Download After Dark M S

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Cassiopeia (constellation) wikipedia, lookup

XMM-Newton wikipedia, lookup

Constellation wikipedia, lookup

CoRoT wikipedia, lookup

Hubble Deep Field wikipedia, lookup

Lyra wikipedia, lookup

Cygnus (constellation) wikipedia, lookup

Gamma-ray burst wikipedia, lookup

Galaxy Zoo wikipedia, lookup

Advanced Composition Explorer wikipedia, lookup

Serpens wikipedia, lookup

Perseus (constellation) wikipedia, lookup

International Year of Astronomy wikipedia, lookup

Supernova wikipedia, lookup

Spitzer Space Telescope wikipedia, lookup

Ursa Minor wikipedia, lookup

Future of an expanding universe wikipedia, lookup

Cosmic distance ladder wikipedia, lookup

Astronomical naming conventions wikipedia, lookup

Corvus (constellation) wikipedia, lookup

Ursa Major wikipedia, lookup

SN 1054 wikipedia, lookup

IK Pegasi wikipedia, lookup

R136a1 wikipedia, lookup

Star formation wikipedia, lookup

History of astronomy wikipedia, lookup

Chinese astronomy wikipedia, lookup

International Ultraviolet Explorer wikipedia, lookup

Theoretical astronomy wikipedia, lookup

Astronomy in the medieval Islamic world wikipedia, lookup

Astrophotography wikipedia, lookup

Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam wikipedia, lookup

Timeline of astronomy wikipedia, lookup

History of supernova observation wikipedia, lookup

Observational astronomy wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
After Dark
MSU’s Astronomy Newsletter
September 2011: No. 43
Upcoming Astronomical Horizons Lectures
All lectures are free to the public and given at Abrams Planetarium, starting at 7:30pm
September 22: EXPLODING STARS IN A WHIRLPOOL AND A PINWHEEL
Professor Horace Smith
In a supernova explosion a single exploding star can produce enough light to rival the
luminosity of an entire galaxy. The summer of 2011 has been a summer of relatively nearby
supernovas, with one supernova exploding in the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51, at the end of May
and a second exploding in the Pinwheel Galaxy, M101, toward the end of August. Though
both are supernovas, the natures of these two exploding stars are very different. The
supernova in M51 may mark the death of a massive star. The supernova in M101 may mark
the death of a white dwarf star in a binary star system. The discovery and origins of
these two exploding stars, more than 20 million light years away, will be explored.
This image of the supernova in
M51 (marked SN) was made
with the digital camera on the
24-inch reflecting telescope of
the MSU campus observatory.
M51 is a spiral galaxy and the
supernova appears to have
erupted within one of the
galaxy’s spiral arms.
The M51 galaxy is some 23
million light years from Earth.
October 27: SAMPLE RETURN FROM COMETS AND ASTEROIDS: PROMISE,
PROGRESS, AND PROSPECTS
Professor Michael Velbel
What are comets and asteroids made of? Can they tell us about the formation and history
of the solar system? Spacecraft have begun to sample material from these distant
astronomical objects with promise for answering these and other questions.
November 17: ASTRONOMY WITH BIG BUCKETS OF WATER: LOOKING AT THE
COSMOS WITH COSMIC RAYS
Professor Jim Linnemann
What are cosmic rays and how were they discovered? How can particles of light with
trillions of times the energy of the light particles from the sun be used to do astronomy
and learn about the sources of cosmic rays? HAWC, a cosmic ray observatory currently
under construction, will detect and measure these cosmic rays of fabulously high energy.
CAMPUS OBSERVATORY PUBLIC VIEWING
NIGHTS
The MSU Campus Observatory opens its doors to the public two
nights per month, weather permitting. This is your chance to look
at planets, star clusters, and other beautiful celestial objects using
the 24-inch telescope and also a number of smaller telescopes.
Knowledgeable professional and amateur astronomers will be on
hand. But come only if the sky is clear, and dress warmly. For a
map, see www.pa.msu.edu/astro/observ.
MSU Campus Observatory
Open House
Public observing nights of the fall semester
will be held Friday and Saturday, Sept. 30 and
October 1 from 9-11pm and Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 4 and 5, from 9-11pm, weather
permitting.
Visit us at www.pa.msu.edu/astro