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Transcript
Hill College
112 Lamar Drive
Hillsboro, Texas 76645
COURSE SYLLABUS
Course Prefix and Number
SOCI 1301
Section:
Course Title
Semester: Fall 2016
Introductory to Sociology
Instructor:
Contact
Phone:
Email:
ACGM Description:
SOCI 1301 Introductory Sociology
The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and
individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through
the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods
of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as
social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.
Catalog Description:
The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and
individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through
the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods
of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as
social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.
Lecture Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 0 Semester Hours: 3
Co-requisites: none
Pre-requisites: none
Introduction and Purpose:
This course is the study of human behavior in society. Sociology helps shed light on the ways in
which social environment affects all aspects of our lives. Human behavior is shaped by the time
in which we live, our place in society, our resources, and our relationships. Understanding the
effects of society on the individual is a crucial component of our well-being in both our
professional and personal lives. To that end, our studies will focus on culture, group dynamics,
poverty and wealth, race, gender, dating and family, deviance, religion, education, and world
population issues. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on developing an understanding
of basic behavioral science methods, major sociological theories, and what C. Wright Mills has
termed “the Sociological Imagination.”
Instructional Materials:
Textbook:
REVEL for Sociology: Down to Earth Approach, 13th Ed. by Henslin
REVEL is an online learning tool that includes ebook, audiobook, and interactive exercises. A
REVEL option that includes a paper copy of the textbook is available. Check with your instructor.
Supplies & Materials:
Pens, paper, and other basic school supplies; computing technology including MSOffice, Hill
College Email and Blackboard access. Instructor may require Scantrons, REVEL online lab, or
other materials.
Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will:
1. Compare and contrast the basic theoretical perspectives of sociology.
2. Identify the various methodological approaches to the collection and analysis of data in
sociology.
3. Describe key concepts in sociology.
4. Describe the empirical findings of various subfields of sociology.
5. Explain the complex links between individual experiences and broader institutional forces.
Source: Texas Higher Ed Coordinating Board (Spring 2016). Academic Course Guide Manual
The students' success in completing these objectives will be measured using a set of
examinations and assignments described, in detail under the section of this syllabus headed
“Methods of Evaluation.”
An Annual Assessment Plan will be implemented each year to review course.
Description of Institutional Core Objectives (ICO’s)
Given the rapid evolution of necessary knowledge and skills and the need to take into account
global, national, state, and local cultures, the core curriculum must ensure that students will
develop the essential knowledge and skills they need to be successful in college, in a career, in
their communities, and in life. Therefore, with the assistance of the Undergraduate Education
Advisory Committee, the Coordinating Board approved a 42 semester credit hour core
curriculum for all undergraduate students in Texas, including a statement of purpose, six core
objectives, and common component areas.
Statement of Purpose
Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of knowledge of human
cultures and the physical and natural world, develop principles of personal and social
responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance intellectual and practical skills that are
essential for all learning. Hill College faculty periodically evaluate the objectives included in the
Foundational Component Area of Behavioral Science.
Course
SLO
Core Objective
College SLO
Critical
Thinking Skills
CT1: Generate and
communicate ideas by
combining, changing or
reapplying existing
information
1, 2, 3,
4, 5
Communication
Skills
Use Any
CS1: Develop, interpret,
and express ideas
through written
communication
1, 2, 3,
4, 5
Communication
Skills
Use Any
Communication
Skills
Use Any
CS2: Develop, interpret,
and express ideas
through oral
communication
CS3: Develop, interpret,
and express ideas
through visual
communication
1, 2, 3,
4, 5
1, 2, 3,
4, 5
Empirical and
Quantitative
Skills
EQS2: Manipulate and
analyze observable facts
and arrive at an informed
conclusion
2,4
Social
Responsibility
Use Any
SR1: Demonstrate
intercultural competence
3,5
Social
Responsibility
Use Any
SR2: Identify civic
responsibility
Social
Responsibility
Use Any
SR3: Engage in regional,
national and global
communities
1,3,5
5
General Learning Activities
Students will develop a clearly defined problem
statement on a sociological topic out of the text,
generate multiple solutions, demonstrate
implementation of the best solution(s), and
evaluate the quality of solution(s) and revise as
needed.
Students will apply sociological concepts and
theories as they relate to everyday life through the
media, books, movies, current events, etc. by
writing a research paper or written assignment that
demonstrates knowledge of major perspectives or
concepts in sociology (three major theoretical
perspectives, sociological perspective, etc).
Students will apply sociological principles as they
relate to everyday life through oral interviews,
assignments, online discussions, or oral
presentations over a sociological concept.
Students will identify sociological concepts by
examining charts, tables and graphs. Students will
present their ideas utilizing visual communication
methods.
Students will be able to apply basic research
methods in sociology, including research design,
data analysis, and interpretation, as well as
identify the independent/dependent variables in a
research study.
Student will identify sociological concepts and
demonstrate the ability to draw abstractions from
anecdotes and individual-level experiences
through assignments that show understanding of
the sociological imagination.
Students will apply sociological concepts and
theories as they relate to everyday life through
journal articles, internet sources, community
contributions, and/or interviews.
Students will examine cross-cultural behavior and
the influence of international forces on national
and local events while applying sociological
concepts and theoretical perspectives through
assignments, projects or exams.
Assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
Rubric, exam
or embedded
assessment
The students' success in completing these objectives will be measured using a set of
examinations and assignments described in detail under the section of this syllabus headed
“Method of Evaluation”.
Annual Assessment Plan will be implemented each year to review course.
Method of Instruction:
This course will be taught face-to-face and/or by various distance learning delivery methods.
Audio-visual materials and computer-based technology will be used when appropriate.
Students will be shown how to use a calculator where appropriate.
Methods of Evaluation:
The students’ success in completing the core objectives within the Foundational Component
Area of Social and Behavioral Sciences will be measured using rubrics, exams, portfolios, or
embedded assessments
Grades in this course will be based on the following evaluative criteria:
Exam Total, Including the Final:
All other Course Items:
50%
50%
These figures are approximate. See individual instructor’s syllabus for specific information.
Letter grades for the course will be based on the following percentages:
90-100%
80-89%
70-79%
60-69%
Below 60%
A
B
C
D
F
Course Outline:
Course Policies
Regular attendance at all class meetings is expected. Disruptions in class will not be tolerated.
Topic Outline
Topics are selected from the following:
1. The Sociological Perspective
2. Culture
3. Socialization
4. Social Structure and Social Interaction
5. How Sociologists Do Research
6. Societies to Social Networks
7. Bureaucracy and Formal Organizations
8. Deviance and Social Control
9. Global Stratification
10. Social Class in the United States
11. Sex and Gender
12. Race and Ethnicity
13. The Elderly
14. The Economy
15. Politics
16. Marriage and Family
17. Education
18. Religion
19. Medicine and Health
20. Population and Urbanization
21. Collective Behavior and Social Movements
22. Social Change and the Environment
Disabilities/ADA
Reports of discrimination based on disability may be directed to the ADA/Section 504
coordinator. The College District designates the following person to coordinate its efforts to
comply with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, which
incorporates and expands the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
amended:
Name:
Lizza Trenkle
Position:
Vice President Student Services
Address:
112 Lamar Drive, Hillsboro, TX 76645
Telephone: (254) 659-7601
Students with qualified and documented disabilities may request accommodations which will
enable them to participate in and benefit from educational programs and activities. Students
should contact the Academic Advising and Student Success Center for more details at: 254 659
7650 for Hillsboro, 817 760 5650 for Cleburne, or 817 295-7392 for Burleson.
EEO Statement
Hill College is committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education and employment. The
college does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of age, race, color, religion, sex,
national origin, disability, genetic information, or veteran status in the administration of its
educational programs, activities, or employment policies.
Instructor’s Class Content
Instructor’s content begins on the following pages or in the accompanying file.