollister, CA; Trevor Tusow,
Forest Grove High School, Forest Grove, OR; Kristin Whitlock,
Viewmont High School, Bountiful, UT
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 209C
Why Do People Kill? Differentiating the Social
Psychology of Genocide
Why do people commit genocide? Learn a differentiated
strategy to teach the social psychology of genocide in an
engaging and rigorous way. Walk away with new techniques
and multiple activities.
Lori Fisher, Animas High School, Durango, CO
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 143B
Jubilee! Using Theater to Understand the Harlem
Renaissance
Make the Harlem Renaissance come alive in this interdisciplinary exploration of culture, class and community. Theater,
poetry, language arts and music come together to form an
educational Jubilee!
Victoria Otten, Anne Smith, Murch Elementary School,
Washington, DC
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
U.S. History
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 202B
Room 103A
Using Art to Create an Interdisciplinary
Classroom
Creative Source Analysis: The Declaration of
Independence, Revised and Updated
The presenters will demonstrate how to create an interdisciplinary classroom using art to show students the connections
between U.S. history and American literature classes.
Melanie Buckley, Heritage High School, Leesburg , VA;
Elizabeth Glynn, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA
Engage your students in multifaceted source analysis through
active reading, collaborative paraphrasing, rhetorical analysis,
and creative rewriting. These methods will be modeled in an
analysis of the Declaration of Independence.
Craig Miller, The Bay School of San Francisco, CA
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
U.S. History
Room 204C
Room 145A
Putting Social Studies Students in “Touch” with
History
Diverse Vocabulary Strategies to Maximize
Achievement for ALL Learners
Learn how collaborative partnerships between archives and
high school classrooms put diverse groups of students in
“touch” with primary sources and add a new dimension to historical research.
Francine Gold, Constitution High School, Philadelphia, PA;
Michael Karpyn, Marple Newtown Senior High School, Newtown
Square, PA; Andrea Reidell, The National Archives at Philadelphia,
PA; Beth Twiss Houting, The Historical Society of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
Experience high return vocabulary strategies—Robert J. Marzano’s theory put to practical application. Unique strategies
teach, reinforce and increase retention of academic vocabulary
for the 5-12 audience, all content. Materials download.
Steve Beasley, Sherry Owens, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 208B
I Was There! Students and the NAACP Fighting
Segregation
History reveals “separate, but equal” never existed. Learn from
an original Brown v. Board of Education plaintiff how students
and the NAACP fought segregation, and compare their efforts
to current marches.
John Stokes, Lanham, MD; Herman Viola, Smithsonian
Institution (emeritus), Falls Church, VA; Lois Wolfe, Henry
County Schools, McDonough, GA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 203A
Affirmative Action: Reverse Discrimination,
Social Justice, or Equal Protection
What is the state of Affirmative Action now? How does it
affect our society today, and shape our society tomorrow? We
will delve into these questions in our seminar.
Philips Dickerson, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
Using Web 2.0 to Promote Learning in the Social
Studies
How can you teach social studies to engage your students? Use
Web 2.0 tools! Attend this session to learn how!
Russell Hammack, Central High School, Tuscaloosa, AL; Lisa
Matherson, Paul W. Bryant High School, Cottondale, AL;
Elizabeth K. Wilson, Vivian Wright, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 147A
Teaching Asia Using Technology
This session will introduce teachers to several award-winning
websites which cover Asian history, geography, current events
and economies. The free lessons are easy to implement and
effective.
Karen Johnson, Nerinx Hall High School, St. Louis, MO; Kevin
Lawrence, China Institute, New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 9
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 140B
Chocolate, Chilies, Cochineal: 3-C’s of Latin
America’s Environmental Trade In-Dependence
Murder! Intrigue! Dyes? Follow the environmental interdependence and economic development of Latin America
through lucrative and treacherous chocolate, chili, and cochineal trades. Primary sources, ready-made lesson plans, bibliography provided.
William Zeigler, San Marcos High School, San Marcos, CA
Higher Education Sessions
Higher Education
Social Sciences
Room 305
Books and Ideas
Notable Trade Book Selection Committee Members will discuss the 2011 books for teaching social studies. The books will
be given away at the end of the session.
Kay A. Chick, Penn State Altoona, PA; Cynthia Grady, Sidwell
Friends School, Washington, DC; Gregory M. Imbur, Goshen
College, Goshen, IN; Kathleen Kavet, North High School, Denver,
CO; Isaac Willis Larison, Norway; Jennifer Lawless, Toledo Public
Schools, Toledo, OH; Andrea S. Libresco, Hofstra University,
Hempstead, NY; Doug Selwyn, SUNY Plattsburg, NY
91st NCSS Annual Conference
117
SAT
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
Higher Education Social Sciences
Room 304
Social Studies Methods: Instructors Share
Strategies
Do you teach social studies methods for elementary, middle,
and/or secondary teacher candidates? Strategies to motivate
teacher candidates to teach social studies will be presented
and discussed.
Amy Good, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC;
Timothy Lintner, University of South Carolina Aiken, SC; Cheryl
Torrez, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Scott
Waring, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
Supervisory-Administrative Session
Concurrent Sessions 9
Supervisory-Administrative
Global Connections
Room 103B
NCSS Professional Development through
Powerful and Authentic Social Studies (PASS)
PASS is an NCSS professional development program based on
principles of authentic intellectual work. This session introduces the PASS criteria, standards, and rubrics. Benefits for
your district will be highlighted.
Joseph Braun, Carmel, CA
***Exhibitor Session***
The Keizai Koho Center organizes ten-day fellowships to
Japan in the summer that allow teachers to learn first-hand
about contemporary Japanese society and enhance their classroom teaching of global perspectives.
Donna Lee Siple, Akemi Handa, Keizai Koho Center Fellowship,
Pittsburgh, PA
Keeping Social Studies in the Elementary
Curriculum
Tired of hearing that social studies is not as important as
reading and math? Share your own experiences and learn from
others how to include social studies in the curriculum.
Michele Harcarik, Falls Church City Public Schools, Falls
Church, VA
Elementary U.S. History
Table 3
How We Teach Social Studies AND Still Pass
Assessments
Participants will explore the tension between developing civicminded, critically thinking students and preparing for end-ofyear assessments. Activities for successful integration of social
studies and literacy will be shared.
Christina Tschida, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Create lessons to engage students in history by using visual
primary sources. See how visual primary sources can engage
all students, including those with reading and writing
barriers.
Lacey Alkire, The Manning School, Golden, CO
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 5
***Exhibitor Session***
America’s Two Civil Wars: Events, Heroes, Villains,
Charts and Conversations!
Room 204B
Foldables for Social Studies Success!
Immerse yourself in 3-D, interactive, hands-on Foldables that
embrace any curriculum and make it individual and kinesthetic and scaffold social studies skills. Gain evidence-based
techniques and depart with immediate, usable ideas.
Jami Humphrey, Dinah Zike Academy, San Antonio, TX
Poster Presentations
Exhibit Hall
Compare causes and consequences of two powerful episodes
of American History in your classroom with implications for
contemporary times. This session is designed to offer instantly
usable, surefire techniques as well as take-away resources.
Kelli Arnold-Wegner, Orchard View Middle School, Muskegon,
MI; Marjorie Dorr, Ealy Elementary School, Whitehall, MI;
Susan Marris, Mona Shares Middle School, Norton Shores, MI;
Jennifer Mesler, Lakeshore Middle School, Grand Haven, MI
Middle Level-Jr. High School Social Sciences
Table 1
¡Bienvenidos! Engaging Young ELLs and their
Families through Culturally-Based Experiences
Session presents a model to support social and literacy development of ELLs. Classroom experiences were designed to
validate and engage families of children ages 3-5 using funds of
knowledge.
Dimensions of Diversity
Table 2
Through Their Eyes: Using Visual Primary Sources
to Engage Students
Ten-Day Study Tour to Japan
118
U.S. History
Table 4
Room 204A
Elementary Elementary Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Exhibitor Sessions
SAT
Vesna Beck, Wilma Robles-Melendez, Nova Southeastern
University, North Miami Beach, FL; Barbara Delmar Robles, San
Juan, PR
World History
Table 6
Films are Fun: Using Films to Help Build
Background Knowledge
Use a variety of films to help ELLs and exceptional students
build background knowledge and deepen understanding in
World and U.S. History including the Roman Empire and
World Wars.
Ruth Luevanos, Pacoima Middle School, Pacoima, CA
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Secondary Level-High School Table 7
Table 12
Beyond the Soup Kitchen:
Analyzing Root Causes of Social Issues
Soundtrack to Your Life: Incorporating
Multimedia Projects In the Classroom
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 8
At-Risk Learners At Risk of Succeeding: Showing
Them the Way!
Bring your passion for educating at-risk youth, and be prepared to leave with effective teaching strategies, an understanding of relevant research in the area, and a network of
like-minded colleagues.
William Kuendig, Wayzata High School ALC, Wayzata, MI
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Table 9
The Global Economy: A Simplifying Model for
Teachers
This presentation explains the global economic systems today,
its characteristics, and its benefits and drawbacks. Along with
resources, suggestions on how to present this topic to students
are provided.
Denise Ames, Center for Global Awareness, Albuquerque, NM
Learn how to create and incorporate multimedia projects
including a soundtrack and life video that will engage your
students and enrich their understanding of themselves and
enhance their technological abilities.
Erin Johnston, South Caldwell High School, Hudson, NC; Sara
Spencer, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 13
History’s Habits of Mind: Strategies for
Overcoming Misinformation and Missing
Information
Missing information and misinformation have been the bane
of history classes. Stanford History Education Group (SHEG)
has pioneered methods to overcome this. As a SHEG partner
we share these methods.
Teresa Eckhout, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 9
This interactive presentation demonstrates strategies for
empowering students to go beyond band-aid solutions to
important issues and look for long-term sustainable solutions.
Project-based learning ideas will be provided.
Jill Bass, Brenan Smith-Evans, Mikva Challenge’s Center for
Action Civics, Chicago, IL
Psychology
SAT
U.S. History
Table 14
Tackling AP U.S. History: Advice For New APUSH
Teachers
The rigor and breadth of APUSH can be quite daunting. This
session provides teachers with pedagogical advice and sample
lessons for one of the most popular of all AP courses.
Noah Rachlin, Pacific Ridge School, Carlsbad, CA
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Table 10
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
What Dewey Can Teach Us about Two Digital
Geography Projects
Table 15
Using John Dewey’s philosophy, a social studies teacher
reflects on the effectiveness of two digital inquiry projects in a
secondary geography classroom leading to the development of
students’ diverse perspectives.
Kenneth Carano, Western Oregon University, Monmouth, OR;
Daniel Stuckart, Lehman College, New York, NY
Explore dozens of online tools and resources in this fast-paced
session. Bring your laptop and walk away with ideas you can
use on Monday.
Angela Cunningham, Bullitt Central High School,
Shepherdsville, KY
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 11
Colored Glasses: Stimulating Students’ Cultural
Self Awareness
With today’s increasing global interdependence, there is a
growing need for each of us to understand who we are and to
be aware of our own and others’ cultural identities.
David Barber, Jennifer McKendree, YFU USA, Washington,
DC
The History Lab: Building a Digital Classroom
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 16
Teaching Revolution through Diversity:
Egyptian and English Uprisings in Context
We all dread That Question from our students: “Why should I
care?” These lesson plans demonstrate how we can prove history’s relevance by using personal experience and current
events.
Andrea Jones, Sumter County High School, York, AL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
119
December 3, Saturday • 10:30–11:30am • Concurrent Sessions 9
11:45aM–12:45PM
2:00–3:00PM
Concurrent Sessions 9
Keynote Speaker
Featured Speaker
Ballroom A
Room 202A
Rex Ellis
Teta V. Banks
Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs, National Museum of
African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution
Thomas Jefferson was a scientist, author, architect, philosopher, and statesman. For many, Jefferson defines America, and
his words continue to be used by many Americans to define
democratic ideals. But Jefferson also owned over six hundred
enslaved Africans during his lifetime. What can we learn about
diversity from one of our premiere founding fathers? And how
can history inform our continuing struggle with diversity in
today’s society?
Former Honorary Consul General, Republic of Liberia
Despite widely-held impressions of American education as
deficient, there are many innovative and effective educational
programs where teachers are developing effective teaching
strategies and advocating for proper resources, and students
are succeeding. Consul Banks will discuss some of these programs, focusing specifically on nontraditional resources from
external organizations, such as the United Nations Association, foreign consulates, and other civic organizations, that
recognize the importance of social studies education to prepare students for the challenges of a global future.
SAT
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120
Dimensions of Diversity
December 3, Saturday • 2:00–3:00pm • Concurrent Sessions 10
2:00–3:00pm
Elementary Concurrent Sessions 10
Room 306
It’s Elementary! A Technology Grab Bag!
Room 204B
Using the Nation’s Report Card: Online Tools
to Raise Achievement and Close Gaps in U.S.
History, Civics, and Geography
Nationally recognized Los Angeles teacher Shannon Garrison
will share information and practical tools from the Nation’s
Report Card at grades 4, 8, and 12, including a demonstration
of complimentary online resources teachers and policymakers
can use to improve achievement in these key social studies
disciplines.
Shannon Garrison, Solano Avenue Elementary School, Los
Angeles, CA
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Civics and Government
Salon C
Research and the Novice Social Studies Teacher:
Empowering the Profession
NCSS Research Community representatives will translate
research into practice for quality instruction in the social
studies. Research on how students learn and evidence-based
strategies will be presented.
Joseph Feinberg, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA; Theresa
McCormick, Auburn University, Auburn, AL; Janet Alleman,
Michigan State University, East Lansing , MI; Ilene Berson,
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Michael Berson,
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Paul Fitchett, University
of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC; Leisa Martin, University of
Akron, OH; Lawrence Paska, University of Albany, SUNY,
Albany, NY
Geography
Room 143A
Traveling the World with Folktales
Traveling the world with folktales focuses on geography and
global connections. Multiple intelligences are engaged with
connections to art, writing, storytelling, math, and kamishibai.
Attendees receive a handout listing folktales.
Denise B. Geier, Northcentral University School of Education,
Prescott Valley, AZ
Elementary Global Connections
Room 149B
Bringing the World into Your Classroom
through Travel
Participants will learn about the non-profit organization
GEEO and how to travel, earn credit, increase international
understanding, and share diverse cultural experiences with
students.
Peggy Altoff, Colorado Springs, CO; Jesse Weisz, GEEO,
Ardmore, PA
This session will share over 20 technology resources appropriate for elementary educators! Learn to capture video using
Firefox, explore Animoto, discover cool Google tools, learn
about Prezi and Glogging too!
Kristi Stricker, Concordia University, Chicago, IL; Lara Willox,
University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
Elementary U.S. History
Room 206
Bringing Everyone into the Discussion:
Conducting Successful Middle Grades Seminars
This interactive session promotes effective instructional strategies for engaging ALL middle grade students, including ELL
and at-risk students, in Socratic-style seminar discussions of
seminal historic texts.
Patricia Jones, Malinda McClain, Faifax County Public Schools,
Fairfax, VA; Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary School
of Education, Williamsburg, VA
Concurrent Sessions 10
Featured Session
Elementary Social Sciences
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Award Session
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolU.S. History
Room 149A
It Makes a Long Time Man Feel Bad
Alarmingly disproportionate populations of African American
males occupy U.S. prisons. What does history have to do with
it? Participants will explore the transition from Southern plantation to Southern prisons. Christine Adrian will illustrate her
classroom teaching method by exploring how current issues
that touch her students’ lives have roots in U.S. history. This
PowerPoint presentation will incorporate film and sound clips.
Statistical materials on the U.S. prison system will be
distributed.
Christine Adrian, Jefferson Middle School, Champaign, IL,
Middle Level Teacher of the Year
Middle Level-Jr. High School Economics
Room 103B
“Abby Takes a Stand” and Other Economic Equity
Lessons
Use children’s literature to explore economic hardship and
injustices of the past and discover how these difficulties led to
the development of economic equity and economic security
programs.
Barbara Flowers, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, MO;
Andrew Hill, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, PA
91st NCSS Annual Conference
121
SAT
December 3, Saturday • 2:00–3:00pm • Concurrent Sessions 10
Middle Level-Jr. High School Social Sciences
Room 145B
Archaeology Alive! A Simulation Dig in the
Middle School Classroom
What better way to discover history than through an archaeological dig? Students are challenged to invent original cultures,
create representative artifacts, and excavate and interpret artifacts designed by their peers.
Amy Beckford, Rebecca Mungai, Cindy Peifer, Tara Quigley,
Princeton Day School, Princeton, NJ
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Concurrent Sessions 10
Room 143C
SAT
History Labs: Boosting Student Achievement
through Guided Historical Inquiry
How can teachers increase engagement and achievement in
U.S. history? History Labs—an innovative, inquiry-based
instructional process—will be modeled and classroom-ready
resources will be shared.
Lane Muth, Wendy Schanberger, Baltimore County Public
Schools, Baltimore, MD
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 203A
Integrated Social Studies: Literacy,
Differentiation and Interactive Whiteboards
Learn to differentiate, engage and extend lessons through various pedagogical strategies, 21st century learning skills and
technologies. Experience interactive whiteboards, and handson, collaborative activities, and leave with digital resources
and lessons.
Leslie Caylor, Elmore County School System, Watumpka, AL;
Larry Zimmerman, Teacher Created Materials, Alpharetta, GA
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 208A
Growing Leaders: Inspiring Young Women to
Enter the Political Realm
This nonpartisan program, designed by former State Representative Barbara McIllvaine Smith (PA House District 156)
motivates young women to explore elected offices and inspires
them to be future political leaders.
Amy Chessock, Rustin High School, West Chester, PA; Barbara
McIllvaine Smith, West Chester, PA; Elisha Ozer, West Chester
Area School District, West Chester, PA; Christine Sappey, Former
Representative Barbara McIlvaine Smith’s Office, West Chester,
PA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209B
Interactive Social Studies for ELLs in the
Mainstream Classroom
122
Dimensions of Diversity
Experience a civics lesson in an uncommon foreign language!
A discussion of strategies that are effective for ELLs in the
mainstream classroom will follow. We will also discuss differentiating assessments.
Jennifer Green, Cory Wright-Maley, University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209A
Advocating for Social Studies at the State and
Local Levels
Presenter will share strategies they have utilized to gather support for social studies at the state and local level. Presenters
will demonstrate how to influence legislative and public
opinion.
Stephen Armstrong, West Hartford Public Schools, CT
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 147B
Diversify Your Teaching Portfolio—Econ Ed Live!
The St. Louis Fed has free education materials—interactive
whiteboard lessons, online learning modules, podcasts and
videos—to help you serve the diverse learning needs of your
students.
Caryn Rossiter, Scott Wolla, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis,
MO
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 209C
Rise Up! Revolution and Democracy
in the Middle East
Acquire strategies to create, evaluate, and use high-interest
concepts, topics, and instructional resources to investigate the
current revolutions in the Middle East. Handouts provided.
Elizabeth Kenyon, Claire Yates, Michigan State University, East
Lansing, MI
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 144C
“Not Another Paper!” Alternative Projects, Tools
& Strategies
Join in reviewing innovative alternative classroom projects
and activities using interactive technologies and learn how
emerging social media tools create interdependent communities and empower student-engagement and learning.
Tom Daccord, EdTechTeacher, Chestnut Hill, MA; Justin Reich,
Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 144A
Global Nation: Freedom of the Press in an
Interconnected World
Explore the impact and ethical implications of the international free flow of information throughout the 20th century,
using primary sources and real-life case studies.
Kim Ash, Newseum, Washington, DC
December 3, Saturday • 2:00–3:00pm • Concurrent Sessions 10
Global Connections
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 143B
Room 204C
Connect Argentina: Shared Narratives & Media
Literacy for Civic Engagement
What is My Role Today? Reliving History through
Simulations
Teachers share their work in Argentina exploring media literacy, international student dialogues, and methods for comparing historical narratives. For both middle- and high-school
educators seeking free curriculum promoting global
citizenship.
Liliana B. Monk, Thomas S. Wootton High School, Rockville,
MD; Ariana L. Wohl, Paul Cuffee School, Providence, RI
Learn a simple and surefire method of creating engaging simulations for your United States and world history classes. Students assume roles, develop empathy, and learn critical
thinking skills.
Betta Borrelli, Kevin Crabb, Georgia College and State
University, Macon, GA
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Psychology and Today’s Generation...What Do We
Do With Them?
Explore ways to engage students kinesthetically, linguistically,
and cognitively. From simple 5-minute mnemonics and demonstrations to projects and informal assessments, you will not
leave empty handed!
Cynthia Dvorak, Schaumberg High School, Schaumberg, IL;
Heather Schroeder, William Fremd High School, Palatine, IL
Social Sciences
Room 140A
Through Your Eyes I See Your World
Combining photojournalism, concept development techniques and field trips, a platform is created to nurture students’
receptiveness to diversity; a necessity in the context of globalization and intensified cultural interactions.
Valerie Shu Hsien Keh, Raffles Institution, Singapore
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 202B
White Out! Capitalizing on the Art of Historical
Detection
White Out! Is a classroom method that allows students to
unlock change over time, historical detection, multiple causation and commonality across media. Unlock history for students of all levels!
Anthony Fitzpatrick, American Institute for History Education,
Swedesboro, NJ
Secondary Level-High School Room 103A
Identity in a Diverse America
Room 147A
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
U.S. History
Room 144B
AP Boot Camp: Help Students Be All They Can Be
Tired of out of shape AP recruits? Need a way to turn them
into top notch AP scholars? AP Boot Camp is the solution for
you. All AP teachers welcome!
Laura Abel, York County School Division, Yorktown, VA;
Melinda Sloan, Houston, TX; Linnea Terndrup, Hampton, VA
In a diverse society and interdependent world, what does it
mean to be an American? This PowerPoint presentation examines the Bradley Project on America’s National Identity.
Peter Gibbon, Boston University, Boston, MA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 145A
Strengthening Our Practice through
Collaborative Learning Study
Concurrent Sessions 10
Secondary Level-High School A team of teacher-researchers will share their experiences as
members of a history-focused collaborative learning team
investigating the question: How can we engage students in
thinking historically?
Rose Darrough, Ramona High School, Ramona, CA; Lea
Heredia, Orange Glen High School, Escondido, CA; Heather
Lattimer, University of San Diego, CA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 208B
Beyond the Western Tradition: Non-Western
History in World History Classrooms
Participants will explore ways to incorporate non-Western historical sources, events, and themes into world history classes.
All participants will leave with a CD of resources and
activities.
Shannon Pugh, Anne Arundel County Public Schools,
Annapolis, MD
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 304
Using Digital Documentaries to Enhance
Historical Thinking
This session explores how digital documentaries can be used
as a powerful tool to promote historical thinking. Participants
will be introduced to methods to design, produce, and evaluate
digital documentaries.
Christopher Leahey, North Syracuse Junior High School, North
Syracuse, NY
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worlD hiStory
Room 203B
Supporting Student Literacy Needs Using
Assessment and Research-Based Strategies
Participants will examine, align, and identify student literacy
needs based on assessment data in order to provide the most
appropriate and effective instructional strategies for reading in
the social studies.
Danielle Kreassig, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia
Beach, VA; Roderick Zano, Princess Anne High School, Virginia
Beach, VA
Higher Education Session
Concurrent Sessions 10
hiGher eDucation
SAT
u.S. hiStory
Room 201
Connecting Tools of the Present to Voices of the
Past
Using Web 2.0 tools as a platform for critique and analysis, we
will demonstrate how students can create a digital flexbook
that challenges the dominant historical narrative. Lesson plans
provided.
Lee Adcock, Jennifer Jones Gorham, University of North
Carolina—Chapel Hill, NC
Supervisory-Administrative Sessions
SuperviSory-aDminiStrative
civicS anD Government
Room 305
The Status of Social Studies: The Largest Survey
Ever Conducted
Results from the largest national survey of social studies
teachers ever conducted. Find out who is teaching, how they’re
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teaching, what they’re teaching, and what they think about
social studies.
Jeff Passe, Towson University, Towson, MD
SuperviSory-aDminiStrative
Global connectionS
Room 140B
Critical Issues in Standardized Assessment
This roundtable session examines critical issues in standardized assessment—including both ends and means, principles
and practices—from local, state, national, and global
perspectives.
Diane Brantley, California State University—San Bernardino,
CA; Tim Coates, Alberta Education, Edmonton, AB; Cathy
Covington, University of Iowa, Ames, IA; Chris Harth, Global
Studies Foundation and St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, Ridgeland,
MS; Leslie Skinner, South Carolina Department of Education,
Columbia, SC
Exhibitor Session
***ExhIbITOr SESSION***
Room 204A
TeachUNICEF: Bringing Global Issues to the
Classroom
TeachUNICEF provides an online portfolio of free globallyfocused resources for U.S. educators. Come see how Teach
UNICEF.org can complement your instruction.
David Donaldson, Daniel Sandowsky, U.S. Fund for UNICEF,
New York, NY
December 3, Saturday • 3:15–4:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 11
3:15–5:15pm
Troy Jones, Christina Tschida, East Carolina University,
Greenville, NC
Vital Issue Session
Elementary Room 147A
Beyond Belief
Susan Retik, Beth Murphy
Beyond Belief documents how
Susan Retik and Patti Quigley,
young mothers widowed in the
terrorist attacks of September
11, reached out to support
widows in Afghanistan through
a sense of shared humanity. It is
a story that challenges us to ask
ourselves what it means to live
in a complex, global community
at the start of the 21st century,
as we ask, “What kind of world do we live in? What kind of
world do we want it to be?” Meet Susan Retik and Director
Beth Murphy for a post-screening discussion. Materials will be
available, including the Beyond Belief Study Guide, written by
Columbia University Teachers College.
3:15–4:15pm
Concurrent Sessions 11
Tough Choices for Nat: Experience Boston 1770
as an Apprentice!
Experience Mission U.S.: From Crown to Colony, a free computer simulation set in Boston in 1770. Teaching strategies
will be modeled by the National Mission U.S. teacher of the
year.
Jana Kirchner, Green River Regional Educational Cooperative,
Bowling Green, KY; Laureen Laumeyer, Meadow View Elementary
School, Elizabethtown, KY
Middle School-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Room 143A
Overwhelmed by Standards? Teaching
Geography with Mosque Architecture
Too many standards, a diverse array of student needs, and limited time? Walk away with a flexible, hands-on lesson incorporating critical thinking skills and social studies content.
Wendy Harris, Metro Deaf School, St. Paul, MN
Middle Level-Jr. High School Award Session
Geography
Concurrent Sessions 11
Room 202A
Geography
Salon C
Room 149A
2011 Carter G. Woodson Book Award: Winning
Author Panel Discussion
Join this panel for a glimpse at the “story behind the stories” of
the 2011 Carter G. Woodson Award and Honor books, as told
by authors. After the session, which will include Q&A with the
audience, the authors will be signing their books at the NCSS
Bookstore, where you can meet them in person!
Elementary Sessions
Elementary U.S. History
Social Sciences
Death Defying: Archaeology, Culture and
Environmental Studies of Northern Peru
Explore Peru with hands-on lessons and a unique website
loaded with pictures, articles and activities about the archaeology, culture, environmental and climate concerns of
Northern Peru.
Paul Nagel, Louisiana Geography Alliance, Natchitoches, LA;
Kristy Snider, Pocono Mountain School District, Swiftwater, PA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 203B
Room 306
Windows into the Past: A Hands-On Archaeology
Lesson
Think, Talk, Write: Using Essential Questions to
Improve Students’ Writing
Examine artifact replicas and archaeological evidence to create
a chronology of the Pueblo Indians of the American southwest. Ideas are presented for adapting the lesson to your
region.
Jill Blumenthal, Marjorie Connolly, Crow Canyon
Archaeological Center, Cortez, CO
Effective writing is directly linked to critical thinking. Presenters will share essential questions and instructional strategies that cultivate critical thinking, promote discussion and
strengthen students’ writing at the middle level.
Jeannette Balantic, Erica Fregosi, Alison Wallace, Garden City
Middle School, Garden City, NY
Elementary Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
U.S. History
Room 208B
Room 208A
History Beyond the Textbook: Presenting
Multiple Perspectives on Historical Events
Just Map It! Using GIS in the History Classroom
Participants will actively explore methods for using primary
sources to move beyond textbooks and draw on multiple perspectives of historical events in ways that connect with students’ lives.
Come learn how easy it is to use GIS to question, analyze, and
map the myths and realities of the North and South. Tips,
tricks, software, and lesson plans will be provided.
Chris Bunin, Christine Esposito, Virginia Geographic Alliance,
Charlottesville, VA
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Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 206
Fun with Collaboration: The Civil War Comes
Alive!
Explore how the Civil War became a collaborative effort across
an entire middle school! Using interdisciplinary lessons, learn
to engage students with help from outside the social studies
classroom.
Nicole Baker, Richard B. Russell Middle School, Winder, GA;
Janet High, Oglethorpe County Middle School, Crawford, GA;
David Kendrick, Madison County Middle School, Comer, GA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Concurrent Sessions 11
Room 143C
SAT
Literacy Strategies: An Important Dimension in
the Social Studies Classroom
It is important for social studies teachers to incorporate literacy strategies to increase comprehension and promote
retention of concepts. Literacy strategies help students engage
and increase enjoyment of social studies.
Mary Lou DiPillo, Regina Rees, Youngstown State University,
Department of Teacher Education, Youngstown, OH
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209A
Preview of the Supreme Court’s 2011–2012 Term
This term promises to be one of the most exciting in recent
memory as the Court deals with hot button issues ranging
from health care to same-sex marriage.
Lee Arbetman, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring, MD
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209B
Teaching Youth with Disabilities: SelfDetermination and Citizenship Participation
Are youth with disabilities active citizens or passive recipients?
This session shows how Virginia’s I’m Determined Summer
Summit taught youth about self-determination, advocacy,
leadership, and citizenship. Classroom strategies are
modeled.
Adam Amick, Virginia Wesleyan College, Norfolk, VA ; Darren
Minarik, American Civics Center, Alexandria, VA; Kim Sheridan,
Radford University, Radford, VA; Chris Walsh, American Civics
Center, Alexandria, VA
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 103A
Buy, Use, Toss? From Consumerism to a
Sustainable Materials Economy
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sons from a free curriculum to explore the life cycle of products and sustainable design!
Ben Wheeler, Explorer West Middle School, Seattle, WA
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 103B
Putting the Interactive in Your Whiteboard
Is your IWB more whiteboard than interactive? The Dallas Fed
is developing content to bring your whiteboard to life. Preview
the newest interactive social studies applications we will make
available.
Stephen Clayton, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Room 145B
Project-Based Approach to Teaching AP Human
Geography
This session will provide educators a project-based approach
to supplement their teaching of AP Human Geography. The
presentation will offer hands-on instructional strategies for
new and veteran teachers.
Nate Newhalfen, John Roncone, Barrington High School,
Hanover Park, IL
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 144C
Mobile Technologies in the Social Studies: Touch,
Type, Transform
Mobile technologies are transforming the educational landscape. Presenters will demonstrate and discuss unique ways
social studies teachers are using handheld and portable devices
to enhance their teaching and student learning.
Tom Daccord, EdTechTeacher, Chestnut Hill, MA; Teresa
Bergstrom, Dunedin Highland Middle School Center for Gifted
Studies, Dunedin, FL; Michael Berson, University of South
Florida, Tampa, FL; Kori Green, El Dorado Middle School, El
Dorado, KS; B. Justin Reich, Harvard Graduate School of
Education, Cambridge, MA
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 147B
Addressing Dimensions of Diversity with
Assessments in Psychology
In this session sponsored by the NCSS Psychology Community, we will share ideas for alternative assessments for various
units and projects for after the AP exam. Materials will be
provided.
Joe Geiger, Carl Sandberg High School, Orland Park, IL; Daria
Schaffeld, Prospect High School, Mount Prospect, IL; Jennifer
Schlicht, Olathe, KS; Sejal Schullo, Glenbrook South High School,
Glenview, IL
December 3, Saturday • 3:15–4:15pm • Concurrent Sessions11
Psychology
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 140B
Room 203A
Brain-Based Diversity
Exploring the Vietnam War through Iconic
Photographs
What do Navy SEALs, competitive athletes, amnesia victims,
serial killers, and daydreaming students have in common? All
are subjects of new research in brain science. Learn more in
this session.
Peter Masciopinto, Hilary Rosenthal, Glenbrook South High
School, Glenview, IL
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 143B
Becoming a National Board Certified Social
Studies Teacher
Two National Board Certified social studies teachers, one
elementary and one secondary, and an NBPTS director will
discuss national board certification and answer your
questions.
Peggy Jackson, Moriarity High School, Moriarity, NM; Kim
O’Neil, Liverpool Elementary School, Liverpool, NY; Lisa
Stooksberry, National Board of Professional Teaching Standards,
Arlington, VA
A lesson on the Vietnam War through iconic photographs
taken by American and Vietnamese photographers will be presented. A discussion of how to select and use historical photographs will follow.
Gabriel Reich, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond,
VA
Secondary Level-High School Room 145A
History Labs: Boosting Student Achievement
through Guided Historical Inquiry
How can teachers increase engagement and achievement in
U.S. history? History Labs, an innovative, inquiry-based
instructional process, will be modeled, and classroom-ready
resources will be shared.
Adam Laye, Bruce Lesh, Baltimore County Public Schools,
Baltimore, MD
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High SchoolU.S. History
Room 202B
Room 204A
A Conversation with the Past
Teaching a People’s History and Challenging
Myths about the Civil War
The Zinn Education Project presents historian James W.
Loewen (Lies My Teacher Told Me and The Confederate and
Neo-Confederate Reader) on teaching about the Civil War
with primary documents.
James W. Loewen, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 204C
U.S. History
U.S. History
Concurrent Sessions 11
Secondary Level-High School Primary sources provide students with context necessary to
understand the past. This presentation will model four activities using primary sources. Audience members will receive a
CD with examples.
Dorothy Blanks, Jeremy Clabough, Shannon Hamblen, Lance
McConkey, Sarah Philpott, Thomas Turner, University of
Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144B
The Interview that Gets You
the Social Studies Job
Making History: Ebenezer Bassett,
First Black U.S. Diplomat
The life and times of an American hero, Ebenezer Bassett
(1833–1908), first black diplomat from the U.S. Life lessons
on the power of education, civic service, and hard work.
Carolyn Ivanoff, Shelton Intermediate School, Shelton, CT
Two former NCSS Presidents who were school administrators
will use their actual interview questions and evaluate answers
given by audience volunteers.
Syd Golston, Phoenix Union High School District, Phoenix,
AZ; Gayle Thieman, Portland State University, OR
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Best Practices in Using Simulations in the Social
Studies
This session will present role-playing simulations for the social
studies. This includes discussing the rationale/best practices
in using simulations, and demonstrating simulations. All participants will receive free resources and simulations.
Jeremy Hilburn, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
NC; Brad Maguth, Hiram College, Hiram, OH; Richard Di
Giacomo, Magnifico Publications, San Jose, CA
World History
Room 140A
North African Crossroads: Ancient Rome, Muslim
Empires, Modern Revolution
Use photographs of North Africa to move beyond “show and
tell” and into pedagogy that challenges stereotypes and
involves critical thinking about how world cultures interconnect. Photographs included with handouts.
Elizabeth Lupfer, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL;
Joan Brodsky Schur, Bank Street College of Education, New York,
NY
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Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 304
Can You See Me Now? Teaching Invisible AP
Students
Keeping Kids in School: Civic Engagement &
Service Learning
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 11
Civics and Government
Room 209C
Test scores show that African American and Latino students
generally earn lower AP scores than do their white and Asian
peers. Teachers can use strategies to narrow this achievement
gap for these “invisible students.”
Chris Ascienzo, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville,
MD; Tracy Oliver-Gary, Paint Branch High School, Burtonsville,
MD; Gabriella Starita, Kennedy High School, Silver Spring, MD;
Kevin Yates, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD
SAT
Supervisory-Administrative Learn how civically engaging students through servicelearning is a proven methodology for reducing dropout rates,
building resiliency, and motivating students to become successful learners and effective citizens.
Michelle Herczog , Los Angeles County Office of Education,
Downey, CA; Katie M. Moore, Constitutional Rights Foundation,
Los Angeles, CA
World History
Exhibitor Session
Room 149B
Be Part of the Revolution—Join Twitter and
Social Studies Chat
Need a dose of inspiration, a place to share your resources, or
support in a new subject or grade? Join the learning revolution
on Twitter with Social Studies Chat.
Angela Cunningham, Bullitt County Public Schools,
Shepherdsville, KY; Becky Ellis, Ben Lomond High School, Ogden,
UT; Jamie Josephson, Woodrow Wilson Senior High School,
Washington, DC; Greg Kulowiec, Plymouth South High School,
Plymouth, MA; Shawn McCusker, William Fremd High School,
Palatine, IL; Ron Peck, North Valley High School, Grants Pass,
OR
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 201
More than Gadgets: The Power of Teaching with
Mobile Devices
Explore how to use iPads and iPod Touches to engage ALL
students in social studies content. Learn instructional strategies that incorporate 21st-century skills and tips for managing
the devices.
Andrea Berge, Achievable Dream High School, Newport News,
VA; Christopher Chappell, Arram Dreyer, Mary Norris,
Menchville High School, Newport News, VA; Renita Williams,
Newport News Public Schools, Newport News, VA
Supervisory-Administrative Sessions
Supervisory-Administrative Civics and Government
Room 305
Teachers and Professional Developers: Let’s
Increase Learning at All Ages!
Who, what, why, how do we teach? How do we assess?
Teaching and professional development using the new NCSS
Curriculum Standards and a Harvard-developed curriculum
framework promotes essential learning.
Mary McFarland, WIDE World, Harvard Graduate School of
Education, Chesterfield, MO
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***Exhibitor Session***
Room 204B
Bringing the World into the Classroom
Professional development activities for educators, resources
for students, and more in support of globalized education.
Amanda Stamp, World Affairs Council, Washington, DC
Poster Presentations
Exhibit Hall
Elementary U.S. History
Table 1: Employing Integrative Approaches for
Successfully Differentiating Instruction in History
This session will provide examples of exemplar lesson plans
that integrate multiple instructional techniques for addressing
the needs of all learners when teaching history.
Joseph Labant, Millersville University of Pennsylvania,
Millersville, PA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 2: History 2.0: Encouraging Student
Historical Thinking through Web-based Digital
Reenactments
Digital reenactments utilize free web-based filmmaking programs to recreate the past in your classroom. Planning materials and student examples for multiple grade levels will be
shared with participants.
Caroline Sheffield, Steve Swan, Shelley Thomas, University of
Louisville, Louisville, KY
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Table 3: Kufis, Crowns, & Kangols
Atumpan-The Talking Drums will demonstrate how a pedagogy of call-response teaching utilizing music, dance, songs,
and storytelling can bring history to life for auditory learners.
LaQuita Staten, Corey Staten, Atumpan-The Talking Drums,
Portsmouth, VA
December 3, Saturday • 3:15–4:15pm • Concurrent Sessions 11
World History
Table 4: Athenian Democracy Alive in Your
Classroom: Speeches, Debates, and Ostracism
In this simulation, students enact the democratic process,
Athenian style. Greece’s “Golden Era” is brought to life as students engage in research, oration, and debate about women,
slaves, and war.
Christina Pelekanos, Village Community School, New York,
NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School World History
Table 5: Understanding Judaism
This session gives teachers knowledge and materials to help
students understand Judaism. Teachers’ guides, lesson plans,
and student handouts will be provided. Participants will experience student activities.
Ben Chaika, Institute for Curriculum Services, San Francisco,
CA
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 6: Outbreak! A Crisis Simulation of a
Biological Weapons Attack
It is May 2013 and you are the newly elected president when
several officials from the CDC inform you that America is
facing another terrorist attack. Full materials provided.
Michael Vogler, Coconino High School, Flagstaff AZ
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Table 7: Power and Liberty: Seeing Through the
Rhetoric
Teach your students how to contextualize modern political
rhetoric by studying how appeals to our sense of individual
power and liberty have been used for political gain in the
past.
Daniel Cwynar, Jason Endacott, Jeffrey Provost, Keene State
College, NH
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Table 8: Headlines to Classroom: Busy Teachers’
Guide to Discussing Economic Events
Do you want to have robust discussions with your students
about current economic topics? Spark student engagement
with classroom-ready discussion questions and answers on
current economic topics.
April McClellan-Copeland, Jennifer Ransom, Federal Reserve
Bank of Cleveland, OH
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Table 9: Care About Our Future? Strategies for
Teaching Economics and Ecojustice
With the scarcity of natural resources becoming an increasingly pressing global problem, the presentation will provide
and discuss lesson plans to help educators teach economics in
an ecojustice context.
Hubert Huang , Penn State University York, PA; Sarah
Lawrence, York Suburban Senior High School, York, PA
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Table 10
Teaching Global Workforce Skills
This session introduces a Globalization Curriculum, developed and piloted by three SUNY institutions, which addresses
global workforce skills and knowledge through instruction
and pedagogically-designed assignments.
Rebecca Smolar, The Levin Institute, New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Table 11: Sins and Virtues: An Inter-disciplinary
Humanities Unit
Social studies and English language arts pre-service teachers
collaborated to create original instructional units centered on
teaching the “Seven Deadly Sins” and “Seven Virtues” in an
inter-disciplinary setting.
Michael Lovorn, Lisa Scherff, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL
Secondary Level-High School Concurrent Sessions 11
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
SAT
Table 12
Reel ‘Em In: Discovering History Through Films
Motivate your students by providing an exciting and meaningful window to the past. Films supply a readily available
teaching tool for critically examining historical periods, people
and events.
Nancy (Cissy) Dowdy, Southside High School, Batesville, AR
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Table 13: Music, Music, Music! Messages and
Meaning in the Classroom
Music must be considered an integral source for effective
social studies instruction. In this presentation, we will share
research findings and effective strategies for using sentient
music in the classroom.
Joseph Adragna, St. Scholastica Academy, Covington, LA;
Anthony Pellegrino, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Table 14: Teaching the Middle East: A New Online
Resource for Educators
Tour this immense site containing essays, images, links, and
lesson plans created by University of Chicago faculty & K-12
teachers. http://teachmiddleeast.lib.uchicago.edu
Wendy Ennes, The Oriental Institute of the University of
Chicago, IL
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4:30–5:30pm
Middle Level-Junior High School Sessions
Middle Level-Jr. High School Concurrent Sessions 12
Room 147A
“You Give Me Your Money But I Get NO Respect!”
Elementary Sessions
Elementary Geography
Room 145A
Concurrent Sessions 12
Dimensions of Diversity from
My Window to Yours
SAT
This session will focus on identifying multicultural children’s
books that depict different types of diversity such as socioeconomic status, cultural beliefs, and gender. Strategies for
classroom use will be shared.
Loraine Stewart, Virginia Commonwealth University,
Richmond, VA
Elementary Global Connections
Room 208B
Web 2.0 for Differentiated Instruction, Authentic
Assessment, and Professional Development
Enhance social studies teaching and learning with Web 2.0
tools to create, share, discuss, engage, collaborate, and communicate in meaningful ways. Learn about wikis, blogs, social
networking, and digital storytelling.
Karla Kingsley, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM;
John Unger, University of New Mexico - Gallup Branch, NM
ElementaryU.S. History
Interested in exciting, interactive lessons that will inspire your
students to learn and discuss community issues and actively
participate in local government? Then this is the session for
you!
Sandra Diamond, University of Missouri-St. Louis, MO;
Barbara Easley, Hazelwood School District, Florissant, MO
Middle Level-Jr. High School One Dimension of Diversity: U.S. Immigration
1820–1860
Participants apply skills of concept attainment, similarities/
differences, etc. while learning about immigration during a
time when “country of origin” was not recorded by the census
(before 1850); CD of materials provided.
Sari Bennett, UMBC, Baltimore, MD
Middle Level-Jr. High School FieldScope: Engaging Students in Geographic
Investigations with Online GIS Tools
Participants will explore current projects, visualization and
analysis capabilities in this free web-based tool from National
Geographic. Topics covered include human influence on the
landscape and geo-spatial data analysis.
Anna Switzer, Elena Takaki, National Geographic Society,
Washington, DC
Online EdVenture-21st Century Learning Tools
for Teachers and Learners
Room 203B
U.S. History
Room 206
Geography
Room 144C
Middle Level-Jr. High School Explore exciting ways of engaging social studies students of
diverse learning styles with The Henry Ford’s free, ready-touse, 21st-century online resources for grades K-12: DigiKits,
ExhibitBuilder and Innovation 101.
Paula Gangopadhyay, Catherine Tuzcek, The Henry Ford,
Dearborn, MI
Geography
Room 209C
Room 145B
Elementary Civics and Government
U.S. History
Evidence of Native America’s Struggle for Tribal
Existence
Participants will explore the past struggles and triumphs of
different American Indian tribes by examining 19th- and 20thcentury National Archives documents and their classroom
possibilities.
Carol Buswell, The National Archives at Seattle, WA; Kristina
Maldre, The National Archives at Chicago, IL; Jenny Sweeney, The
National Archives at Fort Worth, TX
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Visual Literacy: More Than Just a Primary Source
Room 143C
Go above and beyond with primary sources while teaching
key historical thinking and literacy skills. Learn to create visually literate students, build 21st-century skills, and leave with
digital resources/lessons.
Pamela Gothart, Madison County Board of Education,
Huntsville, AL; Larry Zimmerman, Teacher Created Materials,
Alpharetta, GA
Results and resources from a year-long pilot project between
social studies, special education and UDL specialists to reach
diverse learners in middle school.
William McGrath, Montgomery County Public Schools - HIAT
Team, Rockville, MD; Mary E. Sturm, Gina Woodward, Rosa
Parks Middle School, Olney, MD
130
Dimensions of Diversity
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Pilot:
Engage-Support-Challenge
December 3, Saturday • 4:30–5:30pm • Concurrent Sessions 12
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 209B
Fostering Proactive Citizens through Civics
Instruction
Presenters from the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Presidential Learning Center share a unit designed for diverse learners
with the aim of fostering proactive informed, educated, and
conscientious citizens and leaders.
Anthony Pennay, Janet Tran, Ronald Reagan Presidential
Foundation, Simi Valley, CA
Secondary Level-High SchoolCivics and Government
Room 304
Making Citizens through Literature: A New
Approach to Civic Education
The presenters will demonstrate how teachers can use short
stories to promote civic education and introduce their new
online curriculum, whatsoproudlywehail.org, by discussing
Jack London’s To Build a Fire.
Amy Kass, Hudson Institute, Washington, DC; Leon Kass,
American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Economics
Room 103A
Entrepreneurs: Keeping the Economy Moving
Entrepreneurs are fascinating and inspiring people who play a
critical role in the economy. Preview a free publication from
the Dallas Fed that describes the importance of these risktakers.
Princeton Williams, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX
Secondary Level-High School Geography
Salon C
Geography of U.S. Food Production: Best
Practices for Teaching
“Food Production” is the newest installment of the videobased professional development series “Geography: Teaching
with the Stars.” This program features best practices in social
studies, enhancing both pedagogy and content.
Richard Boehm, Carmen Brysch, Cheryl Frazier, Texas State
University-San Marcos, TX
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 209A
Understanding China’s Environmental Outlook:
Black, Green, or Somewhere in Between?
Participants will explore China’s paradoxical environmental
outlook by examining a variety of multimedia sources and discussing the critical roles played by domestic and international
politics in determining China’s environmental future.
Lina Yamashita, Primary Source, Watertown, MA
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 103B
Exploring Genocide: Horror Tale, Storybook, and
International Humanitarian Law
A storybook tale about Cambodia will be the focus for an
examination of genocide and how the international laws of
warfare provide for justice. Free materials will be distributed.
James Lane, Mentor, OH; Icy Smith, East West Discovery Press,
Manhattan Beach, CA
Secondary Level-High School Psychology
Room 147B
The Diverse Field of Psychology: How Do I Teach
Everything?
Concurrent Sessions 12
Secondary Level-High School Sessions
Come learn ways to motivate your students, increase vocabulary practice and include fun projects without sacrificing content. Online access to FRQs, plans, quizzes and presentations
will be provided.
Bernadette Gerace, Prosper High School, Prosper, TX; Catherine
Jaquith, Henry Clay High School, Lexington, KY
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 140A
How Do We Remember? What Do We Forget?
A study of constitutions, memorials, music, currency, and
postage stamps will lead to an understanding of the construction of historical memory and the ways nations remember and
forget the past.
Lorraine Lupinskie, Half Hollow Hills Central School District,
Dix Hills, NY
Geography
Room 140B
Synthesis: A Critical 21st-Century Skill in AP
Human Geography
Examine the importance of synthesis as a thinking tool and
review strategy for AP Human Geography and how synthesis
appears in the free-response exam questions. Explore and
receive instructional materials.
Jody Smothers-Marcello, Sitka High School, Sitka, AL
91st NCSS Annual Conference
131
SAT
December 3, Saturday • 4:30–5:30pm • Concurrent Sessions 12
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 143A
Hands-On Social Studies! Engaging Students
through Service-Learning
Expand your classroom beyond its walls through servicelearning. Get students out of their seats and into their communities to identify problems, investigate causes, and create
solutions to meet community needs.
Jen Baker, Winchester High School, Winchester, MA; Kristen
Ritchie, Winchester Community Service Foundation, Winchester,
MA
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Concurrent Sessions 12
You’ve Got Issues...You Just Didn’t Know It!!
SAT
Learn how to “issue-ize” your instructional units in American
and world history by applying an issues-centered focus to
increase student engagement and understanding. Handouts
and lesson plans will be provided.
Ronald Evans, San Diego State University, CA; Dale
Greenawald, Boulder, CO; Kim Koeppen, Hamline University, St.
Paul, MN; Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown,
PA; Scott Wylie, Teachers College, Columbia University, New
York, NY
Secondary Level-High School
U.S. History
Using Performance Based Assessments to
Benchmark Student Understanding
This presentation will introduce performance assessment tasks
that address 21st-century skills and are being used to benchmark student understanding of content in secondary social
studies classes.
Diana Hasuly, Arlington County Public Schools, Arlington,
VA
U.S. History
Room 202B
This workshop will address the emergence of the United
States’ power and prestige in relation to world events. Teachers
explore the interconnectedness of world and U.S. history
themes.
Chris Bunin, America on the World Stage TAH Project,
Charlottesville, VA; David Hicks, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA;
Scott Mace, Charlottesville City Public Schools, Charlottesville,
VA; Andy Mink, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
U.S. History
Room 144B
“We Shall Overcome”:
The Voting Rights Act of 1965
Learn more about the history behind the Voting Rights Act of
1965 in an interactive session featuring historical documents
and oral histories from the National Archives and House of
Representatives.
132
Dimensions of Diversity
U.S. History
Balancing Liberty v. Security: Lincoln’s
Suspension of Habeas Corpus
The conflict between securing the nation while preserving
individual liberties recurs throughout our history. These two
lessons, developed by the Bill of Rights Institute, provide context for the issue today.
Derik Dupont, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA; Gennie
Westbrook, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA
Secondary Level-High School World History
Room 143B
Unlocking the Power of Words with English
Language Learners
The presenter will share strategies to focus on conceptual
vocabulary knowledge development for English language
learners and integrate vocabulary into social studies curriculum and instruction.
Yu Ren Dong, Queens College, CUNY, Flushing, NY
Secondary Level-High School World History
Lights, Camera...History!
Learn tools and guidelines to help students capture images
and ideas to video. Connect the past with the present and
allow students to contribute to a large community of learners.
Becky Ellis, Ben Lomond High School, Ogden, UT; Greg
Kulowiec, Plymouth South High School, Plymouth, MA; Ronald
Peck, North Valley High School, Grants Pass, OR
Higher Education Session
Higher EducationU.S. History
Room 306
America on the World Stage:
A Global Perspective to TAH
Secondary Level-High School Secondary Level-High School Room 204C
Room 149B
Room 203A
Secondary Level-High School Christine Blackerby, National Archives, Washington, DC;
Kathleen Johnson, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington,
DC
How Public History Can Promote Social Studies
Inquiry
A rare intersection between pre-service teachers, college professors, social studies teachers and museum archivists resulted
in the development of lessons that challenged students to
think critically about primary source documents.
Michael Gray, Douglas Lare, East Stroudsburg University, PA
Supervisory-Administrative Session
Supervisory-Administrative U.S. History
Room 208A
Taking a Core Sample...Using Lesson Study to
Improve Instruction
Join us on a videotape journey through a pre-planning session,
a lesson study, and the debriefing. Planning and assessment
tools for the use of lesson study will be shared.
Nancy Andrzejczak, Lake Elsinore Unified School District,
Lake Elsinore, CA
December 4 • Sessions • 8:00–10:00am
Sunday, December 4
Time
Event
8:00–10:00am
Workshops
10:15–11:15am
Keynote Speaker
Speakers
See Page
p. 133
Judy Woodruff
Join NCSS
November 16–18, 2012
92nd NCSS Annual Conference in Seattle, WA
8:00–10:00am
pp. 7, 136
Confirmed speakers included:
Rick Steves, Regie Routman, Daniel Edelson,
Alan Sears, and Charles Haynes
Jonah Firestone, Sarah Newcomer, Arizona State University,
Tempe, AZ; Kathie Larsyn, C.J. Jorgensen Elementary School,
Phoenix, AZ
Elementary Workshops
ElementaryCivics and Government
Room 147A
Elementary Celebrate Diversity! Reaching Learners
Bilingually With an NCSS-Inspired Curriculum
Room 203A
Educators share K-5 project-based, NCSS-inspired social
studies curriculum centered on the cultures and experiences
of a diverse student body and taught through a dual-language
model in Spanish, Portuguese, and English.
Rosa DeVarona, Julie Nora, Alison Plump, MaryAnn Rinaldi,
International Charter School, Pawtucket, RI
U.S. History
Sing Freedom, See Freedom: African American
Primary Sources for Kids
Room 143C
Experience strategies that make primary sources accessible to
elementary students. These lessons use songs and illustrations
to show the African American fight for freedom and equality
across centuries.
Aaron Wolfe, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Williamsburg,
VA; Kate Wolfe, Newport News Public Schools, Newport News,
VA
Globetrotting with a Gaggle of Gadgets and
Bilbo Baguette
Elementary Elementary Geography
From Sea to Shining Sea….come on a technology adventure
with me! Google, gadgets, Pixie and more, come meet Bo for
lessons galore!
Cheryl Phillips, Prince William County Schools, Manassas,
VA
Elementary Geography
Room 204A
Developing Global Awareness in Young Learners
through Dance
This presentation will focus on methods for young learners to
develop global awareness and an appreciation of diverse cultures through the medium of dance.
Oliver Dreon, Joseph Labant, Stratton (Chip) Schaeffer,
Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, PA
Elementary Global Connections
Room 140B
Crossing Borders with Technology: Students
Navigating their World
Our presentation provides tools for increasing academic
achievement and language, literacy, and technology skills
through web-based and distributed technologies. We showcase student work from an inquiry into global citizenship.
SUN
U.S. History
Room 206
History Lessons: Teaching Historical Literacy in
Elementary Classrooms
When students in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms use comprehension strategies to read, write, talk and
think about history, they actively use knowledge to further
historical understanding.
Joanne Durham, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Capitol
Heights, MD; Anne Goudvis, Public Education Coalition, Boulder,
CO
Elementary U.S. History
Room 208B
Building Symbols: Investigating Architecture in
Washington, DC
Can buildings be symbols? Yes! In this hands-on workshop,
learn how to use Washington, DC’s iconic buildings, like the
Capitol, to teach about the founding values of the United
States.
Mary Hendrickse, Lara Marks-Finder, National Building
Museum, Washington, DC
91st NCSS Annual Conference
133
December 4 • Sessions • 8:00–10:00am
Middle Level-Junior High School Workshops
Middle Level-Jr. High School Middle Level-Jr. High School Room 145A
Global Connections
American History Comes Alive
Room 144B
Yes You Can (and Must) Teach About Religion!
Religion is a dominant and often underrepresented aspect of
social studies. Tanenbaum’s pedagogy helps educators integrate religion and diversity into their cultivation of respectful
global citizens. For all grade levels.
Anshu Wahi, Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding, New York, NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School
Global Connections
Room 149B
Teaching Social Justice through Multicultural
Literature and Social Networking
Multiculturalism through young adult literature illustrates
complexities in life not found in textbooks. Participants will
be exposed to this literature and experience class discussion
through social networking with blogs.
Edith Dunfee-Ries, Joanne Jasmine, Caldwell College, Caldwell,
NJ
Middle Level-Jr. High School Global Connections
Room 144C
Connect to Your World and Your History through
myStory
SUN
Learn how to connect students personally and more deeply to
geography and history through videos of real teenagers and
graphic novels featuring historical figures.
Rebecca Hall, Pearson, Boston, MA
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Global Connections
Room 140A
Welcoming Newcomers and Inspiring Action:
Teaching Immigration Using Human Rights
This interactive session will demonstrate how teachers can use
a new human rights-based curriculum to create welcoming,
inclusive classrooms for all, with a special focus on immigrant
and refugee students.
Emily Farell, Madeline Lohman, The Advocates for Human
Rights, Minneapolis, MN
Middle Level-Jr. High SchoolU.S. History
Experience how American History Comes Alive strategies—
proven-effective, hands-on ways to teach American history to
grades 4-8—can dramatically improve knowledge and performance by special needs, mainstream, gifted, and ELL
students.
Ila Lane Gross, Learning through an Expanded Arts Program,
Inc. (LeAp), New York, NY
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 209A
How Middle-Schoolers Can Use Technology to
Learn and Teach History
Wondering how to connect with heritage sites to engage your
students in learning and teaching history? This session explains
a service-learning program that involves National Park sites,
nonprofits, and schools.
Ed Clark, National Park Service, Manassas, VA; Beth Erickson,
Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Waterford, VA;
John Miller, Prince William Public Schools, Manassas, VA; Scott
Richardson, Corporation for National and Community Service,
Washington, DC
Middle Level-Jr. High School U.S. History
Room 103B
The American Musicals Project: West Side Story
This workshop introduces the Puerto Rican Migration to New
York using the American Musicals Project, a humanities program that teaches social studies using primary sources and
musicals.
Mia Nagawiecki, New York Historical Society, New York, NY
Secondary Level-High School Workshops
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 147B
Discussion in the Classroom—Tools and
Techniques
Explore the importance of discussion as part of citizenship
development. Learn about different methodologies for classroom discussion—civil conversations, deliberation, fish bowl,
Q-cards, public forum and more.
Katie Moore, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles,
CA
Room 143A
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
History Alive! Bringing Museum Theater to Your
Classroom
Room 203B
Join educators and theater specialists from the Smithsonian’s
National Museum of American History for an interactive session on using museum theater programs and theater techniques in your classroom.
Xavier Carnegie, Naomi Coquillon, Susan Evans, National
Museum of American History, Washington, DC
134
Dimensions of Diversity
The Civic Mirror: Immersing ALL Students in a
Civic Experience
“What does this have to do with me?” Students often have difficulty relating to civics, economics, and U.S. government.
Find out how the Civic Mirror can change all of that.
Ken High, Pamela Klotz, Mary Beth Ryan, Hudson High
School, Hudson, MA
December 4 • Sessions • 8:00–10:00am
Secondary Level-High School Civics and Government
Room 143B
ABCD, Social Change in Schools for Free!
In this workshop, Point of View (POV), the PBS social issue
documentary film series, will present ideas for engaging at-risk
youth with documentary film and Asset Based Community
Development (ABCD) strategies.
Jamie Dobie, Eliza Licht, American Documentary | POV,
Brooklyn, NY
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 201
Engage Students in Real-World Events through
National Geographic’s Rich Media
Explore NG Education’s free multimedia, media-rich activities, reference resources, and mapping tools. Learn how to use
iconic National Geographic photos and videos to engage
learners in real-world issues and events.
Alison Michel, Patricia Norris, National Geographic Society,
Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 204B
6-12 Multimedia Playground: Experience
Technology for Your Classroom
Interactive technology is fun but how does it connect to
instruction? This session will allow you to experiment with
new technology products to see what might work for your
classroom.
Melissa Counihan, Elizabeth Murphy, Kate Weber, Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt, Austin, TX; David Lawson, Geraldine Stevens,
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Evanston, IL
Secondary Level-High School Global Connections
Room 304
Beyond the Five Pillars: Teaching About Islam
and Muslims
The typical “five pillars” explanation of Islam doesn’t really
explain much about how Muslims live in our complex world
today. We will explore Muslim diversity across doctrine, culture and politics.
Barbara Petzen, Middle East Policy Council, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School Social Sciences
Room 208A
Fact or Fiction? Teaching Media Literacy to Digital
Natives
Is it okay to cite Wikipedia? Is plagiarism wrong if everybody’s
doing it? Learn about tools to help your students deconstruct
and evaluate information online, in print or on TV.
Maureen Freeman, Newseum, Washington, DC
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 144A
Making It Personal: The March Toward Racial
Equality
Discover untold stories of the Civil Rights Movement through
National Archives holdings including letters, telegrams,
speeches, photos, telephone conversations, and documents
from three presidential libraries and executive branch
agencies.
Kim Barbieri, Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum,
Abilene, KS; Tom Heuertz, Harry S. Truman Library and
Museum, Independence, MO; Michael Hussey, National Archives
and Records Administration, Washington, DC; Marsha Sharp,
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, Austin, TX
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 209C
Differentiating Instruction from LD to AP:
Teaching More Students Well
Wanted: Teachers desiring to effectively reach more students!
Experienced classroom teachers present lessons, resources,
strategies successfully used for students with widely differing
skills, interests, readiness. Extensive online resources/immediate use.
Julie Albrecht, Margaret Bramlett, St. Paul’s Episcopal School,
Mobile, AL; Susan Santoli, University of South Alabama, Mobile,
AL
Secondary Level-High School SUN
U.S. History
Room 149A
Moving Beyond the Textbook: Integrating WebBased Resources into Lesson Planning
Despite documented advantages to using web-based resources,
teachers often rely upon textbooks as the primary source of
information in the classroom. This workshop seeks to dispel
myths surrounding web-based resources.
Melissa Callahan, American Institute for History Education,
Swedesboro, NJ
Secondary Level-High School U.S. History
Room 202B
Father Knows Best to Father Knows Least: The
Sitcom Family
Identify ways to study American culture’s messages of race,
class, and gender by investigating the evolution of family in
sitcoms—from radio in the 1930s to mock documentary
today.
Jennifer Lloyd, Barrie School, Silver Spring, MD
91st NCSS Annual Conference
135
December 4 • Sessions • 8:00–10:00am
SeconDary level-hiGh School
10:15–11:15aM
u.S. hiStory
Room 204C
African American Cultural Humanities Teaching
Rigor through the Arts
Presenting the first African American Cultural Humanities
courses in the country! Integrate music and art into your U.S.
history and English curriculum. Vicki’s workshops are lively
and informative.
Vicki Shields, Ann Arbor Public Schools, Ann Arbor, MI
SeconDary level-hiGh School
u.S. hiStory
Room 209B
Studying the Labor Movement in the New Gilded
Age
American history teachers have an incredible opportunity to
explore connections between current labor protests and those
of the Gilded Age to help students better understand these
challenging economic times.
Katy Swalwell, George Mason University, Middleton, WI
SeconDary level-hiGh School
worlD hiStory
Room 103A
U.S. Military’s 21st-Century Face: Strength
Through Diversity
SuN
Patton unavailable? Start a chapter of Veterans Heritage Project
with your students. Learn world history first-hand from men
and women who lived it—from all segments of America’s
diverse society.
Barbara Hatch, Veterans Heritage Project, Phoenix, AZ
SeconDary level-hiGh School
worlD hiStory
Room 202A
Closing the Achievement Gap: Reading, ‘Riting,
Review for Diverse Classes
Urban challenges abound at suburban Stuart High School
where most students are second-language learners. Experienced teachers will share reading, writing and review methods
used to close student achievement gaps.
Linda Lauderdale, Pam Martinov, J.E.B. Stuart High School,
Falls Church, VA
SeconDary level-hiGh School
worlD hiStory
Room 305
Society, Policy, and Media in Cold War Latin
America
Teacher-researchers will discuss the role of Latin America
during the Cold War, specifically in Cuba, Chile, and El Salvador, on themes of race, mobilization, government, media,
and U.S. foreign policy.
Jen Lewis, Michael Stoll, New York University, NY; Karen
Michels, Beacon School, New York, NY
136
Dimensions of Diversity
Keynote Speaker
Ballroom A
Judy Woodruff
Broadcast journalist Judy Woodruff has covered politics and
other news for more than three decades, as White House correspondent for NBC News, anchor and correspondent for
NCC, and currently as a senior correspondent and co-anchor
of PBS NewsHour. Ms. Woodruff ’s distinguished work includes
an extensive project in 2007 on the views of young Americans
called “Generation Next: Speak Up. Be Heard.” Ms. Woodruff
is the recipient of the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award in Broadcast Journalism/Television and the University of Southern California Walter Cronkite Award for
Excellence in Journalism, among her many distinctions.
Exhibit Booth Floor Plan
Hall H / Level 2
to Exhibitor Lounge
261 360
361 460
461 560
561 660
259 358
359 458
459 558
559 658
257 356
357 456
457 556
557 656
hall
columns
Section C
254
252
250
248
253 352
353 452
453 552
553 652
653 752
251 350
351 450
451 550
551 650
651 750
249 348
349 448
449 548
549 648
649 748
755
753
751
749
747
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242
240
245 344
345 444
445 544
243 342
343 442
443 542
241 340
341 440
441 540
545 644
ECON
ALLEY
645 744
543 642
743
541 640
741
Section B
238
236
234
232
237 336
337 436
235 334
335 434
233 332
333 432
CIVICS
ALLEY
23 24
21 22
19 20
230
228
226
224
739
50’
737
NCSS
30’
633
731
INTL.
ALLEY
329 428
429 528
227 326
327 426
427 526
225 324
325 424
425 524
735
733
433
229 328
745
629 728
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729
627 726
EXHIBITS
246
727
725
17 18
222
220
15 16
218
13 14
216
723
221 320
321 420
421 520
621 720
619 718
719
617 716
717
219 318
319 418
419 518
217 316
317 416
417 516
517
715
Section A
11 12
9 10
7
8
214
212
210
208
213 312
313 412
413 512
211 310
311 410
411 510
209 308
309 408
409 508
721
713
613 712
509
711
611 710
609 708
709
5
6
3
4
1
2
206
204
202
200
205 304
305 404
203 302
303 402
201 300
301 400
707
401
501
603 702
601 700
705
703
701
ENTRY
91st NCSS Annual Conference
137
Exhibitors
More than 175 exhibitors are displaying the latest educational products, programs, services, and travel opportunities. Make sure to
spend time learning about the vast array of organizations serving the professional needs of social studies educators.
We thank all exhibitors for their commitment to NCSS, and for joining us at the 91st NCSS Annual Conference.
Free coffee and tea are available both mornings at stations scattered around the exhibit floor.
Bold numbers at the end of exhibitor listings indicate booth numbers corresponding to the Exhibit Booth Floor Plan on page
137.
Exhibit Hall Hours
Friday, 9:00am–5:30pm
Saturday, 8:30am–5:00pm
1812: Who Won the War?
www.canadianhistoryseries.com
The eScrapbook titled 1812: Who Won the War? is part
of the 21st Century Toolkit: History of Canadian-American
Relations. Produced in partnership with NCSS, it is comprised
of two, 30-minute video programs, six eScrapbooks, and a
Teacher’s Guide. The interactive, digital eScrapbooks feature
educational gaming, multiple layering and role-playing. 453
ABC-CLIO
www.abc-clio.com
130 Cremona Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93117
ABC-CLIO serves the history profession, history teachers, and
students and scholars of history with a complete line of
databases, books, and eBooks, along with social studies
reference and curriculum resources for middle and high school
libraries and classrooms. 401
EXHIBITS
The Advocates for Human Rights
www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org
330 2nd Avenue South, Suite 800, Minneapolis, MN
55401
The Advocates is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and a national leader in
helping K-12 schools incorporate Human Rights Education in
their curriculum and learning environment. Visit our booth for
FREE K-12 lesson plans, toolkits, and resources; information on
trainings; and the NEW 2012 Edition of Energy of a Nation
(immigration curriculum). 357
African Studies Outreach Council
www.africa.upenn.edu/outreachcouncil/
Williams Hall 650, 255 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA
19104
The African Studies Outreach Council promotes the study of
Africa in K-16 institutions. It also develops and disseminates
educational materials, organizes workshops for teachers, and
facilitates the exchange of ideas and information on Africa. The
Council sponsors the Children’s Africana Book Awards, which
provides awards for the best children’s books. 416
American Civics Center
www.americancivicscenter.com
8405 Richmond Highway, Suite I, Alexandria, VA 22309
739
American Federation of Teachers
Educational Foundation
www.aft.org
555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001
The American Federation of Teachers Educational Foundation
works with teachers and other education specialists to develop
internationally-themed civic education materials. The materials
contain primary sources, thoughtful discussion questions and
engaging activities that inspire students to think of themselves
as engaged global citizens. Materials are distributed free to
educators. 443
American Historical Association
www.historians.org
400 A Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003
138
Dimensions of Diversity
The American Historical Association is a nonprofit membership
organization. One of the major areas of focus for the AHA is
history teaching. The AHA’s teaching-related activities include
publication of pamphlets and instructional materials for
teachers, cosponsorship of National History Day, and the award
of multiple teaching prizes. 244
American Institute for History Education
www.aihe.info
1514 Kings Highway, Swedesboro, NJ 08085
The American Institute for History Education (AIHE) is a leading
provider of technology-based classroom and professional
development resources for History, Social Studies and Language
Arts teachers. An award-winning organization, AIHE was
founded in 2003 to provide teachers with classroom tools
designed to increase the overall academic achievement of
students. 501
American Legacy Publishing
www.studiesweekly.com
1922 W. 200 N., Lindon, UT 84042
Studies Weekly delivers textbook content in magazine format.
The content mostly stays the same each year so that teachers
may build lesson plans around it. But then it’s updated to avoid
obsolescence. Motivate students and raise test scores for 12
years per student for the same cost as just one textbook!
312
American Psychological Association
www.apa.org
750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002
The American Psychological Association (APA) seeks to advance
the creation, communication and application of psychological
knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives. APA
supports the teaching of high school psychology through the
APA Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools (TOPSS),
which offers teaching resources and professional development
opportunities. 319
American Red Cross
www.redcross.org
2025 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006
The American Red Cross offers the EHL toolkit to teachers. EHL
is an international education program that explores the
principles of respect for life and human dignity. It offers highquality materials to engage students in developing 21st
century skills to understand when conflict intersects with
people’s rights and protection. Students can view complex
issues from multiple perspectives, and dilemma analysis to
become informed global citizens. It helps teachers connect the
past to real-world events. EHL is aligned with NCSS standards.
Visit www.redcross.org/ehl to learn more. 425
Amsco School Publications, Inc.
www.amscopub.com
315 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013
Amsco publishes textbooks, workbooks, AP and supplementary
programs in World History, American History, Issues & Skills,
Government, Economics, State Assessment etc. for Middle
School, High School and Adult Education. 735
Ancient Order of Hibernians
www.aoh.com
37 Harrison Avenue, Centereach, NY 11720
The AOH is the largest Irish organization in the world whose
goal is to promote the history and contributions of the Irish
people which has, to a large degree, been overlooked in
American history texts. Their focus is on literary notables; on
military dignitaries; on inventive personalities as well as on
how America’s largest immigrant group shaped her growth.
747
Annenberg Classroom
www.annenbergclassroom.org
202 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
211
Annenberg Learner
www.learner.org
1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 302, Washington, DC
20004
In civics, economics, history, psychology, or world studies—
Annenberg Learner has multimedia series for teaching and
distance learning. Need PD credit? Check out our video
workshops for K-12 social studies and geography. Coordinated
Web sites include texts and guides. Videos are available as
captioned DVDs or digital downloads. 619
Annenberg Presidential Learning Center
www.reaganfoundation.org/education
Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, 40 Presidential
Drive, Simi Valley, CA 93065
The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Presidential Learning
Center is committed to engaging the future leaders of America
in the study of our nation’s democratic processes with the aim
of developing proactive informed, educated, and conscientious
citizens and leaders. We develop free curriculum and
programming for educators and students. 234
Archaeology Education Clearinghouse
www.archaeologyeducationclearinghouse.org
Archaeological Institute of America, 656 Beacon Street, 6th
Floor, Boston, MA 02215
Archaeology Education Clearinghouse (AEC) is an affiliation of
professional archaeological societies that promote the use of
archaeology in classrooms. The AEC shares educational
resources, skills, and expertise with educators interested in
exploring the human past. For additional information and to
view our online resources, visit our website at www.
archaeologyeducationclearinghouse.org 711
Asia for Kids/Culture for Kids
http://asiaforkids.com http://cultureforkids.com
4480 Lake Forest Drive #302, Cincinnati, OH 45242
Books, DVD, crafts and music about people, culture and
geography around the world—Families of the World, Worlds
Together, If the World Were a Village, My Brown Eyes, Sing and
Learn, Going to School in India. Shop online at Asia for Kids
(asiaforkids.com) and Culture for Kids (cultureforkids.com).
601
Bedford, Freeman & Worth (BFW)
Publishers
www.bfwpub.com/highschool
4B Cedarbrook Drive, Cranbury, NJ 08512
Bedford, Freeman & Worth (BFW) Publishers offers the highest
quality print and electronic educational materials for select
high school courses. With a focus on AP* and general level
History, Psychology, Economics, and Geography, BFW offers
tools that work and support teachers need, for today and
tomorrow. 316
Benchmark Education
www.benchmarkeducation.com
629 Fifth Avenue, Pelham, NY 10803
Benchmark Education provides you with the resources that you
need to build Social Studies literacy and concepts. Enrich your
core curriculum with leveled texts that support grade
appropriate Social Studies standards, Content Connections Big
Books (develop Social Studies literacy though shared reading
and read-alouds), and Prime (differentiated text pairs for
Middle School Social Studies Standards). 716
Berkshire Publishing Group
www.berkshirepublishing.com
122 Castle Street, Great Barrington, MA 01230
242
Bill of Rights Institute
www.billofrightsinstitute.org
200 North Glebe Road, Suite 200, Arlington, VA 22203
The Bill of Rights Institute’s mission is to educate young people
about America’s Founders, our Founding documents, and how
our Founding continues to affect and shape a free society. The
Institute helps provide social studies teachers with high-quality
professional development programs and supplemental
curriculum on constitutional and American history topics.
324
Boyds Mills Press
www.boydsmillspress.com
815 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431
We publish quality children’s trade books for children from
grades pre K to young adult. Our history imprint, Calkins Creek,
introduces readers to the many people, places, and events that
have shaped our country’s history. History is front and center:
our books combine extensive, original research with vibrant,
compelling writing. Our authors transport their readers back in
time, and make historic events seem familiar and alive. 233
C-SPAN
www.c-span.org
400 North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC
20001
C-SPAN Networks bring you the latest from the White House,
national politics, and Capitol Hill, plus extensive coverage of
Campaign 2012. Watch live or online anytime. 649
Can Manufacturers Institute
www.cancentral.com
1730 Rhode Island Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036
249
Center for Civic Education
www.civiced.org
21600 Oxnard Street, Suite 500, Woodland Hills, CA
91367
The Center develops and implements programs in civic
education at all levels and offers curricular materials,
professional development, and evaluation of civic education.
241
The Center for Learning
www.centerforlearning.org
29313 Clemens Road, Suite 2E, Westlake, OH 44145
The Center for Learning is a 40-year-old, non-profit provider of
high-quality teacher resources and professional development.
Our proven lesson plans, in print and digital formats, enhance
student engagement and build 21st-century skills. Our online
PD coursework promotes educator excellence by producing real
outcomes in the classroom. 350
Center for the Constitution at James
Madison’s Montpelier
http://center.montpelier.org
P.O. Box 911, Orange, VA 22960
The Center for the Constitution at James Madison’s Montpelier
is a nonpartisan organization dedicated to the study and
teaching of founding principles and constitutional ideals. The
Center serves as a teaching academy, a place where
professionals are immersed in an intellectual engagement
with the theory and meaning of the American Constitution.
327
Choices Education Program
www.choices.edu
Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI 02912
Choices curriculum units make complex international and
historical issues accessible to students through a problembased, student-centered approach to learning. Our curriculum
units, free Scholars Online videos, and free Teaching with the
News lessons encourage higher order thinking and 21st century
skills as students grapple with multiple perspectives on issues.
High schools across the U.S. depend on Choices for scholarlybased, supplemental materials for many social studies
courses—stop by our booth and find out why. With Choices,
your students will never again say history or current events are
boring! 400
Christopher Economics & Government
www.christophereconomics.com
7228 Bolingbrook Drive, Portage, MI 49024
Christopher Productions sells superior state of the art
government and economics textbooks. Due to our digital
format we deliver the most up-to-date textbooks for a fraction
of the cost of hardcover books. CP also provides high quality
ancillary materials, graphics production and professional
development for schools seeking to integrate technology in the
delivery of instruction. 541
Civil War Trust
www.civilwar.org
1156 15th Street, NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005
729
Civil War Washington Historic Sites
www.fords.org/home/education/teacher-programs/
professional-development
Through place-based learning at Ford’s Theatre, the Frederick
Douglass National Historic Site, President Lincoln’s Cottage and
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, The Civil War
Washington Historic Sites consortium offers dynamic,
collaborative programming that enhances the study of
Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Washington during
the Civil War. 236
Close Up Foundation
www.closeup.org
1330 Braddock Place, Suite 400, Alexandria, VA 22314
Since 1971 Close Up has educated and inspired young people
to become informed and engaged citizens. Over 725,000
students and teachers have participated in our exciting
hands-on programs. Using Washington, DC as a living
classroom, we provide unique access to the people, processes
and places that make up our nation’s capital. 237
Cobblestone & Cricket
www.cobblestonepub.com
30 Grove Street, Suite C, Peterborough, NH 03458
You love Cobblestone Magazine (American History) and Calliope
(World History), but have you met AppleSeeds (Social Studies),
FACES (World Cultures), and DIG (Archaeology and History)?
With quality informational text, these award-winning
nonfiction magazines build content knowledge, improve
literacy and critical thinking skills, and cultivate an appreciation
of history. What’s more, kids love them. Stop by our booth to
pick up your FREE SAMPLES and to learn about our other
products: CobblestoneOnline, Teaching with Primary Sources
(17 titles), and Nonfiction Theme Packs. Grades 3-12. 321
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
www.history.org
301 First Street, Williamsburg, VA 23185
The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is a leader in interactive
American history media, specializing in resources such as the
Emmy award-winning Electronic Field Trip Series, live interactive
television broadcasts available on participating PBS stations
and via video streaming. These trips are supported by
comprehensive materials supporting American History
Standards of Learning. 508
Concern Worldwide US:
Global Concerns Classroom
www.concernusa.org/gcc
355 Lexington Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017
Global Concerns Classroom (GCC) is a dynamic global education
program of Concern Worldwide US, an international
humanitarian organization. GCC offers free resources (global
guides, videos, posters, toolkits) and services (presentations,
student summits, club support) to U.S. secondary schools. GCC
empowers youth to explore global issues, speak out, and take
action against poverty. 417
Consortium of Latin American Studies
Programs
www.claspprograms.org
University of Texas at Austin, LLILAS, 1 University Station
D0800, Austin, TX 78712
Several Latin American Studies outreach programs will share
curriculum materials, recommended resources, and professional
development—including travel—opportunities for educators.
We work with educators across all subjects and grade levels
who are interested in incorporating richer and more meaningful
Latin American content in the classroom. 410
Constitutional Rights Foundation
www.crf-usa.org
601 South Kingsley Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90005
Constitutional Rights Foundation (CRF) is a non-partisan, nonprofit organization. CRF develops, produces, and distributes
programs and materials to teachers, students, and publicminded citizens. We pass the ideals, ideas, and practices of
participatory democracy on to future generations by making
history, law, and government come alive to young people.
548
Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum
www.cooperhewitt.org
2 East 91st Street, New York, NY 10128
Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum
provides teachers with access to a free online educational
resource center. With over 400 lesson plans, videos and
resources integrating design with all major curriculum areas,
we provide the tools to incorporate design thinking into any
K-12 classroom. 702
Council for Economic Education
www.councilforeconed.org
122 E. 42nd Street, Suite 2600, New York, NY 10168
The Council for Economic Education empowers people to make
informed and responsible choices throughout their lives as
consumers, investors, citizens, and participants in the global
economy. The CEE advocates for better and greater schoolbased economic and personal finance education at the K-12
91st NCSS Annual Conference
139
EXHIBITS
BeadforLife
www.beadforlife.org
2336 Canyon Blvd., Suite 202, Boulder, CO 80302
BeadforLife is a poverty eradication project working with
impoverished women in Uganda. Our members make recycled
paper beads and shea butter products. BeadforLife offers an
interactive service learning curriculum, Understanding Global
Poverty: How Youth Can Make a Difference and a Fundraising
program to help youth join in the fight against poverty. 450
level through well-prepared teachers, high quality programs
and classroom materials that help young people achieve
economic and financial literacy. 545
CQ Press
www.cqpress.com
2300 N Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20037
229
Creation Station LLC
www.famousbe-an.com
14186 Klingensmith Blvd., Carmel, IN 46033
Famous Be’an Collectibles are famous being beanbag “dolls”
that provide educational information for classrooms and
libraries. We offer 75+ historical collectibles! Included with all
collectibles are hangtags with original illustrations and
biographical information in prose and poetic verse. Also
available are bookmarks and a teaching guide (K-8). 341
Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
www.crowcanyon.org
23390 Road K, Cortez, CO 81321
At Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, students participate in
hands-on adventures exploring the archaeology of
southwestern Colorado, near Mesa Verde National Park. With
our field and lab archaeologists, they’ll learn about the
ancestral Pueblo Indians who lived in the area hundreds of
years ago and contribute to our ongoing research efforts.
210
Curriculum Travel of America, Inc.
www.CTAfieldtrips.com
5194 Hamilton Blvd., Allentown, PA 18106
Student group tours led by Certified Teachers to DC, Baltimore,
Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Cape Cod whalewatching,
Gettysburg, French Canada, and more. Custom designed
curriculum-themed plus class trips are arranged. 348
EXHIBITS
Dar al Islam
www.daralislam.org
P.O. Box 180, Abiquiu, NM 87510
The Dar al Islam Teachers’ Institute is a two-week residential
program that offers educators an opportunity to better
understanding the basic tenets, civilization, and world-view of
Islam, to learn about resources for teaching about Islam more
effectively, and to see how Islam works in the daily life of
Muslims. 427
The DBQ Project
www.dbqproject.com
425 Lee Street, Evanston, IL 60202
The DBQ Project, founded in 2000, is committed to helping
teachers implement rigorous writing and thinking activities
with students of all skill levels in grades 4-12. The DBQ Project
offers materials in American, World and Texas History and
provides professional development training and support to
schools and districts across the country. 524
Dinah-Might Adventures
www.dinah.com
P.O. Box 690328, San Antonio, TX 78269
Dinah-Might Adventures is an educational publishing and
consulting company owned by Dinah Zike, Author/Speaker. Her
books are known for their innovative ways to use “Foldables®”
in teaching all subjects and grade levels. She also offers
professional development at the Dinah Zike Academy, a unique
trainer of trainers facility. 340
Donnelly/Colt
www.donnellycolt.com
P.O. Box 188, Hampton, CT 06247
Posters, postcards, documentary DVDs, buttons, stickers,
notecards, and shirts. 528
Dulcinea Media
www.dulcineamedia.com
205 Sherman Street, Lynbrook, NY 11563
208
140
Dimensions of Diversity
DYMO/Mimio Interactive Teaching
Technologies
http://mimio.dymo.com
1 Charles Park, Cambridge, MA 02142
DYMO/Mimio is a global leader in interactive teaching
technologies, and has just introduced the MimioClassroom™
family of products, our best teaching tools ever.
MimioClassroom™ products make it easier for teachers to do
what they do best—teach. That’s what sets DYMO/Mimio
apart in the world of interactive teaching. 308
Educational Tours, Inc.
www.tours-eti.com
P.O. Box 257, Holt, MI 48842
Student Group Travel Company that will customize any
educational trip to any destination in the world.723
EMC Publishing
www.emcschool.com
875 Montreal Way, St. Paul, MN 55102
Review our Economics: New Ways of Thinking textbook program!
Students learn basic economic principles through powerful
real-world examples in the context of globalization using clear
explanations with supporting graphs and charts. Also, ask
about the recently revised American Government: Citizenship
and the Balance of Power and Personal Finance textbook
programs. 311
Engaging Stations for Student Success
www.engagingstations.com
15402 Oak Lake Glen Drive, Sugar Land, TX 77498
Interactives for the Social Studies classroom. Stations are
designed for use with small groups who interact with the
material for 8–12 minutes. Students read, apply, and process
information. Use for previewing, teaching, reteaching,
reviewing, and assessing material. We provide a product that
directly impacts rigor and engagement in the classroom.
726
European Union Centers of Excellence
Network
www.euce.org
301 Pittsboro Street, Office 3209, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel
Hill, NC 27599
The Network of European Union Centers of Excellence offers
K-12 lesson plans, college syllabi, web-based information, and
classroom-ready teaching materials on Europe and the
European Union. These materials are free to the public. To view
our teaching resources, please visit www.euce.org 420
Federal Courts
www.uscourts.gov
One Columbus Circle, NE, Washington, DC 20544
High school teachers find unique, classroom-ready Federal
Courts Basics using interactive and web-based media. Legal
consequences of cyberbullying. Re-enactment of Mendez v.
Westminster opening schoolhouse doors. Teen-relevant
adaptations of two 2010–2011 Supreme Court Cases: Student
counter-protests at military funerals; and age as a factor in
Miranda warnings. 334
Federal Reserve System
www.federalreserveeducation.org
Free educational resources for enhancing economic and
personal finance education. 542
Follett Library Resources
www.titletales.com
1340 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry, IL 60050
As the only company that focuses on preK-12 schools, Follett
Library Resources is uniquely attuned to understanding and
meeting your needs. We provide books, eBooks, digital
resources, audiovisual materials and more to assist social
studies educators in improving student performance and
meeting your curriculum goals. 557
Foundation for Teaching Economics
www.fte.org
260 Russell Blvd., Suite B, Davis, CA 95616
FTE provides teacher training and curriculum materials for
effectively teaching economics at the high school and middle
school levels. 540
Fredericksburg, VA Regional Tourism
www.VisitFred.com
706 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401
An authentic 18th century town—Fredericksburg, VA. George
Washington came with his family in 1738 to live here and
much of the early history relates to his presence. The Civil War
shattered the town’s quiet prosperity and today the NPS
maintains four major battlefields. Old Town offers an eclectic
mix of restaurants, antique shops, and boutiques. 549
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge
www.freedomsfoundation.org
P.O. Box 67, Valley Forge, PA 19481
551
Gallopade International
www.gallopade.com
P.O. Box 2779, Peachtree City, GA 30269
Gallopade International is an award-winning leader in the
publication of Social Studies curriculum and supplementary
educational materials now celebrating its 31st anniversary.
Gallopade products include State Stuff for all 50 states, the
best-selling Carol Marsh Mysteries, Civil War series, writing
development resources and toll, multicultural resources,
classroom decoratives, games and more. 213
GEEO
www.geeo.org
2945 Morris Road, Ardmore, PA 19003
GEEO is a non-profit organization that runs travel programs for
teachers. This summer GEEO and NCSS are collaborating on a
joint program and will organize two trips (Turkey and Peru)
exclusively for NCSS members. Come to our booth to learn
more about the programs and enter our raffle for the chance to
win a free trip to Turkey! 426
The Genocide Education Project
www.genocideeducation.org
51 Commonwealth Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94118
The Genocide Education Project is a nonprofit organization that
assists educators in teaching about human rights and genocide,
particularly the Armenian Genocide, by developing and
distributing instructional materials, providing access to
teaching resources and organizing educational workshops. For
more information, go to www.GenocideEducation.org. For
teaching resources, go to: www.TeachGenocide.com. 418
George Washington’s Mount Vernon
www.mountvernon.org
P.O. Box 110, Mount Vernon, VA 22121
Mount Vernon provides free educational materials and
resources for teachers, grades K-12. Visit our booth to talk to
our educational specialists about our printed and electronic
resources as well as to learn more about our virtual and on-site
fieldtrip experiences. 745
German Information Center USA—
German Embassy
www.Germany.Info
2300 M Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20037
The German Information Center USA offers educators a window
on modern Germany through free educational resources and
materials, both printed and online at www.Germany.info.
441
Gettysburg CVB
www.gettysburg.travel
571 W. Middle Street, Gettysburg, PA 17325
Bring your troops to Gettysburg and discover a true American
treasure. Your students will step back in time as they explore
our 6,000 acre battlefield, become a civil war soldier and hear
the stories of the Gettysburg townspeople. 214
GLSEN—The Gay, Lesbian, & Straight
Education Network
www.glsen.org
90 Broad Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10004
The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) strives
to assure that each member of every school community is
valued and respected regardless of sexual orientation or gender
identity/expression. GLSEN works with educators, policy
makers, community leaders and students on the urgent need
to address anti-LGBT behavior and bias in schools. GLSEN is
focused on building the skills of educators to teach respect for
all people and provides professional development as well as
school and classroom resources. 351
Grand Classroom
www.grandclassroom.com
P.O. Box 7166, Charlottesville, VA 22906
Grand Classroom provides educational student travel to the
Grand Canyon and National Parks of the west as well as a
unique Washington DC adventure. The tours are worry-free
with an emphasis on safety and fun. Grand Classroom provides
superior customer service and numerous benefits for educators
including free travel. 349
Groundwood Books
www.groundwoodbooks.com
110 Spadina Avenue, Suite 801, Toronto, ON M5V 2K4
CANADA
We publish a wide range of books for children from pre-school
to young adult. Visit our booth to see our newest picture books,
fiction and nonfiction titles which includes the award winning
Groundwork Guides series. As well our fiction titles cover a
range of social study themes that encompass the globe. 345
H2O for Life
www.h2oforlifeschools.org
1310 Highway 96E, Suite 235, White Bear Lake, MN
55110
H2O for Life provides a transformational service-learning
project. Students learn about the global water crisis and then
go into action to raise awareness and funds to provide water
and latrines at a partner school in a developing nation that
they select through H2O for Life. 451
Heifer International
www.heifer.org
1 World Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72202
Heifer International is a sustainable development organization
that works to end world hunger and poverty and protect the
earth. Through livestock, training and “passing on the gift,”
Heifer has helped 9.2 million families in more than 125
countries improve their quality of life and move toward greater
self-reliance. 449
Hemisphere Educational Travel
www.hemispheretravel.com
1375 E. Woodfield Road, Suite 530, Schaumberg , IL
60173
526
The Henry Ford
www.TheHenryFord.org
20900 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn, MI 48124
Here, once in a lifetime is waiting around every corner. And
never before seen is seen by millions. It’s where the
extraordinary happens every day. This is a place like no other.
The only place. The Henry Ford. NEW 80,000 sq. ft. permanent
exhibit “Driving America” opens February 14, 2012. A must see
for all ages. 553
Herff Jones | Nystrom
www.herffjonesnystrom.com
3333 Elston Avenue, Chicago, IL 60618
For over 100 years, Herff Jones | Nystrom has been the leading
choice for classroom wall maps and globes, atlases and
programs. This content is now available in dynamic, contentrich layers with StrataLogica, a web-based program powered
by the Google Earth API. StrataLogica gives teachers and
students the opportunity to interact with our world, using a
laptop, computer or interactive whiteboard, while fostering a
21st century learning environment by allowing users to share
and collaborate with other users around the world. StrataLogica
has been recognized as one of District Administration’s Top 100
products, appeared in an official Google video and blog post
and was favorably reviewed on several teacher blogs! Come to
booth #300 to get a free demo and experience
StrataLogica! Please visit www.stratalogica.com to learn
more! 300
History Education
www.historyeducation.com
P.O. Box 816, New Market, IA 51646
HISTORY Education is the education-direct extension of
HISTORY, BIO, LIFETIME, and A&E. We offer multimedia
resources based on our award-winning documentary
programming that challenge, inspire and encourage the love of
learning by connecting with students in an informative and
compelling manner across multiple subjects and disciplines.
200
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
www.hmhpub.com
222 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA 02116
301
iEARN (International Education and
Resource Network)
www.us.iearn.org
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 450, New York, NY 10115
iEARN is a non-profit network of 30,000 schools and youth
organizations in over 130 countries. iEARN enables participants
to design and participate in global projects as part of their
regular classroom and after-school programs. All projects align
to education standards and use a safe and structured online
Collaboration Centre. 408
Independent Lens & POV
www.itvs.org www.pbs.org/pov
651 Brannan Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94107
218
InspirEd Educators, Inc.
www.inspirededucators.com
360 Waverly Hall Circle, Roswell, GA 30075
InspirEd Educators publishes creative, thought-provoking and
practical units for K-12 Social Studies. You will be amazed at
the quality of our student-centered lessons that are easyto-use, engaging, and make learning enjoyable! All InspirEd
units align to the Common Core Standards and emphasize
critical thinking and enduring skills. Come by to see our
fantastic units and take advantage of our special conference
prices! 609
Institute for Curriculum Services
www.icsresources.org
131 Steuart Street, Suite 205, San Francisco, CA 94105
Visit our booth for FREE lesson plans and teacher’s guides on
Jews, Judaism, and Israel. Materials meet public school needs,
including time constraints, and are geared toward a variety of
subjects including American History, Ancient History, Modern
World History, and teaching about religion. 648
International Debate Education
Association
www.idebate.org
400 West 59th Street, New York, NY 10019
Books and journals on all types of debates and on issues
involving youth with the objective to foster and engage
students by offering materials to stimulate the discussion of
issues critical to their lives. For middle and high schools. 419
International Spy Museum
www.spymuseum.org
800 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20004
The International Museum features the largest collection of
international espionage artifacts ever placed on public display.
Many of these objects are being seen by the public for the first
time. These artifacts illuminate the work of famous spies and
pivotal espionage actions as well as help bring to life the
strategies and techniques of the men and women behind some
of the most secretive espionage missions in world history.
456
izzit.org
www.izzit.org
2002 Filmore Avenue, Suite 1, Erie, PA 16506
Offering free DVDs to U.S. teachers in grades 4-12, we are
television producers who create and distribute programs that
spark curiosity and lively classroom discussions. izzit.org
provides more than 300,000 teachers, 44,000 schools and 29
million students with compelling educational DVDs, Daily
Current Events lessons, games and contests. 652
James Madison Memorial Fellowship
Foundation
www.jamesmadison.gov
2000 K Street, NW, Suite 303, Washington, DC 20006
James Madison Fellows and foundation staff will discuss the
$25,000 graduate fellowships offered annually for secondary
school teachers to study the U.S. Constitution. 332
Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation
www.historyisfun.org
P.O. Box 1607, Williamsburg, VA 23187
Our living-history museums explore America’s beginnings
through hands-on, curriculum-based learning. Jamestown
Settlement highlights the Powhatan Indian, English, and
African cultures at Jamestown. Yorktown Victory Center
explores life during the American Revolution, its impact on
diverse people, and development of a new nation. Visit www.
historyisfun.org for education resources. 228
Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation
(JPEF)
www.jewishpartisans.org
2107 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 302, San Francisco, CA
94109
RESIST! Free curricula and short films to inspire and educate
your students about the 20,000-30,000 Jewish men and
women—many of them teens—who fought back during the
Holocaust in armed resistance units. Visit our booth for free
posters, stickers, online professional development opportunities
and more. 428
The Junior Statesman Foundation
www.jsa.org
800 South Claremont Street, Suite 202, San Mateo, CA
94402
741
Keizai Koho Fellowship
www.us-japan.org/jasp
600 Grant Street, Suite 444, Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Introducing a ten-day fellowship to Japan (summer 2012)
where teachers experience contemporary Japanese society
that will enhance their classroom teaching of global
perspectives. 2010 fellows will share about their experience.
Attendees will receive materials on Japan. 448
91st NCSS Annual Conference
141
EXHIBITS
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American
History
www.gilderlehrman.org
19 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036
The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit
organization that promotes the study and love of American
history, by focusing on document-based history education and
working through an array of national programs. The Institute
seeks to instill in every individual an understanding of
America’s past, and its value in today’s world and the future.
737
Klett International & eMapshop
www.globeandmapshop.com
11634 Bust Street, Richmond, VA 23236
eMapshop—pay for it once and own it forever school site
license digital map packages provide a cost efficient and
flexible alternative to subscription on-line mapping programs
with custom designed packages of World & US History,
Government, Geography and interactive layered PDF maps to
fit specific curriculum and budget needs. 412
The Korea Society
www.koreasociety.org
950 Third Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10022
The Korea Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the
promotion of greater awareness, understanding, and
cooperation between the people of the United States and
Korea. The Korea Society offers quality programs of vital
interest to both countries in the areas of policy, business,
education, culture, and the arts. 603
The Laurasian Institution
www.laurasian.org
12345 Lake City Way NE, #151, Seattle, WA 98125
The Laurasian Institution (TLI) is a non-governmental, not-forprofit organization founded in 1990. The program and activities
of TLI give particular attention to cultural interactions with
Asia. TLI contributes to its mission by creating programs that
offer opportunities for students and educators alike to more
directly engage the other. 434
LeadAmerica
www.lead-america.org
1515 South Federal Highway, Suite 301, Boca Raton, FL
33432
LeadAmerica is one of the nation’s educational leaders in
experiential learning for high school and middle school highachieving students. We collaborate with some of the top
colleges and universities throughout the U.S. to offer college
immersion programs designed to better prepare students for
their transition to college and beyond. 253
EXHIBITS
Liberty Fund, Inc.
www.libertyfund.org
8335 Allison Pointe Trail, #300, Indianapolis, IN 46250
617
Liberty’s Legacy
www.libertyslegacy.com
1015 Airport Road, Suite 101, Huntsville, AL 35801
Liberty’s Legacy is dedicated to educating students about the
history, importance and true meaning of freedom. We offer
unique educational products that are symbolized by the Statue
of Liberty. “She” is a constant reflection of the history of this
great nation and the invaluable lessons that come from
knowing and understanding our country’s legacy. 708
Library of Congress
www.loc.gov/teachers
101 Independence Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 205401800
The Library of Congress Teachers page brings the excitement of
primary source documents into the classroom, using millions of
historical artifacts from the Library’s online collections. The
Library’s educational outreach staff will demonstrate how to
access historical documents, images, motion pictures, sheet
music, sound recordings, and maps. 434
M.E. Sharpe
www.mesharpe.com
80 Business Park Drive, Armonk, NY 10504
Sharpe Online Reference is designed specifically to meet the
research needs of high school and undergraduate students.
With completely cross-searchable modules on U.S. and Global
History and Culture, SOLP offers thousands of signed articles,
illustrations, and maps; a multimedia primary source archive;
and extensive collections of free supplementary resources.
343
142
Dimensions of Diversity
Macmillan
www.macmillanacademic.com
175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010
A wide range of books and graphic novels for young adults.
317
Mansfield University
http://mansfield.edu/School-Library-online-masters
Mansfield, PA 16933
Mansfield University offers a totally online, nationally
recognized, and fully accredited program for preparing school
librarians. The academic program is based on the latest
research, but emphasizes practical assignments which are
easily transferred to the library. To accomplish this, the faculty
members have extensive experience in school libraries and/or
are currently in-service professionals. 556
The Markerboard People
www.DryErase.com
1611 N. Grand River Avenue, P.O. Box 80560, Lansing, MI
48906
Student Dry Erase Markerboards and Response Boards in class
sets of 30. Unbeatable prices! Single-and double-sided
available. Perfect for graphing, handwriting, math and science.
Long-lasting, non-toxic, ultra low odor markers too! 516
Master of American History and
Government
http://mahg.ashland.edu
Ashbrook Center at Ashland University, Ashland, OH
44805
Designed for social studies teachers, community college
faculty, and curriculum professionals, Ashland University’s
Master of American History and Government is a content-based
graduate program rooted in the study of original historical
documents. Courses are open to degree-seeking and continuing
education students, with both summer residential and online
delivery options. 333
McGraw-Hill Education
www.mheonline.com
8787 Orion Place, Columbus, OH 43240
McGraw-Hill Education announces the launch of Networks, a
new Social Studies Learning System for 6-12 that offers a
printed textbook, dynamic digital resources, and robust
management and communication tools. For K-6, TimeLinks
provides classroom efficiency with a strong mix of core content,
leveled books, and technology. 517
The National Atlas
www.nationalatlas.gov
1400 Independence Road, Rolla, MO 65401
The National Atlas delivers products that make it easier to find,
get, and use authoritative maps, geographic information, and
data about America. All of our data and web-based graphics
are free of charge with no restrictions on use. 550
National Consortium for
Teaching about Asia
www.NCTAsia.org
The National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA) is a
multi-year national initiative to encourage and facilitate
teaching and learning about East Asia in world history, world
geography, other social studies courses, and language arts/
world literature courses. Since 1998, NCTA has offered seminars
on East Asian history and cultures to an average of 1,000
teachers per year across the country. Teachers receive an
excellent selection of seminar materials, exemplary curriculum
materials and opportunities to apply for NCTA study tours to
East Asia and additional enrichment programs. 432
National Constitution Center
www.constitutioncenter.org
525 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106
The National Constitution Center, in historic Philadelphia, is
America’s most interactive history museum. Whether planning
a field trip, looking for innovative ways to enhance classroom
instruction or seeking a deeper understanding of American
history and active citizenship, the National Constitution Center
is an educator’s ultimate civic learning resource. 328
National Endowment for Financial Literacy
(NEFE)
High School Financial Planning Program
(HSFPP)
http://hsfpp.nefe.org
1331 17th Street, Suite 1200, Denver, CO 80202
This free, non-commercial program provides high school
students with basic finance skills as they outline financial
plans, create budgets, propose investing plans, select credit
management strategies, use financial services, consider
insurance needs, and examine how careers impact financial
planning. Includes student guides, lesson plans, presentations,
web resources, instructor training. 743
Middle East Outreach
www.meoc.us
A consortium of organizations dedicated to the teaching and
study of the diverse peoples and cultures of Southwest Asia
and North Africa. We provide free and low-cost classroomready curriculum materials, professional development, and
other resources for educators at all levels. Stop by to see how
we can help you! 411
National Geographic Learning
www.ngsp.com elt.heinle.com
1 Lower Ragsdale Drive, Building 1, Suite 200, Monterey,
CA 93940
National Geographic Learning provides quality PreK-12,
academic, and adult education instructional solutions for
reading, writing, science, social studies, ESL/ELD, and Spanish/
Dual language. 701
National 4-H Youth Conference Center
www.4HCenter.org
7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815
The National 4-H Youth Conference Center provides hotel style
accommodations for class trips to Washington DC. We feature
quad occupancy rooms with separate beds, all you-can-eatbuffet meals, indoor and outdoor recreation spaces, on site
security and free parking. Fully guided DC tours are available.
Just minutes to the National Mall. 227
The National History Bee & Bowl
www.historybowl.com
P.O. Box 875, Tenafly, NJ 07670
The National History Bee and Bowl organizes two history quiz
competitions for middle and high school students (the Bee is
for individual students; the Bowl is for teams). Students and
teams compete in regional qualifying tournaments for a chance
to attend our National Championships in Washington, DC in
April 2012. 216
National Assessment of Educational
Progress
http://nationsreportcard.gov
1030 15th Street, NW, Suite 600E, Washington, DC
20005
744
National History Day
www.nhd.org
0119 Cecil Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
20742
650
National Peace Corps Association
www.peacecorpsconnect.org
1900 L Street NW, Suite 404, Washington, DC 20036
NPCA connects, informs and engages educators and the public
with the Peace Corps community, particularly in guiding
Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) in their continued
service back home. Use our Global Education program to
connect to RPCVs in your communities and pick up resources
for “bringing the world back home.” 404
National Resource Centers on CANADA
www.k12studycanada.org
The NRCs on CANADA are your source for Canadian content! We
offer summer teacher institutes in Canada, regional professional
development courses for K-12 educators, and we provide a
wealth of teaching materials and free classroom resources for
teaching with Canadian content. 452
National Student Leadership Conference
www.nslcleaders.org
320 W. Ohio Street, Suite 4W, Chicago, IL 60654
Since 1989, tens of thousands of outstanding high school
students from across the United States and around the world
have come to the National Student Leadership Conference to
explore the qualities of effective leadership and gain an
insider’s perspective on some of today’s most sought-after
professions. 212
Navajo Jewelry and Crafts
2904 18th Street NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104
We specialize in authentic handcrafted Navajo, Zuni, and Santo
Domingo pueblo jewelry. They are handmade in sterling silver
with all natural stones, such as turquoise, onyx, opal, etc.
353
NBC Learn
www.nbclearn.com
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10112
NBC Learn K-12 makes thousands of historic videos, current
events, and original resources available to K-12 teachers and
students, all aligned to state standards and mapped to
curriculum. 520
The New York Times
www.ontheavenuemarketing.com
On the Avenue Marketing , 613 South Avenue, Weston, MA
02493
Visit The New York Times booth for reduced rate home delivery
and receive a free gift your new subscription!
The New York Times newspaper is distributed internationally
and is the largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States.
Although nicknamed the ‘Gray Lady’ for its staid appearance
and style, it is frequently relied upon as the official and
authoritative reference for modern events. Founded in 1851,
the newspaper has won 106 Pulitzer prizes, winning its first in
1918 for its World War I reporting. Subscribe Today! 329
Newseum
www.newseum.org
555 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001
Explore the stories behind the world’s important news events
through up-to-the-second technology and engaging hands-on
exhibits in the interactive museum of news, history and the
First Amendment. Learning packages include experiential
professional development workshops for teachers and
interactive classes for elementary through university students.
Visit the Newseum during the conference and receive $10
admission. 336
Oklahoma City National Memorial &
Museum
www.OklahomaCityNationalMemorial.org
P.O. Box 323, Oklahoma City, OK 73101
The Memorial & Museum provides a variety of resources to
teach students about the impact of violence and terrorism.
Through lessons learned from the 1995 Oklahoma City
bombing, educators can improve school climate by encouraging
students to make good choices and discover the importance of
respect, resilience and responsibility. 344
Oxford University Press
www.oup.com/us
198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016
Oxford University Press is a leading publisher of books that
engage students and help teachers shape their courses. Visit
our booth to discover the popular series A History of US and
Very Short Introductions, as well as our renowned primary
sources for Social Studies education. 310
PBS Educational Media
www.shoppbs.org/teachershop
2100 Crystal Drive, Arlington, VA 22202
Create a curriculum that’s on the cutting-edge with PBS
Educational Media! Students Pre-K through post-doctoral will
find our vast array of thought-provoking and engaging titles
an excellent way to challenge assumptions and open their
minds to a new world of learning. Available in a wide range of
convenient formats to fit your classroom needs. 219
Peace Corps—Coverdell World Wise
Schools
www.peacecorps.gov/wws
1111 20th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20526
The World Wise Schools program of the Peace Corps develops
free internet-based resources including publications, stories,
lesson plans, and multimedia (including webquests, podcasts,
videos, interactive games, and slideshows) to help students
explore ways that today’s Peace Corps Volunteers are working
to solve real-world problems related to science and global
society. 436
Peachtree Publishers
www.peachtree-online.com
1700 Chattahoochee Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30318
Peachtree Publishers is an independently owned trade
publisher specializing in quality children’s books, from
children’s fiction and non-fiction picture books for children
2–12, juvenile chapter books, and young adult fiction and nonfiction; and consumer references in health, education, and
parenting. Our mission is to create books that captivate and
educate young and old alike. Free Freight on Show Orders!
728
Pearson
www.pearsonschool.com
501 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116
Pearson, the leader in Pre-K–12 education solutions,
transforms education by connecting personalized, assessmentdriven programs, services, school improvement strategies, and
technology that deliver improved outcomes in student
performance and classroom instruction. Pearson’s researchbased curriculum in print, digital, or blended options engages
digital natives while empowering teachers with professional
development training and services. 509
Penguin Group (USA)
http://us.penguingroup.com
Penguin Group (USA) publishes trade fiction and nonfiction
books through a wide range of imprints. Please visit http://
us.penguingroup.com for information on our titles, subject
catalogs and upcoming academic conventions. 627
Polish Perspectives
429
Population Connection
www.populationeducation.org
2120 L Street, NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037
Population Connection provides quality professional
development workshops and teaching materials for K-12
educators. Their interdisciplinary curricula address human
geography topics including world population trends and their
impacts on environmental health and human well-being.
424
Project Archaeology
2-128 Wilson Hall, Montana State University, Bozeman,
MT 59717
Archaeology seamlessly integrates social studies, science, and
literacy through engaging content and inquiry-based
processes. Project Archaeology, a national archaeology
education program, provides one-stop shopping for
archaeology education. Basic Project Archaeology curriculum
guides and localized content make archaeology education
relevant for students in grades 3–8, including underserved
audiences. 713
Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
http://pulitzercenter.org
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 615, Washington,
DC 20036
The Pulitzer Center is a non-profit journalism organization that
promotes in-depth engagement with global affairs through its
sponsorship of international journalism and an innovative
program of outreach and education. The Center’s education
programs introduce students to systemic global issues and help
them make connections between the global and the local.
457
Rand McNally Education
www.education.randmcnally.com
9855 Woods Drive, Skokie, IL 60077
From traditional wall maps, globes, and atlases to the latest in
21st century digital products, our mission is to provide
innovative, high quality educational products to help teachers
integrate Social Studies into subjects across the curriculum.
640/642
Random House, Inc.
www.randomhouse.com
1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019
Random House, Inc. is the world’s largest English-language
general trade book publisher. Our titles represent a diversity of
important voices in both fiction and non-fiction. Pass by our
booth to browse our full offerings. 613
Robert H. Jackson Center, Inc.
www.roberthjackson.org
305 East Fourth Street, Jamestown, NY 14701
Learn more about how to incorporate the life of Nuremberg
prosecutor Justice Robert H. Jackson into your classroom—
relevant for any educator who teaches the Holocaust, genocide
studies, international law, or the Supreme Court. Lesson plans,
information, and a classroom ready play are available at no
cost. 240
Rock the Vote
www.rockthevote.com
1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 640, Washington, DC
20036
Rock the Vote’s Democracy Class program is designed to
educate and excite high school students about voting, elections
and governance. This non-partisan lesson plan uses music, pop
culture, video, classroom discussion and a mock election to
teach young people the skills to navigate the elections process
and engage as active citizens. Visit: democracyclass.com or
democracyday.com. 238
91st NCSS Annual Conference
143
EXHIBITS
National Parks Conservation Association
www.npca.org
777 6th Street, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001
The National Parks Conservation Association is a non-profit
organization advocating for America’s national parks. Founded
in 1919, we have grown to represent more than 600,000
members and supporters through our DC headquarters and
regional offices, all working to protect and enhance our
national parks for present and future generations. 232
Rosen Classroom
www.rosenpublishing.com
29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010
Rosen Classroom publishes excellent supplemental books and
instructional materials to support standards-based instruction
in the K-8 classroom. We offer leveled informational texts for
history and social studies, including biographies, graphic
nonfiction, primary sources, interactive graphic organizers, and
customized state studies, as well as NEW online and whiteboard
resources. 313
Saudi Aramco World
www.saudiaramcoworld.com
9009 W. Loop South, Houston, TX 77096
459
Scarf World
14 Allen Court, Manalapan, NJ 07726
224
Scholastic Classroom Magazines
www.scholastic.com/classmags
557 Broadway, New York, NY 10012
Scholastic Classroom Magazines are the perfect way to engage
students in current events and social studies topics while
meeting your curriculum needs. They provide timely, highinterest articles that build cross-curricular skills with an
in-depth coverage of U.S. and world news, literature, and more.
Age- and reading-level specific, Scholastic Classroom Magazines
range from grades Pre-K through 12. Stop by booth #621 to
pick up your FREE magazine samples and Teacher’s Editions.
621
EXHIBITS
School Tours of America
www.schooltoursofamerica.com
P.O. Box 550379, Houston, TX 77255
America’s most experienced and trusted team of social studies
field trip planners (4th-12th grades). Our customized, boutique
approach has produced the most satisfied clients for three
decades. Sponsors earn free graduate credit and generous
rewards while students are eligible for undergraduate credit
and valuable leadership credentials for college. 221
Shell Education
www.shelleducation.com
5301 Oceanus Drive, Huntington Beach, CA 92649
Shell Education develops supplemental educational resources
that are research based and correlated to Common Core
standards, the standards of all 50 states, and those of the
Canadian provinces. By working closely with teachers to
develop top quality resources, Shell provides practical,
classroom-tested ideas and professional development resources
for educators and administrators around the globe. 209
Sleeping Bear Press
www.sleepingbearpress.com
315 E. Eisenhower Parkway, Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Thoughtfully written and gorgeously illustrated, Sleeping Bear
Press books are embraced by parents, teachers, and librarians.
Each book is designed for a variety of ages and reading levels
and can be used as a read-aloud resource in the classroom or as
a whole class teaching unit. 712
Smithsonian Institution
www.si.edu
Discover the Smithsonian Institution’s free and low-cost
educational resources for teaching across the social studies
curriculum. With museums covering the history and art of
America and the world, the Smithsonian Institution is a
wonderful resource for teachers and learners nationwide.
700
Social Studies School Service
www.socialstudies.com
10200 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232
Distributor and publisher of curriculum resources including
print, DVD, CD, and web-based solutions. 525
144
Dimensions of Diversity
South-Western Cengage Learning
www.cengage.com/school
5191 Natorp Blvd., Mason, OH 45040
South-Western, Cengage Learning, is a leader in providing
lifelong learning products to educators, individuals and
corporations. Using print, online and technology solutions, we
meet the needs of learners, instructors and trainers in the areas
of psychology, economics, personal finance, business, and
career readiness. 309
Stossel in the Classroom
www.stosselintheclassroom.org
1112 River Oaks, Benton, AR 72019
Free DVDs to teachers on topics of current interest, especially in
social studies. 644
Strategies for Action
www.strategiesforaction.net
3910 Fieldcrest Drive, Riner, VA 24149
Created by two classroom teachers, Strategies for Action is
focused on developing teaching materials that offer efficient
and effective treatment of key information, concepts, and skills.
Providing rich formative assessment, these products maximize
opportunities to design instruction that will deepen learning
for every student. 731
Street Law, Inc.
www.streetlaw.org
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 870, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Street Law designs programs, professional development,
resources, and curricula to help educators teach about law,
democracy, and human rights. Stop by and learn about our
professional development programs and explore our resources
for teaching about the Supreme Court, Guantanamo Bay,
conflict resolution, mock trials/moot courts, and much more!
720
Student Discoveries—Globus Family of
Brands
www.studentdiscoveries.com
5301 South Federal Circle, Littleton, CO 80123
Student Discoveries is a refreshing and unique alternative to
traditional educational student travel programs. Our programs
are influenced by educators and customized for students. We
provide enriching experiences around the globe for our student
travelers, providing a trip of a lifetime—every time! 243
Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center
www.mei.duc/sqcc.aspx
1761 N Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036
The Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center is dedicated to educating the
peoples of America and Oman about the breadth and richness
of our two cultures. The Center promotes mutual respect and
understanding between our nations and strives to educate a
new generation of culturally sensitive and knowledgeable
citizens in each society. Through outreach programs, lectures,
an information-rich website, educational resources and cultural
partnerships, SQCC brings the culture, history, and heritage of
our nations to audiences in the US and abroad. 409
Teacher CEU Toolbox
www.teacherceutoolbox.com
2850 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 200, Henderson, NV
89052
226
Teacher Created Materials
www.tcmpub.com
5301 Oceanus Drive, Huntington Beach, CA 92649
Teacher Created Materials publishes award-winning
supplementary educational materials for all areas of the
curriculum—language arts, social studies, mathematics,
science, technology, and professional resources. We also provide
topical and practical professional development training for
teachers and administrators. 201
Teaching Tolerance
www.tolerance.org
400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104
Founded in 1991 by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Teaching
Tolerance is dedicated to reducing prejudice, improving
intergroup relations and supporting equitable school
experiences for our nation’s children. We provide free
educational materials to teachers and other school practitioners,
including film kits, lesson plans, professional development
materials, and our magazine. 710
Teachinghistory.org
www.teachinghistory.org
George Mason University, 1400 University Drive, M5N 1E7,
Fairfax, VA 22030
Teachinghistory.org is a free resource designed to help K-12
teachers access history content, teaching materials, and best
practices to improve U.S. history education in the classroom.
Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Teachinghistory.
org is a project of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and
New Media at George Mason University. 217
Transatlantic Outreach Program/GoetheInstitut
www.goethe.de/top
812 7th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001
The TOP teaching materials support traditional social studies
curriculum topics, provide the teacher with ready-to-use lesson
plans, and provide students with practice related to social
studies skills in the context of a comparative United States to
Germany approach. They model effective teaching strategies as
well as social studies content and process skills. These kits, as
well as the maps and DVDs, are available free-of-charge to
workshop attendees and booth visitors! 440
Tuttle Publishing
www.tuttlepublishing.com
364 Innovation Drive, N. Clarendon, VT 05759
Tuttle Publishing has been a leader in learning materials about
the cultures and languages of Asia for 63 years. Our classroomtested books are written by teachers and employ both timetested and innovative teaching strategies. 715
USDA—Agriculture in the Classroom
www.agclassroom.org
Room 3271 Waterfront Centre, 800 9th Street, SW,
Washington, DC 20024
USDA Agriculture in the Classroom supports state Agriculture in
the Classroom programs by providing a network that seeks to
improve agricultural literacy—awareness, knowledge, and
appreciation—among PreK-12 teachers and their students.
The USDA supports the state organizations by developing
programs and funding agricultural literacy initiatives. 733
U.S. Census Bureau
www.census.gov
4800 Silver Hill Road 8H816E, Washington, DC 20233
717
U.S. Department of Education
www.ed.gov
400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202
552
U.S. Department of State, Office of the
Historian
http://history.state.gov
SA-1, L-409, 2401 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20522
445
U.S. Fund for UNICEF/TeachUNICEF
http://teachunicef.org
125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038
TeachUNICEF provides a variety of opportunities for American
educators to include global learning in both the formal and
afterschool setting. TeachUNICEF hosts a portfolio of globallyfocused resources (e.g., units, lesson plans, stories, videos, and
podcasts) with local and global action tips and opportunities,
all available for free, at www.teachunicef.org 421
UNHCR
www.unhcr.org
1775 K Street, NW, #300, Washington, DC 20006
Free educational materials on refugees, human rights, and
tolerance. 442
United States Institute of Peace
www.usip.org
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20037
One of United States Institute of Peace’s longest running
programs is the National Peace Essay Contest. Each year high
school students from around the country participate in
classroom exercises and by writing essay on peace and conflict
related topics. This year at NCSS, USIP will exhibit NPEC
curriculum materials and study guides for high school teachers.
444
United States Mint
www.usmint.gov/kids
801 9th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20220
The United States Mint H.I.P. Pocket Change website www.
usmint.gov/kids offers FREE K-12 cross-curricular educational
materials, and introduces students to the history of the coins
they carry. H.I.P. Pocket Change, it’s “History In your Pocket.”
352
Virginia Beach Convention
& Visitors Bureau
www.vbgrouptours.com
2101 Parks Avenue, Virginia Beach, VA 23451
History comes alive in Virginia Beach…from witnessing the
place the first permanent English Settlers first landed on
American soil before going to Jamestown to the first federal
public building project constructed in the 1700’s, The Old Cape
Henry Lighthouse ....Virginia Beach is full of learning
opportunities not experienced anywhere else. 230
enrich and expand your students’ understanding of U.S. history
and the role economics has played in shaping the American
story. For more information please visit us at booth 721 at the
2011 NCSS conference and at our web site, www.
wohlpublishing.com/economicepisodes or email us at
[email protected] 721
Visit Norfolk
www.visitnorfolktoday.com
232 East Main Street, Norfolk, VA 23510
Norfolk, Virginia is the perfect destination for educational and
fun for student tours. From museums to harbor cruises to
outdoor activities there is always something to engage minds
and discover. For more information visit www.visitnorfolktoday.
com or call 800-36803097. 206
World Bank Classroom
www.worldbook.com
233 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL
60601
World Book, Inc., publishes a collection of digital preK-12
educational and reference products, featuring the World Bank
Classroom suite of sites, including Social Studies Power, with
24/7 access, provides the tools educators need to teach social
studies content, track student understanding, and support
differentiated instruction. 245
The Week Magazine Education Program
www.theweek.com
55 West 39th Street, New York, NY 10018
The Week Magazine Education Program is an engaging teaching
supplement for social studies programs that brings current
events into the classroom. Teachers can order discounted bulk
subscriptions for as many weeks as needed. A weekly teacher’s
guide features discussion points, questions, vocabulary focus,
and classroom learning strategies. 225
Who Said What in the White House
www.whosaidwhatinthewhitehouse.com
15 Lewis Road, Irvington, NY 10533
“Who Said What in the White House” is a board game of
presidential quotes and trivia that challenges your presidential
IQ. Carried by some presidential libraries and state historical
societies, it is an absorbing activity great for the classroom with
questions starting from the Founding Fathers through President
Obama. Ages14+ 356
Wohl Publishing
www.wohlpublishing.com
45 S. Park Place, #223, Morristown, NJ 07960
Wohl Publishing is the proud publisher of Economic Episodes in
American History by Mark C. Schug and William C. Wood. It is an
innovative textbook supplement for high schools that will
Youth for Understanding USA
www.yfu-usa.org
6400 Goldsboro Rd., Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20817
246
Youth Leadership Initiative—
U. Va. Center for Politics
www.youthleadership.net
P.O. Box 400806, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Free online civics and government resources for K-12 educators:
lesson plans, mock election, legislative simulation, service
learning, and more. 325
Zinn Education Project (Rethinking Schools
and Teaching for Change)
www.zinnedproject.org
P.O. Box 73038, Washington, DC 20056
The Zinn Education Project supports the use of Howard Zinn’s
best-selling book A People’s History of the United States and
other people’s history titles by offering free lessons for middle
and high schools. All visitors to the booth will receive a free
classroom lesson with handout. 629
EXHIBITS
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
http://investor.gov
Office of Investor Education Advocacy, 100 F Street NE,
Washington, DC 20549
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is an agency of
the U.S. Federal Government that is offering free publications
for financial literacy and investor education. The agency has an
active program to educate our nation’s students as well as the
general public about the importance of making wise financial
decisions and avoiding fraud/scams. 543
91st NCSS Annual Conference
145
Table Top Exhibitors
Affordable World Security
www.affordableworldsecurity.org
A Project of the W.P. Carey Foundation, New York, NY
Join us on the web for a live stream of the conference March
27-28, 2012 from the Newseum, Washington, DC Conference
Vice Chair: Milbry Polk Conference Coordinator: Amy Feldman
[email protected] [email protected]
Table 18
community college educators with a multitude of materials
and opportunities to promote the study of these regions and
cultures in our nation’s classrooms. From professional development seminars and classroom visits to online teaching guides
and presentations, these National Resource Centers offer educators the chance to enrich their lesson plans with quality
resources from one of the top academic institutions in the
world. Table 4
American Foreign Service Association &
Semester at Sea
www.afsa.org/essaycontest
2101 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037
The American Foreign Service Association has partnered with
Booz Allen and Hamilton and Semester at Sea to offer an
exciting opportunity for the student who writes the winning
essay. Win $25,000, a trip to Washington, DC with your parents
to meet the Secretary of State, and a Semester at Sea.
Table 14
Goosebottom Books
www.goosebottombooks.com
710 Portofino Lane, Foster City, CA 94404
Goosebottom Books’ first series, The Thinking Girl’s Treasury of
Real Princesses, won an IPPY silver medal. Their latest, The
Thinking Girl’s Treasury of Dastardly Dames, profiles women
who wielded great power but accumulated nicknames like
“The Black Queen,” and “The Dragon Empress.” Fascinating stories and rich illustrations expose young readers to different
cultures and periods, but underscore one message: girls make
history too. Table 9
Bicentennial of the War of 1812
www.ourflagwasstillthere.org
Table 10
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
www.cpb.org
401 Ninth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20004
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private, nonprofit
corporation created by Congress in 1967, is the steward of the
federal government’s investment in public broadcasting, supporting the operations of over 1,300 locally-owned and -operated public television and radio stations nationwide, and
funding research, technology, and programming for public
media. Table 19
EXHIBITS
East West Discovery Press
www.eastwestdiscovery.com
P.O. Box 3585, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
East West Discovery Press is an independent publisher and
distributor of K-12 multicultural and bilingual books in more
than 50 languages. New featured titles include Half Spoon of
Rice, Thomas the T. Rex, and Relativity by award-winning
authors Michael Smith & Icy Smith. Author signings and raffle
drawing at booth. Table 13
Embassy of Ireland
www.embassyofireland.org
2234 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008
The Embassy of Ireland in Washington DC and our five Consulates General in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, New York and San
Francisco are a source of information about Ireland and the
Irish-US relationship. For more information about the Embassy
and our work, please call 202 462 3939 or see www.embassyofireland.org. Table 12
First Day Cover Lessons
www.fdclessons.com
6421 Lavano Drive, Fort Worth, TX 76134
FDC Lessons use images of first day covers—envelopes containing a commemorative stamp, appropriate postmark and
artwork depicting the topic—to hook students on history.
These warm-up/review lessons provide teachers with procedures, discussion questions, teacher notes, activities and
images to engage students in analyzing, comparing, and justifying their conclusions. Table 1
Georgetown University—School of Foreign
Service National Resource Centers
www.georgetown.edu
37th & O Streets, NW, Washington, DC 20057
Georgetown University has three Department of Education
Title VI funded National Resource Centers in the areas of Contemporary Arab Studies, East Asian Studies, and Eurasian,
Russian, and Eastern European Studies. Through these National
Resource Centers, Georgetown University provides K-12 and
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Dimensions of Diversity
InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan
Washington
www.ifcmw.org
100 Allison Street, NW, Washington, DC 20011
Table 24
Levin Institute
www.levininstitute.org
116 East 55th Street, New York, NY 10022
The Levin Institute (State University of New York) provides
educational resources to deepen knowledge of the challenges
and opportunities of the global economy. Globalization101.org
is one of its key resources to provide educators with the tools to
teach about the dilemmas and trade-offs of globalization.
Table 22
National Council for Geographic Education
www.ncge.org
1145 17th Street, NW, Room 7620, Washington, DC
20009
The National Council for Geographic Education was chartered
in 1915 to support geography teaching at all levels. Visit us
during NCSS and learn how NCGE membership and resources
can help you to enhance the status and quality of geography
teaching and learning in your school and classroom.
Table 3
National Endowment for the Humanities/
Edsitement
http://edsitement.neh.gov
1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, #322, Washington, DC
20506
EDSITEment is a prize winning fourteen year old partnership of
the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Verizon
Foundation. We develop lesson plans, student interactives and
review websites for K-12 teachers. We are especially strong for
interdisciplinary history and social studies resources to supplement, extend and enrich the standard curriculum. Table 6
Scrapbooks that Teach
www.scrapbooksthatteach.com
5801 Nicholson Lane, Suite 1008, North Bethesda, MD
20852
Scrapbooks that Teach is committed to providing a researchbased instructional approach called academic scrapbooking
using creative visuals and photos to motivate students to
remember their teachers’ lessons by personalizing the curriculum. Table 23
Stenhouse Publishers
www.stenhouse.com
480 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101
Stenhouse Publishers provides quality books and videos by
teachers, for teachers. Covering a range of content areas—
from literacy and mathematics to social studies, science, and
environmental education—our professional development
library is grounded in sound theory and research and informed
by our authors’ years of experience in the classroom.
Table 7
Timemaps
www.timemaps.com
10 Maplewood Court, Langley Park, Durham, ENGLAND
DH79P2
Timemaps publishes interactive maps on world history topics,
ranging from the Rise of Islam to the Black Death, and from the
Fall of the Roman Empire to the Atlantic Slave Trade. Engaging
and information-rich maps give students all the information
they need in a visual and engaging way. Table 17
William Penn House
www.williampennhouse.org
515 East Capitol Street, Washington, DC 20003
William Penn House is a hospitality and seminar center located
5 blocks from the US Capitol. We provide hospitality to groups
of 30 or less. Our programs include service learning activities
that we design with the teachers. Areas of concern have been
poverty and privilege; hunger and homelessness; aging in
place and the environment. We also develop seminars utilizing
the extensive resources of Washington, DC. Table 2
The Wilson Center
www.wilsoncenter.org
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, One Woodrow Wilson
Plaza, Washington, DC 20004
The Wilson Center is a nonpartisan institute dedicated to the
study of national and global affairs. Founded in 1968 by an Act
of Congress, the Center provides a safe political space where
the worlds of policymaking and scholarship interact. The Center
conducts research and promotes dialogue from all perspectives. Table 8
WorldView Software
www.worldviewsoftware.com
76 North Broadway, Suite 2002, Hicksville, NY 11801
WorldView Software offers interactive, workbook-style, electronic textbooks, where learners’ responses are stored “in the
cloud” and are accessible from home or school. WorldView
combines the extensive content of a printed textbook and the
versatility of a workbook with all the advantages of a computer. Sign up for free access. Table 11
Youth for Human Rights
www.youthforhumanrights.org
1954 Hillhurst Avenue, #187, Los Angeles, CA 90027
Youth for Human Rights is a nonprofit organization with the
purpose of broadly disseminating the “Universal Declaration of
Human Rights” as approved by the United Nations in 1948. The
goal is to create a future generation who promote peace and
tolerance. Table 5
Convention Center Map
Washington, DC Convention Center, 700 14th Street, Washington, DC, CO 80202
Level 2
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152
Dimensions of Diversity
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