WholeNote Magazine for September 1 Download

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Here is an Acrobat PDF Web version of the September 2008 issue of WholeNote Magazine.
This Web version contains the entire main magazine, including all advertisements.
You may view this PDF of our magazine using the Bookmarks at the left of your screen as a
guide. Click on a Bookmark to go to the desired page. Where you see a “+” sign, click on it and
you will find sub-topics underneath.
WholeNote MarketPlace, our special advertising feature, showcases providers of education,
recording, health, home and other professional services, and can be found on pages 48 and 51.
For another view of the magazine you may click on the Pages tab at the left for a thumbnail view of
each individual page. When you click on the thumbnail that full page will open.
Readers are reminded that concert venues, dates and times sometimes change from those shown in
our Listings or in advertisements. This PDF version is accurate, to the best of our knowledge, as of
August 26, 2008, and will not be updated during the life of the issue. Please check with the concert
presenters for up-to-date information, and consult our main website, starting September 1, for
changes, corrections and additions.
David Perlman, Editor
TM
Wholenote Sept:Layout 1
8/12/08
12:48 PM
Page 1
Lang Lang
Mahler Symphony 3
September 17, 18, & 20 at 8:00pm
Peter Oundjian, conductor
Susan Platts, mezzo-soprano
Women of the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir
Toronto Children’s Chorus
Mahler: Symphony No. 3
Lang Lang Residency
September 21 - 28
The TSO is pleased to present Lang Lang in
Toronto for a full week of performances and
educational events, including two TSO concerts
and a solo recital at Roy Thomson Hall.
Ute Lemper Sings Weill
Peter Oundjian
October 1 & 2 at 8:00pm
Peter Oundjian, conductor
Ute Lemper, vocalist
Hudson Shad, vocal quartet
Weill: The Seven Deadly Sins
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 11 “The Year 1905”
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An arm’s length body of the City of Toronto
ONTARIO ARTS COUNCIL
’
CONSEIL DES ARTS DE LONTARIO
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Canadian Patrimoine
Heritage canadien
Volume 14 #1 September 1 - October 7, 2008
6
8
12
EDITOR’S OPENER David Perlman
FEATURE: Piano ... plus! André Laplante Pam Margles
QUODLIBET: Shoko Inoue’s metamorphoses Allan Pulker
YANNICK NÉZET-SÉGUIN
BEAT BY BEAT (The Live Music Scene)
17
Early Music: Frank Nakashima
In with the New: Richard Marsella
19
21
On Opera: Christopher Hoile
22
Band Stands & Podiums: Jack MacQuarrie
24
Choral Scene: mJ Buell
26
Choral Q & A with Lasana Barrow mJ Buell
28
Jazz Notes: Jim Galloway
29
World View: Karen Ages
New this month from ATMA
MUSICAL LIFE (2)
48
Music’s Children - September’s Child mJ Buell
Summer reflections on the state of music ed Sterling Beckwith
48
52
BookShelf Pam Margles
SACD2 2512
DISCOVERIES - Recordings Reviewed
53
Editor’s Corner David Olds
Vocal
54
56
Early Music and Period Performance
56
Classical and Beyond
57
Modern and Contemporary
59
Jazz and Improvised
60
Pot Pourri
60
Old Wine in New Bottles
Canadian conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s
international career continues to flourish.
This month he assumes the positions of Music
Director of the Rotterdam Philharmonic and Principal
Guest Conductor of the London Philharmonic.
This season he makes US debuts with The Philadelphia
Orchestra, the Boston Symphony, and the
Los Angeles Philharmonic.
SACD2 2549
CALENDAR (Live Music Listings)
32
Section 1: Concerts: Toronto & GTA
Section 2: Concerts: Beyond the GTA
40
42
Section 3: Jazz in the Clubs
44
Section 4: Announcements, Lectures, Workshops, ... Etcetera
SACD2 2514
MUSICAL LIFE (1)
31
Vladimir Orloff – a life in music Bruce Surtees
ENCORE
62
What makes classical Classical? Colin Eatock
ACD2 2324
SACD2 2331
OTHER ELEMENTS
06
Contact Information and Deadlines
Index of Advertisers
31
46
Classified Ads
48
WholeNote MarketPlace: Education
51
WholeNote MarketPlace: Services
ACD2 2294
ACD2 2306
IN THIS ISSUE
AT M AC L A S S I Q U E . C O M
Select ATMA titles now on sale
CHORAL Q & A
Lasana Barrow
Page 26
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
FOCUS ON OPERA:
Mavericks and Warhorses?
Page 21
CONTEST:
Who is September’s Child?
Page 48
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5
EDITOR’S OPENER
The Toronto Concert-Goer’s Guide
Volume 14 #1, September 1 - October 7, 2008
Copyright © 2008 WholeNote Media, Inc.
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Thanks to this month’s contributors
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Ages); New Music (Richard Marsella); Jazz (Jim Galloway); Orchestra
and Band (Jack MacQuarrie); Opera (Christopher Hoile); Musical Life
(mJ Buell); Books (Pamela Margles); Encore! (Colin Eatock)
Features: Pamela Margles, Allan Pulker, Bruce Surtees, Sterling Beckwith
CD Reviewers: Seth Estrin, Daniel Foley, Janos Gardonyi, John S. Gray,
John Keillor, Tiina Kiik, Pamela Margles, Cathy Riches, Terry Robbins,
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Distribution: Chris Malcolm, Gero Hajek, Joyce Leung, and our
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HAULING OUT THE TRUSTY OLD BIKE at 6:30 am this morning (Aug
25) for a brisk ride to the office for this final production shift of
the first issue of the new season (happy 14th, WholeNote!),
there was, surprisingly, enough of a chill in the air that I
stepped back inside to grab a fleece for the ride.
The chill was a bit of a relief, actually—a reminder that,
yes, we still do have seasons. It used to be that the rhythms of
the concert season contributed to the sense of seasonal change,
but this year, more than any I can remember, the lines between
the “regular” concert calendar and its hyper-kinetic summer
twin have become blurred.
Chief culprit for this onset of blurriness, here in Toronto,
was without doubt Agnes Grossmann, whose Summer Music
Academy and Festival weighed in through July and August with
concert after concert of high season heft, and an astonishingly
good fully-staged opera (Ariadne auf Naxos), at the U of T’s
MacMillan Theatre, that would not have been out of place three
subway stops further down the University/Spadina line (where
the Canadian Opera Company holds court for the other three
seasons).
And now, just as we gear up for the transition back to “business as usual”, we find the lines being blurred again, but this
time in the opposite direction—in the form of high quality outof-town festivals (Colours of Music, Sweetwater, Guelph Jazz)
that will tempt us onto the road again, prolonging the summer
just when we should be knuckling down to work.
Speaking of getting to work, my regular cycling route
takes me up a long lane from College to Harbord. Cats,
feral and otherwise, used to be its only daylight denizens,
but now, day and night, raccoons roam, foraging endlessly.
I’m told it’s because their previous nocturnal habits have
been disrupted by the introduction to urban life of green bins,
preventing them from raiding the garbage for easy pickings.
No more feasting all night and sleeping all day.
To my eye they’re looking better for it! Leaner, more
purposeful, with a constant appetite. Maybe, after all,
there’s something to be said for the trend toward a yearround concert diet, minus its cyclical highs and lows.
I get to see a lot of trends from this particular perch at
WholeNote, sometimes quite early in their emergence. Here’s
one. Those of you who resort regularly to our concert listings as
you forage endlessly for live music will be familiar with the
abbreviation (sr/st) near the end of a WholeNote concert listing,
signifying that the ticket price just stated is for seniors and students. A single (sr/st) price used to be the trend, but I’m noticing that increasing the two are becoming untwinned, with the
student discount remaining encouragingly substantial, but with
the senior price creeping closer to the regular ticket price.
I think I understand the rationale: the target group – seniors
who can afford the higher price – is definitely on the rise. But
what of those who can’t? There’s a grim corollary to the term
“target group”—namely “collateral damage”. Worth pondering,
I’d say.
And for seniors adversely affected, there’s one sure way to
buck the trend: make this the year to take the plunge, register
for that course or class you’ve always meant to take, and wave
that student card at the box office instead.
David Perlman
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Aug08_RCM_WholeNote_RC0847_ART
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THE ROYAL
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SEASON 08|09
DON’T MISS THIS UNPRECEDENTED OPPORTUNITY to enjoy
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INAUGURAL
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Sunday, September 28, 2008 2:00pm
ROYAL CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA
MARIO BERNARDI conductor
ANDREW McCANDLESS trumpet
Mozart Jupiter Symphony
Haydn Trumpet Concerto
MARTIN BEAVER
PAUL KANTOR
Wednesday, December 3, 2008 8:00pm
LEON FLEISHER solo piano, 2nd half with
members of ARC (Erika Raum, Marie Berard,
Steven Dann, Bryan Epperson)
MONICA WHICHER soprano and
LIZ UPCHURCH piano
Friday, November 7, 2008 8:00pm
ARC (ARTISTS OF THE ROYAL
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Sunday, January 25, 2009 2:00pm
LI WANG piano
Sunday, November 23, 2008 2:00pm
JUDY LOMAN harp and
NORA SCHULMAN flute
DIANNE WERNER
LI WANG
Friday, April 17, 2009 8:00pm
ATIS BANKAS violin and
DIANNE WERNER piano
TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS
Friday, December 12, 2008 8:00pm
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PAUL KANTOR violin, VIRGINIA WECKSTROM
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ALL CONCERTS LISTED AT MAZZOLENI HALL
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Sunday, January 18, 2009 2:00pm
Sunday, October 26, 2008 2:00pm
ANTON KUERTI piano
Friday, November 14, 2008 8:00pm
MARTIN BEAVER violin and
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LEON FLEISHER
Sunday, February 8, 2009 2:00pm
ANDREW McCANDLESS trumpet
with members of the GLENN GOULD
SCHOOL BRASS FACULTY
Sunday, March 1, 2009 2:00pm
ANAGNOSON & KINTON piano duo
Sunday, March 8, 2009 2:00pm
NADINA MACKIE JACKSON bassoon
GUY FREW trumpet, with members of
GLENN GOULD SCHOOL STRINGS
FACULTY
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AT THE DOOR
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ANDREW McCANDLESS
FEATURE
Piano ... plus!
ANDRÉ
LAPLANTE
Why does this organization remain important to you?
When smaller communities do not have the opportunity to go to
classical music concerts, it’s up to us to go to them. What is also
nice is that we put on concerts at primary schools. The kids all get
into the school gym, where there could be just a small upright piano.
We play a little bit, then we improvise with the kids and explain
what the music is about.
I remember when I was growing up in Rimouski times where
some musicians would come to my school. Those were big events.
They created a lot of interest in music for many people. In my peregrinations through Québec and all over the world I meet people I
went to school with, and they still remember those concerts.
8
Did your parents play?
My mom played enough piano to have an interest in music, and she
was talented. I had a great uncle who played the violin quite well. I
remember hearing him doing some Québec folk songs. Someone
would accompany him on the piano and find the harmonies.
Are you concerned that young pianists don’t get enough opportunities
to play for pleasure like that?
I’m really worried that younger
people have this idea of being
perfect playing machines. There
are so many talented pianists today
that there is pressure on them to
produce something that is technically “perfect”. But this comes at
the price of imagination and character.
Often they can be doing something very well in terms of technique and phrasing, but the character is not strong enough. It’s like
an actor who has great technique,
but what he is doing is not necesLaplante and Toronto Summer Music sarily very interesting if he is not
Academy & Festival artistic
totally in the character he is playdirector Agnes Grossmann
ing.
Technique should be used for expression and not just to play accurately. There’s often a confusion here. It’s always possible to show a
very talented student how to play the instrument. You can be very
technological in learning the motions involved in phrasing well and
producing a really good sound, knowing that if you lift your wrist at a
certain point then it’s going to change the sound. This is how we
learn to play an instrument, and it’s very important.
But the problem is to learn to associate the physical gestures with
the character of the piece. The reflexes involved in playing have to
be directly associated with making music, which means playing in
the character of the music.
PHOTO: DEVONNE SITZER
“Don’t let things become
pale,” André Laplante
was saying to a student
during a masterclass he
was giving at the Toronto André Laplante in concert at Glenn Gould
Summer Music Academy.
Studio, October 2007
He was encouraging her to find more colours in the Schubert sonata
they were working on. She played the passage again. He smiled and
said, “That sounds like the fire alarms in Paris.” The young woman
at the piano laughed, and the whole class joined in.
They were sitting side by side at two concert grands in a huge
room in the lower depths of the Edward Johnson Building at the
University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music, where Laplante had been
teaching during the past week. I had a chance to talk with him during a lunch break, after which he continued through the afternoon
and right into the evening.
Laplante has been involved with the Toronto Summer Music Festival and Academy since artistic director Agnes Grossmann started it
three years ago. Right from the beginning it offered an ambitious
series of public concerts and a fully staged opera, along with extensive masterclasses. Now, three years later, the festival has clearly
become much more than a welcome annual summer event. In fact, it
has proved to be one of the musical highlights of the year in Toronto. Running from mid-July until mid-August, this year’s program
included an evening of Baroque opera arias with Suzie Leblanc and
Daniel Taylor, the debut performance of legendary eighty-four-yearold pianist Menahem Pressler’s new chamber ensemble, and, to cap
things off, a spirited and polished production of Strauss’s opera
Ariadne auf Naxos, staged by Titus Hollweg and conducted by
Grossmann.
But none of these overshadowed the opening gala recital by Laplante, which set the tone for the whole festival. It took place, appropriately enough, at the elegant Carlu, where, in its original incarnation as the Eaton Auditorium, Glenn Gould discovered his favourite piano and made some of his most important recordings.
Since winning the silver medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in
1978, Laplante has gained a strong following around the world. He
is a regular visitor to Toronto from his home in Montreal. He taught
at the Royal Conservatory’s Glenn Gould School for a number of
years, and performs here frequently.
We started by talking about his next visit to Toronto to perform in
the Piano Plus gala on September 9, again in the Carlu. He was one
of the original members of Piano Plus – along with Janina Fialkowska, Angela Cheng, Marc-André Hamelin, Angela Hewitt, and Jon
Kimura Parker – when it started out in 1993 as Piano Six.
PHOTO: DEVONNE SITZER
PHOTO MATTHEW BAIRD
INTERVIEWED BY
PAM MARGLES
Was there much music in your
early years there?
There was less television than
nowadays, so people had more
free time at night. Quite a few
people in our neighborhood played
instruments as amateurs. So they
would get together and make music - not necessarily classical.
They would play the accordion
and the piano and the violin, and
sing. It was a bit improvised, and
certainly not professional, but it
was fun. It was all about how
people could express themselves
with music.
We did not have many concerts
Laplante teaches a masterclass at the
per se, especially classical con2008 Toronto Summer Music Academy
certs. But every once in a while
the Community Concerts organization would put on a concert and it
would be very interesting. When I was six, we moved to Montréal,
so I was exposed to many other things from then on.
How can you teach that?
You cannot separate the pianistic issues from the musical issues.
You have to teach both at the same time. Sometimes this is being
taught well, but sometimes not. It’s more difficult to learn this way,
I’ll admit, but otherwise you become just another very efficient pianist who can play the instrument very well—but imagination is another
thing. Maybe you start to compensate for not being in the character
enough by looking up at the sky. You can look very inspired. But
that doesn’t mean your playing is.
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Where can a student look for that inspiration?
It takes a long time for young musicians to understand that in the
end everything that you learn has something to do with self-confidence. It’s about being our own musician, with our own personality.
The greatest musicians you can name—Horowitz, Richter, Rostropovich, Kempff—are all very different types of musicians, but each of
them has a very strong personality and a very strong voice to say
what they have to say.
What about what the composer has written?
Form and architecture have to be understood, of course. But that’s
about five percent of the game. Ninety-five percent of the game is in
the realm of emotion and character. That is what brings life to the
music.
Of course you have to do the intellectual work to understand how
it’s built, and to know how to place things physically. You need to
spend a lot of time looking at how a piece goes from a to b and b to
c—the thigh-bone connects to the knee-bone kind of thing. But while
you are doing this you have to ask how you express the character of
the music.
GREAT CHAMBER MUSIC DOWNTOWN
The concert,
for Music Toronto,
was like one of those
rare and serious parties
where every person has
something important to say,
all the time.
Then how do you balance your own personal expression of the
character with the composer’s own voice?
In many ways. First of all, you enrich yourself by encountering a lot
of ideas and listening to performers, not necessarily pianists.
I go to the theatre a lot myself, and there I see the same expression of character. It’s within another realm, the realm of acting, but
it is exactly the same thing.
Musicians are nothing but actors—we have to be in the character
of what we are trying to express. I have friends who are painters. I
go to their studios sometimes and they show me what they are doing, and explain it to me.
That’s how Robert Everett-Green
in the Globe and Mail
described the
Brentano Quartet’s
first concert for us.
Do you see similarities with your own work?
Of course. They talk about rhythm and colour. Every art goes to the
same place—to balance and expression, whether it is with colours or
with notes. Notes have colours, you know. Everything is related.
We like to think it describes
every concert we present.
Do you think it is important for musicians to know about the art and
theatre from artistic periods of the past?
Yes, if you know about that it only enriches your imagination. If
you want to play a Bach partita or suite well, you have to know that
it’s all based on traditional Baroque dance rhythms. You have to
understand those traditions and to see something of what they call
the zeitgeist of the period.
I teach a bit at the Conservatory in Montréal, and I’m very happy
that the new director, Raffi Armenian, wants to offer a course on art
history. A lot of students who play Debussy don’t even know what
Impressionism is. If you give them a course in art history they can
compare the painting and the music of Debussy’s time.
This is not only to stuff something into their heads—it’s so that
when they hear the music and see the paintings they can feel what
people were up to and what they wanted to express. That’s what it’s
all about, you know. That’s why we talk about developing our individuality. That individuality has to be based on knowledge of where
the music comes from and how one era influences another, how
Liszt, for instance, influenced Schoenberg.
Should they learn about the instruments from other periods?
It’s important to know about the instruments of the time, and realize,
for instance, that they were playing the Bach Preludes and Fugues
on the harpsichord. That makes you realize how they created lines
by feeling the harmony.
On the modern piano, we can actually play enormous pieces by
Liszt that are very orchestral in character. The Bach Preludes and
Fugues can be orchestral in character, but they represent another
spirit, and come from another time. You have to adapt to all this
knowledge.
How do you respond to those who claim that Bach should only be
played on the harpsichord?
If you want to play on period instruments, I think it’s fine. But
Bach is timeless, and if you play it with the rules of the art, with
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
The Brentano play
our opening night
Thursday October 16.
Hear for yourself.
Check out our full season
on page 4
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ONTARIO ARTS COUNCIL
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9
respect for the form and style, it can be played on many instruments.
For myself, I think that the piano can be a very good voice.
Very – it is an important piece. I
would say, pound for pound, it’s
surely one of the best pieces Liszt
ever composed. It’s phenomenal
what he did with the form. The
whole thing is based on just three
themes, and he developed those
three themes for twenty-five minutes.
I notice that when you teach you offer physical ways of solving a
problem. You demonstrate at the piano a lot, and actually show a
student how to practice something.
I’m performing a lot, so I see the physical, intellectual and expressive elements. I want the students to put those elements together
themselves—not only for the sound, but for the character. That’s
why I send all my students to the theatre. Being a pianist is so isolating. You can work on the piano repertoire for all your life, and
you don’t have enough time in one life to learn half of it.
Has your interpretation changed
much over the years?
Yes it has. The piece is so immense
that you need to swim in it for a
long time. Technically I don’t have
any problem with it now—I never
really did—but I can listen to it
more objectively now, so I can
create much longer lines. Eventually it becomes all one form. Some
times, I will be more interested in
certain aspects of its character,
while at other times different aspects—it has so many.
You are frequently called a romantic virtuoso—even on your own
website.
I do play a lot of romantic music. But I enjoy playing Mozart and
Bach and Schubert as much.
So does that refer to your repertoire or your style of playing?
Maybe one reason why I have that reputation is because I won at the
Tchaikovsky competition. But for many years now I’ve been playing
much more classical style repertoire like Mozart, so I have some
reservations about this.
Laplante receives accolades
at the 1978 Tchaikovsky
International Music
Competition in Moscow
I think of a romantic virtuoso as one who will take liberties with the
score to project their personal vision. But your playing is never just
about you, it’s far more about the music.
It’s all about the music. I’m just a catalyst [he laughs], a catalyst
between the composer and the public, that’s all. I am just trying to
gather enough knowledge on how to play the instrument to project
the ideas and feelings that are in the music. So that’s what my work
is all about.
But there is a confusion. People think of a romantic virtuoso as a
long-haired guy coming on stage and pounding the piano—not at all.
Did the fact that your teacher at Juilliard, Sascha Gorodnitzki, was
Russian have much influence on your style?
Yes, to some extent. Maybe that’s why I’m supposed to be a romantic pianist. Gorodnitzki studied with Joseph Lhevinne, who was
a phenomenal pianist, probably one of the best who ever lived. The
Russians have their own training and their own tradition.
What about these flashy young showmen today who sell out way in
advance and get ovations just for showing up?
I don’t want to go into this, but what I do want to say is that in any
piano class there is always one student who can play faster and louder then the others. But maybe it’s the quietest student sitting in the
back who has real comprehension of music, but will not be as
flashy. Someone who wants to learn how to organize the music and
work on technique is going to have more to give than anyone else.
My favourite example of a not necessarily virtuosic pianist is Alfred Brendel. I never think about him as a pianist, but as an incredible musical mind. He uses the piano as a catalyst for his own expression, and that’s fabulous to me. Another one is Daniel Barenboim, who has one of the greatest musical minds we have seen so
far, a phenomenal talent. But when you listen to him you don’t think
of him as a pianist—you think of him as a musician. He plays the
piano extremely well, obviously, but you always get a musical message, just as with Wilhelm Kempff and Martha Argerich. But they
are all very different, with very different temperaments.
Nobody has the truth about everything. Every pianist has a different personality and a different natural understanding of a certain
musical language.
M U S I C F E S T I VA L
What do they have in common?
They all have this phenomenal desire to express something. One will
be a little more objective, and another one will be a little more subjective, but they are all aiming at the same bulls-eye.
What is it about a pianist that makes people want to listen to them?
In the end, after all the work has been done to organize the music
physically and sound-wise, if the character is present when you play
then you’ve got it! But if it’s not, then someone who goes to your
“perfect” concert will eat their scrambled eggs the next morning and
not even think about the concert anymore, because it was not an
event. I am trying to create an event.
You performed the Liszt Sonata here at the opening concert for the
Toronto Summer Music Festival a couple of weeks ago, and again
at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound a few days ago. That’s
a work you played at the Tchaikovsky Competition thirty years ago.
Has it been a particularly significant piece for you?
10
You are putting a lot into this festival, with the opening night concert and all these masterclasses. What do you think this festival can
accomplish?
S EP T EM B ER 1 9 , 2 0 , 2 1 , 2 0 0 8
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A r t i s t i c D i r e c to r
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FRIDAY, SEPT. 19
LEITH CHURCH
8pm
“transformations”
Works by:
Handel/Halvorsen
Schnittke
Schoenberg
Stravinsky
SATURDAY, SEPT. 20
DIVISION ST.
UNITED CHURCH,
OWEN SOUND
8pm
SUNDAY, SEPT. 21
LEITH CHURCH
2pm
“all good things”
Works by:
Haydn
Brahms
“about face”
Works by:
Schoenfield
Buczynski
Bolcolm
Boccherini
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
It creates an interest, and that promotes classical music. The concerts seem to be attracting a great many people. For the students it
provides an opportunity to go to many masterclasses, not just piano,
and listen to what other people have to say.
I’m very happy to be able to be here giving something to these
students. You know, I learn a lot from my students, how to verbalize an explanation and inspire them. When I practise the same piece
myself, it’s actually a little bit easier. It’s funny to say, but it’s true.
Had you worked with Agnes Grossmann before this festival?
Yes, yes. We had known each other, and had done concerts together. Agnes always comes up with these incredible ideas that work—
like this festival. This is something to pull off.
You are often referred to as the heir to Glenn Gould. Do you see
much in common, apart from the fact that you are both Canadian
pianists who created a sensation when you played in Russia during
the Soviet era?
If this is said it’s a big honour, and a big responsibility. What I
think about Gould is what the majority of people think: he was in a
class by himself. And when you are not only a totally natural musician, but inspired and cultured, then that sets an example. He certainly is a guiding light.
You don’t really share a lot of the same repertoire, especially regarding Bach.
Of course Gould was playing much more than Bach. That’s not the
point. It doesn’t make you necessarily a better musician to play a lot
of Bach—or Mozart or Prokofiev or this or that. I think what makes
you a better musician is to keep an eye on those musicians who
really inspire. You see how much they work, practicing and enriching themselves with culture and putting all their life in the service of
expression. They are a gift to the world.
LISTENING SUGGESTIONS
RECORDINGS
SOLO PIANO
—Hétu: Piano concerto no. 2. CBC Radio Orchestra. CBC Records SMCD 5228
—Tchaikovsky: Piano concerto no. 1 in B-flat minor & other works. Orchestre symphonique de
Québec, Yoav Talmi, conductor. Riche Lieu RIC2 9970.
—Brahms: Piano Sonata no. 3, Two Rhapsodies, op.79. Analekta AN2 9270
—Liszt : Sonata in B minor; Sonetto del Petrarca no. 104, etc. Analekta AN2 9273
—Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit, Valses nobles et sentimentales, Menuet antique, Sonatine. Elan CD
2232
—Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto no. 3, Prélude, op.23, no.1, Tchaikovsky: Autumn Song, op. 37a,
no. 10. Moscow Philharmonic, Alexander Lazarev, conductor. Analekta/Fleur de Lys FL 23107
CHAMBER MUSIC
—Milhaud, Saint-Saëns, Strauss, Nielsen, Françaix & Martinu. Ensemble of the Festival of the
Sound. CBC Records MVCD 1089
—Luedeke: Transparency of Time & other works. Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Bramwell
Tovey, conductor. CBC Records SMCD 5141
—Ravel: Mélodies. Catherine Robbin, mezzo-soprano & members of the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra. CBC Records MVCD 1128
ON LINE
Two live concert recordings are available for listening at Laplante’s web site:
www.andrelaplante.com
Two live concert recordings are currently posted on the CBC Concerts on Demand website:
—Great Canadian Pianists - André Laplante: Glenn Gould, Russia and Russian Music, Oct. 01,
2007, Glenn Gould Studio, Toronto http://www.cbc.ca/radio2/cod/concerts/20071001lapla
—André Laplante and the Shanghai Quartet, Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival, July
26, 2008, Dominion-Chalmers United Church, Ottawa
USA’s
Aurora
Guitar
Quartet
Italian Pianist
Gabriele Baldocci
Belgium’s
Duo Pianists
Arriaga
String Quartet
Anagnoson
and Kinton
Lydia Adams (conductor), Amabile Boys & Men’s Choirs, Anagnoson & Kinton (piano Duo), Arriaga String Quartet, Aurora Guitar Quartet,
Gabriele Baldocci (piano), Carol Beynon (conductor/director), Howard Cable (composer), Graham Campbell (jazz guitar), James Campbell
(clarinet), Susan Carscadden-Mifsud (handbell soloist), Vania Chan (soprano), Lon Chaney (silent screen actor in “Phantom of the Opera”),
Concert Opera Group, Jason Cutmore (piano), Alexander Dobson (baritone), Darryl Edwards (artistic director), Elmer Iseler Singers, Guy Few
piano), Mark Fewer (violin), Fig Leaf Jazz Band, Ken Fleet (conductor/director), Maya Fraser (violin), Rev. Patricia Gale-MacDonald, Allan Gilliland
(composer-in-residence), Selena Gittens (vocalist), Andrea Grant (piano), Rafael Hoekman (cello), Susan Hoeppner (flute), Robert Kortgaard
(piano), Janice LaMarre (viola), Nena LaMarre (piano), Lang Ning Liu (piano), Gillian MacKay (conductor), Leigh-Anne Martin (mezzo soprano),
Rudy Mayes (vocalist), Bob Mills (double bass), Nat King Cole to Johnny Mathis Show, Wendy Nielsen (soprano), William O’Meara (organ), Joe
Palawan (musical director), David Parisi (piano), Angela Park (piano), Penderecki String Quartet, Rick Phillips (narrator), Primus Men’s Choir,
Kelly Robertson (tenor), Royal City Saxophone Quartet, Zorana Sadiq – soprano, Doreen Uren Simmons (piano), Daniel Sullivan (organ),
Stéphan Sylvestre (piano), Peter Tiefenbach (piano), True North Brass, University of Toronto Winds Ensemble, Kristin Wilkes (soprano),
September 26
to
October 5, 08
Amabile Boys Choir
Music
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P
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Wonde
Elmer Iseler Singers
WWWCOLOURSOFMUSICCAsTEL
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
11
QUODLibet
Shoko Inoue’s metamorphoses
by Allan Pulker
PHOTO: LIZ SZYNKOWSKI, IMPACT PHOTOGRAPHY.CA
SOME TIME AGO I wrote
about the fact that Toronto’s
musical life has been enriched by the presence of
musicians who initially
came to study and, when
their studies were finished,
stayed here to live and
work. I talked recently to a
musician who has done just
this, pianist Shoko Inoue,
who, after studying at the
Cleveland Institute, moved
to Toronto about six years
ago to continue her studies
with John Perry and Marc
Durand. Those studies behind her, she has settled in
Toronto, where she currently teaches and performs. The CBC’s “New
Generation” series and
“On-Stage” Concert series
have both provided her with
opportunities to perform
here. Now, her commitment to being here is deepening as she prepares a
new recital series, “Metamorphosis”, which will be informed by her
unique perspective on music and performance – a perspective resulting
from her studies in Cleveland with Armenian-American pianist Sergei
Babayan.
“In my very first lesson with him,” she said, “he showed me
colour, words without words, wealth of possibility in each moment, and
dimensions of music-making that I had never experienced before. From
his piano came magic ‘creature-notes’—so alive! I just burst into tears
from his magical music, because it was beyond being merely beautiful.
How far beauty could reach had been completely unknown to me. It was
as if I was face to face with the universe itself.”
“From that life-changing experience until now, he has been the
most caring and nourishing teacher I have ever had. He has shown me the
power of the pianist to be able to reach, so to say, from beyond the
sky and to bring that beauty back to this earth. He has been the most
important teacher I have ever studied with.”
She has invited Babayan to perform as part of her series, on April 7,
2009. She says, “I am so honoured and grateful that he has agreed to
come.” But before Babayan’s visit, Inoue will be joined by another musician who has influenced her – Amanda Forsyth, in the inaugural concert
of her series on September 19 at Glenn Gould Studio, where they will
perform a program that includes Strauss’ and Rachmaninov’s Sonatas for
piano and cello, as well as a Japanese folksong and a piece by Canadian
composer Alexina Louie.
Inoue’s thoughts on Forsyth also reveal much about Inoue’s ideas on
music. Introduced to National Arts Centre Orchestra conductor Pinchas
Zukerman and Ms Forsyth, the orchestra’s principal cellist, by principal
bass player Joel Quarrington, Shoko accepted the invitation to play with
Forsyth at the Beethoven Festival presented by the National Arts Centre
last year.
“When I heard her playing at the rehearsal,” she told me, “I felt as if
I had known her for long time. The warmth, freedom and depth of her
music-making embraced all around her, and naturally I was magnetized
by her vibrant openness and communication. It is as if through music we
fly towards the sacred place we both dream of going. This concert will be
a great opportunity for a spiritual adventure together in search of the
vision behind our eyes.”
Can you say something about what that vision is now, I asked. “Music” she replied, “is asking for its sacred voice to be heard. In reality
12
there is no difference between the composer, performer, and
audience—all three should be equal in their experience, and only
by coming together can the power of music guide us upwards.
We have to look beyond the familiar roles in society—the role of
the concert, the role of ourselves—to realize that we can at
every moment be borne closer to the truth of our freedom.”
A lofty vision it is, and one which will resonate deeply with
dedicated WholeNote readers in the way it acknowledges the
role of the listeners not merely as witnesses to but as participants in the process of seeking moments when music comes
alive and is metamorphosed into “creature-notes”.
Sandwiched between Forsyth and Babyan’s visits, the second
concert in the “Metamorphosis” series will be a solo piano
recital by Ms Inoue at Glenn Gould Studio on January 19, 2009.
While she already has an enthusiastic following in Toronto, this
will be a great opportunity for those who have not yet discovered
her to do just that.
CONTINUES ON PAGE 14
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Soundstreams WN Sept
8/14/08
5:34 PM
Page 1
08.09
NEW DIRECTIONS IN MUSIC PRESENTED BY
BREAKING THE BARRIERS OF SOUND
Orphei Drängar
THE GREATEST MALE CHOIR
IN THE WORLD
Guest Artist: Opera Star Maria Fontosh, soprano
Sunday, October 19th, 2008 @ 3 pm
Metropolitan United Church (56 Queen Street East)
Orphei Drängar
vibrant
voices
Lawrence Cherney,
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Don’t miss the greatest male choir in the world in a rare
Toronto performance on conductor Robert Sund’s farewell tour! 80 voices perform a powerful programme featuring R. Murray Schafer’s choreographed
Magic Songs, Benjamin Britten’s fiery Ballad of Little Musgrave, Schubert’s
sublime Psalm 23, opera arias, Swedish folk songs, new music, and more.
University Voices 2008:
YOUTH, MUSIC, PASSION!
Friday, November 7th, 2008 @ 8 pm
Metropolitan United Church (56 Queen Street East)
Venezuelan visionary Maria Guinand will conduct Canada’s most talented
University Choirs performing Music of the Americas from the baroque to the
present including: a world premiere by Alberto Grau, plus works by Osvaldo
Golijev, Alberto Ginastera, R. Murray Schafer, José Evangelista, Claude Vivier,
Eric Whitacre, Pinto Fonseca and others.
*$1 from every ticket sold will go to Maria Guinand’s Construir Cantando Foundation
(Building through Singing) to improve the lives of Latin American youth through choral singing.
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir
and the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra
University Voices
MUSIC FOR THE SOUL
Thursday, November 20th, 2008 @ 8 pm
St. Anne’s Anglican Church (270 Gladstone Ave.) FREE PARKING
The Grammy-winning Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir and the virtuoso
strings of the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra perform under founding conductor Tõnu
Kaljuste. Featuring a transcendental programme including Arvo Pärt’s Orient
& Occident and Da Pacem, excerpts of Paul Frehner’s ethereal The Seven Last
Words of Christ and the radiant Beatus Vir of Antonio Vivaldi.
Tickets $15 to $37
Buy tickets to all three and save 10%
Estonian Philharmonic
Chamber Choir
Buy Tickets through St. Lawrence Centre Box Office.
CALL 416-366-7723 or visit www.stlc.com
The Julie-Jiggs Foundation
The McLean Foundation
John McKellar
Roger D. Moore
Daniel Cooper
Generously supported by:
Canadian
Heritage
www.soundstreams.ca
Patrimoine
canadien
Premiere Circle
James Baillie*
Michael and Sonya Koerner*
(Koerner Foundation)
Stan Witkin
John Lawson
*Silver Member and above.
This “Metamorphosis” series should be
a valuable addition to the live music
scene, with a strong international flavour arising out of Inoue’s broad circle
of contacts in the music world and her
strong ties with Japan, and a talented
pianist as the pivot for its choice of
repertoire and artists. (The final concert
of the next series is still in the early
planning stages, but will feature the
music of J.S. Bach and will include a
small instrumental ensemble. The concert will also be at the Glenn Gould
Studio in May.)
48$/,7<$1'6(59,&(
6,1&(
Background:
Shoko Inoue was born and raised in
Tokyo, Japan, began playing the piano
at the age of three, and studied with
teachers Shun Sato and Takashi HironaAbove top: Shoko Inoue’s
ka. After winning third place in the
most influential teacher,
1996 Cleveland International Piano
Sergei Babayan
Competition, she came to the United
States to study under full scholarship at Above: Cellist Amanda
Forsyth will play in Inoue’s
the Cleveland Institute of Music with
inaugural “Metamorphosis”
Sergei Babayan. (To put things into
concert on September 19
perspective, Canadians Angela Hewitt
and André Lemelin—the only Canadians ever to place in the Cleveland International Piano Competition—
were also both 3rd prize winners, in 1979 and 1983 respectively,
when the prize was know as the Casadesus Piano Competition.) In
addition to her success in Cleveland, Inoue was first prize winner
for contemporary music at the Frinna Awerbuch Competition (in
1998) and first prize winner at the Chopin Competition (in 1995),
both in New York, where she made her Carnegie Hall debut.
CORRECTION:
%$&.726&+22/63(&,$/6
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WholeNote has been informed that the September 9 Piano Plus Gala referenced in our cover
story on page 8 has been postponed to a date
to be announced, in the spring of 2009.
We regret the error and will keep our readers
informed on the rescheduling of this event.
Welcome back to a new school year! We are your
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TORONTO PHILHARMONIA
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KERRY STRATTON, Music Director
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2008-2009 Season
MY COUNTRY
SMETANA: Ma Vlast (includes The Moldau)
thursday oct 16 2008, 8 pm
CELEBRATION
LOUIE: Celebration Music
MENDELSSOHN: Symphony No. 3 “The
Scottish”
BRAHMS: Piano Concerto No. 1
Younggun Kim, piano
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thursday nov 13, 2008 8 pm
HOPE AND GLORY
HEALEY: Tribulation and the morning trumpet
MARTINU: Memorial to Lidice
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9
with the Toronto Philharmonia Chorus
)HE
thursday dec 4 , 2008 7 pm
7+(*/25<2)%$5248(
HOME FOR CHRISTMAS
with the Toronto Philharmonia Chorus
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thursday feb 5, 2009 8 pm
LEGENDARY FAVOURITES
BURRY: Orchestra Suite from “The Hobbit”
GLAZUNOV: Violin Concerto
KODALY: Hary Janos Suite
Lance Elbeck, violin
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thursday mar 5, 2009 8 pm
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JOURNEYS
RAMINSH: Suite for Orchestra
HAYDN: Symphony No. 99
VILLA-LOBOS: Sinfionetta No. 1 in B flat
thursday april 2, 8 pm
KEYBOARD FIREWORKS
KA NIN CHAN: Revelation
CHABRIER: Pastoral Suite
PROKOFIEV: Piano Concerto No 3
$SU
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Simon Docking, piano
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thursday may 7, 8 pm
PUCCINI GALA
Lucia Cesaroni, soprano
Michael Toby, tenor
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All concerts at:Toronto Centre for the Arts
5040 Yonge Street
416-733-0545
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
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416 499 0403
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passion has a voice™
Noel Edison ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
115TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON
A M AN DIVINE
R AISED IN SONG
A deeply moving Remembrance Day tribute with
Vaughan Williams’ Dona Nobis Pacem and
Brahms’ Requiem. Friday 7 November
A casual afternoon of popular choral music
and favourite hymns. Sunday 1 Februar y
SACRED MUSIC FOR A SACRED SPACE
FESTIVAL OF C AROL S
Grand symphonic sound envelops body and soul
in the rich acoustics of St. Paul’s Basilica.
Good Friday 10 April
Gather the family for this festive holiday tradition !
Wednesday 10 December
w w w.tmchoir.org
416 -598 - 0422
TORONTO’S FAVOURITE MESSIAH
PA SSION HA S A VOICE !
AN ANNIVER SARY CELEBR ATION
TMC Artistic Director Noel Edison conduct s this year's
Messiah with the TSO ! Wednesday 17 December
Mendelssohn’s Elijah—passionate, dramatic,
and operatic. Saturday 9 May
TORONTO MENDEL SSOHN YOUTH CHOIR (TMYC) PERFOR M ANCES
Saturday 6 December & Saturday 28 Februar y
SEASON SUPPORTERS
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
MOOREDALE CONCERTS 2008/2009
Anton Kuerti, Music Director
Walter Hall, U. of T., 6 Sundays at 3 pm
Music & Truffles for children 5-15 at 1 pm
Sun. Sept. 21, 2008 Españoleta
Chatham Baroque with baroque
percussionist Danny Mallon
Spicy, joyful baroque dances from
Spain
“Very strongly recommended.”
- Gramophone
“… masterful ... stands up to any
ensemble from across the Atlantic.”
- Early Music America
Stars of the TSO
Oct. 12, 2008
Principal horn Neil Deland, principal
violist Teng Li, and others in Mozart’s
Horn Quintet, a rare Haydn trio for
Horn and Strings, Schubert’s String
Trio and a thrilling Hindemith solo
viola work.
Made in Canada
Nov. 9, 2008
A stellar Piano Quartet comprised of
four award winning young Canadian
musicians: violinist Judy Kang, violist
Sharon Wei, cellist Rachel Mercer,
and pianist Angela Park. Fauré Piano
Quartet and solos.
March 22, 2009
Kolja Lessing
unique German violinist AND pianist,
with Anton Kuerti in sonatas by
Mendelssohn & Busoni, Kuerti’s Solo
Violin Partita and Vogel piano Sonata.
“Kolja Lessing’s account of the
Goldschmidt Piano Sonata brought the
house down” - The Guardian, London
“a violinist of the highest class”
- Crescendo, Belgium
Jan. 11, 2009 Kuerti vs Kuerti
For the 1st time in Toronto, Anton
& Julian Kuerti perform together,
with the Hamilton Philharmonic
Orchestra, in Mendelssohn
Concertos, Bartok and
Beethoven’s 8th Symphony.
(MacMillan Theatre)
Richard Raymond
April 5, 2009
piano, fabulous winner of the Montreal
International Competition, performs
Mozart, Chopin, and Dohnanyi.
“all the drama and poetry one could
hope for”
- American Record Guide
With amazing young cellist David Eggert,
winner of the Janigro Competition, in
Rachmaninoff’s fiery Cello Sonata.
Affordable tickets!
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16
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
EARLY Music
THE
The Tafelmusik Effect
by Frank Nakashima
Aldeburgh
C O N N E C T I O N
Celebrating the
Art of Song
Artistic Directors:
Stephen Ralls and Bruce Ubukata
Join us for eight exciting concerts, including
our season’s highlight: Schubert’s Winterreise
BRETT POLEGATO, baritone
Wednesday, March 25, 8:00 pm
Glenn Gould Studio
Tafelmusik circa 1981. (L to R) Tafelmusik founder Kenneth Solway,
harpsichordist Charlotte Nediger, principal cellist Christina Mahler, music
director Jeanne Lamon, and Tafelmusik founder Susan Graves.
NOW ENTERING THEIR 30TH SEASON, and performing more than 50
concerts every year, the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra has received
international critical acclaim for its excellence in the performance of
Baroque and early Classical music. It provides a powerful period
music magnet for Toronto, capable of attracting to town, year after
year, early music luminaries such as Emma Kirkby, Barthold Kuijken, Bruno Weil ... the list goes on.
Tafelmusik’s extraordinary success has done much to nurture and
support historical performance activity here—even beyond their ambitious annual concert series. Tafelmusik is Baroque Orchestra-inResidence at the University of Toronto. They’ve established a Baroque Summer Institute, music education programs for youth, educational concerts, and award-winning children’s recordings. They’ve
made over 70 recordings! When did they have time to do that? In
2006, Tafelmusik was awarded their 8th and 9th JUNO Awards (for
Baroque Adventure: The Quest for Arundo Donax and Beethoven
Symphonies Nos. 5 & 6). This season, they released their 75th and
76th recordings: Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico with Elizabeth Wallfisch (Analekta), and Gloria in Excelsis Deo (CBC Records), a
musical celebration of the Tafelmusik Chamber Choir’s 25th anniversary.
Most important of all, they have employed almost twenty permanent members, each of whom is a specialist in historical performance
practice. There are very few places in the world where these conditions exist, especially for an ensemble which specializes in Baroque
music. Simply put, Tafelmusik has become our leading ambassador
and advocate for early music, bringing it from the margins to the
mainstream of the city’s concert life.
“Tafel”, as many of its devotees refer to it, was born in 1979, as
the Toronto Chamber Music Collective. Shortly thereafter, at the
invitation of its founders, Kenny Solway and Susan Graves, Jeanne
Lamon arrived on the scene, becoming musical director in 1981. The
chamber choir was established the same year, under Ivars Taurins,
and the team was in place. In recent years, Jeanne’s influence has
also been felt in modern Canadian orchestras (with modern instruments!) such as the Vancouver Symphony, the Calgary Philharmonic, and Symphony Nova Scotia. This is not only a sign of her stature
among mainstream classical musicians but also the general (and
growing) acceptance of the importance of historically informed performance, irrespective of instrumentation. In 2000, Jeanne was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.
Just as important, in its way, in 2004 she was named Musician
of the Year by the Toronto Musicians’ Association – indicative of
her organization’s role in giving a whole cluster of top-flight performers the security to base themselves in Toronto. It’s interesting to
look at some of the other things performers connected with Tafelmusik have brought to fruition over the years – not to say that all the
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Sunday Series (2:30 pm, Walter Hall, U. of T.)
October 26: The Enchanted Garden
– the songs of Ravel
November 30: Parnassus on Elm Street
– Arts & Letters Club at 100
February 1: The Wings of Song
– the songs of Mendelssohn
March 15: A James Joyce Songbook
– music and Ireland’s greatest writer
April 26: Thé chantant – songs for an afternoon
Soloists include Nathalie Paulin, Monica Whicher, Gillian Keith, Katherine
Whyte, Allison Angelo, Allyson McHardy, Lauren Segal, Elizabeth
Turnbull, Lynne McMurtry, Colin Ainsworth, Michael Colvin, Lawrence
Wiliford, Philip Carmichael, Giles Tomkins, Peter Barrett, Jason Nedecky
Discovery Series (7:30 pm in Walter Hall, U. of T.)
Tuesdays, November 11 and February 10
presenting six talented young stars at their careers’ brink
Tickets: 416.735.7982
www.aldeburghconnection.org
Ask about our CDs - including the Juno-nominated
Schubert among friends and our very latest, Our own songs.
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
17
WSQ
Concert Series
4 Sundays at 3:00
OCT 5: Mozart, Schubert. with Nicolai Tarasov, clarinet
NOV 16: Vachon, Arriaga, Mozart
FEB 22: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven
MAY 10: Haydn, new commission by William Rowson
St. Olave’s Anglican Church, 360 Windermere Ave.
(just south of Bloor, between Runnymede & Jane/S. Kingsway)
$18, s/s $12, 4-concert Series: $54, s/s $36
For more information call 416-769-7054,
email [email protected], or visit
windermerestringquartet.com, purchase tickets online
credit goes Tafel’s way, but only that success incubates success.
Several former and current members of Tafelmusik’s orchestra
and choir have created new early music ensembles. Larry Beckwith
founded the Toronto Masque Theatre. Larry was also a founding
member of the now dormant trio Arbor Oak, and of violinist Chris
Reibling’s Aradia Ensemble. Once considered Toronto’s number
two Baroque orchestra, the leadership of former Tafelmusik violinist
Kevin Mallon has given Aradia a new impetus and an enviable
reputation thanks to numerous recordings and ongoing projects on
the Naxos label.
Singer Peter Mahon is now the conductor of The Tallis Choir of
Toronto and also makes frequent appearances with Les Violons du
Roy and The Toronto Consort. Lutenist Lucas Harris and harpsichordist Borys Medicky are co-directors of The Continuo Collective of Toronto. Singer Richard Cunningham is the conductor of
the Renaissance Singers (Cambridge). Tafel violinists Julia Wedman and Aisslinn Nosky are founding members of the I Furiosi
Baroque Ensemble, and the Kirby Quartet. Violinist Genevieve
Gilardeau is a member of the Windermere String Quartet. Recorder player Alison Melville was co-founder of Baroque Music
Beside the Grange, now also, alas, dormant, and of Ensemble
Polaris (very much alive!) Other Tafel regulars perform with Opera
Atelier, the Nota Bene Period Orchestra, the Toronto Chamber
Choir, the Academy Concert Series, and in Joelle Morton’s Scaramella concerts. Who have I missed?
Obviously, there is a lot of musical talent here. In hindsight all
we needed was a little push in the right direction. And clearly, when
push came to shove, Tafelmusik was there! However it happened,
we can be thankful that it did, and hope that early music performance continues to flourish in Toronto and beyond.
Frank T. Nakashima ([email protected]) is the President of
the Toronto Early Music Centre, a non-profit charitable organization which promotes the appreciation of historically-informed performances of early music.
on period instruments
Gala Italia
Monday, November 3 at 8 pm
Roy Thomson Hall, Toronto
ORCHESTRA INTERNAZIONALE
D’ITALIA
Kerry Stratton, Conductor
Claudio Marcotulli, Guitarist plus singers T.B.A.
Program
Celebrating Puccini’s 150th anniversary plus
Rossini, *Boccadoro, *Podio, Rodrigo
*Canadian premieres commissioned by RAI Trade
Tickets: $35; Seniors / Students $25
416-872-4255 www.roythomsonhall.com
Info: 416-362-1422
Under the auspices of the Consulate General of Italy
On the occasion of the 13th edition of “Italian Wine Tasting”
and
International Touring Productions
International Resource Centre for Performing Artists
Canadian Debut Tour
Nov. 2 Port Hope, Nov. 4 Welland, Nov. 5 Orillia
Nov. 6 Markham, Nov. 7 Milton, Nov. 8 Barrie
Nov. 9 Richmond Hill, Nov. 10 Montreal
With the support of
Presidenza Marche Regional Council
Cities of Ascoli Piceno, Fermo and Pescara
Domodimonti Cantina
18
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
In With the New
And now for something completely different
PHOTO : JORDAN NOBLES
by Richard Marsella
It’s great to be back for another exciting season of contemporary music in Toronto. In this column we’ll get up close with some of its
more interesting practitioners. This month, I had a refreshing conversation with Jerry Pergolesi, Toronto percussionist and artistic director of CONTACT contemporary music, talking about the evolution of CONTACT, in particular their annual New Music Marathon.
Jerry Pergolesi graduated in 1996 from University of Toronto’s
Faculty of Music. Shortly after, he took a road trip with an influential musician, percussionist Bev Johnston, who advised him that one
of the most inspiring byproducts of music is travel, not necessarily
to make any money, but to share great music with new audiences.
Johnston also advised that it’s almost a wasted effort to travel the
path of the popular, and to do your own thing is always more rewarding. Pergolesi took this advice to heart.
The story of CONTACT begins organically some time in the late
1990s, as friends helping friends with their individual recitals, something familiar to most budding classical musicians. But in the end,
this particular group of friends decided to build ONE collective recital under the name CONTACT.
Originally a mismatched quartet of piano, harpsichord, clarinet and
percussion, the resident ensemble now consists of: Sarah Fraser Raff
CONTACT performing at the Royal Ontario Museum as part of the
(violin), Wallace Halladay (saxophones), Rob MacDonald (guitars),
soundaXis Festival in June 2008
Peter Pavlovsky (double bass), Jerry Pergolesi (percussion/artistic
of Jerry Pergolesi, with other artists from the community—including
director), and Allison Wiebe (piano/keyboards).
composers/performers Juliet Palmer, John Burke, and Lori FreedIn common was the feeling that when they went to a concert, there
man, to name a few. Their very first event was held at the Art Galwas a detachment between audience, composer, and performer. So,
lery of Ontario, featuring Canadian repertoire that they felt compleinitially, they began doing concerts in people’s living rooms, and
mented the artwork hanging on the walls. Since then, they’ve done
then extended the living room feeling to the concert hall, always reconcerts in alternative locations including subway stations, atriums
maining informal….hence the name CONTACT, better-connecting
and on street corners. Their Dadaist motto is to play where the peothe various players in any given musical experience.
ple are, plain and simple.
CONTACT is curated collaboratively, under the artistic direction
CONTINUES NEXT PAGE
Photo: André Leduc
New
Music
Concerts
November Festival
Robert Aitken | artistic director
2008-2009
Season
Saturday November 1, 2008 | Generation 2008 at the Music Gallery
Ensemble contemporain de Montréal – Véronique Lacroix, director
Music by Canadian Composers Michael Berger | Scott Good | Fuhong Shi | Brian Harman
Saturday November 15, 2008 | The Montreal Stockhausen Project at the Enwave Theatre
Lise Daoust | Geneviève Deraspe | Chloé Labbé | François Duval | Marie-Hélène Breault
Sunday November 30, 2008 | Sydney Hodkinson, Hope Lee and David Eagle at the Music Gallery
Accordes string quartet| Fujiko Imajishi violin | New Music Concerts Ensemble | + Centrediscs CD release
Subscriptions $135 | $80 | $30
Pick 3 (or more) each: $25 | $15 | $7.50
Call NMC @ 416 961–9594
Saturday January 17, 2009 | Duo Diorama at the Music Gallery
Minghuan Xu violin, Winston Choi piano perform music by
John Austin | Brian Current | Bright Sheng | Marcos Balter | Elliott Carter | John Melby
Repertoire, dates and artists subject to change
Sunday March 29, 2009 | Roger Reynolds & His Protégés at Isabel Bader Theatre
David Swan | Robert Aitken | NMC Ensemble with electroacoustic processing
Introductions @ 7:15 | Concerts @ 8:00
Reynolds | David Felder | Chaya Czernowin | Juan Campoverde | Antonio Borges-Cuñha
www.NewMusicConcerts.com
Saturday April 18, 2009 | The Wit of Jürg Wyttenbach at Glenn Gould Studio
Monday April 20, 2009 | Jürg Wyttenbach lecture/recital at Gallery 345 – 345 Sorauren Ave.
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
19
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20
For the New Music Marathon, CONTACT first approached office
tower-style atriums, once again simply wanting to play music where
the people are. Unfortunately, in many instances the decision-makers
in these office buildings could not understand the benefits in supporting
a concert series like the one CONTACT was proposing. Fortunately
the folks at Yonge-Dundas Square did.
“When the opportunity arose to partner with Yonge-Dundas
Square, we jumped on it,” begins Pergolesi. “The New Music Marathon was initially modelled something like the “Bang on a Can Festival” in New York, so we’re really not too innovative in terms of
form. What makes us special is that we’re presenting highly experimental music in a popular setting. It’s a long-term investment.
Through dumb luck, we fluke upon our listeners!”
On September 20, CONTACT presents its second annual serving of
the Marathon. Pergolesi says he’s “really excited about it. Digital
Prowess are coming from Guelph to perform a unique orchestration
of Rzewski’s Coming Together, and also performing are solo noise
artist Ryan Clark (guitar and effects); Allison Cameron; Eve Egoyan
(piano); and Kyle Brenders (solo sax).”
Also on the list: IO Media doing multimedia film/video/sound
work, Rob’s Collision, featuring Rob Pillonen, and Mike Hansen
(turntables) doing Stockhausen, Cage and others …Tim Francom/
Dean Pomeroy (percussion) doing Reich’s Nagoya Marimbas, CONTACT performing Philip Glass’ Music in Similar Motion, and the Lollipop
People butchering Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition.
Throughout the day, as part of the Canadian Music Centre’s “New
Music in New Places” program, sound-artist/composer Darren Copeland will lead a unique project called 3-Sided Square. It uses gathered
audio footage from the live stage performances, and from interviews
with people in the Square. At 10-minute intervals between acts on the
stage, the artist will broadcast a laptop improvisation of the audio
through spatialized speakers in the Square.
“One of the biggest challenges is to be ambitious, doing such largescale activities in the middle of the city at such a young stage in the
organization’s development. Doing things like this marathon is dependent on the grass-roots support of everybody in the arts community” says Pergolesi.
Choosing the right repertoire has also been crucial for the group.
“Programming the right music for the right space is an art unto itself,” says Pergolesi. “For example, I’d never program Discreet Music by Brian Eno in a public setting such as Yonge-Dundas, as its subtlety would be lost in the mix. However we did perform this piece at
the Downsview Subway Station during rush hour, and it worked beautifully, aligning more with Eno’s philosophy.”
Last year in Yonge-Dundas Square, CONTACT received a standing ovation for their performance of Two Pages by Philip Glass. “A
new audience applauding artsy fartsy music!” exclaims Pergolesi.
“That was an amazing memory, and I think a highly appropriate piece
for the setting. I think you need to remember that you’re not in the
concert hall, you’re on a street corner. I’m not saying we need to
dumb it down, but there’s suitable repertoire out there that can be an
amazing entry point for new listeners.”
Where does CONTACT fit in? “We don’t. We don’t fit neatly into
the Toronto improvising crowd, the well-established new music presenter crowd, or the Toronto indie hipster crowd. We are more interested in appealing to the crowd that also doesn’t fit in, but moves
amongst all these different crowds.” The nice thing about CONTACT
is that the group is diverse enough to collaborate with a larger slice of
Toronto’s music community.
They’ve also started to gain a bit of a reputation for presenting music-based multi-media events such as John Burke’s Labyrinth Concert
and the world premier of David Lang’s music and film collaboration
Elevated. “Who else would present a drag queen doing contemporary
music?” asks Pergolesi, in reference to CONTACT’s presentation of
Gareth Farr, in their 2006-2007 programming season.
Don’t miss this exciting all-day event.
Richard Marsella is the Ontario Regional Director for the Canadian
Music Centre and composer for the modern music ensemble The
Lollipop People.
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
On Opera
The season beckons
PHOTO CLIVE BARDA
by Christopher Hoile
A scene from War and Peace, English National Opera, 2001. The
COC mounts War and Peace in October 2008
THOSE WITH A TASTE for opera off the beaten track are in for an exciting opera season in 2008–09. Famous operas that have rarely or never been staged in Toronto will make their appearance along with
several world premieres. (Traditionalists, despair not, however,
because these rarities are balanced by a healthy dose of the tried and
true.
The most anticipated works of the season are two COC premieres—Prokofiev’s epic War and Peace (1945) and Dvorák’s most
popular opera Rusalka (1901). After Wagner’s Ring cycle, War and
Peace, based on Tolstoy’s novel, is the most massive work the COC
has ever mounted. It is over four hours long and features over 60
named roles. The enormous cast includes such Canadians as Russell
Braun as Prince Andrei, Judith Forst, Jean Stilwell and Gregory Dahl
as well as familiar foreign guests like Mikhail Agafonov and Laryssa
Kostiuk. Tim Albery, who directed this production for the ENO, also
directs here. The work runs October 10 to November 1, 2008.
Rusalka takes us from the realm of history to fantasy. Michael
Schade sings the role of the Prince who falls in love with the waternymph of the title sung by Julie Makerov, who must make a terrible
sacrifice for her love of a mortal. Richard Bradshaw had promised
Nicholas Goldschmidt that the COC would perform the work to honour him and, though both masters have passed away, the COC has not
forgotten the promise. Rusalka runs January 31 to February 23, 2009.
Were these two operas less rare, the COC’s productions of Verdi’s
Simon Boccanegra (April 11 to May 7, 2009) and Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (May 5–23, 2009) would steal the limelight. The
first has not been staged here since 1979 and the second receives its
main stage premiere.
The COC season is filled out with such favourites as Mozart’s Don
Giovanni (Oct. 5–31, 2008) with Brett Polegato in the title role,
Beethoven’s Fidelio (January 24–February 24, 2009) with Adrianne
Pieczonka as Leonore, Puccini’s La Bohème (April 17–May 24,
2009) and a COC Ensemble Studio production of Mozart’s Così fan
tutte (June 15–21, 2009).
Moving on from the COC, Toronto will witness at least three
world premieres in the coming season. In February 2009, Queen of
Puddings will unveil Inês, the latest opera by James Rolfe to a libretto
by Paul Bentley. This will be a retelling of the tale of Inês de Castro
(1325–55) updated to Toronto of the 1960s and influenced by Portuguese fado. On March 28–29 Opera in Concert and the Esprit Orchestra present Kamouraska by Charles Wilson, a complete reworking of his 1975 opera based on the novel by Anne Hébert. Then June
9–14, Soundstreams presents The Children’s Crusade by R. Murray
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
21
Schafer. The opera, written for over 150 performers, including the
Canadian Children’s Opera Chorus and the Toronto Consort, was
inspired by the bizarre and ill-fated Children’s Crusade of 1212.
The season also abounds in Canadian and Toronto premieres.
From October 8 to November 16, 2008, the Tarragon Theatre
presents the Toronto premiere of The Black Rider by the unlikely trio
of Tom Waits, Robert Wilson and William S. Burroughs. The Brechtand-Weill-influenced opera, popular in Europe ever since its 1990
premiere in Hamburg, is based on the same story as Carl Maria von
Weber’s 1821 opera Der Freischütz.
Opera in Concert has two Canadian premieres on tap. On October
4–5, 2008, it presents Donizetti’s Roberto Devereux (1837) and on
November 20, 2008, it has Saverio Mercadante’s La Vestale (1840).
Among other rarities this season, Opera in Concert with the Aradia
Ensemble present Haydn’s opera buffa Il Mondo della luna (1777) on
February 1, 2009. The University of Toronto Opera Division has
scheduled Domenico Cimarosa’s Il Matrimonio segreto (1792) for
October 30 to November 2, 2008, and a Ravel double bill of L’Enfant
et les sortilèges (1925) and L’Heure espagnole (1911) for March 5–8,
2009. Toronto Operetta Theatre offers Carl Zeller’s delightful classic
Der Vogelhändler (1891) from December 26, 2008 to January 4,
2009, and Kurt Weill’s musical of old New York, Knickerbocker
Holiday (1938), February 18–22, 2009.
For more familiar works, the revitalized Opera Hamilton begins
its new season on October 30 and November 1 with The Magic Flute
starring Colin Ainsworth, Shannon Mercer, Alexander Dobson and
Audrey Elizabeth Luna. Opera Atelier adds to its growing repertoire
of Mozart’s operas with a new production of The Abduction from the
Seraglio on November 8–15, with David Fallis conducting the Tafelmusik Orchestra in the work’s North American premiere on period
instruments. So many operas, so little time!
08|09 season
FREE CONCERTS IN THE
RICHARD BRADSHAW AMPHITHEATRE
BAND Stands (& Podiums)
Four of a kind?
by Jack MacQuarrie
For some years now the BandStand column in WholeNote has striven
to serve one particular segment of the music community. It has been
our goal to provide timely information for both performing groups
and their audiences. In our musings over the summer break we have
had time to reflect on our coverage and contemplate how we might
better serve our constituency in the months ahead. That lead us to the
need to define our community.
Since its inception, BandStand has focused almost exclusively on
the activities of community concert bands and their all brass counterparts. But what about community symphony orchestras and the many
other instrumental groups active in our area? While their numbers
have grown significantly in recent years, they have not had the voice
they deserve in this column.
As a preliminary step, I pulled four diverse instrumental organizations from the hat, so to speak, in order to reflect on the ways their
philosophies and activities are similar and the ways in which they differ. From the band side we picked Milton Concert Band and The
Koffler Concert Band (aka Resa’s Pieces, after director/founder
Resa Kochberg); from the orchestral side, Orchestra Toronto and
The North York Concert Orchestra.
We posed a few basic questions: how set are things already for the
coming year in terms of a concert schedule, repertoire and player
personnel; how did the groups and their directors get where they are
today; and what else do the groups’ directors have on their plates?
are an important component of
Starting with the obvious, ortheir activities throughout the year.)
chestras tend to have more rigid
In all cases repertoire is selected
well-defined concert series in
by the music director, with varyplace, with published brochures
for the season. Probably because ing degrees of input from members of the group. The orchestras
of greater mobility, while they do
tend to emphasize the traditional
have a fixed concert schedule, the
classical repertoire with occasionbands have greater flexibility in
terms of the types of venues where al contemporary works – this season, for example, The North York
they are able to perform. (Groups
of all types make it clear that vary- Concert Orchestra will be featuring a new work composed by muing forms of community outreach
sic director David Bowser. The
emphasis at Resa’s Pieces seems
10th Anniversary Season
to be mostly the works of Broadway composers and easy to play
classical pieces. Perhaps surprisingly, Joseph Resendes intends to
challenge members of his fledgling
Milton Concert Band, particularly
with works of contemporary European composers.
Regarding opportunities for
players, the membership of these
four organizations is generally stable with limited turnover. But that
TRYPTYCH
Begins: September 16th at 12 p.m.
L
D
One
Touch
OF Weill
A Celebration of the Music of Kurt Weill
Sunday Oct 5th 2008
730 PM
Trinity Presbyterian Church
2737 Bayview Ave (South of the 401)
Most Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at noon or 5:30 p.m.
coc.ca
416-363-8231
Maria Thorburn
Edward Franko
Doug MacNaughton
The TrypTych Trio
Official Media Partners:
William Shookhoff - Music Director
145 Queen St. W.
(at University)
22
The TrypTych Cabaret Series
[email protected] TrypTych.org/ 416 763-5066 ex 1
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
being said, opportunities do arise.
The orchestras usually would be
happy to welcome additional violas;
most bands would lay down the
welcome mat for one or two bassoons. Community orchestras generally have paid principals for the
string sections; a practice unheard
of in the community band world! In
all cases, though, you will find that
personal enjoyment, comradeship
and mastering musical challenges
are essential components of their
rehearsal evenings.
As to how the groups got where
they are today, the stories are as
various as you might expect. Orchestra Toronto is the oldest, tracing its origins back to 1954 as The
Bennington Heights Community
Orchestra. With incorporation in
1967, the name was changed to
East York Symphony. The amalgamation of the City of Toronto – the
“megacity” as it was called – in
the nineties prompted another
change, to the current Orchestra
Toronto name.
The North York Concert Orchestra also has something of a
pedigree, initially formed in 1975
as a reading orchestra under the
auspices of the North York Symphony Orchestra. It has developed
into an ambitious multifaceted organization under the acronym of
NYCO, encompassing orchestra,
chorus and small chamber ensembles, with a well-planned multiconcert season. The introduction of
the choir as an integral part of their
organization is definitely their biggest news this season. This new
choir rehearses on a different night
from the orchestra, but is included
in four of the five scheduled concerts listed in this year’s brochure.
And in April 2009, NYCO will
take on its biggest challenge to date
– a four day music festival.
Resa’s Pieces began in 2000, at
the Koffler Centre for the Arts, as
a beginners’ band to provide opportunities for adults to return to
playing band instruments that they
hadn’t touched for years. The re-
sponse to that initial announcement
was so good that they actually began rehearsals months ahead of the
intended startup date.
In the case of Milton, the almost
meteoric growth of that community
in recent years was the catalyst for
the establishment of this new community concert band. Founded by
several former members of the
Etobicoke Community Concert
Band who had recently taken up
residence in Milton, the band began rehearsing on Feb. 1, 2007.
They have since had two successful seasons and, under Resendes,
have an ambitious plan for the
coming year.
As for the music directors, all
have university degrees in music.
Errol Gay of Orchestra Toronto
has a doctorate and has performed
and conducted widely throughout
North America. David Bowser of
NYCO switched from trumpet to
flute and then progressed through
a masters in composition to further
studies in Vienna and in Italy. In
Canada he has conducted symphony orchestras in Thunder Bay and
Brantford and assisted with the
Quebec City Symphony. The
youngest of the conductors,
Joseph Resendes of the Milton
Concert Band, started playing in
Hamilton at age four. He still
plays regularly in the band of the
Music Society of St. Helen’s, an
outstanding Portuguese community
organization, conducted by his father, José Manuel Resendes.
Joseph is putting the finishing
touches to a Ph.D. in music. The
focus of his academic studies is on
the concert band as a viable concert medium (and clearly he’s playing his part in keeping it so!).
Resa Kochberg is a graduate of
the University of Toronto, where
she earned a Bachelor of Music
Education with flute as her major.
Upon graduation, she taught instrumental music for the Scarborough Board of Education, then
took time off to raise her three
children and pursue other interests,
HARKNETT
The Koffler Concert Band (Resa’s Pieces) inspires adults to pick up their band
instruments of days past and make some community music
including private piano instruction.
Now on the faculty at Koffler, she
has conducted the Scarborough
All-City Concert Band, taught and
conducted at Scarborough Music
Camp, and has led numerous flute
workshops.
In addition to teaching and conducting, Resa also plays flute and
piccolo for the North York Concert Band.
Expect to hear more about all
these organizations in this column
as the season progresses, and to
find out about other notable denizens of our community bandstands
and podiums. Suggestions for organizations we might take a look at
are welcome.
Musicians wanted: The North
Toronto Community Band is looking for some new members, particularly Clarinets, Trombones,
French Horns and Percussionists.
Interested musicians should look
them up at: www.ntcband.ca
Coming Events - Please see the
listings section for full details
Please write to us:
[email protected]
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23
Have you wanted to sing in a full-scale performance
of Messiah but needed a “refresher”? Have you ever
wanted to “try on” a choir experience before joining?
Then we have a special offer just for you!
William Woloschuk, Artistic Director
invites you to join them for their
annual presentation of:
sing-along
Messiah
GENERAL
REHEARSALS TO THE PUBLIC:
Tuesdays Sept. 23, Oct. 21 and Nov. 18
7:30 - 9:15 pm
St. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Ave., Toronto
CONCERT :
Friday November 28, 2008 at 7:30 pm
Metropolitan United Church
56 Queen Street East, Toronto
This is a wonderful opportunity to participate
with Counterpoint Chorale, professional
soloists and orchestra.
For information go to www.counterpointchorale.com
or call 416-253-4674
nd
Etobicoke Centennial Choir’s 42 Season
e
cc
ETOBICOKE
CENTENNIAL CHOIR
Our new Music Director Henry Renglich has planned a
terrific programme that has something for everyone.
Henry comes to the choir with a wealth of knowledge,
experience and enthusiasm, and we look forward to
bringing you a season of delightful choral music.
A Canadian Christmas (Carols New & Olde)
Friday December 12 and Saturday December 13 at 7:30 pm
This concert highlights some of Canada’s best loved composers
and arrangers, including Healey Willan and Donald Patriquin among
others, in new and classic Christmas carols and songs. This concert
will also feature a tribute to Barry Gosse, Musical Director of the
ECC from 1968 - 1988, in his setting of the Barnyard Carols.
Requiem (Sacred Masterworks)
Saturday March 21, 2009 at 7:30 pm
Here we feature the sublime and ethereal Requiem by Gabriel
Fauré, Leonard Bernstein’s energetic and moving Chichester
Psalms, Gustav Holst’s magnificent setting of the Hymns from the
Rig Veda, as well as Mozart’s passionate and uplifting Vesperae
Solennes de Confessore.
Choral Scene
Savouring the First Fruits
by mJ Buell
People of all ages with “choir in the
blood” feel September coming with a kind
of giddy feeling, much like “back to
school”—making sure you have your
binder, your pencils, and those all-important right shoes. Those certain clothes ...
Are they all ready to go?
There’s delight and desperation in anticipating what’s going to be in those folders
waiting to be handed out. You set out
resolved to do a better job this year managing schedule and homework.
Fortunately the choral concert season
takes off gradually. But there are always
Elin Osk Oskarsdottir
a few shiny early September apples.
Collaborations involving choral music in the early autumn usually
mean that some folks worked very hard in the late spring, and probably
also gave up some of the late summer to rehearse - you don’t learn Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 in D minor overnight! The Toronto Children’s
Chorus, the women of the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, and mezzosoprano Susan Platts join forces with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra
September 17, 18 and 20 in this magnificent major work that celebrates
nature and all creation.
Canadian choirs travel all over the world. In turn we enjoy the privilege of hosting visiting choirs. Choir administrators, and the families who
volunteer for billeting when these exchanges happen, will tell you that it’s
a bit like playing the lottery – they’re coming when?!!! Sometimes everyone gets lucky, audiences included. What better time to visit Toronto
than September, when we are not yet drowning in a wealth of choral
concert offerings, and we often have some of our most beautiful weather!
The Toronto Welsh Male Voice Choir’s “An Evening of Song – Noson
O Gân” features the Llanelli Male Choir on tour from Bynea, Wales
(September 20). The 65-voice Hafnarfjordur Opera Choir from Iceland will breathe new life into the newly refurbished Mazzoleni Concert
Hall at the Royal Conservatory with “music from the land of ice and
fire” under founder, director, and principal soloist Elin Osk Oskarsdottir,
herself an opera singer (September 28).
Our fine church choirs offer wonderful music as part of the ongoing
fabric of their community life, often asking only a freewill offering:
Choral Evensong at St. Olave’s Anglican Church (September 21) and
100 Years of Great Music at St. Anne’s Anglican Church (September
28), are just a couple of examples. And as we slip into the month of October, Yorkminster Park Baptist Church offers us Masterworks of the
French Romantic (October 3): a programme which features the Fauré
Requiem in D minor, with William Maddox at the organ. It’s the best
known of Fauré’s large works - the beautiful soprano aria Pie Jesu is
often performed as a solo.
Finally, launching a a new book – Elmer Iseler: Choral Visionary by
Walter Pittman – the Elmer Iseler Singers are off to a fast start, September 21, before heading up to Barrie for a concert at the Colours of
Music festival on September 27, A Celebration of Howard Cable in
collaboration with True North Brass.
Love Songs for Springtime (Brahms to Broadway)
Saturday May 30 2009 at 7:30 pm
From the charmingly playful Liebslieder Op.56, by Johannes
Brahms, through the tongue-in-cheek Love Songs for Springtime by
Paul Halley, the rich arrangements of classic Canadian folk songs
by Donald Patriquin, and a selection of favourites from American
popular song, this evening of song is sure to amuse and inspire.
For more information about the Choir (history, membership,
concert locations etc.) we invite you to visit our website at
www.etobicokecentennialchoir.ca or call 416-253-0214
24
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S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Expect something different...
2008 – 2009 Season
LYDIA ADAMS,
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The Houses Stand Not Far Apart
Invites you to
Music For Life!
Saturday, November 1, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Metropolitan United Church
Estacio - THE HOUSES STAND
NOT FAR APART
J Willcocks - LUX PERPETUA
Sir David Willcocks, guest conductor
Chorus Niagara; Talisker Players
2008/2009 Concert Season
Sir David Willcocks
Performance generously sponsored by The Jackman Foundation.
Sir David Willcocks’ appearance sponsored by Partridge Wealth Management.
A Child’s Christmas in Wales
Wednesday, December 17, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Eglinton St. George’s United Church
Canadian theatrical icon Gordon Pinsent
narrates the Dylan Thomas classic
Gordon Pinsent
Passion and Resurrection
Sunday, March 29, 2009, 3:30 p.m. St. Mary Magdalene
Moody - PASSION & RESURRECTION
Talisker Players
Join Lydia Adams and the Amadeus Choir for the best
in choral music. We have a dazzling and diverse
season to offer you - Carmina Burana by Carl Orff
paired with Ruth Watson Henderson's beautifully
expressive Voices of Earth; a "Festive Season" with music
by Benjamin Britten and Conrad Susa, featuring
harpist Erica Goodman; J.S. Bach's glorious masterpiece St. John Passion; and to end the season, a concert
of sheer joy featuring music by Eleanor Daley,
John Rutter and Howard Cable.
Singing with full orchestra, organ, piano or a cappella,
the Amadeus Choir offers MUSIC FOR LIFE!
But you want to know more! Call us today and don't
miss a single spectacular note!
Choral Countdown
Saturday, May 9, 2009, 7:30 p.m. Christ Church Deer Park
AMADEUS CHOIR AND FRIENDS
A medley of choral favourites chosen by choir and audience
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To AUDITION for the 2008-2009 season,
please call Helen at 416 251-3803
Single tickets: $30; $25 senior; $15 student
Season subscriptions: $102; $85 senior; $50 student
For tickets or more information, please contact us at:
416-530-4428; [email protected]
or visit our website: www.orpheuschoirtoronto.com
SEASON OF FESTIVITY
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ST. JOHN PASSION
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Robert Cooper, artistic director • Edward Moroney, accompanist
SING SEA TO SEA
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Professional Singing
Opportunities
The Toronto Chamber Choir will be
holding auditions for the following paid positions:
Section-Leader: Tenor
Section-Leader: Bass
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+(-$++-$'(// fiXdXZ_f`i7`[`i\Zk%Zfd
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To arrange an audition, please contact the Music Director,
Mark Vuorinen at: [email protected]
Visit us at: www.torontochamberchoir.ca
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
25
A Choral Life Q&A
COMPILED AND EDITED BY MJ BUELL
featuring Lasana Barrow
ethereal heights,
elemental force
"4-08"4
The Magic of Music
2008 – 2009 Concert Season
"$0/$&35
*Magic in the Air
Featuring spell-binding music
and a live magician!
Sat Oct 25 2008 - 4:00 p.m.
The Magic of Song
With the Hamilton Children’s
Choir.
Sat Nov 15 2008 - 3:00 p.m.
A Chorus Christmas:
Magic of the Season
The Magic of Music
An alluring spring concert
featuring Canadian and Maori
music.
Sat May 2 2009 - 7:30 p.m.
Around the World
in 80 Minutes
A magic carpet ride around the
music of the world with guest
A long-standing Christmas
artists of World Music and
tradition, featuring True North
dance.
Brass and other special guests.
Spring 2009
Sat Dec 20 2008 - 2:00 p.m.
*Animal Magic and a
Teddy Bears’ Picnic
A delightful afternoon of animal
mischief followed by a Teddy
Bears’ Picnic.
Sat Feb 21 2009 - 4:00 p.m.
Musical Magic Across
the Borders
European tour send-off
concert.
Spring 2009
*Bring your babies and tots!
5PQVSDIBTFUJDLFUTDBSPM!UPSPOUPDIJMESFOTDIPSVTDPN
FYUXXXUPSPOUPDIJMESFOTDIPSVTDPN
Register For
Music Lessons Today
Guitar
Piano
Drums
Voice
Brass
Strings
and more
Oshawa . Markham . North York . Brampton . Mississauga . Burlington
26
Your first ever
choral experience?
I often say I grew
up in Ealing Abbey (West London). I went to the
Benedictian boys
school (funnily
enough called St.
Benedict’s) run by
the monks from the
Abbey, and boys
from the school
auditioned every
year for the Abbey
choir. I had started
music at an early
age, knew how to
read, and decided
to audition. I was
accepted into the
men and boys
choir at 8 years
old.
What choirs have you sung with?
Ealing Abbey Choir, of course, Westminster Abbey Choir summer
school, Ontario Youth Choir, National Youth Choir of Canada,
World Youth Choir, various choirs at the University of Western
Ontario, Trinity College of Music Singers, Woodstock Fanshawe
Singers, and the Stuttgart Chamber Choir for a master class, which
was great fun! (There are a lot I have missed so apologies.)
There’s also this relatively unknown choir called Tafelmusik thrown
in there.
Are you currently singing with a choir?
By the time this is published I will have regretfully just left Tafelmusik to pursue my MBA at HEC in Paris. Ivars Taurins suggested
that I try to sing with Les Arts Florissant or La Chapelle Royale
both located in Paris. I will have to see how much time I have – I
have always been a bit of an idiot that way, doing too many things.
Where does choral singing fit into other aspects of your life?
Wow…well I have always done it, since age 8 or so. I took a break
for a while when I was studying
architecture back in the UK and
subsequently when I was working
full time drawing and shouting at
contractors. I hadn’t sung in a
while until I rejoined Tafelmusik
this past season and realized that I
was really denying an integral
part of me in not singing in
choirs. It is such a wonderfully
creative and bonding experience
through the music that we create
in rehearsals and concerts. It
must be and will always be a part
of my life.
PETER MAHON
Sales Representative
416-322-8000
[email protected]
www.petermahon.com
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
What kind of concerts to you like
to attend? How often?
Not as many as I would like due
to time constraints. I tend to go to
more symphonies and operas
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
actually, as well as the mainstream pop concerts: different stimuli
for the ears.
STEPHANIE MARTIN | Artistic Director
Have you ever performed in what you would consider an unlikely
venue?
Well yes actually: performing in the small streets of an eastern Italian
town called Loretto for a choir festival when I was young… lots of
choirs from different countries in Europe who were required to sing
national folk songs. All the other choirs had a plethora of songs to
sing and honestly the English choir, us, had ONE song that we
murdered over and over: “My Bonnie Lies Over The Ocean”. It was
horrific! It was a form of torture to sing “My Bonnie” so many times
during the course of the festival. We could have at least put in Greensleeves as well!
Comment on the ups, downs, and complexities of the vocal register
you sing in, as a choral singer.
For a countertenor I have always had a very high range, almost more
of a male soprano actually, so I have always had issues with my
lower register. It’s a lot better than it used to be (that could be the
numerous travels to the pub). But I have always found the most
difficult part was blending my head and chest voice to negotiate the
lower alto requirements. When you sing with an ensemble such as
Tafelmusik that performs things at Baroque pitch it becomes even
more challenging. Don’t even mention Purcell to me as far as period
pitch goes! (For the non-early music geeks out there: Purcell’s ‘A’
tone was not at the standard 440htz; it was at 392htz. In practical
terms this means that one is singing approximately a whole tone
lower than usual!)
Occasionally when you are singing in front of an audience as a
countertenor soloist you see the shocked faces of some guys that
have been dragged along to the concert by their significant other.
But audiences tend to be quite knowledgeable and prepared for what
is to come.
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Coming up with your choir…?
As for the October Tafelmusik concert with Emma Kirkby, I am so
sorry that I will miss it. I had an opportunity to sing for her in a master class when I was doing my masters at Trinity College of Music in
London. I sang a Handel Aria and in the melismatic middle section
she really showed me how to sing coloratura. I mean I was huffing
and puffing, honestly really forcing it. Emma Kirkby sings so effortlessly. She got me to relax and just sing through the phrases. If you
haven’t heard her before, which is almost an impossibility since she
is probably on the majority of the early music recordings you own,
you are really in for a treat.
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Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir performs “A
Musical Banquet” with Dame Emma Kirkby October 17-23 (Handel,
Rameau and Monteverdi).
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SINGERS WANTED
All Voices
Amateur & Professional
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David J. King
CONDUCTOR
ALL THE KING’S VOICES 2008-09 Season:
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Cathedral Carols
l Great Choruses From Oratorios
l 15th Anniversary Gala Cabaret
l
SIGHT-SINGING &
VOCAL TECHNIQUE WORKSHOPS
1 = < 2 C 1 B= @A > = < A = @
www.allthekingsvoices.ca
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
416-225-2255
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
27
Jazz Notes
“Silence speaks volumes”
by Jim Galloway
VOLUMES HAVE BEEN WRITTEN about jazz: much of it by mediocre
writers, some of it by musicians (but in fact written by “ghost writers”), a few by musicians who really could write—John Chilton, Art
Hodes, George Melly and Dick Sudhalter come to mind immediately. Above it all, in the rarified atmosphere at the top of a mountain
of words about jazz, sit a select few superior non-musician writers
with both insights on the music and the writing skills to express themselves. Whitney Balliett, Gary Giddins, Philip Larkin and James
Lincoln Collier, whether or not you agree with everything they say,
are among those who have created worthwhile jazz literature.
Right here in Toronto we have Mark Miller, for years an outspoken and often controversial columnist for The Globe and Mail. Miller
now dedicates himself to writing books on jazz—eight of them so far,
all stamped with his trademark relentless research, attention to detail and love of language.
High Hat, Trumpet and Rhythm is his latest, and, in typical fashion, Miller does not go for an obvious easy target, but has chosen the
life of singer, trumpeter and dancer Valaida Snow, whose checkered
career was at its height in the ‘20s and ‘30s. It is a fascinating account of a controversial life, made even more colourful by the many
embellishments of reality contributed by Ms. Snow and unearthed by
Mr. Miller. My hat goes off to Mark for his ability to get an insight
into what must have been a challenging subject, and his talent for
turning it into a fascinating read.
Books dealing with people and events are one thing, but writing
about how music sounds is an entirely different ball game. How do
you convey what a piece of music sounds like?
If I say that Warm Valley played by Johnny Hodges is beautiful, it
doesn’t begin to describe the emotional impact of the sounds. Words,
at best, are inadequate. Language is abstract—a combination of
sounds to help us communicate with each other.
Perhaps we should have embraced the concept of Eskimo languages, which have, for example, multiple words to describe snow.
An editorial in The New York Times of February 9, 1984 gave the
number as 100!
On the other hand, overly esoteric and flowery language can be
more unsatisfactory and inappropriate; so maybe “beautiful” isn’t so
bad!
Then there is the technical approach to writing about the music—
ok to a degree if the reader has a working knowledge of music, but
unable to describe the nuances that make jazz personal. Much as I
love language, once more words are lacking and, in any case, no
matter how well chosen they are, words don’t interpret music. Nor
do they interpret one of music’s essential ingredients—
silence.
The Romans used two
words in referring to silence
– tacere and silere. Not quite
up there with the Inuit, but
giving two very different
meanings to the word. Tacere
meant to shut up, as in interrupting, and had negative
connotations—the silence
resulting from cutting off
someone in mid-sentence.
On the other hand, silere, the
word where our silence
comes from, had a quiet
connotation and meant the
kind of quietness that can be
positively enjoyed.
It is this type of silence, in the form of pauses and rests, without
which music would be meaningless. Try to imagine a chorus by Louis Armstrong or Charlie Parker with no pauses between any of the
notes and you will quickly realise how important space is.
In today’s society there is almost constant noise, often in the form
of “music” to which nobody is listening; it forms an intrusive backdrop of sound in stores, elevators, restaurants, ball games, you name
it. Our technology does away with silence; if there isn’t noise around
us it is because of a technical malfunction. Silence is an enemy of
commerce and is something you have to seek out away from public
spaces.
Small personal protests are the only recourse and if I go into a
restaurant or store with a music/noise level that offends my ears, I
simply leave. Nobody cares, but I feel better.
In music, some composers—such as John Cage—have taken the
use of silence to extreme measures. His composition 4’33" is made
up of three movements performed without a single note being played.
It was perceived as including the sounds of the environment that the
listeners hear while it is performed, not just four minutes and thirty
three seconds of silence.
I grew up—although some of my friends might question that—
when The Goon Show was breaking new ground in radio comedy and
I used to treasure a 78 rpm record that they produced. On one side
was a song called I’m Walking Backwards For Christmas, Across
The Irish Sea. The flip side was Silent Night and it consisted of three
minutes of silence.
Happy Listening!
Featuring some of Toronto’s best jazz musicians
with a brief reflection by Jazz Vespers Clergy
Sunday, September 7th at 4:30 p.m.
BARLOW BRASS & DRUMS
Chase Sanborn & Brian O’Kane (trumpets); Russ Little& Terri
Promane (trombones); Doug Burrell (tuba); Brian Barlow (drums)
Sunday, September 21st at 4:30 p.m.
LORNE LOFSKY 8 ROB PILTCH (guitars)
Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street
(north of St. Clair at Heath St.) 416-920-5211
Admission is free.
28
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
World View
There’s a world of music out there
by Karen Ages
ALWAYS WANTED TO EXPLORE a new musical tradition but didn’t know where to begin? Below is a list of community education organizations
that offer classes in everything from Arabic music to Canadian fiddling to Indonesian gamelan and more. Many have classes starting soon,
so don’t delay in contacting them if you’re interested. But first, some concert highlights this month: The 7th Annual Small World Music
Festival runs September 18–30, bringing a variety of global sounds to town. “A number of exciting debuts and some local favourites perform a wide range of styles from a capella to turntable,” says Small World Music director Alan Davis. The festival kicks off with Zimbabwean singer Chiwoniso at the Lula Lounge, and continues with a host of other performers representing musical traditions from Mexico,
Hungary, Turkey, Greece, Israel, and Mali. Please check our listings and visit www.smallworldmusic.com for details. Toronto’s Indian/
jazz fusion ensemble Autorickshaw performs at the Lula Lounge September 25, with special guest Brazilian/jazz pianist/composer Gordon
Sheard. The concert will feature The Trouble With Hari, a new composition by Sheard, combining the Brazilian ‘Baiao’ rhythm with melodic elements from the ‘Hari Kamboji’ raga. If you’re inspired by the above, read on to see how you can expand your own musical horizons!
indigenous to the highland Sundanese
people of West Java, Indonesia. Sora
Priangan’s mission is to foster an
understanding and appreciation of the
gamelan degung music of West Java,
and that of the unique repertoire commissioned by it’s parent group, the
Evergreen Club. Sora Priangan’s
membership is open to the public, and
presents concerts and
workshops. Rehearsals are Tuesdays
6–9 pm.
Arabesque Academy
www.arabesquedance.ca
1 Gloucester Street, Suite 107
416-920-5593
In addition to being one of the best
places in the city to study the art of
belly dance, Arabesque Academy
offers classes in Arabic instrumental music. At the time of writing,
the fall schedule was not available,
but check their website for updates.
Music classes are offered by noted
local Arabic musicians Dr. George
Sawa, Bassam Bishara and Suleiman Warwar on a variety of traditional instruments including dumbek, Qanoon, Naye, Oude, Voice,
Violin, Saz, as well as history and
theory.
M-DO, Toronto Tabla Ensemble
www.tablaensemble.com
www.mdo-tte.org
355 College St. West, 2nd floor
416-504-7082
Sister organizations since 1988, M-DO
and the Toronto Tabla Ensemble were
established through the shared visions
Clapping Land
of Kathak dancer Joanna de Souza and
www.clappingland.com
Expanding their musical horizons—students from Waleed
Tabla drummer Ritesh Das. Classes
Riverdale Presbyterian Church,
Abdulhamid’s popular Worlds of Music “African drumming”
are offered in both disciples to the
workshop perform at a recital.
662 Pape Ave. 416-220-8161
general public at beginner to advanced levels.
Clapping Land offers classes involving songs,
Fall classes begin the week of September 8.
Gamelan Degung—Sora Priangan
movement and rhythm for young children.
See the websites for details.
Run by Toronto musician Sophia Grigoriadis, “Voice of the Spirit of the Ancestral Mountains”
Miles Nadal JCC
Royal Conservatory of Music (rehearsal
Clapping Land is now accepting registrants
www.milesnadaljcc.ca
for the fall. Visit the website for full details— location)
Corner of Spadina/Bloor
note that classes for babies begin the week of [email protected] Andrew Timar
Sora Priangan is the Evergreen Club Contem- 416-924-6211 x133 Harriet Wichin
September 2. The three levels offered are:
porary Gamelan’s community group, directed The Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Kindermusik Village (Newborns to 18
(open to all), offers classes in a wide variety
months), Sound Adventures (18 months to 3½ by Evergreen Club member Andrew
of areas, including some music. Check the
years), and Sound Explorers (3½ to 5 years). Timar. The instruments and repertoire are
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
29
World of
Music
CONTINUED
website for full details. Classes
include: Klezmer Music Ensemble (taught by Eric Stein of Beyond the Pale), the Community
Choir, Women’s Chorus, and
Tots & Tunes for Babies and
Toddlers. Fall registration began
in August, but there may still be
openings.
RCM Community School
www.rcmusic.ca
273 Bloor St. West
416-408-2825
The RCM Community School, a
division of the Royal Conservatory of Music (set to re-open this
fall at its newly renovated and
expanded Bloor Street location),
offers classes in World Music:
global percussion classes include
Taiko drumming, Ghanaian
drumming, West African drumming and dance for kids, and
Brazilian Samba. There’s also a
general hand-drumming course,
World Music Chorus, Latin Jazz
Ensemble, Tin Whistle, and
Canadian/Scottish/Irish Fiddling.
Fall classes begin September 20
and later.
Worlds of Music
www.worldsofmusic.ca
various locations
416-588-8813
In operation since 1994, Worlds
of Music Toronto has been offering “workshops in traditions
from around the world to students from all walks of life.” At
the time of writing, the fall
schedule of classes was not yet
complete, but the following have
been confirmed: Canadian Fiddling with Anne Lederman,
Dumbek drumming with Suleiman Warwar, Klezmer music
with Eric Stein, Latin Percussion
with Rodrigo Chavez, and Brazilian dance in the tradition of
Maracatu Nunca Antes. Some of
the workshops are offered in
partnership with the RCM Community School and the Miles
Nadal JCC. Other locations and
classes to be announced, so
check the website.
Karen Ages is an oboist who has
also been a member of several
world music ensembles.
She can be reached at
[email protected]
30
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
MUSICAL LIFE
Vladimir Orloff – a life in music
BRUCE SURTEES
Who has not heard a recording of an old favourite so fresh and captivating that one becomes intensely curious about the artist? This
was the feeling for me generated by a new
release of Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations
played by cellist Vladimir Orloff, recorded
live in 1970 with the Lucerne Chamber Orchestra (DOREMI DHR-7896). In this performance and in the following pieces on this
CD, in addition to a velvet tone, elegant
phrasing and inspired musicianship, one
senses a depth and breadth of tradition and
culture that captures Tchaikovsky’s gamut
from the poetic to the turbulent.
Yet Orloff is not a household name as Rostropovich and Piatigorsky are, even though
he is very much in the same league. In an
enthusiastic review of The Art of Vladimir
Orloff (DOREMI DHR-7711/3, 3 CDs), Diapason, the influential French journal, states
“Un violoncelliste de tres grande talent a
(re)decouvir.” Actually, Orloff was a wellknown and respected concert soloist during
the 50s and 60s, regularly appearing with
conductors the likes of Barbirolli, Boult, Sawallisch, Goossens, Silvestri, and Ancerl.
His busy concert career slowed down in
the 70s after he became a cello professor at
the University of Toronto, devoting himself to
his students, the most notable of whom was
Ofra Harnoy, who had come to him as a special scholarship student from the Royal Conservatory when she was 12 years old. Health
problems also contributed to the slowdown of
his concert career. Nonetheless, he was still
performing in various parts of the world until
his retirement.
Vladimir Orloff still lives in Toronto,
where I spent a few delightful
hours with him just before his
eightieth birthday last May in
which he reminisced about his
roots and career. In spite of his
years, he is an athletic, handsome man, with the charisma of
a matinee idol.
So, start at the beginning ... .
I was born in Odessa. My father, a fine cellist, was my first teacher. I started with him
but father and son didn’t work very well together ... after a while he gave me to his best
student. We lived in Minsk but my family
came from Bessarabia.
I heard the Rococo Variations since before
I was born because my father was practising
it all the time. In 1943 my parents moved to
Bucharest where my grandparents lived. At
that time Romania was a German-controlled
territory.
My father was not Jewish so the Nazis did
not touch us but my teacher was killed because he was Jewish and I witnessed it. The
way they killed him was to push him in a hole
with many other people and put them on fire.
Bucharest was such a big change from
poverty and war ... it was beautiful and prosperous. There was a king, princes, and
counts. Rich people sent their children to Paris... Most people spoke French. Very musical people, the Romanians.
The famous Grigoras Dinicu was active,
leading his own orchestra in a posh hotel
which had a concert hall. Jascha Heifetz
stayed in this hotel and heard Dinicu playing
his Hora Staccato and asked for the music.
PHOTO: VOTAVA
INTERVIEWED BY
The piece became almost a signature tune for
Heifetz who played his own version of it and
popularized it. Another illustrious figure in
Bucharest was the violinist and composer
George Enescu. I heard Enescu conducting
... by this time he was not playing anymore.
Do you know the story about Enesco and
Ravel? When Enescu lived in Paris, Ravel
presented him with his new violin sonata. The
two played together with Enescu sight- reading the violin part. After they finished Enescu
said “Let’s do it again.” Enescu put away the
score and played it entirely from memory!
This episode was witnessed by Yehudi Menuhin who was Enescu’s pupil.
When I was 16 I joined the Bucharest
Symphony Orchestra, a great orchestra. At
that time Bucharest was influenced by the
French style with cafes and an easy life. Under the Communist regime things changed.
I entered competitions and was successful
in winning the events in Bucharest, Warsaw,
and Geneva. After winning the competitions,
the Ministry of Culture awarded me the title
of State Soloist and I was then taken out of
the orchestra and played with them only as a
VLADIMIR ORLOFF, CONTINUES ON PAGE 50
index of advertisers
ACROBAT MUSIC 50
ADI BRAUN 49
ALDEBURGH CONNECTION 17
ALL SAINT’S KINGSWAY ANGLICAN
CHURCH 18
ALL THE KING’S VOICES 27
ALLAN PULKER 40
AMADEUS CHOIR 25
AMICI 17
AMOROSO 43
ANNEX SINGERS 46
ART OF TIME ENSEMBLE 38
ATMA 5
AUTORICKSHAW 36
CANADIAN CHILDREN’S OPERA CHORUS 45
CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY 22
CANCLONE SERVICES 50
CHRIST CHURCH DEER PARK JAZZ
VESPERS 28
CITY OF TORONTO HISTORIC MUSEUMS 44
CIVIC LIGHT OPERA COMPANY 33
CLASSICAL 96FM 61
COLOURS OF MUSIC 11
CONTACT CONTEMPORARY 35
COSMO MUSIC 23
COUNTERPOINT CHORALE 24
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
DORIAN SONO-LUMINUS 12
ELMER ISELER SINGERS 35
ENSEMBLE TRYPTYCH CHAMBER CHOIR 47
ESPRIT ORCHESTRA 3
ETOBICOKE CENTENNIAL CHOIR 24
ETOBICOKE SUZUKI SCHOOL 49
GEORGE HEINL 24
HAMILTON CONSERVATORY
FOR THE ARTS 40
HARKNETT MUSICAL SERVICES 23
HELICONIAN HALL 47
HIGH PARK CHOIRS 47
HUMBERCREST UNITED CHURCH 46
INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTRE FOR
PERFORMING ARTISTS 18
JUBILATE SINGERS 47
KITCHENER-WATERLOO
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 41
LA BELLE DANSE 45
LI DELUN MUSIC FOUNDATION 44
LONG & MCQUADE 26
MIKROKOSMOS 43
MOOREDALE CONCERTS 16
MPC MUSIC 39
MUSIC GALLERY 20
MUSIC ON THE HILL 33
MUSIC TORONTO 4, 9
NEW MUSIC CONCERTS 19
OFF CENTRE MUSIC SALON 37
OPERA BY REQUEST 22
OPERA IN CONCERT 39
ORPHEUS CHOIR 25
OSHAWA DURHAM
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 41
PASQUALE BROS. 50
PAX CHRISTI CHORALE 27
PETER ARTHUR 49
PETER MAHON 26
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
MUSIC FESTIVAL 40
REMENYI HOUSE OF MUSIC 14
ROARING GIRL CABARET 28
ROEL OLAY INVESTMENT ADVISOR 46
ROGER BERGS 49
ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 7
SECOND VINYL 43
SHOKO INOUE 35
SINFONIA TORONTO 15
SMALL WORLD MUSIC 30
SOUND POST 14
SOUNDSTREAMS 13
ST. JAMES’ CATHEDRAL 32, 39
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
ST. JOHN’S MUSIC 29
ST. PATRICK’S PARISH CHURCH 36
SWEETWATER MUSIC WEEKEND 10
TAFELMUSIK 64
TAPESTRY 21
TORONTO BEACH CHORALE 47
TORONTO CHAMBER CHOIR 25
TORONTO CHILDREN’S CHORUS 26
TORONTO CONSORT 38
TORONTO MENDELSSOHN CHOIR 6
TORONTO OPERA REPERTOIRE 47
TORONTO PHILHARMONIA 15
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2
TORONTO WELSH MALE VOICE CHOIR 35
TRYPTYCH PRODUCTIONS 22
U OF T FACULTY OF MUSIC 33
WELLINGTON WINDS 47
WHOLENOTE CLASSIFIEDS 46
WHOLENOTE MARKETPLACE/
EDUCATION 48
WHOLENOTE MARKETPLACE/
SERVICES 51
WINDERMERE STRING QUARTET 18, 39
WORLDS OF MUSIC 45
YAMAHA CANADA 63
YORKMINSTER PARK BAPTIST CHURCH 38
31
WHOLENOTE LISTINGS
SECTIONS 1-4: INTRODUCTION
SECTIONS
1-4:
INTRODUCTION
WholeNote
listings
are arranged in
FOUR DISTINCT SECTIONS:
1) Toronto & GTA (Greater Toronto Area)
2) Beyond the GTA
3) Jazz in Clubs
4) Music-related events
(a.k.a. “The EtCetera file”)
This issue contains listings from September 1 to October 7
SECTION 1: Toronto & GTA (pages 32-39) covers all of the
City of Toronto plus the adjoining “905” area - more or less corresponding to the areas accessible from Toronto by phone without long
distance charges. Section 1 includes communities as far west as
Oakville, as far north as Aurora and as far east as Ajax.
In this issue Section 1 includes:
Brampton, Kleinburg, Markham, Mississauga, Toronto & GTA
SECTION 2: Beyond the GTA (pages 40-42) covers all areas
of Ontario outside Toronto and GTA. The towns and cities vary
from month to month.
In this issue Section 2 includes:
Ancaster, Barrie, Campbellville, Cobourg, Guelph, Hamilton,
Kingston, Kitchener, Leith, Minden, Oshawa, Owen Sound,
Picton, Sharon, St. Catharines, Waterloo
SECTION 3: Jazz in Clubs (pages 42-43) is organized alphabetically by club, and provides as much detail on what the clubs are
offering as we had at the time of publication, which varies greatly
from club to club. Phone numbers and website addresses are provided to facilitate access to more up-to-date information.
SECTION 4: Announcements, Lectures/Symposia, Master
Classes…EtCetera (pages 44-45) is for music-related events
and activities, other than performances, which in our judgment will
be of interest to our readers.
A word of caution: a phone number is provided with every listing;
in fact, we won’t publish a listing without one. Concerts are sometimes cancelled or postponed; artists or even venues change after
the listings are published; or occasionally corrected information is
not sent to us in time. So please check before you go out to a
concert.
LISTINGS: SECTION 1
CONCERTS: Toronto and GTA
Monday September 01
— 12:00 noon to 10:00pm: Ashkenaz. Final
Day of Festival. Programme includes Andy
Statman Trio, Flory Jagoda, The Lithuanian
Empire; Lache Cercel, Best of the Fest Finale,
and Ashkenaz Parade. Sirius Stage, Toronto
Star Stage, Enwave Theatre, Brigantine Room,
and other venues at Harbourfront Centre. 235
Queen’s Quay W. 416-973-4000. Many free
events; some with admission fee.
— 12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music Mondays. The Café Olé. Latin jazz. Celia
Palli, vocals; Scott Metcalfe, piano; Paul Metcalfe, saxophone; Benjamin Barrile, flamenco
guitar; Dustin Shaskin, bass. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521 x304. $5(suggested donation).
Tuesday September 02
— 12:10: U of T Faculty of Music. Thursdays at Noon: Music and Poetry. Che-Anne
Loewen, piano; Eric Domville, reader. Walter
Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-978-3744. Free.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
Bob Gaudio, composer; Bob Crewe, lyricist;
Des McAnuff, director; Marshall Brickman
and Rick Elice, book writers; Sergio Trujillo,
choreographer. Performed by Eric Bates (Tommy deVito), Joseph Leo Bwarie (Frankie Valli),
Andrew Rannells (Bob Gaudio), Steve Gouveia
(Nick Massi), and others. Toronto Centre for
the Arts, 5040 Yonge St. 416-872-1111.
$55-$125. Also Sep 3-7, 9-14, 16-21, 23-28,
30; Oct 1-5.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. By Eleanor Bergstein. Royal Alexandra
Theatre, 260 King St. W. 416-872-1212.
$26-$99. Also Sep 3-6, 9-13, 16-20, 23-27,
30- Oct.5.
Wednesday September 03
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. Music by Harvey Schmidt, book
& lyrics by Tom Jones. Joe Cascone (El Gallo); Roger Larios ( Matt); Ashley Gibson (Luisa);
David Haines (Bellomy); Michael Wilmot, piano; Andrew Chan, harp; Joe Cascone, director. 1000 Dundas St. E. 416-755-1717. $25;
$20. Sep 3 sold out. Also Sept. 4-7, 10-14,
17-20.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. Music by Queen and Ben Elton. Panasonic Theatre, 651 Yonge St. 416-8721212. $25-$75. Also Sep 4-7, 10-14, 17-21,
24-28, Oct. 1-5.
Thursday September 04
— 12:15: St. John’s Church York Mills.
Music on the Hill. Big band, jazz, pop. Toronto
Starlight Orchestra. 19 Don Ridge Dr. 416225-6611. Free.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 7:00: Harbourfront Centre/Summer
Music in the Garden. Bach at Dusk. Bach’s
Suite No.1 in G for unaccompanied cello.
Winona Zelenka, cello. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay West. 416-973-4000.
Free.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:30: Lula Lounge. Kevin Laliberté, guitar,
CD launch. Nouveau flamenco, bossa-nova and
middle eastern fusion. 1585 Dundas St. W.
416-588-0307. $15.
Friday September 05
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sept 3.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Lula Lounge. Eliana Cuevas, vocalist. Latin, world and jazz styles. 1585 Dundas
St. W. 416-588-0307. $15.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 10:00: Lula Lounge. Rock Your Spanish.
Latin rock. Gardenias and Revolver. 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307. $10.
Saturday September 06
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
Organ Recitals
Every Tuesday
1:00 - 1:40 pm
HOW TO LIST
Listings in WholeNote Magazine in these four sections are a free
service available, in our discretion, to eligible presenters. If you
have an event, send us your information NO LATER than the 15th of
the month prior to the issue or issues in which your listing is eligible
to appear. Please note, the next issue covers the period from October 1 to November 7.
Listings can be sent by e-mail to [email protected] or by
fax to 416-603-4791 or by regular mail to the address on page 6.
Every Sunday
4:00 - 4:30 pm
preceding
Choral Evensong.
free will offering
ST. JAMES CATHEDRAL
65 Church St.
(King at Church)
416 364 7865
32
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 7:30: Jonah Liebster. Classical Guitar
Recital. Works of Bach, Villa-Lobos, Barrios,
Sor, Milan, and Assad. 300 Bloor St. W. 416898-7719. Free.
— 7:30: Living Art s Centre. Sulyap. Fiesta
Filipina Dance Troupe. Hammerson Hall, 4141
Living Arts Dr., Mississauga. 905-306-6000.
$15-$20.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Music Gallery. Concrete Rockabilly:
CD release. Slim Twig and the Mercy Merce-
Fall
naries. 197 John St. 416-204-1080. $12;
$10(advance).
— 10:00: Lula Lounge. Ricky Franco. Salsa.
1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307. $15.
9:00: dance lesson.
Sunday September 07
— 1:30: CAMMAC / McMichael Canadian
Art Collection. McMichael Sunday Concert
Series. Franklin Penny, jazz trumpet. 10365
Islington Ave., Kleinberg. 905-893-1121.
$15; $9(sr/st).
— 2:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
Music on the Hill
FAC U LTY OF M U SI C
Upcoming Events
SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER HIGHLIGHTS
9/18 - Music for Saxophone
Thursdays, 12:15 - 1:00 pm
All concerts are free and are held at the historic St John’s
York Mills Anglican Church, 19 Don Ridge Drive, Toronto,
York Mills Subway. Yonge and 401. Free parking
416-225-6611
www.stjohnsyorkmills.com
.
SEPT. 4 Toronto Starlight Orchestra
- big band, jazz, pop, swing.
SEPT. 11 Marianne Girard Trio - Marianne Girard, singer songwriter, guitar. Cam McInnes, guitar. Tyler Wagler,
upright bass - folk, pop, country.
SEPT. 18 Sultans of String Duo - Chris McKhool, violin.
Kevin Laliberte, guitar.
Hot: Modern Music Influenced by Jazz. Saxophonist Wallace
Halladay, pianist Peter Tiefenbach and friends open the Thursdays
at Noon series in music by Schulhoff, Denisov and Donatoni.
12:10 pm. Walter Hall. Free
9/21 - Building for Tomorrow
Opera Tea: Hear the Opera Division’s rising stars and meet
Miah Im, the newest member of the Opera Division faculty.
2:30 pm. MacMillan Theatre stage. $26. Limited seating
9/25 - Forgotten Percussion
Thursdays at Noon: Percussionists from the DMA program
perform early significant works for percussion ensemble.
John Brownell, director. 12:10 pm. Walter Hall. Free
9/26 - Rolston & Wong
SEPT. 25 Mood Indigo - Monika Burany, vocalist. Brent
Setterington, keyboards - jazz, gospel.
Celebrated Canadian cellist Shauna Rolston and pianist Lydia
Wong open the Faculty Artist Series in cello sonatas by
Schnittke and Rachmaninoff. 7:30 pm. Walter Hall. $25 ($15*)
OCT. 2
Bret Higgins, double bass. Joel Schwartz, guitar/
mandolin - “Songs of Love and Longing”.
OCT 9
Zelda Turner, soprano. Sue Crowe Connolly, contralto.
Konrad Harley, piano - opera duets
10/2 - Music & Poetry
Thursdays at Noon: Che Anne Loewen, piano,
Eric Domville, speaker. 12:10 pm. Walter Hall. Free
10/3 - Wind Ensemble
Gershwin’s classic Rhapsody in Blue, Grainger’s Lads of
Wamphray, music by Allan Gilliland, and Dana Wilson. James
Campbell, clarinet soloist. Lang Ning Liu, student concerto
competition winner, piano soloist. Gillian MacKay, conductor.
7:30 pm. MacMillan Theatre. $14 ($10*)
proudly presents
10/4 - U of T Symphony Orchestra
Conductor David Briskin makes his UTSO debut in Shostakovich’s
Symphony No. 5, Christopher Theofanidis’s Rainbow Body and
Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, featuring the Gryphon Trio.
7:30 pm. MacMillan Theatre. $18 ($10*).
THE WORLD’S LONGEST RUNNING
MUSICAL!
Book, Music & Lyrics by TOM JONES and HARVEY SCHMIDT
* Try to Remember* Soon It’s Gonna Rain* They Were You*
FAIRVIEW LIBRARY THEATRE
35 Fairview Mall Dr., Sheppard/Don Mills.
Sept. 3 to 20
Wed. - 7pm/Thurs. to Sat. - 8pm/Sun. - 2pm/Sept 20 – 2 & 8pm
TICKETS $20 to $27.50
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
*Senior/student price in brackets
416.978.3744
BOX OFFICE
Walter Hall and MacMillan Theatre are located in the Edward Johnson
Building, 80 Queen’s Park (Museum subway stop).
08|09
www.music.utoronto.ca
33
... 1: CONCERTS: Toronto and GTA
— 2:00: Sunday Serenade Concert Series. Swing Shift Band. Scarborough Civic
Centre Rotunda, 150 Borough Dr. 416-3383295. Free.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 4:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Twilight
Recital Series. Taylor Sullivan, organ. 65
Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz
Vespers: Barlow Brass and Drums. 1570
Yonge St. 416-920-5211. Free (donations
welcomed).
— 7:30: Canadian Armenian Association
for the Performing Arts. National Chamber
Orchestra of Armenia. Aram Gharabekian,
conductor; guests: Greta Hodjkinson and
Etienne Lavigne, dancers; Federico Mondelci,
saxophone. George Weston Recital Hall, Toronto Centre for the Performing Arts, 5040
Yonge St. 416-872-1111. $35-$65.
— 8:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Burnt Sugar.
Global improv mashup. Lula Lounge, 1585
Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307. $10.
— 8:00: Music Gallery. Baroque Meets Improvisation. Works by Biber, Guy and Reilly.
Barry Guy, bass; Maya Homburger, violin; Jeff
Reilly, bass clarinet. 197 John St. 416-2041080. $15; $5(student).
Thursday September 11
— 12:15: Metropolitan United Church.
Noon at the Met. Patricia Wright, organ. 56
Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Free.
— 12:15: St. John’s Anglican York Mills.
Music on the Hill. Folk, pop, country. Marianne
Girard Trio. 19 Don Ridge Dr. 416-225-6611.
Free.
— 7:00: Harbourfront Centre/Summer
Music in the Garden. Soul/Saule-Mates
Chan: Soulmate for solo cello; Takahashi:
world premiere. Shauna Rolston, cello; Keiko
Kitano, dancer-choreographer. Note: Half-hour
concert due to early sunset. Toronto Music
Garden, 475 Queen’s Quay W. 416-9734000. Free.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 10:00: Lula Lounge. Rudy Dubbs. Ska.
1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307. $10.
— 2:00 & 7:00: Mirvish Productions.
Spamalot. See Sep 9.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 4:00: Harbourfront Centre/Summer
Music in the Garden. Your eyes have their
silence. Works by Schubert and Mozart; music
from the Renaissance; Hossfeld: Your eyes
have their silence. Rosetta String Trio: Abigail
Karr, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Kate Bennett
Haynes, cello. Toronto Music Garden, 475
Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
— 4:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Twilight
Recital Series. Clement Carelse, organ. 65
Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 8:00: Lula Lounge. Daddo. Israeli vocalist. 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$20.
— 8:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out
Loud. See Sep 16.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Mahler Symphony No. 3. Susan Platts, mezzo;
Women of the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir;
Toronto Children’s Chorus; Peter Oundjian,
conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-593-4828. $37-$125.
Thursday September 18
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Jazz Series:
Chris Donnelly, piano. Four Seasons Centre for
the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416363-6671. Free.
— 12:10: U of T Faculty of Music. Thursdays at Noon: Modern Music Influenced by
Jazz. Works by Schulhoff, Denisov, and Donatoni. Wallace Halladay, saxophone; Peter
Tiefenbach, piano. Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s
Park. 416-978-3744. Free.
Monday September 15
— 12:15: Metropolitan United Church.
Noon at the Met. Paul Emlyn Jessen, organ.
— 8:30: I Furiosi Baroque Ensemble.
56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Free.
Crazy: CD Launch. Gladstone Hotel, 1214
— 12:15: St. John’s Anglican York Mills.
Queen St. W. 416-531-4635. $17; $10(sr/
Music on the Hill. Sultans of String Duo. 19
st); $25(with CD).
Don Ridge Dr. 416-225-6611. Free.
Tuesday September 16
— 2:00: Northern District Library. Or— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company. chardviewers Program. Emilyn Stam, violin
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Vocal Series: and piano. 40 Orchard View Blvd. 416-393Meet the Young Artists. Members of the COC 7610. Free.
Friday September 12
— 7:00: Nightswimming / Harbourfront
Ensemble Studio; Liz Upchurch, piano. Four
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Centre. Blue Note. See Sep 16.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Queen St. W. 416-363-6671. Free.
Tuesday September 09
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 1:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Music at
—
8:00:
Dancap
Productions.
Jersey
Boys.
— 1:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Music at
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
Midday Recital Series. Andrew Ager, organ.
See
Sep
2.
Midday Recital Series. Andrew Ager, organ.
See Sep 2.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
—
8:00:
Lula
Lounge.
Afri-Latin
Festival.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Danc— 7:00: Nightswimming/Harbourfront
1585
Dundas
St.
W.
416-588-0307.
$5.
— 7:00: Piano Plus. Classical at the Carlu.
ing. See Sep 2.
Centre. Blue Note. Martin Julien and Brian
—
8:00:
Mirvish
Productions.
Dirty
DancAngela Cheng, Jon Kimura Parker,
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
Quirt. York Quay Centre Main Gallery, 235
DJanina Fi- ing. See Sep 2.
E
alkowska, André Laplante,N
piano; Nancy ArSee Sep 9.
Queen’s Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free. Also
—
8:00:
Mirvish
Productions.
Spamalot.
O
genta, soprano; ScottPSt. John, violin; Jens
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Sep 17-21.
See
Sep
9.
T
Lindemann, trumpet
S and others. Carlu, 444
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys. Rock You. See Sep 3.
O
—
8:00:
Mirvish
Productions.
We
Will
P 416-366-7723. $185; $145.
Yonge Street.
— 8:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out
See Sep 2.
Benefit for Piano Plus outreach programs. Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Danc- Loud. See Sep 16.
—
8:00:
Music
Gallery.
Stars
Like
Fleas.
—8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey
— 8:00: Toronto Philharmonia. My CounExperimental pop. Guests: Saffron Sect. 197 ing. See Sep 2.
Boys. See Sep 2.
try. Smetana: Ma Vlast. Kerry Stratton, con— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
John
St.
416-204-1080.
$15.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancductor. George Weston Recital Hall, Toronto
See Sep 9.
—
8:00:
Roaring
Girl
Cabaret.
CD
Release:
ing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St. 416-872“In
Last
Night’s
Party
Clothes.”
Guest:
Peter
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
1111. $29-$59; $25-$59(st); $25-$49(sr).
Loud. 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905-874Katz, singer/songwriter. St. Stephen-in-theMonty Python. Canon Theatre, 244 Victoria
2800. $45-$60. Also Sep 17, 18, 19, 20 and — 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Fields,
103
Bellevue
Ave.
647-341-2923.
St. 416-872-1212. $56-$150. Also Sep 10Mahler Symphony No. 3. See Sep 17.
21.
$10; $20(with CD).
14, 16-21, 23-28, 30-Oct. 5, 7.
— 9:00: Small World Music Festival.
Wednesday
September
17
Saturday September 13
Chiwoniso. Zimbabwean vocals & mbira. Lula
Wednesday September 10
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
— 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist
—
2:00
&
8:00:
Mirvish
Productions.
— 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist
$20; $15(advance).
Church. Noonhour Recital. Michael Bloss,
Dirty
Dancing.
See
Sep
2.
Church. Noonhour Recital. Andrew Adair,
organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free.
—
2:00
&
8:00:
Mirvish
Productions.
Friday September 19
organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free.
— 12:30: Yonge-Dundas Square. SereSpamalot. See Sep 9.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We nades in the Square. Justin Hines, singer-song- — 7:00: Nightswimming / Harbourfront
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
writer. 1 Dundas St. E. 416-979-9960. Free. Centre. Blue Note. See Sep 16.
Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
— 8:00: CityTV/OMNI television. Mondo
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
—
2:00
and
8:00:
Dancap
Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
Muziko a go-go: Alex Cuba, singer-songwriter.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
Jersey
Boys.
See
Sep
2.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
1 Dundas St. E. 416-979-9960. Free.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
—
8:00:
Acoustic
Harvest
Folk
Club.
KathFantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Spamalot. See Sep 9.
erine
Wheatley
&
Wendell
Ferguson.
St.
Ni— 8:00: Humbercrest United Church.
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
cholas
Anglican
Church,
1512
Kingston
Rd.
Blending the Sacred with the Secular In Jazz.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
416-264-2235.
$15.
Jazz, gospel & spirituals in the traditional
See Sep 2.
— 5:30: Canadian Opera Company. Rich—
8:00:
Civic
Light
Opera
Company.
The
New Orleans style-with more than a little
— 8:00: Metamorphosis. Opening Concert.
ard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Piano Virtuoso
Fantasticks.
See
Sep
3.
flavour of Mardis Gras. The Hot Five JazzRachmaninoff: Sonata for Cello and Piano;
Series: Anagnoson and Kinton. Stravinsky:
—
8:00:
Music
Gallery.
Soon
Come
Shekimakers (+ 2). 16 Baby Point Road. 416-767Strauss: Sonata for Cello and Piano; Louie:
Petrouchka (arr. piano four hands). Leslie Kinnah: CD release. The Bhadra Collective. 197
6122. $20; free(children and teens).
Bringing the Tiger Down from the Mountain;
ton and James Anagnoson, piano. Four SeaJohn
St.
416-204-1080.
$22;
$18(advance).
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
Japanese folk songs. Amanda Forsyth, cello;
sons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145
—
10:00:
Lula
Lounge.
Café
Cubano.
Cuban
See Sep 9.
Shoko Inoue, piano. Glenn Gould Studio, 250
Queen St. W. 416-363-6671. Free.
salsa.
1585
Dundas
St.
W.
416-588-0307.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Front St. W. 416-872-4255. $50.
— 7:00: Nightswimming / Harbourfront
$15.
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty DancCentre. Blue Note. See Sep 16.
— 10:00: Lula Lounge. Patsy Cline BirthSunday September 14
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The ing. See Sep 2.
day. A tribute to the country vocalist. 1585
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
— 2:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307. $10.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
34
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall / Small World Music Festival. Los
Lobos with Pistolera. Latino rock fusion. Massey Hall, 15 Shuter St. 416-872-4255.
$29.50-$59.50.
— 8:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out
Loud. See Sep 16.
— 10:00: Small World Music Festival.
Electric Gypsyland. Supermarket, 268 Augusta Ave. 416-588-0307. $10.
ng
TOR
255
Saturday September 20
— 12:00 noon: Small World Music Festival. Mr. Something Something, with Evalyn
Parry. Evergreen Brickworks, 550 Bayview
Ave. 416-588-0307. Free.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Spamalot. See Sep 9.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 & 8:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out Loud. See Sep 16.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 2:00 to 10:00: Contact Contemporary
Music. Toronto New Music Marathon. Works
by Brennan, Cameron, Copeland, Curran, Glass,
and others. The Lollipop People, Eve Egoyan,
Allison Cameron, New Adventures in Sound
Art, Tidal Pool, and others. Yonge-Dundas
Square, 1 Dundas St. E. 416-902-7010.
— 7:00: Nightswimming / Harbourfront
Centre. Blue Note. See Sep 16.
— 7:30: Toronto Welsh Male Voice
Choir. An Evening of Song – Noson O Gân.
Guests: Llanelli Male Choir. Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-410-2254.
$25.00.
— 8:00: Civic Light Opera Company. The
Fantasticks. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall. The Swell Season. Glenn Hansard and
Marketa Irglova. Massey Hall, 15 Shuter St.
416-872-4255. $25.50-$39.50.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Mahler Symphony No. 3. See Sep 17.
Sunday September 21
— 1:00: Mooredale Concerts. Music and
Truffles: Chatham Baroque. Music from Spain
& Latin America. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-5879411. $10.
— 1:30: CAMMAC / McMichael Canadian
Art Collection. McMichael Sunday Concert
Series. Peter Stoll, clarinet. 10365 Islington
Ave., Kleinburg. 905-893-1121. $15; $9(sr/
st).
The Toronto Welsh
Male Voice Choir
presents
“An Evening of Song”~
“Noson O Gân”
Featuring
The Llanelli Male Choir
on tour from Wales
and
The Toronto Welsh Male Voice Choir
newly returned from their performance at Carnegie Hall
William Woloschuk, Artistic Director
Julie Loveless , Accompanist
Saturday, September 20, 7:30pm
Metropolitan United Church
56 Queen Street East, Toronto
Tickets: $25.00
METAMORPHOSIS Concert Series
Opening Concert
or
416-410-2254
www.twmvc.com
Friday, September 19, 8:00 pm
Glenn Gould Studio,
CBC Broadcast Centre
250 Front Street West, Toronto
www.TICKETBREAK.com
Elmer Iseler Singers
Amanda Forsyth, cello
Shoko Inoue, piano
Sergei Rachmaninov Sonata for Cello and Piano
Richard Strauss
Sonata for Cello and Piano
Alexina Louie
Bringing the Tiger Down from the Mountain
Japanese folk songs
Tickets at $50 are available through the Roy Thomson Hall Box office,
60 Simcoe St., Toronto.
Phone: (416) 872-4255 Fax: (416) 593-9918 [email protected]
For on-line ticketing:www.glenngouldstudio.cbc.ca/concerts/listing.shtml
Lydia Adams, Conductor
30 th Anniversary Season
Sunday, September 21, 2008 - 7:00 p.m.
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church
VISIONARY
Works by Eric Whitacre, Martins Vilums,
Ruth Watson Henderson, Maurice Duruflé,
Henryk Gorecki, Imant Raminsh
Launch of book by Walter Pitman – Dundurn Press:
ELMER ISELER, Choral Visionary
Friday, December 5, 2008 – 8:00 p.m
Metropolitan United Church
HANDEL’S MESSIAH
Special Guests:
Sir David Willcocks, Guest Conductor
Amadeus Choir and orchestra
Soloists Leslie Fagan, Jennifer Enns,
Colin Ainsworth and Tyler Duncan
Pre-Concert Dinner – Albany Club/Toronto
Canada Council Conseil des Arts
du Canada
for the Arts
arts
An arm’s length body of the City of Toronto
ONTARIO ARTS COUNCIL
’
CONSEIL DES ARTS DE LONTARIO
FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, TICKETS OR BROCHURE
CALL 416-217-0537 Monday to Friday 9 am - 5 pm
www.elmeriselersingers.com
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
35
... 1: CONCERTS: Toronto and GTA
— 2:00: Debi Sander Walker Entertainment. Patsy Cline Meets The Royals. Debi
Sander Walker, vocalist; The Royals Swingband (Royal Regiment of Canada). Scarborough
Civic Centre, 150 Borough Dr. 905-2754744. Free.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 2:30: U of T Faculty of Music. Building
for Tomorrow: Opera Tea. Students of the
Opera Division, in recital. MacMillan Theatre
Stage, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-978-3744. $26.
— 3:00: Mooredale Concerts. Espanoleta –
Chatham Baroque. Music from Spain & Latin
America. Guest: Danny Mallon, percussion. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building, 80 Queen’s
Park. 416-587-9411. $25; $20(sr/st).
— 3:00 & 7:00: The Rose Theatre. Menopause Out Loud. See Sep 16.
— 4:00: All Saints’ Kingsway Anglican
Church. Trio Bravo. 2850 Bloor St. W. 416233-1125. Freewill offering.
— 4:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Twilight
Recital Series. Andrew Adair, organ. 65
Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 4:00: St. Olave’s Anglican Church.
Choral Evensong. Choir of St. Peter’s Erindale.
360 Windermere Ave. 416-769-5686. Contributions appreciated.
— 4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church.
Jazz Vespers. Roselyn Brown & Friends. 25
St. Phillip’s Rd. 416-247-5181. Pwyc.
— 4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz
Vespers: Lorne Lofsky & Rob Piltch, guitars.
1570 Yonge St. 416-920-5211. Free (dona-
tions welcomed).
— 7:00: Elmer Iseler Singers. Visionary. A
celebration of Elmer Iseler and the 10th anniversary of Lydia Adams as Artistic Director.
Guest: Walter Pitman. Our Lady of Perpetual
Help, 78 Clifton Rd. 416-217-0537. $35;
$30(sr/st).
— 7:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 7:00: St. Patrick’s Parish Church. Inaugural Organ Concert. Performed on the newly
installed pipe organ, Opus 111 by Létourneau.
Ken Cowan, organist. 5633 Highway 7,
Markham. 905-294-5955. Free.
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall. Regine Velasquez and Lani Misalucha.
Philippine pop. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-872-4255. $48-$120.
— 8:00: Small World Music Festival.
Odessa Havana, with Daddo. Al Green Theatre, Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre,
750 Spadina Ave. 416-588-0307. $25.
Monday September 22
— 8:30: Small World Music Festival.
Little Cow. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W.
416-588-0307. $20; $15(advance).
Tuesday September 23
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Chamber
Music Series: Via Salzburg. Gershwin: Lullaby
for String Orchestra; Mozetich: Bassoon Concerto. Via Salzburg Chamber Orchestra; Mayumi
Seiler, director; guest: Michael Sweeney, bassoon. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing
Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-363-6671. Free.
— 1:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Music at
Midday Recital Series. Andrew Ager, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 9:00: Small World Music Festival.
Baba Zula, with DJ Medicineman. Lula Lounge,
1585 Dundas St. W., 416-588-0307. $25;
$20(advance).
Wednesday September 24
— 12:30: Yonge-Dundas Square. Serenades in the Square. Peter Elkas, singer-songwriter. 1 Dundas St. E. 416-979-9960. Free.
— 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist
Church. Noonhour Recital. Angus Sinclair,
organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 7:00: Tafelmusik. Viva L’Italia.
Veracini: Ouverture in F, Op.6, No.4; Vivaldi
Violin Concerto in B-flat, RV 369; Geminiani:
Concerto grosso in d, “La Follia” (after Corelli,
Op.1 No.12). Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra;
Stefano Montanari, violin; Jeanne Lamon, director. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-964-6337. $29-$72; $23-$62(sr);
$15-$20(30 and under).
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Lang Lang Plays Tan Dun. Rimsky-Korsakov:
Capriccio espagnol; Tchaikovsky: Francesca da
Rimini; Stravinsky: Scherzo fantastique; Tan
Dun: Piano Concerto (Canadian premiere). Lang
Lang, piano; Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4828.
$42-$132.
— 8:30: Small World Music Festival.
Savina Yannatou, with Musica Nuda. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W., 416-588-0307.
$25; $20(advance).
2. Alexander Seredenko, piano. Four Seasons
Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen
St. W. 416-363-6671. Free.
— 12:10: U of T Faculty of Music. Forgotten Percussion. DMA percussion students;
John Brownell, director. Walter Hall, 80
Queen’s Park. 416-978-3744. Free.
— 12:15: Metropolitan United Church.
Noon at the Met. Ashley Tidy, organ. 56
Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Free.
— 12:15: St. John’s Anglican York Mills.
Music on the Hill. Jazz and gospel. Mood Indigo. 19 Don Ridge Dr. 416-225-6611. Free.
— 2:00: Northern District Library. Orchardviewers Program. Master Class Players.
40 Orchard View Blvd. 416-393-7610. Free.
— 7:00: Artwalk, The St. Clair Arts Festival & Studio Tour. Fundraising Jazz Concert. Kevin Turcotte, trumpet; Kenny Kirkwood, saxophone; Meirion Kelly, trombone;
Robi Botos, piano; Artie Roth, bass; Daniel
Barnes, drums, Ben D’Cunha, voice. St. Matthews United Church, 729 St. Clair Ave. W.
647-406-3979. $30.
— 7:00: Small World Music Festival.
Autorickshaw, with Gordon Sheard. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$25
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Tafelmusik. Viva L’Italia. See Sep
24.
— 8:30: Small World Music Festival.
Jason Wilson CD Release: “Peacemaker’s
Chauffeur.” Guests: Pee Wee Ellis, Brinsley
Forde and Ernest Ranglin. Hugh’s Room, 2261
Dundas St. W. 416-531-6604. $45; $40(advance).
Friday September 26
— 12:15: St. Andrew’s United Church.
Noonhour Recital. Charles Udell, organ. 32
Main Street N., Markham. 905-294-0351.
Free.
— 7:30: U of T Faculty of Music. Faculty
Thursday September 25
Artist Series. Sonatas by Schnittke and Rach— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company. maninoff. Shauna Rolston, cello; Lydia Wong,
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Piano Virtuo- piano. Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. 416so Series. Prokofiev: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1 and 978-3744. $25; $15(sr/st).
36
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey
Boys. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Music Gallery. CD Release: “Calling
Out.” Fembots. Experimental instruments.
197 John St. 416-204-1080. $15; $12(advance).
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall. Lang Lang, piano. Recital includes Schubert: Piano Sonata No.20 in A, D.959; Bartók:
Piano Sonata; Debussy: Preludes; Chopin: Polonaise in A Flat, Op.53 “Heroic”. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-872-4255. $39.50$99.50.
— 8:00: Tafelmusik. Viva L’Italia. See Sep
24 (30 and under pwyc).
— 8:30: Small World Music Festival.
Jason Wilson CD Release: “Peacemaker’s
Chauffeur.” Guests: Pee Wee Ellis, Brinsley
Forde and Ernest Ranglin. Hugh’s Room, 2261
Dundas St. W. 416-531-6604. $45; $40(advance).
— 9:00: Small World Music Festival.
Eccodek CD Release: “Shivaboom”. Guests:
Kiran Ahluwalia and DJ Medicineman. Drake
Hotel, 1142 Queen St. W. 416-532-4032 .
SaturdaySeptember 27
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Spamalot. See Sep 9.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 7:00: Kidney Foundation of Ontario.
Vocaleidoscope. Arias, art-songs and cabaret.
Aviva Fortunata Wilks and Stephania Romaniuk, sopranos; Nathalie Doucet-Lalkens, piano.
St. James United Church, 400 Burnhamthorpe
Rd. 416-445-0372. $12; $25(families);
Pwyc(students). Proceeds to the Kidney Foundation of Ontario.
— 7:30: Jazz in the Lakeshore. Tim Elliott,
piano. St. Paul’s United Church, 85 ThirtyFirst St. 416-201-0705. $20.
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall. Cesaria Evora with Nikki Yanofsky. Morna from Cape Verde. Massey Hall, 15 Shuter
St. 416-872-4255. $50-$70.
— 8:00: Small World Music Festival. One
Voice. Enwave Theatre. 231 Queen’s Quay W.
416-973-4000. $20.
— 8:00: Tafelmusik. Viva L’Italia. See Sep
24.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Lang Lang. Rossini: Overture to William Tell;
Chopin: Piano Concerto No.2; Tchaikovsky:
Piano Concerto No. 1. Lang Lang, piano; Peter
Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60
Simcoe St. 416-593-4828. $45-$158.
Sunday September 28
— 11:00am to 6:00: Word on the Street.
CityTV Main Stage. DJ Billy Bryans; Tapestry
New Opera Works; Cheri Maracle; The Micah
Barnes Trio; Johannes Linstead, Guitar of Fire;
Liam Titcomb and friends; Lian Hua Arts
Group; and Evalyn Parry and Her Fine Band.
Queen’s Park Cresc. and Wellesley St. E. 416504-7241. Free.
— 2:00: Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestra. Young Artist Concert. Ridout:
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Fall Fair; Schumann: Piano Concerto in a;
Donizetti: Prendi, per me sei libero; Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in e; Beethoven:
Piano Concerto No.1 . CBSO/RCM Concerto Competition finalists: Jennifer Liu, Annie Zhou, pianos; Ema Nikolovska, violin;
Jenavieve Moore, voice; Norman Reintamm, conductor. Scarborough Civic
Centre, 150 Borough Dr. 416-879-5566.
Free.
— 2:00: Off Centre Music Salon. Toronto
Salon: Streetcar 501 Stops at Off Centre.
Works by Colgrass, Freedman, Louie, Rolfe,
Schafer, and Tiefenbach. Shannon Mercer,
soprano; Krisztina Szabo, mezzo; Olivier
Laquerre, baritone; Jacques Israelievitch, violin; Michael Israelievitch, marimba; Joseph
Macerollo, accordion; Inna Perkis, Boris
Zarankin, artistic directors, pianos. Glenn
Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W. 416-2055555. $45; $35(sr/st).
— 2:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.
Great Artist Series. Haydn: Trumpet Concerto; Mozart: Symphony No.41 “Jupiter”. RCM
Symphony Orchestra; Andrew McCandless,
trumpet; Mario Bernardi, conductor. Mazzoleni Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-2825.
$30; $10(st).
— 2:00: St. Anne’s Anglican Church. 100
Years of Great Music. St. Anne’s Choirs. 270
Gladstone Ave. 416 922 4415. Freewill offering.
— 2:00 & 7:00: Mirvish Productions.
Spamalot. See Sep 9.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 3:00: Fiddles & Frets Music Productions. Parlour Sessions: Intimate & Interactive. John Finley, singer; Michael Fonfara,
keyboard. Earthsong Store and School, 2436
Kingston Rd. 416-264-2235. $30(with refreshments).
— 3:00: Hart House. Sunday Concerts: Sara
Buechner, piano. Works by Bach-Busoni, Mozart, Gershwin, and Suesse. 7 Hart House
Circle. 416-978-2452. Free.
— 3:30: Tafelmusik. Viva L’Italia. See Sep
24.
— 4:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Twilight
Recital Series. Andrew Ager, organ. 65
Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 7:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.
Hafnarfjordur Opera Chorus. Elin Osk Oskardottir, conductor. Mazzoleni Concert Hall, 273
Bloor Street W. 416-762-8627. $15; $8.
— 8:00: Music Gallery. Jozef van Wissem.
Improvisation and Renaissance lute. Guests:
Colin Fisher, saxophone and guitar; Brandon
Valdivia, drums. 197 John St. 416-204-1080.
$15; $10(sr); $5(st).
— 8:30: Small World Music Festival. Cor
de Plena. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W.
416-588-0307. $20.
— 9:00: Small World Music Festival.
Toubab Krewe. Guest: DJ Medicineman. Gladstone Hotel 1214 Queen St. W. 416-5314635. $15; $12(advance).
way, oboe; and Edward Norman, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey
Boys. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 9.
— 9:00: Small World Music Festival.
Vieux Farke Toure. Guest: DJ Medicineman.
The Mod Club, 272 College St. 416-5884663. $30; $25(advance).
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4828. $42-$132.
Intermission chat.
Thursday October 02
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Dance Series:
Up Close and Intimate. Classical and contemporary dance. ProArteDanza. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.
416-363-8231. Free.
— 12:15: Metropolitan United Church.
Noon at the Met. Matthew Coons, organ. 56
Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Free.
Wednesday October 01
— 12:15: St. John’s Anglican York Mills.
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company. Music on the Hill. Songs of love and longing.
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre World Music Brett Higgins, double bass; Joe Schwarz, guiSeries: A Tapestry of Indian Rhythm. Bagetar & mandolin. 19 Don Ridge Dr. 416-225shree Vaze, dancer/choreographer; Vineet
6611. Free.
Vyas, tabla. Four Seasons Centre for the Per- — 8:00: Art of Time Ensemble. Words and
forming Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-363Music. Texts by Ginsberg, Ondaatje, Proust,
8231. Free.
Vanderhaeghe, Young and Kleinzahler. Music by
— 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist
Goldsmith, Franck, Mercer, Lewis and
Church. Noonhour Recital. William Maddox, Rutledge. Andrew Burashko, piano; Stephen
organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free. Sitarski, violin; Justin Rutledge, guitar; Michael
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Ondaatje, reader; and others. Enwave Theatre,
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
231 Queen’s Quay W. 416-973-4000. $25— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
$39.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
See Sep 2.
See Sep 9.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Danc— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
ing. See Sep 2.
Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
See Sep 9.
Ute Lemper Sings Kurt Weill. Weill: The Sev- — 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will Rock
en Deadly Sins; Shostakovich: Symphony You. See Sep 3.
No.11 “The Year 1905.” Ute Lemper, vo— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
calist; Hudson Shad, vocal quartet; Peter Hall. Zucchero “All the Best Tour”. Italian
Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, blues. Massey Hall, 15 Shuter St. 416-
Tuesday September 30
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Vocal Series:
Songs of Russia. Members of the COC Ensemble Studio; Liz Upchurch, piano. Four Seasons
Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen
St. W. 416-363-6671. Free.
— 1:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Music at
Midday Recital Series. Victoria HathaWWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
37
... 1: CONCERTS: Toronto and GTA
— 8:00: Toronto Consort. Marco Polo
Project. Music from China and Georgia.
Guests: Wen Zhao, pipa; YuCheng Zhang, xun
and xiao; Yongli Xue, zheng; Kavkasia. TrinityFriday October 03
St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-964— 7:30: Mirvish Productions. The Sound of 6337. $14-$53.
Music. Rodgers & Hammerstein. Princess of
Saturday October 04
Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W. 416-872— 1:30 & 7:30: Mirvish Productions. The
1212. $36-$200. Also Oct. 4, 5, 7.
— 7:30: U of T Faculty of Music. Wind En- Sound of Music. See Oct. 3.
semble. Program includes Gershwin: Rhapso- — 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
dy in Blue; and Grainger: Lads of Wamphray.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions.
James Campbell, clarinet; Lang Ning Liu, GilSpamalot. See Sep 9.
lian McKay, conductors. MacMillan Theatre,
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
80 Queen’s Park. 416-978-3744. $14;
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
$10(sr/st).
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
— 7:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist
Church. Masterworks of the French Roman- Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 3:00: Fiddles & Frets Music Productic. Fauré: Requiem; also works by Schubert
and Wood. Choir of Yorkminster Park Baptist tions. Parlour Sessions: Intimate & Interactive. Claudia Schmidt, singer-songwriter.
Church; William Maddox, organ. 1585 Yonge
Earthsong Store and School, 2436 Kingston
St. 416-922-1167. $10.
— 8:00: Art of Time Ensemble. Words and Rd. 416-264-2235. $30(with refreshments).
— 6:52 to sunrise: Nuit Blanche. See ETC
Music. See Oct. 2.
— 8:00: Dancap Productions. Jersey Boys. listings.
— 7:30: U of T Faculty of Music. U of T
See Sep 2.
— 8:00: Living Arts Centre. Special Events Symphony Orchestra. Shostakovich: Symphony No.5; Theotanidis: Rainbow Body;
Series. David Clayton-Thomas, songwriterBeethoven: Triple Concerto. Gryphon Trio;
vocalist. Hammerson Hall, 4141 Living Arts
David Briskin, conductor. MacMillan Theatre,
Dr., Mississauga. 905-306-6000. $25 and
80 Queen’s Park. 416-978-3744. $18;
up.
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Danc- $10(sr/st).
— 8:00: Brampton Symphony Orchestra.
ing. See Sep 2.
Mayor Susan Fennell’s Symphony Soiree –
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Spamalot.
Those Were the Days. Music made famous by
See Sep 9.
Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra. Guests: Steve
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We Will
Lippia, vocals; Pablo Papacostas, dancer; the
Rock You. See Sep 3.
Tonettes; Robert Raines, conductor. Rose
872-4255. $49.50-$69.50.
— 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Ute Lemper Sings Kurt Weill. See Oct. 1.
Celebrating
80 years on Yonge Street
presents
~E MARCO
POLO
PROJECT
October 3 & 4, 2008 at 8 pm
What if Marco Polo (the famous medieval merchant who
travelled across Asia to Cathay, and then back to his native
Venice) had owned a tape recorder and kept a musical diary
of the musical worlds he encountered? Even more delightful
a thought, what if a few of his musical travelling companions
had played with the musicians they met en route? Join the
Toronto Consort on their most exotic journey yet as they
explore new musical worlds with guests Wen Zhao, pipa,
and a traditional Chinese instrumental ensemble, and
Kavkasia, a traditional Georgian vocal trio led by Toronto
singer Alan Gasser. An adventure like no other!
www.torontoconsort.org
For Tickets call 416-964-6337
Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. West
38
Organ and
Choral Recital
The Choir of Yorkminster Park
Baptist Church
Fauré - Requiem
Works by Schubert and Wood
William Maddox, organ
Masterworks of the French Romantic
Friday, October 3 at 7:30 pm
Tickets $10
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church
1585 Yonge Street, Toronto
416-922-1167
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
tone (Don Giovanni); Robert Pomakov,
bass (Leporello); Gordon Gietz, tenor (Don
Ottavio); Jessica Muirhead, soprano (Donna Anna); Julie Makerov, soprano (Donna
Elvira); and others; COC Orchestra and
Chorus; Robin Guarino, director; William
Lacey, conductor. Four Seasons Centre
for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.
416-363-8231. $60-$290. Also Oct. 8, 11,
15, 18, 20, 23, 26, 28, 31.
— 2:00 & 8:00: Mirvish Productions. We
Will Rock You. See Sep 3.
— 2:00 and 8:00: Dancap Productions.
Jersey Boys. See Sep 2.
— 2:30: Opera in Concert. Roberto Devereux. 1:45: pre-performance presentation.
See Oct. 4
— 3:00: Windermere String Quartet. In
Concert. Schubert: Quartet in G D.887; Mozart: Clarinet Quintet in A K.581. Guest: Nicolai Tarasov, clarinet. St. Olave’s Anglican
Church, 360 Windermere Ave. 416-7697054. $18; $12(sr/st).
— 4:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Twilight
Recital Series. Andrew Ager, organ. 65
Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 6:00: MPC Productions. Night of Music
in Celebration of Norman Amadio. Ted
O’Reilly, Rick Wilkins, John Macleod, RoseSunday October 05
mary Galloway, Don Vickery, and others. Lula
— 1:30: CAMMAC / McMichael Canadian Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
Art Collection. McMichael Sunday Concert Free.
Series. Roberto Occhipinti, bass. 10365 IslingTuesday October 07
ton Ave., Kleinburg. 905-893-1121. $15;
— 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.
$9(sr/st).
— 1:30 & 7:30: Mirvish Productions. The Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre Vocal Series:
The Rake Punished: Highlights from Don GioSound of Music. See Oct. 3.
vanni. Members of the COC Ensemble Studio;
— 2:00: Canadian Opera Company. Don
Liz Upchurch, piano. Four Seasons Centre
Giovanni. Mozart. Brett Polegato, bari-
Theatre, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905874-2800. $80.
— 8:00: I Furiosi Baroque Ensemble. The
T-Word. An exploration of the musical roles of
men and women during a sexually liberated
period. Special guests: Matthew White, countertenor; Stephanie Martin, organ. Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Ave. 416-5362943. $20; $10.
— 8:00: Opera in Concert. Roberto Devereux. By Donizetti. Lara Ciekiewicz, soprano
(Queen Elizabeth); Jennifer Enns Modolo, mezzo (Sara, Duchess of Nottingham); Colin Ainsworth, tenor (Roberto, Earl of Essex); Justin
Welsh, baritone (Lord Duke of Nottingham);
Alison d’Amato, music director & piano. Jane
Mallett Theatre, 27 Front St. E. 416-3667723/800-708-6754. $38; $28. 7:15: preperformance presentation by Iain Scott. Also
Oct. 5.
— 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall & Massey
Hall. Let It Be. Music of Lennon & McCartney. Rik Emmett, Damhnait Doyle, Russell
deCarle and Andrew Craig. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-872-4255. $74.50$94.50.
— 8:00: Toronto Consort. Marco Polo
Project. See Oct. 3.
for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.
416-363-8231. Free.
— 1:00: St. James’ Cathedral. Music at
Midday Recital Series. Quirino DiGiulio, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
— 7:30: Mirvish Productions. The Sound of
Music. See Oct. 3.
— 7:30: York University Department of
Music. Faculty Concert Series: Soundstill.
Southam: Creeks and Rivers. Christina
Petrowska Quilico, piano. Tribute Communities Recital Hall, Accolade East, YU, 4700
Keele St. 416-736-5888. $15; $5(st).
— 8:00: Mirvish Productions. Dirty Dancing. See Sep 2.
presents
Night of Music
in Celebration
of Norman Amadio
Featuring: Tommy Ambrose
MC: Ted O’Reilly
Rick Wilkins, John Macleod,
Rosemary Galloway and Don Vickery
Admission Free Cash Bar
Dinner Reservations Guarantee seating
Sunday, October 5th at 6:00pm
Lula Lounge
A Canadian
Premiere
Guillermo Silva-Marin, General Director
sponsored by
Jackman Foundation
1585 Dundas Street West (West of Dufferin) Toronto
To reserve call please contact Lula Lounge - 416-588-0307
Online - www.lula.ca
For more information: www.mpcmusic.com 416-248-4952
Organ
Recital
Roberto
Devereux
ROBERTO DEVEREUX, a work of
great power and dramatic conviction,
is a gripping tale of an imagined
chapter in the life of England’s
Queen Elizabeth. Donizetti’s magic
expands in a long arc of restrained
emotion – melodious and triumphant.
2008
October 4 at 8 pm
and October 5
at 2:30 pm
416-366-7723 w w w . s t l c . c o m
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Widor - Symphonie 1
Gaetano
Donizetti
Andrew Ager
in Italian
Organist
Lara Ciekiewicz
Jennifer Enns
Modolo
Colin Ainsworth
Justin Welsh
Alison d'Amato
Friday October 10
7:30 pm
Free-will offering
Music Director
Robert Cooper
Chorus Director
ST. JAMES CATHEDRAL
1-800-708-6754
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
65 Church St. (King at Church)
416 364 7865
39
LISTINGS: SECTION 2
CONCERTS: Beyond the GTA
Woolwich St. Guelph. 519-763-4952. $15$20.
— 2:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. John Zorn’s
Electric Masada & The Dreamers. River Run
Centre, 35 Woolwich St. Guelph. 519-7634952. $20-$25.
N.B. For a list of communities in this section
see LISTINGS INTRODUCTION, page 32
Wednesday September 03
Midday Music with Shigeru
Allan Pulker, Flute
Elena Tchernaia, piano
Wednesday September 10
Friday September 05
— 1:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. SAFA. Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, 358 Gordon St.
Guelph. 519-763-4952. Free.
— 11:00pm: Guelph Jazz Festival. Fond of
Tigers. St. George’s Anglican Church, 99
Woolwich St., Guelph. 519-763-4952. $15$20.
— 5:30: Guelph Jazz Festival. Joane Hétu’s Filature. River Run Centre, 35 Woolwich
St. Guelph. 519-763-4952. $15-$20.
— 8:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Instant Composers’ Pool Orchestra / Satako Fujii. River
Run Centre, 35 Woolwich St. Guelph. 519763-4952. $25-$30.
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. Lukasz Kuropaczewski, Guitar. Giuliani: Rossiniana No.3; Rodrigo: Elogio
de la Guitarra; Britten: Nocturnal Op. 75;
Jose: Sonata. KWCMS Music Room, 57
Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$25; $20(sr); $15(st).
ment; Brahms: Clarinet Quintet; Panufnik:
String Quartet No.3. Penderecki Quartet; Canadian Guitar Quartet; Simon Aldrich, clarinet.
Church of Mary Magdalene, 335 Main St.,
Picton. 613-393-3798. $25; $10(st).
— 8:00: Sweetwater Music Weekend.
Transformations. Works by Handel/Halvorsen,
Colgrass, Schnittke, Stravinsky and Schoenberg. Mark Fewer, violin; and friends. Historic
Leith Church, 419134 Tom Thomson Lane,
Leith. 519-376-3517. $30(includes reception).
Saturday September 20
— 10:00am & 2:00: Prince Edward County Music Festival. Family Special: Canadian
Friday September 12
Guitar Quartet. Rossini and Beethoven to tan— 8:00: Brad Halls. The Colours of our
go. Church of Mary Magdalene, 335 Main St.,
Lives. Standards drawn from the colours of
Picton. 613-393-3798. $25; $10(st).
the rainbow. Beth Craig and Tanya Wills. Vic- — 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestoria Hall Concert Hall, 55 King St. W. Cotra. La Diva II. Opera spoof. James Sommerbourg. 905-372-2210. $15.
ville, conductor; Natalie Choquette, soprano.
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
Hamilton Place, 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton.
Orchestra. Pictures at an Exhibition.
905-526-7756. $36-$59; $32-$54(sr);
Saturday September 06
Corigliano: Promenade Overture; Dvorak: Cello $10(st); $5(child).
Concerto in b; Mussorgsky arr. Ravel: Pictures — 7:30: Prince Edward County Music
— 10:30am: Guelph Jazz Festival.
at an Exhibition. Edwin Outwater, conductor; Festival. Chamber Ensembles. Poulenc: ClariFrançois Houle Aerials. Guelph Youth Music
Alban Gerhardt, cello. Centre in the Square,
net Sonata; Louie: Néon; Schumann: Quintet
Centre, Guelph. 519-763-4952. $15-$20.
101 Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519-578for Piano and Strings in E flat. Penderecki
— 12:30: Guelph Jazz Festival. Burrows.
1570. $30-$75.
Quartet; Simon Aldrich, clarinet; Tanya ProcUpper Wyndham Street Jazz Tent, Guelph.
hazka, cello; Stéphane Lemelin, piano. Church
519-763-4952. Free.
Wednesday
Saturday September 13
of Mary Magdalene, 335 Main St., Picton.
— 2:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Friendly Rich
September 3, 12:00 noon
— 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orches613-393-3798. $25: $10(st).
and the Lollipop People. Upper Wyndham
tra. Stairway to Heaven. Murphy: “And so be — 8:00: Kingston Symphony Orchestra.
Street Jazz Tent, Guelph. 519-763-4952.
changed to lightning in the end”; Mozart: Sym- Grand Opera Gala. Joni Henson, soprano; Julie
Free.
— 12:00 noon: Midday Music With
phony No.39 in E flat K.543; Mahler: Sympho- Nesrallah, mezzo; Richard Margison, tenor;
Shigeru. Kuhlau: Duo Sonata; Chopin: Ballade — 2:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Sangha /
ny No.4. James Sommerville, conductor; Nath- Bruce Kelly, baritone; Glen Fast, conductor.
Barry Guy, Maya Homburger & Jeff Reilly.
No.1 in g; Widor: Suite for Flute and Piano;
alie Paulin, soprano. Hamilton Place, 1 SumGrand Theatre, 218 Princess St., Kingston.
Guelph Youth Music Centre, Guelph. 519Borne: Carmen Fantasy. Allan Pulker, flute;
mers Lane, Hamilton. 905-526-7756. $36613-530-2050. $50-$150.
763-4952. $20-$25.
Elena Tchernaia, piano. Hi-Way Pentecostal
$59; $32-$54(sr); $10(st); $5(child).
— 8:00: Sweetwater Music Weekend.
— 3:30: Guelph Jazz Festival. Tallboys.
Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-726— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
About Face. Works by Bolcom, Boccherini,
Upper Wyndham Street Jazz Tent, Guelph.
1181. $5; free(st).
Orchestra. Pictures at an Exhibition. See Sep Buczynski, Hoiby, Murphy and Schoenfield.
— 8:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. DJ Spooky 519-763-4952. Free.
Mark Fewer, violin; and friends. Division
— 5:15: Guelph Jazz Festival. Burnt Sugar. 12.
& Vijay Iyer. Macdonald Stewart Art Centre,
Street Church, 994 4th Ave. E., Owen
Upper Wyndham Street Jazz Tent, Guelph.
358 Gordon St. Guelph. 519-763-4952.
Sunday September 14
Sound. 519-376-3517. $25. 6:30: Pre-con519-763-4952. Free.
$20-$25.
— 2:00: Concert Hall at Victoria Hall:
cert chat.
— 7:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. L’Orkestre
Thursday September 04
des pas perdus. Upper Wyndham Street Jazz Sweet Water Country Music Series. Sweet
Sunday September 21
Water Band and friends. 55 King St. W. CoTent, Guelph. 519-763-4952. Free.
— 1:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Matana
bourg. 905-372-2210 / 888-262-6874.
— 2:00: Ebenezer United Church. Music
— 8:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Tortoise.
Roberts’s Coin Coin: Prologue. Macdonald
$18.55.
for Muses. Kristine Dandavino, soprano;
Stewart Art Centre, 358 Gordon St. Guelph. River Run Centre, 35 Woolwich St. Guelph.
— 2:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
Joanne Averill-Rocha, flute; Kristen Theriault,
519-763-4952. $20-$25.
519-763-4952. Free.
Orchestra. Pictures at an Exhibition. River
harp; Marianne Turner, piano. 12274 Guelph
— 5:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Rouge Ciel. — 9:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. Bernardo
Run Centre, 35 Woolwich St., Guelph. See
Line, Campbellville. 519-822-4374. $20.
Padrón Group. Upper Wyndham Street Jazz
Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, 358 Gordon
Sep 12.
— 2:00: Sweetwater Music Weekend.
Tent, Guelph. 519-763-4952. Free.
St. Guelph. 519-763-4952. Free.
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
All Good Things. Works by Haydn and Brahms.
— 8:00: Guelph Jazz Festival. René Lussier — 9:45: Guelph Jazz Festival. Jane Bun& Kevin Breit / Kidd Jordan Quartet. River Run nett’s Carnavalissimo. Parade to Upper Wynd- Music Society. Petronel Malan, piano. Hay5th Anniversary
dn: Sonata No.50 in C; Heller: 33 Variations on
Centre, 35 Woolwich St. Guelph. 519-763- ham Street Jazz Tent. River Run Centre, 35
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Woolwich St. Guelph. 519-763-4952. Free. the theme of Beethoven’s 32 Variations;
4952. $20-$25.
Brahms: 16 Waltzes; Jelobinsky: 6 Etudes;
— 11:00pm: Guelph Jazz Festival. John
Sunday September 07
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 19 (arr. BusoKameel Farah / Kid Koala. St. George’s Anglini). KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
can Church, 99 Woolwich St., Guelph. 519- — 10:30am: Guelph Jazz Festival. John
Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $20; $15(sr);
Zorn: Improvisations. River Run Centre, 35
763-4952. $15-$20.
$10(st).
Thursday September 18
— 7:30: Prince Edward County Music
Festival. Penderecki Quartet with Friends.
Mozart: Clarinet Quintet; Louie: Bringing the
Tiger Down From the Mountain II; Schubert:
Quintet for Strings D.956. Penderecki Quartet; Simon Aldrich, clarinet; Tanya Prochazka,
cello; Stéphane Lemelin, piano. Church of Mary
Magdalene, 335 Main St., Picton. 613-3933798. $25; $10(st).
Friday September 19
40
— 7:30: Prince Edward County Music
Festival. Guitar and String Quartets. Rossini:
William Tell Overture (arr.); Louie: DénoueWWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
MUSIC
FESTIVAL
September 18-20, 2008
The Church of St. Mary Magdalene
Picton, Ontario
www.pecmusicfestival.com
Presented by
The Prince Edward County Arts Council
Stéphane
Lemelin
Artistic Director
and Pianist
Alexina
Louie
Composer-inResidence
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Tuesday September 30
— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. Opera at
Noon. Vania Chan, soprano; Leigh-Anne Martin,
mezzo; Doreen Uren Simmons, piano. Works
by Debussy, Saint-Saëns, Handel, Délibes and
Bizet. Burton Avenue United Church, 37 Burton Ave., Barrie. 705-725-1070. $15.
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Melodies for
Three. Works by Mendelssohn and Brahms.
Maya Fraser, violin; Rafael Hoekman, cello;
Angela Park, piano. Hi-Way Pentecostal
Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-7251070. $15.
— 8:00: Colours of Music. Saxophone Plus.
Works by Cobb and Wadsworth. Royal City
Saxophone Quartet. Central United Church, 54
Ross St., Barrie. 705-725-1070. $25.
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. Aurora Guitar Quartet. Mozart: Overture to The Magic Flute, Overture to
the Marriage of Figaro; Bizet: Carmen Suite;
Boccherini: Introducion and Fandango; Gershwin: Three Preludes; Bellinato: Balao de Gude;
Piazzolla: Libertango. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$25; $20(sr); $15(st).
— 8:00: Colours of Music. Nat King Cole to
Johnny Mathis. Rudy Mayes and Selena Gittens, vocalists; The Unforgettable All-Stars;
Joe Palawan, bandleader. Central United
Church, 54 Ross St., Barrie. 705-725-1070.
$35.
Thursday October 02
— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. Ring
Those Bells. Works by Grieg, Sibelius, Wiltse
Wednesday October 01
and Childers. Susan Carscadden-Mifsud, hand— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. In Recital. bells; David Parisi, piano. Grace United
Works by Cassado, Vaughan Williams,
Church, 350 Grove St. E., Barrie. 705-725Beethoven. Rafael Hoekman, cello; Angela
1070. $15.
Park, piano. Burton Avenue United Church, 37 — 2:30: Colours of Music. Gabriele BaldocBurton Ave., Barrie.705-725-1070. $15.
ci, piano. Works by Kabalevsky, Schumann,
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Arriaga String
Janácek, Chopin, Tokuyama. Central United
Quartet. Works by Franck, Turina and Milhaud. Church, 54 Ross St., Barrie. 705-725-1070.
Guest: Gabriele Baldocci, piano. Hi-Way Pente- $15. 2:00: pre-concert chat.
costal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705— 8:00: Colours of Music. Gershwin … and
725-1070. $15.
More. Works by Gershwin, Gilliland and We-
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by Buhr, Cabena, Cunningham, Enns, PurvesSmith, and Weaver. Lee Willingham, conductor. Kitchener City Hall Rotunda, 200 King St.
W., Kitchener. 519 894-5308. Free.
Monday September 22
— 8:00: Colours of Music. A Celebration of
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Howard Cable. Elmer Iseler Singers; True
Music Society. Wallace Halladay, SaxoNorth Brass; Lydia Adams, conductor. Hi-Way
phone. Schulhoff: Hot Sonate; Denisov: Sona- Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie.
ta; Takács: Two Fantastics; Lauba: Hard; Wie- 705-725-1070. $35.
doeft: Tunes. Peter Tiefenbach, piano. KWC— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
MS Music Room, 57 Young St. W., WaterOrchestra. Not Made in Vienna. Arnold: Overloo. 519-886-1673. $25; $20(sr); $15(st).
ture in D Op.8 No.6; Dussek: Symphony in B
flat; Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante K.364;
Wednesday September 24
Richter: Symphony in C major. Jennifer Kozbi— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
al, violin; John Posadas, viola; Graham Coles,
Music Society. Penderecki String Quartet.
conductor. Maureen Forrester Recital Hall,
Brahms: Piano Quintet in f; Tchaikovsky: Quar- Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Ave.
tet No.1 in D; Louie: Denouement. Guest:
W. Waterloo. 519-744-3828. $20; $15(sr/
Stephan Sylvestre, piano. KWCMS Music
st); free(children).
Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519Sunday September 28
886-1673. $25; $20(sr); $15(st).
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Penderecki
Thursday September 25
String Quartet. Brahms: Sonata Op.34b (arr.
— 7:30: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony piano quintet); music by Mendelssohn. Guest:
Orchestra. Electronica. Bates: Omnivorous
Stéphan Sylvestre, piano. Central United
Furniture. Greenwood: Popcorn Superhet ReChurch, 54 Ross St., Barrie. 705-725-1070.
ceiver. Edwin Outwater, conductor; Mason
$25.
Bates, DJ. Humanities Theatre, 200 Universi- — 5:15: Colours of Music. Jazz Vespers.
ty Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-578-1570. $35. Fig Leaf Jazz Band. Burton Avenue United
Church, 37 Burton Ave., Barrie. 705-725Friday September 26
1070. Freewill offering.
— 7:30: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony — 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Orchestra. Electronica. River Run Centre, 35 Music Society. The Well-Tempered Etude:
Woolwich St., Guelph. See Sep 25.
24 Etudes by Many Composers. Works by
— 8:00: Colours of Music. Anagnoson and
Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Greidanus,
Kinton. Brahms: Sonata Op.34b; also music by and others. Ron Greidanus, piano. KWCMS
Arensky. Leslie Kinton and James Anagnoson, Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo.
pianos. Central United Church, 54 Ross St.,
519-886-1673. $20; $15(sr); $10(st).
Barrie. 705-725-1070. $25.
— 8:00: Colours of Music. An English Coun— 8:00: Marnie and Larry Paikin. Colina try Garden. Susan Hoeppner, flute; Lawrence
Phillips jazz vocalist & kollage/The Rhythm
Wiliford, tenor; Robert Kortgaard, piano;
Section. Featuring Archie Alleyne, Robi Botos Works by Vaughan Williams, Britten, Quilter
and Artie Roth. The Old Firehall, 334 Wilson
and Reade. Central United Church, 54 Ross
St. E., Ancaster. 905-304-8863. $25
St., Barrie. 705-725-1070. $15.
— 8:00: Sharon Hope United Church.
Monday September 29
David Howard, guitar. Music by Santana, the
Gypsy Kings, and others. 18648 Leslie St.,
— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. In Recital.
Sharon. 905-895-1934. $25.
Works by Ravel, Beethoven and Gershwin.
Maya Fraser, violin; Angela Park, piano. Burton
Saturday September 27
Avenue United Church, 37 Burton Ave., Bar— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. Cabaret at rie. 705-725-1070. $15.
Noon. Music by Bernstein, Porter and Weber. — 2:30: Colours of Music. Jazz in the AfKristin Wilkes, soprano; Kelly Robertson, ten- ternoon. Music by Bernstein, Debussy, Copor; Guy Few, piano. Burton Avenue United
land and Gilliland. James Campbell, clarinet;
Church, 37 Burton Ave., Barrie. 705-725Graham Campbell, guitar; Bob Mills, bass;
1070. $15.
Stéphan Sylvestre, piano; Mark Fewer, violin.
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Arriaga String
Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N.,
Quartet. Works by Mendelssohn, Brahms and Barrie. 705-725-1070. $15.
Arriaga. Guest: James Campbell, clarinet.
— 8:00: Colours of Music. Russian RhapsoCentral United Church, 54 Ross St., Barrie.
dy. Works by Tchaikovsky, Borodin and Glière.
705-725-1070. $25.
Arriaga String Quartet; Penderecki String
— 7:00: Waterloo Region Composers
Quartet. Central United Church, 54 Ross St.,
Choral Song Circle. Choral Concert. Works Barrie. 705-725-1070. Free.
CHA
Mark Fewer, violin; and friends. Historic Leith
Church, 419134 Tom Thomson Lane, Leith.
519-376-3517. $30.
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Jennifer Kozbial, Violin & John Posadas, Viola
Music by Arnold, Dussek, Mozart and Richter
Saturday, September 27, 2008 at 8:00 pm
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo
+HHQDQ%ODLNLH
For ticket information and program details go to: www.kwchamberorchestra.ca
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
41
...SECTION 2: Beyond the GTA
ber. University of Toronto Wind Ensemble;
James Campbell, clarinet; Lang Ning Liu, piano; Gillian MacKay, conductor. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705725-1070. $35.
Beethoven: Symphony No.1. James Sommerville, conductor; Lance Elbeck, Bethany Bergman, violins. Central Presbyterian Church, 165
Charlton Ave. W. Hamilton. 905-526-7756.
$25.
— 7:30: Rhythm Riders Music ProducFriday October 03
tions. Indian Classical Dance and Music Con— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. Jason
cert. See Oct. 3. Deutsch University Centre,
Cutmore, piano. Works by Rachmaninoff, de
Queen’s University, Kingston. 613-549Falla and Gilliland. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 5564. $20.
50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-725-1070.
— 8:00: Colours of Music. Night at the Op$15.
era. Excerpts by Puccini, Rossini, Verdi and
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Aurora Guitar
Mozart. Eight opera singers; Darryl Edwards,
Quartet. Works by Bach, Boccherini, Mozart
narrator; Andrea Grant, piano. Hi-Way Penteand Brouwer. Burton Avenue United Church,
costal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 70537 Burton Ave., Barrie. 705-725-1070.
725-1070. $35.
$15.
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
— 7:30: Colours of Music. Amabile Boys
Orchestra. La Mer. See Oct 3.
and Mens Choirs. Works by Bach, Britten,
Sunday October 05
Schubert and Gilliland. Central United Church,
54 Ross St., Barrie. 705-725-1070. $35.
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Songs of Noel
— 7:30: Oshawa Durham Symphony Or- Coward and Ivor Novello. Alex Dobson, barichestra. Music from The Red Violin.
tone; Zorana Sadiq, soprano; Peter Tiefenbach,
Corigliano: The Red Violin, Chaconne; Brahms: piano. Central United Church, 54 Ross St.,
Symphony No.3 in F Op.90; Moussa: Cyclus;
Barrie. 705-725-1070. $15.
Korngold: Violin Concerto in D Op.35. Philippe — 2:30: Kingston Symphony Orchestra.
Quint, violin; Marco Parisotto, conductor. Uni- Musical Masters. Beethoven: Overture to
versity of Ontario Recreation Hall, 2000 Sim- Fidelio; Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1;
coe St. N., Oshawa. 905-579-6711. $40;
Sibelius: Symphony No. 2. Lucille Chung, piano;
$15(st).
Glen Fast, conductor. Grand Theatre, 218
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Princess St., Kingston. 613-530-2050.
Orchestra. La Mer. Muhly: So to Speak; Mo- — 2:30: Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
zart: Piano Concerto No.27 in B flat K.595;
Orchestra. La Mer. See Oct. 3.
Chopin: Variations on “La ci darem la mano”;
— 2:30: Niagara Symphony Orchestra.
Debussy: La Mer. Edwin Outwater, conductor; Great Britain, Town and Country. Willan: OverOrion Weiss, piano. Centre in the Square, 101 ture to an Unwritten Comedy; Elgar: Cello
Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519-578-1570.
Concerto in e Op.85; Vaughan Williams: Sym$30-$75.
phony No.5 in D. Denise Djokic, cello; Daniel
— 8:30: Rhythm Riders Music ProducSwift, conductor. Sean O’Sullivan Theatre,
tions. Indian Classical Dance and Music Con- 500 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines. 905cert. Pandit Divyang Vakil and Loren Oppenhe- 687-4993. $35-$40; $16(st). 1:45: pre-conimer, tablas; Won Joung Jin, dancer. Atlas Yoga, cert chat.
123 Charles St., Kitchener. 519-884-9877.
— 4:30: St. Paul’s Anglican Church. Organ
Favourites. Works by Bach, Brahms, Franck,
Saturday October 04
Lefébure-Wély and Willan. Elaine Bell, organ.
— 12:00 noon: Colours of Music. In Recital. 19 Invergordon Rd., Minden. 705-457-9422.
Works by Schumann and Barnes. Janice
$12; $5(under 19).
LaMarre, viola; Nena LaMarre, piano. Central — 8:00: Colours of Music. Phantom of the
United Church, 54 Ross St., Barrie. 705Opera. Silent film, with music by William
725-1070. $15.
O’Meara, organ. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian
— 2:30: Colours of Music. Peter and the
Church, 47 Owen St., Barrie. 705-725Wolf. Works by Prokofiev, Franck, Langlais,
1070. $25.
McCune and Yedidia (premiere). Jason CutMonday October 06
more, piano; Daniel Sullivan, organ; Rick Phillips, narrator. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian
— 8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Church, 47 Owen St., Barrie. 705-725Music Society. Arriaga String Quartet. Ar1070. $15.
riaga: Quartet No.1; Borodin: Quartet No.2;
— 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orches- Mendelssohn: Quartet Op.44 No.2. KWCMS
tra. Fire. Mozart: Der Schauspieldirektor
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo.
Overture; Haydn: Symphony No.59 “Fire”;
519-886-1673. $25; $20(sr); $15(st).
Bach: Concerto for Two Violins in d;
Use our Distribution Point Locator
to find the location of your nearest free
WholeNote pick up point.
Key in your postal code,
and the Locator will display
a map showing the
distribution points nearest you.
Go to
www.thewholenote.com. It’s on the Home page!
42
LISTINGS: SECTION 3
JAZZ IN THE CLUBS
Compiled and edited by Ori Dagan
[email protected]
Alleycatz
2409 Yonge St. 416-481-6865
www.alleycatz.ca
Every Mon Salsa Night with Frank Bischun.
Every Tue Whitney Smith’s “Swing House”.
Every Wed Jasmine Bailey & Co. Jazz &
Soul. Sep 4 Soular. Sep 5 Lady Kane. Sep 6
Graffitti Park. Sep 11 Lady Kane. Sep 12
Soular. Sep 13 Lady Kane. Sep 18 Graffitti
Park. Sep 19 Soular. Sep 20 Liquid. Sep
25 Lady Kane. Sep 26 Soular. Sep 27 Lady
Kane.
The Black Swan
154 Danforth Ave. 416-469-0537
Every Wed The Danforth Jam w/ Jon Long
and Friends.
Chalkers Pub Billiards & Bistro
247 Marlee Avenue 416-789-2531
http://www.chalkerspub.com
NO COVER
Every Wed Salsa lesson followed by live
music w/ La Nueva Revalacion. Every Thu
Girls Night Out Vocalist-Friendly Jazz Jam
w/ Lisa Particelli. Sep 7 Richard Whiteman
Trio. Sep 12 Don Thompson Quartet with
Reg Schwager, Jim Vivian, Ethan Ardelli.
Sep 13 Don Thompson Quintet with Jon
Challoner. Sep 14 Don Thompson Quintet with
Kelly Jefferson. Sep 19 Richard Whiteman Trio
with vocalist Heather Bambrick. Sep 20 Bob
Brough Quartet. Sep 21 Mike Murley Quartet.
Sep 26 Richard Underhill. Sep 27 Nancy
Walker Quartet. Sep 28 Lorne Lofsky Trio.
Chick N’ Deli
744 Mount Pleasant Rd. 416-489-3363
www.chickndeli.com
Every Mon Big Band Night. Every Tue Jam
Night. Every Sat Climax Jazz Band 4-7.
Cobourg, The
533 Parliament St. 416-913-7538
Jazz Sundays 9PM
NO COVER
Commensal, Le
655 Bay St. 416-596-9364
www.commensal.ca
Jazz Fridays & Saturdays 6:30 pm - 9:30
pm
NO COVER
The Corktown
175 Young St. Hamilton 905-572-9242
www.thecorktownpub.ca
Every Mon Mohawk College Student Jazz
Jam Night. Every Wed Jazz @ The
Corktown hosted by Darcy Hepner.
Dominion on Queen
500 Queen St. East 416-368-6893
www.dominiononqueen.com
Eton House
710 Danforth Ave. 416-466-6161
First Sunday of Every Month Joel Hartt.
Gate 403
403 Roncesvalles 416-588-2930
www.gate403.com
NO COVER, Pay What You Can
Sep 1 Grante Curle Flamenco Solo, Adam
Texiera Jazz Band. Sep 2 Araujo, Harnett
and Rahbek Jazz Trio, Julian Fauth and
James Thomson Blues Duo. Sep 3 Joshua
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
Goodman Jazz Band, Patrick Tevlin’s New
Orleans Rhythm. Sep 4 Sarah Jerrom Jazz
Trio, Bartek Kozminski. Sep 5 Morgan
Saddler, The Peddlers. Sep 6 Bill Heffernan
& Friends, Melissa Boyce & Kevin Laliberte.
Sep 7 Clela Errington Blues Solo, Starry
Nights, Matt Newton Jazz Band. Sep 8
Julie McGregor Jazz Duo, Sean Bellaviti
Jazz Band. Sep 9 Ken Yoshioka Blues Duo,
Julian Fauth and James Thomson Blues
Duo. Sep 10 Amy Medvick Bossa Nova
Guitar Solo, Patrick Tevlin’s New Orleans
Rhythm. Sep 11 Miss Emily & the Blue
Callers, Joanna Moon Quartet. Sep 12
Rosalind Kindler Jazz Trio, Max Senitt Latin
Band. Sep 13 Bill Heffernan & Friends, Eric
St. Laurent Jazz Band. Sep 14 Klaus
Anselm Jazz Brunch, Shannon Butcher &
Tom MacCarrol, Storyville Project. Sep 15
Mark Meitine Piano Solo, Kevin Laliberte
Flamenco Trio. Sep 16 Ted Hawkins Jazz &
Blues Duo, Julian Fauth and James
Thomson Blues Duo. Sep 17 Frank Pincente
& Mark Meitine, Patrick Tevlin’s New
Orleans Rhythm. Sep 18 Chantelle Wilson
Jazz Band, String Theory. Sep 19 Ventana
5 Jazz Band, “The Worst Pop Band Ever”.
Sep 20 Bill Heffernan & Friends, Herb and
Ray Jazz Group with Friends. Sep 21 Clela
Errington Blues Solo, The France Street
Quartet, Peter Hill Jazz Trio. Sep 22 Michele
Lawrence Jazz Trio, Ali Berkok & Arnold
Faber Duo. Sep 23 Scott Pietrangelo Piano
Solo, Julian Fauth and James Thomson Blues
Duo. Sep 24 Nadia Hosko Jazz Quartet, Patrick
Tevlin’s New Orleans Rhythm. Sep 25 Kenny
Simon Guitar Solo, Cyndi Carleton Jazz
Duo. Sep 26 Fraser Melvin Blues Band,
Elizabeth Shepherd Jazz Band. Sep 27 Bill
Heffernan & Friends, Mr. Rick and the
Biscuits Blues & Swing Trio.Sep 28 Clela
Errington Blues Solo, Amy Noubarian Jazz
Duo, Fern Lindzon Jazz Trio. Sep 29 Eli
Bennett Jazz Band, Mike Field Jazz Duo.
Sep 30 Double A Jazz Duo, Julian Fauth
and James Thomson Blues Duo.
Grossman’s Tavern
379 Spadina Ave. 416-977-1210
www.grossmanstavern.com
NO COVER
Every Mon Laura Hubert Band. Every Tue
Brokenjoe ol’ timey tuesdays. Every Sat
Matinee: The Happy Pals. Every Sun Night:
Nicola Vaughan Acoustic Jam, The
Nationals with Brian Cober – Double Slide
Guitar Open Stage Jam. Sep 11 Grayce
Daddies. Sep 13 Gary Kendall. Sep 18
Blues Drivers. Sep 20 Daredevils of Soul.
Sep 26 Frankie Foo.
Hot House Café
35 Church Street. 416-366-7800
Every Sun. Jazz Brunch with the Ken
Churchill Quartet.
Hugh’s Room
2261 Dundas St. West. 416-531-6604
www.hughsroom.com
Sep 5 Ron Nigrini. Sep 6 Adi Braun. Sep 7
Gary Farmer & the Troublemakers. Sep 10
Sam Phillips. Sep 11, 12 Sam Lindley. Sep
13 Rebecca Jenkins. Sep 15 Dale
Blackford, Carolyn Lykkemark. Sep 16
Lara MacMillan. Sep 17 Roy Bookbinder.
Sep 18 Moonshine Café Showcase. Sep
19 Boys Do Girls. Sep 20 Rita
Chiarelli.Sep 21 Ennis.Sep 23 Rachael
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
. . . . . LISTINGS: SECTION 3
JAZZ IN THE CLUBS, CONTINUED
Unthank & the Winterset. Sep 24 Arrogant
Worms. Sep 25 Jason Wilson. Sep 27, 28
Jenn Grant, Martin Tielli. Sep 29 John T. Davis.
Lula Lounge
1585 Dundas W. 416-588-0307
www.lula.ca
Sep 4 Kevin Laliberte. Sep 5 Eliana Cuevas. Sep
6 Salsa Saturday with Ricky Franco. Sep 7
Burnt Sugar with Sharron McLeod. Sep 10 The
3rd Annual Patsy Cline Birthday Show! Sep 12
Latin Afrofest II. Sep 13 Salsa Dance Party with
Café Cubano. Sep 14 Daddo. Sep 19 Latin
Afrofest II.
Manhattan’s Music Club
951 Gordon St. Guelph 519-767-2440
www.manhattans.ca
Mezzetta
681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687
www.mezzettarestaurant.com
Every Wed Sets at 9 and 10:15. Cover $7.
Reservations recommended for first set. Sep 17
David Mott, Matt Brubeck. Sep 24 Yiddish
Swingtet. Sep 26 Brian Allosery, Van Dixon.
Mezzrow’s
1546 Queen St. W. 416-535-4906
Parkdale neighbourhood pub featuring jazz and
blues on Saturday afternoons, Sunday evenings
and a live jam every other Wednesday.
Momo’s Bistro
664 The Queensway, Etobicoke
416-252-5560
www.momosbistro.com
N’Awlins Jazz Bar and Dining
299 King St. W. 416-595-1958
www.nawlins.ca
Every Tues Stacie McGregor. Every Wed Jim
Heineman Trio. Every Thu Blues Night with
Guest Vocalists. Every Fri/Sat All Star Bourbon
St. Band. Every Sun Robi Botos.
Odd Socks at Dovercourt House
804 Dovercourt Rd. 416-537-3337
www.swingtoronto.com
Sep 6 Drew Jurecka Quartet. Sep 13 Shannon
Butcher & Her Choice Cuts.
Old Mill, The
Home Smith Bar & Grill, 21 Old Mill Rd.
416-236-2641
www.oldmilltoronto.com
$12 Cover Charge
Sep 5 Ross Wooldridge Trio. Sep 6 Sultans of
String Duo. Sep 12 Linda Carone Duo. Sep 13
Dusty Bohdan Duo. Sep 19 Joanne Tudor
Trio. Sep 20 Pat Murray Duo. Sep 26 Sean
Bray Duo.
Meltdown, Laura Hubert Band, Justin
Bacchus, Bernie Senensky.Sep 7 Excelsior
Dixieland Jazz, Club Django, David
Buchbinder, Paula Shear. Sep 8 Richard
Whiteman Trio, Andrew Downing. Sep 9
Olivia’s at Fifty-Three
Ross Wooldridge Trio, Classic Rex Jazz Jam
53 Clinton Street 416-533-3989
with Sly Juhas. Sep 10 Steve Kendry
NO COVER
Quartet, Bernardo Pardon. Sep 11 Kevin
Every Sun Raoul’s Blue Sundays. Every
Quain, Outside Sources. Sep 12 Hogtown
Wed David Virelles Trio. Every Thu David
Syncopators, Sultans of String, Rob Mosher
Buchbinder Trio with the Botos Brothers.
Quartet.Sep 13 Abbey’s Meltdown, Blue
Every Sat Toronto Cuban Jazz Review with
Room, Carissa Neufeld, The Dixie Demons.
Luis Mario Ochoa.
Sep 14 Excelsior Dixieland Jazz, Dr. Nick,
David Buchbinder, Toronto Art Orchestra.
Orbit Room
Sep 15 Richard Whiteman Trio, Dave
508A College St. 416-535-0613
McMurdo Orchestra. Sep 16 Ross
www.theorbitroom.ca
Wooldridge Trio, Classic Rex Jazz Jam with
Sly Juhas. Sep 17 Steve Kendry Quartet,
Pantages Martini Bar and Lounge
Darren Sigesmund Septet.Sep 18 Kevin
200 Victoria St. 416-362-1777
Quain, Darren Johnson Quintet. Sep 19
Every Fri Robert Scott. Every Sat Solo
Hogtown Syncopators, Sultans of String,
Piano: Various artists.
Darren Johnson Quintet. Sep 20 Abbey’s
Meltdown, Godboo/Rotundo Blues, Justin
Pilot Tavern
Bacchus, Paul Read Orchestra. Sep 21
22 Cumberland 416-923-5716
Excelsior Dixieland Jazz, Bohemian Swing,
www.thepilot.ca
David Buchbinder, John Russon Quintet.
Jazz Saturday & Sunday 3:30 – 6:30
Sep 22 Richard Whiteman Trio, Humber
NO COVER
College Faculty Jam Session. Sep 23 Ross
Sep 6 Kirk MacDonald Quartet. Sep 7
Wooldridge Trio, Classic Rex Jazz Jam with
Andrew Downing Quartet. Sep 13 Norman
Sly Juhas. Sep 24 Steve Kendry Quartet,
Marshall Villeneuve. Sep 14 Kollage. Sep
The Short Wayners. Sep 25 Kevin Quain,
20 Chris Gale Quartet. Sep 21 Andrew
Pat LaBarbera & Kirk MacDonald Quintet:
Jacob Scott Quartet. Sep 27 Barry Elmes
Annual Tribute to John Coltrane. Sep 26
Quartet. Sep 28 Sugar Daddy’s Quartet.
Hogtown Syncopators, Sultans of String,
Tribute to Coltrane. Sep 27 Abbey’s
Polar Ice Lounge
Meltdown, Swing Shift Big Band, Raoul &
487 Church Street 416-962-1209
The Big Time, Tribute to Coltrane. Sep 28
www.statlersonchurch.com
Freeway Dixieland, David Buchbinder, Dan
“New York-style Cabaret”
Tepfer Trio. Sep 29 Richard Whiteman Trio,
Reserved Seating: COVER CHARGE + $10
John MacLeod’s Rex Hotel Orchestra.Sep 30
minimum
Ross Wooldridge Trio, Classic Rex Jazz Jam
Sep 5 Cabaret Launch: George Evans. Sep 6
with Sly Juhas.
Heather Bambrick. Sep 12 Nathalie Nadon.
Sep 13 Michael Danso. Sep 19 Carolyn
Saint Tropez, Le
Scott. Sep 20 Sonya Cote. Sep 26 Daniela
315 King St. W. 416-591-3600
Nardi. Sep 27 Bonnie Brett.
Live music 7 days a week
www.lesainttropez.com
Reservoir Lounge, The
52 Wellington St. E. 416-955-0887
Spezzo Ristorante
www.reservoirlounge.com
140 York Blvd. Richmond Hill 905-886-9703
Every Mon Sophia Perlman and the Vipers.
Live jazz every Thursday.
Every Tue Tyler Yarema and his Rhythm.
www.spezzo.com
Every Wed Bradley and the Bouncers.
Every Thu Janice Hagen. Every Fri Chet
Statlers Piano Lounge see also Polar Ice
Valient Combo. Every Sat Tory Cassis.
Lounge (Cabaret Upstairs)
Every Sun Luke Nicholson and the Sunday
487 Church Street 416-962-1209
Night Service.
www.statlersonchurch.com
Live music every night. NO COVER
Rex Jazz and Blues Bar, The
Every Mon Curtains Down Cabaret Open
194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475
Mic with Jenni Burke & Michael Barber.
www.therex.ca
Every Wed Open mic with Anne-Marie
Sep 1 Richard Whiteman Trio, Mister
Leonard. Every Thu Ken & Michael’s
Marbles. Sep 2 Ross Wooldridge Trio,
Cocktail Party, Julie Michels and Kevin
Classic Rex Jazz Jam with Sly Juhas. Sep 3
Barrett.
Steve Kendry Quartet, Del Dako Septet. Sep
4 Kevin Quain, Will Vinson Quartet. Sep 5
The Stone Grill
Hogtown Syncopators, Sultans of String,
51B Winchester 416-967-6565
Will Vinson Quartet. Sep 6 Abbey’s
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4 St.Patrick (at Queen near Osgoode station)
www.amorosomusic.com 416-591-1313
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
www.stonegrillonwinchester.com
Every Sun Jazz Brunch with Archie Alleyne,
Robi Botos, Artie Roth.
Ten Feet Tall
1381 Danforth Avenue, 416-778-7333
www.tenfeettall.ca
Sunday Jazz Matinee 3:30-6:30
No cover
Sep 7 Kiki Misumi and Reg Schwager. Sep
14 Carin Redman Quartet. Sep 21 Steve
Koven Trio. Sep 21 Girls Night Out with Lisa
Particelli 7-10.Sep 28 Rita di Ghent.
Tequila Bookworm
512 Queen Street West 416-603-7335
Experimental Jazz Series: Mondays and
Thursdays at 9pm
$5 Cover
Sep 4 Colin Story, Mark Godfrey, Mack
Longpre. Sep 8 Nicole Rampersaud, Nick
Ward. Sep 11 Terry Quinney, Harley Card,
Justin Gray. Sep 15 Trevor Falls Quartet.
Sep 18 Ryan Westaway Project. Sep 22
Robin Dann, Felicity Williams, Steve Ward.
Sep 25 A Colin Story Project. Sep 29
Anthony Rinaldi, Mark Segger, Steve Ward.
The Trane Studio
964 Bathurst St. 416-913-8197
www.tranestudio.com
Sep 9 Acoustic Soul. Sep 10 Debbie
Fleming Quartet. Sep 11 Joe Sealy and Blay
Ambolley. Sep 12 Tribute to Freddie
Hubbard: The Acoustic Years. Sep 13
Tribute to Freddie Hubbard: The Electric
Years. Sep 14 Out of Orbit. Sep 16 KG and
the VIP’s. Sep 17 From NYC: Aaron Staebell
Quartet f. Brownman. Sep 18 From NYC:
Aaron Staebell Quartet f. Brownman. Sep
19 Ruth Mathiang with Waleed
Abdulhamid. Sep 20 Margot Roi Quartet.
Sep 21 Cara Matthew Band. Sep 23
Acoustic Soul. Sep 24 Steven Ward Quartet.
Sep 25 Jake Langley Group. Sep 26 Waleed
Kush with Special Guest Billy Bang. Sep 27
Trouble with Featured Special Guest Billy
Bang. Sep 28 Glenn Buhr Quartet. Sep 30
Half Full with Marnie Levitt.
Zemra Bar & Lounge
778 St. Clair Ave. W 416-651-3123
www.zemrabarlounge.com
Every Wed Open Mic and Jam with Dave
Edie. Sep 11 You Yourself and I, Barbarella.
Sep 18 Lara Solnicki and Sean Bray. Sep
25 Lara Solnicki and Sean Bray. Sep 26
Errol Fisher Band.
e
SPECIALIZING IN
New & Used Records, CDs & DVDs
Classical, Jazz, Blues, Soundtracks,
Audiophiles & Collectibles
BUY l
SELL l
TRADE
10 Wellesley St. West) near Wellesley subway station)
Toronto, ON
www.secondvinyl.com
TEL: (416) 977-3737
[email protected]
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
43
LISTINGS: SECTION 4
*October 4 10:30am: Healey Willan
Singers. Open Rehearsal. Come & see this
ANNOUNCEMENTS, LECTURES/SYMPOSIA
women’s chamber choir at work. Church of St.
Martin in-the-Fields, 151 Glenlake Ave. ReserMASTERCLASSES, WORKSHOPS, ETCETERA
vations: 416-519-0528.
*October 4 6:52pm to October 5 sunrise:
rental fee of $5 at the Marina Quay West
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Scotiabank/Music Gallery. Nuit Blanche.
office, 539 Queens Quay West (daily from
*September 14 12:30-4:30: Royal ConInstallation: Tasman Richardson’s SPORTS
10am
to
8pm).
416-973-4000,
servatory of Music. Open House. Tour the
BAR captures the revolting essence of trashy
www.harbourfrontcentre.com
new building & take part in sample classes in
Canada and then projects it back at you, com*September 27 6:00-7:00: St. Clair Arts bined with video music concrete. Also, a conmusic & creative arts. 273 Bloor St. West.
Festival & Studio Tour. ARTWALK. Music tinuous screening of short films, featuring
416-408-2825, www.rcmusic.ca
*September 16 7:30: Etobicoke Centen- installation on the sidewalks of St. Clair: Musi- prominent Canadian artists and filmmakers
such as performer and director Karen Hines,
nial Choir. Open Rehearsal. Come and meet cians will play their instruments along the
sidewalks, from Bathurst to Oakwood, preced- comedians Sean Cullen and Mark McKinney,
our new conductor and choristers. Islington
ing 8:30pm jazz concerts at 10 venues along sketch comedy troupe The Sketchersons, muUnited Church, 25 Burnhamthorpe Rd. 416239-1131, www.etobicokecentennialchoir.ca St. Clair between Oakwood & Bathurst. Res- sicians John Southworth and Martin Tielli, and
taurants, cafés & bars will host amateur and opera stars Natalie Choquette and Measha
*September 18 6pm – September 21
professional bands. For more information:
Brueggergosman. 197 John. 416-204-1080.
2pm: Mississauga Symphony. Used Book 647-406-3979.
Free. www.scotiabanknuitblanche.com
Sale. Over 55,000 books in 48 categories;
*To October 1: New Adventures in
*October 4 6:52pm to October 5 sunrise:
comics, sheet music, records, CDs, DVDs,
Sound Art. Sound Travels Festival of Sound
Scotiabank/University of Toronto. Nuit
tapes. Sheridan Centre, Erin Mills Parkway
Art: Sonic Boardwalk. Outdoor interactive
Blanche: Déja, Presque, Jamais: Three views
just north of the QEW. 905-607-4425.
sound sculpture by Allik/Mulder which gener- of creative sound. Marathon of events & in*September 20 12:00 noon – 5:00: Toates a microsound landscape activated by the stallations prepared & performed by faculty
ronto Early Music Centre. 24th Annual
kinetic imprint of passing visitors. Ward Island members, students & alumni. Live performEarly Music Fair. Take in some mini-concerts boardwalk, west end. 416-516-7413,
ance, electronics, multi-channel audio, spoken
with viols, recorders, early keyboard instruwww.soundtravels.ca Free.
word & visual media blend & cross influences
ments, historical woodwinds & other period
through a wide range of genres including jazz,
instruments played by some of the finest mu- *To October 1: New Adventures in
opera, improvisation & contemporary compoSound Art. Sound Travels Festival of Sound
sicians in the city. Also included are exhibits
sition. Walter Hall & adjoining spaces, Edward
Art:
Synthecycletron.
Outdoor
interactive
and information about the art of historical
Johnson Bldg, 80 Queen’s Park (enter via Phisound
sculpture.
Anyone
can
generate
power
music performance. Montgomery’s Inn, 4709
for the sculpture by pedaling, which activates losopher’s Walk). www.arts.utoronto.ca,
Dundas St. West. 416-920-5025. $6, $3(sr/
synthesizers & generates sounds controlled by www.scotiabanknuitblanche.com,
st), $2 (under 12), free to members of the
*Sinfonia Toronto. Join us on a musical
Toronto Early Music Centre, Heritage Toronto, the participant. Centre Island, south side between the Pier & the boardwalk. 416-516journey to Germany, with Sinfonia Toronto
& Friends of Etobicoke’s Heritage.
7413, www.soundtravels.ca Free.
concerts in five historic cities in the cen*To September 24, Wednesdays at
11am: Toronto Music Garden. Guided
*October 2 – October 5: Young Centre.
Tours. Explore the spectacular parade of sea- Canwest Cabaret Festival. Performers include
sonal blooms while learning about the garden’s Mary Margaret O’Hara, Molly Johnson, Patriunique design and history. 45-minute walking cia O’Callaghan, Jackie Richardson, Albert
tours led by Toronto Botanical garden volunSchultz, Queen of Puddings Music Theatre &
teer guides. 475 Queens Quay West. Selfothers. All theatres, Young Centre for the Perguided 70-minute audio tours hosted by Yo-Yo forming Arts, 55 Mill St. Bldg 49. 416-866Ma and Julie Messervy are also available for a 8666. $15-$35.
tral German state of Hesse, plus tours of
castles and museums. November 17-24,
2008. 416-499-0403,
sinfoniatoronto.com
*Toronto General Hospital invites musical performers to participate in its Concert
Series, Music for Heart and Soul. Performances are on Thursday afternoons and Monday
and Wednesday evenings in the DeGasperis
Conservatory, cardiac wing. The series which
has been presented for three years welcomes
new performers to share their music with
patients, families, staff and public. For further
information please call: 416-340-4115.
LECTURES/SYMPOSIA
*September 14 5:00: Nocturnes in the
City. Bedrich Smetana: Ma Vlast (My Country). Audiovisual presentation by Kerry Stratton, about the composer and importance of his
music on the history of the Czech nation. St.
Wenceslas Church, 496 Gladstone Ave. 416499-2716. $20(door).
*September 21 2:00: Royal Ontario Museum. Lecture/demonstration with pianist
Lang Lang and TSO music director Peter Oundjian. 100 Queen’s Park. 416-586-8000. Free
with admission to the ROM: $22, $19(sr/st),
$15(ages 4-14), members free.
*September 21 5:00: St. Olave’s Church.
The English Choral Tradition. Clem Carelse,
director of St. Peter’s, will talk about the music of his life: in South Africa; at King’s College Cambridge; taking Canadian choirs to sing
at the world’s great cathedrals. Preceded at
4pm by Choral Evensong with the choir of St.
Peter’s Erindale. Peaches & cream will be
EarlyMusic
Inn
at the
Saturday September 20, 12 - 5 pm
Montgomery’s Inn
4709 Dundas Street West
416.394.8113
In partnership with the
Toronto Early Music Centre
Concerts and demonstrations of
music from before 1850 throughout
the Inn. Featuring Thomas
Georgi, The Cardinal Consort,
Pastime with Good Company,
the “Pont Paix” Ensemble,
Gin Lane, Sine Nomine
and many others.
Adults $5.71, Seniors /Youth $2.86,
Children $1.90 (plus GST)
Free to TEMC members
www.toronto.ca/museums-events
44
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
served. Contributions appreciated. 360
Windermere Avenue. 416-769-5686,
www.stolaves.ca
*September 29 8:00: Toronto Wagner
Society. Tim Albery discusses his recent
production of the Flying Dutchman. Arts and
Letters Club, 14 Elm St.
www.torontowagner.org Members free, nonmembers by donation ($5-$10 suggested).
*October 1 7:30: Mozart Society. Mozart
and his Friends. Audiovisual presentation by
Professor Franz Szabo. First Unitarian Congregation, 175 St. Clair West. 416-201-3338.
$20, members free.
Energy. Led by Joelle Morton, viola da
gamba, violone & double bass performer
& teacher. Bring your viols, recorders &
stand; music available at the door. Lansing United Church, 49 Bogert Ave. 705653-5480, 416-537-3733. $20.
*September 12 7:15: Recorder Players’
Society. Recorder and/or other early instrument players are invited to participate in
small, informal groups (uncoached) to play
Renaissance and Baroque music. Church of the
Transfiguration, 111 Manor Rd. East. 416694-9266. $10(members), $12(non-members); $80(season).
*September 17 7:30: Toronto ShapMASTER CLASSES
enote Singing from Sacred Harp. Beginners
welcome. Music Room, Bloor Street United
*September 20 10am-12 noon: SweetChurch, 300 Bloor St. W. (at Huron). 416Water Music Weekend. Student Master
Class. Auditors welcome. Location tba, Owen 922-7997 or [email protected]
Sound. 519-376-3517. Free.
*September 21 2:00: CAMMAC, Toronto
Region. Singers and instrumentalists are
*September 28 2:00-5:30: Singing Stuinvited to participate in a reading of the Modio of Deborah Staiman. Master class in
zart Requiem, under the leadership of Howard
musical theatre/audition preparation, using
textual analysis and other interpretative tools Dyck. Elliott Hall, Christ Church Deer Park,
1570 Yonge Street. 416-421-0779. $10(nonfor the “sung monologue”. Yonge & Eglinton
area – please call for exact location. 416-483- members), members/students free.
9532, www.singingstudio.ca
*September 30 8:00: Toronto Folk Sing*September 28 2:30: Toronto Symphony ers’ Club. An informal group that meets for
the purpose of performance & exchange of
Orchestra/Li Delun Music Foundation.
songs. Audiences are welcome. Tranzac Club,
Piano master class with Lang Lang. P.C. Ho
Theatre, 5183 Sheppard Ave. East. 416-490- 292 Brunswick Ave. 416-532-0900.
7962. $35, $25, $50(VIP or on stage).
*October 3 7:15: Recorder Players’ Society. Recorder and/or other early instrument
WORKSHOPS
players are invited to participate in small, informal groups (uncoached) to play Renaissance
*September 7 1:30-4:00: Toronto Early
Music Players Organization. Early Music and Baroque music. Church of the Trans-
figuration, 111 Manor Rd. East. 416-6949266. $10(members), $12(non-members);
$80(season).
*October 4 9:00am-4:00pm: Toronto Early Music Players Organization. Medieval
to Modern. Led by Valerie Horst, recorder
teacher. Bring your viols, recorders & stand;
music available at the door. Lansing United
Church, 49 Bogert Ave. 705-653-5480, 416537-3733. $40.
*October 4 9:30am-12:30: CAMMAC,
Toronto Region. Workshop in piano accompaniment. Please call for more informa-
tion as well as location. 416-421-0779.
*October 4 10:00am: Colours of Music.
Composer Workshop for All: The life and challenges for a composer. Workshop given by
Allan Gilliland, Composer-In-Residence. Burton
Avenue United Church, 37 Burton Ave. Barrie. 705-725-1070.
*Every Sunday afternoon, 2:00: Traditions Folk Club. Acoustic Traditions Jam
Session. Players from beginners & up are invited to this informal jam session. 57 Broadway Ave, Orangeville. 519-942-6258.
Free.
8M.QXXQ0MZ_Q
Learn the minuets and court
dances of the 18th century.
No experience needed.
Register NOW!
Fall Term begins
Sept 8/08
www.labelledanse.com
[email protected]
(416) 324-9118
.M^[]aQ0MZOQ/XM__Q_
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
45
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
INSTRUCTION
MISCELLANEOUS
An ENTHUSIASTIC AND INSPIRING
PIANO/ VOICE TEACHER is accepting
students. RCM, Broadway, Jazz, Classical
styles. Beginning and Advanced students.
Nancy Singla M.Mus. 416-629-8805.
[email protected]
ARE YOU PLANNING A CONCERT or
recital? Looking for a venue? Consider
Bloor Street United Church. Phone: 416-9247439 x22 Email: [email protected]
FABULOUS MUSIC RETREAT
AVAILABLE 1 hr from Toronto on Lake
Simcoe. Sleeps 35, fully equipped for large
or small groups looking to get away. Beautiful walking trails, swimming, loads of
room for rehearsal breakouts. Call 416461-5083.
JAZZ REHEARSAL SPACE New downtown rehearsal space available for jazz
players - 1800 sq ft. Great acoustics. Perfect
for trio or 20 pc band. Fully equipped with
grand piano, electric piano, guitar and
bass amps and drums. Great Rates. For
more info contact Jordan Glick @ 416-8847221 or email [email protected]
EVE EGOYAN seeks advanced, committed piano students ([email protected]
or 416-894-6344)
FLUTE, PIANO, THEORY LESSONS.
RCM exam preparation. Samantha Chang,
Royal Academy of Music PGDip, LRAM,
ARCT. 416-293-1302,
[email protected]
www.samanthaflute.com
HARMONY/RUDIMENTS LESSONS
RCM exam preparation. Experienced RCM
examiner/music teacher. UofT music graduate. Downtown Toronto location. Contact
M. Molinari at 416-763-2236 or
[email protected]
PIANO LESSONS: All ages, styles –
beginner, classical, jazz, pop, RCM exams.
Feel the joy of making music! Peter Ness,
ARCT. 416-767-9747.
PRIVATE VOICE LESSONS – All ages,
various styles. Beginner/intermediate levels
for classical, pop, country. Sing for fun or
prepare for an audition – Express yourself
through song! Melissa De Cloet MMus. 416591-1695 or
[email protected]
SINGING LESSONS with a friendly and
qualified teacher. Professional performer
with Master of Music degree. All levels welcome. Call 416-200-4721.
SUGARLASS VOCAL STUDIO offers
people of all ages the opportunity to develop
their musical potential through singing.
Learn to sing jazz, classical and pop styles.
For more info. check our website:
www.sugarlassvocalstudio.com or email:
[email protected]
THEORY, SIGHT-SINGING, EARTRAINING LESSONS: All grades, RCM
exam prep (rudiments, harmony, history,
counterpoint). Learning can be fun and
easy! Peter Ness, ARCT. 416-767-9747.
WARM, EXPERIENCED AMERICAN
PIANO TEACHER with sterling credentials, unfailing good humor, and buckets of
patience. Royal Conservatory washouts and
adult learners especially welcome. Lovely
Cabbagetown studio, with easy parking/
TTC access. Testimonials: “Now there’s a
teacher!” R.D., age 13. “Deep pleasure.
Sure beats studying with those Quebec
nuns!” S.A., age 50+. Peter Kristian Mose,
416-923-3060 or [email protected]
My students have never won any prizes,
except for love of music. (And loyalty.)
INSTRUMENTS BOUGHT & SOLD
NEW MASON & HAMLIN grand pianos
are the very best in the world. Only 300 per
year hand-made. To see and hear the entire
collection (5’4" to 9’4") go to
www.masonhamlin.ca
ORGAN KIMBALL SWINGER 400 with
Entertainer II with bench, 2 layer board.
Excellent condition. $225.00 or best offer.
Call Theresa 416-743-9245.
46
MUSICIANS AVAILABLE
BARD – EARLY MUSIC DUO playing recorder and virginal available to provide background atmosphere for teas, receptions or other
functions – greater Toronto area. For rates
and info call 905-722-5618 or email us at
[email protected]
MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS! Small
ensembles, Dance Band, Big Band; Cocktail Hour, Dinner music, Concerts, Shows;
Classical, Contemporary, Dixieland, Traditional and Smooth Jazz! JSL Musical Productions 905-276-3373.
MUSICIANS WANTED
AMATEUR MUSICIANS NEEDED
For Adult Concert Band - Start Sept 8th.
Percussion, Oboe, Trombone, Baritone,
Tuba, French Horn. Fun filled friendly
atmosphere. Reading music is a must.
(Monday evening rehearsals)
www.resaspieces.org
email:[email protected] or
[email protected]
CHOIR MEMBERS WANTED
University Settlement Music and Arts
School’s “Settlement Singers” has spaces in
all sections for teens and adults who love to
sing. No audition or experience is necessary. We perform a wide variety of music
from madrigals to show tunes. Choir meets
on Wednesdays from 7:30- 9:30 in the downtown area. Call 416-598-3444 ext 243 for
more information.
CONDUCTING SCHOLAR WANTED
for the Oakville Choral Society commencing
SINGERS
The Annex Singers
A dynamic choir performing
eclectic repertoire seeks new
members with vocal experience.
For information, contact
Richard Partington
416-968-7747
[email protected]
September 2008. We are a non-audition 85voice community choir, seeking an enthusiastic individual to work with the music director in providing leadership to the choir.
Please forward resumes and/or enquiries
by September 30 to J. Bev Stainton, Music
Director, Phone 416-259-9152; Email
[email protected]
MUSIC DIRECTOR WANTED. Central
Baptist Church, Oakville. 8-10 hrs./wk. Keyboarding and organ skills required. Must
be familiar with traditional and contemporary Christian music. For more information,
or to apply, e-mail Jeff Caldwell at
[email protected]
OAKVILLE CHORAL SOCIETY is seeking new TENOR voices. Registration for
2008/09 begins on Tuesday, September 9 at
7:00pm, at Sheridan College, Trafalgar
Campus, Oakville, Room B125. Please call
905-845-5359 or visit www.oakvillechoral.com
PLAY WITH US in celebration of Counterpoint Community Orchestra´s 25th anniversary season. Rehearsals on Monday evenings. Contact Music Director Terry Kowalczuk (416-658-5359) or write to
[email protected]
SOPRANO AND BASS CHOIR LEAD
positions available, Sept - May, competitive
rate, traditional and challenging repertoire,
good sight reading ability and choral sound
preferred, orchestral concert solo opportunities, St. John’s York Mills Anglican, near
subway, 401/Yonge. Email
[email protected] to arrange audition.
SINGERS WANTED! The Irish Choral
Society of Canada is a community SATB
choir under the direction of Karen L.A.
D’Aoust exploring sacred, secular and
folk works centered around Irish and
other Celtic themes. Rehearsals are held
Tuesday evenings in downtown Toronto.
We are currently auditioning experienced
singers for all sections for our upcoming
seventh concert season. Interested singers
can book an audition or obtain further
details by calling 416-467-5961 or email
[email protected]
SUZUKI PIANO TEACHER for established school. Must have minimum Suzuki
Book 1 accreditation to start and be qualified for advanced students. Email resume
to [email protected]
TENOR LEAD WANTED. Bloor Street
United Church (at Huron), Toronto. Thursday evenings and Sunday mornings. Please
contact David Passmore, 416-924-7439 X30.
VESPERA WOMEN’S CHOIR Sarah
John, Music Director. We will be holding
auditions September 3rd, 2008. For more
information or to schedule an audition
please email
[email protected] or call
647-267-0750. www.vesperaensemble.com
The YORKMINSTRELS SHOW CHOIR
seeks male singers. We sing arrangements
from Broadway shows and popular music.
Rehearsals Wednesday evenings near Cummer/Willowdale; performances at community events, fundraisers, senior residences, etc.
Come to our rehearsals in September and
make new friends. Questions welcome: Eva
(905-881-2228) or Sandi (416-229-9313).
SERVICES
ACCOUNTING AND INCOME TAX
SERVICE for small business and individuals, to save you time and money, customized
to meet your needs. Norm Pulker, B. Math.
CMA. 905-251-0309 or 905-830-2985.
The PERFORMING EDGE Performance
enhancement training in tension management, concentration, goal setting, imagery.
Individualized to meet your performance
situation. Kate F. Hays, practising clinical
and performing arts psychology. 416-9610487, www.theperformingedge.com
TAX SAVVY 25%+ P.A. Limited investment syndicate min. $25,000.
www.fxsuisse.com Michael Radulovic 416503-3488.
PRIVATE INVESTMENT ADVICE
Investment skills.
Advice skills.
Best of all, listening skills.
Call Roel Olay,
FCSI, CIM, FMA,
Investment Advisor
(416) 279-1471
PRIVATE CLIENT SERVICES
tdwaterhouse.ca
TD Waterhouse Private Investment Advice is a division of
TD Waterhouse Canada Inc., a subsidiary of The Toronto
Dominion Bank. TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. –
Member CIPF. TD Waterhouse is a trade-mark of the
Toronto-Dominion Bank, used under license.
3 soloist/section-leads needed
for the coming season, beginning September 4.
SOPRANO BARITONE BASS
1. Strong sight-reading skills
2. Limited vibrato
3. Reliable
Please contact Melvin J. Hurst, Director of Music:
[email protected]
Visit the church website for details of the music program:
humbercrestunitedchurch.com
Humbercrest United Church is located in west Toronto,
on Jane, above Bloor.
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
SINGERS WANTED!
The Toronto Beach Chorale
a new community concert choir
is inviting choristers of all voice parts
to audition for its 2008/09 season.
For more information call 416-778-0949 x 2
or email [email protected]
Discover the Joy of Singing
Sing with the High Park Choirs!
Zimfira Poloz, Artistic Director & Conductor
Margaret Stanfield & Marina Filippova, Conductors
TRYPTYCH
Auditions September 27-28, 2008
WANTED
Divisions for choristers ages 5 to 18
Outstanding vocal development
Music theory Warm, encouraging atmosphere
Weekly rehearsals in the High Park area
Choristers (all voices) for
Ensemble TrypTych
Chamber Choir
REWARD
An exciting season of great
choruses from opera,
oratorio and easy
listening repertoire.
Open Rehearsals September 23rd and 25th
A great way to try out the choir
Participate in warmups and try out repertoire
Meet our artistic and administrative staff
WHERE
Trinity Presbyterian Church
2737 Bayview Ave
just south of Hwy 401
Easily accessible by TTC one stop south of
Bayview Subway Stop on
Sheppard line.
Reserve your spot now!
Call (416) 762-0657
Email [email protected]
Visit www.highparkchoirs.org
WHEN
Rehearsals on Tuesday
7:30-9:45 PM
CONTACT US
416 763 5066 ext. 3
[email protected]
Wellington Winds
An accomplished 45-piece wind ensemble based in
the Waterloo Region of Ontario seeks a Music
Director. A successful applicant may assume the
position beginning the 2009-10 season. Applicants
must submit a CV and names of at least two
references, and will audition by conducting a
rehearsal or concert during the 2008-09 season.
Visit www.wellingtonwinds.ca. For more information
contact [email protected]
Toronto Opera Repertoire, the city’s oldest
community-based opera organization, is seeking
enthusiastic choristers for its 2009 season
performances. Our chorus is a non-auditioned
ensemble, and welcomes singers of all ages,
experience, and voice types. Above is a scene from the
final moments of last year’s production of Verdi’s A
Masked Ball – you could be in the picture next year!
Rehearsals will begin in early October.
For more information, see
www.toronto-opera.com, or write to
[email protected]
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
47
MUSICAL LIFE
WE ARE ALL MUSIC’S CHILDREN
by mJ Buell
Welcome back for a fourth season of Music’s
Children contests!
If I had to pick the one common thread, a
golden tie that binds absolutely all of their
stories, it’s hearing music in their childhood
homes, regardless of whether they came
from musician families… radio, with mom
and dad’s records a close second, and
relatives who sang together for fun.
SUMMER REFLECTIONS on
the current state of music ed
by Sterling Beckwith
THIS YEAR’S CELEBRATIONS of R. Murray
Schafer’s 75th birthday bring irresistibly to
mind the days, half a lifetime ago, when the
whole music world looked to Toronto with
admiration and respect. Not, to be sure, for
any premature success in replicating a Vienna
September’s Child is …?
or a Juilliard or even a Bayreuth on Canadian
“1966… prior to a parade as a
soil; but because forward-looking new ways
CLUE: Make new friends but keep the old; one
member of the Whitby Junior Band”
of involving ordinary schoolchildren in the
is silver and the other’s gold!
discovery of music as a creative adventure
Trumpeting a silver anniversary this season, Be sure to always send us your mailing
were being actively developed and practised
address,
just
in
case
your
name
is
drawn!
but still rubbing shoulders with his old friend
here, under Schafer’s inspired leadership.
Winners will be selected by random draw
the euphonium, September’s Child probably
among correct replies received by September (See his remarkable book The Thinking Ear
has lots to say about the social benefits of
for full and fascinating documentation.)
15 2008.
being in a band.
How much of that spirit is still alive here
Are you hoarding a treasured old photo?
today? And where should one look to find
Think you know who September’s child is?
Suggestions welcomed. (Music’s Children
its impact? These questions were much on
Send your best guess to
gratefully acknowledges all of Music’s
my mind when I was invited, earlier this
[email protected]
summer, to check out what some European
Children. You know who you are.)
colleagues have been doing lately to foster
children’s musical creativity, in ways that
also take advantage of the latest computer
wizardry to further enliven the musicmaking
process and heighten its appeal to today’s
kids. (Adapting the technology for just this
purpose happens to be a longstanding reSing with technical ease and vocal beauty
search interest of mine, although Schafer
Opera – Pops – Broadway
himself, a well-known technophobe, might
view it with some suspicion, if not outright
www.JanetCatherineDea.com
disapproval.)
My first stop was at the Sonic Playcall now: (416) 429-4502
ground (Klankspeeltuin), a suite of rooms
inside the city of Amsterdam’s sleek new
waterfront Music Palace (Muziekgebouw aan
’t IJ), crammed with a unique collection of
cleverly engineered sound-activating contraptions, each designed to catch the imagination
and engage the participation of those youngsters (aged 7 through 11) lucky enough to
show up for one or more 90-minute visits
during the school year. They may come on
their own, in small groups, or with whole
classes, not just from schools all across the
city but from outlying areas of Holland as
well. There are even a few times when
adults are allowed in to play, and workshops
tailored to particular interests can also be
scheduled.
We are all immersed in sounds almost
everywhere we go, and there is usually little
any child can do to influence them or fend
them off. But if you can turn particular
Education
Singing Lessons
Ronald R. Rand
MARJORIE SPARKS VOICE STUDIO
Marjorie Sparks B. Mus., B. Ed.
Classical training for private voice
lessons, university entrance auditions,
RCM exams, competitions and
performances. All levels welcome.
For more information see our website.
Teacher of Voice Production for
Speaking and Classical Singing
234 Royal York Rd.
48
416-255-5982
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
416-893-8648
STUDIO LOCATION
550 Eglinton Ave. E., Toronto
www.marjoriesparksvoicestudio.com [email protected]
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
PHOTO: STERLING BECKWITH
sounds instantly on or off just by stepping
classroom use, thanks to the initiative of a
on or hitting or stroking something in a
few of the centre’s brilliant young researchspecial way; if the sounds themselves are
ers, and with the blessing of the nation’s
unusually arresting and varied; and if, when- Ministry of Culture and Communications.
ever you and your friends do keep still, you Meanwhile, the ever-practical British mancan actually hear the stillness—then you’ve
aged to bypass all such comings and goings,
got the beginnings of a powerful linkage
by putting a delightful set of children’s combetween your own body’s restless activity,
posing games on the BBC’s web site, where
on one hand, and a shareable world of pothey were freely and immediately accessible
tential sonic events whose pattern of occurto any youthful members of the wired generrence is both increasingly predictable and
ation with a yen to make their own kind of
more and more under your control, on the
music. (That is, until the BBC’s whole
other.
online digital curriculum had to be scrapped
That seems to be the guiding principle
in 2007, in response to protest by the educabehind most of the installations in Holland’s tional software industry.)
Sonic Playground. And since musicmaking
To whom should we in Canada be lookis typically a group enterprise, each installaing, I wonder, to create and make available
tion is designed to accommodate more than
more such resources for our own kids to
one would-be “composer” at a time. Chilexplore? Of course, not everything that’s
dren are thus encouraged to cooperate and
good for kids has to be computerized, nor
interact while working out their team sound- vice versa. It takes a special kind of vision
Sonic Playground - Kosmix
projects inside a shared listening-space. For to build facilities and programs that are genuexample, in one darkened area of the Playinely mind-opening and child-friendly. And
CD-ROMs and Creating Music website.
ground called Kosmix, a wide black dance
the temptation is strong (even in AmsterMight the Ontario Science Centre, TVO, or
floor is dotted with different-sized circles of
dam!) to just sit each kid down in front of a the CBC be persuaded to contribute further
white light beamed from overhead. Jumping screen running a commercial program like
resources, as part of their expanded cultural
or tiptoeing around among those circles is
Garage Band, and call it a day.
mission?
hard for any kid to resist, especially since
Though our various high-profile music
Certainly our New Music community is
each time you move to step on one and thus faculties seem to be prospering, they could
large, ambitious, and technologically sophisinterrupt its beam of light with your body,
hardly be expected to support R&D of this
ticated enough to embrace such a challenge.
the particular ringing or percussive sound
unconventional kind, preoccupied as they are Who knows? If we can pool our talents,
currently assigned to that spot is automatical- by filling their enrolment quotas for future
coordinate our disparate efforts, and keep our
ly triggered. Result? A giant super-drumset performers, with perhaps a few musicologists focus on supporting children’s creativity,
you and your friends can play simply by
thrown in. Would local music teachers’
Canadians might again find themselves at the
dancing back and forth over it, finding or
associations be interested? What about facul- leading
making up your own visual and musical
ties of Education—any hope there? Perhaps edge of
Piano Lessons
patterns as you go.
an enlightened retailer or manufacturer could 21st-cenA central facility such as the Sonic Play- help? Surely there must be at least a few
In
Your Own Home
tury music
ground, and the innovative child-friendly
committed composers or improvisers willing education.
By Experienced and
composing games and musicmaking environ- to share their expertise with kids, as Morton
Highly Qualified Teacher
ments it has built, are well used and highly
Subotnick has done with his Making Music
valued by the members of
Peter Arthurs
AMUZE, Amsterdam’s lively
Preparation for
consortium of music educators and
Royal Conservatory of Music
institutions. The French, as one
Piano and Theory Examinations
might expect, have taken a differAnd Musical Enjoyment
ent approach. At IRCAM, their
Celebrating 25 Years
high-tech Paris centre for “research and creativity in music and
Violin and Cello age 3 and up
acoustics” founded in 1969 with
government support by Pierre
Suzuki Headstart ages 2 - 4
Boulez, some of the most adMusic & Movement, Theory,
vanced compositional software is
Rhythmic Reading, Orchestra
Limited number of spaces available.
being re-packaged and taken out
416-239-4637
into the hinterland for everyday
[email protected]
(416) 450-6115
Etobicoke Suzuki School
of Music
Canadian Jazz Vocalist
& Recording Artist
ADI BRAUN
Now accepting a limited number of new
voice and piano students
~all styles and levels ~
~preparation for exams & auditions ~
“Every singer on the planet should take at least
one vocal lesson from Adi Braun... her technique
is a wonder to behold.” – Jamyz Bee, JAZZ FM91
For more information please call 416 . 651 . 8116
[email protected]
www.adibraun.com
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
THEORY
COMPOSITION
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Complete RCM curriculum —
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WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
49
Vladimir Orloff – a life in music
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31
featured soloist. As a state soloist I received
a salary from the government. Romania had
only six musicians awarded this title, including violinist Ion Voicu, pianist Mindru Katz,
and cellist Radu Aldulescu. Although I hate
Communism, I must say that it worked to
my advantage. The state salary covered solo
engagements with the Bucharest Symphony.
As a soloist with other cities’ orchestras, I
received an additional honorarium.
However, I was not permitted to leave the
Communist bloc ... until they allowed me to
go to the Geneva Competition.
How did that come about?
In 1962 I met the composer Anatol Vieru
and asked him to compose a cello concerto
for me. He was reluctant, saying that it was
too difficult – The cello register complicates
the balancing of cello and orchestra. To my
great surprise, at our next meeting he announced that he was working on the concerto, had finished the first movement and was
working on the second. It had to be finished
soon because it had been submitted to the
Geneva Competition for compositions and
the deadline was fast approaching. Vieru finished the concerto just in time and a tape of
the work had to be in Geneva within three
days. I felt that I could not learn this new
work in less than three days. Vieru had good
connections in Bucharest and a studio, an engineer, and an orchestra were made available
immediately around the clock. Day and
night, we were living there practically... so
we learned a little and then recorded it and so
on and finally we finished it in time.
The Vieru cello concerto won first place!!
Now, because we won first prize, the two of
us were supposed to go to Geneva and give
the world premiere at a gala concert... and
the authorities could not say no.
So when I was there I met some people
from the Geneva competition and asked them
why I never got any concerts or invitations. I
met the director of the Swiss Romande who
took me to his office and showed me correspondence with the Romanian Concert Bureau management. I saw that I was invited
many times but the replies stated that I was
sick or I had other engagements. The Romanians were worried, of course, that I would
not return if allowed out. I asked the Swiss
Romande to send copies to me as well as the
50
Romanian Concert Bureau, the next time. In
this way, finally they let me go.
The first tour in Switzerland consisted of
five or six concerts and recitals. I was there
with my wife, Marietta, who was my accompanist, and when we finished the tour we
had one free week before a concert tour in
Yugoslavia. We decided to go to Vienna. In
Vienna I went to say hello to a man who met
me at the Enescu Festival in Bucharest.
Hans was a very nice person. I didn’t
speak German but Hans asked me what am I
going to do now and suggested that I should
stay in Vienna. I wanted to say that I wasn’t
prepared yet ... we had only my cello and a
suitcase. I said that I would do it at the next
opportunity. Hans replied, “How do you
know there will be a next time. Besides,
your wife is with you now and this is not
likely to happen again. Wait a minute...” He
picked up the phone and called the Vienna
Philharmonic office saying “I have someone
you should hear.”
An appointment was arranged for the next
day and I was immediately hired and told to
report tomorrow for rehearsals. Of course I
had to do the required official audition. I
shared the news with my wife... “Do we
stay or go.” We stayed. We were giving up
everything: fame, recognition and possessions to begin life in Vienna. The position
with the Vienna Philharmonic provided for
rent and food but it was a difficult time for
me, particularly because of the language.
The VPO is an independent organisation
with the same personnel as the Vienna State
Opera Orchestra. The members drew their
salaries from the Opera, not from the Philharmonic concerts. The Philharmonic had 15
cellos and, like all other instruments, they
worked in the Opera on a rotation system.
Even for Wagner or Richard Strauss, only
eight to ten cellos are needed; for Verdi six
or seven; for Mozart only four or five.
There are always a few members free. One
day Leonard Bernstein came and we had rehearsals in the morning, a recording session
for Decca in the afternoon, and a concert in
the evening. And still some members were
free. This system was very well organized
and my partner at the cello desk helped me
with it.
I still did not have resident papers so I
went to the police and asked for asylum. The
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
Flashback: cover of a flyer advertising a March
28, 1978 concert at Massey Hall, featuring Orloff
playing the Khachaturian cello concerto as soloist
with the Toronto Symphony. Tickets for the
concert ranged from $4.00 to $12.00!
police officer asked why I needed asylum. I
told him that I was a concert cellist and I
want to play concerts anywhere in the West
but the Romanian authorities won’t let me
out. In my profession one must travel around
and not just stay in one place. The police answered that they couldn’t grant me political
asylum on the grounds that the Romanians
wouldn’t let me play music in the West ...
ridiculous ... not a good enough reason! I
was disappointed and went back to my
friend, Baron Otto Meyer, who undertook to
take care of everything. I have no idea of
how he did it but in two weeks I had a passport. This was a passport without citizenship, which meant I had to have visas. So, if
I couldn’t get a visa I just stayed with the
Opera and the orchestra travelled without me.
After two years with the Philharmonic, I
was invited to become a professor at the Vienna Academy, which automatically granted
me citizenship. At the Academy I had to
teach only two days a week and had lots of
time to play and travel, so I looked out for
concert opportunities. Pierre Fournier and his
wife helped me to get concerts as did Gaspard Cassado ... I knew them from Geneva
when I played in the competitions. They had
attended the concert of the winners.
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
Cassado came to Vienna to give a concert
which I attended and afterward went with
him and his group for dinner. In this group I
met Peter Weiser, who organized all the concerts at the Vienna Konzerthaus. Later, at an
after-concert dinner at the Fourniers, I met
Weiser again. Madame Fournier was very
active in promoting me. After that Weiser invited me to be a soloist with the Vienna
Symphony and I played my favourite, the
Rococo Variations. That was on January 13,
1966 and the conductor was Zdenek Kosler.
In November 1968 I played the Boccherini
with the Vienna Philharmonic and Heinrich
Hollreiser. Very favourable reviews.
Who else do you remember from this time?
The Romanian conductor Constantin Silvestri
who had defected two years before me had
become very famous. Much earlier, my first
solo concert in Bucharest had been conducted
by Silvestri. I wrote informing him that I had
left Romania and was not returning. Silvestri
was the artistic director of the Bournemouth
Symphony and he immediately invited me to
play there and also recommended me to his
UK management. Concerts were arranged in
London where I played the Dvorak Concerto
with Sir Adrian Boult ... a really nice man.
He didn’t argue at all. Also the Elgar with
Sir John Barbirolli. In general, very good
conductors don’t interfere with the soloist’s
way of doing things. They might suggest,
but great conductors adapt. So everything
was great for me... I had concerts all over
Europe and had a good paying position at
the Vienna Academy.
me. The next step was to get an engagement
with the Toronto Symphony. Karel Ancerl
was the conductor then and I knew him from
our concerts in Prague. He invited me to
play and suggested Strauss’s Don Quixote,
an attractive piece but not that attractive for
the cello soloist. I wanted to do something
else but Ancerl insisted. While I was back in
Vienna, winding up my affairs, a letter came
from Ancerl saying that he had a big scandal
with the orchestra’s first cellist, Peter
Schenkman, who argued that Quixote was
traditionally played by the principal cellist
and not by a guest soloist. Ancerl asked me
to select a concerto and I chose the Shostakovich E flat, which I liked very much. It was
a big success, even though it was not yet a
repertory piece and many in the audience
were hearing it for the first time.
(The following day, Wednesday, April 11,
1973, William Littler wrote in the Toronto
Star: “... He scampered his way through the
first movement with pinpoint accuracy and
narrowed and intensified the focus of his
tone into a pure shaft of silver to sing his
way through the Moderato. Sing, yes, and
whisper, too. By the time he reached the cadenza, he was making more out of the composer’s shadowy plucking and sudden bursts
of melody than this listener had dreamt the
music contained. What a bow arm! And
what impeccable intonation! In short, here
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
After that I was asked back by the orchestra
every two years, for a total of five engagements. This was the perfect life ... to teach
at the school ... to play ...to tour ... and
then become popular and have the students
want to come to you at the school. I played
chamber music with my faculty colleagues,
Lorand Fenyves and Patricia Parr, and in a
trio with Steve Staryk and Gloria Saarinen. I
also presented concerts and recordings with
Marietta, my wife. There is nothing I
haven’t played that I wanted to. I have always played the full repertoire available.
What I enjoy are the Rococo Variations and
Shostakovich... These are pieces that resonate with me.
Orloff continued teaching and concertizing
until 2002. His last tour was in Romania.
He had received amnesty from the new regime and was awarded top state honours
and ceremoniously decorated.
Vladimir Orloff may be heard playing all
the concertos mentioned above in addition to
Schumann, Khachaturian, Saint-Saens, the
Brahms Double, the two Haydn concertos,
and a few sonatas. (DOREMI DHR 7711/3
and 7896).
Professional Services
So why Toronto?
I received a letter. Ezra Schabas, who was in
charge of the string department at the University of Toronto, wrote offering me a position
as professor. This invitation was prompted
by a strong recommendation from Janos
Starker. In Vienna I had everything; except
that because I left Romania I had been sentenced, in absentia, to 10 years in prison.
Romania was close to Vienna and in my
travels, if by chance my plane should touch
down there, I feared arrest. I accepted the
Toronto offer and contracted for one year. In
that way I could take a leave of absence from
Vienna and, if I were not comfortable in Toronto, I could return to the Academy. Happily, everything worked out... the students
were nice and the political climate peaceful.
I was fast-tracked in Toronto as I had
been in Vienna. Again, doors opened for
Restaurants
was a performance on the plane of complete
technical assurance – the kind that relieves
listener and player alike of anxiety and frees
them to search beyond technique into the
meaning of the music...”
Release pain.
Relax. Breathe. Move.
Dr. Katarina Bulat B.SC. D.C. (& MUSICIAN)
Chiropractor 416-461-1906
Private practice. Coxwell & Danforth area.
LATE FILING YOUR TAXES?
TAXES WEREN’T WHAT YOU EXPECTED?
FACING AN AUDIT?
I can help. I am a Toronto-area Chartered Accountant
with over 20 years’ experience. I am also a musician,
and understand the kind of tax issues musicians face.
For an initial consultation, please email
James Jones CA ASA: [email protected]
or visit www.jamesjonesca.ca.
Services Recording
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
Home
51
Book Shelf
by Pamela Margles
The Russian Life of R. Aloys Mooser,
Music Critic to the Tsars: Memoirs and
Selected Writings
edited by Mary S. Woodside
The Edwin Mellen Press
286 pages; photos. $119.95 US
In 1896 a twenty-yearold Swiss musician, R.
Aloys Mooser, went to
Russia to take up a job
as a church organist.
He immersed himself
in the musical life of
St. Petersburg, got to
know all the major musical figures of the
time, and soon became
an influential music
critic. Thirteen years later he returned home
to Geneva. But it wasn’t until he was over
ninety years old that he wrote this remarkable
memoir.
In her introduction, University of Guelph
musicologist Mary Woodside describes how
she came across this volume, at that time still
unpublished, in the Geneva library where she
was studying Mooser’s collection of rare early editions of Russian operas.
Mooser does not share many details about
his private life – either how he lived or what
he felt – during his Russian sojourn. But he
takes full advantage of his unique position to
provide a vivid perspective on Russian musical life at the turn of the century. His anecdotes and portraits are based on his experiences with the leading composers, performers, conductors and patrons of the time in St.
Petersburg, like the composers Alexandr
Glazunov and Mily Balakirev, and the “greatest Russian cellist of his time”, the charmingly dissipated and undisciplined Alexandr
Verzhbilovich. Affection never prevents him
from criticizing these characters—he calls
his dear friend and teacher Rimsky-Korsakov, whom he considered too musically conservative, “a sheep in wolf’s clothing”.
Woodside underscores the significance of
Mooser’s memoir by pointing out that even
after the vicissitudes of Soviet rule, “the cultural life celebrated in his memoir has not
been destroyed, and is the most enduring and
illustrious part of Russia’s identity.” Her assessment of Mooser as an important bridge
between romantic and modern music is
backed up by the selections from Mooser’s
music criticism that she has included, which,
like the memoir, are being published in English for the first time.
The deft translation by Neal Johnson succeeds in capturing Mooser’s considerable wit
in passages like his description of a concert
given by “a perpetually shaky orchestra
whose phrasing was characterized by the utmost fantasy”. Footnotes are placed conveniently at the bottom of each page, although
you need to be alert to distinguish Woodside’s
52
annotations from Mooser’s own. There is a
detailed index, a bibliography and a terrific
collection of photos.
France, Karlheinz
Stockhausen in Germany, and Serge Garant in Canada. This
The Voice
invaluable collection
by Thomas Quasthoff
of essays manages to
Pantheon
cover essential fac252 pages; $27.95
ets of his work as
both a composer and
Even readers who
teacher.
have never heard
Musicologist Jean
Thomas Quasthoff’s
Boivin, who teaches
singing voice are
at the University of Sherbrooke, looks at
bound to be moved by
Messiaen’s massive Traité de rhythme, de
this memoir. The
couleur et d’ornithologie, completed after his
German bass-baritone
death in 1992 by his wife, the pianist Yvonne
was born a thalidomide baby in 1959. In his own description, he Loriod, and his former student, Alain Louvigrew up to be “a four-foot three-inch concert er. Boivin shows how the treatise reflects
Messiaen’s teaching methods. He describes
singer without knee joints, arms or upper
how Messiaen would sit at the piano and exthighs, with only four fingers on the right
plore what he called ‘unexpected links’ by
hand and three on the left.”
playing from memory examples of orchestral
Quasthoff takes a jocular and sardonic
repertoire from all periods.
view towards his own life. His perceptiveGareth Healey discusses how Messiaen’s
ness is startling, his candour appealing. We
extensive reading of literature influenced his
get a sense of the difficulties of his day-tomusical thinking, and mentions that the auday life, as a child acting the class clown in
order to cope at school, and as an adult look- thors most frequently cited in Messiaen’s
writings are Rainer Maria Rilke, Edgar Aling for a loving relationship.
lan Poe, Henri Bergson and Roger Tory PeAgainst extraordinary odds, he thrived.
terson, the author and illustrator of a series
“Luck,” he says, “has never been shy with
of field guides to birds.
me.” He devotes a good part of this book to
Editor Nigel Simeone relates how Messaithe remarkable people who made that luck
en got involved in an unfortunate legal mess
possible. His wise, adoring parents never
gave up their determination that he be treated over a ballet score he wrote, due to his
as functionally normal, even when faced with naïveté about both human nature and money.
His co-editor Christopher Dingle illuminates
block-headed administrators and his own
aspects of Messiaen’s grand opera Saint
bouts of self-pity. His brother Michael, who
took down this memoir as Quasthoff dictated, François d’Assise, and in particular the birds
that “litter” the score.
has been a true friend and companion. His
There’s a speech by Messiaen himself
mentor, conductor Helmut Rilling, early on
realized the possibilities in his voice and pro- about the contemporary tapestry-maker Jean
Lurcat. Admiring a detail in Lurcat’s work,
vided opportunities. His accompanist Justus
Zeyen spends more time with the singer than Messiaen invites a comparison between lepidoptery and his own system of rhythmic
with his own family.
Quasthoff doesn’t give his characters much modes by commenting that butterflies are livof a life outside his own world, which makes ing non-retrogradable rhythms.
Dingle and Simeone rightly call L’Âme en
his story resemble a fairy tale – complete
bourgeon (The Budding Soul) “the heart of
with happy ending. By the close of the book,
this collection of essays”. This set of imagewhen he has become a singer and teacher of
ry-laden poems by Messiaen’s mother,
renown, he is a happily married father.
This unforgettable autobiography came out Cécile Sauvage, has been scrupulously translated for the first time, with the French on
in the original German four years ago. The
one side and Philip Weller’s sensitive English
translation by Kirsten Stodt Wittenborn,
though readable, is uneven. Tenses are mud- translations on the other. Weller contributes
dled. Books originally written in English, like an essay on Messiaen’s complex, adoring relationship with Sauvage.
Charles Rosen’s The Romantic Generation,
Père Jean-Rodolphe Kars explores the allare cited in German. What I take to be colloquialisms are translated awkwardly, resulting in important spiritual dimension in Messiaen’s
music. In an autobiographical note Kars tells
phrases like “that’s nonsense with gravy”.
how he was born Jewish, trained as a concert
Quasthoff shows a penchant for the surreal –
pianist, then, under the direct influence of
but for the incomprehensible, not at all.
Messiaen’s music, became a Catholic priest.
Olivier Messiaen: Music, Art and Literature He reminds us that Messiaen was above all,
edited by Christopher Dingle/
as he once told me in an interview, “un muNigel Simeone
sicien croyant” – a devout musician.
Ashgate 382 pages $99.95 US
Note: Kent Nagano conducts the Canadian
No composer dominated the past century
premiere of Messiaen’s Saint-François
more than Olivier Messiaen. It wasn’t just
through his compositions. His teaching influ- d’Assise in concert at the Place des Arts in
Montreal with the Montreal Symphony on
enced avant-garde composers like Pierre
December 5 and 9.
Boulez and Iannis Xenakis in his native
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
EDITOR’S CORNER:
September 2008
Through the long
and lazy days of
summer I found
myself drawn to a
number of vocal
discs which on the
surface have very
little in common
with each other.
The first is the new
album by Toronto’s own darlings of “punk
baroque”, I Furiosi, their first for the prestigious Dorian Sono Luminous label. Crazy
(DSL-90902) features the pure tone of soprano Gabrielle McLaughlin in a variety of
settings by Jonathan Eccles, G.F. Handel,
Godfrey Finger, Thomas Arne, Alessandro
Stradella and John Blow which all seem to
explore some aspect of madness (although it’s
hard to be sure as the “eco-friendly” program notes – i.e. no paper used – to be available only on-line at the Dorian website after
the September release were not yet posted at
time of writing). While these songs involve
fairly sparse accompaniment, they are interspersed with instrumental selections in which
Furiosi violinists Julia Wedman and Aisslinn
Nosky and cellist/gambist Felix Deak are
joined by James Johnstone (harpsichord),
Stephanie Martin (organ) and Lucas Harris
(theorbo and guitar). The full and energetic
sound achieved at times belies the size of the
ensemble. Highlights for me include an aria
from Handel’s Giulio Cesare, Arne’s To Fair
Fidele’s Grassy Tomb, an aria “con violines”
from Stradella’s Susanna, Vivaldi’s trio sonata “La Folia” and the viol da gamba solo
Deth by Tobias Hume. One unexpected treasure is the final selection, an intriguing arrangement of Leonard Cohen’s Suzanne. I
must confess I cringed when I saw it on the
track list thinking this was not something I
was going to want hear in “period style” but
from the opening plucked arpeggios on the
cello through the entry of the oh-so-unlike Leonard Cohen high and crystalline soprano
voice and the long haunting violin lines, I was
drawn in and convinced. I’m left wondering
what they would do with Cohen’s Halleluiah.
Concert note: I Furiosi’s concert season begins on October 4 with “The T-Word”, a
drag show with guests Matthew White and
Stephanie Martin at Calvin Presbyterian
Church. www.ifuriosi.com.
Phoenix Edition is a new European label being distributed by Naxos and one of its first
releases is the world premiere recording of
four secular cantatas by Joseph Martin
Kraus. Kraus, a contemporary of Mozart
(they were born in 1756 and Kraus only outlived Mozart by one year, dying of consumption at the age of 36 in 1792), was born and
educated in Germany but spent most of his
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
: recordings reviewed
career in Stockholm
where he served as
court conductor to
Gustav III, became
very interested in the
culture of his adopted home and established a high standard for Swedish music. His broad output
included a wealth of instrumental music and
he composed operas in Swedish, but it is four
of his Italian cantatas which are presented on
the CD La Primavera (Phoenix Edition
101). We are told that the main reason that
these works fell into obscurity is that their
particularly difficult soprano lines were written for a specific singer, Lovisa (Sofia) Augusti, also born in 1756, whose death in 1790
devastated the composer. On this recording
we are treated to the extreme facility of soprano Simone Kermes whose technical abilities and comfort in the stratospheric upper
range make it all sound simple (and musical).
The soloist is required to employ what I
would call “machine-gun tremolo” over extended phrases. In lesser hands this technique
can be simply abrasive and unpleasant, but
Kermes’ control and warm tone, even in the
highest register, makes it an exhilarating experience. Although the booklet notes are in
German, English and French, the cantatas’
lyrics – Anacreonic poems by Pietro Metastasio entitled “La Gelosia” (Jealousy), “La
Primavera” (Spring), “La Scusa” (The Apology) and “La Pesca” (Fishing) – are given
only in the original Italian and in German
translation. Another seeming oversight in the
otherwise thorough liner notes is lack of biographical information about the composer,
although there is an essay about the cantatas
which puts them into the context of his career
in Sweden. That quibble aside this excellent
release which features L’Arte del Mondo – a
youthful offspring of Concerto Köln under the
direction of the Concerto’s founder Werner
Ehrhardt – should go a long way towards
bringing the music of this important and under-recognized composer of the classical era
into the light of day.
The next CD also
features Swedish
music, but it could
not be more different. One morning in
late July I was surprised to see what
appeared to be a
punked-up version of
the Dixie Chicks on
Breakfast TV – three young blond women
playing a kind of hard-edged country music
and really rockin’ out. What really surprised
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
me was that the (six string) banjo player was
using a “bottle neck” slide while also playing
a kick drum, snare and tambourine with her
feet and singing lead lines along with her sisters (who play slap-style upright bass and resonator guitar respectively). Although their
family name is Bondesson, the group is called
Baskery and their debut album Fall Among
Thieves (Veranda Records VERCD001) is
being launched with an international tour that
included 16 stops across Canada over the
summer. I must say I was impressed enough
by what I saw on TV that morning to head out
to the Dakota Tavern to catch their Toronto
club date that evening. Baskery’s live show is
amazing and the CD reflects this energy. As
a matter of fact it was recorded live at Decibel Studios in Stockholm – “nothing hidden,
nothing added” they say – where they constructed a stage on sound floor to create a
concert-like setting. Although not all of the
songs are masterpieces, there is enough craft
and energy here to recommend the group as
more than a curiosity. Check them out at
www.Baskery.com or have a look at their
introductory video on You Tube.
The final disc seems
to have been lost in
the shuffle when it
appeared last February. Reading Tiina Kiik’s review of
Mitch Smolkin’s “A
Song is Born” (see
Pot Pourri on page
60) reminded me
that Aviva Chernick who sings on that release put out her own debut CD recently. In
the Sea (www.avivachernick.com) is an eclectic collection of Ladino and Yiddish/Hebrew folk songs interspersed with such gems
as Kurt Weil’s Pirate Jenny, Randy Newman’s I Think It’s Going To Rain Today and a
particularly effective version of Leonard Cohen’s Dance Me To The End of Love. It’s funny how Mr. Cohen keeps popping up this
month. You’ll find another reference in Ori
Dagan’s review of DK Ibomeka’s new CD
“I’m Your Man” in the Jazz reviews on page
59. But back to Ms. Chernick. The first time
I heard this young singer’s powerful voice
was as the alto soloist in “Mother Was Standing”, an amateur production of Pergolesi’s
Stabat Mater that I had the pleasure to be involved in about a decade ago. Since that time
her voice has matured and her technique has
developed and focussed. In the trio setting
here with pianist/music director Tania Gill
and cello/bass player Andrew Downing she
shines with confidence and style. But most
important, she is obviously having the time of
her life.
Editor’s Corner continues on page 54
53
Concert notes: The Labour Day weekend
will be a busy time for Aviva Chernick at the
Ashkenaz Festival at Harbourfront. On August 30, in addition to performing at Mitch
Smolkin’s CD launch at 7:00, she will also be
celebrating Havdala (the end of the Sabbath)
with Rabbi Aaron Levy at 9:00 on the outside
stage and participating in the late night
Sephardic Cabaret at the Lakeside Terrace.
On August 31, at 6:30 her Huppa Project
launches their “Under the Canopy – Music of
the Jewish Wedding Ceremony” CD at the
Lakeside Terrace, and on September 1 her
band Jaffa Road (formerly Shakshuka) performs a free concert at the Brigantine Room
at 7:00.
We welcome your feedback and invite submissions. CDs and comments should be sent
to: The WholeNote, 503 – 720 Bathurst St.
Toronto ON M5S 2R4. We also welcome
your input via our website,
www.thewholenote.com.
David Olds, DISCoveries Editor
[email protected]
VOCAL
From Courts on High
St. Michael’s Choir School
Independent 6671 (www.smcs.on.ca)
A Toronto treasure
for 70 years, the
venerable “St.
Mike’s” youngsters
are back in the recording scene with
a new CD, their
first major release
since “Christmas
Garland” of 1999.
The choir does not disappoint. On display is
as pure a treble sound as can be achieved.
Twenty-five tracks are presented in diverse
styles, all the way from Gregorian Chant to a
brand-new work by Thomas Dusatko. One
chant clocks in at just 33 seconds, and the
major work, Thou Royal Knight from Courts
on High is nearly six-and-a-half minutes long.
This hymn pays tribute to the school’s patron
saint, St. Michael the Archangel. It was
originally composed in the 1940s by the choir
school’s founder, Monsignor Ronan, and
appears here in an arrangement by alumnus
Kola Owolabi in a performance which features every student of the school.
A large percentage of the sung works are a
capella, but interspersed among these are
five liturigical inventions for organ, played on
the big Casavant at Grace Church-on-theHill. Larger works, with all stops out, and
accompanied choirs, are saved for the end of
54
through such extreme times could
be near impossible,
especially for women who could suddenly find themselves completely at
the mercy of their
captor. Such was
the case for the
women portrayed in these settings by Barber,
Berlioz, and Britten. And it surely takes a
singer with a rich and royal tone with depths
of maturity and inner fire equal to the task of
the extreme emotional states required for the
Ravel - Shéhérazade; Debussy - Proses
delivery of soliloquies by figures such as
Lyriques
Andromache, Cleopatra and Phaedra at such
Marianne Fiset; Marie-Eve Scarfone
pivotal and deadly junctures in their lives.
Analekta AN 2 6761
Add to this the dreamy but extremely clever
Plastered all over
sensuality of Ravel’s Shéhérazade, and the
Marianne Fiset’s
stage requires the most sensitive and seadebut album is a
soned performance, which Jennifer Larmore
reminder that she is
delivers with a mixture of grace, eloquence
not just another
and unrestrained passion. The orchestrations
young Canadian
are phenomenal in their delivery as well,
singer: she is the
with some truly harrowing passages depicting
First Grand Prize
anger, fear, pride, lust, remorse, revenge,
winner of the Monand finally either suicide or resignation to
treal International
one’s fate. A thrilling portrayal of epic granMusic Competition of 2007. Fiset, who is
deur, this CD will make your heart race and
from Québec, is a lyric soprano in the French temperature rise.
tradition, with a clean, tender sound, perfect
Dianne Wells
diction, and a wonderfully smooth, seamless
sense of line. Singing Ravel’s Shéhérazade
Rossini - La Cambiale di Matrimonio
and Debussy’s Proses Lyriques, Fiset shapes Desiree Rancatore; Saimir Pigru; F.M.
phrases beautifully and places each note with Capitanucci; Pesaro Festival; Umberto
delicate precision, modulating her dynamics
Benedetti Michelangeli
with sensitivity. But attention to detail comes NAXOS 2.110228
at a price: Fiset sounds like she is carefully
reading from the score rather than truly enRossini - L’inganno felice
gaging with the music. Variations in colour
Tarver; Mologni; Regazzo; Vinco; Bailey;
and attack are rare, and for all the care she
Czech Chamber Soloists, Brno; Alberto
puts into individual phrases, there are almost Zedda
no climaxes, no moments that sweep you
Naxos 8.660233-34
away into the atmospheric world the music
creates. The bonus track of the Song of the
Moon from Dvorak’s opera Rusalka could
have changed the pace, but here too Fiset
takes a languid approach that highlights the
loveliness of her voice and the music, but
dramatic potential of neither. She might have
borrowed the orchestra that accompanies her
here for a more colourful Shéhérazade,
though Marieve-Eve Scarfone does an adequate job with the piano version. With just
over 45 minutes of music, there is room for
Fiset to show herself to be a more versatile
It was in 1810 when the Rossini, still a teenartist. As it is, there is enough to enjoy, and
ager and fed up with his studies in Bologna,
Fiset is an undeniably charming soprano.
came to Venice to try his luck. Ambitious,
Seth Estrin energetic, talented and full of new ideas, the
boy secured a commission for a one act opera
Royal Mezzo
from a small, almost defunct theatre compaJennifer Larmore; Grant Park Orchestra; ny. Rossini fearlessly delved into the chalCarlos Kalmar
lenge and, so, La Cambiale di Matrimonio
Cedille CDR 90000 104
(The Marriage Contract) was born. Success
was so immediate and resounding that this
While the privileges are wealth and power in former nonentity soon became the talk of the
ancient times may have been splendid, fortown and within the next year and a quarter
tunes could easily and suddenly take a turn
he produced six operas, two of which became
for the worse, resulting in tragedy and humil- immortal masterpieces (Tancredi and
iation. Maintaining a royal countenance
L’Italiana in Algeri).
the disc. The collection as a whole was recorded either at Grace, or at the slightly
smaller Loretto Abbey Chapel in North York.
The legendary team of Ed Marshall and Gary
Ratcliffe have worked their magic, and it is
not easy to tell what work was recorded
where, although the notes do tell, in tiny
print. We aren’t told which of the 3 choirs
sings on which track, but all members are
named. The sound is beautiful, and even the
non-religious can enjoy this CD.
John S. Gray
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
La Cambiale is called ‘farsa comica’, the
comic farce or opera buffa of which Rossini
became an undisputed master. Although
called a farce and full of hilarious situations,
it also has much character humour that
makes it considerably superior to an ordinary
farce. For us Canadians, this piece particularly strikes home in a certain Canadian
businessman Slook, who comes to Europe to
buy himself a wife. ‘Canada’ crops up a lot in
the text, not the least when the incumbent
lovers urge Slook ‘to go home to Canada!’
The performance from the Pesaro Festival, Pesaro being a Rossini Mecca today, is
fabulously entertaining – a delight from beginning to end. Umberto Benedetti Michelangeli is thoroughly at home in the Rossini idiom and conducts with charm, grace, upbeat
tempi and sense of humour. The outstanding
cast of nearly all young Italians sings and acts
to perfection. Soprano Desiree Rancatore, as
Fanny, is already an accomplished coloratura
and Fabio Maria Capitanucci, a powerful
basso, as the Canadian Slook, is a perfect
caricature of himself and perhaps steals the
show.
Today nearly all of Rossini’s 39 operas
have been recorded, many several times. We
are indebted to NAXOS for filling in the
gaps, the unknowns, like L’Inganno felice
(The Happy Deception) of 1812 which also
comes from those early six works in Venice.
Initially a huge success, it was all but forgotten for some hundred years until its revival in
1952. This is an opera seria, of serious subject matter but with a happy ending. This
finely crafted work with lovely music secures
a very satisfying reading, expertly conducted
and sung, again by young, talented singers.
An excellent recording.
Rossini didn’t stay long in Venice. By
1815, at age 23, in the turmoil of Napoleon’s
defeat he took off first to Milan and then to
Naples with Rome soon beckoning. So watch
out world… Rossini is coming!
Janos Gardonyi
Wolf-Ferrari - La vedova scaltra
Sollied; Muraro; D’Aguanno; Mihofer;
Rossi; Teatro la Fenice; Karl Martin
Naxos 2.110234-35
Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari was a man of divided
loyalties. Born in Venice he felt at home both
in Italy, the land of his mother, and in Germany, his father’s country. Like his older
contemporary, Ferruccio Busoni, Wolf-Ferrari received his musical training and spent
most of his career in
Germany. No wonder
then that his musical
influences were divided
as well – it’s Wagner
and Rossini who get
that credit. Best remembered for his Il
Segreto di Susanna,
Wolf-Ferrari had considerable success with
his Italian operas, though they tended to be
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
better received in Munich and Bremen than
in Milan or his native Venice. La vedova
scaltra, one of his later operas, is based on a
play by Carlo Goldoni, a fellow Venetian
whose 18th century plots frequently inspired
Wolf-Ferrari. This is where another paradox
of the composer becomes apparent. He endowed the comedic libretti of an era gone by
with music deeply rooted in the verismo tradition. As most Goldoni tales, La Vedova is a
morality play telling of a cunning Venetian
widow, who through clever disguise tests the
intentions of her four suitors. Not surprisingly, she chooses an Italian Count over a Spaniard, an Englishman and a Frenchman. The
music is unfamiliar, but lovely and performed beautifully. The sets are sumptuous
and the DVD is worth watching for a glimpse
inside the beautiful Teatro La Fenice alone.
Among the principals, Anna-Lise Sollied
stands out, while Alex Esposito, the servant
Arlecchino, is not only an accomplished
singer but also possesses great comedic timing. This is yet another example of the high
quality recordings produced by Naxos.
Robert Tomas
character, and Nancy Gustafson is impassioned as his lover Julia. Canadian Richard
Margison creates a powerful impact as the
ambiguous O’Brien, while Diana Damrau has
two striking cameos. If the music does not
convince at all moments, the singers, staging,
and gripping story make up for it. An extended interview with Maazel makes a valuable
bonus.
Seth Estrin
David Alagna - Le Dernier Jour d’un
Condamné
Roberto Alagna; Indra Thomas;
Jean-Philippe Lafont; Richard Rittelmann;
Orchestre National d’Ile-de-France;
Michel Plasson
Deutsche Grammophon 480 095-8
The abolition of the death penalty was the
most important social issue for Victor Hugo.
“Revenge belongs to humans, the punishment
– to God.” These words of the great writer
resonate through all of his works, none
stronger than The
Last Day of the
Condemned. The
concept postulated
Lorin Maazel - 1984 (Big Brother
by the novel was so
The Opera)
controversial at the
Simon Keenlyside; Nancy Gustafson;
time, that Hugo
Richard Margison; Diana Damrau;
Lawrence Brownlee; Royal Opera House, initially published it
under a pseudonym,
Covent Garden; Lorin Maazel
only acknowledging
Decca 074 3289
it years later. With the death penalty still a
In transforming George Orwell’s seminal
reality in most of the world, this powerful
novel Nineteen Eighty-Four into an opera,
condemnation of killing a human being in the
composer/conductor Lorin Maazel and his
name of the law is as resonant as ever. The
librettists changed the title to 1984. Likewise, opera, created by the Alagna brothers (David
the story of totalitarian dystopia has been
is the composer, Frederico the librettist and
condensed to its most
Roberto the principal performer) is a stirring
dramatic moments,
work that owes much to the music of Pouleaving out any trace of
lenc, especially his Dialogues of the Carthe novel’s satiric wit.
melites. David and Frederico are also acWhere Orwell terrifies
complished visual artists and created the
the reader through
design for the opera, one of their many such
understated irony,
collaborations. The death-row prisoners, sung
Maazel, now nearing
by the exquisite Roberto Alagna and Indra
the end of a celebrated
Thomas, illustrate the depth of despair in the
conducting career,
face of inevitable demise, although from two
stuffs terror down your
different viewpoints. Presenting the anguish
throat. The music is
of the female prisoner is particularly effecimpulsive and jarring, vehement at times, and tive when juxtaposed and overlaid against the
the singers are often stretched to the top of
suffering of the male protagonist. Despite it
their ranges. While Maazel employs a wide
being a highly political piece of art, it is art
range of musical styles, most often the music nonetheless, skilfully exploiting the best tonal
conveys a volatile, swerving tone that swells traditions of operatic music. The end result is
and pops in unexpected places and from unex- an opera that feels classical and yet thoroughpected instruments. At times, however, he
ly contemporary, where both the music and
indulges in more traditional genres – there’s
the libretto force the listener to ponder issues
even a syrupy love duet. No expense has been of life and death.
spared on this new commission from the
Robert Tomas
Royal Opera at Covent Garden. Canadian
stage director Robert Lepage has created a
EARLY MUSIC AND
dark, menacing production that works well
with Maazel’s conception of the work. Best
PERIOD PERFORMANCE
of all is the casting – the inhabitants of Orwell’s world might not be encouraged to
La Pellegrina - Intermedii 1589
possess creative thought, but they sure can
Leclair; Mauch; Bertin; van Dyck; Novelli;
sing. Simon Keenlyside is remarkable as
Fajardo; Capriccio Stravagante Renaissance
Winston Smith, presenting a real, fleshed-out
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
55
qualities of Spanish
art — in particular
the folk and flamenco music the
Italian-born Scarlatti absorbed during his lengthy
Orchestra; Collegium Vocale Gent;
service to the royal
Skip Sempé
courts of Iberia.
Paradizo PA0004
The selections
Beautifully performed in its own right, this
expertly conjure what Sempé describes as
set will be of particular interest to those who Scarlatti’s “high-risk gambler’s instinct”:
wonder about the beginnings of opera. The
virtuosic exuberance, passions, regrets,
play La Pellegrina was performed along with echoes of guitars and mandolins and wild
these Intermedii for the wedding of Ferdinan- nights sing throughout this fantastic musical
do de’ Medici and Christine de Lorraine,
landscape. The recording quality is excellent,
Princess of France
vibrant without becoming overbearing and
(Florence 1589).
blessedly devoid of the distracting mechanical
With music comsounds older instruments are prone to. Canaposed by the likes of
dian musician Olivier Fortin joins Sempé on
Marenzio, Malvezfour of the fourteen sonatas, performing solo
zi, Caccini, Peri,
sonatas arranged as duets on a matched set of
Archieli, Cavalieri
harpsichords built by Bruce Kennedy in 1985.
and Bardi, it is easy
An accompanying promotional disc also conto see how the Intertains numerous selections from the sizable
medii may have
stable of young talent appearing on previous
been the highlight of the festivities. The Inter- releases from Sempé’s own Paradizo label.
medii, which began as a pleasant diversion
Daniel Foley
performed as staged madrigals and dances
between the acts of a play, eventually grew to
become the main attraction of an evening’s
CLASSICAL AND BEYOND
entertainment at the opulent houses of the
Medici dynasty. Over time, as the music,
Beethoven - The Symphonies
dance, machinery and stage design of these
Berlin Philharmoniker; Claudio Abbado
vignettes became more and more elaborate,
Deutsche Grammophon 477 5864
the form naturally expanded to create some
This is Claudio
of the first extended musical dramas. Many
of the texts for the 1589 Intermedii featured in Abbado’s third
complete
this set were written by Rinuccini and StrigBeethoven cycle
gio, who went on to create the librettos for
and his second with
the first operas composed by Peri, Caccini
and Monteverdi. The Collegium Vocale Gent the Berlin Philharalong with Capriccio Stravagante provides an monic Orchestra.
Recorded 2000excellent interpretation and insight into this
2001, it features all
genre. Director Skip Sempé adds an interview discussing the historical and musicologi- the fine production
cal justifications for the orchestration, vocal and execution that listeners have come to
expect from Deutsche Grammophon. It does
style and ornamentation, modern performance and recording of these works. Executed not, however, offer anything new. It has
magnificently, this is a rarified view into one almost all the force of Karajan’s 1963
of the most extravagant performances of the Beethoven cycle but little else to distinguish it
from that older, much loved set of renditions.
period.
Dianne Wells Certainly the ensemble is in top form but
Abbado’s vision is one of lyric clarity that
doesn’t distinguish itself from among the
Domenico Scarlatti
BPO’s Beethoven recording history.
Duende Harpsichord Sonatas
While this makes for a lukewarm recepSkip Sempé
tion, the five disc set is handsome and overall
Paradizo PA 9003
musically satisfying. The packaging is elegant. Most of the interpretations seem lifted
Harpsichordist extraordinaire, tireless impre- from Karajan, except they lack the ferocious
sario and accomplished record producer Skip element that pushed Karajan’s sound over the
Sempé scores another major success with this top. The orchestral preamble to bass-baritone
recital of vibrant sonatas by the Italian keyThomas Quasthoff’s entry in the finale of the
board wizard Domenico Scarlatti.
Ninth Symphony, for example, doesn’t have
As the title of this release indicates, Sempé the dynamic kick that forces the listener’s
has chosen those particular sonatas that exears wide open.
hibit the elusive quality of Duende. Federico
Conversely, anyone who considers Karajan
Garcia Lorca observed, “Everything that has just too brutal an interpreter will probably
black sounds in it, has duende.” It is a conadore these renditions. This may be Abbado’s
cept closely associated with the defining
final shot at this symphonic cycle and his
56
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
melodic strengths largely make up for his
lack of tutti crunch. These performances
reveal a consummate professional who has
all the tools but not the genius necessary to
place him among the greatest directors
who’ve held the podium for Berlin’s top orchestra.
John Keillor
Mahler 10
Wiener Philharmoniker; Daniel Harding
Deutsche Grammophon 477 7347
Gustav Mahler did
not live to add the
finishing details to
the grand torso of
his 10th symphony,
though he had gotten
as far as orchestrating the first and
third movements of
this five-movement
work before his untimely death at the age of
50. For decades only these two movements
were performed until Mahler’s widow Alma
finally consented to allowing Deryck Cooke’s
“performing edition” of the entire score to be
performed in 1963. The edition for this recording is Cooke’s 1976 third revision, published posthumously in 1989.
Though the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra has recorded the opening Adagio movement several times under prominent conductors (Bernstein and Abbado both considered
this the only legitimate portion of the work),
this is the VPO’s first recording of the complete symphony. Oddly, the familiar first
movement receives on the whole the least
convincing rendition. Fortunately, as the
symphony progresses, both orchestra and
conductor rise to the occasion, hitting their
stride in the waltzing fourth movement and
moving sensitively through the finale to provide a touchingly expressive end to this magnificent work.
Album and booklet are festooned with a
half dozen fashion shots of the intense young
maestro Daniel Harding (Sir Simon Rattle’s
most prominent protégé) but nary a one of the
composer. As this is Harding’s debut appearance on the exclusive DG label, it appears
that no expense has been spared to provide a
proper studio realization of the work. Recorded on-site in the Großer Saal of the
Musikverein, this disc boasts much finer
acoustics than DG’s recent string of meretricious live recordings.
Daniel Foley
EXTENDED PLAY – CLASSICAL
VIOLIN CONCERTOS
By Terry Robbins
Franz Clement is generally remembered – if
he is remembered at all – as the soloist in the
premiere of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto,
supposedly sight-reading from the manuscript
and at one point apparently playing his violin
upside down. Not quite the sort of figure you
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
would expect to be the subject of a musical
revelation, but that’s exactly what he is on
Beethoven and Clement Violin Concertos,
a superb 2-CD set featuring Rachel Barton
Pine and the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra under José
Serebrier (Cedille
CDR 90000 106).
Beethoven held
Clement in the highest regard, and with
good reason: he was
an exceptional violinist and a gifted composer. His D Major
Violin Concerto is an impressive work that
puts the Beethoven, long regarded as being
stylistically unique for its period, in a new
perspective, and is all the more remarkable
for pre-dating the Beethoven by more than a
year. The concerto has not been performed in
200 years, and this world premiere recording
uses the new edition prepared by Clive
Brown, who also provides the outstanding
booklet notes. Barton Pine is superb in both
concertos, combining a sensitive understanding of contemporary performance practice
with flawless technique and glorious tone; she
also wrote the excellent cadenzas. The RPO
and Serebrier are perfect partners, and the
recorded sound is outstanding. At the bargain
single-CD price this is an absolute ‘mustbuy’!
Nine violin concertos have been attributed
to Haydn over the years, only four of which
have proved genuine. One has been lost, and
the other three are featured on an excellent
Naxos disc by Augustin Hadelich with the
Cologne Chamber Orchestra under Helmut
Müller-Bruhl (Haydn Violin Concertos
Naxos 8.570483). The CCO has a long history
of period performance, since 1987 on modern
instruments, and the balance between period
style and a full, warm sound is very satisfying. The harpsichord continuo adds
a great deal, and
the tempos are
crisp and bright
throughout. Hadelich’s playing is
excellent in all
respects. He swept
the awards at the
Indianapolis International competition in
2006, and looks set for a stellar career; this
CD marks his professional recording debut.
Highly recommended.
Period style is more prominent on another
intriguing 2-CD set, Giuliano Carmignola’s
recordings of the Mozart Violin Concertos
and the Sinfonia Concertante with Claudio
Abbado and his new, hand-picked Orchestra
Mozart (DGG Archiv 00289 477 7371). This
is the orchestra’s first period-instrument
recording, and their stylised playing may not
be to everyone’s taste. The softer attack
frequently has little sustain, for instance,
making for quite different phrasing. The
interpretations are sensitive and thoughtful
though, with a sparing use of vibrato and
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
no better performances of these scores may
ever be available. Aimard may have won the
race before it really started.
John Keillor
Fiesta
Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of
Venezuela; Gustavo Dudamel
Deutsche Grammophon 4777457
When this year’s Glenn Gould Prize went to
José Antonio Abreu, few in Canada had even
some interesting ornamentation choices.
heard of this remarkable conductor, teacher,
Tempos are again quite fast, with a devilish
economist and humanitarian. The Simón
“Turkish” episode in the Rondeau finale of
Bolívar Youth Orchestra is just one of the
the A major, and there is no languishing in
fruits of the sistema
the slow movements either. Danusha Wask- Abreu set up in his
iewicz plays viola in the wonderful Sinfonia. native Venezuela to
Incidentally, Abbado and the OM have
teach music to
also just released an excellent 2-CD set of
hundreds of thoufive Mozart symphonies in the same style
sands of disadvan(DGG Archiv 00289 477 7598). The pertaged children. Its
formances are live Italian concert recordings
conductor for the
from 2005/06, but the excellent sound quali- past eight years has
ty gives virtually no indication of an audience been his student and
being present.
protégé, Gustavo Dudamel. Though just
twenty-seven, Dudamel has just been made
the new music director of the Los Angeles
MODERN AND
Philharmonic.
CONTEMPORARY
After discs of weightier material – Mahler
and Beethoven symphonies – they here offer
Hommage à Messiaen
showpieces from Latin American composers.
Pierre-Laurent Aimard
These programmatic works all have roots in
Deutsche Grammophon 477 7452
folk melodies and traditional dance rhythms.
The most memorable pieces encompass the
As Olivier Messultry moodiness of Silvestre Revueltas’
siaen’s music cuts
Sensemayá, the painterly vistas of Noon on
deeper and deeper
the Plain by Antonio Estévez, the lilting evointo the mainstream
cations of Danzón No.2 by Márquez and the
classical canon, his
tempestuous drama of Ginastera’s manyname is becoming
layered dances from Estancia.
inextricably bound
The flamboyant exuberance of these young
with pianist Pierremusicians
and their charismatic conductor
Laurent Aimard. As
wouldn’t be nearly so enjoyable if their ena student of both
semble-work wasn’t so focused and their
Messiaen and his wife Yvonne Loriod this
rhythms so articulate. They take Leonard
interpreter has been groomed for the job of
providing definitive renditions of all the com- Bernstein’s Mambo from West Side Story,
the only non-Latin -American piece on the
poser’s pianistic material. This disc commemorates Messiaen’s centenary with early program, much faster than Bernstein ever
did. But they pull it off.
solo piano selections from 1928 to 1950.
The booklet for this live recording inThe spacious breadth of Messiaen’s celescludes an essay based on interviews with
tial brand of tonality was fully formed from
the start – all of the material in this collection Dudamel, and a list of every one of the over
two hundred members of this extraordinary
(Preludes pour piano, selections from Cataorchestra.
logue d’oiseaux, and Quatre Etudes de
Pamela Margles
rythme) demonstrate a fully formed aural
vision of rare genius. Hints of Satie and DeTimothy Corlis - Notes Towards
bussy’s influences are evoked without undue
emphasis. Aimard’s renditions are evocative Various Artists
Chestnut Hall Music CMH080523
and refined, an irrefutable argument for his
(www.myspace.com/timothycorlis)
A-List status as an interpreter. But his performances also have a selflessness that diOccasionally we find a CD that truly stands
rects the ear past the player and into the
out from the rest, and here is one, certainly.
scores themselves so that this recording is a
Timothy Corlis is a composer of great depth
testimony to the composer’s emerging status and passion, not to mention a pristine, polas the supreme French composer of the mid- ished craft. The opening Prelude for the Night
20th century.
of the Lunar Eclipse, a post-impressionistic
The aesthetic accuracy and comparative
duet for cello and piano, draws you in comsimplicity of early scores also serve to help
pellingly.
Messiaen-resisters hear past their deficiency.
The title track follows, for chorus and
It’s praise through faint damnation to say that
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
57
sticks (two hardwood sticks struck together),
2 cymbals, 2 gongs, triangle, tambourine,
snare drum, slap stick, ratchet, tom tom,
woodblock, sleigh bells, castanets, sand
blocks, Chinese temple blocks, thunder sheet,
and, of course, a bullroarer. The bullroarer,
as we all know, is a cigar shaped flat piece of
narrator with soloists; a shattering experiwood attached at one end to a two stranded
ence of Margaret Atwood’s nearly brutal
poetry, linked with Corlis’ masterful writing. chord. It is whirled above the head which
causes it to twist and make the deep, unnervIt is twenty-five of the most intense minutes
ing whirring sound clearly heard in the orgiof listening you are
astic finale of this extraordinary work.
likely to experience.
A suite from Corroboree was first perThe DaCapo Chamformed on August 17, 1946 at a free Sunday
ber Choir is in top
matinee concert by The Sydney Symphony
form. Gaps beOrchestra conducted by newly arrived Sir
tween the tracks are
Eugene Goossens. Goossens introduced Le
short on this disc,
Sacre du Printemps to Australia in the same
adding to the ambigseason. Corroboree was an immediate hit but
uous suggestion that
it was not until December 1960 that a suite
these works might
was recorded by Goossens and the Orchestra
be considered part
of a diverse suite. Following the choral poem (now reissued on Dutton CDBP9779). Goossens took the score to Europe and made a
with the angst-filled chamber piece Western
recording of the suite for Everest, still availaProjections seems the right step. Violinist
Jerzy Kaplanek exhibits his glassy tone, nota- ble on CD (EVC9007 or DVDA1029).
This stunning new CD from Naxos, which
bly.
also boasts the first recording of the exuberTwo musicians in this project contribute
ant Outback Overture, is the only complete
their own pieces to end the disc: Pianist
performance of Corroboree available. EMI
Heather Dawn Taves’ As Through a Glass
Australia’s 1977 CD of the ABC’s recording
Darkly, for tenor (Brandon Leis) and piano,
conducted by John Lanchbery is in the neverwith words by poet G. Victor Toews. Connever. There are seven parts, opening with
ductor Leonard Enns has the last word with
the Welcome Ceremony (Witchetty Grub men
his Cello Sonata. Cellist Ben Bolt-Martin
assisted by members of the Emu Totem) and
shines in this, a work written for him.
closing with the propulsive Procession of
Engineers Earl McCluskie and Ed Marshall have brilliantly captured the sound of St. Totems and Closing Fire Ceremony (in which
representatives of the Lace Lizard, CockaGeorge’s Church, Guelph, and Maureen
Forrester Hall in Waterloo. Warm acoustics too, Honey Ant, Wild Cat, and Small Fly
Totems participate with much use of Boomerbestow a rich benediction on the project.
John S. Gray ang, Spear and Fire Stick).
This unique and attractive work, exciting
and accessible, is a natural for a collector
John Antill - Corroboree
New Zealand Symphony Orchestra; James seeking something beyond the usual repertoire. Audiophiles will certainly want it.
Judd
Bruce Surtees
Naxos 8.570241
Kroger Quartet (DACAPO 8.226059) provide a fascinating glimpse of his recent work.
Written between 1993 and 2005, these are
complex, varied and
difficult quartets
that display a very
strong command of
structure and sonority. The Kroger
Quartet shot to
prominence 8 years
ago with a performance of Nørgård’s
Fifth String Quartet (to which they dedicated
thirty rehearsals!), and Nørgård has worked
closely with the artists since then; two of the
quartets, numbers 7 and 10, are dedicated to
the Kroger, with the latter being written for
them. These are definitive performances,
highly expressive and technically dazzling.
Artistic cooperation between composer and
performers is also a key element in Launch
Pad, an album of five Canadian string quartets commissioned and performed by the
Penderecki String Quartet (Centrediscs
CMC CD 13308). There is an interesting
diversity of sound and style here from five
established midcareer composers:
Laurie Radford,
Alice Ho, Piotr
Grella-Mozejko,
Daniel Janke and
Jeffrey Ryan. Of
particular note are
Radford’s Everything We See In
The Sky (2005), a single-movement work
involving digital signal processing, although
the computer manipulations are not as apparent as you might expect, Ho’s String Quartet
No.2 (2003) in two parts - a soulful Dream
and an agitated Reality - and Ryan’s String
Quartet No.3 “sonata distorta” (2006), a
fascinating work reflecting on the Tolstoy
A corroboree is a
story The Kreutzer Sonata and the Beethoven
EXTENDED PLAY – CONTEMPOceremonial happenviolin sonata that inspired it, with excerpts
ing in which AusRARY STRING QUARTETS
from the Beethoven appearing ‘distorted’ at
tralian Aborigines
By Terry Robbins various levels in the quartet. Some readers
depict their origins,
will recall the premiere performance of this
Reviewing contemporary music can be a bit
folklore and current
work at Music Toronto in a theatrical presenlike
being
handed
a
copy
of
War
and
Peace
in
events including the
the original and being asked what you think of tation that included actor Colin Fox. Again,
stylised mimicking
it when you don’t speak Russian; if you’re not this disc features definitive and stunning perof their revered
formances in all respects by the PSQ.
fauna. Performed in the evening by firelight, fully conversant with the composer’s individual
language
then
how
can
you
judge?
Music
it is enjoyed by performers and viewers
In the 1960s Karlheinz Stockhausen, who
alike. Unspoiled until after 1770, the Aborigi- is different in one critical respect, of course,
died last December at the age of 79, was the
in
that
regardless
of
the
particular
musical
nes were, from a colonial perspective, the
darling of the musical avant-garde and capalanguage the composer uses, something
most primitive, naïve people in the world.
ble of sparking passionate arguments about
should
be
communicated
by
the
music
itself.
They did not have the wheel. But they did
what was or wasn’t music. Now comes a
Does it actually say anything?
have rhythm.
timely DVD of Frank Scheffer’s documentaThere
are
two
essential
CDs
of
contempoAntill witnessed a real corroboree as a
ry on Stockhausen’s Helicopter String Quarrary string quartet music this month that say
youngster in 1913 which drove him to an intet (medici arts 3077508), which was written
a
lot,
plus
an
extremely
interesting
DVD
that
depth study of Aboriginal music. He emulated
for the Arditti Quartet and premiered at the
the atmosphere and sounds of the originals in doesn’t say quite as much.
1995 Holland Festival. The quartet members
the music of his ballet completed in 1944.
play in four different helicopters flying
Consider the scoring which, in addition to the Per Nørgård, now in his mid-70s, has long
through the air, shouting numbers in German,
been
a
major
figure
on
the
Danish
music
usual complement of strings, winds, brass
but unable to hear each other and linked only
and percussion, uniquely calls for this collec- scene, and the world premiere recordings of
by a click-track for coordination. The music
his
String
Quartets
7,
8,
9
and
10
by
the
tion: xylophone, vibraphone, bass drum, thora
58
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
voice, works well on both up tempo and
slower tunes. Although the disc is an eclectic mix there is a very definite style to the
arrangements and performances from core
players Ross MacIntyre on bass, Michael
Shand on piano and Mark McLean on drums
that make it a cohesive yet unique collection. The standout tracks for me are Tears
for Fears’ Mad World, which has been getting a lot of airplay on JazzFM, and Wichita
Lineman with its gentle syncopation, enriched harmonies and gorgeous guitar work
by Rob Piltch, which is worth the purchase
price alone. www.shannonbutcher.com
(mostly tremolo scrubbing) is sent to a
Janelle Monique’s offering “You Go to
ground-level mixing board operated by the
My Head” takes a completely different
composer. The footage of the rehearsals is
riveting, but disappointingly the only perform- approach. Monique and producer Oliver
Miguel draw heavily on standards - and
ance footage is from the helicopters, giving
us no idea of what the performance was actu- some, like Misty, even tip over into the
ally like for the audience on the ground. Love chestnut category - but the use of 80’s pop/
funk/salsa instrumentation render them
it or hate it - and the comments on the
exhilaratingly difficult to recognize. There
YouTube video postings prove that Stockare also a handful of pop tunes, like Dust in
hausen’s ability to spark heated controversy
the Wind and Sting’s Fragile, on which Max
hasn’t diminished over the years - this is a
thought-provoking and fascinating insight into Senitt and Richardo Lewis on drums, Kibwe
Thomas on keyboards and Oliver Miguel on
the composer’s philosophy.
sax, guitars, and programming turn in some
What does the music itself ‘say’ for me,
beautiful playing. Add to that a few bossa
though? Unfortunately, absolutely nothing.
Terry Robbins nova standards and it all adds up to a quirky
pop/funk/Latin/soul/swing stew. Monique’s
singing style is rooted in R&B and Latin
JAZZ AND IMPROVISED
American soil, so, for me, the vocals on the
songs that are not swing standards work
Words We Both Could Say
much better. Some, like A Felicidade, are a
Shannon Butcher
perfect fit. www.moniquemusique.com
Independent SB2008
Cathy Riches
unique take on the
guitar-piano-bassdrums quartet. The
liner notes reveal
that the part of
revered pianist Bob
Erlendson was
intentionally overdubbed atop a trio
recording of Washbrook on guitar, Dennis Pendrith on bass and
Steve Kostashuk on drums. A project 5 years
in the making, this disc comes across as a
carefully prepared meal, the ingredients
being seven originals, a cover and two standards, all immaculately engineered. Compositionally, Washbrook is an engaging storyteller
that draws from a wide pool of worldly
styles. One of several highlights is an aptly
sizzling take on Scorched Sun by recently
departed American jazz guitarist Eddie Fisher. To top it all off, a surprising vocal performance on the Arlen/Koehler chestnut I’ve
Got the World on a String. Although Washbrook has an average voice he sings, as he
plays, with pure passion.
www.washbrookmusic.com
Nigerian-Canadian jazz vocalist DK Ibomeka possesses the sort of voice that commands
your attention. Smiley and striking in performance, the 6’7” giant’s vocals are not only
big, but also sweet,
smooth and wellsuited to the romantic repertoire at
hand. In this setting,
You Go To My Head
Ibomeka is enJanelle Monique
sconced by musical
EXTENDED PLAY –
ZaFeMusik ZAFE2007
excellence: prized
LOCAL INDEPENDENT JAZZ
Toronto bassist
Debut discs from several young singers have
By Ori Dagan George Koller
made their way over the WholeNote transom
wears the producer’s hat, while the smoking
this summer. This month we have two examWhen he isn’t gigging with fellow young cats band includes Davide DiRenzo on percussion,
ples, with more to come in future issues.
on the local scene, guitarist Harley Card
Michael Shand on keys and Kelly Jefferson
Shannon Butcher has come out of the gate leads three
on tenor. Fans of DK will not be disappointstrongly with “Words We Both Could Say”. groups: “God’s
ed. The album is called I’m Your Man and
The main attraction of this disc, besides
Gift to Yoda”,
the title track, penned by the inimitable LeonButcher’s very fine vocal work, is the re“Hobson’s
ard Cohen, works better than expected. Even
freshingly unusual (for a jazz record) source Choice” and a
though the swingers are arguably phrased a
material. With nary a standard in sight, the
quartet under his
little on the safe side, the tender ballads alten tracks of jazzified pop tunes draws from
name. The Harley
low DK’s gift to shine through. Look out for
such diverse sources as The Beatles, No
Card Quartet’s
our big man to take the world by storm: “I’m
Doubt, Blondie (Deborah Harry) and Jimmy independent debut
Your Man” will be released in the U.S. on
Webb/Glen Campbell. The only tune that
CD Non-Fiction is
remotely resembles a standard is It Might As an assortment of eight originals by the lead- September 27 and in Europe in October.
www.dkibomeka.com
Well Be Spring, and that gets a bossa nova-ish er, all titled in two words or less. Contrast
On the Edge - The artistry displayed by
treatment that spritzes it up nicely. Butcher’s is somewhat lacking here, and except for the
these
jazzers is astonishing given that they
appealingly light, clear, and at times breathy formidable composition and strong arrangecannot yet order a drink! Nearly every one of
ment of Right Arm, the disc is not as interthese players is in Grade 10, 11 or 12, particesting as one wishes it were. However, even ipating in the Senior Enriched Jazz level of
if the writing is somewhat formulaic, the
the Humber Complayers make the best of it. This ensemble
munity Music
grooves harmoniously from start to finish,
Program; a few
each member soloing in their own sweet
guests appear courway. Pianist Matt Newton stands out with a
tesy of Humber’s
personal touch, and with aces Jon Maharaj
world famous poston bass and Ethan Ardelli on drums, one
secondary music
can’t go wrong. www.harleycard.ca
program. HopefulSoulful guitarist Rick Washbrook’s latest ly these kids know
outing as a leader, West Mystic, offers a
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
WWW . THEWHOLENOTE . COM
59
how lucky they are to be mentored by Canadian jazz luminaries such as Kirk MacDonald,
Barry Romberg, Jim Vivian and Don Palmer. Embracing the modern American art
form from start to finish, the repertoire ranges from Nat Adderley to Steve Swallow,
Jimmy Van Heusen to John Coltrane. Significantly, some of the highlights happen to be
Canadian content: Kirk McDonald’s The
Torchbearers, Kenny Wheeler’s Hotel le Hot
and an original by guitarist Sam Dickinson,
Etch-a-Sketch. It’s difficult to single anyone
out, but drummers Adam Arruda and Aaron
Landsberg deserve special mention for their
astounding maturity.
www.creativeandperformingarts.humber.ca/
music
POT POURRI
A Song Is Born
Mitch Smolkin
Independent
Advance copy
The smooth, silky
and velvety voice of
Toronto-based actor
and singer Mitch
Smolkin is the major draw and aural
focal point of “A Song Is Born”. Sure, he has
assembled a fine collection of artists to back
him up including guitarist Levon Ichkanian,
Marcelo Moguilevsky, Cesar Lerner, Boris
Sichon, Paul Brody and singer Aviva Chernick. One can’t really go wrong with such an
esteemed group of artists, but Smolkin’s
voice captured my attention in every cut.
The former Artistic Director of the
Ashkenaz festival, Smolkin has undoubtedly
been influenced by the countless artists he has
brought to Toronto for this festival. But he
has gone one step further by using these musical influences as a starting point in which to
develop his own sense of Yiddish, and on a
broader scale, World music. His strong theatrical skills are apparent throughout. After a
more traditional introduction, his upbeat
rendition of Rozhinkes (Almonds and Raisins)
was surprisingly enchanting and reminiscent
of music played at a Parisian cafe. The sweet
clarinet and vocal stylings featured on Papir
Iz Dokh Vays reinforce all the thought put into
this enjoyable release.
My advance review copy did not include
liner notes, but we have been assured that
they will include full production credits and
song lyrics with English translations.
“A Song Is Born” is a well-produced first
release that Mr. Smolkin can be very proud
of!
Tiina Kiik
Concert Note: Mitch Smolkin will launch “A
Song Is Born” in concert at the Ashkenaz
Festival at Harbourfront on Saturday, August
30.
60
OLD WINE IN NEW BOTTLES
Fine old recordings re-released
By Bruce Surtees
It must be remembered that when
George Szell came
to prominence in
the United States in
the mid 1940s (and
his mid-forties) he
was a highly respected conductor
and musician in
Europe. He had a very solid grip on his repertoire which soon expanded to new works
which he was debuting and championing.
However, all that most music lovers around
the world today know about Szell’s artistry
they have divined from the recordings made
by Columbia in Cleveland from the late 1940s
on. In an interview with Szell as an intermission feature in one of the weekly broadcast
concerts, he stated that Columbia allowed
him to record items that he requested only if
they were not in conflict with Ormandy or
Bernstein. Those he did make revealed meticulously prepared performances which
could be misinterpreted as a somewhat objective. The lean balances of those LPs and then
CDs only reinforced that impression.
Happily, two new four discs (priced as
three) sets of live Szell performances from
Cleveland and New York tell another story. It
is very clear throughout that Szell was not a
conductor working on his interpretations. He
knew exactly what he wanted and he got it.
These sets, published by West Hill Radio
Archives of Don Mills are derived from
immaculate sources and contain many revelations. The Art of George Szell Volume One
(WHRA-6018) opens with Szell’s debut concert with the New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra from Carnegie Hall on July
4, 1943. WW2 was still raging and as was the
custom in all countries, the concert opened
with orchestra and audience joining in the
national anthem. I must say that most national
anthems really touch me and this one is no
exception. Fine performances of the
Beethoven Seventh, The Moldau, and the
Tannhäuser Overture follow and the
concert ends with
The Stars and
Stripes Forever. A
concert from the
following week on
the second disc
includes the Mendelssohn Fourth,
Don Juan, and Rhapsody in Blue with Eugene
List in an ‘uptown’ symphonic performance
with lots of energy and bravura... a far cry
from Paul Whiteman.
From Szell’s debut concert with the Cleveland Orchestra on November 2, 1944 we are
treated to The Overture to The Bartered
Bride, Szell’s orchestration of Smetana’s
Quartet in E minor, and Till Eulenspiegel.
Szell worked closely with Strauss and we
know that at least one, if not more, of the
recordings ‘conducted’ by Strauss were actually from the baton of young George. Other
highlights of the set include Capriccio Espagnol and the Prokofiev First Violin concerto
with Szigeti and the Philharmonic from 1945.
The Art of George Szell Volume Two
(WHRA-6019) contains exceptional performances of Lalo’s Symphonie Espagnole (four
movements) with Alfredo Campoli, and
Brahms’ second piano concerto with Clifford
Curzon both from 1953 with the Philharmonic. Concerts in Cleveland during 1957 included the Euryanthe Overture, The Prelude and
Good Friday Music from Parsifal, the
Beethoven Sixth, Haydn 97th and the Schubert
9th. Finally, from 1953 we hear the Franck
Symphony in D minor and one of Szell’s
specialities, the Sibelius Second Symphony.
I was taken aback by the high quality of the
sound throughout these discs, which is clear
and dynamic, giving very few clues to the
vintage. Only the Prokofiev shows its age.
These sets are pressed in Europe and are
not available, for copyright reasons, in the
United States.
Insert your
brochure, flyer or rack
card intoWholeNote
Get your promotional material
into the hands of the people
who matter. Call for rates:
advertiser discounts available.
416-323-2232 x28
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
What makes classical Classical?
By Colin Eatock
The term “classical music” – once so
clear in meaning – has become murky.
On the one hand, it is invoked in a
positive sense, to suggest “bestness”;
on the other hand it has acquired (in
some circles) negative connotations of
stuffy over-formality and pretentiousness.
This Janus-faced ambivalence was
prominently displayed in August when
the CBC held a press-conference to
announce its new line-up of Radio 2
programmes. First, they proudly announced that classical music would
continue to be the most played genre
on the revamped network (a debatable
point). Next, they showed a twominute promotional video – a collage
of the various musics and musicians
we could expect to hear on Radio 2 –
which contained only about 10 seconds
of classical music. It was as though the
CBC was embarrassed by its own
classical content. I guess they didn’t
want to look “elitist.”
So why has the term “classical music” become so complicated, loaded-down
with diverse and even contradictory implications? Why does it mean different things to
different people?
“Classical music,” in its narrowest sense –
the sense favoured by many music historians
– refers to European music of the late 18th
and early 19th centuries. However, most
people use the term more widely than that.
Yet trying to define exactly what “most people” mean when they use the term is a thorny
problem. (This summer, Harbourfront Centre framed a series of concerts around the
question, presenting a mix of traditional,
contemporary and non-Western “classical
musics.”)
Much of the difficulty stems from the fact
that “classical music” is not a single concept,
but a group of competing concepts huddled
together under a common umbrella. Here are
a few of the ideas that, I believe, underlie
common usage of the term.
1] Music which has survived its era, to be
enjoyed by later generations. This certainly
applies to Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. But
it also applies to Elvis Presley. Indeed, in the
myopic world of popular music, any song
that’s still getting airplay a decade after it
was first recorded is hailed as a “classic.” (I
have yet to hear the term “classical rock” –
but I’m expecting it to appear any day now.)
2] Music that is classically proportioned.
We don’t really know much about what ancient Greek music sounded like. But the argument is sometimes put forward that certain
musical styles are analogous to the formal
ideas in Greek art and architecture. This
comparison is often invoked for composers
such as Mozart and Haydn – but it breaks
62
There are other criteria that could
be brought to bear on the question.
There’s instrumentation: pretty much
any music that an orchestra or a
string quartet plays, or a classically
trained singer performs, is arguably
classical. Presentation is also significant: just as anything that’s hanging
in an art gallery claims to be art, any
music performed in a classical concert-setting claims to be classical.
And of course tradition is a strong
factor: classical music is what your
piano teacher taught you that it is.
All the above definitions are
flawed in some way: incomplete,
ambiguous, and fraught with dicey
cultural assumptions and value judgments. It’s tempting to suggest that a
new terminology is needed, just to be
able to discuss this question. But
attempts to establish more precise
terms have met with only limited
acceptance. “Serious music” has
been proposed – but it’s a term that
some find offensive, as it implies that
down when confronted with Wagner, Varèse everything else is frivolous. (Fans of jazz,
or Cage.
rap and esoteric rock music certainly consid3] The music that is preferred by the aris- er their music to be serious stuff.) For a
tocracy. Bach, Beethoven and Brahms do
while, musicologists liked to talk about
well by this definition – and it’s this sense of “Western art-music,” but that term seems to
the word “classical” that we invoke when we be on the wane.
speak of the classical music of India or Japan
Even though trying to define classical mu(i.e. the kind of music that the ruling classes sic is like trying to nail soap-bubbles to the
in those societies listened to). However,
wall, the term shows no sign of dying away.
aristocratic associations have also given
We seem to need it. But maybe the fluidity of
classical music a bad name among those who the term isn’t such a bad thing, as it allows
decry it as “elitist.” If rich people like it, it
for healthy debate, and a continuing evolution
must be bad.
of the concept. At the very least, the ambigu4] The music that is preferred by the intel- ities surrounding the term are an honest religentsia. This definition picks up historically flection of our culture’s increasing uncertainwhere definition 3 leaves off. By the 20th
ty about classical music’s values and boundacentury, aristocratic patronage had pretty
ries.
much dried up: Schoenberg and Stravinsky
Yet if the term “classical music” is fuzzy
didn’t have patrons. However, their music
around its edges, at its core, our sense of
did attract the admiration (or at least attenwhat classical music is all about remains
tion) of a well-educated class of people who
strong. Ask a hundred people passing by the
were interested in contemporary art and
corner of Bloor and Yonge what kind of muideas.
sic Mozart wrote. It’s likely that most of
5] Music that is especially refined, elabothem (or at least most who know who Mozart
rate or complex. This definition is often inwas) will say he wrote classical music.
voked by those brave folks who argue for the
Until someone comes along with a broad
inherent superiority of classical music over
yet precise encapsulation of the idea of claspopular music. It’s a tricky proposition, how- sical music that leaves no loose ends or noses
ever. One could, for instance, argue that the out of joint, permit me to contribute one more
classical music of India is more elaborate
tentative definition. Classical music is the
than European classical music because Indian kind of music that CBC Radio 2 used to play
musicians have a 22-note octave, whereas
most of the time – but doesn’t, so much, any
there are a mere 12 pitches in the Western
more.
chromatic scale. And if complexity is held up Colin Eatock is a Toronto-based writer and
as the highest musical virtue, then Pierre
composer.
Boulez and Milton Babbitt emerge as the
Thanks to Bill Abbott for use of the cartoon. Visit
greatest composers ever. But how many
www.cafepress.com/billatoons for products
classical music fans would agree with that
featuring his work; and www.billtoonshere for an
proposal?
archive of his cartoons.
WWW .THEWHOLENOTE .COM
S EPTEMBER 1 - O CTOBER 7 2008
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