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Transcript
1
Training Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Understand the overall purpose of the Chefs Move to
Schools initiative.
• Understand the state of students’ health in the United
States.
• Discuss steps chefs should take in order to volunteer
in local school nutrition programs.
• State various ways chefs can get involved with
schools.
2
Training Objectives, Cont’d
Participants will be able to:
• Understand school meal reimbursement.
• Describe the method in which school meal prices are
established.
• Identify financial management practices in the school
nutrition program.
• Explain the importance of food safety and sanitation in
school kitchens.
• Identify ways to prevent foodborne illnesses through food
safety and sanitation in school kitchens.
3
Training Objectives, Cont’d
Participants will be able to:
• Access standard operating procedures.
• Identify require meal components.
• Identify the use of USDA foods in the school nutrition
program.
• Explain the difference between a home recipe and a
standardized recipe.
4
Training Objectives, Cont’d
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the advantages of using standardized recipes
in the school nutrition setting.
• Understand the importance of a production record.
• Understand the HUSSC and how chefs can get involved.
5
Ground Rules
6
Participant Introductions
•
•
•
•
Name
Title
Place of employment
What do you hope to
take away from this
seminar?
• If you could be
anywhere right now,
where would you be?
7
Training Agenda
• Introduction to State of Children’s Health and Chefs Move to
Schools Program
• Connect: Chefs Move to Schools
– Lesson 1 – Getting Involved with Schools
– Lesson 2 – School Nutrition Financial Management
– Lesson 3 – Food Safety Basics in Schools
– Lesson 4 – New Meal Pattern
– Lesson 5 – Standardized Recipes and Production Records
– Lesson 6 – HealthierUS School Challenge
8
Introduction to
Connect: Chefs Move to Schools
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Understand the overall purpose of the Chefs Move to Schools
initiative.
• Understand the state of students’ health in the United States.
9
Chefs Move to School
Its purpose:
The First Lady Michelle Obama is calling on
chefs to get involved by adopting a school and
working with teachers, parents, school
nutritionists, and administrators to help
educate children about food.
10
State of Children’s Health in the U.S.
• Overweight among youth ages 6-17 years in the U.S. has more
•
•
•
than doubled in the past 30 years; this has resulted in an
increase in children with Type 2 diabetes.
Intake of total fat and saturated fat is well above
recommendations.
Added sugars contribute about 20% of total food energy.
56 - 85% of children consume soda each day; shifting from
milk to soda and fruit drinks.
11
Lesson 1: Getting Involved with Schools
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss steps chefs should take in order to
volunteer in local school nutrition programs.
• State various ways chefs can get involved with
schools.
12
13
Self- Evaluation
• Are you employed:
– full-time, part-time, or retired?
• Based on your employment status:
– what days and how many hours can you realistically
dedicate to your local school?
• What are you most interested in doing:
– working in the classroom or cafeteria?
14
Ways Chefs Can Get Involved
• Volunteering with the school nutrition
program
• Doing chef events and demos in the
cafeteria and/or with the PTA/PTO
• Talk to students about what it’s like to be a
professional chef
• Being a part of school fundraising events
15
16
Lesson 2: Financial Management
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Understand school meal
reimbursement.
• Describe method in which meal
prices are established.
• Identify financial management
practices in the school nutrition
program.
17
Qualifying for Meal Benefits
•
•
•
•
•
Free: up to 130% of poverty
Reduced: 131% to 185% of poverty
Based on total household size
Free: Total household income for family of 4 = $23,850
Reduced: Total household income for family of 4 =
$44,123
• Approved for SNAP*
+ for
2014-2015
*Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly Food Stamps
18
USDA Meal Reimbursement Rates
(July 2014-June 2015)
PROGRAM
FREE
REDUCED
PRICE
PAID
NSLP
Severe need*
$2.98
$3.00
$2.58
$2.60
$0.28
$0.30
SBP
Severe need*
$1.62
$1.93
$1.32
$1.63
$0.28
$0.28
• Federal Government gives individual districts reimbursement per meal
•
served per day.
Only one meal is reimbursed. No adult meal is reimbursed.
* Severe need – more than 60% of students qualify for free or reduced meals
19
Financial Reality
School nutrition
programs
must be self
supporting.
20
Typical Costs to Produce a Lunch
Food
37%
Labor / Benefits
48%
Supplies
Other, including Indirect Costs
TOTAL
5%
10%
100%
Is this similar to where you work?
21
Expenses
•
•
•
•
•
•
Food
Labor & Benefits
Supplies
Equipment
Maintenance / Repairs
Utilities (Electricity, Fuel,
Water, etc.)
• Custodial & Maintenance
Services
• Transportation
• Professional Development
• Marketing & Recruitment
• Indirect Costs
22
Revenue Sources
•
•
•
•
•
•
Meal Reimbursement
Ala Carte Sales
Outside Contracts
Catering
Concessions
USDA Foods
23
USDA Foods
• Important part of the school
nutrition financial picture
• Healthy, nutritious, and easy to use
• Only for school lunch
• What is the value of USDA Foods?
Value is based on number of meals
served last year - approximately
$0.23.25 cents per meal
24
USDA Foods, Cont’d
How does your state handle USDA Foods?
•
•
•
•
•
Once a month brown box
Raw product only, no processing
Direct Diversion
Department of Defense Produce
Combination of each
25
Example: BBQ Pulled Pork
Typically 6 cases (2,000 servings) of Pork Roasts from
a vendor is approximately $800. Add 1 case of BBQ
Sauce for $15 = total of $815.00.
Food cost/serving = $0.41
VS.
6 cases of USDA Pork Roasts value $372.00
Distribution and delivery fee $18.00
Add 1 case BBQ sauce $15 = total of $405.00
Food cost/serving = $0.20
52% cost savings
26
Lesson 3: Food Safety
Basics in Schools
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Explain the importance of food safety and sanitation in school
•
•
kitchens.
Identify ways to prevent foodborne illnesses through food
safety and sanitation in school kitchens.
Be able to access standard operating procedures.
27
Importance of Food Safety in Schools
• All schools must have a food safety program based on
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)
principles.
• Schools must have two Health Department reviews per
year, which are posted in a public area and online.
• It prevents foodborne illnesses.
28
What is a Foodborne Illness?
• A disease transmitted to people by food or water.
– There are many types; each has symptoms specific to that illness.
• Foodborne illness outbreak: an incident when two or more people
•
•
experience the same symptoms after eating a common food.
An outbreak must be reported to the local health department.
There are three main categories of hazards or contaminates:
• Biological
• Chemical
• Physical
29
Cross Contamination
Review ways to prevent the 3 forms of cross
contamination in handouts:
– Food to Food
– Hand to Food
– Equipment to Food
• What ideas do you have after reviewing
these handouts to prevent cross
contamination in school kitchens?
30
SOP: Standard Operating Procedure
• School’s food service plan is HACCP-based and utilizes SOPs.
• A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is a set of directions
that schools follow to ensure food safety when completing
certain tasks such as cooking chicken, cooling a food, or
sanitizing a work surface. They include:
– Corrective actions
– Monitoring procedures
– Verification procedures
– Record keeping procedures
• SOPs are available on the NFSMI website at:
http://sop.nfsmi.org/sop_list.php
31
Chefs Role in Food Safety
• Role model through proper food safety and
sanitation practices
• Follow SOPs
• Take issues to
kitchen manager
32
Lesson 4: New Meal Pattern
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Identify required meal
components.
• Identify the use of USDA Foods
in the school nutrition program.
33
New Meal Pattern
Nutrition Standards
Based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, the nutrition
standards for schools include:
• Offering fruits and vegetables every day of the week
• Increasing whole grain-rich foods
• Offering only fat-free or low-fat milk varieties
• Meeting caloric needs based on the age of children
• Reducing saturated fat and sodium
• Eliminating trans fat
34
Food Based Menu Planning
Food Based Meal Planning (FBMP):
• Simplifies school menu planning
• Serves as a teaching tool to help children choose a
balanced meal
• Assures that students nationwide have access to key
food groups recommended by the 2010 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans
• Easily communicates meal improvements to parents
and the community-at-large
35
Calorie Requirements:
Age/Grade Groups & Calorie Ranges
Based on weekly averages over a school week
Calorie Range per Grade
Grades K-5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
550-650
600-700
750-850
36
School Week
• Ideally, five consecutive
days
• Minimum of three
consecutive days
• Maximum of seven
consecutive days
37
Food Components
Five required food components:
• Meat and Meat Alternate (M/MA)
• Fruit (F)
• Vegetables (V)
• Grains (G)
• Milk
38
Meat and Meat Alternate (M/MA)
Meal Component
• Offer at least a minimum amount of meat/meat
alternate daily
• Provide weekly required amounts for each
age/grade group
• Include lean or extra lean meat, seafood, poultry,
legumes, yogurt, and tofu
Meat and Meat Alternates
Lunch Meal Component by Age/Grade
Grades K-5 Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
8-10 oz wkly 9-10 oz wkly 10-12 oz wkly
1 oz daily
1 oz daily
2 oz daily
39
Some M/MA Portions
•
•
•
•
Nuts and Seeds
Yogurt
Tofu
Legumes (e.g. peas, beans) *
2 Tbsp = 1 oz
½ cup = 4 oz
¼ cup = 2.2 oz
¼ cup = 2.2 oz
* serving of beans and peas must not be offered as a
meat alternate and as a vegetable in the same meal.
40
Fruit Meal Component
• Fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be
whole, cut-up, or pureed.
• All juice must be 100% full-strength.
• ¼ cup of dried fruit = ½ cup of fruit.
• Cannot include snack-type fruit products or
canned fruit nectar.
Fruit Lunch Meal
Component by Age/Grade
Grades K-5 Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
2 ½ C weekly
½ C daily
2 ½ C weekly
½ C daily
5 C weekly
1 C daily
41
Vegetable Meal Component
• Divided into subgroups that must be met
weekly.
• Vitamin C sources must be served daily and
come from vegetables, fruits, or fruit juice.
• Must be at least 1/8 cup to qualify as part of the
component.
• Legumes (beans and peas) can be credited.
42
Vegetable Meal Component, Cont’d
Vegetable Lunch Meal Component by Age/Grade
Grades K-5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
3 ¾ cups wkly
¾ cup daily
3 ¾ cups wkly
¾ cup daily
5 cups wkly
1 cup daily
Vegetable Subgroups — Weekly Requirements by Age/Grade
Dark Green,
Orange,
Legumes, Beans, Peas,
Starchy
Other
½ cup
¾ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
¾ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
½ cup
1 ¼ cups
½ cup
½ cup
¾ cup
Additional vegetables to
reach total
1 cup
1 cup
1 ½ cup
43
Grains Meal Component
• All grains served must be whole grain-rich
• Serving size range 1.8 -2.6 ounces daily
• 2 oz. grain products = 1 small slice of bread,
½ bagel, ½ bun, ½ cup of cooked oats, rice,
and pasta.
44
Grains Meal Component, Cont’d
Grains Lunch Meal Component by Age/Grade
Grades K-5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
8-9 oz weekly 8-10 oz weekly
10-12 oz weekly
Min: 1 oz daily Min: 1 oz daily
Min: 2 oz daily
45
Milk Component
• A variety of fluid milk— 8 oz
• Must be low-fat (1% milk fat or less if
unflavored) or fat-free (unflavored or flavored).
• Lactose-free milk is an acceptable alternative.
It must be low-fat (1% milk fat or less
unflavored) or fat-free (unflavored or flavored).
46
Milk Component, Cont’d
Milk Lunch Meal Component by Age/Grade
Grades K-5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
5 cups weekly
5 cups weekly
5 cups weekly
1 cup (8 oz) daily 1 cup (8 oz) daily 1 cup (8 oz) daily
47
Certified Child Nutrition Label
48
Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs
The FBG is divided into 7 sections and an index
 Introduction
 Meat/Meat Alternate
 Vegetables
 Fruits
 Grains
 Milk
 Other Foods
Food Buying Guide resource at NFSMI at
http://www.nfsmi.org/ResourceOverview.aspx?ID=441
49
Food Buying Guide Calculator
Food Buying Guide
Calculator resource
at NFSMI at
http://fbg.nfsmi.org/
50
Sodium Guidelines
• Gradually, over a period of time
• USDA will evaluate before going to next level
2014-2015 School Year Lunch Meal
by Age/Grade
Grades K-5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
≤ 1,230 mg sodium ≤ 1,360 mg sodium
≤ 1,420 mg sodium
51
Saturated Fat and Trans Fat
Weekly % of Fat in School Lunch Meal
by Age/Grade
Grades K-5 Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12
Saturated Fat
Trans Fat
< 10 % of Kcal
0 gr/serving
< 10 % of Kcal
0 gr/serving
< 10 % of Kcal
0 gr/serving
Meat that contain a minimal amount of naturally-occurring trans fats are allowed in
the school meal programs. Nutrition label or manufacturer specifications must indicate
zero grams of trans fat per serving.
Note – naturally occurring trans fat in meat and dairy products is excluded
52
Offer vs. Serve — Lunch
Offer vs. Serve allows students to decline a
certain number of food components in the meal.
• Only senior high schools are required to have Offer
versus Serve for lunch
• Students must be offered all five required
components
• Students can decline two of the five components
with the exception of fruit or vegetable
• Must take one serving of the fruit or vegetable
component. Can be a ½ cup serving size.
53
Lesson 5: Standardized Recipes and
Production Records
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Explain the difference between a home recipe and a
standardized recipe
• Describe the advantages of using standardized
recipes in the school nutrition setting
• Understand and prepare a production record
54
Importance of Standardized Recipes
• Consistent food quality
• Predictable yield
• Tested in specific kitchen
with its equipment
• Consistently acceptable
product with customer
satisfaction
• Consistent nutrient content
• Food cost control
• Consistent quality that
should not change
depending on the cook
• Inventory control
• Labor cost control
• Increased employee
confidence
• Reduced record keeping
• Efficient purchasing
• Successful completion of
State/Federal reviews
55
Standardized Recipe Components
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Recipe title
Recipe category
Ingredients
Weight/Volume for each ingredient
Directions/Preparation instructions
Cooking temperature and time
Serving size
Recipe yield
Equipment and utensils to be used
Standardized recipes are available at
http://www.nfsmi.org/USDA_recipes/school_recipes/all_number.pdf
56
Production Records Required
• Complete by the end of the day the meal is
served.
• Supports the claim for reimbursable meals and
identifies information needed for the nutrient
analysis.
• Required and must be kept for 3 years plus the
current year.
57
Lesson 6: HealthierUS School Challenge
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Understand the HUSSC and how chefs can get
involved.
58
What is the HealthierUS
School Challenge?
• USDA voluntary school nutrition and wellness
initiative to improve student health &
well-being
• Commitment to providing students with
healthy school environment
• National recognition and prestige
59
How Does it Work?
• Register as a Team Nutrition School
(It is free)
• Schools must meet or exceed criteria
• Apply for Bronze, Silver, Gold, or Gold Award
of Distinction
online application:
http://www.fns.usda.gov/hussc
60
Resources
For more information and resources visit:
The National Food Service Management Institute
www.nfsmi.org
Chefs Move to Schools
www.chefsmovetoschools.org
61
National Food Service Management Institute
The University of Mississippi
• Mission: To provide information and services that promote
the continuous improvement of child nutrition programs
• Vision: To be the leader in providing education, research, and
resources to promote excellence in child nutrition programs
62