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AUSTRO-ARAB
TRADE DIRECTORY 2011
A-1010 Vienna,
Lobkowitzplatz 1/15
Tel.: +43 /513 39 65
Fax: +43 /513 85 59
E-Mail: headoffice@aacc.at
www.aacc.at
Acknowledgement
The AACC would like to acknowledge the patronage and support of its Vice-President KommR Nabil
Kuzbari, who did not give up on the idea of this Trade Directory and kept motivating the AACC to
finalize it.
The AACC would also like to extend its very special appreciation to the Arab German Chamber of
Commerce and Industry “GHORFA” and its Secretary General Dr. Abdulaziz Al-Mikhlafi, whose
continued support and cooperation are highly valued.
IMPRINT
Owner & Editor
Austro-Arab Chamber of Commerce (AACC)
Lobkowitzplatz 1/15
A-1010 Vienna
T: +43 (0)1 513 39 65
F: +43 (0)1 513 85 59
E: headoffice@aacc.at
W: www.aacc.at
Responsible for the content
DI Mouddar KHOUJA, Secretary General AACC
Design
Bernsteiner Design Department
Print
Bernsteiner Druckservice Ges.m.b.H
Copyright of Images
AACC, IStock, Fotolia, Getty Images
The information in this publication is based on carefully selected and public sources considered as reliable. The AACC does not
make any representation as to its accuracy or completeness. The AACC does not assume liability for the use of this publication or
its contents.
CONTENT
PREAMBLES
Foreword
5
MEMBER DIRECTORY
Addresses of Members
Chemical Products
Culture and Art
Drinks and Tobacco
Engines / Vehicles
Fuel and Energy
Manufactured Goods
Nutrition
Other Manufactured Goods
Raw Materials
Services
Members A-Z
Members/Countries
7
8
12
13
14
19
20
24
26
32
33
52
56
INTERNATIONAL CONTACTS
List of Arab Embassies in Austria
List of Austrian Embassies in Arab Countries
Austrian Trade Commissions in Arab Countries
Addresses of Joint Arab-Foreign Chambers
Addresses of Federations & Chambers of Commerce,
Industry and Agriculture in the Arab Countries
Index
67
69
70
73
77
80
COUNTRY PROFILES
Algeria
Bahrain
Comoros
Djibouti
Egypt
Iraq
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libya
Mauritania
Morocco
Oman
Palestine
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Somalia
Sudan
Syria
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
Yemen
94
98
102
106
110
114
118
122
126
130
134
140
144
148
152
156
160
164
168
172
176
180
AUSTRO-ARAB CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (AACC)
ÖSTERREICHISCH-ARABISCHE HANDELSKAMMER
SERVICE – INFORMATION – NETWORKING
AACC – YOUR STRATEGIC BUSINESS PARTNER
FOR AUSTRO-ARAB ECONOMY & TRADE!
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COUNTRIES
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Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates,
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CONTACT
Austro-Arab Chamber of Commerce (AACC) /
Österreichisch-Arabische Handelskammer
Lobkowitzplatz 1/15, Postfach 181, A-1015 Vienna
T: +43 (0)1 513 39 65 ; F: +43 (0)1 513 85 59
E: headoffice@aacc.at ; W: www.aacc.at
FOREWORD
It is with great pleasure that the Austro-Arab Chamber of Commerce presents its first issue of
the Trade Directory.
As a service provider with special focus on small and medium sized companies and with the
experience of over 20 years in the economies of both, Austria and the Arab World, we have
decided to create one more tool for our members and other interested partners within our network. The conceptual design of the directory is to provide an overview on relevant facts and
information in a literally handy format. In a brief, yet comprehensive form the directory contains
company profiles including contact data of our members, as well as all Arab joint and regional
chambers. Since business can never be isolated from regional conditions, country profiles of all
22 Arab countries are included. Covering basic information as well as more specific aspects of
each respective country they represent a vital part of the directory.
We hope that this directory serves your needs and aspirations in doing business with the Arab
countries and vice versa.
Dkfm. Dr. Herbert STEPIC
KommR. Nabil Kuzbari
President
Vice President
Dipl.-Ing. Mouddar Khouja
Secretary General
5
6
MEMBER DIRECTORY
MEMBERS OF THE AUSTRO-ARAB
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Abiothrin
HandelsgmbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF
GMBH
Activities: Insecticide products & researchRare Earths
Activities: Chemical productions
Special Products: Persalts, bleach for detergents
a) Sodium Perborates (monohydrate and tetrahydrate)
b) Sodium Percarbonate (crystallized and spray
granulated)
Arabic Countries where active: Lebanon, Syria, Egypt,
Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Tunisia, Algeria, and Libya
Details:
Josef-Mayburger Kai 36 / A-5020 Saltburg
Tel.:
0043 (0)662 / 629462
Fax:
0043 (0)662 / 629462 - 50
E-Mail:
office@abiothrin.at
Internet: www.abiothrin.at
Contact: Mr. Martin Mörth
Details:
Auer von Welsbachstr. 1 / A-9330 Althofen
Tel.:
0043 (0)4262 / 505 - 585
Fax:
0043 (0)4262 / 505 - 406
E-Mail:
asg@treibacher.com
Internet: www.treibacher.com
Contact: Mr. Alois Wachmann (Managing Director)
7
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
ALPHA –
Aleppo Pharmaceutical Industries
Borealis
AG
Activities: Manufacturing and producing human
pharmaceutical specialitities
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Activities: Provides plastic materials for the infrastructure, automotive and advanced packaging industries,
markets
Special Products: Borstar technology
Details:
PO Box 517
Baron Str. 6 / Aleppo, Syria
Tel.:
00963 / 21 / 212 2525
Fax:
00963 / 21 / 212 2626
E-Mail:
alphasyr@yahoo.com – achihabi@scs-net.org
Internet: www.alpha-syria.com
Contact: Mr. Ahmad Al-Chihabi
Details:
Wagramer Str. 17-19 / A-1220 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 22 400 300
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 22 400 333
E-Mail:
henry.sperle@borealisgroup.com
Internet: www.borealisgroup.com
Contact: Mr. Henry Sperle
Al Matin Group
for trade and industry
Chemson Polymere-Additive
AG
Activities: Manufacturing polypropylene and
polyethy-lene packaging and building products
Special Products: P.P woven sacks, P.P jumbo bags,
P.E sheets, striping tapes, P.E films, Pipes, GRP, P.E
pipes, aluminium composite panels
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Activities: Manufacture and distribution of additives for
various industries
Special Products: PVC and glass additives, PVC tube
systems, boards, cables, lubricants, metal carboxylate
and lead oxid
Details:
PO Box 1191 / Homs, Syria
00963 / 31 / 21 33 092 / 3 / 4 / 5
Tel.:
Fax:
00963 / 31 / 21 33 091
E-Mail:
almatin@scs-net.org
Internet: www.almatin.com
Contact: Ms. Nahla Hazim
8
Details:
Industriestr. 19 / A-9601 Arnoldstein
0043 / 4255 / 2226
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 / 4255 / 42040
E-Mail:
office@chemson.com
Internet: www.chemson.com
Contact: Mr. Alexander Peyker
Members of AACC
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
EBEWE Pharma
Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
GABRIEL CHEMIE
GmbH
Activities: Production of medical & pharmaceutical
products
Special Products: Oncology (cancer treatment),
immunology. Alexan, calciumfolinat, epirubicin
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Yemen, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, UAE, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Iraq
Activities: Colouring and refining of plastics
Special Products: Colouring food packaging, cosmetics
packaging, agriculture & construction, lifestyle
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan,
Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria,
Tunisia, and UAE
Details:
Industriestr. 1 / A-2352 Gumpoldskirchen
0043 (0)2252 / 636-30
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)2252 / 636-60
E-Mail:
info@gabriel-chemie.com
Internet: www.gabriel-chemie.com
Contact: Mr. Haygaser Apkan
EVER Neuro Pharma
GmbH
G.L.
Pharma
Activities: Development, production, marketing & sales
of innovative, safe and effective drug products for the
treatment of neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular
diseases
Arabic Countries where active: Yemen, Jordan, Egypt,
Lebanon, and Syria
Activities: Production of medical & pharmaceutical
products
Special Products: Tablets, capsules, syrups, creams,
suppositories, X-ray, MRI
Details:
Oberburgau 3 / A-4866 Unterach
0043 (0)7665 / 20 555-0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7665 / 20 555-910
E-Mail:
office@everpharma.com
Internet: www.everneuropharma.com
Contact: Mr. Michael Marijadi
Details:
Arnethstr. 3 / A-1160 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 485 35 05 191
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 485 77 73
E-Mail:
export@gerot.co.at
Internet: www.gerot.co.at
Contact: Mr. Andreas Vogelsinger
Members
Details:
Mondseestr. 11 / A-4866 Unterach am Attersee
Tel.:
0043 (0)7665 / 8123 101
Fax:
0043 (0)7665 / 8132
E-Mail:
office@ebewe.com
Internet: www.ebewe.at
Contact: Mr. Salim Sabbagh
9
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
GREINER BIO-ONE
GmbH
IASON
GmbH
Activities: Producer of medical commodities
Special Products: Vacuette® evacuated blood collection
tubes, Vacuette® blood collection accessories, Vacuette®
blood collection safety products, as well pipette tips, petri
dishes, test tubes …
Arabic Countries where active: All
Activities: Production of radioactive pharmaceuticals,
delivers products to the nuclear and labour medicine
markets
Special Products: IASON Gladiator, EIASON Tg Ca
Details:
Bad Haller Strawe 32 / A-4550 Kremsmünster
Tel.:
0043 (0)7583 / 67 91 139
Fax:
0043 (0)7583 / 63 18
E-Mail:
thomas.gotthartsleitner@gbo.com
Internet: www.gbo.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Gotthartsleitner
Mag. Hoeveler & Co
GmbH
Katharina Hallal
GmbH
Activities: Production and sale of pharmaceutical,
dietetic and dental products
Special Products: Planta lax tea; fittydent (adhesive
cream)
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar,
and UAE
Activities: Plastics production
Special Products: PVC compounds, PVC fittings,
EPS expandable
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt
Details:
Moosham 40 / A-4943 Geinberg
0043 (0)7723 / 423 05
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7723 / 423 05 -15
E-Mail:
office@mag-hoeveler.at
Internet: www.mag-hoeveler.at
Contact: Mr. Robert von Nagy
10
Details:
Feldkirchnerstr. 4 / A-8054 Graz-Seiersberg
0043 (0)316 / 284 300
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)316 / 284 300 - 14
E-Mail:
office@iason.eu
Internet: www.iason.eu
Contact: Mr. Christoph Artner
Details:
Ungargasse 71/2/2 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)718 / 4182
Fax:
0043 (0)718 / 4182-18
E-Mail:
info@hallal.net
Internet: www.hallal.net
Contact: Ms. Katharina Hallal
Members of AACC
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Merck KGaA & Co.
Werk Spittal
Onkotec
GmbH
Activities: Manufacturer of Pharmaceutical products
Special Products: Monoclonal Antibody Erbitux®, Rebif,
Seven Seas, JointCare, Kytta, RonaCare® Ectoin
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Yemen,
Jordan, Qatar, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Saudi Arabia,
Syria, UAE, Egypt, Algeria, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia
Ativities: Biotechnology and mobile diagnostic systems
Special Products: Noninvasive diagnostics and gadgets
for research and development
Mikro-Mineral
GMBH
Sandoz
GmbH
Activities: Production of fertilizers
Special Products: Herbagreen, Herbaland,
Animamineral, Phosgrow, Phosphocal
Activities: Manufacturer of pharmaceutical and
biotechnological substances
Special Products: Noninvasive diagnostics and gadgets
for research and development
Details:
Bahnhofstr. 53 / A-7471 Rechnitz
0043 (0)3363 / 79 238 21
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)3363 / 79 238 22
E-Mail:
info@mikro-mineral.com
Internet: http://www.mikro-mineral.com
Contact: Dr. Peter Ost
Details:
Biochemiestr. 10 / A-6250 Kundl
0043 (0)5338 / 200 642
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)5338 / 200 450
E-Mail:
kundl.austria@sandoz.com
Internet: www.sandoz.at
Contact: Mr. Harald Pöll
Members
Details:
Hösslgasse 20 / A-9800 Spittal/Drau
Tel.:
0043 (0)4762 / 5151 146
Fax:
0043 (0)4762 / 5151 22
E-Mail:
sonja_holzer@merck.at
Internet: www.merck.at
Contact: Ms. Sonja Holzer
Details:
Vestenötting 1 / A-3830 Waidhofen/Thaya
Tel.:
0043 (0)676 / 836 25 300
Fax:
0043 (0)2842 / 533 19
E-Mail:
office@onkotec.eu
Internet: www.onkotec.eu
Contact: Mr. Alex Chiari (CEO)
11
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische
Fabrik GmbH
Wyeth Whitehall
Export GmbH
Activities: Manufacturer of medical and pharmaceutical
products
Special Products: Eucarbon, Biocarbon, Migradon,
Eucarvet
Arabic Countries where active: Qatar, Kuwait, Libya,
Syria, Lebanon, UAE, Bahrain, Oman, Yemen, Jordan,
Egypt, Algeria, Morocco, Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq,
Mauritania
Activities: Manufacturer of medical and pharmaceutical
products
Special Products: Fel-O-Vax FIV (Immunodeficiency
Virus), Robitussin Flu Alert, Advil
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt, Oman, Palestine,
Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait,
Lebanon, Iraq, and Yemen
Details:
Goldegggasse 5 / A-1040 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 505 0341 (0)11
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 505 03 41 31
E-Mail:
office@eucarbon.at
Internet: www.eucarbon.at
Contact: Ms. Ursula Duschanek
Details:
Storchengasse 1 / A-1150 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 89 114 -0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 89 114 -600
E-Mail:
hartmap@wyeth.com
Internet: www.wyeth.com
Contact: Mr. Luciano De Portu
CULTURE AND ART
Traude Fritz
Ing. Pablo Spitzer
Activities: Music, Singing
Special Products: Religious and baroque music, aria,
antique, Mozart, Schubert, chants
Activities: Painting
Special Products: Airbrush paintings
Details:
Wiedner Hauptstr. 61/6 / A-1040 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 767 31 70
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 767 31 70
E-Mail:
fritz@traudl.com
Internet: www.traudl.com
Contact: Ms. Traudl Fritz
Atelier Mag. Art. Herger Helga
Activities: Painting
Special Products: Oil portraits (plants, eyes)
Details:
PO Box 24, Lindauergasse 36 / A-1238 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 888 20 23
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 888 20 23
Internet: www.helga-herger.com
Contact: Ms. Helga Herger
12
Details:
Gudrunstr. 9/1-6 / A-1100 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 602 5292
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 602 5292
E-Mail:
atelier@paplo-spitzer.com
Internet: www.pablo-spitzer.com
Contact: Mr. Pablo Spitzer
Members of AACC
DRINKS AND TOBACCO
POWER HORSE
Energy Drinks GmbH
Red Bull
GmbH
Activities: Producer of energy drinks
Special Products: Power Horse Bottle Energy Drink,
Power Horse Sugarfree, Power Horse Energy Drink
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain,
Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya,
Morocco, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan,
Syria, UAE, Yemen
Activities: Drinks producer
Special Products: Energy Drink
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan,
Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Lebanon, Morocco, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and UAE
Rauch Fruchtsäfte
GmbH & Co OG
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria
GmbH
Activities: Drinks producer
Special Products: Juices (grape, passionfruit, mango,
pear, apple, orange, rhubarb, 100% lemon), ice teas,
iIsotonic sports drinks, apple vinegar, RTD iced coffees
(Cafemio Cappuccino, Cafemio Macchiato)
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan,
Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia,
Syria, UAE, Yemen
Activities: Drinks producer
Special Products: Fruit juice concentrate, beverage
compounds
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman,
Saudi Arabia, and UAE
Details:
Langgasse 1 / A-6830 Rankweil
0043 (0)5522 / 401 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)5522 / 401 - 3
E-Mail:
office.at@rauch.cc
Internet: www.rauch.cc
Contact: Mr. Harald Tschemernjak
Details:
Kroellendorf 45 / A-3365 Allhartsberg
Tel.:
0043 (0)7448 / 2304 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)7448 / 2304 - 900
E-Mail:
info@ybbstaler.at
Internet: www.ybbstaler.at
Contact: Mr. Franz Kapshammer
Members
Details:
Fiedlerstr. 10 / A-4041 Linz
Tel.:
0043 (0)732 / 7097 - 180
Fax:
0043 (0)732 / 738 107
E-Mail:
office@power-horse.com
Internet: www.power-horse.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Königsbauer
Details:
Am Brunnen 1 / A-5330 Fuschl am See
Tel.:
0043 (0)662 / 6582 7595
Fax:
0043 (0)662 / 6580 7040
E-Mail:
rejane.hervy@at.redbull.com
Internet: www.redbull.com
Contact: Mr. Rejane Hervy
13
ENGINES, VEHICLES
14
DCC – Doppelmayr Cable Car
GmbH & Co KG
Fritz Baumaschinen
GmbH & Co KG
Activities: Supplies cable propelled transit (CPT) systems
Special Products: 5 possible train set system configurations: Single Shuttle, Double Shuttle, Bypass, Pinched
Loop, Circular Loop
Arabic Countries where active: Qatar
Activities: Machinery – producer & trader
Special Products: Motors, hydraulic machines, axes,
spare parts, gearboxes, compressor, construction
vehicles and machinery
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
P.O.Box 6
Holzriedstr. 29 / A-6961 Wolfurt
Tel.:
0043 (0)5574 / 604 -1245
Fax:
0043 (0)5574 / 604 -1231
E-Mail:
dcc@doppelmayr.com
Internet: www.dcc.at
Contact: Mr. Stephan Wabnegger
Details:
Bahnhofstr. 29a/25 / A-4481 Asten
Tel.:
0043 (0)7224 / 672 82
Fax:
0043 (0)7224 / 672 86
E-Mail:
info@fritz-baumaschinen.at
Internet: www.fritz-baumaschinen.at
Contact: Mr. Gerhard Fritz
Elin Wasserwerkstechnik
Gesellschaft m.b.H.
GE. Energy Jenbacher
GmbH & Co OHG
Activities: Water pumps, meters, tools and other water
related machines – Producer & Trader
Special Products: Watermeters for flats, houses and big
water meters, heat detecting meter, magnetic inductive
meter, ultrasound meter
Activities: Leading edge energy systems, consulting,
maintenance and upgrade services
Special Products: Gas engine based generator sets
and CHP plants, driven by natural gas or bio and special
gases
Details:
Hainburgerstr. 33 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 716 70 - 28
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 716 70 - 99
E-Mail:
michael.schwarzmann@ewt.at
Internet: www.ewt.at
Contact: Mr. Michael Schwarzmann
Details:
Achenseestr. 1-3 / A-6200 Jenbach
0043 (0)1 / 5244 600 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 5244 600 - 527
E-Mail:
jenbacher.info@ge.com
Internet: www.ge.com/at
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Berger
Members of AACC
ENGINES, VEHICLES
Hörbiger Kompressortechnik
GmbH
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau
Ges.m.b.H.
Activities: Compressor and pump solutions, engine
solutions, integrated service solutions, drive technology
Activities: Supply as well as import/export of various
types of industrial equipment
Special Products: Casting plants, electric motors, generators and converters, power generators for tractors,
railway track machinery, equipment and tools, equipment
for scrap industry, scrap shear, scrap press
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt, Syria, Yemen
Details:
Karl Borromäusplatz 1/3-4 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 713 39 39 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 713 39 39 - 31
E-Mail:
isab-vienna@chello.at
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Ivan Sandurkov
Innovation und Technik
GmbH
Khwanda
Group
Activities: Planning, construction and operation of landfill
sites and waste recycling facilities, Creation of waste
management concepts, management of waste recycling
facilities
Special Products: Remediation of existing landfill sites,
landfill sites with/without gas extraction, refuse derived
fuel production (RDF), biological treatment of organic
waste, production of alternative, renewable energy
Arabic Countries where active: UAE
Activities: Distributor of cars and spare parts and maintenance, car rental, distributor of agricultural products,
storage of fruit crops, olive derivatives producer, restaurants, money transfers
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan,
Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Details:
Werksstr. 21 / A-2824 Seebenstein
Tel.:
0043 (0)2627 / 83 111
Fax:
0043 (0)2627 / 83 111 - 4
E-Mail:
iut@theiutgroup.com
Internet: www.theiutgroup.com
Contact: Mr. Reinhard Göschl
Details:
PO Box 4844 / Damascus, Syria
00963 / 11 / 33 11 902
Tel.:
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 33 11 903
E-Mail:
khwanda@yahoo.com
Internet: www.khwandagroup.com
Contact: Mr. Karim Khwanda
Members
Details:
Donau City Str. 1 / A-1220 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 22440-370
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 2240991
E-Mail:
info-hktes@hoerbiger.com
Internet: www.hoerbiger.com
Contact: Mr. Gerhard Hemetsberger
15
ENGINES, VEHICLES
Leitz
GesmbH & Co KG
Omicron Electronics
GmbH
Activities: Tools used in wood and plastics processing,
consulting, engineering, wood building, furniture production, board processing, machine manufacturers, window
& door products, interior engineering
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan,
Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Activities: Electronics, measuring, testing and inspection
equipment – Producer & Traders
Special Products: Power system testing, creative software solutions for automated testing and documentation
capabilities, protection relays, energy meters,
transducers, PQ analyzers
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Leitzstr. 80 / A-4752 Riedau
0043 (0)7764 / 8200 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7764 / 8200 - 111
E-Mail:
thoechtel@rie.leitz.org
Internet: www.leitz.org
Contact: Mr. Thomas Höchtel
LIEBHERR-Werk
Nenzing GmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von
Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
Activities: Manufacturer of lifting cranes and cargo handling equipment for the maritime industry, the extracting
and transhipment industry, in the fields of demolition and
recycling as well as for foundation and special deep foundation works
Special Products: Ship cranes, offshore cranes, mobile
harbour cranes and reachstackers, universal duty cycle
crawler cranes, lift cranes, foundation equipment
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Egypt, Saudi
Arabia, UAE
Activities: Manufacturer
Special Products: Permanent way machinery
Arabic Countries where active: All
Details:
Dr. Hans Liebherr Str. 1 / A-6710 Nenzing
0043 (0)50809 / 41-0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)50809 / 41-500
E-Mail:
info.lwn@liebherr.com
Internet: www.liebherr.com
Contact: Mr. Kurt Rudigier
16
Details:
Oberes Ried 1 / A-6833 Klaus
Tel.:
0043 (0)5523 / 507 - 141
Fax:
0043 (0)5523 / 507 - 9999
E-Mail:
info@omicron.at
Internet: www.omicron.at
Contact: Mr. Peter Hosp
Details:
Johannesgasse 3 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 515720
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 5131801
E-Mail:
export@plassertheurer.com
Internet: www.plassertheurer.com
Contact: Mr. Gerhard Moor
Members of AACC
ENGINES, VEHICLES
Spitzwieser Sport &
Sondermotoren e.U.
Ti-Tella
Handelsgesellschaft mbH
Activities: High performance sports cars and components, high performance internal combustion engine
components, significant contemporary technologies –
producer & trader
Special Products: Development, manufacture, distribution and service of high performance sports cars, SSS
sports cars from the bare chassis, refinement and performance upgrades, preparation for racing purposes, development, manufacture, distribution and service of high
performance internal combustion engines, engine performance upgrades for road cars, prototype engines, preparation of racing engines, recreation of rare engine components, surface treatments and coatings
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Kuwait, UAE
Activities: Production and installation of vacuum units
and systems
Special Products: Industrial vacuum cleaners, central
vacuum installation, mobile suction devices, dust collectors, oil mist separators, crushing units, splinter
management
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Trade Line
Machinery
Tiger 1 Co.
Activities: Consultancy services and supplying heavy
machinery such as cranes
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
Akram Str. 21 / Mazah, Damascus
Tel.:
00963 / 11 / 6110488
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 6130414
E-Mail:
z.tayara@tiger1me.com
Internet: www.tiger1me.com
Contact: Mr. Ziad Tayara
Members
Details:
Industriezeile 54 / A-5280 Braunau am Inn
Tel.:
0043 (0)7722 / 64 368
Fax:
0043 (0)7722 / 64 368
E-Mail:
office@spitzwieser.com
Internet: www.spitzwieser.com
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Spitzwieser
Details:
Linzer Str. 1 / A-3003 Gablitz
Tel.:
0043 (0)2231 / 6644 – 6
Fax:
0043 (0)2231 / 6644 – 750
E-Mail:
info@ti-tella.at
Internet: www.ti-tella.at
Contact: Mr. Johannes Mayrl
Activities: Machinery trader, surplus & second hand
equipment for pulp & paper industry
Special Products: Pulper and slushing machine cleaner,
refiner and deflaker screen and coarse screen, thickener
and washer pumps and vacuum pumps, paper machines,
board machines, parts of paper and board machines,
various converting machines, laboratory equipment dewatering machines, boiler and turbines valves, slitter
rewinder sheet cutter; Hermas International
Trading(Jordan), Oubary (Lebanon)
Details:
Bahnhofstr. 29a/25 / A-4810 Gmunden
Tel.:
0043 (0)7612 / 715 08
Fax:
0043 (0)7612 / 711 36
E-Mail:
trade.line@uta1002.at
Internet: www.tradelinemachinery.com
Contact: Mr. Christian Gruber
17
ENGINES, VEHICLES
TUMA PUMPENSYSTEME
GMBH
UNTHA
shredding technology
Activities: Water pumps and related engineering;
producer & trader
Special Products: Lobe pump unit, custom made units,
vacuum drying unit, vacuum degassing unit, oil drying
unit, vacuum fish unloading unit, boiler feed unit, vacuum
unit with frequency controller, central vacuum SPECK,
septic tank suction, vacuum sewage collection container
Activities: Shredding technology – producer & trader
Special Products: Four-shaft shredders, two-shaft
shredders, single-shaft shredders
Arabic Countries where active: Lebanon, Syria
Details:
Eitnergasse 12 / A-1230 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 914 9340
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 914 1446
E-Mail:
contact@tumapumpen.at
Internet: www.tumapumpen.at
Contact: Ms. Caroline Tuma
18
Details:
Moldanstr. 141 / A-5431 Kuchl/Saltburg
0043 (0)6244 / 7016 - 537
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)6244 / 7016 - 1
E-Mail:
daniel.wresnik@untha.com
Internet: www.untha.com
Contact: Mr. Daniel Wresnik
Members of AACC
FUEL AND ENERGY
AGT Management &
Engineering AG
OMV
Aktiengesellschaft
Activities: Converting waste materials into electricity or
synthetic gas, fuels and constructing the conversion
plants
Special Products: Electricity produced from used tyres,
industrial waste, sewage sludge, solid waste, biomass
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia
Activities: Crude oil and products; producer & trader
Special Products: Exploration & production, gas & power, refining & marketing, petroleum, hydrogen, sulphur
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt, Iraq, Libya,
Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Geosat Technology
Limited
Activities: Oil and natural gas exploration
Details:
Leobersdorferstr. 42 / A-2560 Berndorf
Tel.:
0043 (0)2672 / 819 759 - 60
Fax:
0043 (0)40 440 / 6 21 664
E-Mail:
office@geosat.info
Internet: www.geosat.info
Contact: Mr. Michael Mumelter
Details:
Trabrennstr. 6-8 / A-1020 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)40 440 / 21 664
Fax:
0043 (0)40 440 / 6 21 664
E-Mail:
daniela.auer@omv.com
Internet: www.omv.com
Contact: Ms. Daniela Auer
Members
Details:
Lederergasse 3 / A-4861 Schöfling
0043 (0)7662 / 48 48 - 16
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7662 / 48 48 - 12
E-Mail:
info@agt-world.com
Internet: www.agt-world.com
Contact: Mr. Manfred Lenzi
19
MANUFACTURED GOODS
Böhler International
GmbH
F. J. Elsner
Trading & Co
Activities: Export sales of high grade special steel products from Bohler Edelstahl GmbH
Special Products: Tool steels, high speed steel, powder
material etc.
Arabic Countries where active: Businesses in Bahrain,
Libya, Oman, Qatar, Sudan, Yemen; also active in: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi
Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE
Activities: Trading of steel and all kinds of steel-products, chemicals, paper & agro-commodities
Special Products: Plastics and industrial chemicals,
newsprint paper, grains
Arabic Countries where active: All
Details:
Norwestbahnstr. 12-14 / A-1201 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 33 143
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 37 419 00 110
E-Mail:
kilian.wagner@bohler-international.com
Internet: www.bohler-international.com
Contact: Mr. Kilian Wagner
20
Details:
Am Heumarkt 11 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 797 36 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 797 36 230
E-Mail:
siegfried.purrer@elsner.at
Internet: www.elsner.at
Contact: Dr. Siegfried Purrer
EOOS
GmbH
IMET
Handelsgesellschaft
Activities: Insulation company with an entire range of
services in the fields of heat, cold, noise and fire
protection
Arabic Countries where active: UAE
Activities: Wholesale of raw materials, fertilizers and
agricultural products, sea and river transport services
Special Products: Phosphate rock, TSP, SSP, wheat,
yellow corn
Details:
Flossland 38 / A-8720 Knittelfeld
Tel.:
0043 (0)3512 / 49 475
Fax:
0043 (0)3512 / 49 642
E-Mail:
office@eoosgmbh.com
Internet: www.eoosgmbh.com
Contact: Mrs. Martina Hartensteiner
Details:
Börsegasse 11/166 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 513 78 67
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 513 78 67 -92
E-Mail:
imet@imet.co.at
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Haderer
Members of AACC
MANUFACTURED GOODS
Khalil Sara
Establishment
OVOTHERM International
HandelsGmbH
Activities: Textiles (wool and carpets), wine, spirits, and
food products (cheese); producer & trader
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Activities: Egg packaging products and egg marketing
services
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Yemen,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Saudi
Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE
Contact:
Mr. Khalil Sara
Mondi Business
Paper Sales GmbH
Activities: Paper products; producer & trader
Special Products: Recycled containerboard, industrial
bags, uncoated fine paper
Arabic Countries where active: Jordan, Lebanon,
Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Kelsenstr. 7 / A-1032 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 795 06 5728
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 790 13 74 5728
E-Mail:
martin.scheibmeir@mondibp.com
Internet: www.mondigroup.com
Contact: Mr. Martin Scheibmeir
Details:
Ricoweg 28 / A-2351 Wr. Neudorf
Tel.:
0043 (0)2236 / 61 928 - 19
Fax:
0043 (0)2236 / 62 741
E-Mail:
gertraud.vimetal@ovotherm.com
Internet: www.ovotherm.com
Contact: Ms. Gertraud Vimetal
Papierfabrik Wattens
GmbH & Co KG
Activities: Special paper products
Special Products: Cigarette and plug wrap paper
Arabic Countries where active: Jordan, Syria,
Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Ludwig-Lassl-Str. 15 / A-6112 Wattens
0043 (0)5224 / 595 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)5224 / 595 - 250
E-Mail:
thomas.janisch@delfortgroup.com
Internet: www.delfortgroup.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Janisch
Members
Details:
PO Box 10242 / Damascus, Syria
00963 / 11 / 331 2159
Tel.:
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 331 2158
E-Mail:
k-sara@scs-net.org
Internet: N/A
21
MANUFACTURED GOODS
Ramses Zwei
GmbH
ROXCEL
HandelsgesmbH
Activities: Real Estate, agriculture and wood products
(mainly from Romania); producer & trader
Activities: Paper and packaging products
Special Products: Cigarette paper, grease and waterproof paper, carbonless paper, coated and uncoated
wood free paper, aluminium laminated paper, toilet tissue
paper white & coloured, MG bleached sulphite/sulphate
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Jordan, Sudan,
Syria, Yemen
Details:
Universitätsstr. 4 TOP 7 / A-1090 Vienna
0043 (0)664 / 5478320
Tel.:
E-Mail:
ramses-zwei.bernhardknorr@chello.at
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Bernhard Knorr
RHI AG
Activities: Refractories from various materials – producer
& trader
Special Products: Steel, cement, lime, non-ferrous,
glass, enviro-energy chemistry, ceramics, raw materials
Arabic Countries where active: Jordan, Libya, Oman,
Syria, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Wienerbergstr. 11 / A-1100 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 50 213 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 50 213 - 6213
E-Mail:
rhi@rhi-ag.com
Internet: www.rhi-ag.com
Contact: Dr. Dieter Siegel
22
Details:
Thurngasse 10 / A-1090 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 401 56 (0)162
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 401 56 / 7100
E-Mail:
elfriede.muehlhauser@roxcel.com
Internet: www.roxcel.com
Contact: Ms. Elfriede Mühlhauser
Stora Enso Timber
AG
Activities: Wood and paper products
Special Products: Variety of paper (includes office papers and publication papers), packaging, graphic products, market pulp, and wood products
Details:
Brand 44 / A-3531
Tel.:
0043 (0)2826 / 7001 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)2826 / 7001 - 2390
E-Mail:
silvio.butalja@storaenso.com
Internet: www.storaenso.com
Contact: Dr. Silvio Butalja
Members of AACC
MANUFACTURED GOODS
VA Intertrading
AG
VIMPEX
HandelsgesmbH.
Activities: Trading in steel products, food products,
pharmaceutical products, chemical products, specialized
countertrade; transportation & logistics services
Activities: Trade & export – paper & board products
Special Products: Road marking material, traffic
system solutions, traffic lights, highway and tunnel
guidance systems, parking guidance, state-of-the-art
traffic telematic software and communication solutions
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE
Details:
Kärntner Ring 4 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1/ 501 51 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1/ 501 51 - 1
E-Mail:
vimpex@vimpex.at
Internet: www.vimpex.at
Contact: Mr. Louai Kuzbari
Members
Details:
Strasserau 6 / A-4020 Linz
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 732 7804 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 732 7804 - 355
E-Mail:
vait@vait.com
Internet: www.vait.com
Contact: Mr. Peter Weigl
23
NUTRITION
ALVETRA u.
WERFFT AG
Activities: Animal health care; producer & trader
Special Products: Carofertin (improves fertility in
livestock)
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia, UAE
Details:
Boltzmanngasse 11 / A-1090 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 319 14 56 - 320
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 319 14 56 - 344
E-Mail:
m.schmidt@sanochemia.at
Internet: www.alvetrawerfft.com
Contact: Dr. Werner Frantsits (CEO), Dr. Margit Schmidt
(Veterinary Dept.)
BEV-Group
Activities: Exotic drinks producer, energy drinks
Special Products: Tantra Exotic Drink, K.O. Hi Level
Arabic Countries where active: Lebanon, Libya, UAE
Details:
Siemenstr. 15/2. Stock / A-6063 Neu-Rum
Tel.:
0043 (0)512 / 890 119 – 30
Fax:
0043 (0)512 / 890 119 – 22
E-Mail:
international@bev-group.at
Internet: www.bev-group.com
Contact: Mr. Tariq El-Hamami
24
Biolachs
Activities: Trader of Salmon products
Special Products: Salmon products and other organic
products
Details:
Obervellach 33 / A-9620 Hermagoras
043 (0)4282 / 2069
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)4282 / 2069 / 20
E-Mail:
info@biolachs.at
Internet: www.biolachs.at
Contact: Mr. Peter Bachmann
Gebrüder Woerle
GesmbH.
Activities: Dairy products, cheese
Special Products: Hard cheese, semi-hard cheese, processed cheese, cream cheese
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Palestine, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Enzing 26 / A-5302 Henndorf/Wallersee
Tel.:
0043 (0)6214 / 6631 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)6214 / 6631 - 33
E-Mail:
woerle@woerle.at
Internet: www.woerle.at
Contact: Mr. Gerhard Woerle
Members of AACC
Ghraoui Group
Die Marmeladen-Manufaktur
Activities: Producer of luxurious chocolate products,
crystallized fruits and confectionary
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Activities: Jam and honey products; producer & trader
Special Products: Apricot, plum, and raspberry jam,
floral and dandelion honey
Details:
PO Box 5256
19th floor, Damascus Tower, Damascus, Syria
Tel.:
00963 / 11 / 231 7000
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 231 7666
E-Mail:
ghraoui@gmail.com
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Bassam Ghraoui
Details:
Weißenbach 162 / A-5350 Strobl am Wolfgangsee
0043 (0)6137 / 5431
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)6137 / 5431 - 5
E-Mail:
marmelade@bergrose.at
Internet: www.bergrose.at
Contact: Ms. Franziska Zopf
Gresam
HandelsgesmbH
Schreiber & Rupp
GesmbH
Activities: Import and wholesale of food stuff
Arabic Countries where active: Lebanon, Syria,
Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia
Activities: Producer, cheese products
Special Products: Processed cheese singles/triangles/
cups
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi
Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Gänsbachergasse 2, Megapark / A-1110 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 796 86 88
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 796 86 88 - 20
E-Mail:
gresam.vienna@aon.at
Internet: www.gresam.com
Contact: Mr. Samuel Nahabedian
Details:
Kugelbeerweg 3 / A-6912 Hörbranz
Tel.:
0043 (0)5573 / 8085 0
Fax:
0043 (0)5573 / 8085 152
E-Mail:
cheese@rupp.at
Internet: www.SchreiberRupp.at
Contact: Mr. Bernd Hofer
Members
NUTRITION
25
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
ADCON Telemetry
GmbH
Aqua
OEG Engineering
GesmbH
Activities: Offering telemetry solutions in water management, irrigation management, agricultural management
and environmental monitoring
Special Products: Wireless sensor networks, software,
Adcon RTU’s, sensors and accessories
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt, Iraq, Jordan,
Morocco, Saudi Arabia
Activities: Building plants
Special Products: Waste water treatment, sea water
desalination
Arabic Countries where active: UAE
Details:
Inkustr. 24 / A-3400 Klosterneuburg
Tel.:
0043 (0)2243 / 38 28 00
Fax:
0043 (0)2243 / 38 28 06
E-Mail:
info@adcon.at
Internet: www.adcon.at
Contact: Dr. Bernhard Pacher
26
Details:
Vogelsangstr. 3 / A-5301 Mondsee
0043 (0)6232 / 7722 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)6232 / 7722 -1710
E-Mail:
hannes.laimer@aqua.co.at
Internet: www.aqua-engineering.at
Contact: Dr. Hannes Laimer
Alu König Stahl
Backhausen interior
design GmbH
Activities: Construction industry, plant and mechanical
engineering with systems in aluminium, steel and PVC-U
Special Products: Fold-slide units aluminium, sliding
doors PVC-U, systems for facades and skylights, door
systems stainless steel, solar shading (Louvre Blades),
balcony glazing, hallow steel, shaped and oval tubes
Activities: Contract and residential business
Special Products: Environment-friendly products and
100% recyclable upholstery and curtain fabrics; custom
made products on request
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia, UAE,
Jordan, Kuwait
Details:
Goldschlagstr. 87-89 / A-1150 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 98 130 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 98 130 - 64
E-Mail:
office@alukoenigstahl.com
Internet: www.alukoenigstahl.com
Contact: Mr. Peter König
Details:
Hoheneich 136 / A-3945
Tel.:
0043 (0) 2852 502-0
Fax:
0043 (0) 2850 502-252
E-Mail:
hoheneich@backhausen.com
Internet: www.backhausen.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Wagner (export manager)
Members of AACC
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
Beta
Handelsgesellschaft m.b.H.
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten
ProduktionsGmbH
Activities: Outdoor wellness
Special Products: Whirlpools
Arabic Countries where active: Qatar, Saudi Arabia,
UAE
Activities: Crystal chandeliers & decorative lightings &
producer & trader
Special Products: Hanging chandeliers, ceiling lights,
wall lights, table lamps, floor lamps, custom made lightings, jewellery
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait,
Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Christian Maschek
Schmuck
Activities: Goldsmith
Special Products: Unique specimen
Details:
Lobkowitzplatz 1 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 512 02 94
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 512 02 94-4
E-Mail:
christian.maschek@aon.at
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Christian Maschek
Details:
Franz Schubert Str. 15 / A-2345 Brunn/Gebirge
Tel.:
0043 (0)2236 / 33 193 10
Fax:
0043 (0)2236 / 32 920
E-Mail:
jochen@dotzauer.com
Internet: www.dotzauer.com
Contact: Mr. Jochen Gold
D. Swarovski & Co.
Activities: Accessories, crystal products; producer &
trader
Special Products: Jewellery, watches, dress, bags
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan,
Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi
Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE
Details:
Swarovskigasse 36 / A-6112 Wattens
Tel.:
0043 (0)5224 / 500 2307
Fax:
0043 (0)5224 / 500 630
E-Mail:
paul.swarovski@swarovski.com
Internet: www.swarovski.com
Contact: Mr. Paul Gerin-Swarovski
Members
Details:
Weblinger Guertel 20 / A-8054 Graz
0043 (0)316 / 816 153
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)316 / 816 153 22
E-Mail:
abud@beta-wellness.com
Internet: www.beta-wellness.com
Contact: Mr. Thair Abud
27
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
Frey Wille
GmbH & Co KG
Hasenkopf
Activities: Clothing and accessories, modern jewellery
producer & trader
Special Products: Diva bangles, silk scarves, handbags,
barrel & quadra watches, bracelets, pendants, rings,
earrings
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE
Activities: Natural stone solutions for interior and exterior
constructions
Special Products: : Custom tailored design, consultancy
service, shower floor, footsplash, creative bathroom,
creative showroom, residential tower, outdoor entrance,
entrance, gold on stone
Arabic Countries where active: UAE, Qatar, Sudan
Details:
Gumpendorferstr. 81 / A-1060 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 599 25 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 599 25 - 43
E-Mail:
office@frey-wille.com
Internet: en.frey-wille.com
Contact: Ms. Eva Brummeir
Details:
Znaimerstr. 68 / A-2020 Hollabrunn
Tel.:
0043 (0)2952 / 2776
Fax:
0043 (0)2952 / 4955
E-Mail:
office@hasenkopf.at
Internet: www.hasenkopf.at
Contact: Ms. Christina Hasenkopf
GLS Tanks
GmbH
Herz Austria
GmbH
Activities: : Glass lined steel-tanks, silos and related
accessories
Special Products: Roofs, roof hatches, flanches, balustrades, insulations, ladders, platforms, side glasses, etc.
Activities: Specialization in the field of plastic
conditioning and processing
Details:
Industriestr. 6 / A-3850 Heidenreichstein
Tel.:
0043 (0)2862 / 531 87 -832
Fax:
0043 (0)2862 / 531 87 -5832
E-Mail:
abud@glstanks.com
Internet: www.glstanks.com
Contact: Mr. Thair Abud
28
Details:
Johann Galler Str. 20 / 2120-Wolkersdorf
Tel.:
0043 (0)2245 / 82494-0
Fax:
0043 (0)2245 / 82494-9
E-Mail:
herz.wolkersdorf@herz-gmbh.com
Internet: www.herz-gmbh.com
Contact: Marion Herz-Degenkolb
Members of AACC
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
J.T. Kalmar
GmbH
Modern Life
Handels GmbH
Activities: Custom lighting and Services: Design, Production, delivery and installation of major lighting installations
for Hotels, Palaces, Public buildings, and Ships
Special Products: Custom designed light fittings and
chandeliers
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE
Activities: Indoor wellness
Special Products: Bathroom products
Arabic Countries where active: Qatar, Saudi Arabia,
UAE
MOBIL BAUSTOFFE
GmbH
Neue Wiener Porzellanmanufaktur
AUGARTEN GmbH
Activities: Concrete and construction material supply
Special Products: Tailor-made batching plants and
facilities
Arabic Countries where active: Qatar
Activities: Manufacture and sale of handmade porce
Special Products: Custom made porcelain (bespoke),
wedding lists, worldwide service (packaging & delivery)
Arabic Countries where active: Oman
Details:
Erlenweg 1 / A-9463 Reichenfels
Tel.:
0043 (0)4359 / 2120
Fax:
0043 (0)4359 / 2120 -15
E-Mail:
office@mobil-baustoffe.com
Internet: www.mobil-baustoffe.com
Contact: Dr. Fridolin Hornung
Details:
Schloss Augarten, Obere Augartenstr. 1 /
A-1020 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 211 24 121
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 211 24 199
E-Mail:
claudia.uth@augarten.at
Internet: www.augarten.at
Contact: Ms. Claudia Uth
Members
Details:
Bennogasse 8 / A-1080 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 40 90 880 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 40 90 880 - 80
E-Mail:
office@kalmarlighting.com
Internet: www.kalmarlighting.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Calice
Details:
Alpine Str. 54 / A-8650 Kindberg
Tel.:
0043 (0)316 / 816 153
Fax:
0043 (0)316 / 816 153 26
E-Mail:
abud@beta-wellness.com
Internet: www.beta-wellness.com
Contact: Mr. Thair Abud
29
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
Österr. Doka SchalungsGerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Activities: System components for production facilities
Special Products: Load-bearing towers, working and
protection platforms
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi
Arabia, Tunisia, UAE
Details:
Reichsstr. 23 / A-3300 Amstetten
0043 (0)7472 / 605 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7472 / 605 - 3981
E-Mail:
oest.Doka@doka.com
Internet: www.doka.com
Contact: Mr. Leopold Hochpöchler
Activities: Provides construction equipment, scaffolding
and formwork, Consultation, lease terms and other
services
Special Products: Formwork systems in steel and aluminium and all accessories, slab formwork, tables and
column formwork, scaffolding systems for every purpose
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia
Details:
Römerweg 9 / A-4844 Regau
0043 (0)7672 / 72 711
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7672 / 78 805
E-Mail:
office@ringer.at
Internet: www.ringer.at
Contact: Mr. Thomas Ringer
PORR – ALLGEMEINE BAUGESELLSCHAFT –
A. PORR AG
Schöler & Co
GmbH
Activities: Full service provider of national and international markets in the fields of construction, i.e. building
construction, civil engineering, project development, road
construction, tunnel construction
Activities: Manufacturer of Crystal
Special Products: Crystal components for decorative
lighting
Details:
Absberggasse 47 / A-1100 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 50626 - 2371
Fax:
0043 (0) 50626 -1186
E-Mail:
pch@porr.at
Internet: www.porr.at
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Hirzi
30
RINGER KG
Details:
Gablonzer Str. 54-61 / A-4550 Kremsmünster
Tel.:
0043 (0)7583 / 7723
Fax:
0043 (0)7583 / 7812
E-Mail:
office@scholer-crystal.at
Internet: www.scholer-crystal.at
Contact: Mr. Christian Pamminger
Members of AACC
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
Activities: Vibration stimulator shoe products, environmental sensors, building & planning hotels and sports
centers
Special Products: PSR-Shoes (www.psr-schuh.at)
Details:
Schubertweg 12 / A-3830 Waidhofen/Thaya
0043 (0)676 / 694 39 71
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 310 01 72
E-Mail:
chiari.srmarketing@aon.at
Internet: www.scienceundresearch.at
Contact: Mr. Alex Chiari (CEO)
Sitte Vienna
Activities: Retailer of exclusive high-quality knitwear
Special Products: Knitted dresses, shirts, trousers, jackets, coats; all made in Austria
Details:
Akazienweg 13 / A-2122 Riedenthal
0043 (0) 2245-20032
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0) 2245-824949
E-Mail:
mhd@mhd.co.at
Internet: www.sittevienna.com
Contact: Ms. Marion Herz-Degenkolb
STRABAG SE
Activities: Building construction & civil engineering (incl.
bridge work, building industrial, residential and commercial buildings), transportation infrastructure (incl. road and
railway construction)
Special Products: Special divisions & concessions (tunnelling works, ground engineering, project development
and PPP projects)
Details:
Donau-City-Str 9 / A-1220 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 22 422 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 22 422 - 2226
E-Mail:
nematollah.farrokhnia@strabag.com
Internet: www.strabag.com
Contact: Mr. Nematolla Farrokhnia
M. Swarovski
GmbH
Activities: Production of reflective glass beads for road
marking systems and surface treatment applications
Special Products: Low and high index retroreflective
glass beads for high performance road and airport marking systems; industrial grade glass beads for blasting and
surface treatment
Arabic Countries where active: Whole Middle East
(through sister companies and local partners)
Details:
Industriestr. 10 / A-3300 Amstetten
Tel.:
0043 (0)7472 / 202 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)7472 / 202 - 249
E-Mail:
office.msa@swarco.com
Internet: www.swarco.com
Contact: Mr. Hans Jesacher
Members
Science & Research
Marketing GmbH
31
RAW MATERIALS
DCM DECOmetal
GmbH
SAG Aluminium Lend
GmbH&Co.KG
Activities: Markets raw materials in steel and mineral
sands industries
Special Products: Metal, ores, alloys, cored wires
Arabic Countries where active: Oman, UAE
Activities: Aluminium solutions for various industries
Special Products: Special welding constructions, pressurised and utility water tanks for concrete mixing
structures
Arabic Countries where active: Oman
Details:
Elisabethstr. 10/5 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 585 5363 - 740
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 585 5363 - 760
E-Mail:
inge.ganahl@dcm-vienna.com
Internet: www.dcm-vienna.com
Contact: Ms. Inge Ganahl
Mayr-Melnhof
Timber Trading GmbH
Tyche Rohstoffhandel &
Beteiligung GmbH
Activities: Wood processing and products
Special Products: Sawn timber, laminated beams
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain, Libya,
Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, UAE,
Yemen
Activities: Trader of construction material and agricultural
products
Special Products: Foliar fertilizer, steel fibres for
industrial floors
Details:
Turmgasse 67 / A-8700 Leoben
0043 (0)3842 / 300 35 - 22
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)3842 / 300 35 - 00
E-Mail:
trading@mm-holz.com
Internet: www.mm-holz.com
Contact: Mr. Josef Steiner
32
Details:
Bundesstr. 25 / A-5651 Lend
Tel.:
0043 (0)6416 / 6500 - 230
Fax:
0043 (0)6416 / 6500 - 369
E-Mail:
andreas.kraly@sag.at
Internet: www.sag.at
Contact: Mr. Andreas Kraly
Details:
Russbergstr. 87 / A-1210 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 290 00 62
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 290 08 05
E-Mail:
office@tyche.co.at
Internet: www.tyche.co.at
Contact: Mr. Anton Scharmitzer, Mr. Stefan Augustyn
Members of AACC
SERVICES
a-consult
GMBH
Architekt
Achtsnit & Achtsnit
Activities: Consulting, business development, project
development
Special Products: Information- and communicationtechnology, eGovernment, eHealth
Arabic Countries where active: Currently focused on
Egypt, Morocco, Syria; target countries are all Arabic
countries
Activities: Civil engineering, building construction &
development
Accès
Alpintechnik Salzburg
Al Mashreq
Investment Fund
Activities: Supplier of special technical solutions for
working at heights, fall protection
Special Products: Consulting and performing of special
solutions from planning to implementation, seminars and
training-on-the-job, multimedia building examination
system, SYAM (Mobile Anchor System)
Activities: Investment services
Special Products: Investment in the oil sector
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
Halleiner Landes Str. 56/5 / A-5411 Oberalm
0043(0)664 / 27 50 990
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)6245 / 205 20
E-Mail:
office@riggingservice.com
Internet: www.riggingservice.com
Contact: Mr. Robert Klein
Details:
PO Box 108
Bezem Ave, Malki, Damascus, Syria
Tel.:
00963 / 11 / 2110053
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 2113312
E-Mail:
hussein.jairoudi@syriatel.com.sy
Contact: Mr. Hussein Jairoudi
Members
Details:
Hetzgasse 20 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 890 3800 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 890 3800 900
E-Mail:
austria@a-consult.at
Internet: www.a-consult.at
Contact: Mr. Albert Kronberger
Details:
Jaquingasse 51/3 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 713 00 00
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 713 66 67
E-Mail:
achtsnit@achtsnit.at
Internet: www.achtsnit.at
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Achtsnit
33
SERVICES
Alshaya Retail
GmbH
ARACON Consulting
GmbH
Activities: Trader in a wide variety of sectors, including
the latest and best recognized names in fashion, footwear, kid’s clothing, health and beauty, home-style, restaurants, prescription eyewear, pharmaceuticals, sports
fashion and office supplies
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan,
Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Activities: Consulting for sales, business networking,
export and other forms of market entry
Special Products: Across industries
Arabic Countries where active: Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi
Arabia
Details:
Kantgasse 3 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 5230787
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 5266510
E-Mail:
pg@gourmetconsult.eu
Internet: www.alshaya.com
Contact: Mr. Peter Gallhofer
Arabital Shipping
Asiah Group Ltd
Activities: Transportation and logistics, air sea freight
services
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Palestine, Saudi Arabia,
Sudan, Syria, UAE
Activities: Organizing trade fairs & exhibitions
Special Products: International market included
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt
Details:
PO BOX 14627
Ras Abu Abboud, Abdullah bin Thani Bldg No. 5 / Room
No. 2 / Near V.I.P. Roundabout, Doha, Qatar
Tel.:
00974 / 4462 17 01
Fax:
00974 / 4462 17 25
E-Mail:
sonjagm@arabital.com
Internet: www.arabital.com
Contact: Ms. Sonja Freigassner
34
Details:
Mitterndorf 5/10 / A-4801 Traunkirchen
Tel.:
0043 (0)660 / 733 50 45
Fax:
0043 (0)660 / 33 733 50 45
E-Mail:
info@aracon.at
Internet: www.aracon.at
Contact: Mr. Wolfgang Maurer
Details:
PO Box 108
Hassan Hashem Street 2 / Fleming, Alexandria, Egypt
Tel.:
00203 / 583 24 77
Fax:
00203 / 585 88 99
E-Mail:
m.hussein@asiahgroup.com
Internet: www.asiahgroup.com
Contact: Mr. Fouad Hussein Ali
Members of AACC
SERVICES
asp.consulting
GmbH
Activities: international consulting and investment company whose core competencies are the sustainable,
successful, and efficient implementation of complex
projects. The regional headquarters in Vienna and Boston
(USA) assist firms worldwide in the successful implementation of M&A transactions, reorganizations, financial
restructuring, post-merger integrations, and focused
performance improvement initiatives. In selected cases
asp. group also acts as investor pursuing an active shareholder approach
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia
AVT-ARGE Regionale Verkehrsplanung und Transportwirtschaft,
Technisches Büro für Raumplanung
Activities: Local traffic planning & planning for railway
infrastructure
Details:
Feldgasse 17 / A-2733 Grünbach
Tel.:
0043 (0)2637 / 3391
Fax:
0043 (01) 257 343923
E-Mail:
avt@business.web.at
Contact: Dr. Heinz Petzmann
Austroplan Austrian
Engineering GmbH
Bags Holding
GesmbH
Activities: Consulting, engineering and project management for the cement, steel and mining industry. Engineering and supply of plants for LPG cylinders, medical disposables and pharmaceutical products
Special Products: Cement consulting and upgrading of
cement plants, construction management and site supervision, consulting services for bio fuels and basaltic fibre
Arabic Countries where active: Saudi Arabia
Activities: Whole sale and trading
Special Products: Building materials, agricultural
products, fertilizers
Arabic Countries where active: Libya, Egypt, Sudan,
Syria, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait
Details:
Storchengasse 1 / A-1150 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 89 189 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 89 189 - 299
E-Mail:
vienna@austroplan.at
Internet: www.austroplan.at
Contact: Dr. Anton Eichinger (Managing Director)
Details:
Schottenring 16/164 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 516 388 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 516 388 - 99
E-Mail:
office@bags-group.com
Internet: www.bags-group.com
Contact: Mr. Amer Auf
Members
Details:
Graben 10 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 512 5000 61
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 512 5000 50
E-Mail:
alexander.behensky@asp-consulting.com
Internet: www.asp-consulting.com
Contact: Mr. Alexander Behensky
35
SERVICES
Bureau Veritas
Austria GmbH
C&I
Leasing GmbH
Activities: Inspections for industry and marine, general
services and international trade, verifications of conformity, inspections for government contracts
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Libya, Lebanon,
Kuwait, UAE, Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sudan
Activities: Financing of real estate, furniture and motor
vehicles
Details:
Apostelgasse 25-27 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 713 1568-0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 713 1568-30
E-Mail:
office@at.bureauveritas.com
Internet: www.bureauveritas.com
Contact: Mr. Rudolf Pichler
CIN Consult
Unternehmensberatung GmbH
C&T Sportpferde
Freudenthal
Activities: Finance, law enforcement, intelligence
community, legal services, foreign affairs, journalism,
academia
Activities: Consulting, training and breeding of sports
horses
Details:
Beatrixgasse 32 / A-1030 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 71605-900
Tel.:
E-Mail:
office@cin-consult.com
Internet: www.cin-consult.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Havranek
36
Details:
Maderstr. 1 / A-1040 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 505 87 87-0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 505 91 91
E-Mail:
office@c-i.at
Internet: www.c-i.at
Contact: Mr. R. Hummelbrunner
Details:
Immendorf Nr. 4 / A-2022
Tel.:
0043 (0)2951 / 8209
Fax:
0043 (0)2951 / 8209 - 4
E-Mail:
freudenthal@immendorf.at
Internet: www.immendorf.at
Contact: Ms. Anna Malenka Freudenthal
Members of AACC
SERVICES
Activities: Contact platform between accredited trade
and economic delegates and the Austrian business and
political community
Arabic Countries where active: Available to accredited
trade and economic delegates of all countries to seek
mutual contact and contact with trade and commercial
organisations at diplomatic level
Details:
Opernring 3 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 588 58 56
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 586 86 59
E-Mail:
trade.del@chello.at
Internet: www.handelsraete.at
Contact: Mr. Ron Willis, C.Eng.(mech.)
Das House – Immobilienentwicklungs
und -verwertungs GmbH
Activities: Real estate developers
Details:
Dr. Karl Lueger Platz 5, 5. Stock, A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 512 85 67
Fax:
0043 (0)2262 / 624 82
E-Mail:
office@dashouse.at
Internet: www.dashouse.at
Contact: Mr. Karl-Heinz Wingelmaier
Dr. D’Aron
Activities: Rental of apartments and flats
Details:
Wilhelminenstr. 181 / A-1160 Vienna
0043 (0)664 / 2553897
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 486 3174
E-Mail:
N/A
Internet: N/A
Contact: Dr. André D’Aron
DIET – Développement Industriel
Enfidha Tunisie:
ENFIDHA INDUSTRIAL PARK
Activities: Provision of land, infrastructure, industrial
environment
Special Products: Mechanical offices for support, gas,
electricity, internet available, hotels, apartments, restaurants, hospitals in the vicinity
Arabic Countries where active: Tunisia
Details:
Immeuble Maghrebia, Tour B, Boulevard 7 Novembre
1987 / 2035 Tunis-Carthage, TUNISIA
00216 / 71 / 940960 or -885
Tel.:
Fax:
00216 / 71 / 942707
E-Mail:
info@enfidha.net
Internet: www.enfidha.net
Contact: Mr. Isnardo Carta
Members
Club of Trade Delegates
(Club der Handelsräte)
37
SERVICES
38
Egypt Air
Emirates Airlines
Activities: Airline
Arabic Countries where active: Egypt (headquarters in
Cairo), Algeria, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya,
Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria,
Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Activities: Transport, airline company
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq,
Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Opernring 1 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 587 45 32
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 587 45 32 - 20
E-Mail:
vienna_sec@egyptair.com
Internet: http://www.egyptair.com/
Contact: Ms. Eva Kadi
Details:
Mahlerstr. 12 / Stg. 6 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 532 60 28
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 533 68 87
E-Mail:
vienna.sales@emirates.com
Internet: www.emirates.com
Contact: Mr. Anton Bily (Sales Manager Austria)
Mr. Robert Posch (Sales Executive)
Ehrlich: Mag. Daniela Ehrlich,
Rechtsanwältin
Europe Arab Bank plc
Activities: Legal services
Special Products: Focus on Corporate & Commercial
Law, Banking & Capital Markets Law, European Community Law, Telecom & IT & E-commerce law, Real Estate,
Litigation & Arbitration, Austrian Civil Law and Unfair
Competition Law
Activities: Banking Services
Special Products: Trade Finance, Corporate Banking,
Treasury Services
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt,
Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Palestine, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE
Details:
Helferstorferstr. 5/8 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 535 40 55
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 535 40 55 - 11
E-Mail:
office@beplaw.com
Internet: www.beplaw.com
Contact: Ms. Daniela Ehrlich
Details:
Mahlerstr. 7 / Top 15/16 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 513 42 40
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 513 42 40 - 9
E-Mail:
nadim.khalili@eabplc.com
Internet: www.eabplc.com
Contact: Mr. Nadim Khalili
Members of AACC
SERVICES
Activities: Real Estate & Relocation Agency specializing
in the sale and rental of high quality properties in both the
Austrian and international market
Special Products: Relocation services to people moving
to Vienna and personnel who are working for the UN,
International Organisations, Embassies and International
Companies
Details:
Graben 7/8 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 328 88 18
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 328 88 18 – 60
E-Mail:
office@expat-consulting.com
Internet: www.expat-consulting.com
Contact: Mr. Aslan Kurtaran
Gentics
Software GmbH
Activities: Software development
Special Products: Standard software solutions for
Enterprise Web Content Management and Enterprise
portal solutions
Details:
Gonzagagasse 11/25 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 71 09 904 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 71 09 904 - 4
E-Mail:
office@gentics.com
Internet: www.gentics.com
Contact: Mr. Alexander Szlezak
FREYGNER
Rechtsanwalt GmbH
Geospace
GmbH
Activities: Legal advice
Special Products: Focusing on European Union Law,
Competition Law, Antitrust & Regulatory Law, Franchise &
Distribution Law, Intellectual Property, Corporate Law,
Real Estate & Building Law, Civil & Contract Law
Activities: Earth observation satellite data distributor,
digital image processing, geographic information systems, consulting, Applied research & development, photo
library, production of images, satellite image maps, satellite image books, digital satellite image atlases on CDRom, education material
Special Products: Satellite Image Atlas of the Republic of
Yemen (1st edition 2010)
Arabic Countries where active: Syria, Iraq, Yemen, and
Saudi Arabia
Details:
Annagasse 6 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 512 33 93
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 512 33 93 -50
E-Mail:
office@freygner.com
Internet: www.freygner.com
Contact: Dr. Sylvia Freygner
Details:
Schönbrunnerstr. 13 / A-1050 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 662 458115
Fax:
0043 (0) 662 458115-124
E-Mail:
office@geospace.at
Internet: www.geospace.at
Contact: Mr. Johann Stegbuchner CEO
Members
Expat Consulting
39
SERVICES
Gesellschaft ÖsterreichischArabische Ärzte und Apotheker
Activities: Non-profit organization, aims to deepen cultural relations and facilitate information exchange between Austria and Arab countries in the fields of medicine
and pharmacology - Services
Details:
Hohe Warte 33 / A-1190 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 3188655
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 3188655
E-Mail:
muna.yazigi@pva.sozvers.at
Internet: www.austro-arabdoc.org/
Contact: Dr. Fouad Harik
Goldenes Kreuz
Privatklinik BetriebsGesmbH
Activities: Privat Clinic
Special Products: Gynaecology and obstetrics, surgery,
internal medicine, infertility treatment centre, prenatal
diagnostics, X-ray and diagnostic imaging department,
medical laboratory, institute for physical medicine, burnout care centre, rooms equipped with wireless broadband
Internet
Details:
Lazarettgasse 16-18 / A-1091 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 40 111 - 510
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 40 111 - 505
E-Mail:
verwaltung@goldenes-kreuz.at
Internet: www.goldenes-kreuz.at
Contact: Ms. Cornelia Böhm (CEO)
40
GourmetConsult
Activities: Gourmet consulting & trade
Details:
Kantgasse 3/2 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 523 07 87
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 526 65 10
E-Mail:
pg@gourmetconsult.eu
Internet: www.aoc-genuss.at
Contact: Mr. Peter Gallhofer
Grand Hotel Vienna
Activities: Offers rooms for accommodation,
conferences, dining
Special Products: Luxuriously decorated rooms and
suites, “Grand Café”, Japanese speciality restaurant, rose
garden, ballroom etc.
Details:
Kärntner Ring 9 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 515 - 800
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 515 - 1313
E-Mail:
kjalloul@jjwhotels.com
Internet: www.grandhotelVienna.com
Contact: Mr. Karim Jalloul
Members of AACC
SERVICES
Heller Consult Tax &
Business Solutions GmbH
Hulla & Co.
Human Dynamics KG
Activities: Consulting services
Special Products: Tax Counselling, Business Consulting,
Promotion, Expansion Consulting, Medical Jobs
Arabic Countries where active: UAE
Activities: Consultancy services for economic, good
governance, institutional development and sectoral policy
issues
Huber: Dr. Max Huber GmbH
Activities: Real estate, financial services, property
management, market research, property sale and rent
Details:
Opernring 9 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 40 24 74 70
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 40 69 589
E-Mail:
Vienna@dmh.co.at
Internet: www.dmh.co.at
Contact: Dr. Max Huber
Details:
Lothringerstr. 16 / A-1030 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 402 50 20
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 402 50 20 - 20
E-Mail:
eric.heldring@humandynamics.org
Internet: www.humandynamics.org
Contact: Mr. Eric Heldring
ICC: Austria International
Chamber of Commerce
Activities: Consultation on:
tPGGFSTBTTJTUBODFXJUIJNQPSUBOEFYQPSUDPOUSBDUT
trade finance, letters of credit, bank guarantees
tJOGPSNTNFNCFSTPOQSFWFOUJPOPGDPNNFSDJBMDSJNF
helps with anti-corruption and counterfeiting
tBEWJDFTPOEJTQVUFQSFWFOUJPOBSCJUSBUJPONFEJBUJPO
tIFMQTXJUIJOUFSOBUJPOBMOFHPUJBUJPOTUSBUFHJFTBOE
tactics
tJTTVFTTQFDJBMJ[FEQVCMJDBUJPOTGPSJNQPSUFYQPSUDPOtracts: Incoterms, rules for letters of credit and bank
guarantees etc.
Arabic Countries where active: All
Details:
Wiedner Hauptstr. 73 / A-1040 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 50 105 37 - 16
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 50 105 37 - 03
E-Mail:
icc@icc-austria.org
Internet: www.icc-austria.org
Contact: Dr. Max Burger-Scheidlin
Members
Details:
Pestalozzigasse 3 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 310 6010
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 310 6010 - 6
E-Mail:
e.heller@hellerconsult.com
Internet: www.hellerconsult.com
Contact: Ms. Elisabeth Heller
41
SERVICES
IIFC Industrial & Investment
Financing Consulting GmbH
Imperial Hotels
Austria AG
Activities: Specializes in the industrial & food field,
offering financing & consulting services
Activities: Hotel business
Special Products: Hotel Imperial (built as a private palace
and has been hosting heads of state, kings and queens,
stars and artists since 1873), Hotel Bristol (next to the
Vienna State Opera; stands for authentic Viennese hospitality and personal service)
Details:
Weimarer Str. 93/5 / A-1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 368 42 42
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 368 42 42 42
E-Mail:
office@ifconsulting.at
Contact: Dr. Farrokh Sharif
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT
Ges.m.b.H
IPSA – International Protect &
Security Agency e.U.
Activities: Oil & gas, water & environment, civil
engineering & infrastructure, energy
Special Products: Consultancy, design and planning,
procurement, construction supervision, project management, start-up
Arabic Countries where active: Kuwait, Libya, Saudi
Arabia, UAE
Activities: Close and executive protection, security
management, risk & threat analysis, crisis negotiations,
investigations and individual security training
Special Products: Special security solutions for clients in
political, diplomatic and economic spheres worldwidet
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt,
Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, UAE
(other Arabic countries upon request)
Details:
Hainburgerstr. 31/2 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)713 / 92 32 - 361
Fax:
0043 (0)713 / 92 32 - 444
E-Mail:
info@ibk.ilf.com
Internet: www.ilf.com
Contact: Ms. Jutta Strolz
42
Details:
Kärntner Ring 16 / A-1015 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 50 110 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 50 110 - 410
E-Mail:
hotel.imperial@luxurycollection.com
Internet: www.hotelimperialvienna.com/
Contact: Mr. Oscar DelCampo
Details:
Josef Hesoun Str. 9/3/M20 / A-2345 Brunn am Gebirge
Tel.:
0043 (0)676 / 595 87 61
Fax:
0043 (0)2236 / 864 225
E-Mail:
office@ipsagency.org
Internet: www.ipsagency.org
Contact: Mr. Sascha Steurer (CEO)
Members of AACC
SERVICES
Islamisches Informations- und
Dokumentationszentrum Österreich
(IIDZ – Austria)
Limousinenservice Schafek
GmbH
Activities: Islamic Information and Documentation Center
in Austria
Special Products: Issuance of Halal certification
Arabic Countries where active: UAE
Activities: VIP Limousine service, omnibus services
Special Products: Multi-lingual (including Arabic) speaking chauffeurs and specialized in all forms of transport
services, for business and private clients
Details:
Theodor-Körner-Str. 10a, A-4050 Traun
Sterngasse 3 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)699 / 884 658 04
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)7229 / 72 364
E-Mail:
kontakt@iidz.at
Internet: www.halal-iidz.eu
Contact: Mr. Günther Ahmed Rusznak
Details:
Lechnerstr. 2-4/6/72 / A-1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)699 / 19 67 69 67
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 9676967
E-Mail:
shahin.schafek@chello.at
Internet: www.vienna-limousinenservice.com
Contact: Mr. Shahin Schafek
Activities: Legal Services, covering a wide range of fields
(includes Banking and Insurance, Competition and Patents, taxes, product regulations, technology, real estate,
construction and general trade and business)
Special Products: International Practice Groups (International Services)
Details:
Kärntner Ring 12 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 516 20 - 120
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 516 20 - 20
E-Mail:
office@lamberteversheds.com
Internet: www.lamberteversheds.com
Contact: Mr. Peter Lambert
Nahas Enterprises Group
Activities: Trade & Services, Travel & Tourism, Hotel &
Resorts, Industry
Arabic Countries where active: Kuwait, Libya, Saudi
Arabia, UAE
Details:
Baramkeh- Amin Rihani Str., Transtour Bldg. 4th /
P.O.Box 3050, Damascus
Tel.:
00963 11 223 4000
Fax:
00963 11 223 5004
E-Mail:
info@nahas.sy
Internet: www.nahas-group.sy
Contact: Mr. Shukri Shaikh Ali
Members
Lambert Eversheds/
Lambert Rechtsanwälte OG
43
SERVICES
Contact: Mr. Stefan Blahut
Activities: Financial services, Central European regional
bank with more than 130 branches covering Austria’s
most industrialized regions, Bavaria (South Germany),
Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary. Correspondent
network comprises more than 2,500 partners
Special Products: Following a universal banking philosophy Oberbank’s activities include among others: international business, loans, deposits, securities, leasing and
derivatives
Arabic Countries where active: Cross-border activities
for corporates and individuals with almost all Arabic
regions, coverage throughout Oberbank’s correspondent
banking network
Activities: Printing and making high security documents
(passports, identity cards, drivers license, visa & residence permits), systems integration and installing personalisation centres
Special Products: e-government® in Austria, providing
services for the Austrian government (personalizing high
security documents)
Details:
Untere Donaulände 28 / A-4020 Linz
Tel.:
0043 (0)732 / 78 02 2500
Fax:
0043 (0)732 / 77 39 80
E-Mail:
manfred.weissmann@oberbank.at
Internet: www.oberbank.at
Contact: Dr. Manfred Weissmann
Details:
Tenschertstr. 7 / A-1239 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 206 66 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 206 66 - 100
E-Mail:
office@staatsdruckerei.at
Internet: www.staatsdruckerei.at
Contact: Prof. Reinhart Gausterer
ÖGV –
Österreichischer Gewerbeverein
OVE: Austrian Electrotechnical
Association
Activities: Known in English as the Austrian Trade Association, it connects its members to important representatives of media, economy, science, and politics.
It can connect its members to each other and solve important problems that members have, among other
services
Special Products: The economic journal “Österreichs
Wirtschaft”
Activities: Contributes to the electro technical field regulations, deals with problems and issues of application of
electrical energy
Details:
Eschenbachgasse 11 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 587 36 33
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 587 01 92
E-Mail:
s.blahut@gewerbeverein.at
Internet: www.gewerbeverein.at
44
Österreichische
Staatsdruckerei GmbH
OBERBANK-AG
Details:
Eschenbachgasse 9 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 587 63 73
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 370 58 06 370
E-Mail:
ove@ove.at
Internet: www.ove.at
Contact: Mr. Peter Reichel
Members of AACC
Plan.NET Middle East
Profi Personalvermittlung
GmbH
Activities: Offline and digital communication
Special Products: Brand and marketing consultancy,
social media, mobile marketing, online research
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Kuwait,
Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria,
UAE
Activities: Trading with importers focused on Arabic
markets
Special Products: Trading, offering and producing of
goods, raw-materials and other trade-business with
European quality and know-how; excellent contact and
negotiation management between European and Arab
producers, merchants and distributors
Details:
PO Box 502865
Al Sufouh Complex 806 & 807 / Dubai Media City, Dubai United Arab Emirates
00971 (4) 439 34 04 -101
Tel.:
Fax:
00971 (4) 439 34 03
E-Mail:
o.zuegel@plan-net.ae
Internet: www.plan-net.ae
Contact: Mr. Oliver Zuegel
Details:
Darwingasse 9/5 / A-1020 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 890 20 27
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 890 20 27 – 15
E-Mail: office@proficenter-vienna.com Internet: www.proficenter-vienna.com
Contact: Mr. Nasr Samir
Premium Health
Solutions GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank
Austria AG
Activities: Offers medical services, check up and preventive programs, intensive care and recovery programs,
rehabilitation services, access to high quality clinics and
spas
Special Products: Comprehensive check-up programs in
Vienna and Zell/See area
Details:
Operngasse 2 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 516 51 73
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 513 44 24
E-Mail:
office@phs-austria.com
Internet: www.phs-austria.com
Contact: Ms. Sonata Neumüller
Activities: Financial Services
Special Products: Financing, treasury & markets, consulting & services, foreign trade, capital markets, equity &
bonds financing, electronic banking solutions, cash management, fund registration Austria, investment banking
Arabic Countries where active: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt,
Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania,
Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria,
Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
Details:
Am Stadtpark 9 / A-1030 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 71707 - 1879
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 71707 - 2388
E-Mail:
walter.rothensteiner@rzb.at
Internet: www.rzb.at
Contact: Mr. Walter Rothensteiner
Members
SERVICES
45
SERVICES
Rechtsanwälte: Dr. Franz Marschall &
Mag. Rene Heinz
Sacher Hotels
BetriebsgesmbH.
Activities: Legal Services
Special Products: Deals with Commercial, Civil, Business Law, Immigration Law, among others
Activities: Hotels (in Vienna and Salzburg), awarded
restaurants, Cafés, luxury products
Special Products: Spa, Deluxe and Top Deluxe Rooms &
Suites, Conferences & Banquets, Original Sacher-Torte
Details:
Goldschmiedgasse 8 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 533 52 56
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 533 01 09
E-Mail:
office@rae-marschall-heinz.com
Internet: www.rae-marschall-heinz.com
Contact: Renua Chhadeh
RISE – Research Industrial Systems
Engineering GmbH
Activities: IT Consulting, software development and
Service
Details:
Am Concorde Business Park F / A-2320 Schwechat
Tel.:
0043 (0)664 / 608 444 1036
0043 (0)664 / 608 444 1036
Fax:
E-Mail:
sana.elkebir@rise-world.com
Internet: www.rise-world.com
Contact: Ms. Sana El-Kebir
46
Details:
Philharmonikerst. 4 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 514 56 - 809
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 514 56 - 810
E-Mail:
aglueck@sacher.com
Internet: www.sacher.com
Contact: Mr. Andreas Glück
SANA Investment Co.
Activities: Cham Holdings arm for the development of
and investment in energy, utilities, industry and
infrastructure sectors
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
PO Box: 9525
Ashrafiyat Sahnaya, Daraa Highway, Shweifat School
Interchange, Mazzeh, Damascus, SYRIA
Tel.:
00963 / 11 / 673 1278
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 673 1279
E-Mail:
mahmoud.khoshman@chamholding.sy
Internet: www.chamholding.sy/sana.html
Contact: Mr. Mahmoud A. Al-Khoshman
Members of AACC
SERVICES
Activities: Constructions, telecommunications
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
PO Box 36729
Yafoor, Palmville Resort, Villa No 10 / Damascus, SYRIA
00963 / 11 / 391 - 00 01
Tel.:
Fax:
00963 / 11 / 391 - 90 80
E-Mail:
omarc@aloola.sy
Internet: N/A
Contact: Mr. Omar Choura
Activities: Sales, Projects and Consulting Services
Special Products: Marketing and sales for diverse
projects, project development and management, tailored
consulting services
Details:
Am Bachlberg 32 / A-4040 Linz
Tel.:
0043 (0)699 / 177 130 91
Fax:
0043 (0)732 / 713 091
E-Mail:
Klaus.Prexl@Liwest.at
Internet: www.klaus-prexl-spc.at
Contact: Mr. Klaus Prexl
Schneider:
Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider GmbH
SQZ Software Engineering &
Qualitätsmanagement Zopf
Activities: IT Consulting services
Special Products: IT-related Quality Assurance (Test
Management, Requirement Management)
Arabic Countries where active: All
Activities: Consulting and Coaching in Software Engineering, Development Processes, Project Management
and Quality Management
Details:
Wolfsaugasse 9 / A-1200 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 350 68 84
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 332 53 08
E-Mail:
wolfgang@drschneider.eu
Internet: www.drschneider.eu
Contact: Dr. Wolfgang Johann Schneider
Details:
Burgstall 30 / A-3034 Maria Anzbach
0043 (0)676 / 90 600 15
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)676 / 90 600 15
E-Mail:
office@sqz.at
Internet: www.sqz.at
Contact: Mr. Siegfried Zopf
Members
SBG – AlMarasem – BTC
SPC
(K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
47
SERVICES
SWZT Chartered
Consultants GmbH
Activities: Development of real estate projects
Details:
Franz Josefs-Kai 21/14 / A-1010 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 532 2791
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 535 4974
E-Mail:
office@swzt.at
Internet: www.swzt.at
Contact: Mr. Moussa Hamzo
TAG – T. Akhras Group
Activities: Importing & exporting all kinds of commodities
(sugar, grains, oil, rice), marine services, ship owner,
transportation, real state developments, Middle East
factories for sugar, Middle East factories for oil and feed
meal, Middle East factories for colugos & starch, grand
mills, samba ice cream, Transmall Trade Complex
Arabic Countries where active: Syria
Details:
PO Box 195
Hamra Str. 9, Akhras Bldg., Homs, SYRIA
Tel.:
00963 / 31 / 24 75 500
Fax:
00963 / 31 / 24 75 095
E-Mail:
t-akhras@scs-net.org
Internet: www.akhrasgroup.com
Contact: Mr. Tarif Akhras
48
Talpa GmbH
Activities: Technical consulting and sales of industrial
manufacturing plants and energy systems
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Qatar
Details:
Simmeringer Hauptstr. 24 / A-1110 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 664 637 2521
E-Mail:
office@talpa.at
Internet: www.talpa.at
Contact: Mr. Herbert Suppan
TECS Telecommunication &
E-Commerce Solutions GmbH
Activities: Mangagement consultancy, process
management, payment processing, digital signatures
Details:
Schottenring 16, A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 535 0057-0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 535 0057-13
E-Mail:
office@tecs.at
Internet: www.tecs.at
Contact: Mr. Fazlollah Rostamian
Members of AACC
SERVICES
TomDive
Vienna Business Agency
Activities: High Performance Diving
Special Products: 1st Class private training; complete
recreational diving program of PADI, the worlds leading
diving association; technical diving program of DSAT, up
to instructor level
Activities: Consulting, financial promotion, marketing
Vamed Engineering
GmbH & Co KG
Activities: Consulting, engineering, contracting and
logistics
Special Products: Research facilities, hospital infrastructure plants
Arabic Countries where active: Iraq, Jordan, Libya,
Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria
Details:
Sterngasse 5 / A-1232 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 60 127 - 0
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 60 127 - 292
E-Mail:
vesales@vamed.com
Internet: www.vamed.com
Contact: Mr. Hisham Tamaa
Webster University
Activities: Education services
Special Products: Career development center, MBA
programs, on-line programs
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Jordan,
Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, UAE
Details:
Berchtoldgasse 1 / A-1220 Vienna
0043 (0)1 / 269 92 93 - 0
Tel.:
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 269 92 93 - 13
E-Mail:
sedlar@webster.ac.at
Internet: www.webster.ac.at
Contact: Ms. Teresa Sedlar
Members
Details:
Erlachgasse 113 / A-1100 Vienna
0043 (0)660 / 38 76 731
Tel.:
E-Mail:
dive@tomdive.com
Internet: www.tomdive.com
Contact: Mr. Thomas Lederberger
Details:
Ebendorferstr. 2 / A-1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0)1 / 4000 861 - 99
Fax:
0043 (0)1 / 4000 861 - 88
E-Mail:
bittmann@vba.at
Internet: www.wirtschaftsagentur.at
Contact: Mr. Rupert Bittmann
49
SERVICES
X-Plus-Management GmbH
Activities: International Consulting services for
companies
Special Products: Advising tools: Advice and handling to
managements & corporations in IT, marketing, logistics,
foreign trade, technologies, HRM
Arabic Countries where active: Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman,
Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Details:
Registered: A-5204 Strasswalchen (Salzburg)
Corp. Headoffice: Lederergasse 6 / A-5020 Salzburg
Tel.:
0043 / 662-881800
Fax:
0043 / 662-881888
E-Mail:
s.ohms@x-plus-management.com
Internet: www.x-plus-management.com
Contact: Mr. Stephan Ohms (Managing Director)
50
Members of AACC
MUNICIPALITIES
Community of Piringsdorf
Piringsdorf is a municipality that is located in the province of Burgenland, in the nation of Austria, in the middle of Europe.
The municipality is famous for its mineral water springs – in 1982 the government of Burgenland licensed the following
therapeutical uses and medical indications for the use the springs: drinking cures and spas. The quality of the water is
excellent and it can be used for drinking, however it is not only limited to such use. Among the many medical indications
the water is qualified to be used for are stomach troubles, therapy after bypass operations, and many other uses. The
community of Piringsdorf, the owner of the springs would like to export its water to the Arab world as drinkable water as
well as for medical use.
Members
Details:
Gemeinde Piringsdorf
Bundesstr. 14 / 7371 Piringsdorf
Tel.:
0043 (0)2616 / 87 13
Fax:
0043 (0)2616 / 88 37
E-Mail:
post@piringsdorf.bgld.gv.at
Internet: www.piringsdorf.at
Contact: Mr. Stefan Hauser (Mayor)
51
52
COMPANY
CLASSIFICATION
PAGE
Abiothrin HandelsgmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
a-consult GmbH
SERVICES
33
Accès Alpintechnik Salzburg
SERVICES
33
7
Architekt Achtsnit & Achtsnit
SERVICES
33
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
26
AGT Management & Engineering AG
FUEL AND ENERGY
19
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Al Mashreq Investment Fund
SERVICES
7
33
Al Matin Group for trade and industry
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
8
ALPHA – Aleppo Pharmaceutical Industries
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
8
Alshaya Retail GmbH
SERVICES
34
Alu König Stahl
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
26
ALVETRA u. WERFFT AG
NUTRITION
24
Aqua Engineering GesmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
26
Arabital Shipping
SERVICES
34
ARACON Consulting GmbH
SERVICES
34
Asiah Group Ltd
SERVICES
34
asp.consulting GmbH
SERVICES
35
Atelier Mag. Art. Herger Helga
CULTURE AND ART
12
Austroplan Austrian Engineering GmbH
SERVICES
35
AVT
SERVICES
35
BACKHAUSEN INTERIOR DESIGN GMBH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
26
BAGS HOLDING GESMBH
SERVICES
35
BETA HANDELSGESELLSCHAFT M.B.H.
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
27
BEV-Group
NUTRITION
24
Biolachs
NUTRITION
24
20
Böhler International GmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
Borealis AG
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
SERVICES
Chemson Polymere-Additive AG
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Christian Maschek Schmuck
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
27
CIN Consult Unternehmensberatung GmbH
SERVICES
36
C & I Leasing GmbH
SERVICES
36
C&T Sportpferde Freudenthal
SERVICES
36
Club of Trade Delegates (Club der Handelsräte)
SERVICES
37
Das House – Immobilienentwicklungs und
-verwertungs GmbH
SERVICES
37
Dr. D’Aron
SERVICES
37
DCM DECOmetal GmbH
RAW MATERIALS
32
DIET – Développement Industriel Enfidha Tunisie:
ENFIDHA INDUSTRIAL PARK
SERVICES
37
DCC – Doppelmayr Cable Car GmbH & Co KG
ENGINES, VEHICLES
14
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
27
D. Swarovski & Co.
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
27
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
8
36
8
9
COMPANY
CLASSIFICATION
PAGE
Egypt Air
SERVICES
38
Ehrlich: Mag. Daniela Ehrlich, Rechtsanwältin
SERVICES
38
Elin Wasserwerkstechnik
Gesellschaft m.b.H.
ENGINES, VEHICLES
14
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
MANUFACTURED GOODS
20
Emirates Airlines
SERVICES
38
EOOS GmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
20
Europe Arab Bank plc
SERVICES
38
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
Expat Consulting
SERVICES
39
Fritz Baumaschinen GmbH & Co KG
ENGINES, VEHICLES
14
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
28
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
9
G.L. Pharma
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
9
GE. Energy Jenbacher GmbH & Co OHG
ENGINES, VEHICLES
14
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
NUTRITION
24
Gentics Software GmbH
SERVICES
39
Geosat Technology Limited
FUEL AND ENERGY
19
Geospace GmbH
SERVICES
39
Gesellschaft Österreichisch-Arabische Ärzte und
Apotheker
SERVICES
40
Ghraoui Group
NUTRITION
25
GLS Tanks GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
28
Goldenes Kreuz Privatklinik BetriebsGesmbH
SERVICES
40
GourmetConsult
SERVICES
40
Grand Hotel Vienna
SERVICES
40
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
10
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
NUTRITION
25
Hasenkopf
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
28
Heller Consult Tax & Business Solutions GmbH
SERVICES
41
Herz Austria GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
28
Mag. Hoeveler & Co GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
10
Hörbiger Kompressortechnik GmbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
15
HUBER: DR. MAX HUBER GMBH
SERVICES
41
HULLA & CO. HUMAN DYNAMICS KG
SERVICES
41
IASON GMBH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
10
ICC: AUSTRIA INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
SERVICES
41
IIFC INDUSTRIAL & INVESTMENT FINANCING
CONSULTING GMBH
SERVICES
42
ILF – BERATENDE INGENIEURE ZT GES.M.B.H
SERVICES
42
IMET HANDELSGESELLSCHAFT
MANUFACTURED GOODS
22
Ing. Pablo Spitzer
CULTURE AND ART
12
Innovation und Technik GmbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
15
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau Ges.m.b.H.
ENGINES, VEHICLES
15
Members A-Z
9
53
COMPANY
CLASSIFICATION
Islamisches Informations- und Dokumentationszentrum Österreich (IIDZ – Austria)
SERVICES
43
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
SERVICES
42
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
29
Katharina Hallal GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
10
Khalil Sara Establishment
MANUFACTURED GOODS
21
Khwanda Group
ENGINES, VEHICLES
15
Lambert Eversheds/
Lambert Rechtsanwälte OG
SERVICES
43
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
ENGINES, VEHICLES
16
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
16
Limousinenservice Schafek GmbH
SERVICES
43
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
RAW MATERIALS
32
Die Marmeladen-Manufaktur
NUTRITION
25
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
11
Mikro-Mineral GMBH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
11
MOBIL BAUSTOFFE GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
29
Modern Life Handels GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
29
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
21
Nahas Enterprises Group
SERVICES
43
Neue Wiener Porzellanmanufaktur
AUGARTEN GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
29
OBERBANK-AG
SERVICES
44
ÖGV – Österreichischer Gewerbeverein
SERVICES
44
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
30
Österreichische Staatsdruckerei GmbH
SERVICES
44
Omicron Electronics GmbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
16
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
FUEL AND ENERGY
19
Onkotec GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
11
OVE: Austrian Electrotechnical Association
SERVICES
44
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
21
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
MANUFACTURED GOODS
21
Plan.NET Middle East
SERVICES
45
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen
GmbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
16
PORR – ALLGEMEINE BAUGESELLSCHAFT –
A. PORR AG
54
PAGE
30
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
DRINKS AND TOBACCO
13
Premium Health Solutions GmbH
SERVICES
45
Profi Personalvermittlung GmbH
SERVICES
45
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
SERVICES
45
Ramses Zwei GmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
22
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
DRINKS AND TOBACCO
13
Red Bull GmbH
DRINKS AND TOBACCO
13
Rechtsanwälte: Dr. Franz Marschall &
Mag. Rene Heinz
SERVICES
46
CLASSIFICATION
PAGE
RHI AG
MANUFACTURED GOODS
22
RINGER KG
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
30
RISE – Research Industrial Systems
Engineering GmbH
SERVICES
46
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
MANUFACTURED GOODS
22
Sacher Hotels BetriebsgesmbH.
SERVICES
46
SAG Aluminium Lend GmbH&Co.KG
RAW MATERIALS
32
SANA Investment Co.
SERVICES
46
Sandoz GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
11
SBG – AlMarasem – BTC
SERVICES
47
Schneider: Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider GmbH
SERVICES
47
Schöler & Co GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
30
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
NUTRITION
25
Science & Research Marketing GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
31
Sitte Vienna
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
31
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
SERVICES
47
Spitzwieser Sport & Sondermotoren e.U.
ENGINES, VEHICLES
17
SQZ Software Engineering & Qualitätsmanagement
Zopf
SERVICES
47
Stora Enso Timber AG
MANUFACTURED GOODS
22
Strabag SE
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
31
M. Swarovski GmbH
OTHER MANUFACTURED GOODS
31
TAG – T. Akhras Group
SERVICES
48
Talpa GmbH
SERVICES
48
TECS Telecommunication &
E-Commerce Solutions GmbH
SERVICES
48
Tiger 1 Co.
ENGINES, VEHICLES
17
Ti-Tella Handelsgesellschaft mbH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
17
TOMDIVE
SERVICES
49
Trade Line Machinery
ENGINES, VEHICLES
18
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
12
Traude Fritz
CULTURE AND ART
12
TUMA PUMPENSYSTEME GMBH
ENGINES, VEHICLES
18
Tyche Rohstoffhandel & Beteiligung GmbH
RAW MATERIALS
32
UNTHA shredding technology
ENGINES, VEHICLES
18
VA Intertrading AG
MANUFACTURED GOODS
23
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
SERVICES
49
Vienna Business Agency
SERVICES
49
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
MANUFACTURED GOODS
23
Webster University
SERVICES
49
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
12
X-Plus-Management GmbH
SERVICES
50
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
DRINKS AND TOBACCO
13
Community of Piringsdorf
MUNICIPALITIES
51
Members A-Z
COMPANY
55
MEMBER DIRECTORY
Algeria
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
Europe Arab Bank plc
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
7
20
36
9
38
38
20
9
10
41
42
16
32
11
30
16
13
45
22
47
12
23
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Mag. Hoeveler & Co GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Omicron Electronics GmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
9
20
10
10
41
15
16
11
16
16
13
13
13
47
12
12
13
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
20
10
41
16
47
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
10
41
16
13
47
a-consult GmbH
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
33
26
7
Bahrain
Comoros
Djibouti
Egypt
56
34
34
34
35
20
27
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
9
24
10
25
41
15
42
29
10
15
16
16
11
16
19
21
16
13
45
25
47
12
23
12
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
Arabital Shipping
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
Geospace GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbHH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
26
34
36
9
20
38
38
24
39
10
41
29
16
19
16
13
45
13
13
25
47
12
49
12
Iraq
Members/Countries
Alshaya Retail GmbH
Arabital Shipping
Asiah Group Ltd
Bags Holding GesmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau Ges.m.b.H.
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Katharina Hallal GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbHH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
57
Jordan
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Alshaya Retail GmbH
Arabital Shipping
Backhausen interior design GmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
RHI AG
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trade Line Machinery
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Webster University
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
26
7
34
34
26
20
27
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
9
24
10
41
42
29
15
16
11
21
30
16
21
21
16
13
45
13
13
22
22
25
47
18
12
49
23
49
12
Alshaya Retail GmbH
Arabital Shipping
ARACON Consulting GmbH
Backhausen interior design GmbH
Bags Holding GesmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT Ges.m.b.H
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
34
34
34
26
35
20
36
27
27
9
38
20
38
28
9
24
10
41
42
42
29
Kuwait
58
11
43
30
16
21
45
16
13
45
13
13
25
47
17
12
23
49
12
50
13
Alshaya Retail GmbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trade Line Machinery
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
UNTHA shredding technology
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Webster University
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
34
7
20
36
27
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
28
9
24
10
25
41
29
15
16
11
21
16
21
45
16
13
45
13
13
25
47
18
12
18
23
49
12
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Arabital Shipping
Bags Holding GesmbH
BEV-Group
7
34
35
24
Lebanon
Libya
Members/Countries
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Nahas Enterprises Group
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Spitzwieser Sport & Sondermotoren e.U.
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Webster University
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
X-Plus-Management GmbH
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
59
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT Ges.m.b.H
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Nahas Enterprises Group
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
RHI AG
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
20
36
27
9
38
20
38
41
24
10
42
29
32
43
16
19
30
21
16
13
45
13
13
22
25
47
12
49
23
Mauritania
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
20
10
41
16
45
47
12
a-consult GmbH
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
Böhler International GmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Red Bull GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
33
26
20
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
10
41
29
32
11
21
16
45
30
16
21
30
13
47
12
23
Morocco
60
Oman
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
20
25
41
16
47
Arabital Shipping
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Europe Arab Bank plc
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Omicron Electronics GmbH
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
34
20
38
24
10
41
16
45
16
13
47
12
Alshaya Retail GmbH
Arabital Shipping
ARACON Consulting GmbH
Beta Handelsgesellschaft m.b.H.
Böhler International GmbH
DCC – Doppelmayr Cable Car GmbH & Co KG
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Hasenkopf
Mag. Hoeveler & Co GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
MOBIL BAUSTOFFE GmbH
Modern Life Handels GmbH
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Talpa GmbH
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Webster University
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
X-Plus-Management GmbH
34
34
34
27
20
14
27
27
38
20
38
38
28
24
10
28
10
41
42
29
32
11
29
29
21
30
16
45
16
13
45
13
13
25
47
48
12
49
23
49
12
50
Qatar
Members/Countries
Palestine
61
Saudi Arabia
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
AGT Management & Engineering AG
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Alshaya Retail GmbH
ALVETRA u. WERFFT AG
Arabital Shipping
ARACON Consulting GmbH
asp.consulting GmbH
Austroplan Austrian Engineering GmbH
Backhausen interior design GmbH
Bags Holding GesmbH
Beta Handelsgesellschaft m.b.H.
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
Geospace GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT Ges.m.b.H
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Modern Life Handels GmbH
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Nahas Enterprises Group
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
RINGER KG
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
X-Plus-Management GmbH
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
26
19
7
34
24
34
34
35
35
26
35
27
20
36
27
27
9
38
20
38
38
28
9
24
39
10
25
41
42
42
29
15
16
16
11
29
21
43
30
16
21
45
16
13
45
13
13
30
25
47
12
49
23
12
50
13
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
20
10
41
16
47
Somalia
62
Arabital Shipping
Bags Holding GesmbH
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Hasenkopf
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Omicron Electronics GmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Red Bull GmbH
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
34
35
20
36
9
38
20
38
10
28
41
32
11
16
16
13
45
13
22
25
12
a-consult GmbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Al Mashreq Investment Fund
Al Matin Group for trade and industry
ALPHA – Aleppo Pharmaceutical Industries
Arabital Shipping
Bags Holding GesmbH
Böhler International GmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Fritz Baumaschinen GmbH & Co KG
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
Geospace GmbH
Ghraoui Group
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau Ges.m.b.H.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Khalil Sara Establishment
Khwanda Group
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
RHI AG
33
7
33
8
8
34
35
20
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
28
14
9
24
39
25
10
25
41
15
29
21
15
32
11
16
21
21
45
16
13
45
13
13
22
Syria
Members/Countries
Sudan
63
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
SANA Investment Co.
SBG – AlMarasem – BTC
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
TAG – T. Akhras Group
Tiger 1 Co.
Ti-Tella Handelsgesellschaft mbH
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
UNTHA shredding technology
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
22
46
47
47
48
17
17
12
18
49
23
12
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
Böhler International GmbH
DIET – Développement Industriel Enfidha Tunisie:
ENFIDHA INDUSTRIAL PARK
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
Europe Arab Bank plc
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Red Bull GmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
7
20
Tunisia
37
27
9
38
20
38
38
9
10
25
41
42
32
11
30
19
21
21
16
45
13
25
47
23
United Arab Emirates
Alshaya Retail GmbH
ALVETRA u. WERFFT AG
Aqua Engineering GesmbH
Arabital Shipping
Backhausen interior design GmbH
Bags Holding GesmbH
Beta Handelsgesellschaft m.b.H.
BEV-Group
Böhler International GmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
DCM DECOmetal GmbH
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
EOOS GmbH
Europe Arab Bank plc
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Hasenkopf
64
34
24
26
34
26
35
27
24
20
36
32
27
27
9
38
20
38
20
38
28
9
24
10
28
41
10
41
42
15
43
42
29
15
16
16
32
11
29
21
43
30
16
19
21
21
45
16
13
45
13
13
22
25
47
17
12
23
49
12
50
13
Böhler International GmbH
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
Egypt Air
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
Emirates Airlines
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
Geospace GmbH
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau Ges.m.b.H.
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
RHI AG
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
20
9
38
20
38
9
24
39
10
41
15
32
11
21
16
19
21
21
16
13
45
13
22
22
25
47
12
12
Yemen
Members/Countries
Heller Consult Tax & Business Solutions GmbH
Mag. Hoeveler & Co GmbH
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT Ges.m.b.H
Innovation und Technik GmbH
Islamisches Informations- und Dokumentations-zentrum Österreich (IIDZ – Austria)
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Modern Life Handels GmbH
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
Nahas Enterprises Group
Österr. Doka Schalungs-Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
Omicron Electronics GmbH
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Plan.NET Middle East
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
RHI AG
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
Spitzwieser Sport & Sondermotoren e.U.
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
Webster University
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
X-Plus-Management GmbH
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
65
66
W
INTERNATIONAL
CONTACTS
LIST OF ARAB EMBASSIES IN AUSTRIA
ALGERIA
KUWAIT
Embassy of the People’s Democratic Republic
of Algeria
Address: Rudolfinergasse 18 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 369 88 53
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 369 88 56
E-Mail:
office@algerische-botschaft.at
Consulate: consulate@algerische-botschaft.at
Internet: www.algerische-botschaft.at
Ambassador: H.E. Ms. Taous FEROUKHI
Embassy of the State of Kuwait
Address: Strassergasse 32 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 405 56 46
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 405 56 46 -13
E-Mail:
kuwait.embassy.vienna@speed.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Mohammad AL-SALLAL
EGYPT
Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt
Address: Hohe Warte 50 – 54 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 370 81 04
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 370 81 04 - 27
E-Mail:
egyptembassyvienna@egyptembassyvienna.at
Internet: www.egyptembassyvienna.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Ehab FAWZY
IRAQ
Embassy of the Republic of Iraq
Address: PO Box 599, Johannesgasse 26 / 1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 713 81 95
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 713 67 20
E-Mail:
office@iraqembassy.at
Chargé d’affaires a.i.: H.E. Mr. Ziad Tariq AL-ADHAMY
JORDAN
Embassy of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
Address: Rennweg 17/4 / 1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 405 10 25
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 405 10 31
E-Mail:
info@jordanembassy.at
Internet: www.jordanembassy.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Makram QUEISI
LEAGUE OF ARAB STATES
Mission of the League of Arab States in Vienna
Address: Schwarzenbergplatz 6/Zaunergasse 1-3 /
1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 513 07 66
Fax :
0043 (0) 1 513 07 67
E-Mail: arab.league.vienna@aon.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Mikhail WEHBE
LEBANON
Embassy of the Lebanese Republic
Address: Oppolzergasse 6/3 / 1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 533 88 21
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 533 49 84
E-Mail:
embassy.lebanon@inode.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Ishaya EL-KHOURY
LIBYA
People’s Bureau of the Socialist People’s Libyan Arab
Jamahiriya
Address: Blaasstr. 33 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 367 76 39
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 367 76 01
E-Mail:
office@libyanembassyvienna.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Ahmed MENESI
67
MOROCCO
SUDAN
Embassy of the Kingdom of Morocco
Address: Opernring 3-5 / 1010 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 586 66 51
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 586 76 67
E-Mail:
emb-pmissionvienna@morocco.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Omar ZNIBER
Embassy of the Republic of Sudan
Address: Reisnerstr. 29/5 / 1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 710 23 43
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 710 23 46
E-Mail:
sudanivienna@prioritytelecom.biz
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Mahmud ELAMIN
OMAN
SYRIA
Embassy of the Sultanate of Oman
Address: Währingerstr. 2-4 / 1090 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 310 86 43
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 310 72 68
E-Mail:
embassy.oman@chello.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Badr bin AL-HINAI
Embassy of the Syrian Republic
Address: Daffingerstr. 4 / 1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 533 46 33
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 533 46 32
E-Mail:
vienna_embassy@syrianembassy.jet2web.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Bassam SABBAGH
PALESTINE
TUNISIA
Mission of Palestine
Address: Josefsgasse 5 / 1080 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 408 82 02
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 408 81 19
E-Mail:
palestine.mission@chello.at
Internet: www.palestinemission.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Zuheir ELWAZER
Embassy of the Republic of Tunisia
Address: Sieveringerstr. 187 / Vienna 1190
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 581 52 81
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 581 55 92
E-Mail:
at.vienne@aon.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Ali CHAOUCH
QATAR
Representation of the State of Qatar
Address: Währingerstr. 2-4 / 1090 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 310 49 50
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 319 08 97
E-Mail:
vertreter.qatar.vienna@chello.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Ali Khalfan AL-MANSOURI
SAUDI ARABIA
Embassy of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Address: Formanekgasse 38 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 367 25 31
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 367 25 40
E-Mail:
emb.saudiarabia.vienna@aon.at
Ambassador: H.H. Prince Mansour bin Khalid AL SAUD
68
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
Address: Peter-Jordan-Str. 66 / 1190 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 368 14 55
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 368 44 85
E-Mail:
emirates@aon.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Mohamad Omran ALSHAMSI
YEMEN
Embassy of the Republic of Yemen
Address: Reisnerstr. 18-20 / 1. Stock, Top 3-4 /
1030 Vienna
Tel.:
0043 (0) 1 503 29 30
Fax:
0043 (0) 1 505 31 59
E-Mail:
yemenembassy.vienna@aon.at
Consulate: konsular@yemenembassy.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Abdel Hahim AL-ERYANI
LIST OF AUSTRIAN EMBASSIES IN
ARAB COUNTRIES
ALGERIA
LIBYA
Austrian Embassy in Algier
Address:
17, Chemin Abdel kader Gadouche,
16035 Hydra
Tel.:
00213 / 21 69 10 86
Fax:
00213 / 21 69 12 32
E-Mail:
algier-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Aloisia WÖRGETTER
Austrian Embassy in Tripolis
Address:
Shara Khalid Ben Walid/Shara Arismondi,
Dahra Area, Garden City, Tripolis
P.O.B. 3207, Tripolis
Tel.:
00218 / 21 44 43 379
Fax:
00218 / 21 44 40 838
E-Mail:
tripolis-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Dorothea AUER
Austrian Embassy in Cairo
Address:
El Nile Street/Corner 5, Wissa
Wassef Street, 5th Floor, Riyadth-Tower,
Giza, 11111 Kairo
Tel.:
0020 / 2 3570 29 75
Fax:
0020 / 2 3570 29 79
E-Mail:
kairo-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.austriaegypt.org
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Dr.Thomas NADER
Office area: Egypt, Sudan, Eritrea
MOROCCO
Austrian Embassy in Rabat
Address:
2 Zankat Tiddas, Rabat
BP 135, Rabat
Tel.:
00212 / 537 76 40 03
Fax:
00212 / 537 76 54 25
E-Mail:
rabat-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/rabat
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Georg MAUTNER-MARKHOF
Office area: Morocco, Mauritania
JORDAN
OMAN
Austrian Embassy in Amman
Address:
Mithqal Al-Fayez Street 36, Jabal Amman
P.O.B. 830795, Amman 11183
Tel.:
00962 / 6 460 11 01
Fax:
00962 / 6 461 27 25
E-Mail:
amman-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Franz HÖRLBERGER
Austrian Embassy in Muscat
Address:
Shatti al Qurum, Al-Kharijia Street,
Way no. 3013,
Villa no. 898, Maskat
P.O.Box 2070, Postal Code 112
RUWI, Muscat
Tel.:
00968 / 2469 4127
Fax:
00968 / 2469 9265
E-Mail:
muskat-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Andreas KARABACZEK
Office area: Yemen, Oman
KUWAIT
Austrian Embassy in Kuwait City
Address:
Daiyah, Area Nr. 3, Shawki Street,
house Nr. 10, Kuwait
P.O.B. 15013 Daiyah, 35451 Kuwait
Tel.:
00965 / 225 52 532
Fax:
00965 / 225 63 052
E-Mail:
kuwait-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Marian WRBA
Office area: Bahrain, Qatar, Kuwait
LEBANON
Austrian Embassy in Beirut
Address:
Avenue Charles Malek, Tabaris – Achrafieh
Tabaris 812 Bldg., 8th floor,
Beirut 2071-1606
P. O. Box 11-3924
Tel.:
00961 / 1 21 73 60
Fax:
00961 / 1 21 77 72
E-Mail:
beirut-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/beirut
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Eva Maria ZIEGLER
SAUDI ARABIA
Austrian Embassy in Riyadh
Address:
Diplomatic Quarter Riyadh
P.O.Box 94373, Riyadh 11693
Tel.:
00966 / 1 480 12 17
Fax:
00966 / 1 480 15 26
E-Mail:
riyadh-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/riyadh
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Johannes WIMMER
Addresses
EGYPT
69
SYRIA
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Austrian Embassy in Damascus
Address:
Farabi Street 1, Bld. Mohamed
Naim Al-Deker,
Mezzeh, East Villas, Damascus
P.O.Box 5634, Damascus
Tel.:
00963 / 11 613 80 1-00
00963 / 11 613 98 300 (Visa Department)
Fax:
00963 / 11 611 67 34
E-Mail:
damaskus-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/damaskus
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Maria KUNZ
Austrian Embassy in Abu Dhabi
Address:
Al Khazna Tower, Abu Dhabi
P.O.B. 35539, Abu Dhabi
Tel.:
00971 / 2 67 66 611
Fax:
00971 / 2 67 15 551
E-Mail:
abu-dhabi-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/abudhabi
www.austrianembassy.ae
Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Julius LAURITSCH
TUNISIA
Austrian Embassy in Tunis
Address:
16, Rue Ibn Hamdiss El Menzah I,
1004 Tunis
Tel.:
00216 / 71 23 90 38
Fax:
00216 / 71 75 54 27
E-Mail:
tunis-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Internet:
www.aussenministerium.at/tunis
Ambassador: H.E. Mag. Dr. Johann FRÖHLICH
AUSTRIAN TRADE COMMISSIONS
IN ARAB COUNTRIES
70
ALGERIA
EGYPT
Austrian Trade Commission in Algiers
Address:
Ambassade d’Autriche Section Commerciale
17, Chemin Abdelkader Gaddouche
16035 Hydra-Alger ALGÉRIE
ALGERIEN
Tel.:
00213 21 / 69 12 29 or 69 27 54
Fax:
00213 21 / 69 15 90
E-Mail:
algier@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/dz
Office Area:
Algeria, Tunisia
Commercial Counsellor: Mag. Ulrike STRAKA
Austrian Trade Commission Cairo
Address:
Austrian Embassy - Commercial Office
8, Ismail Mohamed Street - Zamalek
Cairo
ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT
Tel.:
00202 / 273 576 07 or 273 611 50 or
273 655 63
Fax:
00202 / 273 628 92
E-Mail:
kairo@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/eg
Office Area:
Sudan, Djibouti (et. al.)
Commercial Counsellor: Dr. Kurt ALTMANN
COMOROS
IRAQ
Austrian Trade Commission Johannesburg
Address:
1, Cradock Avenue
(Corner Tyrwhitt Avenue)
Rosebank (Johannesburg)
Tel.:
0027 11 / 442 71 00
Fax:
0027 11 / 442 83 04
E-Mail:
johannesburg@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/za
Office Area:
Comoros (et. al.)
Commercial Counsellor: Dr. Stefan PISTAUER
Austrian Trade Commission Erbil
Address:
Gulan Street at Naz City, Block E,
Groundfloor door 3
Erbil
Tel.:
00964 / 750 449 50 38 or
0043 (0) 676 936 92 86
E-Mail:
bagdad@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/iq
Commercial Counsellor: Mr. Oskar SMRZKA
LIBYA
SAUDI ARABIA
Austrian Trade Commission Tripoli
Address:
Abdulkader el Jazairi
Tripoli
Tel.:
00218 21 / 333 51 76 or 333 51 77 or
333 04 16
Fax:
00218 21 / 333 73 22
E-Mail:
tripolis@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/ly
Commercial Counsellor: Mr. David BACHMANN
Austrian Trade Commission Riyadh
Address:
Kingdom Tower 23rd Floor
Olaya District, Arouba Road
Riyadh 11693
SAUDI-ARABIA
Tel.:
00966 1 / 211 01 11 or 211 01 71 or
211 01 77
Fax:
00966 1 / 211 02 22
E-Mail:
riyadh@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/sa
Office Area:
Saudi Arabia, Yemen
Commercial Counsellor: Mag. Pierre PRUNIS
Austrian Trade Commission Casablanca
Address:
Ambassade d’Autriche –
Section Commerciale
45, Avenue Hassan II
20000 Casablanca
MAROC
Tel.:
00212 522 / 223 282 or 224 770 or
266 904
Fax:
00212 522 / 221 083
E-Mail:
casablanca@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/ma
Office Area:
Morocco, Mauritania (et. al.)
Commercial Counsellor: Mr. Manfred SCHMID
PALESTINE
Austrian Trade Commission Tel Aviv
Address:
Trade Tower, 9th Floor
25, Hamered Street
61500 Tel Aviv
ISRAEL
Tel.:
00972 / 3 516 86 85
Fax:
00972 / 3 516 85 80
E-Mail:
telaviv@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/il
Commercial Counsellor: Mr. Christian LASSNIG
SYRIA
Austrian Trade Commission Damascus
Address:
Mezzeh, Eastern Villas
Farabi Street 116a
Damascus
SYRIA
Tel.:
00963 11 / 611 77 71 or 611 46 16
Fax:
00963 11 / 613 20 78
E-Mail:
damaskus@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/sy
Office Area:
Jordan, Lebanon
Commercial Counsellor: Dr. Kurt MÜLLAUER
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Austrian Trade Commission Abu Dhabi
Address:
Al Khazna Tower, 7th Floor
Al Najda Street
Abu Dhabi
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Tel.:
00971 2 / 676 66 33
Fax:
00971 2 / 676 00 02
E-Mail:
abudhabi@wko.at
Internet:
wko.at/awo/ae
Office Area:
Bahrain, Qatar, Kuwait, Oman, Pakistan
Commercial Counsellor: Dr. Wolfgang PENZIAS
Addresses
MOROCCO
71
OAUSTRIAN TRADE COMMISSIONS
OMARKETING OFFICES
AUSTRIAN TRADE
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72
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ADDRESSES OF
JOINT ARAB-FOREIGN CHAMBERS
AUSTRIA
Austro-Arab Chamber of Commerce (AACC)
Österreichisch-Arabische Handelskammer
Postfach 181, A – Lobkowitzplatz 1,
1015 Vienna - Austria
Tel.:
00431 / 513 39 65-0
Fax:
00431 / 513 85 59
E-Mail: headoffice@aacc.at
http://www.aacc.at
STAFF:
Mag. Leila KAPLAN .......................................................................... Assistant to the Secretary General
Nahla OSSEIRAN ................................................................................ Client Service Officer, Data Base
Wahid Zaffrul SHAN ......................................................................... Legalization Officer
CONSULTANTS:
Dr. Horst MACHU
............................................................................... Chief
Consultant, former Commercial Counsellor in
Arab countries
Min.-Couns. Soliman ELGOHARY ........................................... Consultant
Addresses
EXECUTIVE BOARD:
Dkfm. Dr. Herbert STEPIC ............................................................ President
KommR. Nabil R. KUZBARI ......................................................... Vice President
Dr. Gerhard ROISS ............................................................................. Vice President
Mr. Henry HAFEZ ................................................................................. Vice President
Dipl.-Ing. Mouddar KHOUJA ...................................................... Secretary General
Dr. Alfred STROMMER ................................................................... Treasurer
H.E. Dr. Badr M. AL-HINAI............................................................. President of the Arab Ambassador Council in Austria
(in quarterly rotation)
H.H. Prince Mansour Bin Khalid AL SAUD ........................ Ambassador of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
73
ARGENTINIA
BRAZIL
Argentine-Arab Chamber of Commerce (CCAA)
Cámara de Comercio Argentino Arabe
Arab-Brazilian Chamber of Commerce (CCAB)
Câmara de Comércio Árabe-Brasileira
Montevideo 513 / Piso 6
C1019ABK Buenos Aires – Republica Argentina
Tel.:
005411/ 437 28 167
Fax:
005411/ 437 12 561
E-Mail: camarabe@ccaa.com.ar
http://www.camarabe.com
Av. Paulista, 326 17th/18th Floor
01310 – 902 Sao Paulo - SP - Brazil
Tel.:
005511 / 3283 40 66
Fax:
005511 / 3288 81 10
E-Mail: ccab@ccab.org.br
http://www.ccab.org.br
Mr. Jamal M. AWADAH .............................. President
Mr. Sattamm AL-KADDOUR ................... Secretary General
Mr. Salim Tawfic CHAHIEN ..................... President
Mr. Michel ALABI ............................................. Secretary General
AUSTRALIA
CHINA
Australia-Arab Chamber of
Commerce & Industry Inc. (AACCI)
China-Arab Joint Chamber of Commerce (CAJCC)
China Council for the Promotion
of International Trade (CCPIT)
AACCI National Office
24 Brisbane Avenue Barton ACT 2600 - Australia
P.O. Box 6005 / Kingston ACT 2604 - Australia
Tel.:
00612/ 627 08 037
Fax:
00612/ 627 33 196
E-Mail: ceo@austarab.com.au
http://www.austarab.com.au
Mr. Ray NAJAR ................................................ National Chairman
Mr. Robert NEWTON ................................................ Executive Director
(CEO)
Mr. Wan JIFEI ....... Chairman of Chinese Board of CAJCC
Mr. Adnan KASSAR .. Chairman of Arab Board of CAJCC
BELGIUM
CZECH REPUBLIC
Chambre de Commerce
Belgique-Luxembourg-Pays Arabes (CCBLA)
Arab-Belgium-Luxemburg Chamber of Commerce
Czech-Arab Chamber of Commerce
Cesko - Arabská Obchodní Komora
Rue Mignot-Delstanche Straat 60 /
Brussel 1050 Bruxelles - Belgium
Tel.:
0032 / 2 344 82 04
Fax:
0032 / 2 347 57 64
E-Mail: info@ccbla.org
http://www.ccbla.org
Mr. Johan BEERLANDT ............................. President
Mr. Qaisar HIJAZIN ....................................... Secretary General
74
1 Fu Xing Men Wai Street,
Beijing 100860 - P.R.China
Tel.:
0086 / 10 8807 ext. 5663 / 5393
Fax:
0086 / 10 8807 5408
E-Mail: zhangzhan@ccpit.org
http://www.ccpit.org
Freyova 27/82 /
190 00 Praha 9 – Czech Republic
Tel.:
00420 / 773 131 858
E-Mail: caok@czaok.cz
http://www.czaok.cz
Ing. George KARRÁA
................................. President
FRANCE
IRELAND
Chambre de Commerce Franco-Arabe (CCFA)
The Joint Arab-Irish Chamber of Commerce
250 bis, Boulevard Saint Germain,
75007 Paris - France
Tel.:
00331 / 45 53 20 12
Fax:
00331 / 47 55 09 59
E-Mail:
info@ccfranco-arabe.org
http://www.ccfranco-arabe.org
63 Lower Mount Street,
Dublin 2 - Ireland
Tel.:
00353 / 1 / 662 44 51 – 662 15 77
Fax:
00353 / 1 / 662 47 29
E-Mail:
info@jaicc.ie, jaicc@indigo.ie
http://www.jaicc.ie/
Mr. Louis J. MAGUIRE ................................ President
Mr. Ahmad R. YOUNIS .......................Secretary General
GERMANY
ITALY
Ghorfa Arab-German Chamber of Commerce
and Industry e. V. (Ghorfa)
Arabisch-Deutsche Vereinigung
Für Handel und Industrie e.V.
Arab-Italian Chamber of Commerce
Camera di Commercio Italo-Araba
Chambre de Commerce Italo-Arabe
1 Garnisonskirchplatz,
10178 Berlin - Federal Republic of Germany
Tel.:
0049 30 / 2789 07-0
Fax:
0049 30 / 2789 07-49
E-Mail:
info@ghorfa.de
http://www.ghorfa.de
Dr. Thomas BACH .............................. President
Mr. Abdulaziz AL-MIKHLAFI ..................... Secretary General
Via Monti Parioli 48 /
00197 Roma - Italy
Tel.:
003906/ 322 67 51
Fax:
003906/ 322 69 01
E-Mail:
itaraba@tin.it
http://www.cameraitaloaraba.org
Mr. Sergio MARINI ......................................... President
Mr. Fouad ABDULHADI ............................... Secretary General
GREECE
KENYA
Arab-Hellenic Chamber of Commerce
and Development
Joint Kenya-Arab Chamber
of Commerce and Industry
180-182 Kifissias Ave,
154 51 N. Psychico, Athens - Greece
Tel.:
0030 210/ 671 12 10 101; 6726882
Fax:
0030 210/ 674 65 77; 6746 578
E-Mail:
chamber@arabgreekchamber.gr
http://www.arabgreekchamber.gr/
10th Floor, KCS House, MAMA Ngina Street,
P.O. Box 50182 - 00200 Nairobi - KENYA
Tel.:
00254 / 20 / 343 551
Fax:
00254 / 20 / 310 643
E-Mail:
fakih@kenyaarabchamber.com
fakih_ghorfakenya@yahoo.com
Eng. Anttar BANDALSI ............................... President
Mr. Mohamed E. EL-KHAZMI ................. Secretary General
Mr. Omar FAKIH .......................... Deputy Secretary - General
Addresses
Mr. Herve DE CHARETTE ......................... President
Dr. Saleh Bakr AL-TAYAR .......................... Secretary General
75
MALTA
SWITZERLAND
Maltese-Arab Chamber of
Commerce, Industry and Agriculture
Arab-Swiss Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Chambre Arabo-Suisse du commerce et de l’industrie
Arabische-Schweizerische Handels und Industriekammer
Auberge A, San Anton, De Paule Avenue,
Balzan BZN 02 - Malta
Tel.:
00356 21/ 48 27 50 – 48 27 07
Fax:
00356 21/ 48 27 14
E-Mail: maccia@waldonet.net.mt
Mr. Anthony GUILLAUMIER .................... President
Mr. Mohamed Ezzeddine
BEK DERNA ........................................................ Secretary General
70 / Route de Florissant,
CH-1211 Geneve 12 - Switzerland
Tel.:
004122/ 34 73 202
Fax:
004122/ 34 73 870
E-Mail: arabswisscham@casci.ch
http://www.casci.ch
Mr. Werner OBERLI........................................ President
Mr. Bahaa EL-ATTAR .................................... Secretary General
PORTUGAL
UNITED KINGDOM
Arab-Portuguese Chamber
of Commerce and Industry
Camara De Comercio E Industria Arabe-Portuguesa
Arab-British Chamber of Commerce
AVENIDA FONTES PEREIRA DE MELO 19-8,
1050-116 LISBOA - PORTUGAL
Tel.:
00351 21/ 313 81 00
Fax:
00351 21/ 313 81 09
E-Mail: cciap@cciap.pt
http://www.cciap.pt
43 Upper Grosvenor Street,
London, W1K 2NJ - UK
Tel.:
0044 / 20 / 7235 4363
Fax:
0044 / 20 / 7245 66 88
E-Mail: info@abcc.org.uk
http://www.abcc.org.uk
Sir Roger TOMKYS ....................................... President
Dr. Afnan Al-SHUAIBY ................................ Secretary General
Mr. Angelo CORREIA ................................... President
Mr. Allaoua Karim BOUABDELLAH .... Secretary General
76
RUSSIA
UNITED STATES
Russian-Arab Business Council
National U.S.-Arab Chamber of Commerce
Office 143 / 17/8/9 bldg1,
Prechistenka St., Moscow, 119034 / Russia
Tel.:
007495/ 730-4123
Fax:
007495/ 730-4123
E-Mail: rads@russarabbc.ru
http://www.rusarabbc.ru
1023 15th Street, N.W.
Suite 400, Washington D.C. 20005 - U.S.A
Tel.:
001 202 / 289 59 20
Fax:
001 202 / 289 59 38
E-Mail: info@nusacc.org
http://www.nusacc.org
Mr. Vladimir P. YEVTUSHENKOV ........ Chairman
Mrs. Tatiana GVILAVA ................................. Director
Mr. David HAMOD ....................................... President & CEO
Mr. Donald DE MARINO ..................... Chairman
ADDRESSES OF FEDERATIONS & CHAMBERS
OF COMMERCE, INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE
IN THE ARAB COUNTRIES
ALGERIA
EGYPT
Chambre Algérienne de Commerce et d‘Industrie
(CACI)
Federation of Egyptian Chambers of Commerce
BAHRAIN
Bahrain Chamber of Commerce and Industry
P.O.Box 248 Manama – Kingdom of Bahrain
Tel.:
00973 17/ 380 000
Fax:
00973 17/ 380 123
E-Mail: bcci@bcci.bh
http://www.bahrainchamber.org.bh
COMOROS
Union des Chambres de Commerce d’Industrie et
d’Agriculture des Comoros
P.O.Box 763 Moroni – Comoros
Tel.:
00269 / 730 958
Fax:
00269 / 731 983
http://www.uccia-comoros.com/
DJIBOUTI
Chambre Internationale de Commerce et d’Industrie
(Djibouti)
B.P. 84 Djibouti – République de Djibouti
Tel.:
00253/ 351 070
Fax:
00253/ 350 096
E-Mail: ccd@intnet.dj
4 / Falaki Square, 25 Cairo – Egypt
Tel.:
0020 22/ 795 60 66 - 795 11 36 - 795 36 77
Fax:
0020 22/ 794 38 01 - 795 11 64
E-Mail: fedcoc@menanet.net, info@fedcoc.org.eg
http://www.fedcoc.org.eg
IRAQ
Federation of Iraqi Chambers of Commerce
Saadoun St., Baghdad - Iraq
Tel.:
00964 / 790 362 1817
Fax:
N/A
E-Mail: ficcbaghdad@yahoo.com
http://www.ifi-iraq.org/
JORDAN
Jordan Chamber of Commerce
P.O.Box 7029 Amman 11118 – Jordan
Tel.:
00962 6/ 566 54 92
Fax:
00962 6/ 568 59 97
E-Mail: info@jocc.org.jo
http://www.jocc.org.jo
Jordan Chamber of Industry
P.O.Box 1800 Amman 11118 – Jordan
Tel.:
00962 6/ 464 30 01 Fax:
00962 6/ 464 78 52
E-Mail: aci@aci.org.jo
http://www.aci.org.jo
Addresses
Palais Consulaire 6 / Bd. Amilcar Cabral - 16003 Alger
BP 100 Alger 1er Novembre, Place des Martyrs - Algérie
Tel.:
00213 21/ 96 77 77 or 96 66 66
Fax:
00213 21/ 96 70 70
E-Mail: infos@caci.dz
http://www.caci.dz
77
KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA
LIBYA
Council of Saudi Chambers
Federation of Jamahiriya Chambers of Commerce,
Industry & Agriculture
P.O.Box 16683 Riyadh 11474 - Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Tel.:
00966 1/ 21 82 222
Fax:
00966 1/ 21 82 111
E-Mail: council@csc.org.sa, info@csc.org.sa
http://www.csc.org.sa/
P.O.Box 12556 / Maidan Al-Jazayer, Tripoli – Libya
Tel.:
00218 21/ 33 65 -130 or -133
Fax:
00218 21/ 33 65 -126 or -127
E-Mail: contact.inf@guocci.com
http://www.guocci.com
Federation of GCC Chambers
P.O.Box 2198 / 31451 Damam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Tel.:
00966 3 83 55 006
Fax:
00966 3 83 55 007
E-Mail: fgccc@fgccc.org
http://www.fgccc.org
KUWAIT
Kuwait Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Commercial Area # 9 / Al-Shuhadaa St., Kuwait City
P.O.Box 775 / Safat 13008 – Kuwait
Tel.:
00965/ 224 23 555 or 224 23 666
Fax:
00965/ 224 04 110
E-Mail: kcci@kcci.org.kw
http://www.kcci.org.kw
LEBANON
Federation of Chambers of Commerce,
Industry & Agriculture in Lebanon
P.O.Box 11-1801 / Beirut - Lebanon
Tel.:
00961 1/ 744 702 or 353 190
Fax:
00961 1/ 349 614
E-Mail : fccial@cci-fed.org.lb
http://www.cci-fed.org.lb
General Union of Chambers of Commerce,
Industry and Agriculture for Arab Countries
P.O.Box: 11-2837 / Beirut - Lebanon
Tel.:
00961 1/ 826 021/ 22/ 24
Fax:
00961 1/ 826 020
E-Mail : admin@uac.org.lb, uac@uac.org.lb
http://www.gucciaac.org.lb
78
MAURITANIA
Chambre de Commerce, d’Industrie et d’Agriculture
de Mauritanie
Av. de l’indépendance, BP 215 / Nouakchott – Mauritanie
Tel.:
00222/ 525 22 14
Fax:
00222/ 525 38 95
E-Mail: info@chambredecommerce.mr
http://www.chambredecommerce.mr/
MOROCCO
Fédération des Chambres Marocaines de Commerce,
d`Industrie et de Services
6 Rue Erfoud, P.O.Box 218 Rabat cp10001 - Maroc
Tel.:
00212 37/ 76 70 51
Fax:
00212 37/ 76 70 96
E-Mail: fcmcis@menara.ma
http://www.fcmcis.ma/
OMAN
Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry
P.O.Box 1400 , Postal Code 112 / Ruwi Muscat – Sultanate Of Oman
Tel.:
00968 24/ 70 76 74
Fax:
00968 24/ 70 84 97
E-Mail: occi@chamberoman.com
http://www.chamberoman.com
PALESTINE
TUNISIA
Federation of Palestinian Chambers of Commerce,
Industry & Agriculture
Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce
et de l’Artisanat
Jerusalem, Al-Rashid St., P.O.Box: 54107
Tel.:
00970 2/ 23 44 923
Fax:
00970 2/ 23 44 924
E-Mail: fpccia@palnet.com
http://www.pal-chambers.org Cité administrative, lot N°7 / Cité El-Khadhra,
1003 Tunis - TUNISIE
Tel.:
00216 71/ 142 300
Fax:
00216 71/ 142 100
E-Mail: contact@utica.org.tn
http://www.utica.org.tn
QATAR
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (U.A.E.)
Qatar Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Federation of UAE Chambers of Commerce & Industry
P.O.Box 402 / Doha – Qatar
Tel.:
00974/ 44 55 91 11
Fax:
00974/ 44 66 16 93 / 44 66 16 97
E-Mail: info@qcci.org, qcci@qatar.net.qa
http://www.qcci.org
ABU-DHABI Office: P.O.Box 3014 Abu-Dhabi – U.A.E.
Tel.:
00971 2/ 621 41 44 Fax:
00971 2/ 633 92 10
E-Mail: fcciauh@emirates.net.ae
http://www.fcci.gov.ae
SOMALIA
DUBAI Office: PO Box 8886 Dubai - UAE
Tel.:
00971 4/ 22 12 977
Fax:
00971 4/ 22 35 498
E-Mail: fccidxb@emirates.net.ae
Somali Chamber of Commerce and Industry
SUDAN
Sudanese Businessmen and Employers Federation
P.O.Box 1758 Khartoum – Sudan
Tel.:
00249 1/ 83 431 -276 or -277 or -278
Fax:
00249 1/ 83 431 -281 or -283
E-Mail: info@sudabiz.org
http://www.sudabiz.org
SYRIA
Federation of the Syrian Chambers of Commerce
Moussa Bin Nussair St.
P.O.Box 5909 Damascus – Syria
Tel.:
00963 11/ 333 73 44 or 33 11 504
Fax:
00963 11/ 333 11 27
E-Mail: syr-trade@mail.sy
http://www.fedcommsyr.org YEMEN
Federation of Yemeni Chambers of Commerce and
Industry
P.O.Box: 16992 / Sana’a - Republic of Yemen
Tel.:
00967 1/ 261 295 - 265 038
Fax:
00967 1/ 261 269
E-Mail: info@fycci-ye.com
Addresses
Somali Chamber Building, near Banadir Hotel, Shibis
District, Mogadishu - Somalia
Tel.:
00252 1/ 64 30 81 or 00252 5 / 942 333
Fax.:
00252 1/ 22 15 60
E-Mail: info@somalicci.com
http://somalicci.com/
79
MEMBER DIRECTORY
Chemical Products
Abiothrin Handelsg. mbH
AKTIVSAUERSTOFF GmbH
ALPHA – Aleppo Pharmaceutical Industries
Al Matin Group for trade and industry
Borealis AG
Chemson Polymere-Additive AG
EBEWE Pharma Ges.m.b.H. Nfg.KG
EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH
Gabriel Chemie GmbH
G.L. Pharma
GREINER BIO-ONE GmbH
Mag. Hoeveler & Co GmbH
IASON GmbH
Katharina Hallal GmbH
Merck KGaA & Co. Werk Spittal
Mikro-Mineral GmbH
Onkotec GmbH
Sandoz GmbH
Trenka Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Fabrik GmbH
Wyeth Whitehall Export GmbH
Culture and Art
Fritz: Traude Fritz
Herger: Atelier Mag. Art. Herger Helga
Spitzer: Ing. Pablo Spitzer
Drinks and Tobacco
POWER HORSE Energy Drinks GmbH
Rauch Fruchtsäfte GmbH & Co OG
Red Bull GmbH
Ybbstaler Fruit Austria GmbH
Engines, Vehicles
Elin Wasserwerkstechnik Gesellschaft m.b.H.
DCC – Doppelmayr Cable Car GmbH & Co KG
Fritz Baumaschinen GmbH & Co KG
GE. Energy Jenbacher GmbH & Co OHG
Hörbiger Kompressortechnik GmbH
Innovation und Technik GmbH
ISAB Industrieanlagenbau GmbH
Khwanda Group
Leitz GesmbH & Co KG
LIEBHERR-Werk Nenzing GmbH
Omicron Electronics GmbH
Plasser & Theurer Export von Bahnbaumaschinen GmbH
Spitzwieser Sport & Sondermotoren e.U.
Trade Line Machinery
Tiger1 Co.
Ti-Tella Handelsgesellschaft mbH
TUMA PUMPENSYSTEME GMBH
UNTHA shredding technology
Fuel and Energy
AGT Management & Engineering AG
Geosat Technology Limited
OMV Aktiengesellschaft
80
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
18
18
19
19
19
19
Manufactured Goods
Böhler International GmbH
EOOS GmbH
F. J. Elsner Trading & Co
IMET Handelsgesellschaft
Khalil Sara Establishment
Mondi Business Paper Sales GmbH
OVOTHERM International HandelsGmbH
Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH & Co KG
Ramses Zwei GmbH
RHI AG
ROXCEL HandelsgesmbH
Stora Enso Timber AG
VIMPEX HandelsgesmbH.
VA Intertrading AG
20
20
20
20
20
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
22
23
23
24
ALVETRA u. WERFFT AG
BEV-Group
Biolachs
Gebrüder Woerle GesmbH.
Ghraoui Group
Gresam HandelsgesmbH
Die Marmeladen-Manufaktur
Schreiber & Rupp GesmbH
Other Manufactured Goods
ADCON Telemetry GmbH
Alu König Stahl
Aqua Engineering GesmbH
Backhausen interior design GmbH
Beta Handelsgesellschaft m.b.H.
Christian Maschek Schmuck
Dotzauer Kristallleuchten ProduktionsGmbH
D. Swarovski & Co.
Frey Wille GmbH & Co KG
GLS Tanks GmbH
Hasenkopf
Herz Austria GmbH
J.T. Kalmar GmbH
MOBIL BAUSTOFFE GmbH
Modern Life Handels GmbH
Neue Wiener Porzellanmanufaktur AUGARTEN GmbH
Österr. Doka Schalungs- Gerüstbautechnik GmbH.
PORR – ALLGEMEINE BAUGESELLSCHAFT – A. PORR AG
RINGER KG
Schöler & Co GmbH
Science & Research Marketing GmbH
Sitte Vienna
Strabag SE
M. Swarovski GmbH
Raw Materials
DCM DECOmetal GmbH
Mayr-Melnhof Timber Trading GmbH
SAG Aluminium Lend GmbH&Co.KG
Tyche Rohstoffhandel & Beteiligung GmbH
24
24
24
24
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
26
26
27
27
27
27
28
28
28
28
29
29
29
29
30
30
30
30
31
31
31
31
32
32
32
32
32
Index
Nutrition
81
33
Services
Accès Alpintechnik Salzburg
Architekt Achtsnit & Achtsnit
a-consult GmbH
Al Mashreq Investment Fund
Alshaya Retail GmbH
Arabital Shipping
ARACON Consulting GmbH
Asiah Group Ltd
asp.consulting GmbH
Austroplan Austrian Engineering GmbH
AVT-ARGE Regionale Verkehrsplanung und Transportwirtschaft,
Technisches Büro für Raumplanung
Bags Holding GesmbH
Bureau Veritas Austria GmbH
CIN Consult Unternehmensberatung GmbH
C & I Leasing GmbH
C&T Sportpferde Freudenthal
Club of Trade Delegates (Club der Handelsräte)
Das House – Immobilienentwicklungs und -verwertungs GmbH
Dr. D’Aron
DIET – Développement Industriel Enfidha Tunisie: ENFIDHA INDUSTRIAL PARK
Egypt Air
Ehrlich: Mag. Daniela Ehrlich, Rechtsanwältin
Europe Arab Bank plc
Emirates Airlines
Expat Consulting
FREYGNER Rechtsanwalt GmbH
Gentics Software GmbH
Geospace GmbH
Gesellschaft Österreichisch-Arabische Ärzte und Apotheker
Goldenes Kreuz Privatklinik BetriebsGesmbH
GourmetConsult
Grand Hotel Wien
Heller Consult Tax & Business Solutions GmbH
Huber: Dr. Max Huber GmbH
Hulla & Co. Human Dynamics KG
ICC: Austria International Chamber of Commerce
IIFC Industrial & Investment Financing Consulting GmbH
IPSA – International Protect & Security Agency e.U.
Islamisches Informations – und Dokumentationszentrum Österreich (IIDZ – Austria)
ILF – Beratende Ingenieure ZT Ges.m.b.H
Imperial Hotels Austria AG
Lambert Eversheds/Lambert Rechtsanwälte OG
Limousinenservice Schafek GmbH
Nahas Enterprises Group
OBERBANK-AG
ÖGV – Österreichischer Gewerbeverein
Österreichische Staatsdruckerei GmbH
OVE: Austrian Electrotechnical Association
Plan.NET Middle East
Premium Health Solutions GmbH
Profi Personalvermittlung GmbH, activities???
Raiffeisen Zentralbank Austria AG
Rechtsanwälte: Dr. Franz Marschall & Mag. Rene Heinz
RISE – Research Industrial Systems Engineering GmbH
Sacher Hotels BetriebsgesmbH.
SANA Investment Co.
82
33
33
33
33
34
34
34
34
35
35
35
35
36
36
36
36
37
37
37
37
38
38
38
38
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
41
41
41
41
42
42
42
42
43
43
43
43
44
44
44
44
45
45
45
45
46
46
46
46
SBG – AlMarasem – BTC
Schneider: Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider GmbH
SPC (K.Prexl Sales-Projects-Consulting)
SQZ Software Engineering & Qualitätsmanagement Zopf
SWZT Chartered Consultants GmbH
TAG – T. Akhras Group
Talpa GmbH
TECS Telecommunication & E-Commerce Solutions GmbH
TomDive
Vamed Engineering GmbH & Co KG
Webster University
Vienna Business Agency
X-Plus-Management GmbH
Municipalities
Community of Piringsdorf
47
47
47
47
48
48
48
48
49
49
49
49
50
51
51
INTERNATIONAL CONTACTS
Algeria
Egypt
Iraq
Jordan
Kuwait
League of Arab States
Lebanon
Libya
Morocco
Oman
Palestine
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Sudan
Syria
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
Yemen
List of Austrian Embassies in Arab Countries
Algeria
Egypt
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libya
Morocco
Oman
Saudi Arabia
Syria
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
69
69
69
69
69
69
69
69
69
69
70
70
70
Index
List of Arab Embassies in Austria
83
84
Austrian Trade Commissions in Arab Countries
Algeria
Comoros
Egypt
Iraq
Libya
Morocco
Palestine
Saudi Arabia
Syria
United Arab Emirates (UAE)
70
Addresses of Joint Arab-Foreign Chambers
Austria
Austro-Arab Chamber of Commerce (AACC)
Argentina
Argentine-Arab Chamber of Commerce (CCAA)
Australia
Australia-Arab Chamber of Commerce & Industry Inc. (AACCI)
Belgium
Chambre de Commerce Belgique-Luxembourg-Pays Arabes (CCBLA)
Brazil
Arab-Brazilian Chamber of Commerce (CCAB)
China
China-Arab Joint Chamber of Commerce (CAJCC)
Czech Republic
Czech-Arab Chamber of Commerce (CZAOK)
France
Chambre de Commerce Franco-Arabe (CCFA)
Germany
Ghorfa Arab-German Chamber of Commerce and Industry e. V. (Ghorfa)
Greece
Arab-Hellenic Chamber of Commerce and Development
Ireland
The Joint Arab-Irish Chamber of Commerce
Italy
Arab-Italian Chamber of Commerce
Kenya
Joint Kenya-Arab Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Malta
Maltese-Arab Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture
Portugal
Arab-Portuguese Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Russia
Russian-Arab Business Council
Switzerland
Arab-Swiss Chamber of Commerce and Industry
United Kingdom
Arab-British Chamber of Commerce
United States
National U.S.-Arab Chamber of Commerce
73
70
70
70
70
71
71
71
71
71
71
73
74
74
74
74
74
74
75
75
75
75
75
75
76
76
76
76
76
76
77
77
77
77
77
77
77
77
77
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
Index
Addresses of Federations & Chambers of Commerce,
Industry and Agriculture in the Arab Countries
Algeria
Chambre Algérienne de Commerce et d’Industrie (CACI)
Bahrain
Bahrain Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Comoros
Union des Chambres de Commerce d’Industrie et d’Agriculture des Comoros
Djibouti
Chambre Internationale de Commerce et d’Industrie (Djibouti)
Egypt
Federation of Egyptian Chambers of Commerce
Iraq
Federation of Iraqi Chambers of Commerce
Jordan
Jordan Chamber of Commerce
Jordan Chamber of Industry
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Council of Saudi Chambers
Federation of GCC Chambers
Kuwait
Kuwait Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Lebanon
Federation of Chambers of Commerce, Industry & Agriculture in Lebanon
General Union of Chambers of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture
for Arab Countries
Libya
Federation of Jamahiriya Chambers of Commerce, Industry & Agriculture
Mauritania
Chambre de Commerce, d’Industrie et d’Agriculture de Mauritanie
Morocco
Fédération des Chambres Marocaines de Commerce, d`Industrie et de Services
Oman
Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Palestine
Federation of Palestinian Chambers of Commerce, Industry & Agriculture
Qatar
Qatar Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Somalia
Somali Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Sudan
Sudanese Businessmen and Employers Federation
Syria
Federation of the Syrian Chambers of Commerce
Tunisia
Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisanat
United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.)
Federation of UAE Chambers of Commerce & Industry
Yemen
Federation of Yemeni Chambers of Commerce and Industry
85
COUNTRY PROFILES
94
Algeria
Fact File
Hydrocarbons Sector
Population & Labour Market
Economic Reforms & Liberalisation
Foreign Trade
Investment
Long-term Growth Forecast
Telecoms
Tourism
Agriculture
98
Bahrain
Fact File
Reforms
Industries
Imports
Exports
Banking
ICT
Tourism
Construction
Outlook
98
98
98
99
99
99
100
100
100
100
102
Comoros
Fact File
Geography
Demography
Economic Outlook
Trade
Reforms
Tourism
Media
Banks
102
102
103
103
103
104
104
104
105
106
Djibouti
Fact File
Economy
Investment
Agriculture & Fishing
Reforms
Energy & Water Sector
Banking & Finance
106
106
107
107
107
108
109
110
Egypt
Fact File
Population
Economy
Reforms
Oil & Gas
Banking Sector
Insurance Sector
Tourism
Construction & Real Estate
Investment
IT & Telecoms
86
94
94
94
95
95
96
97
97
97
97
110
110
110
111
111
112
112
112
113
113
114
Iraq
Fact File
Economy
Reforms
Construction & Infrastructure
Energy
Industry
Banking Sector
Insurance Sector
Agriculture, Food & Fisheries
Outlook
114
114
115
115
116
116
116
117
117
117
118
Jordan
Fact File
Reforms
Investment
ICT & Health Sector
Transport
Trade Relations
118
118
118
120
120
121
122
Kuwait
Fact File
Economy
Oil & Petroleum
Banking Sector
Insurance Sector
Health Sector
Power & Water
Agricultural Sector
Trade
Foreign Direct Investment
122
122
122
122
123
124
124
124
124
125
126
Lebanon
Fact File
Financial Sector
Insurance Sector
Tourism
Energy Sector
Communications & IT
Investment
126
126
126
128
128
128
129
Fact File
Economy
Investment
Imports
Exports
Energy Sector
Telecommunications
Tourism
Retail Sector
Privatisation
130
130
130
131
132
132
133
133
133
133
Index
130
Libya
87
134
Mauritania
Fact File
Fishing
Agriculture
Telecommunications & New Technologies
Mining
Manufacturing
Tourism
Banking & Finance
Exports
Other Sector
140
Morocco
Fact File
Highlights
Banking
Tourism
Infrastructure
Agriculture
Energy Sector
140
140
140
141
142
143
143
144
Oman
Fact File
Economic Outlook
Power & Water
Oil & Gas
Transport & Communications
Tourism & Real Estate
Industrial Sector
144
145
145
145
145
146
146
148
Palestine
Fact File
Economy
Agriculture
Construction
Telecoms
Outlook
148
148
149
150
150
151
152
Qatar
Fact File
Real Estate & Construction
Transport
Tourism
Attracting Talent
Research & Development
Telecoms
Free Zones
Environment
152
152
153
153
153
154
154
155
155
156
Saudi Arabia
Fact File
Oil & Gas
Banking Sector
Trade
Non-Oil Spending
Construction & Real Estate
Petrochemicals
Power & Water
Telecoms
Transport
Tourism
88
134
134
134
135
135
136
136
137
138
138
156
156
157
157
157
158
158
158
159
159
159
160
Somalia
Fact File
Economy
Agriculture
Telecoms
Mineral Resources
Reconstruction
160
160
161
162
162
163
164
Sudan
Fact File
Economy
Oil & Gas Sector
Agriculture
Boosting Exports
Financial Sector
Telecoms
164
164
164
165
166
166
166
168
Syria
Fact File
Overview
Oil & Gas
Agriculture
Pharmaceuticals
Tourism
Telecoms
Banking & Financial Sector
168
168
168
168
169
169
169
171
172
Fact File
Trade with Europe
Human Resources
Tourism
Construction & Real Estate
Financial Sector
Fisheries
172
172
173
173
174
174
175
United Arab Emirates
Fact File
Oil & Gas
Construction
ICT
Free Zones
Tourism
Agriculture
176
Yemen
180
Fact File
Oil & Gas
Electrical Power
Tourism
Infrastructure
Fisheries
Agriculture
Education
176
176
176
177
178
178
179
180
181
181
181
182
182
182
183
Index
Tunisia
89
ALGERIA BAHRAIN COMOROS DJIBOUTI EGYPT IRAQ
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CONTENTS
Algeria (DZ)
94
Morocco (MA)
140
Bahrain (BH)
98
Oman (OM)
144
Comoros (KM)
102
Palestine (PS)
148
Djibouti (DJ)
106
Qatar (QA)
152
Egypt (EG)
110
Saudi Arabia (SA)
156
Iraq (IQ)
114
Somalia (SO)
160
Jordan (JO)
118
Sudan (SU)
164
Kuwait (KW)
122
Syria (SY)
168
Lebanon (LB)
126
Tunisia (TN)
172
Libya (LY)
130
UAE (AE)
176
Mauritania (MR)
134
Yemen (YE)
180
DZ
ALGERIA
COUNTRY NAME:
People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria
LAND AREA:
2,4 million km2
POPULATION:
35 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), French (commercial)
CURRENCY:
1 Algerian Dinar (DZD) = 100 Santeem
1 EUR = 100 DZD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Algiers (Capital), Oran, Constantine,
Annaba, Setif
NATIONAL DAY:
1 November – Revolution Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 1
Algeria is a gateway between Africa and Europe;
the Sahara desert which covers more than fourfifths of its land. Algeria is a large country with
substantial mineral resources, but limited fertile
land. Its population is around 34 million, making it
the second-most populous country in North Africa
after Egypt. It is classified as a lower-middleincome country, with a GDP per head of just over
$8,000 (measured using purchasing power parity—PPP—exchange rates) in 2008, slightly above
the average for North Africa.
ALGIERS
ALGIERS
capital spending has increased significantly over the past
few years, and the government plans to maintain this
momentum though implementing a US$150bn development programme for 2009-13. Vested interests continue
to obstruct economic diversification in many areas of
the economy, such as import concessions, publicsector firms and the state-owned oil and gas company
“Sonatrach”.
Hydrocarbons Sector
The hydrocarbons sector is the backbone of the
economy, accounting for roughly 60% of budget reve-
Algeria has emerged from a decade of debilitating civil
nues, 30% of GDP, and over 95% of export earnings.
war in the early 2000s. During the conflict, when the
Algeria also has the eighth-largest reserves of natural
country was mostly isolated from the rest of the world,
gas in the world and is the fourth-largest gas exporter;
the economy was supported by the hydrocarbons sector,
it ranks 15th in oil reserves. Algeria’s deposits of gold,
which, insulated from the violence, managed to attract
uranium, zinc, iron and other minerals are also substan-
considerable foreign investment.
tial. However, the dominant position of the hydrocarbons
The high oil prices in recent years have helped improve
sector makes the Algerian economy highly sensitive to
Algeria’s financial and macroeconomic indicators. Algeria
fluctuations in international oil prices and in output.
has decreased its external debt to less than 5% of GDP
after repaying its Paris Club and London Club debt in
Population & Labour Market
2006. Algeria’s real GDP also has risen due to higher oil
94
output and increased government spending.
Over the past two decades, Algeria, like most of the coun-
Foreign trade and most non-energy prices have been
tries in the Middle East and North Africa, has experienced
liberalized and private sector activity has been on an
a rapid increase in population that has left the country with
upward trend. However, exports have barely diversified
a very young demographic profile. This means that for the
away from the volatile hydrocarbon sector. The govern-
next 15 years or so, the working-age population will grow at
ment will continue to rely primarily on public invest-
a higher rate than the overall population.
ment to achieve its aims of creating jobs, improving the
The EIU forecasts that average working-age population
provision of housing and utilities and developing non-
growth rate will be 2.2% in 2009-13. However, the propor-
hydrocarbons industry and the service sector. Actual
tion of Algerians in the 0-14 age bracket is starting to fall,
Algeria
which will result in a slowdown in the rate of growth of the
professional service firms. Algeria’s more stable macro-
working age population compared with the previous five
economic framework and financial balances have helped
years.
to implement the reforms. The government is moving
With regards to unemployment, official figures indicate that
steadily to open up the financial sector to foreign inves-
unemployment has fallen significantly since the start of the
tors. The banking sector is set to be reformed gradually,
current decade, suggesting that the surge in government
but the process is likely to be haphazard.
investment, which was initiated in 2002 and which is set to
With regards to tax, the International Monetary Fund (IMF)
accelerate over the forecast period, may have had a posi-
is offering helpful advice on economic policy and recent
tive impact. The unemployment rate at end-December 2008
progress made towards strengthening tax administration
was officially estimated at 11.3%, compared with 11.8% 12
and simplifying the tax system has been welcomed by the
months earlier and almost 30% at the start of the decade.
Fund. Over the last decade, Algeria has initiated important reforms towards reducing exemptions, improving
Economic Reforms & Liberalisation
VAT design, and eliminating the turnover tax.
The IMF has stressed the need for sustained further
During the last three decades, Algeria began with a
implementation of financial sector reforms to improving
strategic plan to diversify its economy and sources of
the business climate and enhancing private-sector led
income. However, for most of the 1990s the country
growth. The IMF recommended the strengthening the
suffered from severe political and economic difficulties,
role of private banks, and improvements of the country
and the liberalization process and economic reforms was
bank governance and risk management. Algeria banking
resumed after President Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s re-election
system is now progressively transitioning to get to par
for a third term in April 2009. Algeria is now is undertaken
with that of the rest of the world although commer-
various reforms to shift the economy from a planned to a
cial banking and insurance sectors in Algeria remain
market economy.
underdeveloped.
Algeria has courageously over the past decade attempted
to modernize its financial system despite challenges
Foreign Trade
posed by the large hydrocarbon sector. Privatization of
state-owned industries provides significant transaction
Algeria is running substantial trade surpluses and building
and advisory opportunities for investment banks and
up record foreign exchange reserves. Sharp rises in crude
95
DZ
oil prices few years ago have pushed up total export
the government’s recent changes in policy that limit the
earnings dramatically in recent years. In 2008 export
share that foreign investors can hold in joint ventures.
revenue rose by one-third year on year to $78.2bn.
Greenfield investments, which can be wholly owned, will
However, the trade surplus increased by only 14% to
remain an attractive opportunity. Moreover, provided
$39.1bn, as buoyant domestic demand boosted imports.
investors are prepared to be patient, they will often be
The bulk of Algeria’s foreign trade is oil exports to the
able to negotiate with the government on a case-by-
US and gas exports to the European Union, while most
case basis and possibly obtain more than 50% in joint
imports originate in the EU, a pattern that will be remain
ventures, especially outside the oil and gas sector.
during the following years. Algeria has a free trade agree-
Structural reform within the economy, such as devel-
ment with the EU and is seeking to expand its trading
opment of the banking sector and the construction of
relations with the UK and other EU member states
infrastructure, moves gradually ahead, attracting foreign
beyond its traditional trading partner, France.
and domestic investment outside the energy sector.
Moreover, the tax regime is gradually being reformed in a
Investment
bid to increase flexibility and transparency and to simplify
the system. Foreign investors benefit from tax incentives,
96
Investment prospects shows that the largest share
including five-year tax relief for companies investing in
of opportunities will continue to be concentrated in
new projects, but since the beginning of 2009 will have to
the hydrocarbons sector—both upstream and down-
reinvest these benefits and pay a 15% tax on repatriated
stream—which is better managed than other areas of the
profits. Algeria’s score in the EIU’s business environment
economy and more receptive to foreign involvement. The
rankings improves in the forecast period (2009-13), taking
final amendments to the hydrocarbons law have recently
its global ranking to 70th position from 76th.
been passed, which at least broadly clarifies the terms
EU direct investors into the manufacturing industries
that foreign investment in this sector will face over the
enjoy the benefits of a large pool of cheap labour, as
following few years. Other openings for investors in utili-
well as preferential access to the EU investors in compli-
ties, including power and water management, housing,
ance with Algeria’s Association Agreement with the
construction and telecommunications is also expected
EU. A range of tax breaks are also on offer. Algeria also
to continue to expand, leading to more broad-based
expected the broader market access will increase further
growth opportunities in the few years to come, despite
if the country joins the World Trade Organisation.
Algeria
Long-term Growth Forecast
The government considers that it has sufficient funds
saved from its large budget surpluses over the past five
years to render this expansionary medium-term fiscal
policy sustainable, provided that oil and gas prices do
not weaken significantly from 2009 levels. The Economic
Intelligence Unit (EIU) predicts that Algeria’s current
account will remain in surplus throughout the forecast
period, (2009-2013) owing to healthy hydrocarbons
receipts. The surplus will narrow, though, from a peak
of 22% of GDP in 2008 to around 7.5% of GDP in 200913. EIU forecasts that expansion in the hydrocarbons
sector and in government spending will push up real
GDP growth to around 6.3% in 2013, following sluggish
growth in 2008-10.
Algeria’s real GDP growth is forecast to accelerate from
a moderate annual rate of 3.3% in 2009-10 to an average
of 5.7% in 2011-20, before picking up slightly to 6.1%
in 2021-30. This will help push GDP per head towards
$35,670 (measured using PPP rates) by 2030. Crucially,
this forecast assumes that Algeria will largely escape the
worst aspects of the “natural resource curse” that tends
to affect primary commodity exporters.
Telecoms
Privatisation of Algeria’s telecommunications sector
began in 2000 since which three mobile cellular licenses
were issued and, in 2005, a consortium led by Egypt’s
weaknesses in the sector such as quality of service, poor
Orascom Telecom won a 15-year license to build and
infrastructure and administrative obstacles. As part of the
operate a fixed-line network; the license allows Orascom
plan, personnel in the hotel trade and tourism sector will
to develop high-speed data and other specialized
receive better training through public-private partnership
services and contribute to meeting the large unfulfilled
to upgrade their skills to meet international standards.
demand for basic residential telephony. Meanwhile,
Agriculture
mately 200,000 subscribers by 2006.
Large stretches of Algeria are richly fertile making for
Tourism
a thriving agricultural sector employing some 9.4% of
the working population. Main crops include olives and
Algeria’s tourism industry has great potential and has set
tobacco. More than 30,000 km² of land is devoted to the
itself the aim of boosting tourists to 2.5mn a year. The
cultivation of cereal grains. The Tell is the main grain-
country possesses remarkable world class archaeological
growing land where the principal cereal crops raised are
sites from the Roman and Phoenician eras (including
wheat, barley and oats. Many varieties of vegetables and
seven UNESCO World Heritage sites) and a long stretch
fruits are grown for export. Algerian figs, dates, olives
of Mediterranean coastline. However, facilities for tourists
and olive oil, esparto grass and cork are also exported.
are limited. For example, there are few international stan-
The deglet nour variety of dates is a major export product
dard hotels. Algeria is now keen to upgrade its tourism
for Algeria largely destined for the European market
product in order to take a greater share of the global
where it is popular among consumers. The country is
tourism market. Algeria aims to see an increase in hotel
the world’s second largest producer of these dates after
capacity and welcomes ideas to boost visitor numbers. A
Tunisia. The date has been described by the agriculture
tourism development master plan for the year 2025 has
ministry as a “flagship product for Algerian agricultural
been drawn up which identified areas where there are
exports”.
Algeria
internet broadband services began in 2003 with approxi-
97
BH
BAHRAIN
COUNTRY NAME:
The Kingdom of Bahrain
LAND AREA:
660 km2
POPULATION:
738,000 (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), English (commercial)
CURRENCY:
1 Bahraini Dinar (BHD) = 1000 Fils
1 EUR = 0.51 BHD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Manama (capital), Muharraq, Isa Town,
Ar-Rifa
NATIONAL DAY:
16 December
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
Bahrain’s strategic geographical position has
made it a natural trading hub throughout its long
history. Historically, Bahrain had long played a key
role in the Gulf and now is becoming one of the
region’s most dynamic and accessible economies. For much of the 18th and early 19th century
the country was also important as a pearl-fishing
centre.
MANAMA
insurance scheme, a figure that employers match.
There is also a 10% municipal tax on rents and a 3%
levy on all hotel bills.
Reforms
Efforts towards economic reform are driven by the need
to diversify the economy away from oil (as output is
declining), stimulate private-sector growth and foreign
investment, and address high unemployment among
The discovery of oil in Bahrain in the 1930s has
nationals. The state’s ability to upgrade its infrastructure
enabled the creation of an attractive and modern infra-
and invest in education will be constrained by the depen-
structure, an elegant skyline, luxury hotels, a bustling
dence of the public finances on oil revenue.
international airport, excellent roads and telecommu-
With the private sector continuing to depend on expa-
nications and a thriving port. But the island’s reserves
triate labour, unemployment among Bahraini nationals will
of oil proved to be small by comparison with its Gulf
remain a key social and political concern for the authori-
neighbours, although it remains the main motor of
ties. The public sector is relatively small for a GCC state,
growth. This has forced Bahrain down the path of
accounting for only one in 11 jobs, and so can absorb
economic diversification. With its highly developed
only a limited number of entrants to the labour market. In
communication, financial services and transport facili-
an effort to boost employment in the private sector, the
ties, Bahrain is home to numerous multinationals with
government will continue to implement “Bahrainisation”
business in the Gulf.
policies, setting quotas on the number of expatriates who
The relatively liberal social climate has stimulated
can work in any given sector.
tourism, attracting, particularly, residents from nearby
Saudi Arabia. These activities have been comple-
Industries
mented by the development of a significant industrial
98
base, for which Aluminium Bahrain (Alba) is a corner-
Because of the small scale of its hydrocarbons reserves,
stone. Bahrain is highly dependent on regional demand
Bahrain was ahead of its GCC counterparts in seeking
for its services and goods exports.
to diversify the local economic base away from energy
Bahrain has an extremely low-tax environment. There
dependence. Factors such as labour costs, energy costs,
is no corporation tax, and there has traditionally been
taxes and transport infrastructure, played significant roles
no income tax, although from June 2007 employees
in making Bahrain increasingly attractive to manufacturing
pay 1% of their salaries into a national unemployment
businesses. In the 1970s and early 1980s it invested
Bahrain
heavily in industrial infrastructure. Bahrain is home to Alba,
– a key national asset in the current international climate.
one of the world’s largest aluminium smelters, producing
The Central Bank of Bahrain is considered to be one of
the highest grade material. This creates significant oppor-
the region’s most progressive regulators, and has helped
tunities in downstream aluminium manufacturing, such as
develop the country’s reputation as an international
in the automotive, aviation and other precision engineering
finance centre. The CBB capitalized on its position as one
sectors.
of the first Gulf States to begin diversifying away from oil
Bahrain has also developed production of petrochemicals
and into financial services.
and iron and steel, as well as aluminium-based industries
Bahrain’s regulatory environment, low start-up costs
and ship repair at the Arab Shipbuilding and Repair Yard
and lack of any limitations on foreign ownership have
(ASRY).
made it a destination for banks looking to establish
A study from Porsche Consulting identified clear cost and
themselves in the region. Bahrain is now a leading inter-
operating advantages in Bahrain for a number of segments
national finance centres, home to more than 400 licensed
in the automotive sector, including high-performance car
financial services institutions, representing a rich mix of
assembly and precision-engineered automotive compo-
recognisable international, regional and local names. In
nents. The presence in Bahrain of the international Formula
addition to traditional banking, Bahrain also became the
1 circuit has also led to the creation of world-leading
leading centre for Islamic finance. The first Islamic bank
centre for engineering and design excellence.
in Bahrain was established in 1979, when Bahrain Islamic
Bank was licensed.
Imports
Bahrain remains the most import-dependent of all the Gulf
Co-operation Council (GCC) states, although this is in
part because it imports substantial quantities of crude oil,
which it refines and exports at a profit. However, Bahrain is
actively pursuing the diversification and privatization of its
economy to reduce the country’s dependence on oil.
Exports
Petroleum production and refining account for over 60%
of Bahrain’s export receipts, over 70% of government
revenues, and 11% of GDP (exclusive of allied industries), underpinning Bahrain’s strong economic growth in
recent years. Aluminium is the second major export after
oil. Other major segments are the financial and construction sectors. Bahrain is focused on Islamic banking and
is competing on an international scale with Malaysia as a
worldwide banking centre.
Banking
The island has emerged as the region’s principal offshore
banking hub and also as an important centre for insurance and Islamic banking. Services constitute the bulk of
GDP, reflecting Bahrain’s success in exploiting its location to become an important services and distribution
centre for the Gulf.
Bahrain’s financial sector is the largest single contributor
to GDP, accounting for 27.5% of total Bahrain GDP. In
fact, finance is now the most important sector of the
economy. Financial services are regulated by the Central
Bank (formerly the Bahrain Monetary Agency), which has
built a good reputation as an effective banking regulator
99
BH
ICT
Crescent dining, shopping and entertainment resort.
There will also be an 18-hole golf course designed by
Bahrain is an obvious choice for ICT businesses wishing
Ernie Els, and one of the region’s largest marinas, with
to locate in the Gulf because of low office lease rates,
400 berths across three islands. Attracted by these
excellent broadband and telecoms connections and
prestige projects more major hotel groups are setting
lower labour costs than our neighbours. Significant
up such as Four Seasons, Kempinski and Renaissance,
investment has been undertaken to provide a highly-
joining those already established like Ritz-Carlton, Sher-
developed technology infrastructure. A growing demand
aton, Radisson, Novotel, Marriott and Banyan Tree.
for ICT products and services is a natural consequence
of Bahrain’s strong growth in other sectors. Firms
Outlook
already present in Bahrain include ICT software companies such as Software AG of Germany and three of
The EIU forecasts that Bahrain’s real GDP growth is
India’s largest IT companies, Satyam, TCS and WIPRO.
projected to slow to an annual average of 3.3% in 200913, from the very high estimated annual average of 7%
Tourism
in 2004-08. This is mainly because of a more subdued
outlook for global and regional growth, and for the
Bahrain’s heritage as a cultural and trading centre dates
global financial sector, particularly in the early part of
back more than four millennia making it an attractive
the forecast period, following recent financial turmoil.
place to visit. Tourism is increasingly becoming the
This will constrain the growth of Bahrain’s exports of
focus of investment in the kingdom’s drive to diversify
goods and services, a vital source of overall economic
its economy. Bahrain offers great potential as both a
growth given the small size of the domestic market,
regional and a world tourist destination, blessed with 33
with Bahrain having just over 1m residents. In general,
islands, a cosmopolitan capital city; an attractive, liberal
the private sector will benefit from a rapid expansion in
lifestyle; and a rich history and culture. There were
construction over the forecast period, notably in road-
over six million visitors to Bahrain in 2008. The Island
building, power and water projects, tourism and retail
was known as Dilmun, and home to an ancient trading
infrastructure, and housing. Private firms will also gain
civilisation. Dilmun’s capital was a major port whose
an increasing role in areas formerly managed by the
remains are still visible at the UNESCO World Heritage
state.
Site of Bahrain Fort (Qal’at al Bahrain). The Kingdom is
mentioned in one of the world’s oldest works of literature – the Epic of Gilgamesh, where the island was
home to the source of eternal youth.
Construction
Many new development projects are opening in Bahrain
to provide residential, business and recreational facilities. These include Bahrain Bay, City Centre Mall, Al
Areen, Amwaj Islands and Durrat Al Bahrain which
are now opening up Bahrain to a wider market and
attracting more visitors. The billion-dollar Al Areen
development furthers Bahrain’s reputation as a friendly
destination for family and health-oriented tourists.
Phase one includes the Banyan Tree Desert Spa and
Resort, the largest spa in the Middle East, and the stateof-the-art ‘Lost Paradise of Dilmun’ Water Park. The
development will comprise five-star hotels, residential
villages, entertainment and recreational facilities, shopping centres and the Al Areen Wildlife Park.
Durrat Al Bahrain is the Kingdom’s largest luxury residential, commercial and tourist resort development.
Costing $6bn, it consists of The Islands, six ‘Atolls’ and
five ‘Petals’, with 1,800 luxury residential villas; and The
100
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101
KM
COMOROS
COUNTRY NAME:
Union of the Comoros
LAND AREA:
2,240 km2
POPULATION:
773,407 (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Comorian, Arabic, French
CURRENCY:
1 Comoros Franc (KMF) = 100 Centimes
(not issued)
1 EUR = 491 KMF (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Moroni (capital), Fomboni, Tsimbeo,
Domoni
NATIONAL DAY:
6 July
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
The Comoros, officially known as the Union
of the Comoros, comprises a group of islands
in the Indian Ocean, off the eastern coast of
Africa on the northern end of the Mozambique
Channel between northern Madagascar and
north-eastern Mozambique. The Comoros has a
diverse culture and history, as a nation formed
at the crossroads of many civilizations.
MORONI
Some villages are not linked to the main road system
or are at best only connected by tracks usable only by
four-wheel-drive vehicles.
Ports are rudimentary, although a deepwater facility
functions in Anjouan. Only small vessels can approach
the existing quays in Moroni on Grande Comore, despite
improvements. Long-distance, ocean-going ships must
lie offshore and be unloaded by smaller boats; during
the cyclone season, this procedure is dangerous, and
ships are reluctant to call at the island. Most freight is
Much of the land area is mountainous and made up of
sent first to Mombasa or the island of Reunion from
lava-encrusted soil that is unsuited to agriculture. Never-
where they are transshipped.
theless, subsistence agriculture and fishing involves
France, Comoros’ major trading partner, finances small
more than 80% of the population and represents 40%
development projects. Comoros has an international
of the country’s gross domestic product, providing virtu-
airport at Hahaya on Grande Comore.
ally all foreign exchange earnings. Plantations engage
a large proportion of the population in producing the
Geography
islands’ major cash crops for export: vanilla, cloves,
102
perfume essences, and copra. Comoros is the world’s
Comoros is endowed with numerous picture postcard
leading producer of essence of ylang-ylang, used in the
beaches that make its potential for tourism consider-
manufacturing of perfume. It also is the world’s second-
able, but development has been impeded by recent
largest producer of vanilla. Principal food crops are
political instability and numerous coups. Three main
coconuts, bananas, and cassava. It is not self-sufficient
islands in the volcanic Comoros archipelago: Grande
in food and foodstuffs constitute 32% of total imports.
Comore, Moheli and Anjouan. The Comoros also claims
Service sectors that are important include tourism,
the French controlled island of Mayotte (aka. Mahoré).
construction and commercial activities. Money sent
The Comoros has a diverse culture and history and
home by Comorans working abroad provides a vital
three official languages—Comoran (Shikomor), Arabic,
source of revenue.
and French. It is the only state to be a member of the
The government is endeavouring to upgrade educa-
African Union, the Francophonie, the Organization of
tion and technical training, to privatise commercial and
the Islamic Conference, the League of Arab States and
industrial enterprises, to improve health services, to
the Indian Ocean Commission. In 2007, the Comoros
diversify exports, to promote tourism, and to reduce the
joined the Community of Sahel-Saharan States
high population growth rate.
(CEN-SAD).
Comoros
At 2,235 km², the Comoros is the third smallest African
Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF).
nation by area, and one of the smallest in the world,
The IMF met with the President of the Union, the Gover-
and with a population estimated at 798,000 it is also the
nors of the three island entities, the Minister of Finance
sixth smallest African nation by population. Its name
of the Union and the Governor of the Central Bank
derives from the Arabic word qamar (“moon”), which
of Comoros. Key objectives are to re-establish fiscal
explains to symbol depicted on its flag.
stability by containing the domestic primary budget
deficit below 1 percent of GDP per year, and raising
Demography
total revenue to 14.3 percent of GDP by 2012. Structural
reforms, including reforms of public utilities, would aim to
Population figures for the islands vary considerably.
raise economic growth to around 2 ½ percent per annum
According to UN figures, Comoros has a population of
during the period 2010-12. The IMF welcomed recent
around 800,000, with an average projected increase of
progress in preparing reform strategies for the Comoros
2.5 percent between 2004 and 2015. Comoros is more
Hydrocarbons Company (SCH) and Comores Telecom;
densely inhabited than many other sub-Saharan coun-
and in initiating preparations for a reform strategy for
tries, putting severe strain on its limited farmland, water
the electricity parastatal. Looking ahead, the IMF said
and firewood; 34 percent of the population dwelling in
decisive implementation of the reforms will be important
urban areas. There is an average of 275 people per km².
to foster sustained strong growth and achieving faster
poverty alleviation.
Economic Outlook
Trade
An International Monetary Fund mission team visited
the capital Moroni in June 2009 to assess the coun-
Major imports include basic foodstuffs, mainly rice, some
try’s performance under the Emergency Post-Conflict
consumer goods, as well as petroleum products, cement
Assistance (EPCA) programme and to discuss a new
and transport equipment. The main export partners are
programme that could be supported by the IMF under the
the US, France, Singapore and Turkey. Imports partners
103
KM
are France, South Africa, the UAE, Kenya, Italy, Mauritius
much needs to be done to reform the civil service and
and Singapore. Traditionally, France has been the main
the budget process.
trading partner for Comoros and remains so today with
France providing almost half of the imports and taking
Tourism
two-thirds of exports. Britain’s trade links with Comoros
are minimal.
Comoros considers the tourism sector to be a potentially
important source of higher economic growth. Tourism in
Reforms
the region has generally increased in recent years, but
Comoros has been the exception because of its political
After nearly a decade of political turmoil, significant
instability. Reestablishing air links, simplifying visa proce-
progress has been achieved with national reconcili-
dures, and promoting the Comoros as a destination for
ation and inter-island cooperation over recent years.
specialized tourism could herald a recovery in tourist
Political tensions have obstructed the implementa-
arrivals and revive hotel infrastructure.
tion of coherent policy reforms and severely impeded
economic progress, particularly effecting investment,
Media
tourism and growth of the private sector. Comoros
104
continues to follow IMF recommendations on imple-
There is no national newspaper in Comoros; the leading
menting policies conducive to the restoration of confi-
regional paper is Al-Watwan published on Grande
dence, including revenue-sharing, joint administration
Comore; Kwezi is also published on Mayotte. There
of the customs office, and the transfer of spending
is a Radio Comoros and a Comoros National TV both
competencies to the island governments. However,
providing nationwide services.
Comoros
lished in 1981; the Bank for Industry and Commerce
(Banque pour l’Industrie et le Commerce-BIC), a
commercial bank established in 1990 that had six
branches in 1993 and was a subsidiary of the National
Bank of Paris- International (Banque Nationale de
Paris-Internationale); BIC Afribank, a BIC subsidiary;
and the Development Bank of Comoros (Banque de
Développement des Comores), established in 1982,
which provided support for small and medium-sized
development projects. Most of the shares in the Development Bank of Comoros were held by the Comoran
government and the central bank; the rest were held by
the European Investment Bank and the Central Bank for
Banks
Economic Cooperation (Caisse Centrale de CoopéraFrench government. All of these banks had headquarters
Bank of Comoros (Banque Centrale des Comores) estab-
in Moroni.
Comoros
tion Économique-CCCE), a development agency of the
The country’s banking system consists of the Central
105
DJ
DJIBOUTI
COUNTRY NAME:
Republic of Djibouti
LAND AREA:
23,200 km2
POPULATION:
740,528 (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic, French
CURRENCY:
1 Djibouti Franc (DJF) = 100 Centimes
1 EUR = 240 DJF (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Djibouti (capital), Dikhil, Tadjoura,
Obock, Khor Angar
NATIONAL DAY:
27 June
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
The Republic of Djibouti is located strategically
at the foot of the Red Sea. Its capital is DjiboutiVille or Djibouti city. Djibouti is one of the region’s
poorest countries, not only lacks resources, but
faces a severe climate that is a serious obstacle
to development. Djibouti’s location is its main
economic asset given its mostly barren landscape. The capital’s port handles all the major
imports and exports into landlocked Ethiopia and
Djibouti is an expanding shipping hub on one of
the busiest maritime trade routes in the world. It
is a major dropping point for World Food Programme and USAID supplies, which are transported by road or rail to Ethiopia’s capital, Addis
Ababa. Meanwhile, Ethiopia’s cash crop, coffee,
is exported in bulk from Djibouti.
DJIBOUTI-VILLE
is the mainstay of the economy and creates at least 70%
of GDP. The capital has the only paved airport in the
republic. In addition, Djibouti has one of the most liberal
economic regimes in Africa, with almost unrestricted
banking and commerce sectors. Djibouti is a free-trade
zone. Port activity and related services constitutes the
main commercial activities, in addition to a small tourist
industry.
Agriculture remains poorly developed, due to harsh
climate, high production costs, unskilled labour, and
limited natural resources. Agriculture is extremely
small and generates 3.2% of GDP. Local farmers are
only able to produce around 3% of the country’s food
needs. The great bulk of the requirements therefore
must be imported. In recent years, Djibouti has sought
to increase food production by developing its fishing
industry, including the construction of a fish canning
factory financed by the Islamic Development Bank. It has
Economy
also sought to increase the efficiency of agricultural land
through irrigation projects, but with limited success.
106
Apart from substantial salt deposits, there are few other
Manufacturing is small and the industry that exists is
natural resources of significance in the country. Djibou-
small-scale. The mineral deposits that exist are minimal
ti’s economy depends largely on its proximity to the large
and the arid soil is unproductive – around 89% is desert,
Ethiopian market and a large foreign expatriate commu-
10% pasture, and 1% forested. However, services and
nity. Its main economic activities are the Port of Djibouti,
commerce provide most of Djibouti’s gross domestic
the banking sector, the airport, and the operation of the
product. The economy is therefore based on service
Addis Ababa- Djibouti railroad. Djibouti’s main industry
activities and highly dependent on international aid. The
is mineral water bottling plant, leather tanning, construc-
service sector is connected with the country’s strategic
tion, pharmaceuticals factory, abattoirs, salt mining,
location and status as a free trade zone in the Horn of
and one petroleum refinery. Djibouti’s most important
Africa. Djibouti provides services as both a transit port
economic asset is its strategic location on the busy
for the region and an international trans-shipment and
shipping route between the Mediterranean Sea and the
refuelling centre. Imports and exports from Ethiopia
Indian Ocean. The trans-shipment trade through the port
represent 85% of port activity at Djibouti’s container
Djibouti
terminal. Principal exports from the region transiting
unproductive terrains in Africa. Local farmers are only
Djibouti are coffee, salt, hides, dried beans, cereals,
able to produce around 3% of the country’s food
other agricultural products, and wax. Djibouti itself has
needs. The great bulk of the requirements therefore
few exports, and the majority of its imports come from
must of necessity be imported. In recent years, Djibouti
France. Most imports are consumed in the country, but
has sought to increase its food production by devel-
others are re-exported to Ethiopia and north-western
oping its fishing industry, including the construction of
Somalia.
a fish canning factory financed by the Islamic Development Bank. It has also sought to increase the efficiency
Investment
of agricultural land through the development of irrigation projects, but with limited success.
The UAE is one of the countries carrying out ambitious
investment projects to turn Djibouti into Africa’s biggest
Reforms
shipping terminal, in a project that aims to extend its
commercial reach throughout East Africa. The inte-
Djibouti has also been making recent progress in imple-
grated business plan aims to transform Djibouti into an
menting structural reforms, the IMF points out. The
elite tourist destination.
economy however still very much depends on a large
The 1000 km Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad is the only
foreign expatriate community, the maritime and commer-
line serving central and south-eastern Ethiopia. The
cial activities of the Port of Djibouti, its airport, and the
single-track railway occupies a prominent place in
operation of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad. Djibouti’s
Ethiopia’s internal distribution system for domestic
macroeconomic environment has improved significantly
commodities such as cement, cotton textiles, candles,
over the last few years. Annual real GDP growth accel-
small rocks, coconuts, sugar, cereals and charcoal. The
erated from an annual average of 3% in 2001-05 to to
European Union is helping to finance the modernisation
6% in 2008 onwards. This growth was mainly driven by
of this important asset.
large foreign domestic investments in the port, tourism,
and construction sectors, the IMF reports. Investment as
Agriculture & Fishing
share of GDP doubled within two years, reached 40% in
2007. After remaining stagnant for several years, credit to
As stated, the country’s agricultural sector is inhibited
the private sector increased by 23%, owing in part to a
by a very inhospitable climate and one of the most
real estate and construction boom.
107
DJ
Energy & Water Sector
of network losses, high administrative overhead costs
and overall lack of managerial capability and incentive.
The World Bank is preparing a $7 million International
In addition, in the energy sector, there is a 33% tax on
Development Association (IDA) credit to back a $10
all petroleum products which is passed through to the
million project to reform Djibouti’s power and water
consumers and is estimated to generate revenues to the
sector. The funding will permit exploration of the poten-
government of around $6 million per year. tial for renewable power for the country’s Obock area;
Djibouti has developed an action plan for both sectors
the Djibouti Ville distribution network and what will be
focused on increasing access and improving competi-
Djibouti’s first wind farm; funds are also earmarked to
tiveness through a reduction of the high cost of service
cover a 2MW plant serving Ali Sabieh and Dikhil.
and improvement in overall service delivery. The key
Meanwhile, state-owned “Electricité de Djibouti” is
objectives in the sectors are to: improve efficiency and
planning a 30MW geothermal BOO plant for Lake Assal
financial performance in the utilities through restruc-
costing an estimated $115 million following the carrying
turing and promotion of private sector participation;
out of a feasibility study by US firm Geothermal Devel-
address key service delivery constraints through reha-
opment Associates.
bilitation of networks and administrative improvements;
Djibouti receives assistance from the World Bank to
and explore new resources for water supply such as
develop its national energy strategy. In this regard, the
desalination and power generation, such as renewable
Bank drew up an inventory of all sources of energy used
energy and interconnection possibilities.
by households, including quantities, costs and demand
The latter objective is particularly important for the
for electricity services and amenities. Local people face
water sector because the capital city Djibouti-ville relies
high tariffs and low levels of access to electricity. The
entirely on the aquifer for its water supply. Weak control
connection rate in the country is below 30%. Although
over water extraction and over water consumption
a variety of energy sources could be made available,
has led to overexploitation of the aquifer and rapidly
kerosene and electricity account for 79% of all energy
deteriorating water quality. In the power sector, the
consumed in Djibouti at present. Poorer households
financial performance has drastically deteriorated due
spend 13.5% of their total expenditure on energy,
to high international oil prices. The electricity tariff is set
compared to 5.3% for better off citizens in the capital
to cover cost at a price per barrel level not exceeding
Djibouti-ville.
$25 compared to recent prices reaching $32. Djibouti
Kerosene is the most important source of energy for
cooking and lighting because it is the least expensive
option. However, kerosene costs have been rising at
a rate of 2.3% per year. The poor have responded to
these higher costs by increasing use of wood fuel and
charcoal, though both resources are scarce. Clearly, in
the long term this is not an environmentally sustainable
option. 58% of households have access to electricity,
some resort to illegal connections partly because of high
costs.
The World Bank’s policy recommendations include:
reducing the cost of kerosene by revising surtaxes,
reviewing the price structure of liquefied petroleum
gas, and promoting access to 3 or 6 kilogram bottles
to expand the range of affordable and better energy
services; and promoting energy efficiency.
The energy and water sectors are key bottlenecks to
poverty alleviation in Djibouti due to their very high
cost of production which constitute barriers to access.
The consumer prices for electricity and water services
are the highest in the region, at an average of $0.20/
kWh for electricity and $1.10/m3 for water. The reason
for the high prices is mainly the high cost of electricity
production as a result of the reliance on imported diesel
fuel for power generation, high inefficiencies in the form
108
is, however, endowed with good potential to develop
approximately $600 million in dollar deposits. There
its renewable energy resources, in particular wind and
is a growing banking and insurance sector, and the
geothermal.
telecommunications sector is the best in the region. In
Djibouti agreed to an IMF Staff Monitoring Program in a
February 2001, the World Bank adopted its first Country
bid to improve the performance of its public utilities,
Assistance Strategy for Djibouti. This was developed
power and water in particular. Furthermore, the World
in close partnership with the authorities and has served
Bank is finalizing a Water Sector policy for Djibouti and
as a roadmap for the Bank’s assistance to the country.
identified the sector’s institutional arrangements as the
Since 2001 Djibouti has become a magnet for private
main reason for inadequate service levels. The largest
sector capital investment, attracting inflows that now
donor in the water sector, the European Union,
average more than $200 million. In July 2005, the World
requested World Bank engagement in order to finalize
Bank had financed 17 operations in the country for a
its investment program.
total original commitment of $155.5 million. A total of
five active investment projects form part of the Bank’s
Banking & Finance
current portfolio in the country, including support for
health and basic infrastructure.
Djibouti has almost unrestricted banking and commerce
sectors. It has an expanding financial sector that
offers some basis for wealth generation. This has
been growing largely as a result of the stable and
freely convertible currency and absence of exchange
controls. It is economically dependent to an overwhelming degree on its position as a free trade zone
and key international transit port for the region. Djibouti
has become a significant regional banking hub, with
Djibouti
Djibouti
109
EG
EGYPT
COUNTRY NAME:
Arab Republic of Egypt
LAND AREA:
1 million km2
POPULATION:
80,5 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 Egyptian Pound (EGP) = 100 Piaster
1 EUR = 7.5 EGP (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Cairo (capital), Chabra, Gizeh,
Alexandria
NATIONAL DAY:
23 July – Revolution Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
Occupying the northeast corner of the African
continent, Egypt is bisected by the highly fertile Nile valley, where most economic activity
takes place. One of the largest economies in
the Arab world, Egypt is rich in resources and
boasts thriving tourism and agricultural sectors.
Its natural resources include oil, natural gas, iron
ore, phosphates, manganese, limestone, gypsum,
talc, asbestos, lead and zinc. The country borders
the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the
Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and
includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula.
CAIRO
able income, and is prepared to spend it on consumer
goods. Over the forecast period, there will be increasingly strong demand for items such as cars, mobile
phones, flat-screen televisions and home computers.
Economy
Egypt’s primary economic strength stems from its
diversity in comparison with the rest of the region. In
2008/2009, hydrocarbons extractions constitute 15%;
manufacturing 16.6%; agriculture nearly 13.7%; wholesale and retail trade 11.5%; construction and real estate
7.1%; financial and telecommunications services 6.8%;
and externally oriented sources, such as the Suez
Population
Canal, 2.7% and tourism 3.5%. The Economic Intelligence Unit (EIU) shows that all categories of Egypt’s
110
Egypt has the largest population in the Arab world, but
business environment rankings are forecast to improve.
only the fourth-largest economy after Saudi Arabia,
The categories that are expected to improve the most
the UAE and Algeria. Egypt’s GDP per head at market
are foreign trade and exchange controls, as imports
exchange rates is expected to rise steadily throughout
tariffs continue to be lowered; financing, as small and
the forecast period (2009-2013), after falling in the
medium-sized firms gain greater access to the stock-
period 2002-04 in dollar terms as a result of slow
market, banking regulation improves and banks step
growth and the 45% depreciation of the Egyptian
up their risk-assessment strategies; taxes, because
pound against the US currency between 2000 and
of ongoing improvements to the tax administration;
end-2003. Real annual GDP growth is expected to
the macroeconomic environment, as robust economic
average around 6%, which will almost double real GDP
growth is expected to continue; infrastructure, as the
per head in dollar terms owing to the pound’s strong
government invests heavily in road, rail and sea facili-
appreciation. Egypt will continue to be a relatively
ties; and government policy towards private enter-
attractive market. The size of its population—it is the
prise and competition, as privatisation continues and
most populous Arab country—makes it an important
competition legislation is improved. Market opportuni-
and influential market, with huge potential, and one that
ties will also improve in the future as a result of greater
will continue to grow fast.
economic diversification and better foreign invest-
This expanding middle class has substantial dispos-
ment policies. After slowing sharply in 2008/09 and
Egypt
2009/10, economic growth is projected to strengthen
Oil & Gas
over the remainder of the forecast period, to an average
of 6.7%, slightly below the growth rates recorded
Egypt’s crude oil and condensates reserves are at 4.19
between 2005/06 and 2007/08. The government’s infra-
bn barrels in mid-2008 according to government figures,
structure programme and continued economic reform
but rising to 4.4 bn in June 2009 following new discov-
will increase growth potential in the longer term and
eries. This would last some 15 years at current extrac-
productivity.
tion rates. The mature fields in the Gulf of Suez produce
about 50% of the country’s oil, but exploration activity
Reforms
is focused on frontier areas such as the Western Desert
near the Libyan border, the offshore Mediterranean
The Egyptian economy has been gaining thanks to the
and Sinai. Exploration is largely undertaken by foreign
wide-ranging reforms that the country began implementing
companies, especially BP of the UK and Eni of Italy, in
in 2004 and the subsequent awakening of domestic
partnership with the state-owned Egyptian General Petro-
demand long depressed due to decades of slow growth.
leum Corporation (EGPC). Eni, which produces 500,000
The reforms now have a measurable impact on the coun-
barrels of oil equivalent per day in Egypt, of which 1.4bn
try’s economic performance and have sustained high
cu ft/day is gas, has said that it will invest US$6bn in the
growth for the past 10 years. Changes in economic policy
oil sector until 2010, with its partners providing another
have been made to minimise the state’s role. The prime
US$6bn. Two-thirds of oil output is refined domestically.
drivers of the economy are foreign direct investment (FDI),
Because of depletion in the ageing Gulf of Suez oilfields,
remittances, Suez Canal fees and tourism.
crude oil production has declined significantly since
In 2005, Egypt reduced personal and corporate tax rates,
1996, when it reached a high of 922,000 b/d, to around
reduced energy subsidies, and privatized several enter-
667,000 b/d in 2007 (including condensates and natural
prises. The stock market boomed, and GDP grew about
gas liquids), according to the EGPC. Crude oil exports
7% each year since 2006. Despite these achievements,
are constrained by lower production and by rising local
the government has failed to raise living standards for
demand.
the average Egyptian, and has had to continue providing
Egypt’s proven reserves of natural gas were 77.2trn cu ft
subsidies for basic necessities.
in mid-2009. The government is encouraging additional
The subsidies have contributed to a sizeable budget
exploration, as a minimum total of 120trn cu ft would be
deficit – roughly 7% of GDP in 2007-08. FDI has increased
necessary for the government to realise its ambitious
significantly in the past two years, but the government will
plans for the sector, which include LNG projects, gas
need to continue its aggressive pursuit of reforms in order
export pipelines, gas-to-liquids schemes, petrochemicals
to sustain the spike in investment and growth and begin to
expansion and increased domestic consumption. Egypt
improve economic conditions for the broader population.
has also rapidly expanded its LNG export capability,
Egypt’s export sectors – particularly natural gas – have
becoming the world’s sixth-largest gas producer and the
bright prospects.
third-largest in Africa, behind Algeria and Nigeria.
111
EG
Banking Sector
2007-08 to 2010-11, and Net interest income is projected
to grow at a CAGR of over 12% during 2008-2012.
Rationalisation of the tax code has encouraged more
The banking system comprises 39 total banks in Egypt in
FDI, with 27 tariff categories cut down to six and a reduc-
2008/09 with total branches of 3441 banks. Private and
tion of duties of around 75%. New policies have been
joint venture banks are increasingly growing, but many
adopted to encourage various business sectors, while
remain relatively small with few branch networks.
stocks have made impressive advances.
Since 2003 the most significant reform achieved by the
Insurance Sector
state in terms of the everyday operation of the Egyptian
economy has been the complete overhaul of the banking
Egypt’s insurance sector can be generally described as
system. The dominance of public banks is starting to
in process of developing with big potential for growth.
subside with four of the country’s major banks being
The sector has been long hampered by a lack of public
sold, a move which included the eradication of a large
appreciation of the significance of insurance as well as
percentage of non-performing loans that had been
heavy state dominance. However, the picture is expected
hindering sector growth. The World Bank loan of $500m
to brighten with the planned privatization and liberaliza-
was given to allow the recapitalization required in order
tion of the sector. Several developments have been
for two of the biggest public banks to comply with Basel
taking place to open up the sector. Ongoing changes
II standards. The venture into the private sector is helping
include redefining the supervisory role of the Egyptian
banks recruit higher-quality employees and target parts
Insurance Supervisory Authority (EISA), encouraging
of the market traditionally left untouched, such as the
more private sector participation through new licenses
local retail market, ultimately benefiting local consumers.
and acquisitions, as well as enhancing efficiency and
Along with privatization comes new legislation, so that
dissemination of information.
the sector will operate to international standards and
The Egyptian insurance sector has traditionally dealt with
setting off a trend of mergers and acquisitions.
a limited range of insurance covers, but with the upsurge
Deposits at Egyptian banks are forecasted to grow at
of international competition and the changing needs
Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of about 14%
of the market itself, the sector is expected to witness
between 2008-09 and 2010-11, with household sector
the emergence of various activities, especially in the
accounting for majority of deposits. Meanwhile, Bank
untapped areas of life insurance, third-party liability and
loans to private business sector are forecasted to grow
health insurance.
at a CAGR of about 9.5% during 2008-09 to 2010-11.
Manufacturing sector will remain the major recipient of
Tourism
bank loans in local as well as foreign currencies during
Tourism is one of Egypt’s key foreign currency earnings, with its fascinating ancient monuments, year-round
sunshine and beautiful beaches which attract visitors
from around the world in ever growing numbers. Arab
tourists rose to 1.8 million in 2007 from 1.1mn in 2002,
with revenues spiking to $2.2bn per year. The UAE
invested $4bn in the country’s tourism sector accounting
for 30% of total Arab investment in the country, a senior
Egyptian official revealed. Speaking at the Arabian Travel
Market in Dubai, in May, Hisham Zazo, the country’s first
assistant tourism minister, said that the sector comprises
11.3% of Egypt’s GDP and 19.3% of the total investment made in foreign currencies. “Egypt plans to attract
14 million holidaymakers and boost hotel capacity to
240,000 rooms by 2011,” Zazo said. Leisure tourism
is the largest segment, with business and conference
tourism coming in second. Hotel capacity has been
increasing by 5% per year. More development is on the
horizon and the ministry of tourism is working to make
licensing and land purchasing easier, focusing on the
northern coast for both residential and foreign tourists.
112
Egypt
Construction & Real Estate
attracting foreign direct investments.
Modernization has brought a great deal of investment,
The last two years have been good ones for the
with the year 2006/07 seeing $7.48bn worth of funds
construction and real estate sector with increased activi-
flowing into the industry sector. Purchases of new cars
ties ongoing in the sector. Accounting for some 7.1%
are increasing, indicating greater wealth and confidence
of GDP in 2008/2009, high-profile real estate projects
among consumers. Following global trends, economic
and improvements in the country’s tourism sector drove
zones and industrial parks are offering generous advan-
the industry. The need for low-cost housing and infra-
tages to companies, boosting trade and attracting even
structure development should help to push the industry
more investment. A sudden reduction in import taxes
onwards. Rapid population growth has created the
and a growing middle class has also created a healthy
need for 22 new cities in 2008/09, all of which will need
environment for the retail sector and the Global Retail
a considerable amount of real estate. The introduction
Development Index ranked Egypt at 14th place in terms
of mortgage facilities will give a boost to the real estate
of potential. Meanwhile, new shopping complexes and
sector and as businesses and investors start to look
malls are appearing along with the introduction of inter-
beyond Cairo the real estate boom looks set to spread
national brand names.
outward beyond the capital.
Investment
IT & Telecoms
munications in Egypt have come a long way in the past
investment (FDI), remittances, Suez Canal fees and
10 years. The private sector is just starting to emerge,
tourism. Changes in economic policy have been made
allowing for more competition in terms of both prices
to minimise the state’s role. FDI inflows reflect extremely
and services. Call charges for mobile phones have
positively on global investment sentiment in Egypt. Data
been dropping significantly for the last five years and
released by the Central Bank of Egypt reveals that Net
the entrance of a third mobile operator, Etisalat Misr,
FDI inflows increased from $509.4 million in FY 2000/01,
is increasing competition even more. The issuance of
to reach $11.1 billion in FY 2006/07 and $13.2 billion
3G licenses is also causing waves in the industry and
in FY 2007/08, approaching $21bn in July 2007 to
the country is bracing itself for a more open market. IT
June 2009. According to the World Investment Report
is also becoming a more important sector. Outsourced
published in 2008 by the United Nations Conference on
call centres are becoming major employers and a new
Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Egypt was ranked
emphasis is being placed on computer literacy both in
first in North Africa and second in the African continent in
schools and workplaces.
Egypt
Along with other major infrastructural changes, telecomThe prime drivers of the economy are foreign direct
113
IQ
IRAQ
COUNTRY NAME:
Republic of Iraq
LAND AREA:
438,000 km2
POPULATION:
29 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 Iraqi Dinar (IQD) = 1000 Fils
1 EUR = 1.586,85 IQD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Baghdad (capital), Basra, Mosul, Kirkuk,
Najaf
NATIONAL DAY:
9 April
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
Straddling the Tigris and Euphrates rivers and
stretching from the Gulf to the Anti-Taurus
Mountains, modern Iraq occupies roughly what
was once ancient Mesopotamia, one of the
cradles of human civilisation. In the Middle Ages
Iraq was the centre of the Islamic Empire, with
Baghdad the cultural and political capital of
an area extending from Morocco to the Indian
subcontinent.
BAGHDAD
the economy, but the recent and continuing progress
provides encouraging signs for investors.
Oil revenue constitutes around 99% of total export
earnings and over 75% of budget revenue. This leaves
Iraq highly vulnerable to the volatile oil market and to
any deterioration in the security situation. The IMF estimates that Iraq will continue to be heavy reliant on oil
for the foreseeable future.
The oil industry, which is the bedrock of the economy,
has begun gradually to recover from the toll of warrelated damage and post-war looting. Attempts to
Iraq is a major oil producing country with official oil
boost and sustain exports have been held back by
reserves counting as the third in the second in the
persistent sabotage, targeted mainly at oil export infra-
world. The country is not only fortunate in its extensive
structure, as well as by a lack of investment in new
oil resources, much still to be unexplored, it enjoys
production. Nevertheless, having remained at or below
additional resources such as a fertile agricultural sector.
a disappointing 2 m barrels/day (b/d) since 2003, oil
Farming provides rich and diverse range of produce
production has increased markedly since the autumn of
both for domestic consumption and export. The main
2007, as improved security has allowed the reopening
agricultural produce include wheat, barley, rice, vegeta-
on a sustainable basis of the northern Kirkuk pipeline.
bles, dates, cotton; cattle, sheep, poultry. Meanwhile,
As a result, oil output averaged around 2.4 m b/d over
its main industries are petroleum, chemicals, textiles,
the first half of 2008.
leather, construction materials, food processing, fertil-
Development of a manufacturing sector has been
izer, metal fabrication and processing.
hindered by the extremely poor security climate since
2003, as well as by the country’s infrastructural defi-
Economy
ciencies. The government has sought to boost development spending significantly, but progress has been
After more than a decade of UN comprehensive sanc-
hampered by security problems despite improved
tions and three major wars, the lifting of sanctions
stability since mid-2007, as well as by bureaucratic
by the UN Security Council Resolution 1483 in May
shortcomings. Total government revenues have
2003 was supposedly to allow reconstruction efforts
benefited from high oil prices in recent years; however,
to begin. However, serious security problems had
revenues have declined significantly since the oil price
hampered the rebuilding effort. The past five years
dropped in 2008.
have been extremely difficult for the reconstruction of
114
Iraq
Reforms
expressed interest in reinvigorating Iraq’s industrial
sector. The government of Iraq is pursuing a strategy
During the last few years Iraq has also made signifi-
to gain foreign participation in joint ventures with State-
cant progress in implementing structural reforms and
owned enterprises. Provincial Councils are also using
continues to make progress with reconstruction. During
local budgets to promote and facilitate investment. The
the past few years, Iraq witnessed some progress in its
Central Bank has been successful in controlling inflation
reconstruction, increases its oil exports, and improves the
through appreciation of the dinar against the US dollar.
living conditions for its citizens. However, Iraq still has a
long way to go before it is able to realize its full potential
Construction & Infrastructure
as a major player in the regional and global economy.
Iraq has also made significant progress in adopting new
Major reconstruction work continues to take place in
investment law and implementing some important struc-
the country’s infrastructure and is attracting consider-
tural reforms.
able investment. One of the latest was announced in
Iraq is making some progress in building the institutions
July 2009, that Iraq is to construct a “Sport City” in the
needed to implement economic policy. In March 2009
southern oil hub of Basra to host the Gulf Cup at the end
Iraq concluded a Stand-By Arrangement (SBA) with the
of 2012, government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh said:
IMF that details economic reforms. The SBA allows an
“The council of ministers, on the recommendation of the
80% reduction of the debt owed to Paris Club creditor
minister for youth and Sports freed up 446 million dollars
nations. The International Compact with Iraq was estab-
to build a 146 hectare modern complex inspired by the
lished in May 2007 to integrate Iraq into the regional and
architectural style of Basra”. Youth and sports ministry
global economy, and the Iraqi government is seeking
spokesman Assifa Moussa said, the complex would
to pass laws to strengthen its economy. This legislation
consist of a 65,000 capacity main stadium, a 10,000 seat
includes a hydrocarbon law to establish a modern legal
arena and four smaller training stadiums, each with 400
framework to allow Iraq to develop its resources and
seats. A sporting village consisting of eight buildings
a revenue sharing law to equitably divide oil revenues
each housing 16 apartments will also be built under the
within the nation, although both are still under conten-
project, led by an Iraqi company working in association
tious political negotiation. Some foreign entities have
with two US firms, Moussa added.
115
IQ
of phosphates, salt, and sulfur. Since a relatively productive period in the 1970s, the mining industry has been
hampered by conflict. Iraq during the 1970s had also
established big state-owned industries mainly specialized
in petroleum, chemicals, textiles, leather, construction
materials, food processing, fertilizer, metal fabrication
and processing.
Banking Sector
Iraq financial sector currently consists of six state-owned
banks, including Rafidian Bank (founded in 1941) and
Rasheed Bank (founded in 1988), which are considered
the biggest banks (86% of the total assets) in Iraq, in
addition to, the Agricultural Bank, the Industrial Bank,
the Real Estate Bank, and the Socialist Bank. Until 2003,
these banks account for about 93 percent of banking
Energy
system assets. There are also 18 private banks with an
increasing capitalization since 2003. The Central Bank of
Just before the start of the war in March 2003, nation-
Iraq has meanwhile been making progress in improving
wide electricity capacity was around 4,500 mw/day,
its accounting and governance structure. Since 2003,
according to the October 2003 UN/World Bank “Joint
audits of the country’s two largest state banks, Rafidain
Iraq Needs Assessment”. The post-war power supply
and Rasheed, are underway, as a first step to developing
has been affected not only by war-related damage, which
a restructuring programme for the two banks.
resulted in a shortage of domestic oil supplies, but also
The 18 private banks were established during the sanc-
by the subsequent looting of power stations and sabo-
tions era (1990-2003) in an effort to handle local deposi-
tage of oil pipelines. Interruptions to oil supplies have a
tors’ financial needs and reform as well as modernize
direct impact on the output of power stations that are
the banking sector. However, these banks remained
entirely oil-fuelled, as is the case in Baghdad. Further-
small and were limited to domestic transactions and
more, electricity facilities—such as pylons and high
attracted few private depositors. Both private and state
voltage transmission lines—have been targeted by polit-
banks in Iraq were badly damaged by the international
ical forces opposed to the presence of coalition troops
embargo. After 2003 and in attempts to further priva-
in the country. Although, this does not represent the
tize and expand the system, Iraqi government removed
same scale of damage that occurred in the 1991 war, the
restrictions on international bank transactions and freed
combination of looting and sabotage has had a compa-
the Central Bank of Iraq from government control. In
rable effect on the national grid. As a result, according
2004 three foreign banks received licenses to do busi-
to the US State Department, national electricity supply
ness in Iraq. Also, Iraq Securities Commission has issued
was only able to meet 51% of demand in late July 2008,
detailed rules governing trading of non-Iraqis at the Iraq
leaving the average Iraqi with less than 10 hours/day of
Stock Exchange (ISX).
electricity from the power grid.
Private sector and foreign investors are increasingly
showing interest in Iraq’s financial sector, especially as
Industry
Foreign Investment Law allows foreign banks to hold a
50% interest in Iraqi private banks. International banks
116
Traditionally, Iraq’s manufacturing activity has been
will be permitted to enter Iraq as branches, subsidiaries,
closely connected to the oil industry. The major industries
representative offices or through joint ventures with local
in that category have been petroleum refining and the
banks. Standard Chartered, HSBC, and the National
manufacture of chemicals and fertilizers. Before 2003,
Bank of Kuwait received licenses to conduct banking
diversification was hindered by limitations on privatization
transactions in Iraq. In July 2009, Asiacell announced
and the effects of the international sanctions. Since 2003,
the signing of an e-banking cooperation agreement with
Iraq is making extensive efforts to rebuild its industrial
AMWAL, a consortium of leading private Iraqi banking
infrastructure.
institutions. The move will enable Iraqi citizens to settle
Apart from hydrocarbons, Iraq’s mining industry has
their financial transactions using their mobile phones
been confined to extraction of relatively small amounts
without having to visit their banks.
Iraq
Agriculture, Food & Fisheries
Historically, only 50 to 60% of Iraq’s arable land has
been under cultivation. However, Iraq now is facing
unprecedented harsh conditions due to decreasing water
supplies in the two rivers. Iraqi officials say the Ataturk
Dam in Turkey and Syrian water projects on the Tigris
and Euphrates are hindering adequate water supplies.
The officials added that: “Before building these dams in
Turkey or using water in Syria for large areas for irrigation, we were getting... nearly 30 billion cubic metres of
water,” they said. “Now it’s about a third of that amount,
so the flow in both rivers – especially in the Tigris – has
been reduced.” This situation has greatly affected the
agricultural sector in Iraq and the country remains a net
food importer.
Outlook
The Economic Intelligence Unit (EIU) lowered its forecasts for Iraq’s fiscal deficit for the 2009-10, after raising
oil price projections. Nevertheless, the EIU still expect
Iraq’s budget to return an average deficit of $15.6bn in
2009-10. Iraq’s current-account deficit forecast has also
narrowed slightly, owing to the revision of the oil price
projections. It is expected now that the current account
will return a deficit of $6.4bn in 2010.
Real GDP growth is forecast to slow in 2009-10, from an
estimated rate of 7.8% in 2008 to an average of 5.7%,
as a tighter fiscal stance has a knock-on impact across
the economy. Thus, economic growth in 2009-10 was
Insurance Sector
expected to remain relatively healthy, if geographically
uneven A recovery is expected in some of Iraq’s southern
The insurance sector in Iraq has been opened up to
and western provinces, leading to greater wholesale and
competition. It was in 1997 that a change in the law
retail trade, as well as increased investment, including
permitted the establishment of private Iraqi-owned
from Iraq’s neighbours.
companies in the sector. Since 2005 foreign insurance
providers have been allowed to enter the market.
Now foreign investment has started to find its way into
the insurance sector but as yet only to a limited extent.
The Ministry of Finance is responsible for licensing
insurers to write both life and non-life insurance cover.
Estimated annual gross written premium is estimated at
investors can now enter the market as long as they
comply with the 2005 insurance law, which stipulates
capital requirements for insurance firms. Foreign investors are also able to open branches in the country. The
insurance industry is overseen by the Iraqi Insurance
Diwan whose powers are set out under the Insurance
Business Regulations Act of 2005. This is an independent
body that sets the overall policy and procedures for the
regulation of the insurance industry.
Iraq
just £3.3mn according to specialist observers. Foreign
117
JO
JORDAN
COUNTRY NAME:
Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
LAND AREA:
89,000 km2
POPULATION:
6,4 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 Jordanian Dinar (JOD) = 1.000 Fils
1 EUR = 0.96 JOD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Amman (capital), Aqaba, Irbid, Zarqa,
Karak, Maan
NATIONAL DAY:
25 May – Indepence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
In the last decade, the Hashemite Kingdom
of Jordan has sustained vast development
achievements that brought qualitative stride
at all economic, social and political sectors.
These results were also made through the
relentless efforts of His Majesty King Abdullah II
Ibn Al-Hussein who spares no effort in the process
of building modern Jordan and in achieving a
better future for the Jordanian people.
AMMAN
initiatives, including “Jordan First” and the “National
Agenda”. “Kuluna Al Urdun”, spearheaded by His
Majesty King Abdullah II Ibn Al-Hussein, was developed
through extensive participation from all segments of the
Jordanian society in order to build national consensus
on a comprehensive unified vision and policy actions to
support a bold reform and modernization of Jordan’s
economic, institutional and political infrastructure. It also
envisions additional investments to bring about improved
living conditions, increased job opportunities, and
upgraded social services to all Jordanians.
Jordan has attained many accomplishments in respect
Young people are one of Jordan’s national priorities,
of economic development and growth rates, as well
greatest asset, and hope for the future. Youthful energies
as the support of the market absorption of labor force.
are being directed towards serving the community, and
The current and future economic plans aim at the
organized in group frameworks through a number of
redistribution of the development returns to all the
initiatives aimed at tapping their intellect, creativity and
Kingdom’s regions in away that will better serve the
aspirations. In order to ensure the active participation of
development needs of them. In this respect and under a
youth, Jordan has committed itself towards mobilizing all
Royal guidance, the government established economic
stakeholders (government agencies, civil society, national
and development areas all around the Kingdom with
and international institutions, private sector) case in point
the aim of attracting local and foreign investments and
is the “National Strategy for Youth”, and “We are All
establishing projects that will absorb labor force in these
Jordan” Youth initiatives.
regions.
Reforms
Investment
With access to over one billion consumers at the cross
118
Jordan realizes the importance of continuing the
roads of three continents, Jordan is situated at the heart
thrust of its reform agenda. Transforming Jordan into
of the region that interconnects three continents. Its
a modern knowledge-based economy with increased
location and excellent transportation network make it an
productivity and employment continues to be at the core
ideal base of operations for companies seeking export
of Jordan’s long-term development vision as articulated
to countries and regions which Jordan has bilateral and
in the “Kuluna Al Urdun” (We are all Jordan) initiative,
multilateral trade agreements with, thereby expanding
which builds on past achievements and previous reform
their market to over one billion consumers in Europe,
Jordan
North America and the Middle East. As well, its stable
economic liberalization initiative through transformation
political and economic environments enhance the
of Aqaba, the Kingdom’s only port city and a
Kingdom’s suitability as a base from which to supply
surrounding area of 375 km2, into the Aqaba Special
such large markets. Jordan is home to a competitive
Economic Zone Authority (ASEZA). ASEZA is a duty free
and vibrant economy that has achieved constantly high
zone that is successfully attracting substantial foreign
growth.
and domestic private investment. It offers advanced
The investment promotion law in Jordan offers a
infrastructure and logistics systems, quality lifestyle, and
number of benefits and incentives to investors in the key
a superior business environment.
sectors of the economy, including industry, agriculture,
Aqaba Development Corporation (ADC), inaugurated
hospitals, hotels, leisure and recreational compounds,
at the beginning of 2004, is the central development
Maritime transport, railways, pipeline transportation
company for ASEZA. It is a private shareholding
and distribution services for water, gas, and petroleum
company owned jointly by the government and the
derivatives as well as their exploitation, conventions
Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority (ASEZA) with
and exhibition centers, call centers. Jordan’s economy
the mission to implement the ASEZA Master Plan in
offers special opportunities in fast rising sectors that
a manner that ensures integrated development by
include pharmaceuticals, minerals, information and
maximizing public-private partnerships.
communication technology ICT, Dead Sea products,
The South Industrial Zone (SIZ) is one of the principal
textiles and apparel, tourism, real estate and automotive
investment opportunities within ASEZA. Comprising
industry.
some 12 square kilometers of still vacant readily
Jordan Investment Board (JIB) is a governmental body
developable land, it encompasses and surrounds
that was established by means of the investment
the existing heavy industrial district. It is also directly
promotion law of 1995 and the investment law of 2003,
adjacent to the site where the new Aqaba seaport will
JIB is a world class agency entrusted with promoting
be built over the coming five to seven years. Already
Jordan as a unique destination for foreign direct
present are the marine terminals for import and export of
investment and sustaining domestic investment to
dry bulk and liquid bulk commodities. The development
achieve economic prosperity in the Kingdom. JIB is at
concept for the SIZ is to build an industrial area that
the disposal of all investors seeking assistance in their
provides for the development of existing industries in an
business and investment needs.
orderly manner, develops related downstream industries
The Government of Jordan has implemented a bold
and provides a highly competitive world-class industrial
119
JO
park to enable the development of new industries. The
poised to emerge as a producer of world-class fruits
SIZ concept plans for industrial clusters which meet
and vegetables. The Pharmaceutical and Medical
the demands of existing and new industries; provides
Supply sector together represent one of Jordan’s
centralized grouping of services such as cooling water,
premier industries, surpassed only by garment
pipelines and conveyors where possible; and plans for
sector in terms of both total output and exports.
inter-modal transport centers to enable rapid transfer
With pharmaceuticals exports exceeding USD 442.4
of goods and people. The SIZ dedicates part of the
million in 2007, Jordan is the MENA regions largest
area to anchor an integrated agro-chemical/fertilizer
Arab exporter and a growing producer of consumable
cluster, using the competitive advantage of Jordan
medical supplies.
and its neighbors in phosphate, potash and natural
The demand analysis exams trade flows in a wide range
gas resources as well as taking advantage of existing
of manufacturing sectors under the broad heading
fertilizer industry and deepwater ports both existing
of other manufactured products, including: furniture
and under-development. The SIZ has also dedicated
and furniture components; electrical machinery and
remaining areas for heavy chemical industries,
electronics; fabricated plastic products; and packaging.
supporting industries and future industrial expansion.
The King Hussein Bin Talal Development Area (KHBTDA)
ICT & Health Sector
in Mafraq – situated 60 km northeast of the capital
Amman at the Nexus of a modern highway network
ICTs growth in Jordan has surpassed the high rates
connecting Jordan, Syria, Iraq and Saudi Arabia – is
witnessed in the region, with many firms headquartered
strategically positioned to function as an industrial
in Jordan and maintaining project offices in regional
center and inland port stretching across 21 square
markets. Jordan’s prominent reputation in health care,
kilometers with an adjacent functional airport and a
based on advanced systems and highly regarded
future railway system. Through the unique combination
physicians, is attracting 100,000 international patients
of its geographic location, public sector commitment,
annually.
and a legal and regulatory framework underpinned by
the progressive and robust development areas law, the
Transport
KHBTDA is an unparalleled infrastructure, industry and
logistics investment opportunity. With regional markets
Jordan and most of its neighbors signed the
exceeding 300 million inhabitants, the potential to
International Agreement on Rail Development in the
connect overland routes with access to major regional
Arab Mashreq, which defined minimum technical
ports, and the planned conversion of the adjacent
standards and identified priorities routes for linking the
King Hussein Airbase and to a mixed use airport, the
economies of the region. The network within Jordan
sight has the potential to become not only a leading
is fully consistent with the standards of and priorities
location for industrial production, but also a regional
specified in the agreement, as is the work is underway
transportation hub for inward movement of goods from
in neighboring countries. All of Jordan’s neighbors have
throughout the region, and indeed the world.
plans for standard gauge rail development to the Jordan
border.
Industry
Services account for 73% of Jordanian GDP in 2005.
Jordan commercial services balance with the world
120
The manufacturing sector comprises a great deal of the
has been positive until 2000. Jordanian leading export
industrial activity that will drive investment demand into
services sectors are travel (55%) and transportation
the KHBTDA. The Mafraq Development Corporation
(22%). Services sectors reforms are well advanced
(MDC) vision for the sight is to attract investment from
and generally in line with international best practices
a variety of light and medium industrial sectors, with
and principles of the Single Market. Jordan has made
the aim of serving major regional export markets as well
substantial commitments under GATS by binding 11
as Jordanian domestic demand. Sectors with potential
sectors.
to drive development include: food and beverage;
The EU’s policy towards the Mediterranean region
pharmaceutical and medical supplies; light chemicals;
as a whole is governed by the Euro-Mediterranean
and a wide range of other manufactured products.
Partnership, launched at the 1995 Barcelona summit
Jordan has already established itself as a serious
between the European Union and its 10 Mediterranean
exporter to regional markets, and its leading producers
partners. Jordan is an active participant in furthering the
are already looking beyond, to the EU and the US,
trade objective of this process whose aim is to create
to export high quality foods, and the Jordan valley is
a Euro-Mediterranean Free Trade Area by 2010 via a
Jordan
network of bilateral Association Agreements between
Trade Relations
the EU and individual Mediterranean partners, together
On 25 February 2004 Jordan signed a free trade
themselves. The Euro-Mediterranean Association
agreement with Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. The
Agreement with Jordan was signed on 24 November
Agadir Agreement, as it is known, commits the parties
1997 and entered into force on 1 May 2002 replacing
to removing substantially all tariffs on trade between
the co-operation Agreement of 1977.
them, and to intensifying economic cooperation notably
Industrial products originating in Jordan are imported
in the field of harmonising their legislation with regard to
into the EU free of customs duties and charges.
standards and customs procedures. A similar agreement
Reciprocally, Jordan abolished customs duties and
has been signed 2009 with Turkey. Jordan already signed
charges on a large number of products originating in the
a bilateral free trade agreement with the US in 2000 and
Community and is liberalising the remaining products
a free trade agreement with Singapore in 2004. It is to be
in several stages, according to their sensitivity for
noted that Jordan became a member of the World Trade
Jordanian markets.
Organisation (WTO) in April 2000.
Jordan
with free trade agreements between the partners
121
KW
KUWAIT
COUNTRY NAME:
State of Kuwait
LAND AREA:
17,800 km2
POPULATION:
2.8 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), English (commercial)
CURRENCY:
1 Kuwaiti Dinar (KWD) = 1000 Fils
1 EUR = 0.38 KWD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Kuwait City (capital), Hawalli, Jahrah,
Sabahiyah
NATIONAL DAY:
25 February
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
Kuwait is a small, rich, relatively open economy
with self-reported crude oil reserves of about 104
billion barrels – 10% of world reserves. Kuwait is the
seventh largest oil exporter in the world; sits on a
tenth of global crude reserves, and has plans to
boost output to 4 million barrel by day by 2020.
Kuwait plans also to spend some $55bn on oil
projects in the coming five years, which will help
Kuwait to increase its oil output by 300,000 bpd
starting from mid-2009. The spending includes a
multi-billion dollar scheme to produce more oil
from some northern oil fields under the delayed
‘Project Kuwait’ which involve foreign firms in
production. Kuwait is also rich with gas. Its natural
gas reserve is the twentieth in world, with an
estimated reserve of 62.8Tcf which contributes to
0.9% of the world’s total reserves.
KUWAIT CITY
important obstacle for the flow of foreign investment
into the country. The sale of state properties law sets
guidelines for the government to provide state land to
local or foreign investors. It also provides a legal basis
for projects involving public-private partnerships (PPPs).
Finally, a bill was passed authorizing the privatization
of Kuwait Airways, which would mark the first major
privatization in the country. Kuwait granted licenses to
three private airlines and four new private universities,
and privatized a number of gas stations.
Oil & Petroleum
Kuwait petroleum accounts for nearly half of GDP, 95%
of export revenues, and 80% of government income.
Oil will account for around half of Kuwait’s nominal GDP
in 2009-10, and will drive the wider economy through
its knock-on impact on government consumption,
and hence private-sector domestic demand. Kuwait
Economy
experienced rapid economic growth over the last several
years on the back of high oil prices and in 2008 posted
Macroeconomic performance has been strong due
its tenth consecutive budget surplus. However, oil output
to high oil proceeds, and the outlook remains very
is expected to fall sharply in 2009, following an OPEC
favourable. Structural reforms continued, aimed at
agreement to cut production, before expanding by 9% in
promoting a dynamic private sector driven economy and
2010. The global financial crisis might have also slowed
enhancing incentives for bringing in foreign technical
the pace of investment and development projects, but
know-how. Kuwait’s structural reforms aiming to promote
Kuwait has vowed to use its considerable financial
a dynamic open economy driven by the private sector
resources to stabilize the economy if necessary.
have been gaining momentum. The National Assembly
in 2007 passed three important economic laws. One
Banking Sector
law reduces the profit tax on foreign investors from
122
55% to 15% and exempts capital gains from stock
Kuwait has one of the most robust banking sectors in
investment from tax. The new legislation removes an
the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region, benefiting
Kuwait
from the country’s outstanding economic performance
Islamic competitor but other Islamic financial service
in recent years. Kuwaiti banks are also benefiting from
providers are set to pose increased competitive
fairly effective banking supervision by Central Bank which
pressures.
has been very successful role in restoring confidence in
the system and nurturing its development. The fact that
Insurance Sector
Kuwait has relatively undiversified economy, with half of
its GDP generated from oil-related activities, the result
While Kuwait was among the first Gulf States to launch a
of banks having limited non-oil related exposures and
domestic insurance industry, with the Kuwait Insurance
sizeable balance-sheet concentrations, both to the oil
Company founded in 1960 and Al Ahleia Insurance
sector and to individual entities.
in 1962, the sector still only accounts for around 1%
The Central Bank of Kuwait (CBK) is monitoring banks
of Kuwait Gross Domestic Product (GDP). However,
closely, including through regular stress testing. Kuwait
Kuwait’s insurance industry is developing at a steady
recognizes that the number, size and activities of
pace, with growing popularity among locals being driven
investment companies have grown significantly over
by a wider range of available products, especially from
the last few years, making that sector systemically
companies that provide Sharia-compliant services.
important. The overall current regulatory framework
The local Kuwaiti market has strong potential for
covers disclosure, credit concentration and provisioning,
expansion. According to official figures, the Kuwaiti
anti-money laundering, and consumer/instalment loans
population is growing at a rate of 3.6% a year. The
limits. The CBK is carefully watching individual banks’
increase is largely being fuelled by a continued influx of
exposures to investment companies. Kuwait’s domestic
foreigners.
banking system is also relatively saturated, with 16 banks
While foreign companies do operate in the Kuwaiti
– including Islamic financial institutions, specialized bank
insurance industry, the 12 local firms dominate the
and foreign banks branches – competing to serve a total
sector, accounting for more than 85 percent of the
population of 3.4 million (only a third of which comprises
market. Activity is mainly centred on general insurance, or
the banks’ traditional retail target market). Conventional
non-life policies, which include property, marine, general
banks have historically dominated the financial system.
accident and fire insurance. Life insurance has recently
To date, Kuwait Finance House has been their primary
been gaining in popularity, with such policies accounting
123
KW
for almost 30% of total premiums as of the end of 2006,
Power & Water
according to a report issued by Dubai-based firm CPI
Financial in 2008. This is due in part to new regulations
The Kuwait Electricity and Water Ministry’s current five-
that require expatriates to have medical insurance.
year plan concentrates on developing and upgrading
The change in attitude toward life insurance may
electricity and water services for consumers, including
also stem from the rise of companies offering Sharia-
several major projects to meet increasing consumer
compliant products, first offered in 2000. Takaful
demand. Proposed new projects include building
insurance has been strengthening over years in the
new power generating stations that will be capable of
Kuwaiti market, as it is the case in other GCC States,
generating up to 6,700 megawatts of power equivalent
accounting for around 20% of all premiums as of
to 70% of the current production. One such project
mid-2007.
involves establishing a power generation plant at the
north Zour station that will operate on gas turbines. The
Health Sector
project will be divided into two stages. The first was
floated through a public tender during 2008. It includes
Kuwait is looking at introducing greater private sector
constructing the first part of the station generating
participation in the delivery of the country’s healthcare
1,600 megawatts and will be completed in 2010. The
system. The Ministry of Health in June 2008 stated that
second stage commenced in 2009 to generate 1,600
it was looking at the outsourcing of the management
megawatts too and is slated for completion in 2011.
of government clinics and hospitals to private sector
Kuwait is also to float a tender to construct the Subiya
professionals. Kuwait is putting efforts to extend the
power station that will generate 2,000 megawatts; work
private sector participation in the health care system, and
on which is expected to commence in 2010. There are
opening the sector to private and foreign investment.
plans to undertake a number of projects to increase
water production. Construction of new water desalination
plants will produce 275 million gallons of water per day
and ease continuing water shortages.
Agricultural Sector
In an effort to promote food security, Kuwait is
considering new projects in the agricultural sector,
such as the production of plant and fish farming,
livestock, dairy production, fattening of calves and
cattle-breeding. In general, the non-oil contribution to
GDP continues to expand rapidly and both the fiscal
and external current account remains in large surplus.
Growth in the non-oil economy has been over 9%, and
the large increase in oil revenue generated substantial
fiscal and external current account surpluses, enabling
the country to build up the stock of foreign assets.
Trade
Export volumes in 2009 are similarly expected to decline
as demand weakens in Kuwait’s biggest export markets,
notably in East Asia. Growth in the services sector (led by
financial services, logistics, telecommunications and
retail), which accounts for around 40% of nominal GDP,
will be modest in 2009-10. As a result, the Economic
Intelligence Unit (EIU) forecast that real GDP will contract
by 0.7% in 2009, after expanding by an estimated 8.5%
in 2008, before returning to growth of 4.4% in 2010, as
the external outlook begins to improve. Kuwait’s global
integration is underpinned by active membership in
124
Kuwait
The EIU expects that Kuwait will follow an expansionary
to liberalize domestic regulations. A member of the WTO
fiscal policy, using its oil revenue to raise spending on
since 1995, Kuwait also participates in various
infrastructure and redistribute wealth. The fiscal surplus
preferential trade arrangements, including the GCC
is forecast to average 8.3% of GDP a year in 2009-13.
customs union and the Greater Arab Free Trade Area.
The EIU expects also that the oil sector will drive most
The GCC common market agreement was launched in
economic activity. Real GDP growth is set to decline
January 2008.
from the highs of recent years, as oil output rises only
In May 2007, Kuwait adopted a fiscal strategy involving
slowly (following recent OPEC cuts) and efforts to draw
higher capital spending, limiting expanding current
in foreign investment to boost production in the northern
expenditure, and saving part of the oil wealth to reduce
oilfields remain stalled, despite the fact that some new
dependency on oil income for funding the budget. In
energy projects will be initiated towards the end of the
2007 also, Kuwait abandoned the peg to the US dollar in
forecast period. Following a slight upward revision to
favour of a peg to an undisclosed currency basket.
EIU oil price forecast, EIU now expects a budget surplus
Kuwait is undertaking large-scale investments to expand
of 2.4% of GDP in fiscal year 2009/10.
oil production and refining capacity.
The IMF in a 2008 report urged Kuwait to support more
Foreign Direct Investment
private sector-led investment and growth by bringing
capital market, companies, competition, public-private
The net flow of foreign direct investment into Kuwait
partnerships and privatization laws in line with best
should rise modestly over the forecast period.
international practice. Progress in 2007 included
Nevertheless, apart from Equate II (a petrochemicals
reduction of taxes on foreign investors, priority given to
venture) and some smaller-scale projects, most
the new capital market law and other draft laws to
developments will be financed almost exclusively from
facilitate broadening the role of private sector. There is
domestic sources. The upstream oil and gas sectors
potential to enhance the involvement of foreign technical
will remain largely closed to foreign investors, limiting
know-how in the development of the northern oil fields.
technology transfer.
Kuwait
global and regional trade initiatives and an ongoing push
125
LB
LEBANON
COUNTRY NAME:
Lebanese Republic
LAND AREA:
10,200 km2
POPULATION:
4,1 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), French, English,
Armenian
CURRENCY:
1 Lebanese Pound (LBP) = 100 Piaster
1 EUR = 2 LBP (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Beirut (capital), Sidon, Jounié, Tripoli
NATIONAL DAY:
22 November – Independence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
Lebanon gained its independence from France
in 1943 and developed one of the Middle East’s
most advanced economies. It has long been
the convergence point of trade routes and the
meeting place for a wide variety of peoples, the
basis of the rich and diverse national culture that
exists in the country today. It is a regional and
international hub for trade, finance, services,
industry, culture and tourism. At the centre of the
Eastern Mediterranean, Lebanon is at the crossroads of Africa, Asia and Europe. It enjoys a rich
variety of climates and ecosystems.
BEIRUT
resource – vast forests of cedar – was exhausted
in ancient times, and today, the main focus of the
primary sector is quarrying for the cement industry.
The industrial sector is also small, partly because the
domestic market shows a preference for imported
goods. Among the sector’s most significant exports are
processed food and jewellery – with the latter showing
strong growth in recent years.
Lebanon enjoys a free foreign exchange market,
full currency convertibility, complete repatriation of
capital and a regulated banking secrecy law. These
privileges make Lebanon a prime destination for foreign
investment and tourism. Investors can benefit from
a sophisticated legal framework, which protects the
As a trading and international banking centre, it was
rights and assets of both Lebanese and non-Lebanese
long known as “the Switzerland of the Middle East”
investors.
until its disastrous 1975–1990 civil war and protracted
conflict. The 1975-90 civil war seriously damaged
Financial Sector
Lebanon’s economic infrastructure, cut national output
126
by half, and all but ended Lebanon’s position as a
Lebanon’s financial sector, one of the region’s most
Middle Eastern entrepot and banking hub. In the years
sophisticated, offers a wide range of services. There are
since, Lebanon has rebuilt much of its war-torn physical
few restrictions on domestic banking and few barriers
and financial infrastructure by borrowing heavily –
to foreign banks. Regulations are fairly transparent,
mostly from domestic banks.
and credit is allocated on market terms. There are 69
Lebanon’s most important area of economic activity
banks registered at the National Bank of Lebanon/
has historically been services, which in 2008 accounted
Banque du Liban, with 62 active commercial banks and
for an estimated three-quarters of nominal GDP. The
12 specialized banks. Banking currently employs more
capital, Beirut, remains a significant regional banking
than 17,660 individuals in 872 branches conveniently
centre. Although agriculture remains an important
spread throughout the country, and manages the
source of employment, most rural holdings are small,
equivalent of $90 billion in assets nation-wide.
economically inefficient and rented by subsistence
Foreign representation is important either in the form
farmers – so agriculture accounts for only around 5%
of a foreign bank maintaining branches in Lebanon
of nominal GDP. The country’s most precious natural
(11 banks) or equity stakes in several local banks.
Lebanon
16 foreign banks have also a representation office in
Lebanese banks from subscribing to subprime
Lebanon. Foreign representation is significant, whether
mortgage products.
through foreign banks maintaining their branches in
Lebanon or equity stakes in several local banks. At the
Insurance Sector
same time, Lebanese banks have expanded abroad,
particularly in Syria, Jordan and France. Today, there
The Lebanese insurance market has always been open
are eighteen Lebanese banks active in one way or
and liberal, in line with Lebanon’s free market economy.
another in sixteen foreign countries. Foreigners can
Private insurers have historically been the only players
open accounts in banks operating in Lebanon and
in the local market and the state has never national-
get credit on market terms. The Banking Control
ized or expropriated an insurance firm. Additionally,
Commission (BCC) closely monitors bank credits. Bank
the Lebanese state never owned insurers and private
financial statements are in compliance with international
companies did not have to compete with state entities
accounting standards. Independent auditors audit
or worry about government monopolies, as is the case
annual accounts, and most banks utilize internationally
in many other Arab countries.
recognized accounting firms. The recent report by
This characteristic has helped the sector respond to
International Monetary Fund (IMF) noted that the global
market forces and avoid the distortions associated with
financial crisis on Lebanon had had no major impact.
state-ownership of insurers. Further, the sector has
Like other Middle Eastern states, the local bourse
very low barriers to entry and is one of the most open
declined, but real estate markets did not crash, and
insurance sectors in the region. The existing rules and
banks were not failing. Key to Lebanon’s success at
regulations already allow foreign insurers full ownership
insulating itself from the worst of the global financial
of local operations and for the acquisition of a domestic
meltdown has been sound fiscal policy from the Central
insurer. Competition exists from a large number of
Bank. Years ago, CBL issued a bank circular prohibiting
domestic firms as well as from Arab and foreign
127
LB
insurers already present in the market. As at 2007,
now being made to reposition Lebanon on the inter-
figures published by Lebanon’s Ministry of Economy
national tourism map. The Ministry of Tourism is
and Trade showed that the total assets of that coun-
continuing with projects to promote Lebanon providing
try’s insurance sector amounted to $1,555 million, of
electronic services and information, participating in
which $829 million was held in investments.
world exhibitions, and targeting selected new markets.
The operational efficiency of the Lebanese insurance
sector is positively influenced by the fact that the
Energy Sector
industry is totally in the hands of the private sector. On
the other hand, Lebanon does not have the advantages
Lebanon depends almost entirely on external energy
of the more efficient Arab markets in terms of large
sources, in particular for oil products. Growing energy
industries related to oil production. Further, Lebanon
needs may impact increasingly on the high energy
has one of the more developed life insurance sectors
import bill and thus on the country’s economy. It could
relative to other Arab countries, which increases the
develop towards a transit country, including to the
comparative efficiency of the Lebanese market.
benefit of secure energy supply to the EU. Lebanon
took a major decision to introduce natural gas in the
Tourism
economy, although it has no known gas reserves of
its own. Gas pipelines are under development and
Tourism, the country’s major economic activities and
will bring Egyptian and Syrian gas to the region and
foreign exchange earners, was hit severely by the coun-
possibly further to the EU. Lebanon participates in the
try’s protracted political crises. Adverse political and
Euro-Mashreq Gas Market project that aims to reform
security conditions placed it on the list of the “world’s
and modernise the gas industry in Egypt, Jordan,
most dangerous destinations”. However, efforts are
Lebanon and Syria, and achieve the progressive integration of their gas markets with a view to integration
with the EU internal gas market.
Rehabilitation of energy infrastructure requires significant investments. Development of the oil sector,
including the viability of the operation of a refinery, is
under study. Lebanon aims to increase the share of
renewable energy sources such as hydro, solar and
wind in the country’s energy balance to as high as 10%
by 2015. The state-owned electricity producer, Electricité du Liban (EDL), generated 10.54bn kwh in 2007,
overwhelmingly from imported oil. This was a modest
3.2% improvement on the previous year, but still well
below estimates of current demand of some 14.5bn
kwh. As a result, electricity rationing continues in all
areas, especially during the summer months, when
air-conditioning greatly increases demand, leading to
periodic brownouts and – less frequently – outright
blackouts.
Investment
The Investment Development Agency of Lebanon
(IDAL) provides support and assistance for investment
matters.
Worldwide telecom company Ericsson established a
global-services delivery centre in Beirut in August 2007
to provide services to local and regional costumers.
The centre will service 70 countries in the region.
A new Islamic investment bank is to set up headquarters in Beirut. The Jousour Bank, owned by the Kuwaitbased International Investors Group – IIG, will provide
128
Lebanon
financial and investment services according to Islamic
a cable car departing from KROUM when it has been
principles.
constructed.
Horizon Management, together with Kuwait-based
Communications & IT
projects in Beirut. Excavation for a 220-room hotel
at Raouche, Ras Beirut, is currently underway. On
Lebanon was one of the first countries in the region
completion, the $45 million project will be under the
to have widespread Internet access, given a strong
management of international hotel-chain Kempinski.
interest in technology, multilingual skills and a vast
The second project is a five-star hotel and shopping
expatriate population seeking to communicate with
mall in Verdun. This is estimated to require investment
relatives at home, but facing high fixed-line interna-
of $100 million.
tional call costs. Dial-up Internet became widespread in
Optimum Developments is to launch the Ehden moun-
the mid-1990s, but fears of losses to the state-owned
tain destination project. This will consist of two sepa-
telecoms provider from Internet telephony helped delay
rate components with nature integration as a major
the official introduction of broadband until 2007. In the
feature.
interim period, as many as 100,000 residents obtained
KROUM is to be a traditional Lebanese commercial,
faster access through unlicensed cable, microwave and
residential mixed use village, a 120 room 5-star hotel, a
satellite providers. The delay caused penetration rates
residential spine offering a diversity of apartments and
to fall behind those of most Gulf Arab states, although
a medi-spa.
the country remained ahead of other regional neigh-
LES PARCS D`EHDEN is an eco village, hill lakeside
bours, with a total of 230,000 subscriptions in 2005,
cabanas and family dwellings, and a small conven-
according to the ITU. Since the official introduction
tion centre. Both projects will complement the long
of broadband, penetration has increased, but costs
awaited Ehden Eco Ski Resort, to be developed on a
remain high: for example, a 1Mb broadband connection
40,000,000 m2 car-free domain accessed solely by
typically costs more than $100 a month.
Lebanon
United Real Estate Company, is undertaking two new
129
LY
LIBYA
COUNTRY NAME:
Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
LAND AREA:
1,8 million km2
POPULATION:
6,3 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), Italian, English
CURRENCY:
1 Libyan Dinar (LYD) = 1.000 Dirham
1 EUR = 1.7 LYD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Tripoli (capital), Benghazi, Al-Djofra,
Misurata, Zawia, El Khoms, Ras-Jedir
NATIONAL DAY:
1 September – Revolution Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
Libya, one of the largest countries of North Africa,
represents an exciting emerging market in close
proximity to Europe. Today there is much that is
positive concerning its economy as Libya makes
progress in integrating itself within the global
trading system and embarks on a major economic program of development. Libya’s market
is increasingly open to foreign investors and offers
tremendous opportunities for new business. Libya
is undertaking a LD150 billion ($126.5bn) five-year
infrastructure redevelopment plan to modernise
water, irrigation and sanitation facilities and build
airports, schools and houses. Spending is also high
on areas such as railways and telecommunications. It is continuing with its efforts to diversify the
economy and encourage more private-sector
participation in areas like manufacturing and
services. As the country moves forward with its
modernisation and integration within the global
economy, Libya offers potentially rich trade
opportunities in nearly every sector, including
oil and gas, agriculture, telecommunications,
education, medical equipment and services and
tourism.
TRIPOLI
Income obtained from oil and gas exports has enabled
Libya to maintain a large public sector with extensive
public investment in services like health and education,
as well as agriculture and the development of non-oil
related industries.
Economy
Public services comprise about 7% of GDP. In 2009 the
oil sector provides about 70% of GDP, up from 50% in
2002 in line with rising oil prices during the period. The
share of other sectors to the economy has fallen correspondingly, except for public services, which absorbed a
significant proportion of the higher revenue.
The public administration employs some 16% of the
workforce; health services employ 12% and education
27%. While the relative dominance of the oil and gas
sector has continued to increase, the extraction industry
employs less than 2% of the labour force. The manufacturing industry employs 8%, while agriculture, forestry,
and fishing employ about 7% (agriculture having declined
from about 70% before the growth of the oil industry).
The country operates a large trade surplus. Some 97%
of exports consist of oil, natural gas and petroleumbased commodities. The remaining 3% mainly consist
of agricultural and fisheries products. In 2007, 88% of
Libya has been ranked by the World Bank as an “upper-
exports went to the EU, with Italy as the main destination,
middle-income developing country”. The economy is
followed by Germany, Spain and France.
dominated by the oil and gas sector, through which it
has been transformed from a poor, largely agricultural
Investment
economy to one of Africa’s wealthiest nations. It has the
130
highest income per capita of the developing countries in
The country’s Promotion of Investment of Foreign Capital
the Mediterranean region.
Law No. (7) 2003, which amended the Law No. (5) 1997
Libya
law on foreign investment, is the key investment law.
the modernisation of the banking sector by introducing
The 1997 law allowed 100 percent foreign ownership of
modern services such as ATMs and credit cards. Twenty-
companies that receive a licence. Relatively few projects
one regional banks have been merged, banking super-
were licensed, partly because of complex and time-
vision reinforced, interest rates and foreign exchange
consuming procedures, and partly because key sectors
partially liberalised, and the exchange rate unified.
such as telecommunications, financial services and distri-
2007 saw the start of a strategy announced by the
bution were excluded.
Central Bank as early as 2004, to restructure, develop
Under the 1997 law, the investor is entitled to employ
and modernise the banking system to reach standards of
foreign staff and technical expertise necessary for the
international institutions.
establishment and operation of the project. The process
Minority stakes of two Libyan banks were sold to foreign
for obtaining work permits can be cumbersome. Article 8
investors. The first step was to sell off a minority stake in
of the 2003 foreign capital law specifies that investment
Sahara Bank, Libya’s second largest commercial bank
shall be allowed in the following fields: industry, health,
with total assets of around $3.6 billion. BNP Paribas SA
tourism, services and agriculture, with other field speci-
won a bid for the privatisation of Libya’s Sahara Bank
fied by a decision of the General People’s Committee
with 19% of the shares, for about €145 million with the
upon submission of the Secretary.
option to raise their participation up to 51% in three to
five years. The Wahda Bank sale was structured in the
Banking & Finance
same way as the previous deal, with the offer of an initial
19% stake. In 2008, a number of foreign commercial
The most significant reforms in the service sector over
banks won approval to open their representative offices
the past decade have occurred in banking and finance.
in Libya.
The latest Banking Law No.1 of 2005, along with the
The Libyan Stock Exchange, established in March 2007,
Anti-Money Laundering Law No.2 of 2005, are aimed at
was the first exchange of its kind in the country.
creating a new legal framework for the banking system.
The country’s five public banks were recapitalised and
Imports
its four private banks licensed. The Bank of Commerce
and Development is the most substantial of the four
Libya imports a wide range of industrial and agricultural
private banks operating in Libya, and has led the way in
products; major suppliers for these products are Italy,
131
LY
Germany, China and Tunisia. China is now Libya’s third
Energy Sector
largest supplier and the second largest after the EU as a
whole.
Some 97% of Libya’s exports consist of oil, natural gas,
Libya is highly dependent on imports for much of its food
iron and steel and petroleum-based commodities. The
supply, particularly cereals and fats and oils. Approxi-
energy industry is thus the country’s most important
mately half of Libya’s food needs come from imports.
export industry and a key source of income.
Major suppliers are Tunisia, the Russian Federation,
Libya’s proven oil reserves of 41 billion barrels are almost
Turkey, the Netherlands and Italy.
half the total reported oil reserves in Africa and over
3% of the world total. Libya has the largest proven oil
Exports
reserves in Africa, at 41.5 billion barrels as of January
2007 which is up from 39.1 billion barrels in 2006,
Exports of agriculture goods are extremely small,
with new discoveries supporting, and often allowing
primarily animal and vegetable oils and fats, potatoes and
increases, in the rate of production.
some beverages. Local consultations have confirmed a
Libya is currently the second-largest crude oil producer
prolific trade in smuggling subsidised food into neigh-
in Africa, with an estimated 1.7 million barrels per day
bouring countries means that much of Libya’s agriculture
in 2006. With current plans to expand production to 3
exports not being captured by official statistics. Subsi-
million barrels a day, Libya’s proven reserves would last
dised agricultural products from Libya reach Chad, and
for 38 years. Despite the lifting of sanctions, Libya’s
other Maghreb countries through Tunisia and then on to
current oil production is still only half of what it was in the
Algeria.
early 1970s, and is expected to climb back to 3 million
Libya is a net importer of fish and fish products, a
barrels per day by 2015.
trend that has increased over recent years as exports
It has been estimated that more than $30 billion in foreign
of Atlantic bluefin tuna have declined and imports of
investment will be needed to achieve this increase in
processed pacific tuna have increased substantially.
production.
Fisheries exports are categorised by small volumes of
Production costs are relatively low, and Libyan oil is high
high value premium bluefin tuna and frozen fish fillets
in quality. Low transport costs given its close proximity
sold to the Japanese and Korean markets, with higher
to Europe give Libya a further advantage. European oil
volumes of common varieties sold live or chilled to
companies maintained their operations after US compa-
nearby Tunisia, Malta and Turkey.
nies left in the 1980s; the American companies signed a
Standstill Agreement with the Libyan National Oil Corporation (NOC) which allowed them to retain their original oil
rights and obligations. The NOC maintained production
at lower levels, and after the lifting of sanctions the US
companies resumed operations.
Some 5% of Libyan oil exports go to China. Libya has
given limited prospecting concessions to both China and
Taiwan. In 2004, the China National Petroleum Corporation constructed two oil pipes linking the Wafa oil field
with the port of Mellitah in association with the Italian
Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi and the Libyan National Oil
Corporation. Further pipelines are under consideration to
allow the export of oil from Niger via Libya.
Libya’s gas reserves are estimated at 1,500 billion cu.m.,
or 1% of world reserves. At an anticipated extraction rate
of around 12 billion m3/y the known reserves would last
for 125 years. However, at this extraction rate the income
from gas is considerably less than that from oil.
At an oil price of $50 per barrel, Libya’s oil income would
amount to some $50 billion per year. Its income from
natural gas at $350 per 1000m3 would be about $4
billion per year. If it were possible to increase the rate of
gas extraction to give the same annual income as oil, the
known reserves would last for 10 years. In total, Libya’s
132
Libya
proven oil and gas reserves are enough to maintain its
tious government target to see visitor numbers reach 10
national income for about 50 years.
million per year and lift the sector’s percentage of foreign
Libyan natural gas exports have increased since 2005,
revenue to ten per cent, the Libyan tourism industry is
particularly to Italy. The NOC has a joint venture with the
growing rapidly with the construction of hotels, resorts
Italian company, Agip, in the Western Libya Gas Project.
and upgrades in transportation systems, including new
Most of the gas will be exported to Italy via the Green
airports under construction in Tripoli and Benghazi.
Stream pipeline that was inaugurated in 2004, connecting
Libya to Italy via Sicily. This is the biggest foreign invest-
Retail Sector
ment in Libya’s energy sector since UN sanctions were
suspended. For export further afield, Libya is expanding
The retail sector has stabilised in recent years, following
its current LNG plants and building new ones.
the abolishment of a ban on private selling and control by
state owned stores. The sector is characterised by more
Telecommunications
or less modern shops, mostly small; a traditional souk
selling mainly household goods, clothes and textiles;
The telecommunications sector has grown dramatically
and apparently unregulated street markets selling every-
since 1990. Considerable further expansion is planned,
thing. Restrictions on private ownership have been lifted,
with a targeted increase in density from 12% to around
attracting some local and foreign investment mostly into
37% by 2020, at an estimated cost of $10 billion. Priva-
the higher end sector.
tisation of the state monopoly is not currently intended,
but foreign investors have played an increasing role.
Privatisation
In 2004, France’s Alcatel and Finland’s Nokia won the
contract to develop and construct the Libyan mobile
The negotiations on the return of the American oil compa-
network.
nies led to the introduction of a privatisation policy. Some
In 2008, China’s Zhongxing Telecom Equipment signed
360 production units were scheduled to be transferred
an agreement for the construction of the first network in
from the public to the private sector between 2003 and
Africa under the WiMax regulation.
2008. By the end of 2004 only 14 had been successfully
privatised.
Tourism
By August 2006 the number of privatised enterprises had
reached 67, with a total value of LD 696 million (about
As a preferred sector for foreign investment, the tourism
$500 million). These included an aquaculture project, six
sector has attracted major investments from companies
chicken factories, and a range of industrial companies.
Libya
in the UK, Italy and other countries. Driven by an ambi-
133
MR
MAURITANIA
COUNTRY NAME:
Islamic Republic of Mauritania
LAND AREA:
1 million km2
POPULATION:
3,2 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), French, others
CURRENCY:
1 Mauritanian Ougiya (MRO) = 5 Khoums
1 EUR = 397,11 MRO (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Nouakchott (capital), Nouadhibou,
Kaedi, Zouérat
NATIONAL DAY:
28 November – Independence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 0
Mauritania lies mainly in the Sahara Desert belt of
West Africa and shares borders with Morocco,
Algeria, Mali and Senegal. The capital city and major
port is Nouakchott while other major towns are Kaedi
and Zouerate and the port of Nouadhibou. The
country possesses a 700 km Atlantic coastline and in
total is approximately twice the size of France,
although over half of the land mass is desert.
ALGIERS
NOUAKCHOTT
export earnings. The main species of fish that can be
caught are deep sea and shellfish, such as shrimp which
are exported to markets like Japan. Fish stocks off the
coast of Mauritania are reputed to be among the richest
and most diverse in the world. The commercial value of
the fish stock is high. It is estimated, for example, that
the country enjoys the largest stocks of octopus and
croakers in the world.
Effective regulations and protective measures such
as patrols off the coastal waters help to prevent
Apart from its newly developed oil and gas sectors, Mauri-
overexploitation of the marine zone. A new fisheries code
tania depends on traditional agriculture, fishing off its rich
adopted in 2000 emphasised sustainable development
coastal waters and a modern mining industry that devel-
of the commercial fishing industry, expansion of artisanal
oped in the 1960s following the discovery of high-grade
fisheries, reorganisation and modernisation of the
iron ore. Raising crops and pasturing livestock remain
fleet and development of processed product exports.
the main economic activities. Major agricultural products,
Mauritania has signed bilateral fishery agreements
produced chiefly near the Senegal River on irrigated lands
with Algeria, Japan, Morocco, Russia, Senegal, Tunisia
and in scattered oases, are millet, dates, sorghum, and
and the European Union. The potential for export
yams. Livestock such as sheep, goats, cattle, and camels
development in this sector lies in the expansion of
are raised.
artisanal and coastal fisheries.
Iron ore sales account for about half of the country’s
There is a new zoning system in place to help boost
export earnings. Gypsum and salt are also mined. Mauri-
the level of activity and increase processing of fish
tania has large copper ore reserves, but difficult mining
products, particularly, pelagic species, which are still
conditions and low world commodity prices have resulted
underexploited. Enhanced quality management and
in mine closures. The country’s few manufactured goods
better promotion will help to improve product access and
are made up principally of processed food (especially
value on foreign markets.
frozen fish) and clothing. Smaller industries include
brewing, dairy processing, oil and sugar refining.
Agriculture
Fishing
This sector is the largest employer in the country,
accounting for nearly 50 percent of all jobs. The sector
134
The important fishing industry contributes around 10
has been liberalised to allow private operators to operate
percent of the country’s GDP and 45 percent of its
where once the state sector was dominant. One of the
Mauritania
key measures of reform has been the development of
Mining
farm credit, which, initially, was available only for rice
production and is now open to other agricultural sectors.
Mining of mainly iron ore is a major economic activity
accounting for around 12 percent of the country’s GDP
Telecommunications & New
Technologies
and is the leading employer after the public service.
Activity in the sector is dominated by the leading mining
company, Societe nationale industrielle et miniere
Mauritania has offshore oil and gas deposits and a growing
(SNIM). The country’s other commercially exploitable
upstream oil industry. Offshore oil extraction began in
mineral deposits consist of copper and cobalt. Gold and
February 2006. GDP surged to 11.2% in 2006, which was
diamond rich sites have also recently been discovered
one of the highest growth rates in the world. Production is
through prospecting and they may prove economically
expected to stabilise at around 30,000 barrels p/d thereby
viable. De Beers and other leading diamond companies
moderating expectations of GDP growth. Mauritania is
are currently exploring the country’s potential in this
one of the four oil refining countries in West Africa. Its
regard. On the strength of the deposits that have so far
downstream oil industry is now a significant element in the
been discovered, the World Bank reported that Mauri-
country’s economy. Oil derived products supply 95% of
tania could become a diamond producer in the medium
the country’s commercial energy needs.
term.
135
MR
Manufacturing
increase steadily over recent years, but other niche
tourism activities are emerging, such as fishing, hunting
Manufacturing, handicrafts and fish-processing together
and nature watching.
contribute about 7 percent of the country’s GDP. Food
In addition to an attractive and extensive coastline,
processing is the main manufacturing activity, while non-
Mauritania boasts a rich and ancient heritage which
food manufacturing activities include chemicals and plas-
includes the old trading and religious centres of
tics, building materials, paper and packaging. However,
Ouadane, Chinguetti, Tichitt and Oualata. These areas
these are all conducted on a small scale and are not
could attract more visitors if marketed energetically
particularly attractive to foreign investors.
and if basic infrastructure was improved. These ancient
settlements were founded in the 11th and 12th centuries
Tourism
to serve the caravans crossing the Sahara and became
focal points of Islamic culture. They have preserved
136
Expansion of the tourism sector offers new and prom-
an urban fabric that evolved between the 12th and
ising potential, if it were to receive a sufficient invest-
16th centuries. Typically, houses with patios crowd
ment, particularly to improve facilities and infrastructure.
along narrow streets around a mosque with a square
It is still very underdeveloped with annual revenues esti-
minaret. The four ancient cities have been designated
mated at only $20m and visitor numbers are currently
UN World Heritage Sites, while the nature reservation
only in the thousands. Most visitors are business trav-
of Banc d’Arguin is also protected. Mauritania is trying
elers to the capital Nouakchott, where there are inter-
to balance preservation of its natural environment with
national standard hotels. Tourism in Mauritania consists
development of tourism and increasing the number of
mainly of desert holidaying, which has seen demand
visitors.
Mauritania
One factor hampering the growth in tourism is the fact
making Mauritania’s banking penetration rate a mere 4.2
that international flights into the country are infrequent
percent. This is one of the lowest across all of Africa and
and expensive. The part privatised national airline, Air
particularly in the surrounding Maghreb countries, where
Mauritanie, flies to Paris and countries in West Africa.
banking rates are around 50 percent. However, bank
Three international airports at Nouadhibou on the coast,
deposits have recently registered an annual growth rate
the main airport serving the capital Nouakchott, also on
of 11 percent.
the coast, and a third airport at the inland city of Atar,
The arrival of more new international players reflects
have connections to 13 national airports and an
the greater attractiveness of the sector. France’s BNP
additional 20 airstrips.
Paribas Group was granted authorisation from the
Mauritanian authorities to open a full-service bank in
Banking & Finance
the country in September 2006. In April 2008, Emerging
firm focused on investing across the African continent,
commercial banks, most of which began as joint ventures
announced it had invested $15.9 million to acquire a
between the state and foreign or domestic investors,
controlling interest in BACIM Bank, the seventh largest
and were progressively privatised. As of December
banking group in Mauritania and whose parent organisa-
2006, the 11 banks had aggregate assets of $1.0 billion
tion is the Central Bank of Mauritania. ECP’s investment
and managed approximately 125,000 bank accounts,
will enable BACIM to transform into a top-tier banking
Mauritania
Capital Partners (ECP), an international private equity
Mauritania’s financial system includes 11 retail and
137
MR
reforms, in agreement with the IMF backed Financial
Sector Assessment Programme recommendations. This
is seen as critical to creating the conditions for higher
private sector-led growth. The increased presence of
foreign banks is likely to boost competition, and, along
with improved banking supervision, should strengthen
the financial sector.
The country saw the establishment of its first exclusively
Islamic bank with the launch of Al Wataniya in March
2008, according to North Africa Times. The new bank is
a pioneer in the sector and seeks to attract capital into
the country.
Exports
Mauritania’s major export industries are iron ore, fish
and fish products, while its most important imports are
machinery and equipment, petroleum products, capital
institution by strengthening management, consolidating
goods, foodstuffs and some consumer goods.
resources, and upgrading technology infrastructure and
improving risk management.
Other Sectors
“The Mauritanian banking sector is poised for significant
138
growth over the next five years due to solid macroeco-
There are development opportunities in the artisanal
nomic fundamentals, an emerging consumer market, and
sector, if initiatives are taken to improve artisan produc-
a growing corporate sector,” said Vincent Le Guennou,
tivity, product quality and markets access. The govern-
executive vice president of ECP. “We expect that
ment adopted a plan for the handcraft industry designed
the growing Mauritanian economy and the increasing
to develop and modernise sector. Financial and insur-
confidence of the international community will continue
ance services, air transportation, health and education
to stimulate foreign direct investment in the country,
have all been privatised. All these sectors offer attractive
resulting in substantial gains for the banking sector”.
investment opportunities, particularly for foreign direct
Mauritania has adopted ambitious banking sector
investments.
Mauritania
Mauritania
139
MA
MOROCCO
COUNTRY NAME:
Kingdom of Morocco
LAND AREA:
446,000 km2
POPULATION:
31,6 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), French
CURRENCY:
1 Moroccan Dirham (MAD) = 100 Santimat
1 EUR = 11.15 MAD (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Rabat (Capital), Casablanca, Fes,
Marrakech, Meknes, Oujda, Agadir,
Tangier, Tetouan, Laâyoune
NATIONAL DAY:
30 July
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 0
Morocco managed to resist the direct effects
of the global financial crisis through solid fundamentals and structural reforms, as well as its
sound banking and financial system and efficient
exchange rate regime. Nonetheless, given its
open economy, Morocco has felt the impact of
the economic downturn on those productive sectors that are most dependent on foreign markets,
particularly Europe, the country’s main trading
partner. In response, the country implemented a
number of measures under the 2009 Finance Act
to bolster domestic demand and investment and
to support the sectors worst hit by the global crisis,
while establishing mechanisms to monitor the
results of the measures taken.
RABAT
Highlights
Seven priority industrial sectors have been targeted by
Morocco for development to boost the country’s exports,
the country’s Ministry Industry, Trade and New Technologies has announced. The sectors comprise four new and
three traditional ones: automotives, aerospace, electronics
and offshoring were the new sectors offering opportunities, while agro-foods, seafood and textiles were the
traditional sectors to be upgraded. But all these sectors
equally possess great potential for development with the
help of investors and partners. The kingdom is the world’s
largest exporter of phosphates, a sector being developed
by state company Office Cherifien des Phosphates (OCP).
A number of international companies have signed partnerships with OCP. A new port at Tangier, being developed
by the Tangier-Mediterranean Special Agency, is set to
Foreign Direct Investment has increased substantially in
be one of the largest deep-water ports in the Mediter-
recent years; from an average of only $80 million in the
ranean. A second terminal, due to be operational in 2012,
1980s to $500mn in the 1990s, it reached $3.5bn in 2008.
will increase the port’s container capacity from 3.5 million
As a liberal economy, Morocco has long been open
twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) to 8.5 million TEU. The
to foreign investors and adopted reforms including
scheme is being accompanied by major infrastructure proj-
privatisation much earlier than many other countries.
ects in the area and is designed to promote regional devel-
Foreign investors are able to own 100% of their
opment. An integrated transport network, including new
businesses, land and properties without any need for a
road and rail networks, is set to cost $5-6 billion. Morocco
local partner.
is also becoming a centre for offshoring, with its existing
The economy has been boosted in recent years by
flagship offshoring zone, CasaNearshore, to be followed
growing consumer spending and inward investment
by others in Rabat, Fez and Marrakech.
which has been underpinned by state-backed
infrastructure projects and tourism. Domestic demand is
Banking
seen growing by 5.9%, down from 10%. Growth in 2008
140
was 5.6%. The HCP saw 2010 growth at 2.4%, although
Morocco’s banking sector, like banking throughout Africa,
much depends on volatile farm yields.
has not suffered as much as financial sectors in other
Morocco
parts of the world, an international conference in Dar es
assets to credit to the private sector fell by 3 points
Salaam, Tanzania held on 10-11 March 2009 was told. In
during this period. The most plausible explanation for
Morocco, net profits in the banking sector was expected
this lies in the structure of the Moroccan credit market,
to grow at around 15% in 2009, Mohamed Benchaaboun,
the IMF said. On the supply side, bank credit is highly
CEO of Morocco’s Banque Centrale Populaire, estimated.
concentrated with limited competition, with the three
But while the financial sector may have escaped the
largest banks accounting for roughly 60% of outstanding
turmoil, the continent is feeling the impact of the global
credit to the private sector in 2007.
recession. In Morocco, Benchaaboun said, the recession
was slowing demand in such vital sectors as tourism and
Tourism
remittances were also falling.
The strength of the banking and financial sector has been
The tourism ministry forecasted a record number of
improved by the success of Morocco’s economic reform
foreign tourists in 2009 but expected that they would
programme since the turn of the century which has
spend less than in previous years. Tourism attracts
substantially strengthened macroeconomic conditions
more investment than any other sector into the country
and accelerated the pace of non-agricultural growth.
and contributes around 7% to the GDP annually, so
Increases in tourism and remittance receipts, coupled
the government has been taking proactive measures to
with higher capital inflows, have sustained current
ensure that this momentum continues through the global
account surpluses for most of the period, and boosted
downturn. With tourist receipts decreasing 3.5%, from
domestic liquidity. In contrast with what happened in
Dh58.67bn (€5.33bn) in 2007 to Dh56.59bn (€5.14bn) in
other regions of the world, these developments did not
2008, internet marketing is being used more actively to
fuel a credit boom, an IMF working paper observed.
expand the arrivals base beyond the traditional European
During the first half of the current decade, the expansion
markets with a focus on attracting tourists from Eastern
of the banking sector’s balance sheet did not translate
Europe, Russia, the Gulf and China.
into a significant increase in credit to the economy. Its
Marrakech, Fez, Casablanca and Agadir have been
ratio to GDP remained basically flat between 2000 and
selected as priority regions for the expansion of high-
2006; in fact, the share of the banking sector’s total
end cultural and beach tourism. Tourism initiatives also
141
MA
include Plan Azur, Plan Biladi and Plan Madain which
12 million people. The total cost of the airport redevelop-
are aimed at developing resorts, bolster domestic
ment plans is estimated at €320m.
tourism and showcase cultural destinations. Plan Azur
A new low-cost airline, Air Arabia Maroc, started opera-
is expected to be the linchpin of the three, as Morocco
tions on 6 May 2009 with an inaugural flight to Stansted
looks to capture some of the lucrative regional resort
Airport in London. The new Moroccan airline, flying to
market. As part of the Azur Plan, a 12 billion dirhams
selected destinations across Europe and North Africa,
($1.5bn) Mediterranean coastal resort was unveiled in
was founded by Air Arabia, one of the first low cost
June. The Saidia Mediterrania resort, inaugurated by King
airlines in the region, in partnership with Regional Air
Mohammed VI, covers 696 hectares and will ultimately
Lines, a leading private carrier in Morocco and Ithmaar
have a capacity of 30,000 beds, and generate 8,000
Bank of Bahrain.
direct jobs and 40,000 indirect ones by 2013. The resort
includes nine top hotels, 12 holiday villages, eight tourist
Infrastructure
complexes, 2,700 apartments, 300 villas, three 18-hole
142
golf courses, a marina with 1,350 berths for boats, and
Morocco is speeding up investment on infrastructure
a 43,000-sq m “Médina Center” Mall that can host up to
projects such as roads, highways, new railway lines and
160 shops.
the important Tanger Med Port complex, which will be
Plan Azur aims to create new tourist destinations on the
the biggest port in Africa. Social housing is another key
Mediterranean and the Atlantic coasts.
ambition with new urban areas planned.
Meanwhile, Morocco has been granted a €240m ($310m)
The Union for the Mediterranean launched a new regional
loan from the African Development Bank (ADB) to assist
infrastructure development fund, Inframed, at its meeting
in the upgrading of facilities at five of its largest interna-
in Alexandria, Egypt on 30 April 2009. The initiative
tional airports: Casablanca, Rabat, Marrakech, Agadir
established a regional framework for public-private-
and Fez. In 2007, the five airports handled 91% of the
partnerships to aid the development of infrastructure
country’s total annual passenger traffic, comprising about
across the region and will participate in financing energy
Morocco
efficiency, transportation, environmental and urban devel-
training, and working to provide access to water and
opment projects.
land.
The union aims to raise more than €1bn ($1.3bn) in equity
Energy Sector
de Depots, Italy’s Cassa depositi e prestiti, Morocco’s
Caisse de Depot et de Gestion, and Cairo-based invest-
News of more gas finds in Morocco kindled hopes of a
ment bank EFG-Hermes. The four institutions jointly
new source of both energy and income for the country.
committed €400m to the project.
In March 2009, Dana Petroleum announced a new
Morocco has put in place plans to develop the real
“significant” gas discovery at Anchois, in the Tanger-
estate sector and attract investment into the property
Larache licence, with its first well offshore Morocco. The
market the plans include the building of up to 200,000
Anchois-1 discovery well is located about 40 km from the
new housing units and the creation of three new cities
coast and was drilled to a total depth of 2,435m. Prelimi-
on an overall land area of 1,643 ha near the provinces of
nary estimates of reserves were said to be around 100
Agadir, Settat and Nador.
billion cubic feet. Earlier, Circle Oil Plc confirmed that it
had found natural gas in the north-east of capital Rabat,
Agriculture
as part of the Ouled N’Zala permit. At the same time,
Morocco
capital for the new fund which is led by France’s Caisse
Tethys Oil started drilling operations at the Tafejjart-1 well
The performance of the agricultural sector has been
on the Bouanane licence onshore Morocco.
strong of late with good harvest boosted by heavy
In a move to meet supply challenges, to preserve the
rainfall. In January 2009 it was announced that the
environment, and to support sustainable development,
Plan Maroc Vert (Green Morocco), a programme to
the country launched last November the Moroccan Solar
upgrade the country’s global agricultural competitive-
Energy Project which will be built on 5 sites. With a total
ness would receive a budget of Dh20bn (€1.8bn) for the
investment of 9bn $, the project aims at the installation
next five years. The plan will renovate the sector through
by 2020 a total capacity of 2.000 MW.
increasing investment, improving management and
143
OM
OMAN
COUNTRY NAME:
Sultanate of Oman
LAND AREA:
212,000 km2
POPULATION:
2,9 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), English
CURRENCY:
1 Omani Rial (OMR) = 1.000 Baisa
1 EUR = 0.52 OMR (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Muscat (capital), Suhar, Sur, Salala,
Ar-Rustaq
NATIONAL DAY:
18 November – Birthday of Sultan Qaboos
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 4
The Sultanate of Oman is strategically located at
the south-eastern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, the junction of the world’s two large continents: Asia and Africa and on the trade route
between Europe, Asia and the Far East. His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said is the Head of State
of the country. His accession in July 1970 ushered
in the new era and modern age for Oman. The
Sultanate enjoys a stable social, political, and
economic system with excellent relations with
neighbouring countries. All this enabled the country to play an active role in promoting regional
political and economic cooperation. In addition
to its rich cultural heritage it has a safe environment, friendly people and abundant scenic
beauty and variety. Oman offers a lot to attract
tourists and business visitors alike.
MUSCAT
of challenges stemming mainly from the fact that the
economy is relying on oil which is a non-renewable
dwindling resource subject to a high degree of price
volatility. Recognizing this challenge, the government has
initiated a structural adjustment process aimed at laying
a solid foundation for a diversified economy led by the
private sector. Entailed amending laws and regulations
such as Foreign Investment Law, labour law, and others
including the Commercial Law, the Agency Law, the
Copyright Law, and the Corporate Income Tax Law,
which are pursuing the provisions of the Basic Law of
the State proclaimed the supremacy of law as the basis
for governance and guaranteed equal opportunities and
freedom for all. These reform measures paved the way
towards improving the economy’s potential and its ability
to break away from its dependency on oil and to diversify
the sources of national income. To this end, a number of
huge projects have been completed or are underway in
the current Seventh Five-Year Development Plan.
144
Market-oriented policies and private sector development
These are the positive steps in Oman’s way to realize
are deeply rooted economic concepts and practices
its Future Vision, and outline the major policies and
in Oman. The government has always regarded a
mechanisms through which the country will achieve
dynamic private sector as the engine of prosperity and
sustainable development in a private sector-led and an
growth. This is clearly reflected in Oman’s Development
export-oriented economy with diversified sources of
Strategy, which was adopted back in 1974. One of the
national income. With the objective of integrating into
salient features of this strategy was to establish a free
the international economy, Oman joined World Trade
competitive market economy with equal opportunities
Organization in November 2000 and became a full-
for all.
fledged member. Oman as a founding member of GCC,
Through consecutive Five-Year development plans,
is now part of the GCC Common Market and also playing
Oman has achieved remarkable progress on both
an active role in the Greater Arab Free Trade Area of the
the economic and social fronts in a relatively short
Arab League.
period of time. Nevertheless, after three decades of
With the successful completion of the Sixth Five-Year
intensive development efforts, Oman still faces a host
Development Plan (2001-2005) and the satisfactory
Oman
progress realized in the Seventh Plan (2006-2010). Oman
tax rate to 12 per cent for all companies with an initial tax
has confidence and a robust outlook for future.
free exemption of RO30,000.
Economic Outlook
Power & Water
For 2009, Oman has announced a US$16.7 billion
The state-owned Oman Power and Water Procure-
budget. The budget proposes to be flexible as it may
ment Company (OPWP) aims to boost power generation
entail adjustments if the average oil price falls below
capacity in the Sultanate by around 3,200 MW through
US$45 per barrel. Revenues are forecast to be US$14.6
the development of four new Independent Water and
billion, based on the assumption of an average oil price of
Power Projects (IWPPs). The privately financed projects
US$45 per barrel and production of 805,000 barrels per
— planned at Barka/Sohar, Duqm, Ghubrah and Salalah-
day. An increase of US$1.6 billion in expenditure repre-
are targeted to be brought into commercial operation
sents an 11 per cent growth from the previous year. The
over the 2010-2015 timeframe. The single largest among
development budget allocation of US$2.1 billion, showing
these is an IWPP proposed to be established either in
an increase of 10 per cent over the previous year, will
Barka or Sohar. It will have a generation capacity of 1,300
cover ongoing as well as new development projects listed
MW and a water desalination component of 55,000 cubic
in the Seventh Five Year Plan (2006-2010). Additional
metres per day.
allocations have been made for the road sector, ports
Omani government planned to complete the privatisation
and airports to spur the growth of the economy. Oman’s
of the Main Interconnected Transmission System, which
tax rate is now the lowest in the region, according to
serves the north of Oman, by the first quarter of 2010.
the Royal Decree No. 28/2009 issued in June 2009. The
The authorities are also considering the privatisation of
new uniform of tax rate removes the disparity in tax rates
the three state-owned power distribution and supply
between foreign and local companies, and reduce the
companies in the future.
Oman Wastewater Services Company (OWSC) has
signed two contracts worth over US$375 million, covering
the development of two key components of the Seeb
Wastewater project.
Oil & Gas
Oman has signed a concession agreement with Occidental Oman Gas Company, a subsidiary of energy
major Occidental Petroleum, covering the exploration
and development of potential gas reserves in Block 62
(Habibah) in the Dakhiliya region. Occidental Oman Gas,
along with its partners, are committed to investing around
$500 million in exploration activities targeting Habibah’s
gas potential.
Dolphin Energy has begun the supply of Dolphin Gas
to Oman. Dolphin Energy signed a Gas Sales Agreement with Oman Oil Company agreeing to supply the
Sultanate with up to 200 million standard cubic feet a day
of Dolphin Gas.
Transport & Communications
The Nawras consortium was awarded the second Integrated Fixed Public Telecommunications License by the
Telecommunication Regulatory Authority (TRA). Nawras
is the Qatari telecoms operator Qtel’s 56 per centowned subsidiary in Oman. Also, the TRA has issued
Class II licenses to five companies as resellers of basic
mobile services in the Sultanate. The licenses were
145
OM
granted for a period of five years, but extendable if the
firms concerned comply with their license obligations.
The first phase development of a world-class airport
in Sohar is already in progress. The airport will form a
key component in a broader land, rail and air transport
network that will strengthen the Batinah region’s development as a major centre for economic growth.
The first phase development of the airport at Ras al
Hadd is in progress. The airport is expected to be operational in 2010-11.
In the new industrial city in Oman “Duqm”, The first
phase of the Duqm International Airport project at a cost
of US$70 million will be executed by Desert Line Projects company, while a consortium of Galfar Engineering
& Contracting and South Korea’s Daewoo Engineering
& Construction have won the contract to build a ship
repair and drydock complex. Also a consortium of
Consolidated Contractors Company, STFA of Turkey,
and the Belgian-based Jan De Nul will undertake the
expansion of the Duqm port complex at an additional
cost of US$870 million. The new investment is in addition to an existing contract currently being executed
by the consortium. As a result of the upgrade, the total
investment in the Marine Works Infrastructure being
executed has been scaled up to around US$1.3 billion.
complete will cover an area of 2.5 million square metres
Oman plans to issue a major contract involving the
combining more than 4,000 residential homes, as well
construction of a deepwater bulk jetty at the Port of
as retail, leisure and hotel accommodation, a marina
Sohar. Total investment is estimated at US$200 million.
and a golf course. Over 600 homes are currently under
German group Sellhorn won a contract to provide
construction.
consultancy work for the latest expansion of Salalah’s
Oman’s first Integrated Tourism Project, Muscat Hills,
southern port. The work involves overseeing the design
was to be opened the first 9 holes of the 18 hole cham-
and construction of berths seven, eight and nine at the
pionship green golf course in March 2009. The US$780
site.
million project comprises an 18 hole green golf course,
The state-owned Oman Shipping Company (OSC) is
a gated residential development, a boutique resort
seeking to raise US$4 billion in new credit facilities to
hotel, premium office space, retail outlets and entertain-
finance the ongoing expansion of the company’s fleet.
ment options.
The company aims to buy between 15 and 20 tankers
Al Madina A’Zarqa (Blue City) project is to be built over
for refined oil products, to meet rising demand.
a 32 sq. km. water front at Al Sawadi, 45 minutes from
The Indian group Consulting Engineering Services
Muscat. The first phase of the US$15 billion project to
(CES) won a contract to carry out a feasibility study for
build a mega city is currently in progress. New tourism
Oman’s 260-kilometre long Batinah Railway which will
projects in Oman are expected to provide 10,000 direct
run along Oman’s northern coast. The company will
jobs during the next five years.
plan all elements of the design for the railway, including
passenger and freight services. The line is intended to
Industrial Sector
provide an alternative to travelling by car on the Batinah
highway.
The US$2.4 billion Sohar Aluminium smelter began
operations on June 11, 2008, with capacity produc-
Tourism & Real Estate
tion approximately 350,000 metric tonnes per year. The
company will export about 140,000 tonnes of its annual
146
The first homes at “The Wave, Muscat” were completed
production, while the remaining 210,000 tonnes will be
and the keys were recently handed over to their
sold to local companies that have been formed to cre-
first residents. The Wave is a US$805 million free-
ate a new downstream aluminium industry.
hold Integrated Tourism Complex project and when
Construction work on a major aluminium rolling mill was
scheduled to commence at the Sohar Industrial Estate
Takamul Investment Company, a majority Omani gov-
in the second quarter of 2009. The project promoted
ernment owned investment vehicle, plans to establish
by Takamul Investment Company SAOC in partnership
a ‘Minerals City’ in the Sultanate to serve as a hub for
with Bahrain’s GARMCO, involves a capital investment
a number of ambitious minerals-based downstream
of around US$325 million. The project will have a total
processing projects. Key among these ventures is a
capacity of 160,000 tonnes per year of aluminium gen-
magnesium-ferrosilicon project. The company is weigh-
eral coil, foil and paint stock products. The rolling mill
ing the feasibility of developing a 30,000-tonnes-per-
project will depend on hot metal as feedstock from the
year capacity project at an estimated cost of US$250
Sohar Aluminium smelter.
million. Commissioning is slated for 2011. A salt/soda
Oman signed two contracts to the accelerated develop-
ash project is also planned in partnership with Indian
ment of the iron ore pelletizing plant and distribution
business conglomerate Tata. Feasibility studies now
centre, which the Brazil-based conglomerate is devel-
under way into the US$450 million project, envisage an
oping at the industrial port with an investment of US$1.4
output of 100,000 tonnes of salt and 500,000 tonnes
billion. The venture involves an iron ore pelletizing plant
of soda ash. Takamul is also promoting a string of pet-
with a production capacity of nine million tonnes per
rochemicals based downstream ventures. The biggest
year of direct reduction pellets. The first plant is due to
among these is a US$800 million Purified Terephthalic
come on stream in December 2010. In this regard also,
Acid (PTA) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) project
Oman and Brazil have signed an agreement for the sup-
in association with an international partner. The venture,
ply of gas for 20 years for the iron ore pelletizing plant of
with a proposed capacity of 700,000 tonnes of PTA and
the Brazilian-based Vale company which will be set up
430,000 tonnes of PET, is planned to come on stream in
at Sohar Industrial Port.
the second quarter of 2012.
Oman
Oman
147
PS
PALESTINE
COUNTRY NAME:
Palestine
LAND AREA:
6,220 km2
POPULATION:
4 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 Israeli New Shekel (ILS) = 100 Agorot
1 EUR = 4.98 ILS (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Jerusalem (capital), Gaza, Ramallah,
Nablus
NATIONAL DAY:
15 November
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
The Palestinian economy has been sustained
by enormous injections of foreign aid and the
recent growth in the West Bank has been a direct
result of a large increase in such investment
flows combined with increased security. In 2008,
budget support alone increased by nearly 80%
from the 2007 level and at close to $1.8 billion,
was equivalent to about 30% of GDP. The Palestinian Authority (PA) has relied on donor funding
to pay salaries and clear arrears to public sector
employees and the private sector that had accumulated during 2006 and 2007. The 2009 budget
assumes that donors will maintain the high level
of budget support and calls for close to $2.8bn
in aid for 2009, taking into account the recovery
and reconstruction needs in Gaza.
JERUSALEM
Palestinian territories, Oussama Kanaan, on 15 July 2009.
The Palestinian economy grew 2.3% in 2008, despite
a sharp downturn during the final quarter under the
impact of the global downturn. The Palestinian Central
Bureau of Statistics (PCBS) indicated that the gross
domestic product (GDP) of the West Bank and Gaza
rose to $4.64bn in 2008, up from $4.53bn in 2007. The
figures would make 2008 the best year for the Palestinian
economy in terms of GDP alone for more than a decade.
The largest contributing sectors to the economy were
mining, manufacturing, electricity and water, retail, and
public administration and defence.
Palestinian authorities are in the process of rebuilding the
economy following the devastating impact of the threeweek onslaught on Gaza at the end of 2008.
According to the World Bank, budget support remains
indispensable to allow the PA to continue to provide
basic services and is appropriate given the good perfor-
Economy
mance in public sector management. Improvements in
security in the West Bank have not yet translated into
148
The International Monetary Fund has said that the Pales-
increases in private sector activities and investment proj-
tinian economy could post its strongest performance in
ects have still to deliver tangible results.
years in 2009, but only if border restrictions on Pales-
Funds pledged at the “International Conference in
tinian trade and movement are eased substantially. The
Support of the Palestinian Economy for the Reconstruc-
growth, projected to be as high as 7%, could further
tion of Gaza”, which was held at Sharm El-Sheikh in
stabilise the West Bank, bolster peace efforts and ease
Egypt on 2 March 2009, have not yet translated into
the financial burden on the international community.
tangible progress towards reconstruction of Gaza due to
Donor countries spent some $1.8 billion in 2008 alone
the restrictions that that region is under.
to cover the Palestinian deficit, in part to make up for a
According to a World Bank report, “Palestinian Economic
stagnant economy.
Prospects: Gaza Recovery and West Bank Revival”,
For solid growth to be sustained beyond 2009, trade
published in June 2009, restrictions imposed on both the
restrictions imposed on the West Bank would also need
West Bank and Gaza are still “preventing any real upturn
to be eliminated, stated the IMF representative in the
in economic activity”.
Palestine
As a result, the West Bank economy in particular is
devastated from years of blockade, was further ravaged
“dramatically failing to fulfil its potential even in periods of
by the recent military operation. Consequently, what little
relative stability in the security situation”.
growth has occurred, has taken place in the West Bank.
The report showed that progress in the relaxation of
On the other hand, the global financial crisis has thus far
economic restrictions during 2008 had been marginal
not had a significant impact on the Palestinian economy,
at best. As a result of imposed security measures, the
according to IMF assessment.
Palestinian economy “hollowed out”, with the productive sectors declining and the public sector growing, with
Agriculture
more of the Palestinian population looking to the public
sector for employment and assistance in coping with the
Agricultural output in 2008 was about 55% below its peak
impact of unemployment.
in 1999, according to statistics bureau PCBS. The agri-
Even before the onset of hostilities in Gaza in late
culture sector has been severely affected by continued
December 2008, the macroeconomic environment in
military operations, with the widespread destruction
the Palestinian territories had been more difficult than
of cultivated land, greenhouses, livestock and poultry
anticipated in the Palestinian Reform and Development
farms, water wells, irrigation networks, and other produc-
Plan (PRDP) for 2008-10. Restrictions in the West Bank
tive assets. Fragile ground-water resources have been
continued during 2008, while Gaza’s isolation increased.
severely compromised, particularly from the destruc-
Moreover, inflation was much higher than anticipated,
tion of the waste-water infrastructure, which released
which further eroded real wealth and incomes. Never-
hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of raw sewage
theless, in the West Bank the adverse impact of these
into the environment.
factors on private sector confidence and growth was
Palestinians suffer from serious water shortages and
tempered by the redeployment of security forces in
investment in water supply and sanitation infrastructure
several cities, as well as prudent expenditure policy that
has dropped to very low levels. For example, current
minimised new arrears accumulation. Overall, real GDP
investment in the West Bank water sector is one tenth
growth in 2008 in the West Bank & Gaza is estimated at
of planned levels, the World Bank estimates. Few major
about 2%, which translates to a decline of almost 1%
investments are going ahead and more is being invested
in real per capita terms, resulting in a per capita income
in small local emergency projects than in large infrastruc-
of just over $1,000 in 2008. The Gaza economy, already
ture projects. In effect, emergency projects have become
149
PS
the norm. Waste water treatment investments have been
growth and the urgent need for a revival from its current
blocked for a decade, and only one of seven planned
condition, recognising that political uncertainty, com-
new plants, at al-Bireh, is operational. Meanwhile, Gaza
bined with continued expansion of settlements, restric-
drew up a well designed master plan for water and sani-
tions on movement and trade, and restrictions on access
tation, but unfortunately less than 2% of the investment
to resources, have strangled investment and stripped the
programme has been implemented. The plan provided
economy of the bulk of its productive capacity. None-
for an integrated production and conveyance system,
theless, strategies are being developed to encourage
and a major expansion of wastewater treatment capacity,
productivity and growth in the industrial, agricultural,
including three new plants.
housing, and tourism sectors and allow the Palestinian
economy to develop a diversified export portfolio. To this
Construction
end, in 2008, the Palestinian Public Private Partnership
was established with representatives from the public
The construction sector saw little growth in the last four
and private sector. This organisation meets regularly to
years and is only a third of its size in 1999. Recently,
identify needed policy changes and help guide the PA’s
a few large housing construction projects have been
private sector strategy.
announced in the West Bank, including a new planned
community north of Ramallah, which will require over
Telecoms
$500 million in private investment. If these projects come
150
to fruition they would give a large boost to the construc-
During 2008, on the back of three major Palestinian invest-
tion sector.
ment conferences held in Bethlehem, Nablus, and London,
The development plan envisages a dynamic private
a number of large initiatives were launched, among others
sector as the engine of economic growth. Private sec-
the introduction of a second mobile telephone provider
tor growth is necessary to provide jobs for the rapidly
(Wataniya Telecommunications Company), the planning
expanding Palestinian population and tax revenues to
of large new housing projects, and a new housing finance
support government programmes. The plan affirms the
fund. In addition, older initiatives for the construction of
Palestinian economy’s enormous potential for future
several industrial estates across the West Bank in Jericho,
Jenin, Tarkumiya and Bethlehem, were revived. However,
given the right conditions. Though the Palestinian econ-
in the face of ongoing economic restrictions most of these
omy faces immense challenges, especially since 2000, it
projects have not got off the ground to date.
also has many advantages, including a forward-thinking,
The World Bank report pointed out that although a
entrepreneurial, and talented private sector, and a rapidly
frequency agreement was signed between the PA and
growing and well-educated workforce.
Israel to enable the introduction of a second mobile tele-
The business sector consists of many small local busi-
phone provider in 2009 the frequencies have so far not
nesses that aspire to a high-level of professionalism and
been released. This could have serious consequences for
product quality. Large enterprises are internationally con-
the investment climate, competition in the telecommunica-
nected, with partnerships extending to Europe, the Gulf,
tions sector, as well as for the PA’s fiscal position due to
and North America.
the potential loss of an estimated $354mn in licensing fees.
Human capital is an invaluable asset for the Palestinian
In the PA’s budget for 2009, the share of development proj-
economy as it seeks to develop and strengthen. With
ects in total spending was targeted to rise from 8 to 13%,
a very young population, the workforce is expected to
as part of the authority’s strategy of assuming increased
expand significantly over the next several decades. Pal-
“ownership” of public investments. Expenditure on devel-
estinians entering the labour market are generally highly
opment projects for 2009 was budgeted at $503mn,
educated, multilingual, and well versed in the new tech-
consisting of $200mn in large infrastructure projects and
nologies and practices conducive to doing business at a
$303mn in community-based projects. This compares with
global level.
an estimated total public investment of $250mn in 2008,
Palestine also boasts a multitude of promising economic
about $60mn of which was on community-based projects.
sectors offering opportunities for investment. The services sector, with the sub-sectors of internal trade, trans-
Outlook
port, tourism, and information technology, are all ripe for
expansion. The construction, manufacturing and mining,
Despite the problems, Palestine as a market-based econ-
and chemical industries also promise fruitful investment
omy has tremendous investment potential in the future
opportunities.
Palestine
Palestine
151
QA
QATAR
COUNTRY NAME:
State of Qatar
LAND AREA:
11,400 km2
POPULATION:
840,926 (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), English (commercial)
CURRENCY:
1 Qatari Riyal (QAR) = 100 Dirham
1 EUR = 4.95 QAR (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Doha (capital), Ras Laffan
NATIONAL DAY:
3 September – Indepence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
According to the International Monetary Fund,
Qatar’s economy was expected to grow by 29%
in 2009, the fastest rate in more than a decade,
as its natural gas production almost doubled. The
country was also expected to maintain budget
and current account surpluses. Qatar is also identified as one of the high growth markets offering
most potential for exporters and investors.
DOHA
Middle East. The country currently exports 8.5m metric
tonnes per annum and plans to invest in the sector to
boost exports to 28mta by 2012, which if achieved would
make it the world’s largest producer.
Other important non-oil industries receiving an injection
of investment are cement, metals and chemicals.
Over recent years Qatar’s economy has experienced
rapid growth, largely because of an increase in its gas
production. Five more liquefied natural gas (LNG) “supertrains” are expected to come on stream by 2010, driving
In early 2009, the IMF said, “Qatar is the fastest growing
remarkable rates of real economic growth, although there
economy in the Gulf region and has so far managed well
were some technical delays in the first super-train, which
the impact of the global financial crisis. Construction,
delivered its first shipment in March 2009.
manufacturing and financial services were all projected
Qatar has been increasing gas exports to boost
to grow at a strong pace. Qatar’s economy expanded an
economic growth and in 2009, it stepped up the search
estimated 16.4% last year and is expected to perform at
for new and short-term customers for its LNG as
least as strongly in 2009.”
demand in some of its main markets, especially Japan
While oil and gas will remain the mainstay of the Qatar
and South Korea, waned owing to the global recession.
economy into the foreseeable future, significant efforts
With proven reserves of 25trn cu metres and production
and investment are being made into the development and
capacity expected to reach 77m tonnes by the end of the
expansion of several economic sectors in order to diverse
decade, Qatar is seeking to become the world’s leading
the country’s sources of revenue.
supplier of LNG. It is becoming increasingly important
Real estate, petrochemicals, financial services, including
as a supplier of gas to Europe and has signed deals with
Islamic banking, research and development, IT and
several countries in the EU.
tourism are regarded as particularly potential and offer
notable business and investment opportunities. Services
Real Estate & Construction
such as health and education are receiving significant
152
investment.
The real estate and construction sector has been
The country’s non-energy sector has been expanding
booming over recent years and was one of Qatar’s
with Qatar seeking to increase its contribution to the
drivers of growth in 2007 and 2008 with demand strong
economy to 80% by 2015. The petrochemicals industry
in various different niche areas of the market. The sector
already constitutes an important sector for Qatar which
provides continuing opportunities for developers and
is now the third largest petrochemicals producer in the
contractors, as a result of the ongoing government-
Qatar
backed infrastructure and housing projects. The resi-
expected to be completed in 2015; and an important new
dential market has proven especially strong with growth
port project at Mesaieed.
stimulated by increasingly prosperous Qatari nationals as
well as the influx of expatriates over recent years pushing
Tourism
up demand. Qatar has unveiled some ambitious mixed
use integrated real estate projects at the luxury end of
Qatar hopes to see the expansion of its role as a prime
the market such as the $2.5 billion Pearl Qatar and the
venue for specialised tourism activities with areas like
$5.5bn Lussail waterfront development, the latter set to
business meetings and conferences, sporting events and
provide housing for some 200,000 people. Other proj-
cultural tourism seen as offering the most potential. The
ects have been unveiled to cater for rising demand at the
country is fortunate in its having many archaeological sites,
lower and middle range of the market.
island resorts, seaside towns and historical attractions
Meanwhile, Qatar’s commercial real estate market has
such as forts and castles which are more than sufficient
been expanding with around 800 new towers under way
to satisfy the curiosity of the tourist. Other tourist attrac-
or planned.
tions relate to Qatar’s extensive sports and leisure facilities
including golf, horse riding, falconry, boating, swimming
Transport
and deep-sea fishing.
While Qatar already has an extensive transport network,
Attracting Talent
this is being rapidly expanded to meet present and future
needs of the economy. Planned spending on major trans-
Despite the global downturn, Qatar has remained a desir-
port infrastructure projects is estimated to be around
able location for many and continues to attract talented
$21.6 billion. Among the new developments is a $2.7bn
professionals who are helping to maintain its growth,
causeway that will link Qatar and Bahrain, which at more
according to the findings of a REED survey released in
than 40 km long will be the longest such link in the world;
July 2009. According to the report, energy, property and
the New Doha International Airport, whose construction is
construction, aviation, information technology, financial
153
QA
services, accountancy and banking remain the strongest
of the larger Qatar Education City, which is being devel-
sectors for attracting overseas talent.
oped as a key component of the country’s programme
Nevertheless, Qatar saw its population fall by more
to expand its skills resources and build a knowledge-
than 40 thousand people in June 2009 from May, after
based economy. Education City is a major educational
witnessing growth for the first five months of the year,
and cultural development in Qatar housing some of
official data has shown. As of 30 June 2009, the popu-
the world’s leading academic institutions on a 7-million
lation stood at 1.61 million people, compared with
square-metre site and is set to position Doha as a key
1.65 million in May, according to data released by the
centre for education and scientific research in the Gulf.
Qatar Statistics Authority. In the beginning of June, the
authority said Qatar’s population grew 6.5 percent to
Telecoms
1.65 million in the first five months of the year from 1.55
million in December 2008. The majority of the country’s
Qatar’s telecommunications sector has undergone major
population is comprised of expatriate workers. It can also
changes over the past decade at a time when the country
be mentioned here that Qatar has pursued a determined
has gone through a period of economic boom. Supplier
“Qatarisation” policy under which all joint venture indus-
and regulator Qatar Public Telecommunications Corpora-
tries and government departments seek to place Qatari
tion − now known as Qatar Telecom QSC (Qtel) − offered
nationals into managerial and decision making positions.
45% of its share capital to the public in 1998. Its reve-
As a result growing numbers of foreign-educated Qataris
nues increased from $295 million in 1997 to $2.8 billion
have been returning home to assume key positions
by 2007. Qtel has reported a 33.1% increase in its mobile
formerly occupied by expatriates.
subscriber numbers for 2008, giving it a customer base
of 1.683 million. There is a strong demand among Qataris
Research & Development
for multiple handset ownership and subscriptions, an
opportunity that new market entrant Vodafone is hoping
154
Qatar aims to establish itself as a centre for research and
to tap into.
development in the Gulf and one of the cornerstones of
In 2006, Qatar established ictQATAR as the new regu-
the policy in this regard is the Qatar Science and Tech-
lator of ICT activities, tasked with protecting consumers
nology Park (QSTP), which was officially opened on 16
and fostering new and innovative ICT technologies.
March. A project of the Qatar Foundation, QSTP is part
ictQATAR has taken initiatives in e-education, e-health,
Qatar
e-business, e-government, cyber security and infra-
of the importance of conservation is a key plank of the
structure. ictQATAR has also licensed a consortium
country’s attempts to preserve its fragile ecosystem. The
comprising Vodafone Qatar and Qatar Foundation to be
Ministry of Environment takes overall responsibility for
the second GSM carrier in the country.
balancing the often conflicting needs of economic growth
The new integrated real estate developments now under
and environmental protection.
construction promise a qualitative jump in available ICT
infrastructure and services, since comprehensive broadband services are an integral design feature.
Free Zones
In 2005, Qatar enacted a law for the establishment of Free
Zones aimed at further diversifying the economy. Compawithout a local sponsor or service agent, and enjoy 100%
non-Qatari ownership and many other benefits.
Environment
Protection and management of the environment is one
of the four pillars enshrined in Qatar’s National Vision
2030, the country’s strategy for the next two decades
which was issued in October 2008. Economic diversification along with population expansion, industrialisation and a growth in construction projects have all put
tremendous pressures on Qatar’s environment so action
is being taken to address the threats posed to environmental sustainability. Raising awareness among Qataris
Qatar
nies setting up in the free zones can operate and trade
155
SA
SAUDI ARABIA
COUNTRY NAME:
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
LAND AREA:
2,15 million km2
POPULATION:
26 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 Saudi Rial (SAR) = 100 Halala
1 EUR = 5.04 SAR (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Riyadh (capital), Jiddah, Dammam
NATIONAL DAY:
23 September
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s 2009 budget projected a 16% increase in expenditure, reaching
a record $126 billion. Several projects, in power
generation, desalinisation and transport infrastructure, are seen as strategic, with the Kingdom
aiming to further diversify its hydrocarbons-based
economy.
RIYADH
sectors like the petrochemicals. The combined efforts of
the petroleum and industry sectors led to the expansion of
secondary and specialised chemical industries. This has
been followed by the launch of industrial clusters.
The Kingdom is seeking to attract investment in industries
where it enjoys a relative advantage and which are associated with the oil industry, including metal industries and
auto supplies, such as tyres, in addition to the packaging
and packing industries.
Between 2003 and 2007 real GDP growth averaged
Saudi Arabia’s industrial clusters programme seeks to
around 5% a year, the strongest growth in a decade.
attract, facilitate and develop a number of pivotal projects
In 2008, real GDP growth is estimated to have reached
by 2013. The anticipated total private sector investments in
4.5%, largely driven by strong private and public
all the projects of these clusters are estimated at SR40bn.
investment expenditure on the back of record oil prices
Growth in demand by industries and utilities for fuel and
and abundant liquidity.
feedstock has resulted in the expansion of the Kingdom’s
Advances have been made in improving the investment
natural gas industry – in exploration, production and
climate in recent years as is indicated by how the country
processing – in tandem with the progressive growth in oil
has risen on the World Bank’s ranking of countries that
production and refining. Saudi Aramco’s efforts managed
facilitate investment, from 67th place 2005 to 16th in
to yield an increase in discovered gas reserves from 184
2008. Economic diversification is seen as a special
trillion cubic feet in 1990, almost one-quarter of which was
challenge because of decades-long dependence on oil
in the form of non-associated gas, to 267 trillion cubic feet
revenues as a key source of income.
in 2008, more than half in the form of non-associated gas,
notwithstanding cumulative production of some 97 trillion
Oil & Gas
cubic feet during the period.
Saudi Aramco’s programmes for reserve development
156
In 2008, the oil sector accounted for about 32% of real
and gas production continue with, for example, the Karan
GDP while oil export revenues represented about 90%
offshore gas field expected to boost production capacity
of total exports and public revenues. Crude oil is used as
by some 1.8 billion cubic feet per day.
feedstock and fuel, in addition to products, natural gas and
Similarly, refining projects, which are associated with
natural gas liquids, for industry and utilities, which benefit
petrochemical complexes, such as the Petro Rabigh and
a wide range of industries such as petrochemicals, mining,
Ras Tanura projects, and other projects in Jubail, Yanbu
cement, power generation and desalination. Oil also
and Jizan, aim to expand refining capacity and diversify
contributes to the diversification of industries in related
the petrochemical products base. Cooperation between
Saudi Arabia
the mining and petroleum industries – implementing the
Trade
active and planned projects at Ras al-Zawr Port, in preparation for completion of the railway link project connecting
Saudi Arabia lifted customs tariff on 92 new products in
the Northern Frontier Area via the Central Province to the
June 2009 in line with World Trade Organisation (WTO)
Eastern Province – is set to lead to the exploitation and
rules. The move brought the total number of products
processing of raw phosphate and bauxite, coupled with
that enjoy either tariff exemption or reduction to 851.
creation of an industrial base that combines the oil sector
The Kingdom joined the WTO in December 2005. As
with the minerals and petrochemical industries, expanding
listed on the custom’s website goods exempted from
from there into more diversified and more specialised
tariff include live horses, sheep, goats, turkey, meat of
industries.
sheep, various types of fish, vegetables and fruits and
wheat and rice flour. Some major products now enjoying
Banking Sector
tariff cuts are bottled water, soap, sanitary pads,
napkins, tissue papers, detergents, gypsum, paints,
Having been left largely unaffected by the international
plastic pipes, materials required for doors, electric wire,
credit crisis, Saudi banks maintained their stability and
pre-cast building blocks and fertilizers.
will now profit from the trickle-down effect of the large
government-driven infrastructural development projects.
Non-Oil Spending
Saudi banking has remained strong due to its adequate
liquidity base and asset quality, according to Fitch Ratings.
The non-oil sector has been expanding rapidly over the
A slowdown in lending in the first quarter of 2009 was
past few years and the IMF forecasts an expansion of
apparent and, according to figures from the Saudi Arabian
over 3% in the sector in 2009, which would be down
Monetary Agency (SAMA), the Kingdom’s commercial
on the 5.3% in the previous year, but it remains posi-
banks reduced lending in the first quarter of 2009 by 3.6%
tive in the context of the global downturn and the fall in
year-on-year to SR35.5bn ($9.48bn).
world oil prices. A surge in public sector spending has
Consumer credit is considered an area with large poten-
been comfortably financed by assets built up during the
tial for growth. Demographically driven sectors, such as
recent oil price boom. This is strengthening the non-oil
housing, are expected to continue growing. Mortgage
sector. Public sector deposits with domestic banks are
schemes have long been heralded as one of the most
worth around SR980bn ($260bn), according to Samba
promising areas of business for banks in the Kingdom.
Financial Group. The value of non-oil contracts awarded
Government estimates put the demand for new housing at
by the public sector exceeded SR225bn ($60bn) —
130,000 units per year. Final approval for the long-awaited
equivalent to 18% of the forecast for total GDP for 2009.
mortgage law is expected to come by the end of 2009.
The increase in investment helped reassure investors
157
SA
that Saudi Arabia remains committed to supporting
the Saudi Arabian industry will continue building from
non-oil growth and expanding and improving its infra-
a position of strength well into 2010, whereas other
structure over the medium term, Riyadh-based Samba
Arabian Gulf markets continue to seek stability,” he
Financial Group said in a report, “Saudi Arabia: 2009
added. Less than 80 active projects, with a total value of
Mid-year Economic Review and Forecast”.
around $20bn were placed on hold or cancelled in Saudi
Arabia in marked contrast with the other markets.
Construction & Real Estate
Petrochemicals
Major investment in the infrastructure and construction
sector remains dominated by the approximately $120bn
The important petrochemicals sector is one of the corner-
in the Economic Cities developments over the next five
stones of the country’s economic diversification ambi-
year. Despite the downturn in global markets, develop-
tions with the government seeking to make it a worldwide
ment and investment in Saudi Arabia’s real estate sector
sector leader by 2015. According to Bank Audi, it is esti-
are expected to remain strong. At least 10 major new
mated that more than $70bn could be injected into the
city and real estate projects are currently underway in
sector by 2011in the form of public-private partnerships
the country. These include the King Abdullah Economic
and joint ventures with foreign petrochemicals firms.
City (valued at $93bn), Prince Abdulaziz bin Mousaed
The sector profits were impacted by the global situa-
Economic City ($53bn), Jizan Economic City ($30bn),
tion in 2008, but by the second quarter of 2009, Saudi
Jeddah Project Mile High Tower ($10bn), Shamieh
Basic Industries Corporation (SABIC) was outperforming
Project ($9.3bn), Madinah Knowledge Economic City
its international rivals, despite a 76% drop in profits
($7bn), Al-Zahira City ($4bn), Jabal Omar ($3.3bn), Injaz
compared with the same period in 2008. The company
($3bn) and Riyadh Marriland Leisure Park ($3bn).
reported net profits of SR1.8bn ($480m) for the second
Meanwhile, Emaar Properties has been considering bids
quarter, down from SR7.5bn in the same period of 2008.
from seven architects for the contract to draw up the
Bahrain-based investment bank SICO said that despite
concept design for its 1 km tall Kingdom Tower to be
the fall in profits, the company is still performing much
built at Jeddah Kingdom City. Development manager
better than other petrochemicals producers worldwide.
Emaar is working on behalf of Saudi Arabia’s Kingdom
Holding Company after the two firms signed a manage-
Power & Water
ment agreement in early June 2009, under which Emaar
158
will oversee construction of the entire 23km2 of Jeddah
Saudi Arabia has one of the largest per capita electricity
Kingdom City. There are sound economic arguments for
consumption rates in the world and its growing popula-
the tower with industry insiders predicting that comple-
tion means that demand is rising rapidly, with regional
tion of such a landmark project is set to increase the
electricity consumption estimated to be growing at 5–6%
cost of properties in the city.
a year. According to current industry reports, demand for
Saudi Arabia remains one of the most active construc-
power in the Kingdom is projected to double by the 2030
tion markets in the world as it improves its infrastruc-
to reach 50 gigawatts. In addition to meeting the needs
ture to meet domestic demand with more than 350 of
of the growing population, Saudi Arabia needs to expand
the active projects in construction. The civil building
its power capacity and network to support its ambitious
construction industry has not been much affected by
industrialisation plans.
the economic crisis, according to a study by research
Saudi Arabia has one of the most sophisticated water
house Proleads Global released in August 2009.
desalination sectors in the world and spending is set
“Insights Saudi Arabia: An Investigation into the Current
to remain high with an estimated $90bn needing to
and Future State of the Civil Building Construction
be spent over the next 20 years on the expansion and
Industry” examined more than 720 projects with a total
maintenance of existing water desalination plants and on
budget of more than $430bn across commercial and
the construction of new projects to meet the high water
retail: education and healthcare, leisure and entertain-
consumption levels. GE Energy opened a technology
ment, and residential sectors.
centre in the city of Dammam in the summer of 2009
“The market in Saudi Arabia is expected to maintain
highlighting its growing commitment to providing new
current levels throughout 2010, although slight decline
water solutions at a time when the kingdom is facing
is expected in the education and healthcare sectors
unprecedented demand for reliable sources of water. The
countered with an expected slight growth in commer-
GE Saudi Water & Process Technology Centre, built at a
cial and retail,” commented Emil Rademeyer, Director
cost of nearly $10mn, will serve the company’s industrial
of Proleads Global. “Our cashflow projections show
customers in Saudi Arabia and the wider region.
Saudi Arabia
Telecoms
Sea Gateway Terminal expansion at Jeddah Islamic Port
set to increase capacity of the port by around 45%.
The telecom sector witnessed a growth rate of 15%
In May 2009, it was announced that the UK’s Foster &
year-on-year in 2008, from 10% in 2007. Factoring in
Partners had won an SR142 million contract to design
slower economic growth in 2009, Shuaa Capital said that
four stations for the new high-speed Haramain Railway
it expected “the telecom sector, led by the mobile and
linking the two holy cities of Makkah and Madinah with
broadband (fixed and wireless) segments, to deliver high
Jeddah. The rail link, initiated by the Saudi Rail Organisa-
single digit growth with a possibility to surprise us with
tion, is seen as one of the country’s major infrastructure
a low double digit growth.” The country’s active mobile
projects, intended to bolster social and cultural connec-
penetration reached approximately 125% in 2008, and
tions between western cities, as well as improving trans-
was forecasted to grow toward a 145% active mobile
port options for pilgrims making their way to the holy
penetration rate by 2010, the report Saudi Vision 2009
cities. Transport Minister Jabara Al-Seraisry said that
added.
the four stations would be located in Jeddah, Makkah,
Madinah and King Abdullah Economic City in Rabigh and
Transport
added that Foster & Partners had long-standing experience in the field.
High levels of investments have been set aside to
upgrade of its whole transport infrastructure, with
Tourism
the Kingdom all being expanded. The 2009 budget
In recent years, the Kingdom has sought to capitalise
announced total spending of SR475bn ($126.8bn), with
on its potential as a global tourism destination, focusing
an allocation to the transport sector of SR19.2bn ($5.1bn)
primarily on local tourism and regional visitors, but now
for new and ongoing projects. A “Saudi Arabia Freight
increasingly looking towards creating more specialised
Transport Report” for the first quarter of 2009 from Busi-
packages for foreign visitors.
ness Monitor International predicted an average growth
The Kingdom enjoys some breathtaking natural land-
in freight transport of 3.7% a year until 2013. Maritime
scapes and a wealth of marine life which is a big
transport is expected to grow at 5.8% a year while train
attraction for scuba diving. In addition, important archae-
and airfreight are predicted to grow at 4.7% and 4.2%.
ological sites are situated at Madain Al Saleh, Jeddah,
In response to increasing demand pressures port infra-
Hofuf, Najran, Taif, Takub, Al Jouf and Hail. The Supreme
structure is set to be significantly upgraded. Competitive-
Commission for Tourism (SCT) oversees the develop-
ness will certainly be boosted by new projects, like the
ment of the tourism industry and tourism is now being
King Abdullah Economic City Seaport, expected to cost
significantly upgraded with public and private sectors
$5bn and be able to handle about 20m containers a year.
partnering to deliver a national tourism strategy.
Other port facilities are also being upgraded with the Red
Saudi Arabia
seaports, airports and road and rail networks across
159
SO
SOMALIA
COUNTRY NAME:
Somali Democratic Republic
LAND AREA:
627,337 km2
POPULATION:
9,8 million (2009 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Somali (official), Arabic, Italian, English
CURRENCY:
1 Somliland Shiling (SOS) = 100 Cent
1 EUR = 2.221,76 SOS (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Mogadishu (capital), Hargeysa, Kismaayo
NATIONAL DAY:
26 July – Independence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
Covering a land area of 637,657km2, the Republic of Somalia has a long coastline on the Horn of
Africa and to the north faces the Arabian Peninsula, where traditionally it has had important
commercial and trading ties. For many years the
country has been driven by factional conflicts
and the lack of a functioning national administration which have acted as major breaks on inward
investment and economic development. As a
result few reliable up-to-date statistics are available about the Somali economy.
MOGADISHU
of two decades of instability in Somalia. An African
Union Summit urged more support for the Transitional
Federal Government as the legitimate authority in
Somalia. The international community has also been
urged to honour pledges made to support Somalia
during the Brussels Donors’ Conference held in April
2009 where $200 million was pledged for reconstruction
efforts. The UN is calling on the international community to invest in building the country’s security institutions and improve the capacity to deliver public services
and employment, which would have a positive impact
on the Somali people. Projects to encourage youth
employment and enhance the livelihoods of ordinary
It can be safely stated that Somalia is one of the poorest
Somalis should also be a priority.
countries in the world. The UNDP’s Human Development Index ranked it 161 out of 163 countries back in
Economy
2001. Conflict, war and continuing insecurity have seri-
160
ously impacted on access to even the basic services
Somalia’s economy has been described as stronger
and infrastructure. All this has combined to increase
than that of many countries in Africa in terms of gross
poverty in the country and made welfare conditions
domestic product and imports and exports, participants
worse compared to the days before the civil war.
at a United Nations-backed meeting held in Dubai said.
Somalia joined the League of Arab States in 1974. In
Despite the crisis that Somalia continues to face, its
1991, the northern region broke away unilaterally to form
government was commended by the UN for having put
the unrecognised Somaliland based around the city of
in place more transparent and accountable financial
Hargeisa. A Transitional Federal Government (TFG) was
management measures. In a move that should help
formed in January 2005 with regional governments in
generate greater donor confidence, Somalia contracted
Somaliland (NW) and Puntland (NE). This transitional
auditing firm PricewaterhouseCoopers to assist with
government represents Somalia at the UN, the League
tracking and reporting on the use of public funds and
of Arab States and the African Union. A UN brokered
thus help improve transparency, the UN reported in July
peace agreement was unveiled in Djibouti in the summer
2009.
of 2008.
The UN is initiating a series of projects to help Somalia
The international community is now taking action to
move beyond the current emergency and ensure that
reverse the stagnation that has been the consequence
its people experience some benefit from the peace
Somalia
process. Current projects include increasing access
Somalia’s small industrial sector, based on the
to basic services such as water, health and educa-
processing of agricultural products, has largely been
tion, improving livelihoods through rapid employment
looted and sold as scrap metal. Somalia’s service
generation, rehabilitation of key infrastructure and other
sector also has grown. Telecommunication firms
rapid-impact recovery programmes.
provide wireless services in most major cities and offer
The economy could be boosted through livestock and
the lowest international call rates on the continent.
livestock products, agriculture, money transfer, tele-
Mogadishu’s main market offers a variety of goods from
communications, infrastructure, oil and gas, mining,
food to the newest electronic gadgets. Hotels continue
transport and even tourism, according to the UN Polit-
to operate and are supported with private security.
ical Office for Somalia (UNPOS).
Somalia’s arrears to the IMF continued to grow. Statis-
Sudan recently pledged its support to help rebuild
tics on Somalia’s GDP, growth, per capita income, and
Somalia’s financial and economic infrastructure as the
inflation must be viewed with more than a degree of
country seeks to establish real peace and stability.
scepticism.
Despite the lack of an effective central government,
The Somali International Financial Centre (SIFC), an
however, Somalia has maintained a healthy informal
agency created by the transitional government, offers
economy, largely based on livestock, money transfer
a tax-free offshore international banking regime. There
companies, and a growth in telecommunications. The
are also laws providing for offshore insurance and
extensive Somali community overseas helps sustain an
e-commerce. The SIFC is committed to strict confiden-
economy weakened by years of strife and turmoil.
tiality and world class regulatory standards; there is a
modern money-laundering law. The Central Bank of
Somalia was based in Mogadishu.
Remittance services represent a large industry in
Somalia. Somali entrepreneurs overseas who fled
because of the war contribute around $1 billion annually to the country’s economy. In the absence of a
formal banking sector, money exchange services have
burgeoned, handling between $500 million and $1
billion in remittances annually.
Agriculture
Agriculture is the most important sector, with livestock
normally accounting for about 40% of GDP and some
65% of export earnings. Livestock, hides, fish, charcoal, and bananas are Somalia’s principal exports,
while sugar, sorghum, corn, qat, and machined goods
are the principal imports.
Livestock has traditionally accounted for about 40% of
GDP and about 65% of export earnings. Nomads and
semi-nomads, who are dependent upon livestock for
their livelihood, make up a large portion of the country’s population. Sugar, sorghum, maize, and fish are
products for the domestic market. The small industrial
sector, based on the processing of agricultural products, accounts for 10% of the country’s GDP.
Livestock remains the main source of income for the
people of Somalia but exports have periodically been
interrupted by bans imposed by importing countries in
the Gulf region, due to outbreaks of livestock disease.
Camels, sheep and cows destined for Saudi Arabia
and Yemen form the bulk of the country’s agricultural
exports. A partnership between the European Commission and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization
161
SO
(FAO) and the World Bank for the provision of support
Telecoms
for Somalia’s agricultural sector led to the preparation
of a longer term livestock strategy as a framework for
Somalia’s public telecommunications system has been
further coordinated work in the sector.
almost completely destroyed or dismantled during the
After livestock, bananas, grown on plantations along
conflict, but several private sector providers are growing
the Juba and Shebelle rivers, are the main exports.
and Internet services are emerging in greater number.
Over recent years, improved technologies have been
Telcom, a telecommunications network operator in
introduced to increase production efficiency. Somalia
Somalia, was the first major privately owned company
began exports of bananas to countries of the European
providing telecommunications to major cities. The
Union, but the trade has suffered from the protracted
company is headquartered in Mogadishu, and has repre-
instability.
sentative offices in Dubai and the UK. The company
Other important crops grown in Somalia include sugar
has an estimated 750 employees. Somafone Telecom-
cane, which the country has been seeking to develop
munications Service Company (operating as Somafone)
for export. Production of seed cotton is another signifi-
is Somalia’s leading mobile telephone operator. It was
cant crop but the quantity is insufficient for export and
formed in 2003 as a fully owned subsidiary of Somafone
is mostly used in the small domestic textile industry.
FZ LLC of Dubai Internet City.
Maize and sorghum are produced as subsistence crops
in the southern part of the country. Fishing was mainly
Mineral Resources
a small-scale subsistence activity until recently, but
162
nowadays fish products like lobster, shark, tuna and
Somalia has deposits of gypsum, gold, silver, nickel,
sardines are caught for export.
copper, zinc, lead, salt, limestone, uranium and iron
Somalia
ore. Although most of these resources are small, some
of the world’s largest deposits of gypsum can be found
near Berbera and significant iron ore deposits have been
discovered in the country’s Bur region. The mining sector
Reconstruction
The rehabilitation of the Somali economy has been
moving ahead intermittently but remains frustrated by
outstanding security issues and establishing a peaceful
environment. Somalia currently lacks functioning financial institutions which are the foundation of any sound
economy and would normally provide crucial backup for
business initiatives. There are no commercial banks, no
central bank and no credit or savings institutions apart
from remittance companies operating in the country. In
fact, funds in the form of remittances made by Somalis
living abroad constitute the most vitally important means
of financial support for the country. It has been estimated
by UNDP that remittances transferred by Somali companies abroad amount to between $700mn and $1bn per
annum.
Somalia
is small and contributes less than 0.5% of GDP.
163
SU
SUDAN
COUNTRY NAME:
Republic of Sudan
LAND AREA:
2,4 million km2
POPULATION:
44 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic, English
CURRENCY:
1 Sudanese Pound (SDG) = 100 Qirsh
1 EUR = 3.1 SDG (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Khartoum (capital), Omdurman, Atbara,
Port-Sudan, El-Obeid, El-Fasher, Juba
NATIONAL DAY:
1 January – Independence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard time is gmt + 2
Sudan is the largest and one of the most diverse
countries in Africa, a home to deserts, mountain
ranges, fertile agricultural lands and rain forests.
The country borders the Red Sea and is located
between Egypt and Eritrea. Its natural resources
are substantial, but its main resources are oil and
gas. Other resources include iron ore, copper,
chromium ore, zinc, tungsten, mica, silver and
gold. Sudan has huge oil reserves, including
potentially large undiscovered reserves, which
makes it attractive to foreign investors. The country has suffered from protracted internal disputes
over many years and been subject to sanctions
as a result of unresolved political conflicts in
regions like Darfur.
KHARTUM
and financing rigidities, implied a sharp reduction in
Sudan’s overall resources. Annual oil revenues for the
period 2009–12 are projected to be 6 percentage points
of GDP lower than in 2005–08.
The news prompted the IMF to warn of the risks that the
country’s major achievements of the past several years,
in terms of maintaining macroeconomic stability and
strong growth, could be jeopardised. Foreign exchange
reserves fell sharply to less than two weeks of imports.
Real GDP growth is expected to nearly halve in 2009,
while inflation is projected to decline to single digits.
Total oil production is projected to increase somewhat in
2009, but the non-oil sector is likely to slow down significantly owing to the global slowdown and the impact of
domestic demand policies aimed at containing import
pressures in the face of declining foreign exchange
reserves. Both the services and agricultural sectors would
Economy
be affected by lower inflows of foreign direct investment.
Overall real GDP growth is projected at about 4% in 2009
Despite a weak final quarter in 2008, Sudan’s economic
and should pick-up slightly to 5% in 2010. Average infla-
indicators remained fairly strong during the year, while
tion is expected to decline to 9%, reflecting lower world
inflation trends mirrored developments in world food
food prices and tighter financial policies.
prices. Real GDP growth was estimated at about 7%
in 2008, with non-oil growth of 8.5%—compared with
Oil & Gas Sector
10 and 7.5%, respectively in 2007, according to an IMF
164
report issued on 21 July 2009. The buoyant non-oil
Sudan is still one of the most unexplored oil territories in
growth, driven by the services sector, compensated
Africa and the Middle East. The country has estimated oil
for lower oil production. Sudan was hit by the global
reserves of about 900 million barrels and estimated gas
crisis, mostly through a sharp decline in oil revenues. In
reserves of about 100 billion cubic metres. Most current
the fourth quarter of 2008, the sharp drop in oil prices
production comes from the Melut and Muglad basins. In
put significant pressure on public finances, leading to
2005, the country earned $4.8bn in oil export revenues.
some arrears accumulation. The decline in oil revenues,
There are ambitious plans to develop the oil and gas
coupled with continued weakness in non-oil collections
resources. The government in Khartoum aims to
Sudan
increase production to 600,000 b/d by the end of 2007
Agriculture
and to 800,000 b/d in 2008, from about 500,000 b/d in
mid-2007. State oil company Sudan National Petroleum
After oil and gas Sudan’s primary resources are in the
Corporation (Sudapet) is active in the oil exploration and
agricultural sector which has great potential for develop-
production sector, working in partnership with foreign,
ment to increase productivity. It expanded at the average
largely Asian, companies to raise oil output from an esti-
rate of 8.5% per annum during the last decade. The Gulf
mated 500,000b/d in 2008 to a forecasted 520,000b/d in
States and countries such as China have demonstrated an
2009.
increased interest in investing in the sector. In June 2009,
The acceptance of an international arbitration ruling
a conference was held in Khartoum to explore the possi-
issued on 22 July 2009 over the disputed Abyei field was
bilities of Sino-Sudanese cooperation and partnership in
widely viewed as an encouraging development giving
the area of agriculture with the aim of developing strategic
a boost to peace and reconciliation in the country. The
partnership between the resources of both countries
ruling from the Hague-based Permanent Court of Arbi-
including land, water, technical know how and financial
tration (PCA) redrew the boundaries of Sudan’s oil-rich
resources.
Abyei region and ceded some productive oilfields to
Although the country is trying to diversify its cash crops,
the north side. Both the National Congress Party (NCP)
cotton and gum Arabic remain major agricultural exports.
and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM)
Grain sorghum is the principal food crop, and wheat is
pledged to respect the international arbitration deci-
grown for domestic consumption. Sesame seeds and
sion. The boundary dispute over Abyei had been one
peanuts are also cultivated for domestic consumption as
of the most sensitive issues in the 2005 Comprehensive
well as increasingly for export. Livestock production has
Peace Agreement in Sudan. The decision was welcomed
vast potential, and many animals, particularly camels and
by countries internationally, including China, which is a
sheep, are exported to other Arab countries. However,
major trade partner for Sudan; China and Sudan estab-
Sudan remains a net importer of food because of problems
lished diplomatic ties in 1959 and bilateral trade stood at
of irrigation and transportation which act as constraints to
$8.2 billion in 2008.
the development of a more dynamic agricultural economy.
165
SU
Cash crops grown under irrigation include cotton and
Financial Sector
cottonseed, which is of primary importance to the
economy, sesame, sugarcane, peanuts, dates, citrus fruits,
Sudan is working with the IMF to strengthen the coun-
yams, tomatoes, mangoes, coffee, and tobacco. The main
try’s financial sector by ensuring that banks comply
subsistence crops produced in Sudan are sorghum, millet,
with regulations. The Central Bank of Sudan will actively
wheat, cowpeas, beans, pulses, corn, and barley. Cotton
enforce prudential standards and ensure that all banks
is the principal export crop and an integral part of the
comply with existing regulations. A plan is being
country’s economy and Sudan is the world’s third largest
prepared to restructure the Omdurman National Bank
producer of sesame after India and China.
(ONB) in line with recommendations of an independent
audit completed in 2008 with the ultimate objective of
Boosting Exports
privatising the bank.
Sudan’s Minister for Industry, Eng. Al Ahmed Osman,
Telecoms
indicated that the country wants to boost its leather
166
exports in the coming five years so that their revenues
Sudatel, the state-controlled telecoms operator and
will exceed $150 million instead of $30mn at present.
Sudan’s second-largest mobile phone operator, generated
Speaking at a meeting of the higher committee for devel-
net profits of $164.4m in 2008.
opment of exports and investment in the industrial sector,
In February 2009, Lebanon’s Fattouch Investment Group
the minister also referred to plans to increase the exports
launched the Vivacell mobile network to become the
of ethanol fuel, sugar, medicines and ceramics, Suda-
fourth mobile operator in Sudan. Kuwaiti and South
nese news agency SUNA reported on 10 July 2009.
African mobile phone giants had already found the
Sudan
Sudan market a difficult one due to the expense and time
involved in building networks capable of reaching the vast
majority of the population. Fattouch won a licence from
the government of South Sudan. Under the 2005 peace
accord, the south had the right to licence two mobile
phone operators. Vivacell is a relaunch of Network of the
World, a Sudanese-owned company that was set up soon
after the peace accord was signed. The south awarded
tion, Zain, MTN and the state-controlled third nationwide
operator Sudani are all expanding into the southern parts
of the country.
Sudan
its other licence to Gemtel, a Ugandan operator. In addi-
167
SY
SYRIA
COUNTRY NAME:
Syrian Arab Republic
LAND AREA:
185,000 km2
POPULATION:
20,2 million (2009 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic, English, French widely spoken
CURRENCY:
1 Syrian Pound (SYP) = 100 Piastre
1 EUR = 62.24 SYP (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Damascus (capital), Aleppo, Homs,
Hama, Latakia
NATIONAL DAY:
17 April – Indepence Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 2
As part of Syria’s ambitious attempts to develop a
dynamic, liberalised modern economy, it continues to adopt important reforms to open up,
diversify its income streams, boost the efficiency
of production and attract foreign investors. During the past few years, the country has seen the
introduction of its first private banks and in March
2009 it marked the opening of the Damascus
stock exchange. The global economic downturn has slowed down but not halted the country’s growth with most forecasts now predicting
between 2%-4% growth in 2009, which compares
with almost 6% in 2008. The IMF has estimated that
real GDP growth will be 3%.
DAMASCUS
resource” asset. Some 200,000 graduates have to be
absorbed into the Syrian economy each year; many also
choose to become self-employed while others look for
work abroad mainly in neighbouring Arab countries.
Some 26% of the total workforce is employed in the agricultural sector which remains by far the greatest single
employer followed by the industrial sector at nearly 16%;
however, industry is strengthening and expanding at a
steady rate as a result of ongoing economic reforms.
The remaining 58% of the workforce is employed in the
services sector, where areas like finance and tourism
have been offering more employment opportunities.
Oil & Gas
The country’s oil reserves are gradually being depleted
Overview
and by January 2009 reached 2.5 billion barrels, which
is the equivalent of half Oman’s reserves and only 3% of
Agriculture remains one of the most important sectors of
Kuwait’s reserves, according to the Oil & Gas Journal.
the economy and Syria’s main agricultural produce are
Syria is making efforts towards oil efficiency. However,
wheat, barley, cotton, lentils, chickpeas, olives, sugar
natural gas production is seen as offering future oppor-
beets; beef, mutton, poultry, eggs and dairy. The coun-
tunities as it seeks to benefit from its strategic location to
try’s main industrial activities are in petroleum, textiles,
become a transit hub for Egyptian, Iraqi and Iranian gas.
food processing, beverages, tobacco, phosphate rock
Syria has also started to partner with international energy
mining, cement, oil seeds processing and car assembly.
companies with a view to becoming a gas exporter,
The oil industry is becoming less important as the country
although at present all the gas it produces is consumed
moves further ahead with its drive to diversify and open
by the domestic market.
up to investors.
Official statistics put the country’s total workforce at
Agriculture
over 5.5 million people. An important characteristic of
168
Syria is its very young population profile with well above
Agriculture saw some improvements in 2009 after the
60% of the total under the age of 25 and as many are
severe droughts that the country suffered in 2008. As rain-
well educated this is regarded as a significant “human
fall levels picked up early this year, better crop volumes
Syria
are expected in the current harvests. Wheat is a stra-
attract investors and foreign firms, particularly from the
tegic crop whose output last year totalled 2 million tons
Gulf, are showing increased interest in the investment
but is expected to rise to around 3-4 million tons in the
opportunities in Syria. For example, the Kuwait invest-
2009/2010 harvest.
ment company, MAK Group (or Al-Kharafi Group), started
Another strategic crop, cotton, had a slightly better perfor-
construction work on the $217 million Kiwan tourist
mance in 2009. Cotton production is important for the
project in downtown Damascus. This complex will include
country’s textile manufacturing sector which is the second
a five-star hotel with 500 rooms and suites, international
largest export for foreign receipts and accounts for 15% of
business, entertainment, medical, sporting and shopping
total exports.
facilities, as well as a conference centre and a park. The
construction work is scheduled to take no more than
Pharmaceuticals
three years on a BOT basis.
Furthermore, the Tourism Ministry unveiled 65 new sites
The more export-oriented pharmaceuticals sector has
with investment potential for development as tourist
been performing successfully recently with two of the
resorts at an estimated total investment valued at $2.9bn.
country’s pharmaceutical companies receiving European
All the projects are to be offered to investors and devel-
Union certification to enable them to export their prod-
opers on BOT. These projects are expected to attract
ucts into the EU market, joining four other companies
more foreign investors.
already supplying these markets.
Meanwhile, in terms of healthcare provision for Syrian
Telecoms
citizens, the private sector is being encouraged to take
a more active role in order to meet rising population
Another sector offering considerable investment potential
demand and improve standards of care. New investment
is telecommunications, which is undergoing restructuring.
legislation is seeking to attract private foreign investors
At the end of 2008, a new law was drafted to establish an
by enabling private specialist hospital projects.
independent regulatory authority for the sector which is
currently dominated by two main firms, Syriatel and MTN.
Tourism
It will issue licenses, assign spectrum and frequency as it
regulates and opens up the sector to competition.
Syria is becoming an increasingly appealing tourist
destination, with European travellers beginning to visit in
higher numbers. The impact of world recession on the
sector’s growth has been negligible with the number of
tourists entering the country in the first half of 2009 up
by 9% on the same period in 2008 to reach 1.98 million,
excluding Syrian expatriates, according to the Ministry
of Tourism. It is thought that middle income Arab tourists, who make up an important portion of the total visitor
numbers to Syria, have been relatively less affected by
the crisis, while western tourists appear to be increasingly interested in visiting the country. The increase in US
and European visitors is also seen as a success for the
energetic advertising campaigns launched by the Tourism
Ministry in recent years.
As the sector continues to expand, one of the biggest
challenges is to train a sufficient number of staff to handle
the influx of visitors. At present, hospitality training in
Syria delivers an estimated 700-800 staff each year, but
an extra 50,000 will be needed if the country is to meet
the forecast expansion of tourism in the next couple of
years.
The country’s hospitality infrastructure is in need of
substantial upgrading and additional hotels and leisure
facilities are required to meet the needs of the influx
of new visitors. Fortunately the sector is continuing to
169
SY
The mobile sector, with a third operator expected to be
the first quarter of 2009. The country’s banking sector
launched in the coming months, is seen as most dynamic
is well regulated and conservatively managed by the
with a penetration rate of 36% and an estimated 7.1
Central Bank, which has served the sector well in the
million users by the end of 2008. In comparison, fixed
face of recent global financial upset. Syrian banks had
line penetration was about 18% and had 3.8 million
little or no investments in toxic assets which inflicted so
subscribers. Internet use is also expanding at a rapid rate
much damage elsewhere. The breakdown of deposits
and recent steps that are likely to enhance its use include
by currency shows that both local currency and foreign
a new law in February 2009 to recognise electronic signa-
currency grew similarly last year. Foreign currency
tures in business and other electronic dealings.
deposits continued to account for about 20% of total
Outsourcing of ICT services in Syria is seen as a poten-
deposits and grew by 16.4% in 2008, while local currency
tially important new sector of the economy. The country
deposits progressed by 15.5% over the same period,
has seen the successes that have been achieved in this
Bank Audi Syria reported in July 2009.
regard in places like India and Egypt. The Gulf States in
Banks are continuing to enhance their branch networks in
particular are viewed as potentially important customers
their drive to seize on the lucrative opportunities offered
for outsourcing services such as consultancy, imple-
by Syria’s emerging financial services sector. Total bank
mentation and customisation and, with new private
branches rose from 348 at year-end 2007 to 374 at year-
sector business encouraged to set up in the context of
end 2008, according to Central Bank statistics. Private
market liberalisation, ICT outsourcing is seen as offering
banks have been responsible for almost all the new
tremendous growth potential for Syria. Some call centre
expansion as they sought to offer their clients a broader
outsourcing in Syria already takes place, but the size of
range of retails and commercial banking products.
this sector remains limited at present.
Harsher financial conditions have not prevented new
banking ventures from being concluded. For example,
Banking & Financial Sector
Fransabank Syria officially launched operations in the
country in spring 2008, becoming the tenth conventional
170
Syria enjoyed continuing expansion of the banking
private bank in the country. In addition, a Syrian-Iranian
sector in 2008 and total deposits achieved a growth of
commercial bank, Banki, a joint venture between the
3.6% in the fourth quarter of the year and by 2.5% in
Commercial Bank of Syria and Iran’s Bank Saderat
obtained a preliminary license from the authorities.
stability, improving a clean banking sector that works in
Bank of Jordan, Lebanese owned Bank Al Sharq and
accordance with the international standards and prac-
the Qatar National Bank (QNB), through an affiliate, all
tices,” SANA news reported. He also stated that Islamic
recently entered the market. QNB-Syria, a private Syrian-
banks had an important role to play to help develop the
Qatari bank, launched an IPO of 34% of its total equity
banking sector, to assist economic growth and to finance
with subscription ending on 10 August 10 2009. Other
essential projects in Syria. Foreign banks have recently
conventional and Islamic banks from the region are all
been allowed to open a representative office in the
preparing to apply for licenses and start operations later
country, a move regarded as another step towards the
in 2009.
further modernisation of the country’s banking sector.
Damascus hosted the 4th conference of Islamic banks
The opening of the Damascus Securities Exchange
and financial institutions on 1 June under the title “Islamic
(DSE) on 10 March 2009 was a significant step towards
Banking, investment opportunities and challenges of
formalising the economy and offers great potential for
competition” which saw the participation of some 800
growth. The stock exchange is initially to be divided into
central bank governors, directors and chief executives
two markets, a “regular” market and a “growth” market.
of Islamic, commercial and investment banks from about
Companies that list will follow transparency rules on
20 Arab and foreign countries. Governor of the Central
disclosure of information on their performance, which
Bank of Syria Adib Mayaleh pointed to the importance
should encourage banks to increase lending to indi-
of Islamic banking and stressed that “as a supervising
viduals and corporations. The DSE is monitored by the
authority, we aim to achieve financial balance and
Syrian Commission on Financial Markets and Securities.
Syria
Syria
171
TN
TUNISIA
COUNTRY NAME:
Tunisian Republic
LAND AREA:
155,360 km2
POPULATION:
10,5 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic (official), French (commerce)
CURRENCY:
1 Tunisian Dinar (TND) = 100 Milim
1 EUR = 1.92 TND (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Tunis (capital), Nabeul, Sousse, Sfax,
Bizerte, Gabes
NATIONAL DAY:
20 March
TIME ZONE:
Tunisia Standard Time is GMT + 1
One of Tunisia’s main attractions for investors is
its stable market which has offered a degree of
security and certainty for business over many
years. The country is widely noted for its social stability and consensus politics, characteristics which
no doubt led it to be named as Africa’s “most at
peace” country in a recent Global Peace Index.
Tunisia has also long been able to offer a modern
infrastructure along with supportive business legislation and a significant degree of transparency in
the decision making processes which benefits the
ease of doing business.
TUNIS
are “one of its most competitive advantages”, resting
on “fairly transparent and trustworthy relations between
government and civil society”. The country was also
ranked highly in terms of the quality of its infrastructure
(34), its health and primary education (27), higher
education and training (27), goods market efficiency (30)
and innovation (27).
Trade with Europe
Tunisia enjoys close and mutually beneficial relations with
the countries of the European Union. More than 75% of
the country’s foreign trade occurs within the markets of
the EU. Tunisia has many attractions for investors and
172
The economy has demonstrated resilience in the face of
has achieved important successes in establishing itself
the global downturn and the
as an outsourcing destination for many European compa-
Tunisian banking sector continued to operate relatively
nies. Its close proximity to the European continent gives
undisturbed because of its minimal exposure to foreign
it a special advantage and EU member states are major
capital.
trade partners for the country. It takes only 20 hours for
Tunisia was ranked as the most competitive business
goods to be shipped from a Tunisian port to reach the
environment in Africa in a report released during the
main ports of the Mediterranean. One key development in
recent World Economic Forum (WEF) summit in Cape
Tunisia’s drive to enhance its export potential to Europe
Town. The 2009 Africa Competitiveness Report,
and further afield is the construction of the Enfidha port
produced by the WEF in association with the African
project which will give the country its first deepwater
Development Bank and the World Bank, gives the
docking capabilities. With Enfidha, Tunisia hopes to
Tunisian economy a score of 4.6 out of a maximum five
repeat the success that Morocco has achieved with the
for competitiveness, ranking it the 36th most competitive
Tanger-Med port. In its bid to integrate its economy into
economy globally, and the fifth most competitive in the
the global market, Tunisia became the first Arab country
Arab world.
to complete the process of entering the EU free trade
The report, which is based both on hard data and
zone in January 2008. Tunisia has also announced that it
responses to the WEF’s Executive Opinion Survey,
intends to join six other Mediterranean countries in imple-
singles out Tunisia’s institutional performance in
menting a full “open-sky” agreement by 2010, a move
particular for praise, noting that the country’s institutions
that will make the country available to low-cost flights
Tunisia
and provide a boost for its tourism industry.
and young women. According to the World Economic
Its policy of exchange rate flexibility was seen as a key
Forum’s (WEF) 2009-2010 “Global Competitiveness
factor in helping the economy to reduce tariffs and
Report”, Tunisia ranks second in the Arab world and first
barriers to entry, enabling the country’s textile sector in
in Africa for the quality of its educational system, while
particular to compete in European markets without the
coming in 17th worldwide.
need for protective measures. Stable fiscal policy has
These are all real achievements that have significantly
also contributed towards a low inflationary environment,
improved the life chances of many hundreds of thou-
another key requirement for maintaining competitiveness,
sands of Tunisians. This record also means that the
especially in the manufacturing sector.
country has a pool of well educated, competent and
adaptable people equipped with the skills needed in a
Human Resources
modern economy. A major task of Tunisia in the mediumterm is to create sufficient job opportunities for its people,
The Tunisian workforce is well educated and the popula-
particularly for young university graduates, the IMF has
tion is notable for its large middle class. People in this
said.
social category are estimated now to make up some 80%
of the total population. Tunisia is also a country of home-
Tourism
owners at more than 80%.
An increasing number of students are choosing to study
Tourism is a mainstay of the national economy; Tunisia’s
for technical, scientific and engineering degrees with
tourism product offers superb beaches, good infrastruc-
computing, telecommunications, multimedia, nanotech-
ture of thermals, spectacular desert scenery and a wealth
nology. Genetic engineering is gaining in popularity.
of historical sites dating back nearly 3,000 years to when
Meanwhile, a feature of the Tunisian labour market is
the ancient city of Carthage dominated the entire western
the high number of women in the workplace. As a result
Mediterranean. The combination of Islamic and Euro-
of the education policies pursued over many years,
pean cultures makes Tunisia a very popular North African
99% of Tunisian girls now complete primary education,
holiday destination for a broad range of visitors. While
while over 58% of university students are women. A
Europeans continue to hold the largest market share, in
literacy rate of over 90% has also been achieved for girls
recent years there have been a rising number of arrivals
173
TN
from countries that have not traditionally been important
Construction & Real Estate
markets for Tunisia; these include Eastern Europeans and
people from neighbouring countries such as Libya.
As part of its economic development strategy, Tunisia
Apart from catering to the needs of a more diverse
encourages large-scale infrastructure projects and has
range of visitors, Tunisia is also diversifying its tourism
been successful in attracting significant investment for
product by developing niche sectors such as sports and
some major high profile projects such as the Tunis Sports
medical tourism where significant growth opportunities
City and the Tunis Financial Harbour. Many of the inves-
exist. For example, the country is attracting an average
tors for these ambitious new developments in the capital
of 60,000 visitors to take part in golfing holidays each
Tunis and around the country have come from the Gulf.
year. A special study was conducted into the potential for
Additional activity in the construction sector is seen with
expanding this market area a couple of years ago. There
the financing of some major projects to upgrade the
are at present 10 golf courses in the country, but with a
transport sector with notable activities taking place to
planned expansion there is potential for another 20 to be
enhance roads and ports.
developed. Investment in this area is highly encouraged.
Tunisia recently inaugurated the international airport
As far a medical tourism is concerned, Tunisia is
“Enfidha-Zine El Abidine Ben Ali” which is supposed
expanding rapidly as a top medical tourism destination. It
to become the biggest airport of Tunisia. It will have a
is now securely placed on the tourism map for this niche
capacity of receiving 5 million passengers and reaching
product and it is widely recognised as offering a large
30 million passengers.
range of services such as heart, dental, eye and aesthetic
surgery at competitive rates. Medical services in Tunisia
Financial Sector
are on average some 40-70% cheaper than in many
174
European countries. There are many opportunities for
The Tunisian financial sector has not been directly
innovation and development of this specific niche area of
affected by the international crisis. The country continues
the tourism sector.
with its long-term strategy of reinforcing the banking
Tunisia
sector, which has led to a decline in the ratio of non-
new companies to enter this sector and for the expansion
performing loans to total loans from 17.6% in 2007 to
of existing ones, particularly in value-added (processed)
15.5% in 2008 and an increase in the provisioning ratio
products.
from 53.2% in 2007 to 56.8% in 2008. Tunisia intends
to continue this effort even after reaching the targets of
15% and 70%, respectively. The IMF commented that a
more forward-looking and comprehensive approach to
the prudential indicators could prove beneficial, particularly in the context of the implementation of Basel II.
The fishing industry is among those sectors most likely
to show improved export performance in the intermediate to long term, because of growing demand for fish
products and the abundance of exploitable species in
Tunisia’s Mediterranean Sea. Current policies designed
to encourage investment and deregulation of the industry
offer promises for the industry’s expansion, particularly in
value-added products. Tunisia is now a major producer
and exporter of seafood.
Therefore, the fish processing industry has attracted the
attention of foreign investors as well as of local companies. Given the abundance of fish resources existing in
Tunisia’s waters and the growing world demand for fish
products, there are considerable opportunities both for
Tunisia
Fisheries
175
AE
UNITED ARAB
EMIRATES
COUNTRY NAME:
United Arab Emirates
LAND AREA:
83,600 km2
POPULATION:
4.9 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic
CURRENCY:
1 UAE Dirham (AED) = 100 Fils
1 EUR = 4.92 AED (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Abu Dhabi (capital), Dubai, Sharjah
NATIONAL DAY:
2 December
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 4
In little more than 30 years the UAE has achieved
remarkable progress from a group of small
neighbouring communities to a prosperous and
modern commercial centre whose continually
changing skyline is beginning to rival anything in
the Middle East. The UAE has a vibrant free
economy, a significant proportion of its revenues
arising from exports of oil and gas. Successful
efforts have been made to diversify, away from
dependence on hydrocarbons and a solid
industrial base has been created, together with
a very strong services sector. The establishment
of free zones has been an important feature of
this diversification policy and reform of property
laws gave a major boost to real estate and
tourism sectors.
ABU DHABI
cargo handler DP World revealed that business at its
ports dropped ten per cent in the first half of 2009 as
the shipping industry struggled through the downturn.
Oil & Gas
The UAE is the world’s third largest exporter of crude oil
and, as of February 2009, oil production was 2.223 million
barrels a day. Oil reserves were 97.8 billion barrels, the
sixth largest reserves in the world. Abu Dhabi holds 92.2
billion barrels or 94% of the UAE total. Meanwhile, natural
gas reserves are 6 trillion cubic metres, which is the fifth
largest in the world, according to official sources.
The UAE is an increasingly attractive place to do business
and, despite the global downturn of 2009, considerable
opportunities continue to emerge in each of the emirates. Clearly Dubai and Abu Dhabi are the big attractions,
but investors are now increasingly looking further afield
Despite the global financial crisis resulting in an
towards the emerging markets of the smaller emirates
inevitable contraction in 2009, the UAE economy
such as Sharjah and Ras Al Khaimah. Visitors are drawn
remains robust, shielded by significant overseas
towards the open, low-tax and robust economy, stable
financial assets acquired during the period of booming
market, the ease of doing business, the essential back up
oil revenues. Substantial public expenditure, made
provided by first rate infrastructure, the transparent regu-
possible by its assets, combined with strong
latory system and the legal protection offered in particular
fundamentals and sound fiscal policies, to minimise the
to intellectual property rights.
impact of the crisis and receding petrodollar income on
the UAE’s economy. It has speeded up its recovery in
Construction
2010. In particular, the UAE decided to maintain high
176
investment budgets, especially for core long-term
Despite the global slowdown, the UAE continued to be
infrastructure projects, in order to stimulate growth and
one of the most active construction markets in the world
steer the economy away from recession. The UAE has
with more than 750 active projects in construction and
obviously not been totally insulated from the
450 recently completed, according to a report by Dubai-
reverberations of the global recession and in this regard
based research house Proleads Global issued in July
United Arab Emirates
2009. Although more than 400 projects with a total value
buildings with the exception of those that come under a
in excess of $300 billion had been placed on hold or
special decree or resolution. The law covers a wide range
withdrawn; the report forecasts stability returning to the
of topics dealing with buildings starting from designs,
sector in 2009 with some recovery in cash flow in 2010.
construction license, architectural standards and speci-
Considerable building activities are taking place across
fications, additions, expansions, maintenance and safety
the emirates. Abu Dhabi still has a major shortage of resi-
and security systems up to penalties for breaching provi-
dential units and work on infrastructure projects such as
sions of the law.
new roads, the metro and Khalifa Port, as well as airports
and new industrial areas, has proceeded without delay.
ICT
Abu Dhabi was considering allowing 100 per cent foreign
ownership of some projects, the chairman of the Depart-
The UAE compares favourably internationally in terms
ment of Economic Development stated. “We feel strongly
of its ICT services recording high rates of usage as the
inclined to grant 100 per cent ownership to foreigners in
country’s ICT sector shows continuing rapid growth. The
new and old industries as well as other projects,” Nasser
dynamism in the sector is attributed largely to the intro-
Ahmed Al Kuwaiti told Emirates Business on 24 May
duction of competition, as well as the adoption of interna-
2009.
tional best practices and governance.
Meanwhile, the number of contractors and consultants
The UAE ranked first among Arab countries in internet
entering Abu Dhabi increased according to a report
user rate, international internet bandwidth rates, the
issued by the Directorate of Contractors’ Classifica-
importance of ICT to the government’s vision of the
tion and Consultants’ Registration at the Department
future, personal computer rates, ICT use and government
of Economic Development (DED), which said that the
efficiency; e-government, government prioritisation of
construction sector in Abu Dhabi witnessed a major
ICT, laws relating to ICT, and the number of telephone
development during the first half of 2009.
lines, according to the Global Information Technology
The construction sector in Ras Al Khaimah is to be
Report 2007 – 2008, released in March 2009 by the World
better regulated under a new law issued by H H Sheikh
Economic Forum and based on estimates of the Interna-
Saud bin Saqr Al Qasimi, Crown Prince and Deputy
tional Telecommunication Union (ITU).
Ruler of Ras Al Khaimah.. Provisions of law no 1 of 2009
The UAE also ranked second among the Arab countries
for regulating buildings in RAK will be applicable to all
in terms of: high-speed monthly broadband subscription,
177
AE
lowest cost of broadband, the availability of government
design cities.
online services, and secure internet servers. Internation-
Setting up business in one of the UAE’s many Free Trade
ally, the UAE ranked first worldwide on the cost of mobile
Zones (FTZs) is widely seen as an attractive option for
telephone call and on residential monthly telephone
foreign investors. The concessions offered to investors
subscriptions. In other areas, the UAE ranks worldwide
in the free zones have led to their success in attracting
as follows: fourth on the importance of ICT to govern-
a large number of companies and foreign direct invest-
ment vision of the future, sixth on government success
ment. In turn, this success has had the positive effect of
in ICT promotion, seventh on government prioritization
expanding net non-oil exports.
of ICT, ninth on ICT use and government efficiency, 10th
on mobile telephone subscribers rate, 10th on business
Tourism
telephone connection charge, and 14th on residential
telephone connection charge.
Tourism sector officials in Abu Dhabi reported that the
emirate was becoming an important tourism hub in the
Free Zones
Gulf and Middle East due to its rich tourism varieties
and capability to provide unprecedented entertainment,
178
Each of the emirates now has its own free zones,
culture, artistic, musical, fairs and other competitive
although the majority are in Dubai. All free zones in
services in the region. In addition, Abu Dhabi said that
the UAE are governed by the independent Free Zone
it was eyeing a 59% growth in cruise passenger arrivals
Authority (FZA) which is also the agency responsible
in the 2009/2010 season. Forecasts by the Abu Dhabi
for issuing operating licences and assisting companies
Tourism Authority (ADTA) point to some 199,113 arrivals
with establishing their business. Dubai is the home to a
in the season, which runs from end of November to
majority of the free zones, including the famous Jebel
beginning of May.
Ali, the Airport Free Zone, Dubai Internet City and Dubai
Meanwhile, Sharjah, widely seen as the UAE’s cultural
Healthcare City. More specialist free zones are planned
capital, was holding its position as a leading destination
catering for specific sectors including textile, energy and
for cultural, heritage and family tourism worldwide.
Agriculture
The UAE has demonstrated an increased interest in the
development of organic farming in recent years. This is
largely because traditional farming methods are widely
seen as impractical to meet the needs of the growing
population. The first internationally recognised organic
farm in Abu Dhabi was certified to European standards
in 2007 and since then the sector has been growing. The
land under organic cultivation is set to double against the
backdrop of increasing support and encouragement from
UAE public agencies keen to promote the sector. The
total area under organic farming would increase to 3,000
acres as the demand for natural food products is on the
rise, said industry experts. They said the focus on organic
farming had come at a time when the market for organic
and natural food products started picking up in the UAE as
well as in the region. According to global data, the Middle
East is considered to be the fastest growing market for
natural and organic foods. On current estimates, the global
market for these green alternatives to conventional food is
to the tune of $220bn. The main domestically grown crops
in the UAE are dates, tomatoes, melons, cucumbers,
lettuce, camel milk, Akkawi cheese, aubergines and celery.
The UAE imports most of its basic food needs including
sugar, dairy products, meat, rice, tea, coffee, poultry,
wheat flour and fruit.
United Arab Emirates
United Arab Emirates
179
YE
YEMEN
COUNTRY NAME:
Republic of Yemen
LAND AREA:
527,968 km2
POPULATION:
23,4 million (2010 est.)
LANGUAGE:
Arabic, English
CURRENCY:
1 Yemeni Riyal (YER) = 100 Fils
1 EUR = 290.80 YER (Nov. 2010)
MAIN CITIES:
Sanaa (capital), Aden, Hodeida
NATIONAL DAY:
22 May – Republic Day
TIME ZONE:
Standard Time is GMT + 3
Although by no means one of the wealthiest
countries in the Middle East, Yemen offers some
important opportunities that should not be overlooked by investors. Its resources are limited and
it needs to meet the challenges posed by a rising
population. The country also faces depletion of its
oil reserves and its groundwater, but it is developing its gas industry and taking steps to improve
the efficiency of its agriculture and irrigation.
Challenges also include a generally underdeveloped infrastructure, but the country has been
attracting increased funding from international
donors. The country’s main industrial activities
are crude oil production and petroleum refining; small-scale production of cotton textiles and
leather goods; food processing; handicrafts; small
aluminium products; cement and commercial
ship repair.
SANAA
ment to fuel subsidies in 2005, a new general sales tax,
an anti-corruption drive, and improvements to the social
safety net—most of which have been only partially implemented and there have been significant delays.
With the country’s oil reserves expected to be depleted
in just over a decade, Yemen is preparing to make the
transition to a non-oil economy. A decline in oil output
and volatility in world oil prices have added a sense of
urgency to the economic reform process. Economic
activities in the non-oil sectors have increased at a
“reasonable rate” according to the IMF, but inflation has
been a key concern.
Inflation in Yemen has been extremely volatile in the past
year, but it is expected to fall.
However, Yemen has been relatively insulated from the
financial side of the current world economic crisis and its
banks have had relatively low exposure to private foreign
lending. Portfolio investment is quite limited, given the
absence of a domestic stock market or commercial credit
market. Yemen’s main foreign asset—the Central Bank’s
180
Average GDP growth for 2009-2010 was predicted to
reserves—are highly liquid and kept predominantly in the
reach 5.1% as the country’s first LNG plant comes on
form of deposits in international banks.
stream, marking an important new development for the
Yemen is seeking closer ties with the region and the
country’s bid to diversify its sources of income.
world economy. Discussions on accession to the WTO
In 2006 Yemen began a new economic reform
have been taking place since 2004. Bilateral negotia-
programme designed to bolster the non-oil sector,
tions on goods and services have been concluded with
boost diversification and attract foreign investment. As a
China and are ongoing with Australia, Canada, the Euro-
result, international donors pledged around $5 billion for
pean Union, Japan, Korea, and the US. The country also
development projects in the country. The IMF had said
continues to pursue membership in the Gulf Cooperation
that economic reforms had slowed after the 1990s and
Council primarily through the Yemeni-Gulf Technical
urgently need to be reinvigorated. Although a number of
Committee. In mid-2008, GCC members tasked the
reform initiatives emerged in recent years—including civil
Secretary General to conduct an integrated study on the
service and public financial management, a major adjust-
prospects for Yemen’s accession into the bloc.
Yemen
Yemen is pursuing efforts to further diversify its economy
oil revenue from currently producing fields. This will
and promote alternative sources of growth and employ-
require developing the country’s gas pipeline infrastruc-
ment generation. In addition to the gas sector, there
ture to facilitate access to the power sector and other
has been a focus on strategies to promote the develop-
customers. There is significant scope for the participation
ment of the country’s tourism and maritime activities, to
of private sector investors in the gas infrastructure devel-
capitalise on the coastal location and cultural heritage.
opment work that Yemen needs to undertake.
Several other areas of the non-oil economy have been
identified as potential sources of growth: agriculture
Electrical Power
(particularly honey), fishing, building stones and leather
products.
Yemen is seeking private investors to develop new power
To encourage investment, Yemen has undertaken a
projects. The Public Electricity Corporation is being
number of initiatives to strengthen the investment climate
assisted by the International Finance Corporation (IFC)
including the establishment of a one-stop shop for inves-
as it moves ahead with the development of independent
tors, a new procurement law, and an active anti-corrup-
power projects (IPPs). The IFC is engaged in carrying
tion authority; as well as a comprehensive review of
out a feasibility study for a private power project, it was
company and labour laws. In recognition of such efforts,
reported.
Yemen’s ranking on the World Bank’s Doing Business
report jumped from 113 in 2008 to 98 in 2009. Interna-
Tourism
tional donor support has been instrumental in helping to
sustain reform efforts.
Opportunities to develop the country’s tourism industry
are considerable. Yemen has some of the most attractive
Oil & Gas
locations in the world and could significantly boost visitor
numbers given more effective promotion and improve-
Yemen started to export gas through Yemen Liquefied
ments in the tourism infrastructure. The capital Sana’a
Natural Gas (YLNG) in 2009. It also aims to develop the
has a unique character whose old city with its distinc-
domestic gas market, in particular gas-to-power. Lique-
tive buildings is listed among the world heritage sites of
fied natural gas (LNG) export revenue and domestic gas
UNESCO. Ma’rib is another impressive location where
sales are expected to partially offset the decline in crude
the Great Ma’rib Dam, an example of early Yemenite
181
YE
civilization, can be found. Meanwhile, Shibam has been
Fisheries
dubbed the Manhattan of the desert. Situated 250 miles
182
off the coast of Yemen, the island of Socotra is the
Yemen has held talks with the World Bank and the
largest member of an archipelago of the same name, a
European Union on implementing fisheries projects
four-island cluster off the Horn of Africa and Gulf of Aden.
that donors had agreed to fund in the country’s coastal
Socotra is noted for its lush vegetation and exotic wildlife.
provinces. The Minister of Fisheries Wealth Mohammed
Yemen’s potential as a tourism destination has suffered
Shamlan discussed the projects with a mission from the
because of negative reporting that has damaged the
organisations in June 2009. He praised the efforts of the
country’s image abroad. Recently, Yemen’s tourism
Bank and the EU to develop the fisheries sector in the
authorities have been seeking to change foreign attitudes
country and affirmed that the Ministry was working to
and to this end launched tourism promotional campaigns
overcome any difficulties that deter the implementation of
in European countries.
such projects.
Infrastructure
Agriculture
A new port at Hadramout is to be built on a 12 million
Yemen is seeking to improve the productivity of its agri-
square metre site to complement Yemen’s existing port
cultural sector with the aim of improving food security.
facilities at Aden, Hudeidah and Mukalla. The proposed
It is focusing on attracting investors to strengthen the
$240 million new port will serve trade routes between
infrastructure that supports the sector particularly the
Europe, Africa and Asia, as well as other destinations
development of marketing and the promotion of agricul-
around the Indian Ocean. As part of plans to increase the
tural exports. The World Bank and international donors
capacities of ports and to operate them in more efficiently,
are supporting numerous projects in the country’s agri-
Yemen has sought partnership with specialist international
cultural sector.
companies to establish the port.
The agricultural industry in Yemen suffers from serious
Yemen
natural threats relating to climate and regular hazards
the third phase concerns reforming and developing the
such as swarms of locusts. These are a significant threat
Vocation Training Fund by reorganisation and reviewing
to farmers in the valleys and central highlands areas and
regulations.
can lead to serious food crises. A large proportion of the
population remains entirely dependent on agriculture for
Education
The World Bank is funding a Technical Education Development Project to the tune of $15mn. The project seeks
to improve the performance of vocational training institutions in the country through the implementation of
advanced training programmes to meet labour market
demands. The Ministry of Education and the World
Bank met in July 2009 and stressed the importance of
reforming the Vocational Training Fund, developing its
capabilities to improve education quality and to meet
labour market’s needs at the local and regional levels.
The project has three components divided into three
phases. The first phase represents planning, monitoring and assessment in the ministry and the project’s
management unit; the second phase relates to designing
and delivering new advanced technical programmes; and
Yemen
their livelihoods.
183
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