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Sarah A. Huett
U.S. History Lesson Plan
TEKS Lesson Plan/Unit Plan
Texarkana Independent School District
Teacher: Sarah A. Huett
Subject/Course: U.S. History
Grade(s): Grade 11
Time frame: 45 minutes or less
Re-Teach Lesson Plan Number:
Topic/Process:
Textbook:
T.I.S.D.
15
Major Concept/Ideas: Cold War
The Americans: Reconstruction to the Present, McDougall Littell
Ch 18, 19, 20
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): US1 A-C, US6 D-H, US14 B-E
(1) History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S.
history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:
(A) identify the major eras in U.S. history from 1877 to the present and describe
their defining characteristics;
(B) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant
individuals, events, and time periods; and
(C) explain the significance of the following dates: 1898, 1914-1918, 1929, 19411945, and 1957.
(6) History. The student understands the impact of significant national and international
decisions and conflicts from World War II and the Cold War to the present on the United
States. The student is expected to:
(D) describe U.S. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including
the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization,
and the Berlin airlift;
(E) analyze the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam and describe their domestic and
international effects;
(F) describe the impact of the GI Bill, the election of 1948, McCarthyism, and
Sputnik I;
(G) analyze reasons for the Western victory in the Cold War and the challenges
of changing relationships among nations; and
(H) identify the origins of major domestic and foreign policy issues currently
facing the United States.
Sarah A. Huett
U.S. History Lesson Plan
T.I.S.D.
(14) Economics. The student understands the economic effects of World War II, the
Cold War, and increased worldwide competition on contemporary society. The student is
expected to:
(B) identify the causes and effects of prosperity in the 1950s;
(C) describe the impact of the Cold War on the business cycle and defense
spending;
(D) identify actions of government and the private sector to expand economic
opportunities to all citizens; and
(E) describe the dynamic relationship between U.S. international trade policies
and the U.S. free enterprise system.
TAKS: US1 A-C, US6 D-F, US14 E
(1) History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S.
history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:
(A) identify the major eras in U.S. history from 1877 to the present and describe
their defining characteristics;
(B) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant
individuals, events, and time periods; and
(C) explain the significance of the following dates: 1898, 1914-1918, 1929, 19411945, and 1957.
(6) History. The student understands the impact of significant national and international
decisions and conflicts from World War II and the Cold War to the present on the United
States. The student is expected to:
(D) describe U.S. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including
the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization,
and the Berlin airlift;
(E) analyze the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam and describe their domestic and
international effects;
(F) describe the impact of the GI Bill, the election of 1948, McCarthyism, and
Sputnik I;
(14) Economics. The student understands the economic effects of World War II, the
Cold War, and increased worldwide competition on contemporary society. The student is
expected to:
(E) describe the dynamic relationship between U.S. international trade policies
and the U.S. free enterprise system.
Sarah A. Huett
U.S. History Lesson Plan
T.I.S.D.
Concepts
Enduring Understandings/Generalizations/Principles
The student will understand that
Chronology
Chronology is important to the study of US History.
Change
Change may be positive or negative. Change often occurs
as a result of conflict. Change is inevitable.
Difference among people can create conflict/war. Social,
political and economic oppression often leads to conflict/war.
Industrialization may lead to changes in culture, economy
and demography.
Nationalism may lead to conflict between nations.
Similarities and differences influence relationships.
Effective leaders are often visionaries. Effective leaders
motivate and inspire those they lead. Effective leaders often
emerge during times of conflict. Americans often look to their
president and political heads to be effective leaders.
Government reflects societies’ values and beliefs.
Technology may lead to social, economic and political
changes.
Conflict/War
Industrialization
Nationalism
Relationships
Leadership
Government
Technology
Sequence of Activities (Instructional Strategies):
1. Review Activities: Review with students the major events and individuals
from the Cold War period that will be tested on the TAKS test. Be sure to review
your TEKS to make sure you cover all major events and individuals. You can
conduct this review in several ways:
1. Orally – Orally discuss with students the events and individuals.
2. Cooperative Learning - Divide students into groups and assign each group
a couple of events and individuals. Have them brainstorm about that
event or individual and record their answers on butcher paper. Lastly,
have each group present their information to the class.
3. TAKS Review Workbook: Have students review the time period
using a TAKS Review Workbook such as Mastering the Grade 11 TAKS
Social Studies Assessment by Jarrett Publishing.
Questions to Consider in Lesson:
1) What were the most important events of the cold war era?
2) What significant dates occurred?
3) What contributions did the significant leaders make to American history?
Sarah A. Huett
U.S. History Lesson Plan
T.I.S.D.
Assessment of Activities:
Classroom Discussion
Classroom Observation
Activity
Prerequisite Skills:
1. Discussion Skills
Key Vocabulary:
See appropriate TEKS
Materials/Resources Needed:
Copies of TEKS, paper, pens, markers, copies of TAKS Review Workbooks
Modifications: Allow students to have extended time to complete activities. Follow all
modifications on students IEP.
Differentiated Instruction: Have students create a large timeline that outline the major
events of the time period. Be sure the students include pictures and other visuals on
their timeline.
Teacher Notes:
Sample Test Questions:
1. What did the Marshall Plan do?
A. divided Berlin into four sectors
B. determined how Allies would get war reparations from Germany
C. determined the battle plan for the Allied invasion of Normandy
D. provided aid to needy European countries after World War II
Sarah A. Huett
U.S. History Lesson Plan
T.I.S.D.
2. The defensive military alliance between the U.S., Europe and Canada after World
War II was theA. League of Nations
B. North Atlantic Treaty Organization
C. United Nations
D. Marshall Plan
Project developed and delivered through a Collaborative Research Grant between
Texarkana Independent School District and TAMU-T Regents’ Initiative.