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1413
Wednesday
12:00-19:30
Michigan
Affective Audiences: Analysing Media Users, Consumers and Fans
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U Of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Alina Dobreva, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Nancy Baym, U of Kansas, USA
Robert Burnett, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Christine Scodari, Florida Atlantic U, USA
Denise D. Bielby, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jostein Gripsrud, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Sanna Inthorn, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
John Street, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Martin Scott, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Elizabeth Bird, U of South Florida, USA
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Jennifer Rauch, Long Island U, USA
Angela M. Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Brita Ytre-Arne, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Elizabeth Carnegie, Sheffield U, UNITED KINGDOM
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Curtis Coats, U of Colorado, USA
Robert Moses Peaslee, Texas Tech U, USA
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Emily Elizabeth West, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
Dana Neacsu, Rutgers U, USA
Hiesun C. Suhr, Rutgers U, USA
Lia Ungureanu, Rutgers U, USA
Michael R. Real, Royal Roads U, CANADA
R.M. Milner, U of Kansas, USA
Rebecca Williams, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Martina Schuegraf, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Theo Hug, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
Lothar Mikos, U of Film and Television, GERMANY
Michele Rosenthal, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Rivka Ribak, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Sarah Banet-Weiser, U of Southern California, USA
Gayle S. Stever, Arizona State U, USA
Stijn Reijnders, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Shelley-Jean Bradfield, Indiana U, USA
Jonathan Alan Gray, Fordham U, USA
Samita Nandy, Curtin U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Katherine Sender, U of Pennsylvania, USA
David Gauntlett, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Jean Burgess, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Michael Mario Albrecht, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Omar O. Dumdum, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Suellen Rader Regonini, U of South Florida, USA
Virginia Anne Nightingale, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Criselda Garcia, U of the Phillipines, PHILIPPINES
Elizabeth Wissinger, City U of New York, USA
Daragh O'Reilly, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Jakob Eckstein, Blondheim TV und Film Produktion, GERMANY
Melanie Bourdaa, U of Bordeaux, FRANCE
Michael Lahey, Indiana U, USA
The study of audiences constitutes a central concern of contemporary (popular) communication research. As
Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama fills football stadia addressing enthusiastic supporters and political
commentators frequently refer to "Obama fans" and "Palin fans", evidence of the centrality of notions of affect and
participation in contemporary mediated communication - within and beyond the realm of traditional popular culture is abundant. This preconference explores the social, cultural, textual and psychological conditions through which
readers engage with, and attach meaning and emotional significance to the texts they privilege in their everyday life
media consumption. Corresponding with this year's conference theme - Keywords in Communication - the field of
audience studies constitutes a key conceptual battleground that has witnessed a number of paradigm changes over the
past half century which have both reflected and contributed to the wider discourses of Social and Cultural Theory.
"Affective Audiences" explores these recent paradigm changes by offering a dedicated space within the ICA
conference programme that combines empirical audience research with a thorough examination of the field's canon
and a discussion of its conceptual challenges vis-à-vis convergence and globalization.
1411
Wednesday
13:00-19:00
Indiana
India and Communication Studies
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Daya Thussu, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Arvind Singhal, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Biswajit Das, Centre for Culture,Media and Governance, INDIA
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
David Page, Sussex U, UNITED KINGDOM
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Sunil Abraham, Alternative Law Forum, INDIA
Vibodh Parthasarathi, Jamia Millia Islamia, INDIA
William Mazzarella, U of Chicago, USA
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
Hemant Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Sevanti Ninan, The Media Foundation, INDIA
Vinod Pavarala, U of Hyderabad, INDIA
Anjali Monteiro, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, INDIA
Atul Tandon, Mudra Institute of Communication, INDIA
Victoria Farmer, SUNY, Geneseo, USA
Shanti Kumar, U Texas, USA
Ananda Mitra, Wake Forest U, USA
India plays an increasingly important role in the processes of globalization, including the global production of culture
and the communications technology industry. At the same time, the field of communication studies in India is
expanding. Yet there is no Indian Communications Association and little in the way of considered and formal review
of contributions to the field. This pre-conference is an effort to create a new coherence and a new salience for this
subject by mapping the area of communication and culture studies in India; to strengthen ties among leading and
emerging scholars and institutions in India and elsewhere; to develop and cultivate a research agenda for the field; and
to explore the creation of an Indian Communication Studies Association. The pre-conference will take place over 2
days. The first day will be dedicated to paper presentations from emerging scholars on a diverse range of issues,
including media and cultural representations, gender, minorities, issues of nationalism and culture, and structural
questions of governance. The second day will be centered around three panels, which will address the development of
communication studies in India; issues of technology, governance and development; and a discussion of scholarship
about India. The organized panels will draw from academia, business, civil society, and government/policy-making
circles.
1412
Wednesday
13:00-17:00
Iowa
Mobile2.0: Beyond Voice?
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Francois Bar, U of Southern California, USA
Tim Kelly, The World Bank, USA
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Randy Spence, Economic and Social Development Affiliates (ESDA), CANADA
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Participants
The Iphone and Mobile Access to the Internet
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Pal Roe Sundsoy, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
New Paths: Exploring Mobile-Only Internet Use in South Africa
Jonathan Donner, Microsoft Research India, INDIA
Assessing Cell Phone Usage Among Low-Income South African Youth
Tino Kreutzer, U of Cape Town, SOUTH AFRICA
Mobile Voices: A Mobile, Open Source, Popular Communication Platform for First-Generation Immigrants in Los
Angeles
Francois Bar, U of Southern California, USA
Melissa M. Brough, U of Southern California, USA
Sasha Constanza-Chock, U of Southern California,USA
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Cara J. Wallis, U of Southern California, USA
Mobile Phones and Migrant Workers in Malaysia
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Mobile Adoption in Asia
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
The Strategic Use of Mobile Phones Among Poor People in Some Latin American Countries
Luis Fernando Gamboa, U del Rosario, COLOMBIA
Mobile Teens in Taiwan
Yi-Fan Chen, Old Dominion U, USA
Information and Communication, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction: A Background Paper
Randy Spence, Economic and Social Development Affiliates (ESDA), CANADA
The Personal Hand Phone: A Vehichle for Developing and Sustaining Local Business Networks? Exploring the
Usage of Mobile Phones among Small Malaysian Enterprises
Tom Erik Julsrud, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Andrew Wong, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Mobile 2.0 in Brazil: Income Generation and Power Asymmetries
Gilson Schwartz, U of Sao Paulo, SPAIN
Education, Mobile Phone Use, and Production Decisions: A Rural Case Study in Peru
Aileen Agüero, Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, PERU
Emerging Mobile Phone Uses Among Young Users: The Mobile Images and the Video
Corinne Martin, CREM Metz U, FRANCE
The Role of Mobile Communication and Social Networks in Civic Life: A Study of U.S. Adults
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Omnipresence as a Strategy for Maintaining Expansive Social Horizons: The Social Utility of Mobile Phone E-Mail
for Japenese Youth
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, CANADA
Mito Akiyoshi, Senshu U, JAPAN
Reexamining Interactions With Urban Space: A Field Study of a GPS-Based Mobile Social Network
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
The Social Life of Wireless Urban Spaces: Wireless Internet Use, Social Networks, and the Public Realm
Keith N. Hampton, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Oren Livio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Lauren Sessions, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Taking Governance to the Masses Through Government on a Mobile: Innovations in m-Government in Tiruvallur
District in Tamil Nadu
Rajendra Kumar, Indian Administrative Service, INDIA
The Interplay of Information, Payments, and Logistics Over Mobiles
Ayesha Zainudeen, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Longitudinal Findings From Aceh Besar Midwife Mobile-Phone Project
Arul Chib, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Assessment of Health Repository Over Voice Net Platform
Umesh Sachdev, Uniphore Software Systems, INDIA
Suma Prashant, Rural Technology and Business Incubator, INDIA
Perceptions of the Mobile Device as a News Medium in Sweden and Japan
Oscar Westlund, Göteborg U, SWEDEN
Problems With Digital Inclusion and Public/Privacy Issues of Mobile Technology
Muneo Kaigo, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Comparison of Mobile TV in Singapore and Taiwan: Social-Technical System Approach
Trisha Tsui-Chuan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yu-li Liu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Towards a Realistic Assessment of Mobile TV Developments
Anders Henten, Aalborg U, DENMARK
Reza Tadayoni, Aalborg U, DENMARK
Lonely Adopters? An Exploratory Study of Early Adopters of Mobile Television
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Thilo von Pape, U Paul Verlaine, FRANCE
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
GPSFilm: Lociation-Based Mobile Cinema
Scott Hessels, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
This preconference will explore the 'Mobile2.0' era that is emerging, in which mobiles are becoming increasingly
important in bringing people into the Information Society. This preconference will attempt to draw together research
which will help piece together evidence for and against this emerging Mobile2.0 narrative in the context of the larger
social-science understanding of mobile-use behavior. The workshop will not be limited to papers dealing with the
mobile as the path to the Information Society or to research dealing with the developing world, but we do expect these
themes to be represented because most mobiles are now in the developing world and most growth is in these markets.
The workshop will focus on mobile communication, but we will encourage papers that contrast this with the broader
set of ICTs.
1819
Wednesday
18:30-20:00
Wisconsin
Media Ethics Preconference Welcome Reception
Sponsored Sessions
This reception is open to all attendees of the Media Ethics Preconference. The reception is sponsored by New York
U's Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and Goldsmiths, U of London, FAO Centre for the study of
Global Media and Democracy.
2111
Thursday
08:00-17:00
Indiana
India and Communication Studies
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Daya Thussu, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Arvind Singhal, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Biswajit Das, Centre for Culture,Media and Governance, INDIA
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
David Page, Sussex U, UNITED KINGDOM
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Sunil Abraham, Alternative Law Forum, INDIA
Vibodh Parthasarathi, Jamia Millia Islamia, INDIA
William Mazzarella, U of Chicago USA
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
Hemant Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Sevanti Ninan, The Media Foundation, INDIA
Vinod Pavarala, U of Hyderabad, INDIA
Anjali Monteiro, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, INDIA
Atul Tandon, Mudra Institute of Communication, INDIA
Victoria Farmer, SUNY, Geneseo, USA
Shanti Kumar, U Texas, USA
Ananda Mitra, Wake Forest U, USA
India plays an increasingly important role in the processes of globalization, including the global production of culture
and the communications technology industry. At the same time, the field of communication studies in India is
expanding. Yet there is no Indian Communications Association and little in the way of considered and formal review
of contributions to the field. This pre-conference is an effort to create a new coherence and a new salience for this
subject by mapping the area of communication and culture studies in India; to strengthen ties among leading and
emerging scholars and institutions in India and elsewhere; to develop and cultivate a research agenda for the field; and
to explore the creation of an Indian Communication Studies Association. The pre-conference will take place over 2
days. The first day will be dedicated to paper presentations from emerging scholars on a diverse range of issues,
including media and cultural representations, gender, minorities, issues of nationalism and culture, and structural
questions of governance. The second day will be centered around three panels, which will address the development of
communication studies in India; issues of technology, governance and development; and a discussion of scholarship
about India. The organized panels will draw from academia, business, civil society, and government/policy-making
circles.
2112
Thursday
08:00-17:00
Iowa
Mobile2.0: Beyond Voice?
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Francois Bar, U of Southern California, USA
Tim Kelly, The World Bank, USA
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Randy Spence, Economic and Social Development Affiliates (ESDA)
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Participants
The Iphone and Mobile Access to the Internet
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Pal Roe Sundsoy, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
New Paths: Exploring Mobile-Only Internet Use in South Africa
Jonathan Donner, Microsoft Research India, INDIA
Assessing Cell Phone Usage Among Low-Income South African Youth
Tino Kreutzer, U of Cape Town, SOUTH AFRICA
Mobile Voices: A Mobile, Open Source, Popular Communication Platform for First-Generation Immigrants in Los
Angeles
Francois Bar, U of Southern California, USA
Melissa M. Brough, U of Southern California, USA
Sasha Constanza-Chock, U of Southern California, USA
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Cara J. Wallis, U of Southern California, USA
Mobile Phones and Migrant Workers in Malaysia
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Mobile Adoption in Asia
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
The Strategic Use of Mobile Phones Among Poor People in Some Latin American Countries
Luis Fernando Gamboa, U del Rosario, COLOMBIA
Mobile Teens in Taiwan
Yi-Fan Chen, Old Dominion U, USA
Information and Communication, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction: A Background Paper
Randy Spence, Economic and Social Development Affiliates (ESDA), CANADA
The Personal Hand Phone: A Vehichle for Developing and Sustaining Local Business Networks? Exploring the
Usage of Mobile Phones among Small Malaysian Enterprises
Tom Erik Julsrud, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Grace Roldan, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Andrew Wong, Telenor Research & Innovation Centre, NORWAY
Mobile 2.0 in Brazil: Income Generation and Power Asymmetries
Gilson Schwartz, U of Sao Paulo, BRAZIL
Education, Mobile Phone Use, and Production Decisions: A Rural Case Study in Peru
Aileen Agüero, Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, PERU
Emerging Mobile Phone Uses Among Young Users: The Mobile Images and the Video
Corinne Martin, CREM Metz U, FRANCE
The Role of Mobile Communication and Social Networks in Civic Life: A Study of U.S. Adults
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Omnipresence as a Strategy for Maintaining Expansive Social Horizons: The Social Utility of Mobile Phone E-Mail
for Japenese Youth
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
Mito Akiyoshi, Senshu U, JAPAN
Reexamining Interactions With Urban Space: A Field Study of a GPS-Based Mobile Social Network
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
The Social Life of Wireless Urban Spaces: Wireless Internet Use, Social Networks, and the Public Realm
Keith N. Hampton, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Oren Livio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Lauren Sessions, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Taking Governance to the Masses Through Government on a Mobile: Innovations in m-Government in Tiruvallur
District in Tamil Nadu, India
Rajendra Kumar, Indian Administrative Service, INDIA
The Interplay of Information, Payments, and Logistics Over Mobiles
Ayesha Zainudeen, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Longitudinal Findings From Aceh Besar Midwife Mobile-Phone Project
Arul Chib, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Assessment of Health Repository Over Voice Net Platform
Umesh Sachdev, Uniphore Software Systems, INDIA
Suma Prashant, Rural Technology and Business Incubator, INDIA
Perceptions of the Mobile Device as a News Medium in Sweden and Japan
Oscar Westlund, Göteborg U, SWEDEN
Problems With Digital Inclusion and Public/Privacy Issues of Mobile Technology
Muneo Kaigo, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Comparison of Mobile TV in Singapore and Taiwan: Social-Technical System Approach
Trisha Tsui-Chuan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yu-li Liu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Towards a Realistic Assessment of Mobile TV Developments
Anders Henten, Aalborg U, DENMARK
Reza Tadayoni, Aalborg U, DENMARK
Lonely Adopters? An Exploratory Study of Early Adopters of Mobile Television
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Thilo von Pape, U Paul Verlaine, FRANCE
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
GPSFilm: Lociation-Based Mobile Cinema
Scott Hessels, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
This preconference will explore the 'Mobile2.0' era that is emerging, in which mobiles are becoming increasingly
important in bringing people into the Information Society. This preconference will attempt to draw together research
which will help piece together evidence for and against this emerging Mobile2.0 narrative in the context of the larger
social-science understanding of mobile-use behavior. The workshop will not be limited to papers dealing with the
mobile as the path to the Information Society or to research dealing with the developing world, but we do expect these
themes to be represented because most mobiles are now in the developing world and most growth is in these markets.
The workshop will focus on mobile communication, but we will encourage papers that contrast this with the broader
set of ICTs.
2116
Thursday
08:00-17:00
Nothwestern
2117
Thursday
08:00-17:15
Ohio State
2130
Thursday
08:00-12:00
Chicago
Ballroom A
Global Communication and Social Change: Future Research Agendas and Trajectories
Sponsored Sessions
At its business meeting in Montreal, the Division for Global Communication and Social Change approved a proposal
for a one-day divisional preconference in Chicago. It will take its title from the name of the division, Global
Communication and Social Change: Research Agendas and Directions. The meeting considered that it is desirable and
timely for divisional as well as interested members of other ICA divisions to explore the evolving and diverse
meanings of the key words of the division's own nomenclature, and what these may suggest for future research
agendas and for the division's articulation of its identity(ies) and goals.
Global Communication and Social Change: Future Research Agendas and Trajectories
Sponsored Sessions
At its business meeting in Montreal, the Division for Global Communication and Social Change approved a proposal
for a one-day divisional preconference in Chicago. It will take its title from the name of the division, Global
Communication and Social Change: Research Agendas and Directions. The meeting considered that it is desirable and
timely for divisional as well as interested members of other ICA divisions to explore the evolving and diverse
meanings of the key words of the division's own nomenclature, and what these may suggest for future research
agendas and for the division's articulation of its identity(ies) and goals.
International Communication Association Executive Committee Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montreal, CANADA
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jon F. Nussbaum, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
2136
Thursday
08:00-17:30
Chicago
Ballroom G
Addressing Communication's Keywords Communicatively: Multicontext Exemplars and Interrogations of the
Uses of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Lois Foreman-Wernet, Capital U, USA
Albert Linderman, Sagis Corporation, USA
Brenda Dervin, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Introduction: Purpose and Procedures for the Workshop
Lois Foreman-Wernet, Capital U, USA
Albert Linderman, Sagis Corporation, USA
Keynote Session. Communicating as if Communication Matters: How Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology Reaches
Beyond Media and Messages, Context and Content
Brenda Dervin, Ohio State U, USA
Morning Group Session #1: Information Seeking and Use - Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Metatheory, Research, and Design
Brenda Dervin, Ohio State U, USA
Information Authenticity Redefined as Authentic Informing Through Dialogue: An Application of Dervin's SenseMaking Methodology
Roberta Brody, CUNY, USA
Understanding How People Think About Global Warming: An Application of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Angela Poe Dossett, Ohio State U, USA
How Undergraduates Grapple With Reading Journal Articles: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Explore
the Experiences of Beginning Students
Rachel A. Kirk, U of Tennessee, USA
The Information Literacy of New Master of Library Science Students: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology as
a Research Approach
Daniel Roland, Kent State U, USA
Exploring the Dynamic Aspects of Information and Communication Behavior: Putting Dervin's Sense-Making
Methodology Into Motion
Paul Solomon, U of South Carolina, USA
Morning Group Session #2: Health Communication: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Metatheory,
Research, and Design
Patricia Kelly, U of Tasmania, AUSTRALIA
Interactive Dialogue in a Health Communication Context: An Application of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Prudence Dalrymple, Drexel U, USA
Exploring Knowledge Creation and Utilization Among Doctors and Nurses: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making
Methodology
Louisa Mei Chun Lam, U of Wales, UNITED KINGDOM
Studying the Information Needs of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Drawing Conceptual Insights From Dervin's
Sense-Making Methodology
Paula Ormandy, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
The Information Work Users Do in the Chronic Illness Experience: A Study Informed in Part by Dervin's SenseMaking Methodology
Maria Souden, U of Michigan, USA
Morning Group Session #3: Organizational Communication - Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Metatheory, Research, and Design
Linda Schamber, U of North Texas, USA
Barometers of Institutional Inflexibility: Using the Movement Through Time-Space Conceptualizations From
Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Angela Coco, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Researching Organizational Publics as Though People Mattered: Facilitating Two-Way Communication Using
Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Lois Foreman-Wernet, Capital U, USA
Collaborative Designing With Fuzzy Foresight: Applications of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Effective
Communication Innovation
Peter Jones, U of Toronto, CANADA
Eliciting Chief Financial Officer "Deep Smarts" in a health maintenance organization (HMO): Applying Dervin's
Sense-Making Methodology
Albert Linderman, Sagis Corporation, USA
Morning Group Session #4: Online Communication: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Metatheory,
Research, and Design
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
How Designers Make Sense of Lighting Manufacturers' Websites: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Study Designers' Experiences
Jarmila A. Kopecka, Delft U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Sicco C. Santema, Delft U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Sense-Making in Website Design: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology in Website User Testing
Molly Martin, Seattle Times, USA
What Do Health Professions Do When They Search for Images? Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Explore the Image Retrieval Needs of Healthcare Professionals
Miguel E. Ruiz, U of North Texas, USA
Designing Online Public Spheres in the Context of Web 2.0: Web Design Metatheory and Practice Using Dervin's
Sense-Making Methodology
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Collecting Information for software requirements: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Georg Strom, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Morning Group Session #5: Social and Critical Theory (A): Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Metatheory, Research, and Design
Peter Shields, Eastern Washington U, USA
Verbing "Political Communication": Potential Uses of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Laurel Suzanne Gleason, Ohio State U, USA
Forward to the Past: Critiquing Web 2.0's Notions of Dialogue Through Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
John W. Higgins, Menlo College, USA
The Craft of Rhetorical Invention: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Examine Individual Differences in
Reasoning About Communication
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
"Subject" as "Actor" in Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology: Keyword Reflections From Critical Theory
Ed McLuskie, Boise State U, USA
Negotiating Peace Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Christlin Parimalanathan Rajendram, Eastern U, SRI LANKA
Debriefing of Morning Groups
Lois Foreman-Wernet, Capital U, USA
Afternoon Group Session #6: Audience Reception: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Metatheory,
Research, and Design
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Fostering Students' Critical Responses to Cultural Experiences Through the Use of Dervin's Sense-Making
Methodology
Lois Foreman-Wernet, Capital U, USA
Online Fan Communities as Dialoging Entities: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Understand
Community Construction and Participation
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Studying Bollywood Cinema and Audiences: Verbing Transnationalism Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
as Research Approach
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Kavita Karan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Studying Viewer Relationships to Idealized Body Images: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology as Method
and Sensitizing Metatheoretical Framework
Vickie Rutledge Shields, Eastern Washington U, USA
Afternoon Group Session #7: Spirituality, Faith, and Communication: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
to Metatheory, Research, and Design
Kathleen D. Clark, U of Akron, USA
Using Contemplative Spirituality in Collaboration With Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Interrogate
Communicative Proceduring
Kathleen D. Clark, U of Akron, USA
Faith and the Environment: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Explore Meaningful Connections
Joshua Hause, Ohio State U, USA
Studying Clergy and the Sermon Preparation Task: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Daniel Roland, Kent State U, USA
Afternoon Group Session #8: Pedagogy as Communication: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Metatheory, Research, and Design
John W. Higgins, Menlo College, USA
Understanding Students' Reception of Study Materials: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Angela Coco, U Of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Teaching Students Communicatively: Twenty Years of Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Audience
Reception, User Studies, Philosophy, Methodology, and Interviewing
Brenda Dervin, Ohio State U, USA
Critical Pedagogy and Student Self-Reflexivity: Facilitating With Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
John W. Higgins, Menlo College, USA
Creating Wise Global Citizens: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Understand Transformative Learning
in Higher Education
Patricia Kelly, U of Tasmania, AUSTRALIA
Learning as Emerging Through Dialogue: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology in Designing Critical
Pedagogy
Christlin Parimalanathan Rajendram, Eastern U, SRI LANKA
Afternoon Group Session #9: Knowledge Sharing and Management: Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
to Metatheory, Research, and Design
Molly Martin, Seattle Times, USA
Knowledge Management in the Workplace Context: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Design Effective
Online Knowledge Sharing and Exchange
Bonnie Wai-Yi Cheuk, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Bridging Gaps Between Software Developers and Corporate Support Teams Mandated to Facilitate End Users: Using
Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Address Communication Issues
Albert Linderman, Sagis Corporation, USA
Truth in Participation Processes: Potentials and Challenges of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology in Eliciting
Mindful Participation in Non-Western, Underserved Communities
Michel J. Menou, Les Rosiers sur Loire, FRANCE
Traversing Interdisciplinary Scholarly Camps: Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Explore
Understandings and Practices of Boundary Crossing
Linda Schamber, U of North Texas, USA
Knowledge Management Beyond Keywords: Studying Knowledge Workers and Designing Systems to Meet Their
Needs Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Patricia C Nsc Souto, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Afternoon Group Session #10: Social and Critical Theory (B): Applying Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to
Metatheory, Research, and Design
Ed McLuskie, Boise State U, USA
How Students Construct Social Theories: Facilitating Student Explorations Applying Dervin's Sense-Making
Methodology
David Paul Easter, Ohio State U, USA
Refocusing the Social Justice Research Tradition to Pluralistic Voices: How Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Might Contribute
Sue Curry Jansen, Muhlenberg College, USA
Understanding "Others": Using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology to Study How People Overcome Prejudice
Renu Pariyadath, Ohio State U, USA
Surveillance Studies: Potential Uses of Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology
Peter Shields, Eastern Washington U, USA
3:30 - 4:30 p.m. Debriefing of Afternoon Groups
Albert Linderman, Sagis Corporation, USA
4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Closing Comments
Brenda Dervin, Ohio State U, USA
Presenters use Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology (SMM) in small or large part to look at phenomena
communicatively, framed as dialogue and focused on sense-making. In SMM, most differences above represent
"noun" worlds, engraved by history and normative practices. Within SMM, nouns are bracketed as substantive
surfaces to examine universalities in the human condition of communicative "verbs." One workshop purpose is
normative -- people with like-minded substantive interests sharing understandings of theory, method, results,
conclusions. The larger purpose is for every participant to work systematically at communicating across boundaries -to surround and interrogate two questions: If, how, when, and with what success and struggles SMM was used to: 1)
transcend nouns and focus on communicating verbs; and 2) implement the dialogic theory that is SMM's foundation.
This is a working workshop. Persons not listed as presenters will be welcome.
2118
Thursday
08:30-17:00
Purdue
Media Ethics: Preconference
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Ethical issues have accompanied the development of media studies from its inception. However, it seems that
agreement on a broad conceptual framework for media ethics is still to be established and a broad dialogue between
theoretical perspectives on ethics and contemporary media practitioners yet to be achieved. The preconference will
provide a platform for these debates in the areas of transcultural discourse ethics, virtue ethics, new ethical
formations, representation of otherness, audiences responsibility and more. The reception is sponsored by New York
U's Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and Goldsmiths, U of London, FAO Centre for the study of
Global Media and Democracy.
2119
Thursday
08:30-17:00
Wisconsin
Media Ethics Breakout
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
The preconference will bring together communication scholars, media theorists, journalists and practitioners to
collectively consider the question of media ethics. Ethics has recently emerged as a central concern in the humanities
and social sciences, as well as in various subsets of media and communication studies. An increasing number of
scholars are now involved in issues directly pertaining to the relation of media and ethics while drawing on various
philosophical traditions. While ethical issues have accompanied the development of media studies from its inception
and, agreement on a broad conceptual framework for media ethics is still to be established and a broad dialogue
between theoretical perspectives on ethics and contemporary media practitioners yet to be achieved. The
preconference will provide a platform for such an attempt.
2135
Thursday
08:30-16:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
2210
Thursday
09:00-16:30
Illinois
2213
Thursday
09:00-17:00
Michigan
Organizational Communication Doctoral Consortium: Multidisciplinary Research on Organizational
Communication
Sponsored Sessions
The purpose of this consortium is to develop some actionable ideas for young scholars to participate in sustaining an
interdisciplinary focus in teaching and research while at the same time maintaining the core identity that has
developed for organizational communication over the last several decades. As a relatively applied discipline,
organizational communication seeks to have important input to practice, problem-solving, and policy. Yet, one of the
key ingredients to true problem focused-research and teaching that can inform complex issues is the intellectual spark
and challenge that comes from seeking ideas in other disciplines and collaborating in interdisciplinary teams.
Research consistently demonstrates that the most productive outcomes typically come from diverse teams that pool
the intellectual resources from multiple disciplines. The format consists of panels of colleagues who are experienced
in interdisciplinary research and teaching and who are tasked to share insights with young scholars seeking to
maximize the potential impact of their research and teaching in organizational communication. The preconference
will focus on providing concrete suggestions that are consonant with the careers needs of junior scholars who will
soon grow into the future leaders of our field. The session focuses on motivating our newest colleagues to pursue the
interdisciplinary option and to work through some concrete, actionable, realistic ways to do so. The consortium will
concurrently address a variety of professional and career issues of young scholars with the goal of participants leaving
with concrete, useful professional advice and direction.
Introduction to Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Sponsored Sessions
This preconference will be a full-day workshop on Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM), led by one of the preeminent experts in the field -- Deborah Kashy. Dr. Kashy is not only exceptionally well informed about HLM, but has
also shown considerable ability to translate that knowledge to beginners in workshop formats (for years she has lead
the dyadic data analysis workshop for the internationally-recognized "Data Analysis Training Institute of
Connecticut"). Dr. Kashy will lead the entire workshop using SPSS as the software tool and is able to pitch the
workshop broadly, shifting from examples involving dyadic data analysis applications (her particular expertise) to
other applications where participants are nested within a higher-order factor (e.g., groups, media studies).
Affective Audiences: Analysing Media Users, Consumers and Fans
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U Of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Alina Dobreva, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Nancy Baym, U of Kansas, USA
Robert Burnett, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Christine Scodari, Florida Atlantic U, USA
Denise D. Bielby, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jostein Gripsrud, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Sanna Inthorn, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
John Street, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Martin Scott, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Elizabeth Bird, U of South Florida, USA
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Jennifer Rauch, Long Island U, USA
Angela M. Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Brita Ytre-Arne, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Elizabeth Carnegie, Sheffield U, UNITED KINGDOM
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Curtis Coats, U of Colorado, USA
Robert Moses Peaslee, Texas Tech U, USA
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Emily Elizabeth West, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
Dana Neacsu, Rutgers U, USA
Hiesun C. Suhr, Rutgers U, USA
Lia Ungureanu, Rutgers U, USA
Michael R. Real, Royal Roads U, CANADA
R.M. Milner, U of Kansas, USA
Rebecca Williams, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Martina Schuegraf, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Theo Hug, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
Lothar Mikos, U of Film and Television, GERMANY
Michele Rosenthal, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Rivka Ribak, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Sarah Banet-Weiser, U of Southern California, USA
Gayle S. Stever, Arizona State U, USA
Stijn Reijnders, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Shelley-Jean Bradfield, Indiana U, USA
Jonathan Alan Gray, Fordham U, USA
Samita Nandy, Curtin U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Katherine Sender, U of Pennsylvania, USA
David Gauntlett, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Jean Burgess, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Michael Mario Albrecht, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Omar O. Dumdum, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Suellen Rader Regonini, U of South Florida, USA
Virginia Anne Nightingale, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Criselda Garcia, U of the Phillipines, PHILIPPINES
Elizabeth Wissinger, City U of New York, USA
Daragh O'Reilly, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Jakob Eckstein, Blondheim TV und Film Produktion, GERMANY
Melanie Bourdaa, U of Bordeaux, FRANCE
Michael Lahey, Indiana U, USA
The study of audiences constitutes a central concern of contemporary (popular) communication research. As
Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama fills football stadia addressing enthusiastic supporters and political
commentators frequently refer to "Obama fans" and "Palin fans", evidence of the centrality of notions of affect and
participation in contemporary mediated communication - within and beyond the realm of traditional popular culture is abundant. This preconference explores the social, cultural, textual and psychological conditions through which
readers engage with, and attach meaning and emotional significance to the texts they privilege in their everyday life
media consumption. Corresponding with this year's conference theme - Keywords in Communication - the field of
audience studies constitutes a key conceptual battleground that has witnessed a number of paradigm changes over the
past half century which have both reflected and contributed to the wider discourses of Social and Cultural Theory.
"Affective Audiences" explores these recent paradigm changes by offering a dedicated space within the ICA
conference programme that combines empirical audience research with a thorough examination of the field's canon
and a discussion of its conceptual challenges vis-à-vis convergence and globalization.
2243
Thursday
09:00-16:00
Los Angeles
Preconference on Religion, Politics and the Media
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
In his Presidential Address to the 1998 ICA Conference in Jerusalem, Peter Monge joined a growing number of
voices in the academy in calling for American scholars to pay greater attention to the question of religion. This lacuna
is particularly notable as we look at the interaction of religion, media, and politics at this point in the development of
American political culture (and in the so-called "post-9/11 era"). This preconference is intended to be a day of
dialogue on the questions and challenges in studying the intersections between religion, politics, and the media in
American life and American public culture. It will consist of four sessions. Three will be "round tables" of four
invited panelists, structured to encourage dialogue amongst panelists and participants around key questions of the
interaction between these social dimensions. Panelists will make brief informal presentations followed by open
discussion.
2270
Thursday
09:30-17:00
Student Center East Room 302
2430
Thursday
13:00-16:00
Chicago
Ballroom A
The Future is Prologue: New Media, New Histories?
Sponsored Sessions
Organized by the ICA Communication History Interest Group and the editors of New Media & Society, this
preconference brings together scholars interested in historical research relating to the challenges of historical methods
of research as applied to new media (broadly construed). New media encompass both new opportunities and new
dilemmas for scholars. This ICA pre-conference invites participants to reflect on ways to analyze, preserve , and
understand new media in a manner that is both sensitive to the past and to future needs of historical research. The
history of new media is a burgeoning new subfield, but one aspect that often goes overlooked is how new media
involve new ways of doing history. The purpose of this pre-conference is to focus attention on the shifting needs of
historical scholarship about new media. It will include a demonstration of new technologies for collaboration and
visualization under development at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory, U of Illinois at Chicago.
International Communication Association Annual Board of Directors' Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jon F. Nussbaum, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montreal, CANADA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
Yu-li Liu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Gianpietro Mazzoleni, U of Milan, ITALY
Elena E. Pernia, U of the Philippines - Diliman, PHILIPPINES
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Aldo Vasquez Rios, U de San MartÃn de Porres - Escuela de Ciencias de Comunicacion, PERU
Michele Cheng Hoon Khoo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Mikaela L. Marlow, U of Idaho, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Bowling Green State U, USA
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
James W. Neuliep, St. Norbert College, USA
Pamela J. Kalbfleisch, U of North Dakota, USA
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Mark Aakhus, Rutgers U, USA
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, USA
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, USA
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
David J. Phillips, U of Toronto, CANADA
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
2444
Thursday
13:00-17:00
Miami
Preconference on Fair Use and Academic Freedom: Asserting Fair Use Rights in Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patricia A. Aufderheide, American U, USA
Chris Boulton, U of Massachusetts, USA
Participants
Peter Decherney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Tarleton Gillespie, Cornell U, USA
Robert Goldman, Lewis & Clark College, USA
Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern U, USA
Bill Herman, Hunter College, USA
Renee Hobbs, Temple U, USA
Sut Jhally, U of Massachusetts, USA
Mark Latonero, California State U, Fullerton, USA
Kembrew McLeod, U of Iowa, USA
Hector Postigo, Temple U, USA
This preconference is a working session of about 40 communication scholars who will brainstorm research to analyze
the problems of access to copyrighted material in the academic field of communication today, and to develop a
proposal for addressing those problems further within our professional context. We expect that participants will look
upon this event as the beginning of a project. The format will be that of a workshop; there will be no paper
presentations. Communication scholars need fair use to be able to do their work. Scholars and creators have
increasingly found copyright restrictions to impose burdens harsh enough to affect the range, quality and type of work
that we undertake. The recent rise of digital making and sharing practices, in combination with the growth of
broadband distribution, has made this problem increasingly acute. In this process, the ideology of authorship--a
reverence for individual authorship that is a legacy of 19th century Romanticism and that carefully excludes the social
aspects of creativity--has been sedulously invoked by the publishers, distributors and content companies with which
scholars and creators must interact. Marginalized, by contrast, has been the underlying goal of copyright, to promote
and reward the creation of culture. Similarly marginalized has been the recognition of art or expression not merely as
finished objects but as practice, to borrow an insight from Raymond Williams, one of the founding thinkers of the
field of communication. Communication scholars have special needs to access copyrighted material in order both to
analyze it and to create new work, as well as to teach effectively and support student creative and scholarly projects.
Circulation of this work, not only in nonprofit environments but in the corporate world of distribution, is critical to its
evolution and to growth of the field. Often neither the authors nor their publishers and distributors are well-informed
about copyright and their options under the law. At the same time that scholars and creators have encountered
obstacles to doing their work well because of copyright, they have also collectively found ways to assert their rights
and develop tools to address the problem. For instance, as has been demonstrated dramatically and publicly since
2005, with the launch of the Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use, the copyright
doctrine of fair use is a vital and useable tool to fairly and legally employ copyrighted material in new academic and
creative work. In the wake of its success in changing industry practice, other creator groups, including media literacy
teachers and film scholars, have publicly established their interpretations of fair use, through their professional
associations. Communication scholars could build upon this example and extend the effort in the interest of their
research and teaching.
2545
Thursday
13:30-16:30
Scottsdale
Corporate Social Responsibility and Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Robert L. Heath, U of Houston, USA
Participants
Organizational Perspective
Mette Morsing, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Government Perspective
Mordecai Lee, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Societal Perspective
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
CSR Rhetoric
Oyvind Ihlen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
CSR & Reputation
Mark Eisenegger, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Respondent
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is emerging as a central issue for business and the academy and public relations
is taking an active role in aligning stakeholder and community concerns with the changing relationships between
business, government and society. The purpose of this pre-conference is to discuss the key issues for public relations
and organizational communication that arise from the CSR phenomena in order to further the research agenda in this
area. The conference should be of interest to scholars in the public relations division and the organizational
communication division.
2630
Thursday
16:00-17:00
Chicago
Ballroom A
International Communication Association's Annual Member Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
The annual member meeting provides an opportunity for members to raise issuesregarding the association and to
introduce busniness items to the ICA board of directors. This is the members' venue to shape the association and its
future direction
2801
Thursday
18:00-19:15
Grand
Ballroom I
ICA Opening Plenary: Keywords in Regulation, or How the FCC and Others See Regulation in the Digital Age
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Robert W. McChesney, U of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
Michael Copps, Federal Communications Commission, USA
Robin Mansell, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Joseph Torres, Free Press, USA
Georgette Wang, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
In this panel Acting FCC Chair Michael Copps will share thoughts about the new Commission taking shape, with
particular emphasis on the challenge to ensure public interest protections in the Digital Age. Following his talk,
panelists from the U.S., UK and Taiwan will offer their views on the same issue.
2933
Thursday
19:30-20:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
ICA's 59th Annual Conference Opening Welcome Reception
Sponsored Sessions
The welcome reception is open to all conference attendees
3201
Friday
09:00-10:15
Grand Ballroom I
Uncertainty and Information Management: Reflections on the Current and Future State of These Constructs
(Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Interpersonal Communication
Language & Social Interaction
Health Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Relational Dialectics Theory: Reclaiming Uncertainty Through the Formation of New Meanings
Leslie A. Baxter, U of Iowa, USA
Dawn O. Braithwaite, U of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA
Uncertainty and Communication in Couples Coping With Serious Illness
Daena Goldsmith, Lewis and Clark College, USA
The Theory of Communication and Uncertainty Management: Implications From the Wider Realm of Information
Behavior
Timothy P Hogan, Department of Veterans Affairs, USA
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
The Model of Social Information Seeking via CMC: Information Seeking and Interpersonal Outcomes Using the
Internet
Artemio Ramirez, Jr., Arizona State U, USA
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
3210
Friday
09:00-10:15
Illinois
3211
Friday
09:00-10:15
Indiana
Public Session Liaison Committee
Sponsored Sessions
This panel will discuss ICA strategies for developing links to international organizations. This session is an open
discussion forum for a broad debate about new ways of collaboration with international organizations, academic and
nonacademic with members of the Liaison Committee.
Organizational Discourse: Theory and Research
Organizational Communication
Chair
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Discourse Structuration in Practitioner Accounts of the Normative Practices of Informed Consent to Treatment:
(Re)producing the Discourse of Liability
James O. Olufowote, Boston College, USA
Key Findings in Discourse on Organizational Change
Catrin E. Johansson, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Not Trusting Trust and Doubting Doubt: Practices of Emotion Management in the Financial Industry
Dina V. Nekrassova, Rutgers U, USA
Social Influence in Organizational Discourse Networks
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bart J. van den Hooff, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sonja Utz, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marleen Huysman, Vrije U – Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montreal, CANADA
3212
Friday
09:00-10:15
Iowa
Cultural Appropriations of New Communication Technologies
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Mark Latonero, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Participants
Discursive Strategies of Gender Mainstreaming: Essentialism in International Technology Policy
Victoria Newsom, Loyola Marymount U, USA
Lara B. Lengel, Bowling Green State U, USA
Young People and the Digital Divide: An Ethnographic Study of Media-Have-Less Youths
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
E-Government and Citizen Participation in Developing Countries: The Case of China
Yuehua Wu, Michigan State U, USA
Johannes Bauer, Michigan State U, USA
iPhones in China: The Contradictory Stories of Media-ICT Globalization in the Era of Media Convergence and
Corporate Synergy
Yu Shi, Pennsylvania State U - Harrisburg, USA
Respondent
Sujatha Sosale, U of Iowa, USA
3213
Friday
09:00-10:15
Michigan
Commandments And Beyond: Ethics And Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
Apologizing in a Globalizing World: Crisis Communication and Apologetic Ethics
Finn Frandsen, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Winni Johansen, Aarhus School of Business, U, DENMARK
Does a Code of Ethics of a Public Relations Firm Make a Difference?
Eyun-Jung Ki, U of Alabama, USA
Hong-Lim Choi, U of Iowa, USA
Jonghyuk Lee, U of Iowa, USA
Organizational Environment, Autonomy, and the Ethics Counselor Role in Public Relations
Jinae Kang, U of Alabama, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
The Ethics Codes of Public Relations Firms Across Countries: The United States and South Korea
Eyun-Jung Ki, U of Alabama, USA
Soo-Yeon Kim, U of Florida, USA
3214
Friday
09:00-10:15
Michigan State
Children, Advertising, and Persuasive Techniques
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Ariel Chernin, Center on Media and Child Health, USA
Participants
Children's Understanding of Advertisers' Persuasive Tactics
Esther Rozendaal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Is Children's Understanding of Nonspot Advertising Comparable to Their Understanding of Television Advertising?
Laura Helen Owen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Charlie Lewis, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
Susan Auty, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Increasing Children's Understanding of Advergames' Commercial Nature: Does an Advertising Literacy Lesson or Ad
Break Make a Difference?
Susannah R. Stern, U of San Diego, USA
Soontae An, Kansas State U, USA
Using Brand Characters to Promote Young Children's Fruit Consumption
Simone Marijke de Droog, U of Amsterdam / ASCoR, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peer-ing into Prohealth Advertisements for Children: Analysis of Their Reactions to and Suggestions for Campaign
Visuals
Elizabeth Johnson Avery, U of Tennessee, USA
Courtney Carpenter Childers, U of Tennessee, USA
Cheryl Ann Lambert, U of Tennessee, USA
Sora Kim, DePaul U, USA
3215
Friday
09:00-10:15
Minnesota
Promoting Open Competition in Networked-Based Content, Applications and Services
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Participants
A Lost Promise: The Lack of Interoperability for Open Standard Document Formats
Rajiv Shah, U of Illinois, USA
Jay P. Kesan, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Analog Fights Over Digital Rights: The Congressional Debate Over Copyright and Digital Rights Management,
2003-2006
Bill D. Herman, Hunter College, USA
Electronic Communications Between Regulation and Competition Law
Natascha Just, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Lock Down on the Third Screen: How Wireless Carriers Evade Regulation of Their Video Services
Robert M. Frieden, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Respondent
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Efforts to provide the benefits of market competition in applications software and in communication services and
content are evaluated in this panel, including open standard document formats, intellectual property measures, and
competition policy.
3216
Friday
09:00-10:15
Nothwestern
Motherhood-Parenthood through Gendered Prisms
Feminist Scholarship
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Participants
Consequences of Being the Team "Mom": Women in Sports Information and the Friendliness Trap
Marie Hardin, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Erin Elizabeth Whiteside, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Empowering Mothers of Missing Women in American Television Media
Isra Ali, Rutgers, the State U, USA
Politicizing the Personal? The Storying of Age-Related Infertility in Public Discourses
Jennifer J. Bute, Ohio U, USA
Lynn Marie Harter, Ohio U, USA
Erika Kirby, Creighton U, USA
Marie A. Thompson, Ohio State U, USA
Happy Parent #1 Day: Gender as Rhetorical Strategy in the Same-Sex Marriage Debate
Carrie Anne Platt, North Dakota State U, USA
Respondent
Jimmie Manning, Northern Kentucky U, USA
3217
Friday
09:00-10:15
Ohio State
Researching Social Constructions of Identity: Examining How the Use of Keywords Enhances and Complicates
Communication Scholarship
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Examining the Intersection of Gender and Race/Ethnicity: How Keywords Within Communication and Other
Disciplines Influence Studies of Identity Negotiation
Cerise L. Glenn, Purdue U, USA
Ronald L. Jackson II, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Defining Socioeconomic and Social Class: Explicating the Use of Keywords in International Communication
Research
LaKesha Graham, Rockhurst U, USA
Looking at Stigma, Disclosure, and Identity Negotiation: How Keywords Impact Constructing and Presenting
Communication Research
Andrew Spieldenner, Howard U, USA
What is "the Latino Identity?": Constructing Latino Voters in U.S. Presidential Campaign 2008
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
Communication scholars who research identity of underrepresented groups negotiate the tensions of obtaining a
distinctive voice within their respective sub-fields while showing connection to them. Further, they negotiate how the
constructs and keywords they utilize shape their research since terms are not consistently used within the field of
communication and in other fields that share common interests. This panel addresses the manner in which these
tensions manifest while examining the unique contributions of communication inquiry.
3218
Friday
09:00-10:15
Purdue
Global Media, Hybridity, and Cultural Identities
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Giorgia Aiello, Colorado State U, USA
Participants
"The Amazing Race" in Burkina Faso: A Study of Burkinabé in the Hybrid Encounter
Leslie Steeves, U of Oregon, USA
An Imagined Global Chinese Community: Television and Diaspora in Phoenix TV Documentary "Chinatown"
Le Han, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Bollyculture in the Diaspora
Andy Kavoori, U of Georgia, USA
Kalyani Chadha, U of Maryland, USA
The War Over D-War: An Investigation of the Global Production, Distribution, and Reception of a Strategically
Hybridized Cultural Text
Jaehee Cho, U of Texas, USA
Herim Erin Lee, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Patrick D. Murphy, Southern Illinois U - Edwardsville, USA
3219
Friday
09:00-10:15
Wisconsin
Advances in the Study of Self-Initiated Repair
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Jenny Mandelbaum, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
A Twig on a Branch of the Tree of Repair
Emanuel A. Schegloff, U Of California, Los Angeles, USA
Cascading Troubles in the Organization of Repair
Gene H. Lerner, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Celia Kitzinger, U of York, UNITED KINGDOM
Geoff Raymond, UC Santa Barbara, USA
Estefania Guimaraes, Roehampton U, UNITED KINGDOM
'Or'-Initiated Self-Repair
Celia Kitzinger, U of York, USA
Gene H. Lerner, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
This panel presents papers that advance our understanding of conversational repair. It opens up the matter of selfinitiation of repair, greatly expanding our understanding of the repertoire of practices speakers have at their disposal,
and the range of interactional consequences these practices may have. Schegloff lays out nine distinct self repair
operations, and then details how one type operates. Lerner, et al. show how repair solutions themselves can become
sources of "cascading trouble" in both talk and body behavior. Kitzinger and Lerner describe a distinct lexical form of
self-repair - 'or'-initiated repair - and then expand the analysis to include other lexically-initiated and tacitly-initiated
forms of repair.
3221
Friday
09:00-10:15
Lincolnshire II
Multitasking in Daily Media Use: Theoretical Approaches and Empirical Explorations
Information Systems
Mass Communication
Chair
Peter Vorderer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
"It's Hard to Concentrate on One Thing!" What Can Diaries Tell Us About Media Use?
Michael Jäckel, U of Trier, GERMANY
Multitasking and Multiple Media Use: Diary, Survey, and Experimental Methods
Se-Hoon Jeong, Indiana U – Purdue U Indianapolis, USA
Martin Fishbein, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Weiyu Zhang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Using Computer and Television at the Same Time: Different Forms of Multitasking?
Christoph Kuhlmann, TU - Ilmenau, GERMANY
Jens Wolling, Ludwig-Maximilians-U Munchen, GERMANY
Prevalence and Origins of Multitasking in U Class Rooms: An Intercultural Comparison
Peter Vorderer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Matthias R. Hastall, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Respondent
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Multitasking, the performance of two or more activities simultaneously, is a very common phenomenon in today's
media environments. Media offerings are frequently used either in combination (e.g., radio with internet) or media
usage is combined with non-media activities (e.g., eating, housework). Particularly younger adults spend more time
than ever before with multiple media use, and such activity may account for up to half of the time spent with media.
Little is known, however, about determinants, processes, and effects of multitasking media use. Multitasking media
behavior furthermore presents a serious challenge for the measurement of media exposure. This panel examines the
importance and effects of multitasking media usage and presents new theoretical approaches and recent empirical
findings.
3223
Friday
09:00-10:15
Great America II
Lost in Translation: Cultural Cues and the Challenges of Research in Intercultural Contexts
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Contextualizing Research on the Health of the Lebanese Elderly
Nadine A. Yehya, Purdue U, USA
Between Scriptures and Transcriptions: Hindu Indian Female Priests and Career Discourses
Suchitra Shenoy, Purdue U, USA
Doctor-Physician Communication in China: Cultural and Social Change in the Transition From Traditional Medicine
to Western Medicine
Qian Wang, Purdue U, USA
Intercultural Commonalities in Research: Cultural Nuances, Anecdotes, and Experiences
Elena Gabor, Purdue U, USA
Respondent
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
In this roundtable discussion, panelists will discuss the challenges of doing research in non-English speaking settings
and reporting findings in English. Panelists will highlight the loss of key cultural dimensions and concepts when
translating them into English. Panelists will also discuss multiplicity of identities including the outsider-insider
statuses, issues pertaining to representation and positionality, translation and transcription predicaments, and the
search for appropriate native words encountered in conducting research in such settings. The panel will conclude by a
re-telling of experiences conducting research in the United States. As with roundtable discussions, maximum time
will be spent interacting with audience members, learning from each others' experiences, finding ways to overcome
these challenges as well as in designing innovative strategies to use such settings to develop ethical and qualitatively
rich data.
3230
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Internet Use & Abuse
Communication and Technology
Chair
John Christian Feaster, U of Richmond, USA
Participants
Active Audience and Automatic Usage: A Test of Rival Hypotheses on Automaticity of Internet Use
Taiquan Peng, City U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jonathan J.H. Zhu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Loneliness as the Cause and the Effect of Problematic Internet Use: The Relationship Between Internet Use and
Psychological Well-Being
Junghyun Kim, Kent State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Problematic Internet Use and Psychosocial Well-Being Among MMO Players
Scott Caplan, U of Delaware, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Nick Kenlun Yee, Stanford U, USA
Academic Internet Use: Issues and Lessons in e-Research
Han Woo PARK, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
3231
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Methods & Measures in Technology Research
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, USA
Participants
Reactivity of Real-Time Response Measurement: How Do RTR Techniques Influence Processing of Media Content?
Andreas M. Fahr, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Annette Fahr, Forschung & Analyse, GERMANY
Mobile Phone Communication Competence: Development and Validation of a New Measure
Emil Bakke, Ohio U, USA
Judging a Book by the Cover: Using Facial Expressions to Predict Performance
Sun Joo Ahn, Stanford U, USA
Maria Jabon, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Uncertainty or Ambivalence: Exploring the "Don't Know" Response in a Public Opinion Survey About
Nanotechnology
Tsung-Jen Shih, U of Wisconsin, USA
3232
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Deliberation, Political Engagement, and Participation in the Public Sphere (High Density)
Political Communication
Chair
Gianfranco Pasquino, Dipartimento di Organizzazione e Sistema Politico, ITALY
Participants
Audience Participation: Media Power in the Emergent Public Spheres in China
Lingling Pan, Temple U, USA
Thomas L. Jacobson, Temple U, USA
Deliberative and Participatory Democracy? Ideological Strength and the Processes Leading From Deliberation to
Political Engagement
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Young Min Baek, U of Pennsylvannia, USA
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication, USA
Multisite Videoconferencing as a Public Sphere in First Nation Communities: A Case Study
Fenwick McKelvey, Ryerson U, CANADA
Susan O'Donnell, National Research Council, CANADA
Promoting Participatory and Deliberative Democracy: The Roles of Newspapers and Television News
Seth K. Goldman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Diana C. Mutz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Citizen Audience and European Transcultural Public Spheres: Exploring Civic Engagement in European Political
Communication
Swantje Lingenberg, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Discussing Measures of Political Discussion: An Evaluation of the Measurement of Network Size, Agreement, and
Disagreement and Implications for Inferences
William P. Eveland, Jr., Ohio State U, USA
Myiah Hutchens Hively, Ohio State U, USA
Alyssa Morey, Ohio State U, USA
Towards a Theoretical Framework for Public Deliberation in Africa
George William Lugalambi, Makerere U, UGANDA
3233
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
New Member and Graduate Student Orientation to ICA and the Conference
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Mikaela L. Marlow, U of Idaho, USA
Michele Cheng Hoon Khoo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
This session is designed for new members to ICA, though all members interested in learning more about the
organization are welcome. The session will include : (a) a general overview of ICA as an organization; (b) an
overview of the conference; and (c) opportunities for participation in ICA. Questions and discussion will occur
throughout the session.
3234
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Forms of Talk on Radio and Television
Mass Communication
Participants
Changing Characteristics of the Broadcast News Interview
Martin Mathew Montgomery, U of Strathclyde, UNITED KINGDOM
Belligerent Broadcasting and Business on Television
Michael Higgins, U of Strathclyde, UNITED KINGDOM
Angela Smith, U of Sunderland, UNITED KINGDOM
Agony on Air: The Mediation of Advice in a Popular Radio Program
Joanna Thornborrow, U of Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM
The Audience of One: Interactive Television and the Architecture of Participation
Stephanie Marriott, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
The study of forms of talk on radio and television makes a fundamental contribution to our understanding of the
discourses of broadcast media and how they communicate with audiences. The analysis of broadcast talk is
interdisciplinary in its approach, drawing inspiration from linguistic pragmatics, the sociology of interaction, ordinary
language philosophy and phenomenology. Contributors to this panel are mainly linguists working in departments of
media and communications studies.
3235
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Expanding the Study of Agenda Setting
Mass Communication
Chair
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
Assessing Agenda Setting's Theoretical Utility in the Developing World: The Case of Kenya
Uche Titus Onyebadi, Southern Illinois U, USA
The Compelling Arguments Hypothesis and Individual Differences in Sensitivity to Negative Issue Attributes
Janice L. Liebhart, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Media Attention Dynamics in Complex Societies: A Conceptual Framework
Annie Waldherr, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
From What the Public Thinks About to What the Public Does:Agenda-Setting Effects as a Mediator of Media Use and
Civic Engagement
Soo Jung Moon, U of West Georgia, USA
3236
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
The Production of Global "Reality": Identity at the Intersection of Music and Television
Popular Communication
Participants
Reality TV and Globalization
Biswarup Sen, U of Oregon, USA
Making the Brand: The Creation and Formatting of a Global Popular Music Product
Chenjerai Kumanyika, Pennsylvania State U, USA
From Affective Economics to the Economy of Aesthetics: The Case of French Idol as a Glocalized Hybrid
Jill G. Campaiola, Rutgers U, USA
What "American Idol Gives Back": Cultural Incentives to Global Charity
Charles Michael Elavsky, Pennsylvania State U, USA
This panel considers the impact that music-based 'reality' television shows have on developing the broader logics of
production and experience related to music as symbolic cultural capital. Exploring these developments as they play
out across different cultural contexts illustrates the affective consequences such formats have for the operation of
popular music both for conceptualizing the politics of identity and as a form of global communication.
3237
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
Titillating News
Journalism Studies
Chair
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Participants
Explaining Sensationalist Television News: A Comparison of Dutch, Flemish, Walloon, and French Newscasts
Paul G. HendriksVettehen, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Mariska Kleemans, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Tabloidization and Coverage of Domestic Violence in Hong Kong Newspapers
Kiu Chor Ho, The U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Thomas Abraham, U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
The Value of Emotion: An Examination of Television Journalists' Notions on Emotionality
Mervi Pantti, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Journalists as Actors in Social Dramas of Apology
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U - Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Respondent
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
The traditional ideal of journalism, as a conduit of cold hard facts, has prompted pontification about sensationalism in
news for centuries. The presenters in this paper session add substance to this debate by defining sensationalism,
identifying the conditions that produce it, investigating how journalists think about it, and offering insights into the
social functions of news dramas.
3240
Friday
09:00-10:15
Denver
New Media, National Image, and Social Transition in the Chinese Context
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Eddie Kuo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
From Digital Divide to Linguistic Divide: Chinese in the Cyber World
Eddie Kuo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Online Journalism and Media Censorship
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
One Country Two Expectations: The Comparison of Public Agendas in Shanghai and Guangzhou during Beijing
Olympic Games
Huailin Chen, U of Macau, MACAO
"One Event, Different Interpretations": Readings of the Beijing Olympics, Readings of China
Xiaoxia Cao, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Changing of the Image of China: A Framing Analysis of Coverage in the Time Magazine From 1992 to 2008
Di Wang, U of Macau, MACAO
Legitimizing Ruptures of Development Trajectories: Party Press Discourse on Rural Society in Transitional China
(1997-2006)
Yunya Song, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
This session covers a wide range of interesting and meaningful issues in communication in the Chinese context in the
transitional information age. Two papers explore the impact and control of the new media, three papers discuss the
national image of China as related to the 2008 Olympics and the coverage of China in the U.S. press, and one paper
examines the discourse that legitimizes raptures in rural development in the Party press during China's transition to a
bureaucratic capitalist society.
3241
Friday
09:00-10:15
Houston
Communication and Organ Donation
Health Communication
Chair
Jakob D. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Evaluating a Bone Marrow Storyline on The Bold and the Beautiful: The Impact of Identification, Transportation, and
Motivation on Knowledge and Action
Lauren B. Movius, U of Southern California, USA
Charlotte Lapsansky, U of Southern California, USA
Janel S. Schuh, U of Southern California, USA
Sandra Buffington, U of Southern California, USA
Paula Woodley, U of Southern California, USA
Michael J. Cody, U of Southern California, USA
Predictors of Bone Marrow, Organ, and Egg Donation: Applying the Situational Theory of Problem Solving
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
Hongmei Shen, U of Maryland, USA
Susan E. Morgan, Rutgers U, USA
Examining the Role of Framing the Narrative in Persuasive Organ Donation Messages: A Test of Psychological
Reactance Theory
Brian L. Quick, U of Illinois- Urbana-Champaign, USA
Allison M Scott, U of Illinois, USA
A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Public Education Campaigns on the Promotion of Organ Donation
Thomas H. Feeley, U of Buffalo, USA
Shinil Moon, SUNY Buffalo, USA
3242
Friday
09:00-10:15
Kansas City
Media and Minorities
Political Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
"Mainstreaming" and "Nonmainstreaming" of Muslim Minority Audiences: The Role of Identification With Muslim
Community
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yanli Chen, Media Development Authority, SINGAPORE
Yulin Li, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Nurshahisdah Mokhtar, National Institute of Education, SINGAPORE
Esther Chew Sia Yap, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Media Effects on Group-Related Stereotypes and Policy Opinions: Evidence From a Two-Wave Panel Survey in a
Political Campaign
Christian Schemer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Onscreen Muslims: Media, Identity, Terrorism, and Public Policy
Nicole Anderson, U of California- Santa Barbara, USA
Mary Elizabeth Danis, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Michael Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Propagandizing the Status Quo: The Differential Impact of Cultivated Worldviews on Minorities
Laurel Suzanne Gleason, Ohio State U, USA
3243
Friday
09:00-10:15
Los Angeles
Newsworthiness and Gatekeeping
Mass Communication
Chair
Eric E. Peterson, U of Maine, USA
Participants
Examining the New Gatekeepers: News Portals' Inclusion and Ranking of Media and Events
CamLy Nguyen Bui, Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse U, USA
The Contingency of Intermedia Agenda-Setting. A Longitudinal Study in Belgium
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Stefaan Walgrave, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Centrality of News Article in the Blogosphere
CamLy Nguyen Bui, Syracuse U, USA
Yujing Ma, Syracuse U, USA
Attention and Prominence Dimensions of Salience for Major Online Newspapers' Coverage
Jeongsub Lim, Austin Peay State U, USA
3244
Friday
09:00-10:15
Miami
Corporate Politics/ Consumer Politics
Philosophy of Communication
Public Relations
Chair
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Producing Symbolic Power Through Practice: The Case of Public Relations
Lee Edwards, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
When Harm Is Done: Legitimization and Corporate Social Responsibility
Graham K. Knight, McMaster U, CANADA
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Buying Not Buying: Buy Nothing Day and Consumer Activism
Adrienne Shaw, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Finding Angelina Jolie in the Field of Global Neoliberal Governmentality
Julie Ann Wilson, U of Minnesota, USA
Respondent
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Are the boundaries of poltiics being transformed by consumer activism, celebrity culture, corporate claims to social
responsibility, and the saturated public relations environment? If so, what are the implications for questions of power
and public culture? This panel addresses these urgent questions from multiple angles.
3245
Friday
09:00-10:15
Scottsdale
On Community
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Garnet C. Butchart, U of South Florida, USA
Participants
The Incommunicable Community
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
The Exceptional Community: On Foreigners and Strangers
Garnet C. Butchart, U of South Florida, USA
Monuments, Memory, and Community in Post-Soviet Ukraine
Ihor Junyk, Cultural Studies Program, Trent U, CANADA
Of Ghosts, Future, and Memories
Briankle Chang, U of Massachusetts, USA
The concept of community is addressed critically from multiple perspectives in continental philosophy. Topics
converge on the ontology of community (its constitution in difference) and on the temporality of community (its
imagination in the future past). The purpose of the panel is to critically examine how community functions, its
constitution, its limits, and how ideas about community in critical communication theory and philosophy can be
reconceived.
3251
Friday
09:00-10:15
Belmont
Advertising, Aesthetics and the Public Sphere
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Mary Angela Bock, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Performativity of the Feminine and the Corporate: The 1981 Corporate Advertisement for the Seibu Retailing Group:
"Father Didn't Know - Mother Wants Her Own Desk"
Toyoko Sato, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Building Brand Value Through Visual Communication in the European Finance Sector
Angela Bargenda, Ecole Supérieure du Commerce Extérieur, FRANCE
The Art of Visual Communication
Joost Verhoeven, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Thomas van Rompay, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Prabath van Zanten, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Ad Th. Pruyn, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Missing Children, Milk Cartons, and Anxiety in the Public Sphere
J. Perry Howell, U of Iowa, USA
3301
Friday
10:30-11:45
Grand Ballroom I
Keyword: Anonymity (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Information Systems
Political Communication
Organizational Communication
Health Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Steve Rains, U of Arizona, USA
Participants
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Martin Tanis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sandra Petronio, Indiana U - Purdue U Indianapolis, USA
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
This keyword theme panel will address the following question: "Are the new technologies fostering anonymous
communication a curse or a cure for modern society?" Five experts from five different institutions representing
perspectives from six association divisions will explore this issue—and likely reach different conclusions. The panel
will include presentations from each of the panelists as well as ample discussion time to explore with the audience the
peril and promise of anonymity.
3310
Friday
10:30-11:45
Illinois
Session Sponsored by the German Communication Association: Stability and Change in German Journalism
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Defining Journalism and Measuring Journalistic Change
Maja Malik, U of Münster, GERMANY
Armin Scholl, U of Münster, GERMANY
Structure and Professional Role of Journalism in Transformation
Armin Scholl, U of Münster, GERMANY
Siegfried Weischenberg, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Journalistic Media Organizations in Transformation
Maja Malik, U of Munster, GERMANY
Journalistic Media Content in Transformation
Bernd Bloebaum, U of Muenster, GERMANY
Respondent
David H. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
In Germany - as in many other countries - journalism has been changing obviously during the last decades. However,
it still fulfils (more or less) a certain societal function. On the basis of two major research projects the panel analyzes
journalism in Germany and its transformation since the beginning of the 1990s. Together, both studies are able to
portray the structural and functional development on different levels of the journalistic system: journalists and their
professional roles, the organization of journalistic work in newsrooms and the formal and content-related variables of
media coverage. It will be discussed, to what extent a changing journalistic system still is identifiable and measurable
as journalism.
3311
Friday
10:30-11:45
Indiana
The Communicative Constitution of Organization: Multiple Approaches
Organizational Communication
Chair
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Disciplining the Journal: Journaling a Discipline
Stephanie J. Fox, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Consuelo Vasquez, U de Montreal, CANADA
Francois Cooren, U de Montreal, CANADA
Leaders Define Leadership: Discourses of Leadership Within an Academic Leadership Development Center
Brenda L. Berkelaar, Purdue U, USA
Elizabeth Ann Williams, Purdue U, USA
Jennifer S. Linvill, Purdue U, USA
The Communicative Constitution of Stakeholder Identification
Matt Koschmann, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
To Have or Not to Be: Possession of Action as Organizational Mode of Being
Nicolas Bencherki, U de Montreal, CANADA
Emilie Pelletier, U de Montreal, CANADA
Respondent
Tim Kuhn, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
3312
Friday
10:30-11:45
Iowa
What Framing Studies of News Reveal About China
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Siho Nam, U of North Florida, USA
Participants
China Through the Eyes of American Newspapers: Representation and Framing
Youling Liu, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Chinese Media in Change: A Comparison of Chinese Media Framing of the 2003 SARS Crisis and the 2008 Sichuan
Earthquake
Aimei Yang, Oklahoma U, USA
Media Transparency in Action: A Case Study of Media Coverage of a Controversy Between ENGOs and a Paper
Company in China
Anna Victorovna Klyueva, U of Oklahoma, USA
Aimei Yang, Oklahoma U, USA
Scare Sell? A Framing Analysis of News Coverage of the Recalled Chinese Products
Seong Choul Hong, Indiana U, USA
Respondent
Herman Wasserman, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
3313
Friday
10:30-11:45
Michigan
Reaching Across Borders: International Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Derina R. Holtzhausen, Oklahoma State U, USA
Participants
Public Diplomacy, Crisis Communication Strategies and Managing Nation Branding: The Case of Israel
Eli Avraham, U of North Texas, USA
The Effectiveness of the Galileo Message Strategy for International Development Campaigns
Yon Soo Lim, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
George A. Barnett, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
The Influence of a Cross-National Conflict Shift on a Transnational Corporation's Host Customers
Hyunji Lim, U of Florida, USA
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Winning American Hearts and Minds: A Longitudinal Study of China
Xiuli Wang, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3314
Friday
10:30-11:45
Michigan State
Bridge Building in Public Relations: Organization--Public Relationships
Public Relations
Chair
Lee Edwards, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Cultural Heritage and Public Relations: How Museums Establish Relationships With Their Local Community
Paul Capriotti, U Rovira Virgili, SPAIN
Employees as Boundary Spanners: Predicting Employees' External Communication Behavior Through EmployeeOrganization Relationships
Yunna Rhee, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
Examining The Impact of Source Credibility on Corporate Social Responsibility and Organization-Public
Relationships in Times of Crisis
Michel M. Haigh, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Pamela Brubaker, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Secrecy and Organization-Public Relationships: The Processes and Consequences of Secrecy-Communication
Strategies
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
Angelica Ruvarac, Purdue U, USA
Frye Nick, U of Missouri, USA
Seungyoon Lee, Purdue U, USA
3316
Friday
10:30-11:45
Nothwestern
Policy Off Our Backs: Critical Studies of Identity in Regulatory and Policy Cultures
Feminist Scholarship
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Nancy E. Worthington, Quinnipiac U, USA
Participants
Bringing Blue Skies Down to Earth: Gender, Local Identity, and Citizen Policymaking in Negotiations for Cable
Television in the U.S.
Bill Kirkpatrick, Denison U, USA
Deregulation is a Feminist Issue: The National Organizations for Women and the Fight Against Media Consolidation
Allison Perlman, Rutgers U-Newark, USA
Women, Technology Work, and Development in Malaysia: Contradictions Between Policy and Reality
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U, USA
Do Regulators Have Identities? Cultural Identity and Studies of Regulatory Culture
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Respondent
Kathryn C. Montgomery, American U, USA
At a time when feminism has been reduced once again to "the woman question," that is, how many women's bodies
are present in any given political process, it seems appropriate to explore the multiplicity of ways that gendered
oppression operates through communications policy and regulatory spheres. This panel engages and expands upon
contemporary work in critical policy studies by exploring media regulation through the lens of identity politics. By
analyzing local, national, and international regulatory spheres, papers in this session seek to disassemble the identityneutral analyses of media policy and reveal how gendered, classed, and raced assumptions have inflected, and
continue to impact, the policy making process, community and activist resistance, and the lived experiences of media
workers and citizens.
3317
Friday
10:30-11:45
Ohio State
The Political Uses of Black Popular Culture
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Richard Iton, U of Toronto, CANADA
Participants
"Bush Knocked Down the Towers": Conspiracy, History, and Identity Politics in Hip-Hop's Memory of 9/11
Heidi Khaled, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Improvising on Reality: The Black Prisoner as 1970s Cultural Icon
Dan Berger, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The "Dirty South": A Tropological Comparison of Racial Identity in American Popular Culture
Steven F. Rafferty, U of Southern California, USA
Discourses on the "Down Low": The Mediated Construction of an HIV/AIDS Policy Problem
Riley Snorton, U of Pennsylvania, USA
This panel examines the myriad ways black popular culture intervenes in discourses of politics, health, and
geography. With careful attention paid to both to physical space and the architecture of public memory, each paper
critically examines the structures that enable and constrain blackness. Using institutional and cultural approaches,
panelists explore both historical and contemporary examples of the ways black popular culture is both deployed and
deplored in broader struggles over space, race, and nation.
3318
Friday
10:30-11:45
Purdue
Predictors and Consequences of Health-Related Disclosures
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Rachel McLaren, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
A Multiple Goals Perspective on Topic Avoidance and Relationship Satisfaction in the Context of Breast Cancer
Erin Donovan-Kicken, U of Texas, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Action Tendency Emotions Evoked by Memorable Breast Cancer Messages and their Association with Prevention
and Detection Behaviors
Sandi Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Lauren Melissa Hamel, Michigan State U, USA
Michael R. Kotowski, U of Tennessee, USA
Samantha Munday Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Atkin, Michigan State U - Department of Communication, USA
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Christine Skubisz, U of Maryland, USA
Carolyn Kay LaPlante, Michigan State U, USA
Generational Issues in Disclosure of Bipolarity: Concerns of Uncertainty and Protection
Erica Bauer, U of Illinois, USA
Teresa L. Thompson, U of Dayton, USA
An Integrated Model of Health Disclosure Decision-Making
Kathryn Greene, Rutgers U, USA
3319
Friday
10:30-11:45
Wisconsin
Political Cognition: How People Process Political Messages
Political Communication
Chair
Lilach Nir, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Participants
A Real-Time Assessment of Candidate Appraisal: Revisiting the Online and Memory-Based Models
Young Mie Kim, Ohio State U, USA
R. Kelly Garrett, Ohio State U, USA
Proximity to Experts? Rethinking Operationalizations of Cognitive Outcomes Based on Dual-Source Measures
Kajsa E. Dalrymple, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Elizabeth A. Corley, Arizona State U, USA
The Opinion Factor: The Effects of Opinionated News on Information Processing and Attitude Change
Lauren M. Feldman, American U, USA
When Citizens Meet Experts: Effects of Issue Experts' Mental Models on Citizens' Opinion as Textual Network (Top
Paper)
Young Min Baek, U of Pennsylvannia, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
3321
Friday
10:30-11:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Motivation (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Norman C. H. Wong, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Does the Trait-Frame Matter? An Investigation of the Interactions Between Behavioral Inhibition/Approach Systems
and Message Framing on Health Message Processing
Weirui Wang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Gender Differences in Motivational Activation
Satoko Kurita, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Sungkyoung Lee, Indiana U, USA
Andrew J. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Soyoung Bae, Indiana U, USA
Jacob Koruth, Indiana U, USA
How "Good" Is That Beer in the Window? Motivational Activation and Use Influence Reactivity to Pictures of Risky
Products
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Motivational Activation During Online Shopping
Petya Dimitrova Eckler, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Anastasia Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
Jeremy Littau, U of Missouri, USA
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Journalism School, U of Missouri-Columbia, USA
Processing Visual Detail: How Motivation Guides Encoding Specificity
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
The Effect of Identity on the Use of Social and Personal Media: Marginalization, Motivation, and the Internet
Mark A. Hamilton, U of Connecticut, USA
The Influence of Motivation Activation on Processing of Attack vs. Blame Antitobacco Advertisements
Jensen Joann Moore, West Virginia U, USA
Under Pressure: Motivated Media Use in a Social Context
Wendy A. Maxian, Texas Tech U, USA
3323
Friday
10:30-11:45
Great America II
Intergroup Communication in Organizations and Institutions (Age and Aging)
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Janice Lee Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Internal Communication in Organizations: Virtual Teams and Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) as
Keywords
Bolanle A. Olaniran, Texas Tech U, USA
Marking the Division of Labor: Division of Meanings in Organizational Groups
Mirit Devorah Shoham, Ohio U, USA
The Rhetorical Construction of the Aged Identity: Ethos and Redefinition as Counterrhetoric
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Old or Experienced?: Exploring Age Related Cognitions in U.S. Elections
Hillary Cortney Shulman, Michigan State U, USA
Lindsay Beth Neuberger, Michigan State U, USA
David Christopher DeAndrea, Michigan State U, USA
3330
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Technologies of Mobilization
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sharon Meraz, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Participants
Instrumental Utilization of ICTs in Mobilization Processes of Political Collective Actions: In the Context of Korean
Grassroots Protest in 2008
Kyounghee Hazel Kwon, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Yoonjae Nam, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
"Poking" People to Participate: Facebook and Political Participation in the 2008 Election
Jessica Vitak, Michigan State U, USA
Andrew Smock, Michigan State U, USA
Paul J. Zube, Michigan State U, USA
Caleb T. Carr, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Cliff Lampe, Michigan State U, USA
Civil Society and Online Political Forums: Network Analysis of 6 Years of Political and Philosophical Discussions in
Newsgroups
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Mobilizers Mobilized: Information, Expression, Mobilization, and Participation in the Digital Age
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Eulalia Puig Abril, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Patrick Wright, U of Wisconsin, USA
Cristian Berrio, U de San Buenaventura – Bogota, COLOMBIA
3331
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
In and Out of Control
Communication and Technology
Chair
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Participants
Successful Online Public Relations Message Conveyance: The Role of User Control in Websites
Stephanie Ahn, U of Georgia, USA
Gaming Across Different Consoles: Exploring the Influence of Control Scheme on Game Player Enjoyment
Anthony Michael Limperos, Pennsyvania State U, USA
Mike Schmierbach, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Frank E. Dardis, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Daniel J Tamul, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Andrew D. Kegerise, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Inventing Security Conscious, Tech-Savvy Citizens
Kelly Allison Gates, U of California – San Diego, USA
IM Dropping Out: Learning Lessons From Former Instant Messaging Users For Supporting Online Interaction
Jeremy Birnholtz, Cornell U, USA
3332
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Distinctive Qualities in Communication Research Around the Globe
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Donal Carbaugh, U of Massachusetts, USA
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Wenshan Jia, Chapman U, USA
Igor Klyukanov, Eastern Washington U, USA
Nurit Guttman, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Johan Leuridan Huys, IAC - InterAmericas Council, PERU
Nazan Haydari, Maltepe U, TURKEY
Jan E. Servaes, U of Massachusetts, USA
This panel is designed to devote regional attention to the idea that there are significant research programs in different
world regions that make an impact on national or regional concerns in particular communication contexts and that
exemplify the distinctive nature of communication research in that locale. The central issue is how communication is
distinctive from, yet collaborative with, other disciplines in the needs of a particular world region and/or for people in
general. Continuing the discussion from last year's ICA Theme (Communicating for Social Impact), it provides
insight into how research is embedded in regional context and contributes to our mission of impacting the quality of
life.
3333
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
"Discourse" as a Key Communication Term
Theme Sessions
Chair
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Participants
Discourse as a Key Term in Rhetoric and Political Communication
Rob Asen, U of Wiscosin, USA
Organizational Discourse: Examining New Terrains in Organizational Communication
Linda L. Putnam, U of California, USA
Discourse as Object of and Approach to Study
Douglas Vincent Porpora, Drexel U, USA
Discourse, Media, and Power
Lilie Chouliaraki, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
'Discourse' as a Key Term in Language and Social Interaction
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
The linguistic turn in communication and other social sciences has led to "discourse" becoming a key term in a variety
of traditions in the field. At its broadest "discourse" references both a method and several distinctive intellectual
traditions. Discourse points to the grounded analysis of talk and text, that is discourse analysis. And, influenced by
theorists such as Foucault, Habermas, and Bakhtin, it refers to larger belief systems and practices in society. This
panel brings together scholars from five traditions to illuminate the meanings and uses of "discourse" in their area of
communication scholarship: (1) political communication and rhetoric, (2) organizational communication, (3)
philosophy of communication and journalism, and (4) media studies and (5) language and social interaction.
3334
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Gender in Children's TV Worldwide
Mass Communication
Chair
Juliette Walma Van Der Molen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Gender Representation in Children's Television Worldwide: A Comparative Analysis of 24 Countries
Maya Goetz, IZI International Central Institute, GERMANY
Sexualising Girls: Concerning Television Fiction Made for Children
Jeanne Jeanne Prinsloo, Rhodes U, SOUTH AFRICA
"Without Family:" Representations of Families in Children's Television Around the World
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Representations of Diversity: From Black and White to Latina/os and Others
Angharad N. Valdivia, U of Illinois, USA
Respondent
Katalin Lustyik, Ithaca College, USA
Gender representations in children's television are an issue of particular importance. Nevertheless, we lack extensive
international analyses. This Panel presents results of a comparative study of children's TV in 24 countries. While the
focus of the quantitative content analysis is on the +26,000 fictional characters, qualitative studies offer insight into,
among others, representations of diversity, families and sexualisation of girls. Panelists from Israel, South Africa,
Germany and the United States represent the international team of scholars who worked on this project.
3335
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
Diverse Approaches to the Study of Narrative and the Media
Mass Communication
Chair
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Film Involvement and Narrative Persuasion: The Role of Identification With the Characters
Juan Jose Igartua, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Howdunit?: Some Narrative Considerations for a Cross-Medial Understanding of the Mystery Genre
Deborah Leiter, Purdue U, USA
A Story About a Stupid Person Can Make You Act Stupid (or Smart): Behavioral Assimilation (and Contrast) as
Narrative Impact
Markus Appel, U of Linz, AUSTRIA
Transmedia Storytelling: Implicit Consumers, Narrative Worlds, and Branding in Contemporary Media Production
Carlos Alberto Scolari, Fundacio U - Balmes, SPAIN
3336
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
The Consequences of Postnetwork Television Beyond Prime Time
Popular Communication
Participants
Network Talk Shows in the Age of Digital Distribution
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Like Sands Through the Hourglass: The Changing Fortunes of the Daytime Television Soap Opera
Elana Levine, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Home is Where the Brand is: Children's Television in a Postnetwork Era
Sarah Banet-Weiser, U of Southern California, USA
Reinventing PBS: Public Television in the Postnetwork, Postwelfare Era
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
The More Things Change…: The Dynamics of Local Television Affiliates
Jonathan Nichols-Pethick, DePauw U, USA
National Nightly News in the On Demand Era
Amanda D. Lotz, U of Michigan, USA
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, U.S. television completed shifts in its core industrial processes that
fundamentally redefined the medium and led to ample speculation that the end of television was near. Most such
prognostications drew their evidence from the medium's prime-time series, however, television has always offered
much more than this evening programming. The papers collected for this panel examine the consequences of shifts in
television's industrial and cultural norms for programming outside of prime-time, commercial television in order to
better understand the adjustments faced by the medium in their entirety as well as the culture at-large.
3337
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
Deciding What is Newsworthy
Journalism Studies
Chair
Eytan Gilboa, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Participants
From Breaking News to Making News. Challenges for Swedish Professional Journalism in New Media Environments
Lars W. Nord, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Newsroom Self-Censorship in China: A Case Study of How Discourse Gets Changed
Jingrong Tong, Liverpool Hope U, UNITED KINGDOM
Who Is Making the Decisions? A Study of Television Journalists, Their Bosses, and Consultant-Based Market
Research
Kate West, U of Texas, USA
Rehashing the Gate: News Values, Nonnews Spaces, and the Future of Gatekeeping
Joshua Braun, Cornell U, USA
Respondent
Pamela J. Shoemaker, Syracuse U, USA
3340
Friday
10:30-11:45
Denver
Media and Interpersonal Influences on Adolescent Health Cognitions, Intentions, and Behaviors
Health Communication
Chair
Jessie M. Quintero Johnson, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Decomposing Media Influence on Adolescents' Smoking Intentions: The Mediating Role of Perceived Descriptive
and Injunctive Norms
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Roles of Interpersonal and Media Socialization Agents in Adolescent Health Literacy: Proposing and Applying a
Health Socialization Model
Hye-Jin Paek, Michigan State U, USA
Bryan H. Reber, U of Georgia, USA
Ruth Ann Weaver Lariscy, U Of Georgia, USA
The Differential Impact of Teacher Delivery Skills on Outcomes for Low- and High-Risk Adolescents in a Universal
Prevention Program
Steven Michael Giles, Wake Forest U, USA
Melinda Pankratz, PIRE, USA
Chris Ringwalt, PIRE, USA
Nisha Gottfredson, PIRE, USA
William B Hansen, Tanglewood Research, USA
Linda Dusenbury, Tanglewood Research, USA
Julia Jackson-Newsom, U of North Carolina-Greensboro, USA
The Influence of Youth MTV/VH1 Viewership on Cigarette Use and Association with Smoking Peers
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
3341
Friday
10:30-11:45
Houston
Managing Health and Illness in the Community and the Workplace
Health Communication
Chair
Joshua B. Barbour, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
Increasing Workplace Stair Use Through Communication: Two Studies Emphasizing Point of Choice Messages
Melanie Booth-Butterfield, West Virginia U, USA
Robin Lesher, West Virginia U, USA
Adel Schooley, West Virginia U, USA
Natasha Daniels, West Virginia U, USA
Brian Cherwinski, West Virginia U, USA
Michael Gerheiser, West Virginia U, USA
Megan Reimer, West Virginia U,USA
Carrie Hall, West Virginia U, USA
Josh Hess, West Virginia U, USA
Nicole Marino, West Virginia U, USA
Organizational Attraction, Perceived Organizational Support, and Smoke-Free Workplace Policies
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Seoyeon Hong, Michigan State U, USA
Justin Andrew Cherry, Michigan State U, USA
Fred Youngyoul Kang, Michigan State U, USA
Doshik Yun, Michigan State U, USA
Hannah Ariane Klautke, Michigan State U, USA
Seungcheol Austin Lee, Michigan State U, USA
The Importance of Communication Factors to Safety Climate: An Exploratory Analysis
Kevin Real, U of Kentucky, USA
M. D. Cooper, BSMS Inc., USA
Social Support Functions During a Slow-Motion Technological Disaster: Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Libby,
Montana
Rebecca J. Cline, Karmanos Cancer Institute/Wayne State U, USA
Heather Orom, State U of New York,-Buffalo, USA
Lisa Berry-Bobovski, Karmanos Cancer Institute, USA
Tanis Hernandez, Center for Abestos Related Disease, USA
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
Brad Black, Center for Asbestos Related Disease, USA
Ann G. Schwartz, Karmanos Cancer Institute, USA
John C. Ruckdeschel, Karmanos Cancer Institute, USA
3342
Friday
10:30-11:45
Kansas City
Youth and Politics
Political Communication
Chair
Christian Baden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Adolescent Knowledge and Interest in the 2008 Presidential Election: School and Home Influences and Media Use
Motives
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Hans Karl Meyer, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Mi Rosie Jahng, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Change: Young Voters Speak During the 2008 Presidential Primary Season
Kenneth J. Levine, U of Tennessee, USA
Naeemah Clark, U of Tennessee, USA
Daniel Marshall Haygood, U of North Carolina, USA
Robert A Muenchen, U of Tennessee, USA
Carolyn Ringer Lepre, Marist College, USA
Civic Education for Deliberative Citizens: An Empirical Examination of the Effects of Civic Experiences in Schools
Kyurim Kyoung, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Civic Learning Online: A Framework for the Study of Civic Engagement Websites for Youth
Christopher Wells, U of Washington, USA
Deen Freelon, U of Washington, USA
W. Lance Bennett, U of Washington, USA
Facebook Politics: An Exploratory Study of American Youth's Political Engagement During the 2008 Presidential
Election
Jingsi Wu, U of New York-Albany, USA
3343
Friday
10:30-11:45
Los Angeles
The Effects of Stereotyped Portrayals
Mass Communication
Chair
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
Participants
Television Crime Drama and Racial Attitudes
Lingling Zhang, Towson U, USA
Pride, Prejudice, and Policy Preferences: Exploring the Relationships Between TV Stereotypes, Racial Attitudes, and
Support for Affirmative Action
Srividya Ramasubramanian, Texas A&M U, USA
Exemplar Versus Prototype-Based Processing of Media Content and the Influence on Racial/Ethnic Evaluations
Dana Mastro, U of Arizona, USA
Riva Tukachinsky, U of Arizona, USA
Race, Rap, and Perception: An Examination of the Effects of Artist's Race on Participant Endorsement of Ethnic
Blame
Christopher Steven Josey, U of Illinois, USA
Travis L. Dixon, U of Illinois, USA
3344
Friday
10:30-11:45
Miami
Media Studies and the Question of Religion: The Challenges of the Religious "Object"
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Participants
The Problem of Religion: Conceptual and Methodological Challenges in Media and Communication Studies
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
Where's Waldo? Looking for Religion in Media and Cultural Studies
Michele Rosenthal, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
The Challenges of Addressing Islam in Communication and Cultural Studies
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Places of Religion in American Mass Communication Research, 1945-1980
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Respondent
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
In his 1998 ICA Presidential Address, Peter Monge called on communication scholars to turn their attention to
religion as a fundamental question. In the post-9/11 world, the import of Monge's challenge has become even more
obvious. And yet, religion remains a relatively infrequent topic of study by communication scholars. This panel
considers the reasons why this might be the case, investigating historical, theoretical, methodological, and political
questions for communication scholars in their encounter with religion.
3345
Friday
10:30-11:45
Scottsdale
Working Conditions in Journalism
Journalism Studies
Organizational Communication
Chair
Sandra Vera Zambrano, Institut D'Etudes Politiques, FRANCE
Participants
Analysis of Self-Conception and Labour Conditions of Business Journalists Working for European Media
Ellen Grosshans, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Harald G. Rau, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
What It Takes to Face the Challenges: Sociological Profile of Colombian Journalists
Jesús Antonio Arroyave, U del Norte, COLOMBIA
Marta Milena Barrios, U del Norte, COLOMBIA
Newspapers, Labor, and the Flux of Economic Uncertainty
James Compton, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
The (Dys)function of Anxiety in Journalism: A Workplace Disability or a Tool in News Element Selection? A Study
of Working Journalists in the United States and China
John E. Newhagen, U of Maryland, USA
Bu Zhong, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Wenjing Xie, U of Maryland, USA
Respondent
Lucy Kueng, The Jonnkoping School of Business, SWEDEN
The International Federation of Journalists has signaled a worrisome trend towards so-called "atypical" news work.
This means journalists are increasingly working without contracts, job security, or formal recognition of their work.
This drift calls for research on the working conditions of journalists around the world, as the group of scholars in this
session has done.
3351
Friday
10:30-11:45
Belmont
Data Mining for Gold: Using Interactive Games for Instructional Assessment
Game Studies
Chair
Shalom M. Fisch, MediaKidz Research and Consulting, USA
Participants
Data Tracking and Error Analysis as Tools for Understanding Children's Literacy Learning
Carla C.E. Fisher, Sesame Workshop, USA
Glenda Revelle, Sesame Workshop, USA
Mathematical Problem Solving and Online Gameplay
Shalom M. Fisch, MediaKidz Research and Consulting, USA
David Hirmes, Thirteen/WNET, USA
Michael Templeton, Thirteen/WNET, USA
Frances Nankin, Thirteen/WNET, USA
Sandra Sheppard, Thirteen/WNET, USA
Richard A. Lesh, Indiana U, USA
Elizabeth Motoki, Indiana U, USA
Sandra Crespo, Michigan State U, USA
Vincent Melfi, Michigan State U, USA
Informal Science Literacy in Online Play
Constance Steinkuehler, U of Wisconsin- Madison, USA
This panel draws together research spanning literacy, science, and mathematics (and both educational and noneducational interactive games) to address two central questions: (1) To what degree does online gameplay reflect
children's understanding of educational content? (2) Is data mining sufficiently rich to model children's reasoning
regarding educational content, as opposed to simply counting right and wrong answers? Together, these papers lend
insight into factors that influence children's behavior during gameplay, as well as guidelines for effective use of data
mining as an assessment tool for applied reasoning in various academic subject areas.
3401
Friday
12:00-13:15
Grand Ballroom I
Projections of the Future From Reflections on the Past: Interpersonal Issues
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Participants
An Eye on the Future Through a 40-Year Glace Back on Constructivism and Communication and the Evolution of
Communication Research
Jesse G. Delia, U of Illinois, USA
Understanding the Outcomes of Supportive Communication: A Dual-Process Approach
Brant R. Burleson, Purdue U, USA
Communication and Quality of Life Across the Life Span
Jon F. Nussbaum, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Respondent
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
ICA honors its new Fellows each year with a special program that focuses on their life work and contributions to the
field of communication.
3430
Friday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
ICA Miniplenary: The Message
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Paul Kelvin Jones, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Participants
W. Lance Bennett, U of Washington, USA
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Daniel Dayan, CNRS, EHESS, Institut Marcel Mauss, CEMS, FRANCE
Much theory in communication draws from an implict or explicit notion of "the message." But different intellectual
vantage points bring to the foreground various aspects of this keyword. Scholars from political communication,
cognitive science, popular communication, journalism, mass communication and visual studies share their thoughts
on "the message."
3433
Friday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
ICA Miniplenary: Funding for Research
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Marshall Scott Poole, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Peter Golding, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Jacqueline R. Meszaros, National Science Foundation, USA
Francois Heinderyckx, ECREA - European Communication Research & Education Assoc, BELGIUM
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Stefaan G. Verhulst, Markle Foundation, USA
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg, USA
Connie M. Yowell, MacArthur Foundation, USA
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Securing funding for research is one of the more challenging tasks associated with academia, but it can be particularly
so for junior scholars who have not yet established the kind of track record relevant to decision-making among
funders. This panel brings together scholars and funders in a discussion of how to secure funding when starting out.
3434
Friday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
ICA Mini-Plenary: Keywords - Public Sphere, Public Culture, and Reasoned Public Choice
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The Referents of Public Culture, 1988-2008 (20th Anniversary)
Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Northwestern U, USA
Public Culture in the Era of the Irreverent, Rights-Claiming Citizen
Michael Schudson, U of California - San Diego, USA
Public Spheres, Affective Worlds
Lauren Berlant, U of Chicago, USA
Public Knowledge: What the Public Knows in Different Media Systems
Shanto Iyengar, Stanford U, USA
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
The Inherent Arbitrariness of the "News" Versus "Entertainment" Distinction
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The roundtable seeks to sort out the referents of the keywords "Public Sphere, Public Culture and Reasoned Public
Choice" and their stakes for theory and research in social science in general and in media and communication studies
in particular, providing the basis for well-defined comparative and historical research and for broader, cross-unit
usage of these concepts. It attempts to move the assessment of the deliberative and decision-making capacity of the
public sphere from stiff dichotomies to conceptual gradualism. The notion of unlimited reasoned public choice serves
as a methodological fiction in order to detect empirical variations. The participants address the referents and the
stakes of the keywords from the angle of their recent work which explicitly or implicitly provides elements of a
Zeitdiagnose of public culture.
3501
Friday
13:30-14:45
Grand Ballroom I
Keywords in Communication: Effects (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Game Studies
Information Systems
Mass Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Communication Effects: Like Shooting Yourself in the Foot Over and Over and Over Again
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Explaining Processes or Predicting Outcomes: The Perils and Promise of the Effects Tradition in Political
Communication
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
The Posteffects Era?
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Effects Is Dead: Long Live Dynamics
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
One of the essential key words in the study of communication has been effects. The effects tradition has been a
central part of the study of communication for much of the past century. This is true across the discipline whether the
focus is on the effects of persuasive messages, TV violence, political news coverage, or the newest video game
release. The four panelists explore what the effects tradition has meant to the study of communication and will
advance proposals for where the discipline should go in the future regarding the study of the effects of
communication.
3510
Friday
13:30-14:45
Illinois
ICA Division and Interest Group Officers' Orientation and Training
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Sam Luna, International Communication Association, USA
Participants
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
R. G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Jillian M. Baez, U of Illinois , USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A&M U, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Thorsten Quandt, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Jonathan Corpus Ong, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
J. Alison Bryant, Nickelodeon/MTV Networks, USA
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ariel Chernin, Center on Media and Child Health, USA
Stijn Reijnders, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California, Irvine, USA
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
New chairs, vice-chairs and secretaries of ICA divisions and interest groups should attend this session. You will
become acquainted with the web-based utility features availalbe to you as division and interst group leaders. Explore
ICA website-based utilities that allow you to communicate with your section members easily. The Content
Management Systemwill let you update your section websites easily and with no knowledge of web code. Come see
how to mke your tenure as officers much easier!
3511
Friday
13:30-14:45
Indiana
Studies in Organizational Resistance
Organizational Communication
Chair
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montreal, CANADA
Participants
Discourse, Control, and Resistance: Constructing Identity in the National Park Service
Amy Pearson, Arizona State U, USA
From Emplaced Identities to Democratic Participants: Discourses Performed and Resisted by Retirement Village
Members
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
George Cheney, U of Utah, USA
C. Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Resisting Corporate Colonization: Enacting the Tension Between Organizational and Societal Discourses of Work
and Life at One Swedish Organization
Stacey Marie Beeman Wieland, Villanova U, USA
Subaltern Organizing: Resisting Master Narrative of Development
Mahuya Pal, U of South Florida, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Respondent
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
3512
Friday
13:30-14:45
Iowa
Popular Culture, Globalization, and Society
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Alan O'Connor, Trent U, CANADA
Participants
Rearticulating Social Change for Interactive Media: Queer Indian Bloggers' Resistance as Media
Producers/Consumers
Rahul Mitra, Bowling Green State U, USA
The Impact of Globalization on Bollywood Cinema's Depictions of Violence, Sexuality, Crime, Vice, and Romance
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Kavita Karan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dying for Our Sins: Christian Salvation Rhetoric in Celebrity Colonialism
Spring-Serenity Duvall, Indiana U, USA
Daniel Henny Syndrome: Media Representation of the Mixed-Blood in Korea
Eun-Jeong Han, Washington State U, USA
Respondent
Alan O'Connor, Trent U, CANADA
3513
Friday
13:30-14:45
Michigan
Top Papers in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Guenter Bentele, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Participants
Crisis Response Effectiveness: Methodological Considerations for Advancement in Empirical Investigation Into
Response Impact
Tomasz Antoni Fediuk, Illinois State U, USA
Kristin M. Pace, Illinois State U, USA
Isabel C. Botero, Illinois State U, USA
Health News Agenda-Building: Journalists' Perceptions of the Role of Public Relations
Maria E. Len-Rios, U of Missouri, USA
Amanda Hinnant, U of Missouri, USA
Sun-A Park, U of Missouri, USA
Cynthia M. Frisby, U of Missouri, USA
Young Ah Lee, U of Missouri, USA
Spin Doctors in the Spotlight: Effects of Strategic Metacoverage on Perceptions of Political PR
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Matthijs Elenbaas, U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3514
Friday
13:30-14:45
Michigan State
From the Laboratory to the Living Room: Challenges Translating Children and Media Research to the Public
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Participants
The Mediatrician Perspective: A Pediatrician Experience of Translating Media Research
Michael O. Rich, Center on Media and Child Health, USA
Media Effects Research as Applied Science: Social Scientists Surviving (and Prospering) in a Newly Medicalized
Field
David Stephen Bickham, Children's Hospital Boston/Harvard Medical School, USA
Communicating Quantitative Children and Media Research to Parents and Journalists: Challenges, Strategies, and
Opportunities
Ariel Chernin, Center on Media and Child Health, USA
National Media, National Studies: How One Researcher Talks About Them
Ellen Wartella, U of California - Riverside, USA
The purpose of the panel is to discuss the challenges involved in translating research findings for the general public.
Participants affiliated with the Center on Media and Child Health and the audience will discuss how researchers can
collaborate with the media and the public in responsible efforts to translate their findings into accessible information
for parents, teachers, and pediatricians responsible for children's well-being without compromising the quality of the
research and their professional integrity and ethics. The various perspectives will include examination of challenges
posed to social scientists to write and format their work as applied research with expectations from clinicians, the
press, and others that results can be distilled into actionable and digestible sound bites; the translation of quantitative
research results to non-academic audiences: correcting the tendency to infer causal relationships from correlational
evidence; explaining the difference between statistical and practical significance; and addressing researchers' own
concerns that their work will be misrepresented by journalists. The panel will facilitate participation of audience
members in the discussion and an opportunity to share their own experiences and suggestions.
3515
Friday
13:30-14:45
Minnesota
Restoring Copyright Balance in Academia: Fair Use, DMCA Exceptions, and Educational Exemptions
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Lokman Tsui, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Misunderstanding Copyright: Bridging the Gap Between Copyright Expansionism and Copyright Secessionism
Patricia A. Aufderheide, American U, USA
Peter Jaszi, Washington College of Law , USA
The Digital Millennium Copyright Act and Piracy in the Classroom
Peter DeCherney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Fashion Ads as Data: Fair Use, Author RIghts, and Institutional Repositories for Academic Research
Chris Boulton, U of Massachusetts, USA
Media Literacy Gets Fair Use: The Best Practices Model in Teaching
Renee Hobbs, Temple U, USA
Respondent
Bruce A. Williams, U of Virginia, USA
As copyright law has increasingly favored the copyright owner—with copyright extension, extended claim over
derivative works, and default copyright--the balancing features of copyright law have increasingly risen in
importance. In particular the doctrine of fair use has become a critically important feature of copyright law and policy,
to permit new creation and scholarly exchange. This panel showcases recent research on balancing features of
copyright in academe, particularly within communication.
3516
Friday
13:30-14:45
Nothwestern
Queering the Qualitative: Exploring Qualitative Research Methods as a Tool for Inquiry Into Diverse Sexual
Identities
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Jennifer Dunn, Ohio U, USA
Participants
Sexual Identities, Sexual Practices, Relational Possibilities: Unpacking Discourses From 'Top' to 'Bottom'
Jimmie Manning, Northern Kentucky U, USA
Policing the Lesbian in the Policing Profession: Narratives of Identity, Visibility, Politics, and Hope
Andrea P. Lewis, Northern Illinois U, USA
Theorizing Male Friendship: Queering the Straight, Straighting the Queer
Ahmet Atay, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
"Loving the Sinner"…With a Twist: A Phenomenological Study of How Self-Identified Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual
Evangelical Christians Negotiate Faith-Grounded Identity and Community
Nneka Ifeoma Ofulue, U of Maryland, USA
This panel explores the value of qualitative inquiry for investigating research topics regarding gay, lesbian, bisexual,
transgender, or otherwise queer individuals. In addition to presenting complete research studies that queer a variety of
notions including the workplace, friendships, sexual positions, and religion, the audience will engage discussion about
the value of qualitative research methods, their ability to generate understandings of queer life and identity, the
visibility of such work, and the strengths and limitations of the methods for building theory relevant to diverse sexual
and gender identities.
3517
Friday
13:30-14:45
Ohio State
Dialogues and Conflicts: Points of Contact in Media Production and Policy
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Imagining the Diasporic Link: The Franco-Algerian Media Dialogues on the 2005 Emeutes in France
Irina Daniela Mihalache, Carleton U, CANADA
The Yellow Press: Asian American Radicalism and Conflict in Gidra - ERIC Top Paper
Lori Kido Lopez, U of Southern California, USA
Another American Race Riot: A Differential Racialization/Image Restoration Analysis
Evan Beaumont Center, Siam U, THAILAND
The Extreme of the Mainstream: Fitna and "Dangerous Islamic Media" in the Netherlands
Hatim El-Hibri, New York U, USA
Discourses of Diversity in Irish Broadcasting
Gavan Titley, Centre for Media Studies, IRELAND
Diverse Directions: Managing Diversity Media Policy in Finnish and Swedish Public Service Broadcasting
Karina Horsti, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Gunilla Hultén, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
3518
Friday
13:30-14:45
Purdue
Avoidance and Disclosure in Interpersonal Settings
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Effects of Parents' Divorce-Related, Strategically Ambiguous Disclosures on Parents' and Emerging Adult Children's
Postconversation Outcomes
Tara G. McManus, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Jon F. Nussbaum, Pennsylvania State U, USA
The Standards for Openness Hypothesis: A Gendered Explanation for Why Avoidance is so Dissatisfying
Tamara D. Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Andrea Lynn Joseph, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Breaking Bad News: Direction of the MUM Effect and Senders' Cognitive Representations of News Valence
Jayson Lee Dibble, U of Hawaii, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Managing Face Threatening Act: An Integrated Approach of Self-Reported Survey and Third-Party Observations
Xiaowen Guan, U of St. Thomas, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
3519
Friday
13:30-14:45
Wisconsin
The Practice of Deliberation
Language & Social Interaction
Political Communication
Chair
Christine Iacobucci, Wells College, USA
Participants
The Communicative Self-Discipline Needed to Achieve Stasis in Deliberative Interaction
Robert E. Sanders, SUNY - Albany, USA
The Role of Reasonable Hostility in Public Deliberation
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Deliberative Strategy "On the Fly"
Christine Iacobucci, Wells College, USA
Reflecting on the Practice of Deliberation: Experiences, Concerns and Possibilities
Daniel Robichaud, U de Montreal, CANADA
This panel presents both a theoretical representation of the communicative self-discipline needed of persons to
achieve deliberation in the ideal sense, and evidence from naturally occurring cases that educated people who are
engaged in deliberation fail to exhibit the needed self-discipline. The question this panel opens for presenters and
attendees, and for further research, is whether the failure to exhibit such self-discipline is variable and remediable, or
inherent; whether it arises from cultural premises and norms about how to resolve disagreements, individual
experience and skills, or a basic limitation on what people are communicatively capable of.
3521
Friday
13:30-14:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Attention (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
Participants
Animation and Involuntary Covert Attention: A Methodological Testing of "Automatic Attention Capture" vs.
"Contingency Capture" Theories
Nokon Heo, U of Central Arkansas, USA
Antecedents and Consequences of Program-Involvement: A Naturalistic Field Study
Marjolein Moorman, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lotte Michaela Willemsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Attending to Television: Automatic, Controlled, and Narrative-Based Processes
Kent N Lowry, Texas Tech U, USA
Wes Wise, Texas Tech U, USA
Wendy A. Maxian, Texas Tech U, USA
Kelli R. Brown, Texas Tech U, USA
Samuel D. Bradley, Texas Tech U, USA
How Gender Affects Reading News: Androgyny as a Moderator of Cognitive Resources and Comprehension
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Improving Brand Attitudes and Choice Through Congruence in Communication Modalities:The Moderating Role of
Processing Style
Marieke L. Fransen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bob M. Fennis, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Ad Th. Pruyn, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Laboring the Written News: Effects of Story Structure on Cognitive Resources, Comprehension, and Memory
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Cognitive and Emotional Processing While Navigating CNN.com
Anastasia Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Jeremy Littau, U of Missouri, USA
Saleem Elias Alhabash, U of Missouri, USA
Petya Dimitrova Eckler, U of Missouri, USA
3523
Friday
13:30-14:45
Great America II
Symbols & Paradoxes We Live by: Understanding Culture and Society
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
Participants
Blind to Debate: What Rwanda (Scholarship) Reveals About U.S. Conceptions of Public Deliberation
Sarah Elizabeth Ryan, Baruch College, USA
Neo-Knowledge Production Theory for Communication-Between-Culture Studies
Fei Jiang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Revulsion Versus Reverence: The Swastika and its Symbolic Significance
Satarupa Dasgupta, Temple U, USA
Integration, Adaptation, and Superposition: An Argument for Fusion Theory
Clark Callahan, Brigham Young, USA
Respondent
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
3530
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Psychology of Technology Adoption
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Technology Attributes, Perceived Value and Quality of Information, and Social Utility as Predictors of Podcast
Adoption and Use
Xigen Li, City U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Li Zeng, Arkansas State U, USA
Online Radio Adoption Cognition, Attitude, and Intention
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
"Not Another TAM Paper": Relating Individual and Context Characteristics to the Adoption of HDTV
Eva Baaren, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Lidwien van de Wijngaert, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Erik Huizer, Utrecht U,, THE NETHERLANDS
Understanding User Acceptance of Competing Instant Messaging Applications: A Structural Equation Modeling
Approach
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Chan Hock Chuan, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Kwok Kee Wei, City Uof Singapore, SINGAPORE
3531
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Language of Online Interaction
Communication and Technology
Chair
Zuoming Wang, U of North Texas, USA
Participants
"You Can Trust Me," "I Can Trust You": Linguistic Accommodation and Trust in Text-Based CMC
Lauren Scissors, Northwestern U, USA
Alastair Gill, Northwestern U, USA
Darren R. Gergle, Northwestern U, USA
Speech Act Analysis Within Social Network Sites' Status Messages
Caleb T. Carr, Michigan State U, USA
David B Schrock, Ferris State U, USA
Patricia R Dauterman, Independent Researcher, USA
Making an Offer They Can't Refuse: How Borrower Language in Peer-to-Peer Lending Impacts Funding (TOP 3
Student Paper)
Laura Larrimore, Ithaca College, USA
Li Jiang, Cornell U, USA
Scott Gorski, Cornell U, USA
David Markowitz, Cornell U, USA
Jack Zhao, Cornell U, USA
Kristina Amada Canlas, Cornell U, USA
Sorry, You're Just Not My Type: Romantic Rejection in Computer-Mediated Communication
Stephanie Tom Tong, Michigan State U, USA
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
3532
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Political Campaigns Around the World (High Density)
Political Communication
Chair
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, USA
Participants
Beyond American Negativity: Dynamics of Negative Campaigning in a Multiparty System
Christian Elmelund-Præstekær, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Global Patterns of Virtual Mudslinging: Evidence From German Party Web Sites in State, National, and European
Parliamentary Elections
Eva Johanna Schweitzer, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Innovation or Normalization in e-Campaigning? A Longitudinal Analysis of German Party Web Sites in the 2002 and
2005 National Elections
Eva Johanna Schweitzer, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Popularization and Personalization in Political Communication: A Conceptual Analysis
Rosa van Santen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Liesbet van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Searching for Mexican Sovereignty in the Age of Globalization: A Discourse Analysis of Mexico's 2006 Presidential
Election
Mark Anthony Poepsel, U of Missouri, USA
The Party of the Undecided: The Election Campaign for the 2008 General Election as Seen by the Italian People
Marzia Antenore, Sassari, ITALY
Gabriella Fazzi, Sapienza U of Rome, ITALY
Laura Iannelli, Sapienza U of Rome, ITALY
The R3VOLution Will Not Be Televised: An Ethnographic Essay on Politics 2.0 and Ron Paul's Mash-Up Subculture
Michael James Serazio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Relationship Between Electoral Systems and Political Marketing: Israel 1988-2003
Yehudith Auerbach, Bar Ilan U, ISRAEL
Yehuda Talya, IDC Herzliya, ISRAEL
3533
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Personal Surveillance, Digitized Identity, and Control in National and Transnational Contexts
Communication and Technology
Chair
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Social Media, Public Intimacies and the Transformation of Contemporary Surveillance
Lemi Baruh, Kadir Has U, TURKEY
Levent Soysal, Kadir Has U, TURKEY
Surveilling the Body: Backscatter X-Rays, Infrared Cameras, and New Practices of Looking
Shoshana Magnet, U of Illinois, USA
Sexual Dangers, Risky Individuals, and Online Identity Verification: A Comparison of United States and European
Union Initiatives
Mihaela Popescu, California State U - San Bernardino, USA
Ece Algan, California State U - San Bernardino, USA
Cloud Control
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Iowa, USA
Respondent
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
This panel explores the implications of the use of new media and new technologies as tools of personal control and
surveillance in national and transnational contexts. Drawing upon various examples of recent surveillance practices
such as biometric technologies and backscatter x-ray machines, age and identity verification platforms, cloud
computing and self-regulatory identity-monitoring on social network and blogging sites, this panel interrogates the
emerging digitization of the "total identity", the mechanisms for establishing and communicating such digitized
identities, and the risk-based policy principles that inform the recent standards of securization merging online and
offline contexts.
3534
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Foreign Television News Around the World: Topics, Conflict, Sensationalism and Domestication
Mass Communication
Participants
Foreign Television News: Conceptual Issues
Heikki Johannes Heikkila, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Topics and Issues in Foreign Television News
Constanza Mujica, Pontificia U Católica de Chile, CHILE
William Porath, Pontificia U Católica de Chile, CHILE
Ruud Wouters, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Sensationalism and Conflict in Foreign Television News
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Ven-Hwei Lo, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Knut De Swert, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Eddie Kuo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Francis Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Wan-Ying Lin, City U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Xiaoge Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Baohua Zhou, Journalism School of Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Domestication of Foreign Television News
Agnieszka Magdalena Stepinska, Adam Mickiewicz U, POLAND
Rasha Kamhawi, U of Florida, USA
Jacques Alkalai Wainberg, Catholic U - Porto Alegre, BRAZIL
This panel presents four papers by scholars from several countries, as part of an ongoing study in nearly 20 nations
focusing on foreign news on television. The papers present a number of perspectives on the news - topics, conflict,
sensationalism and domestication - by analyzing and comparing foreign and domestic news. The data of the study are
based on a 4-week content analysis conducted spanning the period from January to March 2008 on each country's
public service station and its most popular commercial rating-based station or network.
3535
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
Health Issues and the Media
Mass Communication
Chair
Laura M. Arpan, Florida State U, USA
Participants
PSAs on Television: An Over-Time Appraisal
Walter Gantz, Indiana U, USA
Hyangsun Lee, Indiana U, USA
Victoria Rideout, Kaiser Family Foundation, USA
Nancy Carol Schwartz, U of North Texas, USA
James Reynolds Angelini, U of Delaware, USA
"Googling" Cancer: News Aggregation's Impact on Article Overlap, Frame, and Fear in Online Cancer News
Ryan James Hurley, Wake Forest U, USA
Angeline Sangalang, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Ashley Muddimann, Wake Forest U, USA
Does Watching Television Affect Your Fear of Illness? A Cultivation Analysis
Jan Van Mierlo, U of Hasselt, BELGIUM
How Appetitive and Aversive Activation Influence Persuasiveness of Attack vs. Blame Antitobacco Advertisements
Jensen Joann Moore, West Virginia U, USA
3536
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Political Entertainment's Coverage of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election
Popular Communication
Political Communication
Participants
Prime Time Candidates and their Real Life Counterparts
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U Of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Jester No More: Jon Stewart, The Daily Show, and Campaign '08
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
The Presences and Absences of Governor Palin
Jonathan Alan Gray, Fordham U, USA
What if You Satirized an Election and Nobody Watched?: Tina Fey and Sarah Palin Steal the Spotlight in Canada
Serra Tinic, U of Alberta, CANADA
Satire For Change and Profit: Popular Politics Online in the 2008 Election
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Earnestly Ironic: Viral Videos for Action
Amber Day, Bryant U, USA
What a Whirlwind: Satiric Moments in Celebrity Talk on Chelsea Lately
Ethan Thompson, Texas A&M U - Corpus Christi, USA
Satirical Goldmines: How the Real News Cashes in on the Fake
Sue Collins, New York U, USA
In recent years, satire and political entertainment have held an increasingly prominent place at the table of American
politics, with many citizens turning not just to the news for political analysis, but also to a wide variety of political
entertainment and satirical outlets. With this in mind, this panel evaluates how political entertainment fared on the
grand stage, by examining its handling of the 2008 US presidential election. Debriefings of campaign strategy and
journalistic coverage of elections are commonplace, but we propose to take satire and political entertainment's place
in American and global politics seriously, and hence to debrief its successes, failures, blindspots, and triumphs. How
did it invite citizens to think and talk about the election and the candidates? How did it frame the major events and
figures of the season? How, when, where, and why did it work effectively? And importantly, relative to other media
outlets' coverage of the election, what, if anything, did political entertainment add, and what, if anything, was lost?
This roundtable panel will adopt a discussion-based format to examine these and other questions, as a way of
foregrounding an interest in the intersections of ironic analysis, power and citizenship, journalistic narratives, and the
political potential of entertainment.
3537
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
The Well-Being of Investigative Journalism
Journalism Studies
Chair
Bruno F. Battistoli, Syracuse U, USA
Participants
Investigative Journalism in China
Jingrong Tong, Liverpool Hope U, UNITED KINGDOM
Colin Stuart Sparks, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Making In-Depth News: The Tensions Between Investigative Journalism and Social Control in China
Fei Chris Shen, Ohio State U, USA
zhian Zhi Zhang, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Role Conceptions of Brussels Correspondents From the New Member States
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Outsourcing of Investigative Reporting in American News Media: An Agenda-Setting Study
Gerry Lanosga, Indiana U, USA
Respondent
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
3540
Friday
13:30-14:45
Denver
Communication About Sexual Health
Health Communication
Chair
Robin E. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Psychosocial Barriers to Prenatal Care for African American (Black) Adolescents: A Review and Meta-Analysis
Lisa Bradford, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
E. Racquel Racadio, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Mike Allen, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Mary K. Madsen, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Abigail Krempas, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Something to Talk About: Mass Media Message Format, Interpersonal Discussion and Health Behavior Change
Sally Margaret Dunlop, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Yoshihisa Kashima, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Melanie A. Wakefield, The Cancer Council Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Underserved Women Describe Fertility-Related Expectations: Descriptive Norms, Injunctive Norms, and Behavior
Jennifer J. Bute, Ohio U, USA
Robin E. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Exploring the Presentation of News Information About the HPV Vaccine: A Content Analysis of a Nationally
Representative Sample of U.S. Newspaper Articles
Jessie M. Quintero Johnson, U of Illinois, USA
Catlainn Sionean, Uof Illinois, USA
Allison M Scott, U of Illinois, USA
Sex After 50: A Qualitative Study on Mature Women's Sexual Health Attitudes
Cynthia R. Morton, U of Florida, USA
Hyojin Kim, U of Florida, USA
Debbie Treise, U of Florida, USA
3541
Friday
13:30-14:45
Houston
Health Information Management
Health Communication
Chair
Timothy P Hogan, Department of Veterans Affairs, USA
Participants
Communication Inequality in Self-Efficacy for Health Information and Health Information Channel Use: Comparison
Across Education, Ethnicity, and Geographic Groups
Youjin Choi, U of Florida, USA
Jangyul Robert Kim, Colorado State U, USA
Information Seeking From Media and Family/Friends Increases the Likelihood of Engaging in Healthy Lifestyle
Behaviors
A Susana Ramirez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Lourdes Susana Martinez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Derek Freres, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Nehama Lewis, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Profiling Characteristics of Internet Medical Information Users
James B. Weaver, III, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Darren Mays, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Gregg Linder, Scarborough Research, USA
Dogan Eroglu, National Center for Health Marketing , USA
Frederick Fridinger, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Jay M. Bernhardt, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Modes of Online Health Information Acquisition
Margaret L. McLaughlin, U of Southern California, USA
Lauren B. Frank, U of Southern California, USA
Jae Eun Chung, U of Southern California, USA
Shuya Pan, U of Southern California, USA
Joe Jin Phua, U of Southern California, USA
Nupur Sen, U of Southern California, USA
Hua Wang, U of Southern California, USA
3542
Friday
13:30-14:45
Kansas City
Emotion in Political Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Sungeun Chung, Western Illinois U, USA
Participants
An Individual's Emotional Reaction to Political Advertisements: Using Framing and Priming as a Theoretical
Framework
Jeffrey Robert Carlson, U of Connecticut, USA
Rory Peter McGloin, U of Connecticut, USA
Christopher J. Kowal, U of Connecticut, USA
The Role of Anger and Information in Deliberation (Top Student Paper)
Nuri Kim, Stanford U, USA
Uncivil Engagement: Linking Incivility to Political Participation Through Negative Emotions
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Kjerstin Thorson, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Timothy K.F. Fung, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Porismita Borah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Why Does Incivility Matter When Communicating Disagreement?: Examining the Psychological Process of
Antagonism in Political Discussion
Hyunseo Hwang, U of California - Davis, USA
Respondent
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
3543
Friday
13:30-14:45
Los Angeles
Influences on Publishing and Programming
Mass Communication
Chair
Steffen Burkhardt, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Participants
Understanding Power: A Quantitative and Qualitative Study of Scheduling Power at PBS Member Stations
Amber Melissa Korbl Smallwood, U of West Georgia, USA
Professional Media in the Orbit of Power Structure and Academic Marketplace
Hongtao Li, City U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Organizational Influences on College Student Newspapers: A Web Survey of Newspapers of ACEJMC Programs
Shaniece B. Bickham, Southern U and A and M College, USA
Jae-Hwa Shin, U of Southern Mississippi, USA
Understanding Readers of Local Newspapers and Editorial Journalism in Small Communities
Kenneth Fleming, U of Missouri, USA
Brian Steffens, U of Missouri, USA
3544
Friday
13:30-14:45
Miami
Citizen Voice and the Branded Nation
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U - Ohio, USA
Participants
Between Community and Commodity: Nationalism and Nation Branding
Goran Bolin, Sodertorn U, SWEDEN
Per Ståhlberg, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Considering a New Key Word "Internet Activism"
Jinsun Lee, Rutgers U, USA
Nations as Brands: Towards an Agenda for Research and Critique
Nadia Kaneva, U of Denver, USA
The Citizen's Voice: Albert Hirschman's Exit, Voice, and Loyalty and its Contribution to Media Citizenship Debates
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U - Ohio, USA
There is now renewed interest in the various ways in which citizens, both individually and collectively, can find
voice, making timely a return to Albert Hirschman's 1970s text, Exit Voice and Loyalty. At the same time, national
loyalties are increasing repackaged in commodified form, risking their attenuation in in a marketised discourse. This
panel addresses these contrasting trends and their potential intersections.
3545
Friday
13:30-14:45
Scottsdale
Framing as a Key Word in the Reporting of Critical Social Issues
Journalism Studies
Chair
D. Charles Whitney, U of California - Riverside, USA
Participants
The Politics of Framing in Science Journalism
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
News We Can Use? Framing Lite-Bite Politics
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Slanting While Framing the News: Children's Health Care Policy and the Liberal Bias Hypothesis
Gerard Mathews, George Washington U, USA
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Representation of War and the Cultural Foundations of Media Framing
James S. Ettema, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
D. Charles Whitney, U of California - Riverside, USA
This panel addresses the keyword 'framing' which has emerged as, arguably, the most important term in the
contemporary analysis and critique of news and informational media. The presentations all take up the task of
analyzing, in Erving Goffman's terms, 'the basic frameworks of understanding available in our society for making
sense out of events;' and they do so with regard to events occurring in settings of great social, political and/or cultural
significance. Specifically, these topical settings include the framing of war, electoral politics, health care policy, and
science. The presentations, which include both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the social organization of
sense-making, aim to conceptually recast familiar assumptions about the media's capacity to frame issues and events
that reside at the heart of public life.
3551
Friday
13:30-14:45
Belmont
Game Studies: Examining Group Play
Game Studies
Chair
Katherine Currie Isbister, New York U - Poly, USA
Participants
As Real as Real? Macroeconomic Behavior in a Large-Scale Virtual World
Edward Castronova, Indiana U, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Yun Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
Brian Keegan, U of Southern California, USA
Rabindra A. Ratan, U of Southern California, USA
Li Xiong, U of Southern California, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Focused on the Prize: Characteristics of Experts in Virtual Worlds
Jing Wang, Northwestern U, USA
David A Huffaker, Northwestern U, USA
Jeffrey William Treem, Northwestern U, USA
Lindsay Fullerton, Northwestern U, USA
Muhammad A. Ahmad, U of Minnesota, USA
Marshall Scott Poole, U of Illinois, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Gender Attribution in Online Video Games
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Erin K. Maloney, Michigan State U, USA
"F*ck You, Noob Tube!": Learning the Art of Ludic LAN War
Matthew Thomas Payne, U of Texas, USA
3601
Friday
15:00-16:15
Grand Ballroom I
Public Policy, Public Intellectuals (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Communication Law & Policy
Philosophy of Communication
Visual Communication Studies
Communication and Technology
Mass Communication
Chair
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Participants
Digital Divide Research
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente / Cubicus / GW / CW, THE NETHERLANDS
Fair Use and the Creative Process
Patricia A. Aufderheide, American U, USA
Media and Public Debates in Britain
Graham Murdock, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Mass Media Reform
Robert W. McChesney, U of Illinois, USA
Respondent
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
Communications scholars research and teach about one of the most important social institutions maintaining any
society, as well as, inevitably, about a constellation of the most important corporations and/or government-sponsored
entities. What is the responsibility of communications scholars to the larger society? How do they define and act upon
the public interest? This cross-divisional panel of public intellectuals discusses the challenges facing academics who
take on this role.
3610
Friday
15:00-16:15
Illinois
Ownership, Control, and the Freedom of the Press
Political Communication
Chair
Danilo Yanich, U of Delaware, USA
Participants
Careful What You Say: Media Control in Putin's Russia - Implications for Online Content
Katherine Nikolaeva Ognyanova, U of Southern California, USA
Mediated Political Support: How Press Freedom, Media Ownership, and News Exposure Combine to Influence
Support for Democracy and Political Institutions
Gustavo Rivera, U of Texas, USA
Sebastian Valenzuela, U of Texas, USA
Ownership Matters: Localism, Local Television News, and the FCC
Danilo Yanich, U of Delaware, USA
Turning Gray: Three News Zones and Fragmented Power Structure in China
Fen Jennifer Lin, Department of Media and Communication, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3611
Friday
15:00-16:15
Indiana
Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Ethics
Organizational Communication
Chair
James O. Olufowote, Boston College, USA
Participants
Corporate Social Responsibility and Outsourcing: Complicating Factors
Erin Ortiz, U of Utah, USA
Moral Communication and Organizational Communication: On the Narrative Construction of "Social Responsibility"
Friederike Schultz, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Protecting Complainants and Respondents: An Analysis of U Research Misconduct Policies
Rebecca Ann Lind, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Ginnifer L. Mastarone, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Korin Isotalo Hunt, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Jill Caravelli, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Sarah E. Millermaier, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Nathan Earixson, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
We Believe: How Corporations Communicate Social Responsibility
Amy O'Connor, North Dakota State U, USA
Michelle D. Shumate, U of Illinois, USA
Respondent
Heather Zoller, U of Cincinnati, USA
3612
Friday
15:00-16:15
Iowa
Top Papers in Global Communication and Social Change
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Bowling Green State U, USA
Participants
Weaving Webs of Faith: Examining Internet Use and Religious Communication Among Chinese Protestant
Transmigrants
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Jessie Poon, U at Buffalo, State U of New York, USA
Savage Deregulation in Thailand: Expanding Hallin & Mancini's European Model
Lauren Kogen, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The African Philosophy Debate and a Communicative Action Narrative for Development
Thomas L. Jacobson, Temple U, USA
Lingling Pan, Temple U, USA
The Silent Community: Organizing Zones in the Digital Divide
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Kirsty Frances Barber, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Respondent
Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Bowling Green State U, USA
3613
Friday
15:00-16:15
Michigan
Chair's Panel in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Donald K. Wright, Boston U, USA
Krishnamurthy Sriramesh, Sri Guruduth Agencies, INDIA
Derina R. Holtzhausen, Oklahoma State U, USA
Ronel Susan Rensburg, U of Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA
Kirk Hallahan, Colorado State U, USA
3615
Friday
15:00-16:15
Minnesota
Identity and Communication History
Communication History
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Sheila Lodge, UHI Millenium Institute, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Revisiting Journalism in the 19th Century: Empirical Findings on Women Journalists in Central Europe
Susanne Kinnebrock, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
The Making of a 'Matinee Idol': Representations of Islam in Lowell Thomas's Lawrence of Arabia
Julien S Gorbach, U of Missouri, USA
"No Sex in Labor": Tracing "Jennie June's" Views on Gender
Lori Amber Roessner, U of Georgia, USA
"Stories of Great Indians" by Elmo Scott Watson: Syndication, Standardization, and the Noble Savage in Feature
Writing [TOP FACULTY PAPER IN INTEREST GROUP]
Miranda Jean Brady, U of Minnesota, USA
Respondent
Sharrona Pearl, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The papers collected in this session all involve historical themes relating to identity, as it is involved in
communication. Under this broad rubric we find surprising and ironic developments in the history of communication.
Working from differing methods and assumptions, each of these papers represents an important exploration of
identity in communication.
3616
Friday
15:00-16:15
Nothwestern
Beyond the Modifier: Feminist as Keyword
Feminist Scholarship
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
Feminism as a Critical Subjective State
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
Feminist and Feminine: Becoming the Bride
Maria Mastronardi, Northwestern U, USA
Feminist Foundations: Methodological Approaches to Socialising and Self-Representation on Facebook
Nancy Thumim, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Gunn Enli, U of Oslo, NORWAY
How to Feed a Feminist Curiosity About the Work of Institutions
Carrie Rentschler, McGill U, CANADA
Feminist Media Studies, Meet "The Trades"
Mary Douglas Vavrus, U of Minnesota, USA
Respondents
Janice Radway, Northwestern U, USA
Dale Bauer, U of Illinois, USA
Feminist has bloomed into keyword status as it has shaped and re-shaped the evolving subfields of communication
research. In media studies alone, feminist has transcended its use as modifier. By shifting the perspective of the
researcher and point of view toward objects of study, a feminist approach to media studies has altered fundamental
categories such as "subject," "researcher," "participant" "interview," "text," and even "data" and "analysis". In
reconfiguring our relationship to these categories, the feminist in feminist media studies has revolutionized two modes
of inquiry that characterize the field: audience research and textual analysis. Moreover, as it has penetrated the once
masculinist-dominated realm of Theory, feminist reassessments have demanded a refinement in theorizing, enabling
accounts that better explain how gendered dynamics transform media texts and institutions, and how we engage with
and across them. This panel brings together feminist scholars from communication studies and related fields,
including sociology and English literature, whose work has both shaped and challenged the use of feminist in feminist
media studies. Researchers offer exempla for how feminist analysis has reconfigured—and how it continues to alter-media studies.
3617
Friday
15:00-16:15
Ohio State
Meanings of Difference and Identity Construction in Media Consumption
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
Viewer Responses to Character Race and Social Status in Advertising: Blacks See Color, Whites See Class
Gregory J. Hoplamazian, Ohio State U, USA
Osei Appiah, Ohio State U, USA
Whites in a Non-White Mind: Ethnographic Study of White Perception in Japan
Atsushi Tajima, SUNY - Geneseo, USA
Understanding the Influence of Mass Media in Forming American and Chinese Stereotypes
Lin Zhu, Purdue U, USA
Thomas Christie, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Negotiating Identities: Ethnic Minorities' Creative Consumption of Mainstream Media in Hong Kong
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Lisa Leung, Lingnan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Identity Threat Versus Safety for Racial Minorities in Virtual Worlds: Effects of Numerical Representation of Race as
a Diversity Cue
Jong-Eun Roselyn Lee, Stanford U, USA
Sung Gwan Park, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
3618
Friday
15:00-16:15
Purdue
Family Communication Processes: At the Intersection of Family and Community
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Andrea Lynn Joseph, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Publicly and Privately Constituting Community: A Theoretical Approach to Understanding Urban Community
Development
Vikki Sara Katz, U of Southern California, USA
Communication is the Key: How Army Wives Communicatively Cope With Stress Throughout a Wartime
Deployment
Katheryn C. Maguire, Wayne State U, USA
Erin Sahlstein, U of Richmond, USA
The Role of Parental Modeling and Family Communication Patterns in Developing Communication Competence in
Homeschooled Children
Allison Marie Scott, U of Illinois, USA
Jessie M. Quintero Johnson, U of Illinois, USA
Invited Presentation: Family Communication: At the Front of the Applied Turn in Interpersonal Communication
Steven Wilson, Purdue U, USA
Elizabeth Munz, Purdue U, USA
Kristi Lee Chopski Wilkum, Purdue U, USA
3619
Friday
15:00-16:15
Wisconsin
Top Papers in Instructional & Developmental Communication
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
The Development of Online and Offline Self-Disclosure in Preadolescence and Adolescence and Their Longitudinal
Effects on the Quality of Friendships
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Searching for the Symbol in Hip-Hop Music: Wreaking Havoc in the Classroom With Burke's Agency
Connie Johnson, U of Texas, USA
Effectiveness of Video Podcasts to Enhance Student Performance in Communication Theory Classes
Michel Dupagne, U of Miami, USA
Diane Millette, U of Miami, USA
Kim Grinfeder, U of Miami, USA
Assessing the Value of Virtual Worlds for Postsecondary Instructors
Kevin Westmoreland Bowers, U of Florida, USA
Matthew W Ragas, U of Florida, USA
Jeffrey C Neely, U of Florida, USA
3621
Friday
15:00-16:15
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Narrative (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Samuel D. Bradley, Texas Tech U, USA
Participants
Narrative Impact: Mediator and Moderator of Message Exposure and Outcome Expectancy
Jingbo Meng, U of Southern California, USA
Narrative TV Commercials: Identification and Appreciation
Luuk Lagerwerf, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Narratives and Counterfactual Thoughts in a Food Safety Context
Claudia Alejandra Barriga, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
Structural/Formal Features of Narrative
Ashley Nicole Sanders-Jackson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Effects of Single Modality Cognitive Load on the Perceived Reality of Media Narratives
Brandon H. Nutting, Texas Tech U, USA
Where Am I? How Can I Get There? Impact of Navigability and Narrative Transportation on Spatial Presence
Bimal Balakrishnan, U of Missouri, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
The Portrayal of Characters With Mental Illness on Television: Prevalent, Consistent, and Negative
James Reynolds Angelini, U of Delaware, USA
P. Gayle Nadorff, U of Connecticut, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Jack Martin, Indiana U, USA
Bernice A. Pescosolido, Indiana U, USA
3623
Friday
15:00-16:15
Great America II
Intercultural Communication Division Top Papers
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Unpacking Cultural Differences in Communication Styles: A Comparison of the Cultural-Selves and Universal Needs
Perspectives
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
Brant R. Burleson, Purdue U, USA
Meina Liu, U of Maryland, USA
Cultural Adaptation and Ethnic Online Communities: A Study of Chinese Sojourners in the U. S.
Nan Ke, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Sensation Seeking and Intercultural Communication Competence: A Model Test
Lily A. Arasaratnam, Southern Cross College, AUSTRALIA
Smita C. Banerjee, U of Lincoln, UNITED KINGDOM
Factors Contributing to Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Mainland Students in Hong Kong: Testing a Dynamic Model
(Top Student Paper)
Juana Du, Hong Kong Baptist U, HONG KONG
Respondent
James W. Neuliep, St. Norbert College, USA.
3630
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Online Dating
Communication and Technology
Chair
Artemio Ramirez, Jr., Arizona State U, USA
Participants
Self-Presentation in Online Dating Profiles: The Role of Physical Attractiveness (TOP Faculty Paper)
Catalina Laura Toma, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Intervening Processes Between Computer-Mediated Communication and Interpersonal Attraction: An Experimental
Comparison (TOP 3 Faculty Paper)
Marjolijn L. Antheunis, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Alexander P Schouten, Vrije U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Effects of Relational Motivation and Age on Online Self-Disclosure: A Content Analysis of MySpace Profile Pages
Jinsuk Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Hannah Ariane Klautke, Michigan State U, USA
Kim B. Serota, Michigan State U, USA
An Investigation of Communication Privacy Management and Self-Disclosure in Online Dating
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Chih-Hui Lai, Rutgers U, USA
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
3631
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Innovative Key Words in Communication: Blogospheres around the World
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sorin Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
The Blogosphere in the United States: Corporations Own the Agora
Mihaela Vorvoreanu, Clemson U, USA
The Blogosphere in France: Discourses of and About Nationalism and Minorities
Sorin Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
The Blogosphere in Romania: Cybercommunication and Democracy
Diana Cismaru, National U of Political Studies and Public Administration, ROMANIA
The Blogopshere in Fiji: Social Disruption and Social Media
Charu Uppal, U of South Pacific, FIJI
Respondent
Zizi A. Papacharissi, Temple U, USA
This panel provides analyses of various aspects of the blogosphere around the world, by means of examples from the
United States, a country of Western Europe (France), a country of the former communist bloc in Eastern Europe
(Romania), and a country in the Asia-Pacific region (Fiji). The panelists approach diverse research data from these
geographic and cultural areas with various methodologies, while commonly addressing the following problematics:
(a) the emergence and expansion of the blogosphere; (b) the roles and challenges of the blogosphere in the
re/construction of a (virtual) public sphere; and (c) the sometimes convergent and sometimes divergent relationships
between the "virtual" public sphere and the "real" public sphere. In considering these topics, the panelists position the
blogosphere as a keyword in communication.
3632
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Framing and Framing Effects (High Density)
Political Communication
Chair
Yoram Peri, Tel-Aviv U, ISRAEL
Participants
Communication and Foreign Policy Opinions: Attention to News, Policy Framing, and Willingness to Engage (Top
Student Paper)
Teresa Myers, Ohio State U, USA
Exploring Some Antecedents of the Media's Framing of Election News
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, USA
Peter Van Aelst, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
Frames vs. Evidence: Investigating the Influence of Question Wording on Policy Support and Political Beliefs
Daniel E. Bergan, Michigan State U, USA
Hillary Cortney Shulman, Michigan State U, USA
Lindsay Beth Neuberger, Michigan State U, USA
Framing the First and Second Intifada: The Development and Implementation of a Comparative and Longitudinal
Research Design
Annelore Deprez, U of Gent - Department of Communication Sciences, BELGIUM
Karin Raeymaeckers, U of Gent - Department of Communication Sciences, BELGIUM
Framing the Population Debate: A Comparison of Source and News Frames in the Philippines
Clarissa C. David, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
The Ideological Preferred Meaning of Agricultural Biotechnology in Northern Belgium's Press (1998-2007)
Pieter Alexander Maeseele, Ghent U, BELGIUM
The Water Cycle or Media Attention Cycle? Water News Revisited
Lifen Cheng, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Juan Jose Igartua, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
When Good News is Bad News: Explicating the Moderated Mediation Dynamics Behind the Reversed Mobilization
Effect
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3634
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Mood, Emotion and Enjoyment of the Media
Mass Communication
Chair
Mark Shevy, Northern Michigan U, USA
Participants
The Role of Mixed Affect in the Experience of Meaningful Entertainment
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Anthony M. Limperos, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Daniel J Tamul, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Julia K. Woolley, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Moods, Media Preference, and Media Selection
Jiyoun Kim, U of Michigan, USA
Arthur A. Raney, Florida State U, USA
Predicting Emotions and Metaemotions at the Movies
Anne Bartsch, Martin-Luther-U - Halle, GERMANY
Markus Appel, U of Linz, AUSTRIA
Dennis Storch, Martin Luther U Halle, GERMANY
Humiliation and Enjoyment of Reality Shows
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Gabriel Weimann, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Inbal Bar-Sinai, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
The four papers explore various facets of the interface between mood and emotions and media enjoyment and
selectivity.
3635
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Political News: Antecedents and Consequences of Use
Mass Communication
Chair
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
Participants
Media Preferences and Democracy: Refining the 'Relative Entertainment Preference' Hypothesis
Jason Lee Rittenberg, U of Illinois, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Shanna Casey, U of Illinois, USA
Parental and Environmental Antecedents of Adolescent News Use
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Hans Karl Meyer, U of Missouri, USA
Jeremy Littau, U of Missouri, USA
Mi Rosie Jahng, U of Missouri, USA
Seeking Entertainment vs. Enlightenment From the News: Opposing Impacts of News Motives on Political
Knowledge
Grace Yang, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Validating the Cognitive Mediation Model: Tapping Elaboration Complexity Using Thought-Listing
Gabi Joachim Schaap, U of Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
3636
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Labyrinths of Mexicanness: Traits, Features, and Perspectives in the Construction of Mexican Identity
Popular Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Alfredo Tenoch Cid Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de México, MEXICO
Participants
Prehispanic Roots of Mexican Identitary Images
Alfredo Tenoch Cid, Tecnológico de Monterrey, MEXICO
Zoomorphism in the Mexican Telenovela Cuna de Lobos (Cradle of Wolves, 1986-2008)
Armín Gómez, Tecnológico de Monterrey, MEXICO
Mexican Identity on YouTube: A Youngsters' User Approach
Jacob Israel Bañuelos, Tecnológico de Monterrey, MEXICO
Respondent
Juan Piñón, New York U, USA
This panel analyzes signifying systems and processes involved in the construction of Mexican identity and
Mexicanness through the study of contemporary texts based on pre-hispanic pictographic writing, ancient Mexican
thought at work in contemporary telenovelas, multicultural hybrid Mexican identities consumed and produced by
youngsters in YouTube, and traits of Mexicanness in Mexican New Cinema.
3637
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
Journalists on Journalism
Journalism Studies
Chair
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Organizational Culture and Capacity for Change in Public Service News Organizations
Nicole B. Usher, U of Southern California, USA
Patricia Riley, U of Southern California, USA
Rearticulating the Journalism Profession: Public Journalism and Professional Reflexivity
Laura Ruusunoksa, U of Tampere, FINLAND
The Impact of Perceived Media Influence on Professional Orientations: A Survey Study of Hong Kong Journalists
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Modeling Perceived Influences on Journalism: Evidence From a Cross-National Survey of Journalists
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Rosa Berganza, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Incilay Cangoz, Anadolu U, TURKEY
Basyouni Ibrahim Hamada, U of Cairo, EGYPT
Folker Christian Hanusch, Uof the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
Sonia V. Moreira, Rua Almirante Alexandrino, BRAZIL
Peter Mwesige, Makerere U, UGANDA
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Dani Vardiansyah Noor, Indonusa U, INDONESIA
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
By most accounts the professional field of journalism is changing dramatically. The papers in this internationally
diverse session show how, particularly in the eyes of journalists, news organizations remain at the center of the how
they give meaning to their work and how they perceive their role in society. This collection of studies also suggest
that in the context of reduced newsroom employment, declining audience sizes, the growing influence of new media,
and managerial adjustments, the role of the media firm needs rearticulation in journalism research.
3640
Friday
15:00-16:15
Denver
The International Association of Language and Social Psychology (IALSP) Presents Common Ground
Keynotes and Keywords With ICA
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Michael L. Hecht, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mary Lee Hummert, U of Kansas, USA
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Jon F. Nussbaum, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
This sponsored session is designed to introduce ICA members to the dynamic scholarship happening in the
International Association of Language and Social Psychology (IALSP). Spotlight scholars of IALSP and ICA will
discuss their research and relationship with IALSP and ICA. We will use this session to enhance the scholarly and
professional associations between ICA and IALSP -- encouraging ICA members to join and participate in IALSP.
Executive members will be facilitating the discussion and available to register new members.
3641
Friday
15:00-16:15
Houston
Culture-Centered Health Communication
Health Communication
Chair
Robin E. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Defining Sexual Concurrency Before We Try to Prevent It: An Arrival at the Categorical Concept of "Walking
Around Outside" in Central Mozambique
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Emily Susan Holman, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Maria Elena Figueroa, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Patricia Poppe, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Rosa Acevedo Said, Johns Hopkins U, USA
'We are Mothers First': Localocentric Articulation of Sex Worker Identity as a Keyword in HIV/AIDS
Communication
Ambar Basu, U of South Florida, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Constructing "The Disadvantaged Roma" Audience: Public Health Communication and Politics in Contemporary
Romania
Adina A.G. Schneeweis, U of Minnesota, USA
Brian Southwell, U of Minnesota, USA
Creating a Culturally Grounded HIV/AIDS Family Stigma Communication Scale
Khadidiatou Ndiaye, Michigan State U, USA
3642
Friday
15:00-16:15
Kansas City
Political Communication in Transitional Democracies - A Global Perspective
Political Communication
Chair
Katrin Voltmer, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Free But Responsible? Assessing the Media's Democratic role in South Africa and Namibia
Herman Wasserman, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
Joshua Ogada, U of Stellenbosch, SOUTH AFRICA
Negotiating Control: Power and Strategic Communication in Postcommunist Countries
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
Katrin Voltmer, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Jens Adam, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Alina Dobreva, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Diversity in Latin American Newscasts: Results From a Five-Country Study
Sallie L. Hughes, U of Miami, USA
Understanding Media in Transitional Societies: Beyond Naive "Democratization Theory"
Colin Sparks, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
One of the most important developments in world politics at the turn of the millennium is the global spread of
democratic rule. Unlike in previous 'waves of democratization' the media have been a major player both in processes
of regime change and the subsequent consolidation of democracy. However, in many instances the transition of the
institutions and practices of political communication has proven one of the most disputed and disrupted areas of
change with far-reaching consequences for the viability of the newly established democratic order. This panel brings
together a set of papers that explore the link between democratic transition and political communication in as different
parts of the world as southern Africa, central-eastern Europe and Latin America. They present new empirical evidence
and fresh theoretical insights that help to better understand the cultural, political and economic factors that shape
political communication and the public representation of politics in new democracies.
3643
Friday
15:00-16:15
Los Angeles
Television Studies 2009: Contemporary Perspectives on a Changing Medium
Popular Communication
Chair
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
Nice Dig!: An Analysis of the Verbal and Visual Coverage of Men's and Women's Beach Volleyball During the 2008
Olympic Games
Lauren M Reichart, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
The Weather Channel and Popular Problematizations of the Atmosphere
Chris Russill, U of Minnesota, USA
Riding the Wave of the New Jew Revolution: Watching The Daily Show With Jews for Jon Stewart
Amy B. Becker, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Reality Parenting 101: Celebrity Dads, Reality Sitcoms, and New "Old-School" Family Values
Jennifer M Fogel, U of Michigan, USA
"Me TV": Towards Changing Television Viewing Patterns?
Nele Simons, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
User-Generated Video and Intertextuality
Lars Holmgaard Christensen, Danish School of Media and Journalism, DENMARK
Peter Kofoed, Aalborg U, DENMARK
Tove Arendt Rasmussen, Aalborg U, DENMARK
3644
Friday
15:00-16:15
Miami
Beyond Metaphors
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Theo Hug, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
Participants
Theories of Metaphor and Their Metaphors
Klaus Krippendorff, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Immersive Metaphor
Zsuzsanna Kondor, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, HUNGARY
From "Virtuality" to "Interactivity"
Christina Slade, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Speaking of Technology / Dreaming of Society - Employing Metaphors, Images and Associations for a Rhetoric of
Progress
Mirko Schaefer, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Taking historically, culturally, and technically variable media constellations as a starting point when exploring human
conditions, the question arises how processes of communicative stabili¬zation come about and how we conceive more
or less stable forms of sociability. It is widely accepted that language and media affect the way we perceive, conceive,
act, and communicate. Meanwhile, human beings have become mediating interfaces themselves, especially in the era
of networked computing. In this dialectics of mediating structures and structuring mediation various forms of
metaphors are used to indicate and delineate complex processes of material-semiotic exchange. In this session,
concepts and forms of metaphor, related modes of reference, and consequences for communication studies are
explored and discussed by means of empirical evidence and philosophical argumentations.
3645
Friday
15:00-16:15
Scottsdale
Journalistic Tear and Repair
Journalism Studies
Chair
Mahmoud Eid, U of Ottawa, CANADA
Participants
Memory and Forgetfulness in the News: Pinochet and the Ghost of Past Events in Chile's Newspapers
Ingrid Bachmann, U of Texas, USA
Reporting on the Reporters: A Discourse Analysis of Press Coverage of Dateline's "To Catch a Predator" (Top Three
Graduate Student Paper)
Katrina Flener, Temple U, USA
Journalism, Memory, and Reparative Rituals: The Winograd Commission Report in the Israeli News Media (Top
Three Graduate Student Paper)
Keren Tenenboim Weinblatt, U of Pennsylvania, USA
New(s) Media, Public Address, and the Global Conjuncture: Machinima and "The French Democracy"
Adrienne Russell, U of Denver, USA
Jayson Harsin, American U of Paris, FRANCE
Respondent
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
This session's presenters challenge the ways in which journalism position itself as a qualified agent in making sense of
a society's past, present, and future. Moreover, new storytellers in the media ecosystem are identified and evaluated
for providing alternatives to the reparative rituals of the news media.
3651
Friday
15:00-16:15
Belmont
Studying Visual Aspects of the Web: Usability, Aesthetics, and Ideology
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Susan O'Donnell, National Research Council, CANADA
Participants
A Critical Cultural Analysis of YouTube: Power and Control in a Web 2.0 Interface
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Patricia Hellriegel, Lessius U College, USA
How Bad Videos Are Actually Good: Exploring Parodic Displays of Technical Competence on YouTube
Patricia G. Lange, U of Southern California, USA
Key Words in the Evaluation of Web Sites: Visual Criteria and Usability
Juliann Cortese, Florida State U, USA
Ulla Bunz, Florida State U, USA
Edward Hopper Goes to the Net: Media Aesthetics and Visitor Analytics of an Online Art Museum Exhibition
Nicole Smith Dahmen, Louisiana State U, USA
Suzanne Sarraf, National Gallery of Art, USA
3710
Friday
16:30-17:45
Illinois
The Long Mid-20th Century in Communication History
Communication History
Chair
Josh Lauer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Birth of Bureaucratic Organizational Culture in Early Korean Broadcasting
Misook Baek, Research Professor, Seoul National U, KOREA, PEOPLE REPUBLIC
Myungkoo Kang, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sungmin Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Fireside Chats: How the Print Media Covered President Roosevelt's Radio Addresses
Jennifer Marie Kowalewski, Journalism and Mass Communication Department, USA
Propaganda Leaflets and Cold War Frames During the Korean War
Seong Choul Hong, Indiana U, USA
The Postwar Revolt Against U.S. Radio, 1945-1949
Victor W. Pickard, U of Illinois, USA
This session brings together diverse papers, all of which involve ideas/events from the mid-20th century, broadly
construed. Though their topics vary widely, one will find unexpected connections in the discussions of these papers.
3711
Friday
16:30-17:45
Indiana
Current Research on Organizational Networks
Organizational Communication
Chair
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Establishing a Foundation for Transitional Networks: Building the Case for an Alternative Network Form
Lisa Chewning, Rutgers U, USA
The Coevolution of Multiplex Networks in Organizational Communities
Seungyoon Lee, Purdue U, USA
Peter Monge, U of Southern California, USA
The Value of Networks of Practice: The Role of Embeddedness and Media Use
Bart J. van den Hooff, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Femke de Leeuw van Weenen, Viadesk, THE NETHERLANDS
Marc Leidner, Viadesk, THE NETHERLANDS
Marleen Huysman, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Work and Life: The Role of Networks in the Emergency Response Organizations
Mengxiao Zhu, Northwestern U, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
3712
Friday
16:30-17:45
Iowa
Global Communication and Social Change Business Meeting
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Joseph Oliver Boyd-Barrett, California Polytechnic - Pomona, USA
Participant
Veena V. Raman, Pennsylvania State U, USA
3713
Friday
16:30-17:45
Michigan
Public Relations Division Business Meeting
Public Relations
Chair
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Oyvind Ihlen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
3714
Friday
16:30-17:45
Michigan State
3715
Friday
16:30-17:45
Minnesota
IAMCR Panel - Alternative Keywords
Sponsored Sessions
Public Service Media: Protecting the Public Interest in the Digital Environment
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Christine L. Ogan, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Introduction: The Role of Public Service Media in the Digital Environment
Matthias Kuenzler, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Manuel Puppis, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Edzard Schade, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
United Kingdom: A Public Service Publisher on the Internet?
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Canada: Local Content in the New Media Broadcasting Environment
Philip Savage, McMaster U, CANADA
The Netherlands: Being Present Wherever the Public Is: Public Service Broadcasters' Role on Digital Platforms.
Recent Evidence from the Netherlands
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Johannes Bardoel, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
European Union: The European Union's Influence on the Public Service Remit
Natascha Just, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Michael Latzer, ITA - Austrian Academy of Sciences, AUSTRIA
The role of public service media (PSM) is up to fierce debates which touch three crucial points: The normative
justifications of PSM; options to institutionalize PSM; and the influence of the EU on national policy options. This
panel first discusses justifications and policy options from a theoretical point of view. Then the panel focuses on case
studies from different countries in order to identify different ways to protect the public interest in the digital
environment.
3716
Friday
16:30-17:45
Nothwestern
3718
Friday
16:30-17:45
Purdue
Feminist Scholarship Division Annual Meeting
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
The Dark Side of Relational Communication: Hurtful, Bullying, and Teasing Messages
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Ashley V Middleton, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
A Relational Turbulence Model of Relationship Characteristics Associated With Experiences of Hurt in Romantic
Relationships
Jennifer A. Theiss, Rutgers U, USA
Leanne Knobloch, U of Illinois, USA
Maria G Checton, Rutgers, USA
Kate Magsamen Conrad, Rutgers, USA
The Effect of Relationship Characteristics on Reactions to Hurtful Messages From Romantic Partners
Rachel McLaren, U of Iowa, USA
Denise H. Solomon, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Jennifer Priem, The Pennsylvania State U, USA
Examining the Motivations and Intentions of Teasers: A Hurtful Communication Approach
Courtney N. Wright, U of Tennessee, USA
Michael E. Roloff, Northwestern U, USA
Structural Model of Bullied Individuals' Disclosure, Efficacy Perceptions, and Their Family's Communication
Orientations
Masaki Matsunaga, Waseda U, JAPAN
3719
Friday
16:30-17:45
Wisconsin
Instructional & Developmental Communication Division Business Meeting
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
3721
Friday
16:30-17:45
Lincolnshire II
Studies in Cultural Meanings and Identities
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
George B. Ray, Cleveland State U, USA
Participants
Contested Cultural Concepts: Discursive Resources for Oppositional Membering in Public Talk
David Boromisza-Habashi, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
The "Self" as a Culturally Constituted Discursive Resource in Interventions
Brion van Over, U of Massachusetts, USA
Dilemmatic Spaces in Qualitative Research: Lessons in Social Interaction From Fieldwork Experiences in India
Suchitra Shenoy, Purdue U, USA
Impression Management on Reality TV: How Parents Respond to Visual Hypothetical Narratives of Child Health
Cynthia Gordon, Syracuse U, USA
"Don't Call Us That, Something, Waiji Xinniang": A Cultural and Semiotic Analysis of Perceptions of the "Foreign
Bride" Phenomenon in Taiwan
Todd L. Sandel, U of Oklahoma, USA
3723
Friday
16:30-17:45
Great America II
Intercultural Communication Division Business Meeting
Intercultural Communication
Chair
James W. Neuliep, St. Norbert College, USA
Participant
Leeva Chung, U of San Diego, USA
3730
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Communication and Technology (CAT) Division Business Meeting
Communication and Technology
Chair
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
3731
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
The Past, Present, and Future of General Semantics
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Peter K. Fallon, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Participants
Bruce I. Kodish, Institute of General Semantics, USA
Corey Anton, Grand Valley State U, USA
Jacqueline Rudig, Institute of General Semantics, USA
Lance A. Strate, Institute of General Semantics, USA
This panel will discuss the origins of the discipline of general semantics and the Institute of General Semantics, as
founded by Alfred Korzybski in Chicago 70 years ago, its history and evolution up to the present day, and its future as
a system, area of study, and institution.
3732
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Political Communication Division Buisness Meeting
Political Communication
Chair
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
3733
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Identity and Language as Keywords in Communication Across and Between Groups: Roundtable Discussion
Following IALSP
Theme Sessions
Chair
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
Participants
Identity and Language Within the Context of Adult Disability and Chronic Illness
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
The Intersection of Language, Identity, Communication, and Stereotypes: The Challenges of Aging
Mary Lee Hummert, U of Kansas, USA
The Identity Factor in Crossing the Boundaries of Language, Culture, and Ethnicity
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Language and Social Identity in Interpersonal Communication
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Language and Identity in the Context of Aging, Culture, and Mass Media
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
Respondent
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
This is a Cross-Unit program proposal designed to bring together members of ICA across divisions to discuss
keywords in communication, language and identity. This panel also offers a multi-disciplinary edge, bringing together
ICA members who are also members of the International Association of Language and Social Psychology to debate
and discuss these keywords across contexts of Health, Family and Organizational, Culture, Interpersonal, and Mass
Communication. This roundtable discussion will be held in conjunction with the IALSP sponsored session.
3734
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Body Image, Beauty Standards, and Sex
Mass Communication
Chair
Jessica Taylor Piotrowski, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Body Ideals in the Media: Perceived Attainability and Social Comparison Choices
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Joshua Paul Romero, Ohio State U, USA
College Men's Third-Person Perceptions About Idealized Body Image and Consequent Behavior
Stella C. Chia, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Nainan Wen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Effects of Plastic Surgery Reality TV Shows Among College Students
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Jong Woo Jun, U of Florida, USA
Processes Underlying the Effects of Adolescents' Use of Sexually Explicit Internet Material: The Role of Perceived
Realism
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3735
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
Cognitive Approaches to Framing
Mass Communication
Chair
Paul D'Angelo, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
Shifting the Valence Balance: Resonance, Resistance, and Countervalence of Cognitive Responses to Communication
Frames
Christian Baden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
News Framing and Public Opinion: A Mediational Analysis
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Framing and Trans-Framing: A Mental Models Approach to News Framing Effects
Hyun Suk Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Cognitive and Attitudinal Effects of the News Frame and Group Cue on Processing News About Immigration
Juan Jose Igartua, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Lifen Cheng, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Félix Moral, U of Málaga, SPAIN
Itziar Fernández, National U of Distance Education, SPAIN
José Gómez-Isla, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Jose Antonio Otero, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Elena Palacios, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Tania Acosta, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
3736
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Communication Approaches to the Study of Consumer Culture
Popular Communication
Chairs
Emily Elizabeth West, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
Matthew P. McAllister, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Media Audience Studies and Consumption: Audience Response to Product Placement in the Makeover Reality Genre
Katherine Sender, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Is Consumerism Still Problematic for Television Producers?
Louise Woodstock, Ursinus College, USA
The Production and Consumption of Identities in Japanese Advertising
Todd Joseph Miles Holden, Tohoku U, JAPAN
Giving Goffman's Gender Advertisements a Second Look in Light of Consumer Culture
Daniel Thomas Cook, Rutgers U, USA
Self, Commodity, Promotion, and Politics
Alison Mary Virginia Hearn, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, CANADA
Global Media Texts and Consumption: The Study of International Magazines
Katherine T. Frith, Southern Illinois U, USA
Digital Media and the Transformation of Consumer Culture
Joseph Turow, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Political Economy and Consumption: Studying the Advertising Industry
Inger Lisbeth Stole, U of Illinois, USA
Studying Sexual Commerce: A Communication Studies Perspective
Lynn A. Comella, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
In response to the continued prominence and growing visibility of consumer culture throughout the world, an
interdisciplinary cluster of scholarship, labeled by some as Critical Consumer Studies, has developed to understand
the nature of modern consumerism. The field of Communication is uniquely positioned to contribute to, shape, and
dialogue with scholars who study consumer culture from other fields such as history, sociology, and marketing. This
roundtable brings together scholars from Communication and Media Studies to discuss what our field brings to the
study of consumer culture, and conversely, what a focus on consumer culture brings to the study of communication
and media.
3737
Friday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
The End of Print Journalism?
Journalism Studies
Chair
Anne-Katrin Arnold, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Goodbye to the News: Using Journalists' Last Words to Unpack the "Structures of Feeling" of Journalism in
Transition
Nicole B. Usher, U of Southern California, USA
Different News Media, Different News Seeking Behaviors: Identifying College Students' Patterns of News Media Use
Gregory J. Hoplamazian, Ohio State, USA
John Christian Feaster, U of Richmond, USA
Local Newspaper Readership in the 21st Century: Exploring Differences Between 'Hybrid' and Online-Only Users
Hsiang Iris Chyi, U of Texas, USA
Mengchieh Jacie Yang, U of Texas, USA
Seth Lewis, U of Texas, USA
Nan Zheng, U of Texas, USA
Harvesting Market Position or Planting for the Future?: The Influence of Workforce Investment on Newspaper
Readership
Phil Meyer, U Of North Carolina, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Temple Northup, U of North Carolina, USA
Respondent
Sam N. Lehman-Wilzig, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Newspapers are venerated as the cornerstones of professional journalism and one of the indispensable conduits of
contemporary democracy. Yet, many indicators point to print journalism as nearing expiration. The scholars featured
in this session will engage this conundrum from multiple sides.
3740
Friday
16:30-17:45
Denver
Health and Technology Literacy: Considerations for Using Technology to Deliver Health-Related Information
Health Communication
Chair
Bree Holtz, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Evaluating Access to Health Information on the Web: A Multidimensional Approach
Pamela S. Whitten, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Munday Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Bree Holtz, Michigan State U, USA
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
Strategies for Providing Online Cancer-Related Health Information to Audiences With Limited Health Literacy:
Lessons Learned From the Digital Divide Pilot Projects
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
Designing e-Health Applications for Low Health Literate Parents: Building Parenting Capacities to Combat
Childhood Obesity
Michael S. Mackert, U of Texas, USA
Leeann Kahlor, U of Texas, USA
Diane Tyler, U of Texas, USA
Jamie Gustafson, U of Texas, USA
Utilizing Mobile Phones to Manage Asthma
Bree Holtz, Michigan State U, USA
Pamela S. Whitten, Michigan State U, USA
Health literacy is becoming an increasingly significant communication issue, as it has been demonstrated to impact
the success of treatments, health interventions and the overall health status of individuals. Low health literacy has
been associated to overall poor health and linked to poor outcomes of specific diseases including cancer, diabetes, and
asthma. As access to the Internet and other technologies, such as mobile phones, are becoming increasing available to
people, they are also becoming relevant platforms of providing health information. Health literacy is now beginning
to intersect with other forms of technological literacy such as ICT literacy. This panel will discuss the relevance of
health literacy and technology literacy as important considerations when conveying health messages to the public
through use of technologies.
3741
Friday
16:30-17:45
Houston
Communication and Coping with Chronic Illness
Health Communication
Chair
Graham Douglas Bodie, Louisiana State U, USA
Participants
Living With Diabetes: The Value of Everyday Communication
Cat McGrew, Western U, USA
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Medical, Personal, and Social Forms of Uncertainty Across the Transplantation Trajectory
Summer Carnett, U of Illinois, USA
Anne Margaret Stone, U of Illinois, USA
Allison Marie Scott, U of Illinois, USA
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois, USA
Talking About Schizophrenia: Preferences for Self-Disclosure in China and the U.S.
Zheng An, U of New Mexico, USA
Virginia McDermott, U of New Mexico, USA
Conflict, Face, and Disability: An Exploratory Study of the Experiences of College Students With Disabilities
Sara Goddard, Keene State College, USA
Maria Beatriz Torres, Minnesota State U, USA
3742
Friday
16:30-17:45
Kansas City
Organizational Communication and Globalization Processes
Organizational Communication
Chair
Johny T. Garner, Pepperdine U, USA
Participants
(Re)Imagining Possibilities for Peace
Stephanie N. Norander, Missouri State U, USA
Disneyland Paris: A Case Analysis Demonstrating How Glocalization Works
Jonathan Matusitz, U of Central Florida, USA
Organizational Colonization and Mediated Narration of National Progress in India With the Launch of the World's
Cheapest Car
Rahul Mitra, Bowling Green State U, USA
Respondent
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
3743
Friday
16:30-17:45
Los Angeles
Popular Media, Identity, and Everyday Life
Popular Communication
Chair
Jane Banks, Indiana U, USA
Participants
The Narrative Structure of Everyday Media Use
Lars Holmgaard christensen, Danish School of Media and Journalism, DENMARK
Much Ado About Media? The Importance of Popular Media in Everyday Girl Culture
Linda Duits, ASCoR - U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Ties That Bind: The Performance of Gender, Sexuality, and Friendship on MySpace
Niels Van Doorn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Enquiring J.Lo's Booty: Celebrity Culture and the Racial Politics of the Tabloid Press
Isabel Molina Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
When the Sportswriters Go Marching In: Sports Journalism, Collective Trauma, and Memory Metaphors
Michael James Serazio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Diamonds on a Jeweler's Felt: Sincerity, Irony, and Utopia in Emo and Mumblecore
Justin Horton, Georgia State U, USA
3744
Friday
16:30-17:45
Miami
Philosophy of Communication Division Business Session
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participant
Des Freedman, U of London, Goldsmiths College, UNITED KINGDOM
3745
Friday
16:30-17:45
Scottsdale
3751
Friday
16:30-17:45
Belmont
Remembering Brenda Danet
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Elihu Katz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Online Persuasion: Visual Marketing and Political Campaigning
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Robert L. Craig, U of St. Thomas, USA
Participants
Going Glocal: A Visual Content Analysis of Parent and Local Web Sites for U.S. Brands
Minji Kim, U of Florida, USA
Belio Antonio Martinez, Jr., U of Florida, USA
"Change the Way You Communicate!" Nokia's Upstreaming and Downstreaming of MMS
Jonathan J Lillie, U of Hawaii, USA
Pictures of a Floating World
Arielle Emmett, U of Maryland, USA
Visual Style and Visual Strategy in U.S. Presidential Campaigning: A Study of Online Campaign Spots in the 2008
Presidential Primaries
Ognyan Seizov, Jacobs U -Bremen, GERMANY
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
3813
Friday
18:00-19:15
Michigan
3816
Friday
18:00-19:15
Nothwestern
3823
Friday
18:00-19:15
Great America II
Public Relations Division Reception
Public Relations
Chair
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Reception for the Communication History Interest Group and the Feminist Scholarship Division
Communication History
Feminist Scholarship
This will be a joint reception for the Communication History Interest Group and the Feminist Scholarship Division.
The reception will feature the screening of a documentary film entitled "Out of the Question: Women, Media, and the
Art of Inquiry." Description of the film: In the 1940s, a group of often-unsung women helped lay the foundations for
the field of media research. Working at Columbia U's Bureau of Applied Social Research and government agencies
like the Voice of America and the Office of War Information, these women investigated wartime propaganda and the
emerging media cultures of American life, helped establish new research methods like the focused interview, and
carved out careers in climates that strongly favored the men they worked with. This documentary, directed by awardwinning filmmaker Naomi McCormack, charts the experiences and careers of five of these women—Thelma
Anderson, Joan Doris Goldhammer, Gladys Lang, Thelma McCormack, and Yole Sills—who together did pioneering
work on media and politics, social influence, and celebrity during a formative period for the field. "Out of the
Question" was directed and produced by Naomi McCormack (Penn State U). Executive Producer and Research
Director for "Out of the Question": Peter Simonson (U of Colorado)
Intercultural Communication Division Reception
Intercultural Communication
Chair
James W. Neuliep, St. Norbert College, USA
Participant
Leeva Chung, U of San Diego, USA
3832
Friday
18:00-19:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Political Communication Division Reception (Off site)
Political Communication
Chair
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
This is an off-site reception. Location TBA April 1 through the division page:
http://www.icahdq.org/sections/secdetinfo.asp?SecCode=DIV06
3844
Friday
18:00-19:15
Miami
3845
Friday
18:00-19:15
Scottsdale
Philosophy of Communication Division (Reception - OUT OF VENUE)
Philosophy of Communication
In Memory of Dr. Michael Pfau
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
William L. Benoit, U of Missouri, USA
Dr. Michael Pfau, Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication at the U of Oklahoma, passed away on
March 12, 2009. Michael was a prolific scholar, a mentor in the true sense of the word, and a valued friend to many in
the field of communication. His service to the International Communication Association was especially strong having
just recently stepped down from his editorship of the Journal of Communication. Michael Pfau's influence on the field
will be felt for many years to come. This session will be led by five scholars who knew Michael well and who can
share some unique perspectives on his life and work. We encourage everyone who knew Michael Pfau to come to the
session, share their experiences, and pay tribute to this preeminent scholar who will be sorely missed by the
discipline.
3851
Friday
18:00-20:00
Belmont
Visual Walking Seminar: Gentrification of Chicago Neighborhoods
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Charles Suchar, DePaul U, USA
Chuck Suchar, Professor and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, DePaul U is an eminent visual and
urban sociologist and a former professional photographer. He will take us on a visual walking tour of the
neighborhood around Lincoln Park - a preeminent example of a gentrified community - and talk about the visual
documentation of gentrification based on his earlier work in the neighborhood through the 1980s and 90s. Start Friday
4:00 PM Duration: approx. 2 hrs (transportation not included)
3830
Friday
18:30-20:30
Chicago
Ballroom A
Offsite Social by Communication and Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and Game Studies
Interest Group @ Rock Bottom Restaurant & Brewery
Communication and Technology
Information Systems
Game Studies
Pub gathering for members of Communication & Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and Game
Studies Interest Group. Location: Rock Bottom Brewery, One West Grand Avenue, Chicago, IL 60610, less than 5
minutes' walk from the hotel. First drink is free for CAT/InfoSys/Game Studies members.
3913
Friday
19:30-22:00
Michigan
3953
Friday
19:30-21:30
Clark
Public Relations Dinner (offsite)
Public Relations
The Public Relations will have its social hour continued with its traditional PR Division Dinner for members
immediately following the reception. The cost is $60 per person with a limit of 60 people. The location will be
announced at the PR Division Business Meeting.
Graduate Student Reception
Sponsored Sessions
4A50
Saturday
07:00-09:15
Armitage
4201
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Grand Ballroom I
ICA Past Presidents' Breakfast
Sponsored Sessions
On Difference (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Philosophy of Communication
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
Power in Difference: Tracing the Journey of "The Other"
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Demonstrating Difference in Ethnographic Studies of Communication
Donal Carbaugh, U of Massachusetts, USA
Brion van Over, U of Massachusetts, USA
Diversity Management, Inc.: The Politics of Difference in Business Publishing
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Juxtapositions of Difference in the Cosmopolis: A New Politics of Representation?
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel engages with various definitions, histories, and manifestations of the word difference. Within the filed of
communication studies, difference has been used as a keyword to mark identificatory differences, paradigmatic
differences, philosophical, and methodological differences. Focusing on this fluidity and diversity, this keyword
cross-unit panel brings together a group of international scholars who represent various divisions, to interrogate the
term through a variety of paradigmatic, methodological and philosophical lenses.
4210
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Illinois
Reconceptualizing Communication History
Communication History
Chair
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Participants
A Redemptive Dream of the Bad Old Days: Nostalgia as Resistance in Tarkovsky's "Andrei Rublev"
Greg Blake Miller, U of Oregon, USA
Death at Broadcasting House
Staffan Ericson, Södertörns Högskola, SWEDEN
Media, Authenticity, and Religion Søren Kierkegaard as Media Critic
Kristoffer Anselm, Linus Holt, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Obscene Mailings and the Judicial Regulation of Media Consumers' Inner Life Between 1873 and 1945
Mihaela Popescu, California State U - San Bernardino, USA
Selling Free Speech: Advertising and the First Amendment
Molly Catherine Niesen, U of Illinois, USA
Respondent
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
One of the important areas of interest for the communication history interest group has been the history of the idea of
communication. These papers address philosophical issues in communication from an historical perspective.
4211
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Indiana
Work Meetings as Constitutive Organizational Phenomena: Multidisciplinary Research
Organizational Communication
Chair
Clifton W. Scott, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Participants
The Meeting as a Contemporary Organizational Research Topic: Why Meetings Matter and Always Should Have
Clifton W. Scott, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Steven Rogelberg, U of North Carolina- Charlotte, USA
Joseph Allen, U of North Carolina- Charlotte, USA
Thinking Outside the "Clocks": The Effect of Layered Task Time on Creative Autonomy in Meetings
Beth Rubin, U of North Carolina –Charlotte, USA
Brett Agypt, U of North Carolina- Charlotte, USA
When Supervisors Lead Meetings: Relationships With Leader-Member Exchange, Perceived Organizational Support,
and Meeting Citizenship Behaviors
Linda Shanock, U of North Carolina –Charlotte, USA
Ben Baran, U of North Carolina Charlotte, USA
"No Closed Doors": How Open Meeting Requirements Shape Communicative Conduct
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Respondent
Helen Schwartzman, Northwestern U, USA
It is estimated that members of large organizations spend about 75% of their time in meetings. Given our sustained
interest in the organizing properties of communication, surprisingly little of our organizational communication theory
considers the impact of meeting phenomena on the structuring of organizational life or the health and well being of
members. Representing the disciplines of anthropology, industrial/organizational psychology, sociology and
communication, this panel features studies that consider work meetings as constitutive organizational phenomena.
4212
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Iowa
Perspectives on the Global Blogosphere
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Tatyana Dumova, Montclair State U, USA
Participants
Reflections on the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election in the Turkish Blogosphere
Mehmet Yilmaz, Ege U, TURKEY
Guliz Uluc, Ege U, TURKEY
Umit Isikdag, Independent IT Consultant, TURKEY
The Sources of Political J-Blogs in the U.S.
Marcus Messner, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Fame, Fantasy, Fanfare, and Fun: All is Fit to Fiddle Within the Chinese Culture of Blogmongering
Zixue Tai, U of Kentucky, USA
The Theater of the Blog: A Hegemonic Analysis of a Posted Saga
Richard Fiordo, U of North Dakota, USA
Respondent
Tatyana Dumova, Montclair State U, USA
The birth of a blog has added a new dimension to the global public discourse. This panel brings together international
scholars to discuss the political, social, and cultural implications of "blogalization." The global blogosphere is viewed
from various angles and multiple perspectives, including reflections on the 2008 U.S. presidential election in the
Turkish blogosphere, the news sources of j-blogs, the Chinese culture of blogmongering, and a theoretical
conceptualization of the phenomenon of the blog.
4213
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Michigan
Top Student Papers in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
A Test of Excellent Leadership in Public Relations: Key Qualities, Valuable Sources, and Distinctive Leadership
Perceptions
Juan Meng, U of Alabama, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
Karla K. Gower, U of Alabama, USA
William C. Heyman, Heyman Associates, Inc.
Exploring Product Category Effects: The Interplay of Crisis Responsibility Attributions on Attitudes Toward the
Organization and Purchase Intention
Jeesun Kim, U of Missouri, USA
On the State of the Communication Profession in Europe
Johannes Christian Fieseler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Bettina Beurer-Zuellig, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
The Shadow of Excellence: A Jungian Approach to Public Relations Ethics
Johanna Fawkes, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
4214
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Michigan State
Adolescents and Sexual Media Content
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Joanne Cantor, U of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Participants
Sexual Ambivalence in Seventeen Magazine: A Content Analysis of 1997 and 2007
Suchi Pradyumn Joshi, Amsterdam School of Communication Research, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Predictive Validity of Media Exposure Measures: Comparing Content Analysis With Survey in the Context of Sex
and Media
Chul-joo Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Martin Fishbein, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Adolescent Sexuality and Media Influences in China: Modulating Effects of School, Family, and Friends
Fei Tong, Chinese U Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The Effects of Parental Mediation of Sexual Content on Adolescents' Sexual Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors
Wenxiu Guo, Ohio State U, USA
Amy Nathanson, Ohio State U, USA
The Role of Media Literacy in Adolescents' Responses to and Interpretations of Mediated Sexual Messages
Bruce Pinkleton, Washington State U, USA
Erica W. Austin, Washington State U, USA
Yi-Chun Chen, Virginia Tech, USA
Marilyn Cohen, U of Washington, USA
4215
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Minnesota
International Perspectives on Policy Intervention: State, Corporation, and Citizen Activism
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
R. G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
Participants
Coercion Unmasked: The Counterhegemonic Impact of New Media Activism in Singapore
Cherian George, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Information-Seeking Behavior of Justices During U.S. Supreme Court Oral Arguments (Top Three Paper)
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
James Phillips, Brigham Young U, USA
Public Sphere and Network Neutrality
Taejin Koh, Michigan State U, USA
The Diffusion of Access-to-Information Legislation: A Cross-National Contextual Analysis
Jeannine E. Relly, U of Arizona, USA
Respondent
R. G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
The conditions and practices of seeking, obtaining, and sharing information in political and judicial processes are
central to the shaping of public debates. This panel assesses citizen activism, information-seeking by judges, the
conditions to support a vibrant sphere of public deliberation, and access to information in a variety of national and
cross-national settings.
4216
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Nothwestern
Feminist Challenges in World News: Hard, Soft, Violent, or Just Repressed?
Feminist Scholarship
Journalism Studies
Chair
Meenakshi Gigi Durham, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
"Hard" News, "Soft" News, and the Gendered Discourse of "Important" and "Interesting"
Hagar Lahva, Sapir Academic College, ISRAEL
Gender Quotas, the Public Sphere, and the Media: The Portuguese Case
Maria Joao Silveirinha, U of Coimbra/CIMJ, PORTUGAL
Ana Teresa Peixinho, U de Coimbra, PORTUGAL
The Giver of Life and the Griever of Death: Women in the Israeli TV Coverage of the Second Lebanon War (2006)
Hagar Lahva, Sapir Academic College, ISRAEL
The Return of the Repressed: Mapping Public and Private Spaces in the Portuguese Quality Press
Claudia Alvares, Lusofona U, PORTUGAL
4217
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Ohio State
The Video Consumer Mapping Study: The Media Ecosystem, Now and Next
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Richard Zackon, New York U, USA
Participants
Lessons Learned in Design and Execution of the Video Consumer Mapping Study
Michael Holmes, Ball State U, USA
Snapshots of the Media Ecosystem: Media Reach and Duration Across Locations and Dayparts
Mike Bloxham, Ball State U, USA
The Media Acceleration Method and Results From the Video Consumer Mapping Study
Elizabeth Hawke, Ball State U, USA
The Nielsen-funded Council for Research Excellence recently sponsored a large, multi-city "Video Consumer
Mapping" study. The study included field observation of a sample of 375 former Nielsen cooperators and 100
participants in a "media acceleration" panel (the latter purchased media devices and services at a steep discount). Over
14,000 hours of observational data--two days per participant, in 10-second granularity--were logged by trained
observers in spring and fall 2008. Participants' media exposures, life activities and locations were captured throughout
each observed day. Presentations will 1) describe the study's purpose, design and execution, 2) provide an overview of
the media ecosystem with implications for media measurement and 3) explore the influence of "media acceleration"
on participants' media.
4218
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Purdue
Meet the Editors of ICA Publications
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Krishnamurthy Sriramesh, Sri Guruduth Agencies, INDIA
Participants
Michael J. Cody, U of Southern California, USA
Jake Harwood, U of Arizona, USA
Kevin B. Wright, U of Oklahoma, USA
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Angharad N. Valdivia, U of Illinois, USA
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Mike West, International Communication Association, USA
This panel provides the membership with the opportunity to meet the editors of ICA's journals and the
Communication Yearbook. This session is devoted to answering and addressing issues that the membership may have
about specific publications.
4219
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Wisconsin
Studies in Language & Social Interaction Research
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Cynthia Gordon, Syracuse U, USA
Participants
Some Uses of Head Nods in "Third Position" in Talk-in-Interaction
Kevin Andrew Whitehead, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Pragmatics of Peer Advice Online: An Examination of a LiveJournal Community
Inna Kouper, Indiana U, USA
When Things Speak: Ventriloquized Figures in Reported Speech
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
"Do You Like Those Sweetie?" Parental Responsibility vs. the Child's Autonomy in CD Patients' Mealtime Talk
Hedwig Te Molder, Wageningen U, THE NETHERLANDS
Mario Veen, Wageningen U, THE NETHERLANDS
4221
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Persuasion (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Participants
Computer-Mediated Communication and Persuasion: Testing a Social Information Processing/Heuristic-Systematic
Synthesis
Brandon Lee Van Der Heide, Michigan State U, USA
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Do Superdiffusers Argue Differently? An Analysis of Argumentation Style Based on Diffusion Ability
Christopher John Carpenter, Michigan State U, USA
Michael R. Kotowski, U of Tennessee, USA
Franklin J. Boster, Michigan State U, USA
Kyle R. Andrews, Michigan State U, USA
Kim B. Serota, Michigan State U, USA
Allison Soo-Jung Shaw, Michigan State U, USA
Expanding the Theory of Reasoned Action to Promote a Land Preservation Millage
Erin K. Maloney, Michigan State U, USA
Lindsay Beth Neuberger, Michigan State U, USA
Maria Knight Lapinski, Michigan State U, USA
Paul Kindel, Michigan State U, USA
Stacy Sheridan Byers, Sheridan Land Consulting, USA
Ellen M. Bassett, Portland State U, USA
Charles Atkin, Michigan State U, USA
Hypocrites and Excuse Makers: The Promises and Perils of Mass Mediated Hypocrisy Induction for Behavior
Modification
Angela Poe Dossett, Ohio State U, USA
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Perceptions of Alcohol Commercials as a Function of Sexual and Social Alcohol Expectancies
Jennifer L Monahan, U of Georgia, USA
Jennifer A. Samp, U of Georgia, USA
Jessica Domby, U of Georgia, USA
Regulatory Focus, Functional Theories of Attitude Change, and Goal-Conflicting Behaviors
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
How Does Seeing Other Readers' Reactions to News Modulate Perceived Media Influence on Public Opinion?
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yoon Jae Jang, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Good Enough! The Influence of Organizational Communication Strategies to Refocus Users' Expectations on
Information Sharing Systems.
Axel Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
4223
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Great America II
Keywords in Media Ecology
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Peter K. Fallon, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Participants
Corey Anton, Grand Valley State U, USA
Peter K. Fallon, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Joshua Meyrowitz, U of New Hampshire, USA
Janet Sternberg, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Lance A. Strate, Institute of General Semantics, USA
In following with the theme of the 2009 Conference of the ICA, this panel focuses on the five key words/concepts in
the study of media ecology. The panelists will address how these concepts, taken together and as a whole, not only
define but comprise the conceptual framework known as media ecology.
4230
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Cueing Online Credibility
Communication and Technology
Chair
Carmen Stavrositu, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
Participants
Trust on the Web: How Young Adults Judge the Credibility of Online Content (TOP 2 Faculty Paper)
Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern U, USA
Lindsay Fullerton, Northwestern U, USA
Ericka Menchen-Trevino, Northwestern U, USA
Kristin Thomas, Northwestern U, USA
Social and Heuristic Approaches to Credibility Evaluation Online
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Andrew Flanagin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ryan B. Medders, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Perceptions of Credibility: A Comparison of User-Generated and Expert-Generated Websites
Thanomwong Poorisat, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Benjamin H. Detenber, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Vani Viswanathan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Helen Nofrina, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Anthropomorphic Cues: How Do They Influence Users' Judgments About Credibility?
Youjeong Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Source Cues in Online News: Is Proximate Source More Powerful Than Distal Sources? (TOP Student Paper)
Hyunjin Kang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Keunmin Bae, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Shaoke Zhang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
4231
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Social and Socialization Motives for ICT Use
Communication and Technology
Chair
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
College Students' Motives for Using Social Network Sites and Their Relationships to Users' Personality Traits
Alice E. Hall, U of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
Examining New Media Use and Interability Communication Among Deaf Persons
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Elizabeth Karras, New York State U - Buffalo, USA
Shyness, Sociability, and the Role of Media Synchronicity in the Use of Computer-Mediated Communication
Michael Che Ming Chan, City U Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The Mobile Phone and Socialization: Family vs. Friends
Yi-Fan Chen, Old Dominion U, USA
4232
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Factors Shaping the News
Political Communication
Chair
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
Participants
Incumbency Bonus in Election News Coverage Explained: The Logics of the Political System and the Media Market
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Albaek Erik, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
News on the Move: Exogenous Events and News Coverage of the European Union
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Role Played by News Networks in the Construction of "Public" Issues: The Brief, Happy News Life of the
"Francisville Four"
Christopher William Anderson, Columbia U, USA
Transformation of Media Structures and Media Content. A Diachronic Analysis of Five European Countries
Jens Lucht, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Linards Udris, foeg - U of Zurich, SWTIZERLAND
Respondent
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
4233
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
A Roundtable Discussion About the Greening of ICA
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
Participants
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Marie A. Mater, Houston Baptist U, USA
Stacey Sowards, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Andy Opel, Florida State U, USA
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Linda L. Putnam, U of California, USA
Sam Luna, International Communication Association, USA
From the annual Consumer Electronics Show to the Society of Environmental Journalists to Burning Man,
conventions, conferences and even radical art festivals are going green. What does this mean? For many groups, the
first steps toward a more sustainable gathering include using recycled paper and soy based inks, composting food
waste and purchasing carbon offsets. These somewhat cosmetic efforts present a challenge to ICA and the community
of scholars who gather annually to share their work. While small changes can be a starting point they can also serve as
a panacea that inhibits more substantive actions by alleviating the political pressure to confront climate change.
Navigating this tension while taking concrete steps - both large and small - will require leadership, structural change
and new individual behaviors. If sustainability is to be an actual keyword and not a buzzword, ICA will need to move
beyond the obvious and begin working toward an environmentally conscious, truly 21st century conference. What this
looks like and how we might get there are the challenges confronting our global academic network. This roundtable
will take up this challenge with the help of a group of scholars from across the discipline, in dialogue with the
audience and ICA leadership, with the goal of mapping out a path toward a greener ICA.
4234
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Above and Beyond? A Look at Uncharted Processes in Media Effects Research
Mass Communication
Participants
Away From the Middle Range: The Pros and Cons of Ecological Studies in Mass Communication Research
Jan Van den Bulck, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Implicit Associations Test: Just What is the IAT Measuring?
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Narrative Rehearsal of Norm Violation Scripts: Expanding the Methodological Repertoire of Cultivation Research
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Thinking While Viewing: What Thoughts During Viewing Can Tell Us About Narrative Experiences and Effects
Rick W. Busselle, Washington State U, USA
Yushu Zhou, Washington State U, USA
Almost all media effects research has to deal with three or four problems: relationships between variables are small
(even though exposure is almost universal), the concepts are latent and the explanatory models are hypothetical. The
lack of easily measured and manifest variables makes media effects theories vulnerable. There is a risk of too much
researcher socialization where people accept theories as valid because everybody else does and methods as sound
because it is what we are used to. In a discipline where relationships are small and debatable, it is important to explore
uncommon ground and to challenge all theories and hypotheses constantly.
4235
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Implications of Ingroup and Outgroup Portrayals
Mass Communication
Chair
Laura Triplett, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Participants
Stereotype Content and the African American Viewer: An Examination of African Americans' Stereotyped
Perceptions of Fictional Media Characters
Meghan Shara Sanders, Louisiana State U, USA
Please Your Self: Social Identity Effects on Selective Exposure to News About In- and Out-Groups
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Matthias R. Hastall, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Social Identity Theory as a Framework for Understanding the Effects of Exposure to Positive Media Images of Self
and Other on Intergroup Outcomes
Kathleen Marie Warber, Wittenberg U, USA
Dana Mastro, U of Arizona, USA
Christopher Joseph McKinley, U of Arizona, USA
German Listeners' Music-Genre Schemas for International and Domestic Popular Music: Differences in Cognitive
Associations Associated With Exposure to Country, Hip-Hop, Punk, and German Folksy Music
Mark Shevy, Northern Michigan U, USA
Susanne Kristen, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, GERMANY
4236
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Barack Obama and Popular Communication: The Rise of Politics of the Popular
Popular Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Participants
Revived 19th Century Political Practices
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Obama's Brother: Humor and Satire in the Dutch Television Coverage Of The Us Presidential Elections
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U Of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Structured Polysemy of the Post: Watching Political Humor on a Social Network
Ethan Thompson, Texas A&M U, USA
Obama Fans Worldwide: The Politics of Affect and Proximity
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
On November 4th Barack Obama was elected the first Democratic president of this century and the first AfricanAmerican to take the highest Office in US history. However, his election does not only mark a potentially
fundamental change in American politics itself. The 2008 presidential campaign marked the arrival of new forms of
political communication and a distinct blurring of the realms of political and popular culture. Returning to the
political home of Barack Obama in Chicago, Illinois, this panel features four papers by scholars whose research
focuses on the interface between popular political media. It sets out to analyze and explore the multifaceted premises
and consequences of the transformations in popular and political communication that propelled as much as were
driven by Obama's campaign.
4237
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
The Complexities of Watchdogging
Journalism Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Participants
Follow the Leader: Effect of Death Thoughts on U.S. Journalists' Support for President George W. Bush
David L. Cuillier, U of Arizona, USA
Media Pluralism by Default: The Case of Moldova
John Houston Parmelee, U of North Florida, USA
The Publicness of the Media in the Transition From an Authoritarian Regime: Exploring the Transformation of the
Chinese Press From a Perspective of "Public Opinion Supervision" Discourse After 1978
Weizhen Lei, Renmin U - China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Heng Lu, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
4240
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Denver
Online Social Support, Information, and Health Communication
Health Communication
Chair
Ellen Rubenstein, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
An Examination of Obesity Stigma and Identity Through Online Discourse
Mary Beth Asbury, U of Kansas, USA
How Does Insightful and Negative Emotional Disclosure Bring Potential Health Benefits?: Study Based on Online
Support Groups for Women with Breast Cancer
Minsun Shim, U of Georgia, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
The Effect of Computer-Mediated Social Support in Online Communities on Patient Empowerment and DoctorPatient Communication
Hyunjung Oh, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Byoungkwan Lee, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Who Gives Care to the Caregiver: Effects of Online Social Support Groups on Wellbeing of People Taking Care of
Others?
Martin Tanis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Enny Henrica Das, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Healthy Communication: Mere Communication Effect on Managing Chronic Health Problems
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
Seungyoon Lee, Purdue U, USA
Justin Guild, Purdue U, USA
4241
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Houston
Affect in Persuasive Health Communication
Health Communication
Chair
Christine Skubisz, U of Maryland, USA
Participants
Examining the Role of Efficacy Appeals in HIV Testing Promotion: A Close Look at the Relationship Between Fear
and Guilt With Psychological Reactance and Boomerang Effects
Brian L. Quick, U of Illinois- Urbana-Champaign, USA
Cortney M. Moriarty, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Mitigating Psychological Reactance: The Role of Message-Induced Empathy in Persuasion
Lijiang Shen, U of Georgia, USA
Motivating Emergency Preparedness Behaviors: The Effects of Guilt Appeals and Guilty Feelings
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland - College Park, USA
Jill Cornelius Underhill, U of Maryland, USA
The Persuasive Effects of Affect and Motivation on Message Framing
Changmin Yan, U of Maine, USA
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Fuyuan Shen, Pennsylvania State U, USA
4242
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Kansas City
Media Policy, Media Systems, and Democracy
Political Communication
Chair
Gaurav Sood, Stanford U, USA
Participants
Is Art Efficient? The Rhetorical Struggle for the NEA
Emily Petrone, American U, USA
Media Systems and Political Systems: Dimensions of Comparison
Sven Engesser, Ludwig Maximilian U - Munich, GERMANY
Annika Rechmann, U of Munich, GERMANY
Political Communication and Media System in Australia
Paul Kelvin Jones, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Michael Pusey, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
The Transformation of Political Communication in Mexico (1994-2006)
German Espino, U Autonomous - Queretaro, MEXICO
4243
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Los Angeles
Reactions to Bad Things Happening
Mass Communication
Chair
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Participants
Games and Recovery: The Use of Video and Computer Games to Recuperate from Stress and Strain
Leonard Reinecke, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Sabine Trepte, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Compassion Desensitization: Comparing Reactions to Nonfiction Disaster and Fictional Television Violence
Lyudmila Popova, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
How Do We React When Our Favorite Shows and Favorite Characters Are Taken Away? An Examination of a
Temporary Parasocial Breakup
Julie Lather, Ohio State U, USA
Emily Moyer-Guse, Ohio State U, USA
Cultivation Theory Revisited: The Impact of Childhood Television Viewing Levels on Social Reality Beliefs and
Construct Accessibility in Adulthood
Karyn E. Riddle, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
4244
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Miami
The Management of Mediated Performance
Philosophy of Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Espen Ytreberg, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
Disciplining the Performances of Electronic Media
Espen Ytreberg, U of Oslo, NORWAY
A Phenomenological Approach to the Production of Live Sports Coverage
Paddy Scannell, U of Michigan, USA
Changing Styles of News Presentation: The Performative Paradox
Martin Mathew Montgomery, U of Strathclyde, UNITED KINGDOM
"Ordinary" Production: Reality TV and Emotional Labor
Laura Anne Grindstaff, U of California - Davis, USA
The panel draws together current work on mediated performance, in order to emphasise and develop the contribution
media studies scholarship makes to the interdisciplinary study of performance and performativity. The emphasis is on
how performances are managed in an institutional and production setting. A focus on the management of media
performances provides a fresh view on some basic issues of performativity: how performance involves the
constitution of subjectivity, identity, and the category of "person". It also introduces new dimensions to the discussion
of performance, to do with the importance of the premeditations, competences and production practices that lie behind
it. The panel's contributions examine a broad spectrum of television genres from a textual and production studies
perspective.
4245
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Scottsdale
Contemporary Perspectives on the Performance of the Press
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Linda K. Fuller, Worcester State College, USA
Participants
100 World Trade Center Bombings in Darfur Sudan: Ownership Structure and Functions of the Press in a Globalizing
World
Bella Mody, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Linda J. Hofschire, Independent Researcher, USA
Operational Models and Bureaucratic Imperatives in the Global Promotion of Media Diversity
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washingon U, USA
The Grass is Greener on This Side: Indian Journalists' Job Satisfaction, Media Freedom Rating, and Perceived
Importance of Profession
Bridgette P. Colaco, Troy U, USA
Jyotika Ramaprasad, U of Miami, USA
When Journalism and Marketing Intersect in TV News Programs: A Case Study of Taiwan's Product Placement
Research and Its Implications for Global Television Programs
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Respondent
Hemant Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
4251
Saturday
09:00-10:15
Belmont
Hybridization, Rhetoric and Ethics of Non Fiction: Photojournalism, Documentary and Reality TV
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Participants
The Edge of Documentary: Judith Butler and the Monks of the Grand Chartreuse
Steven W. Schoen, U South Florida, USA
"Don't Interfere, They Will Fuck Up By Themselves": Questions of Genre Hybridization, Authenticity, and Ethics in
Reality Television
Jelle Mast, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Human-Interest Story or Propaganda?: Life's Photographic Portrayals of Koreans' Suffering in the Korean War
Sun-A Kim, Ewha Womans' U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Reader Reactions Toward an Ethical Dilemma Faced by Photojournalists: Examining the Conflict Between Acting as
a Dispassionate Observer and Acting as a "Good Samaritan"
Yung Soo Kim, U of Kentucky, USA
James David Kelly, Indiana U Bloomington, USA
"I Have Been Rather a Hawk": Image Vernacular and Visual Narrative in the Vietnam War Photojournalism of Larry
Burrows
Walter Patrick Wade, Northwestern U, USA
4301
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Grand Ballroom I
Communication and Authenticity (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Philosophy of Communication
Public Relations
Political Communication
Organizational Communication
Chair
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Authenticity in Organizational Context: Fragmentation, Contradiction and Loss of Control
Lee Edwards, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Construction of an Authenticity Index
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Socially Mediated Authenticity in Public Affairs Communication: DipNote
Dawn R. Gilpin, Arizona State U, USA
Organizational Metaconversations and Authenticity
Simon Torp, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Respondent
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
This panel addresses the problematic of authenticity in the context of a communicative environment where
authenticity is seen as desirable yet may not be possible once explicit claims to 'be authentic' are made. Individuals
and Organizations deploy symbolic discourses to underpin claims to authenticity with particular meanings in mind,
yet they paradoxically lose control of those meanings as the 'constructed nature' of authenticity is revealed. The
papers in this panel explore the problematic of authenticity from four different perspectives.
4310
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Illinois
Revisiting Interwar Communication Research: Dewey, Lippmann, and the Chicago School
Communication History
Chair
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
Participants
Lippmann, Dewey, and Carey: The '20s Filtered Through the '80s
Michael Schudson, U of California - San Diego, USA
The Dewey and Lippmann Exchange in Historical Context
Sue Curry Jansen, Muhlenberg College, USA
Mass Society, Mass Culture, and Mass Communication: The Meanings of Mass
Kurt Lang, U of Washington, USA
Gladys Lang, U of Washington, USA
James W. Carey's Chicago School: Drafting a Usable Past
Jefferson D. Pooley, Muhlenberg College, USA
Respondent
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
The panel questions a number of overlapping ideas about the legacy of interwar media scholarship, including (1) the
tendency to dismiss the concept of "mass society" as ideologically problematic; (2) the view that an exchange
between John Dewey and Walter Lippmann represented a crucial fork in the road in the development of media
studies; and (3) the claim that an interpretivist "cultural approach" to the field can be deduced from the work of
Dewey and the Chicago School.
4311
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Indiana
Sense-Making and Work Identities: Examining Dirty Work, Stigma, Class, and Media Use
Organizational Communication
Chair
Heather Zoller, U of Cincinnati, USA
Participants
One Hand Washes the Other? How Miners Interact About Their Dirty Work
Mark Van Vuuren, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Jacqueline Teurlings, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Ernst T. Bohlmeijer, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Stigma Management Communication: A Typology of Strategies Used by Stigmatized Individuals
Rebecca J. Meisenbach, U of Missouri, USA
Tuning in to "The Office": Connecting Organizational Communication Behaviors and Attitudes With Media Use
Keli L. Finnerty, Pepperdine U, USA
Johny T. Garner, Pepperdine U, USA
When the Dream and Promise Collide: Accounting for Class Mobility-Based Ambivalences
Kristen Lucas, U of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA
Respondent
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
4312
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Iowa
Theory and Policy in Communication for Social Change
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Veena V. Raman, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Framing the Digital Divide: Bridging the Gap Between Users and Makers of the Internet
Andrea Calderaro, European U Institute, ITALY
Social Inequalities and ICT Policies in Developing Countries: A Case of South Africa
Toks Oyedemi, Department of Communication, USA
Organizing Change in Participatory Development
Lalatendu Acharya, Purdue U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
The Problematic Privatization of Programs for the Public Good
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Veena V. Raman, Pennsylvania State U, USA
4313
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Michigan
The Thing That Never Dies: Reputation And Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Jane E. Fitzgibbon, Wayne State U, USA
Participants
Media Agenda Setting and Corporate Reputation in France
Roei Davidson, Communication Department, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Nicolas Chazaud, U of Montpellier, FRANCE
Public Engagement in Supportive Communication Behaviors: Effects of Relational Satisfaction and Organizational
Reputation in Public Relations Management
Soo Yeon Hong, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Sung-Un Yang, Syracuse U, USA
The Influence of Firms' Agenda-Building Efforts and Media Agenda-Setting on Organizational Prominence
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Towards Building the Relationships-Reputation Integrated Model
Youngju Sohn, U of Georgia, USA
4314
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Michigan State
Regulating and Mediating Children's Media Use
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
Participants
Media Ratings: To See or Not To See?
Jordy Gosselt, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Menno de Jong, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Joris van Hoof, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Only Two Hours?: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Parents Face in Restricting Child Television Time
Cortney A. Evans, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Jennifer Horner, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Protecting the Technologically Precocious Child: Technologies of Moral Authority in the Media Decency Debate
Carrie Anne Platt, North Dakota State U, USA
The Interaction Effects of Peer and Social Influence: An Application of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of
Technology to Messenger Adoption
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Chan Hock Chuan, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Milagros Rivera, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
The Appeal of Unsuitable Video Games: An Exploratory Study on Video Game Regulations in an International
Context and Media Preferences of Children in Germany
Sven Joeckel, HMT - Hannover, GERMANY
Leyla Dogruel, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
An Integrated Model of Parental Mediation: The Effect of Family Communication on Children's Perception of
Television
Seon-Kyoung An, U of Alabama, USA
Doohwang Lee, U of Alabama, USA
4315
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Minnesota
Media Governance: Understanding Processes of Content Control
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Matt Jackson, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Beyond Cynicism: A Review of the FCC's Reasoning for Modifying the Newspaper/Broadcast Cross-Ownership Rule
Jonathan Obar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Legitimacy Management of Press Councils: How Self-Regulatory Organizations Respond to Their Environments
Manuel Puppis, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Setting Stage for the Sixties: Restrictions on Speech About Drugs in America Prior to 1968 (Top Three Paper)
Stephen I Siff, Miami U, USA
Two Strikes and a Foul Ball: One More Pitch for the Fairness Doctrine
Christopher R Terry, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Respondent
Matt Jackson, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Whether to regulate media content, and how best to achieve public goals concerning media content, are among the
central issues in communication policy debates. Papers on this panel consider questions of media content control and
processes of regulation, including supporting viewpoint diversity through ownership caps and the Fairness Doctrine,
or practices of self-regulation by media enterprises.
4316
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Nothwestern
Advances in Theory and Research on Students in and out of the Classroom
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Michel Dupagne, U of Miami, USA
Participants
Student-Centered Learning: Toward Generating Pedagogical Strategies for Interdisciplinary Public Affairs Courses
Gerald-Mark Mark Breen, U of Central Florida, USA
Jonathan Matusitz, U of Central Florida, USA
Thomas Wan, U of Central Florida, USA
Instructor-Student and Student-Student Rapport in the Classroom
Brandi N Frisby, West Virginia U, USA
Underlying Expectations of Native-English-Speaking Teachers and South Korean Students: Insights From Personal
Narratives
Elizabeth Root, Oregon State U, USA
Student Generated Protective Behaviors to Avert Severe Harm
Sandi Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Carolyn Kay LaPlante, Michigan State U, USA
Wilma Novales Wibert, Michigan State U, USA
Alex Ryan Mayer, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Atkin, Michigan State U, USA
Katherine Ann Klein, Michigan State U, USA
Edward Lawrence Glazer, Michigan State U, USA
Dennis Martell, Michigan State U, USA
4317
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Ohio State
Representation and Rejection: Rearticulating Fear Through Brown
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
What Claims Can Brown Make? Racial and Economic Citizenships in the Caribbean
Susan Harewood, U of Washington –Bothell, USA
Brown Men of the Middle East: The Politics of Islamophobia
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Suspects in the City: Browning the 'Not-Quite' Citizen
Jenny Burman, McGill U, CANADA
Alien Bodies, Brown Bodies: Popular Narratives of the Immigrant as Benign Terror
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
In recent history, especially following September 11th, 2001, ethnic and racial prescriptions of self and other have
become complicated, both in the United States and globally. The notion of security, terror, and threat are re-presented
through carefully codified understandings of otherness. This panel engages with this reality by looking at covert and
overt changes/justifications/political interventions through the broad category of 'brown'. The panel, through various
approaches and examples, including popular culture, political discourses and practices, history and citizenship argues
that brown, both metaphorically and symbolically represents the changing nature of global racial politics.
4318
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Purdue
Theoretical Advances in Disclosure and Avoidance Decisions
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Tamara D. Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Regulating the Privacy of Confidentiality: Grasping the Complexities Through Communication Privacy Management
Theory
Sandra Petronio, Indiana U - Purdue U, Indianapolis, USA
Jennifer Reierson, North Dakota State U, USA
Why People Conceal or Reveal Secrets: A Multiple Goals Theory Perspective
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Anita L. Vangelisti, U of Texas - Austin, USA
The Divorce Disclosure Model (DDM): Why Parents Disclose Negative Information About the Divorce to Their
Children and Its Effects
Tamara D. Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Paul Schrodt, Texas Christian U, USA
Tara G. McManus, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Conflict Avoidance: A Functional Analysis
Michael E. Roloff, Northwestern U, USA
Courtney N. Wright, U of Tennessee, USA
After a period of relative dormancy, research on disclosure, avoidance, and/or secrecy has exploded back onto the
scene during the past 15 years. It is now a part of our fundamental understanding of interpersonsl process that people
often have to make difficult decisions about their disclosures, including if and when to disclose or keep the
information private, the conditions under which they would disclose, and potential consequences of the disclosure (or
secrecy) for themselves, others, and their relationships. The goal of this panel was to bring together the scholars that
have defined and shaped recent progress in this area and ask that they summarize existing knowledge and offer new
directions for research. All four papers do exactly that.
4319
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Wisconsin
Politics in Action, and Political Aspects of Language Use
Language & Social Interaction
Political Communication
Chair
Mark Aakhus, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
"I Have a Question for You": One Practice for Managing Institutional Interaction
Gonen Dori-Hacohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Prevalence of Strategies and Tactics in Political Televised Debates: Different Use Before Versus After Election Day
and Between Majority Versus Opposition?
Dave Gelders, Katholische U Leuven, BELGIUM
Metaphor, Narrative, and Social Reality in a Conversation About Homelessness
David Ritchie, Portland State U, USA
Race, Power, and Language Criticism: The Case of Hawai'i
Mikaela L. Marlow, U of Idaho, USA
Cyberculture and the Construction of Antilanguage
Kalen Mary Ann Churcher, Niagara U, USA
4321
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Framing (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Nancy Rhodes, IUPUI, USA
Participants
Affective States and Message Frames
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Gender Differences in Valence in "Real" and "Fake" Violent Images
Matthew John Kobach, Indiana U, USA
Heuristic vs. Systematic Processing of Specialist vs. Generalist Sources in Online Media
Yoon Jeon Koh, Marketing Laboratory,, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Media Influences on Brand Placement: Does it Matter in Which Program a Brand is Placed?
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Regulatory Fit of Message Frames
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Seeing is Learning: How Visual Framing Affects Learning From the Television News of International Conflict
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
The Effect of Framing and Motivational Activation on the Processing of Health Messages
Madhuja Banerjee Whitehead, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Video Use Moderates Skin Conductance Responses to Video Clips Labeled Real People vs. Actors
Vanessa Vega, Stanford U, USA
Byron Reeves, Stanford U, USA
4323
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Great America II
Communicating Across Cultural and Ethnic Groups
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Fei Jiang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Interethnic Communication Among College Students: An Examination of Behavioral and Contextual Factors
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kelly Lynn McKay-Semmler, U of Oklahoma, USA
Revealing Personal Information Associated with Identities in Intercultural Friendships Between U.S. Americans and
Chinese Sojourners
Yea-Wen Chen, U of New Mexico, USA
Dissenters Not Allowed: The Interplay of Nationalism, Dogmatism, and Social Identity in Nation-Hate
Communication Contexts
Khaled A. G. Nasser, Louisiana State U, USA
Gennadi Gevorgyan, Louisiana State U, USA
Al-Jazeera English: A Conciliatory Medium in a Conflict-Driven Environment?
Shawn Powers, U of Southern California, USA
Mohammed El-Nawawy, U Of West Florida, USA
Respondent
Leeva Chung, U of San Diego, USA
4330
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Avatar Power
Communication and Technology
Chair
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Static Avatars, Social Presence, and Online Answers
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
My Picture is Better Than Yours: Self-Endorsing in Online Advertisements
Sun Joo Ahn, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
The Influence of Racial Embodiment on Racial Bias in Immersive Virtual Environments
Victoria Jane Groom, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Clifford Ivar Nass, Stanford U, USA
Virtual Experiences, Physical Behaviors: The Effect of Presence on Imitation of an Eating Avatar
Jesse A. Fox, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Smile and the World Will Smile With You: The Effects of a Virtual Agent´s Smile on Users' Evaluation and Smiling
Behavior
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Nicole Sommer, U Duisburg - Essen., GERMANY
Stefan Kopp, U of Bielefeld, GERMANY
Christian Becker-Asano, ATR Kyoto, JAPAN
4331
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Youth and Communication Technology: The Role of Social Network Sites in the Lives of Young People
Communication and Technology
Participants
It's Personal: Similarities and Differences in Online Social Network Use Between Teens and Adults
Amanda B. Lenhart, Pew Internet and American Life Project, USA
A Typology of Social Network Site Users
Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern U, USA
MySpace Vs. Facebook: A Digital Enactment of Class-Based Social Categories Amongst American Teenagers
Danah Michele Boyd, U of California, USA
Increasing the Social Capital of Rural Youth Through Social Media
Cliff Lampe, Michigan State U, USA
Andrew Smock, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Steinfield, Michigan State U, USA
Social Network Engagement: A Youth Perspective on the Potential Diminishing Returns
Matthew S Eastin, U of Texas, USA
Olga Kazakova, U of Texas, USA
This panel addresses current scholarship on youth use of social network sites (SNSs). Topics include rural youth and
the use of SNSs for purposes of increasing social capital, an investigation of class distinctions among Facebook and
MySpace teen users, a typology of SNS users among youth, a comparison of youth and adult use of SNSs, and a
discussion of the positive and negative effects of SNS use on youths' sense of self.
4332
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
"What to Think About?" and "How to Think?" (Attribute) Agenda Setting Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Lutz M. Hofer, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Agenda Building: Web Site Campaigning, Newspaper Coverage, and Candidate Stereotypes in the 2008 Democratic
Presidential Campaign
Yunjuan Luo, Indiana U, USA
Candidate Image in Election Campaigns: Attribute Agenda Setting, Affective Priming, and Voting Intentions
Meital Balmas, Hebrew U - Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U - Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Setting the Investment Agenda: Evidence From Closed-End Country Funds
Kyu S. Hahn, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Shanto Iyengar, Stanford U, USA
The Fight for "How to Think:" Traditional Media, Social Networks, and Attribute Agenda Setting
Sharon Meraz, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
When Media Matter for Politics. Partisan Moderators of Mass Media's Agenda-Setting Influence on Parliament in
Belgium
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Stefaan Walgrave, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
4333
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Key Concepts in News and Journalism: Objectivity and its Adjacent Concepts
Theme Sessions
Chair
Howard Tumber, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Doctrine in Decay: The Postobjectivity Vacuum in Journalism
Rodney Evan Tiffen, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Journalism and Public Interest
David E. Morrison, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
The "Journalist" and the "Civic" Models of Advocacy Journalism
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washingon U, USA
Trust Me, I'm a Journalist: Shattered Glass and the Crisis of Trust in Liberal Journalism
Brian McNair, U of Strathclyde, UNITED KINGDOM
Journalism as Engagement: The War Correspondent - From Attachment to Testament
Howard Tumber, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Political Journalism and Accountability: From the 19th Century to the Present
Marina Prentoulis, Richmond American U in London, UNITED KINGDOM
The aim of this panel is to invite a number of theoretical, historical and practical contributions examining and
analysing the use of objectivity in relation to the adjacent concepts that anchor it within particular contexts of the
communications environment of the twenty-first century. While there is some agreement that 'objectivity' functions
more as an abstract ideal that journalism and the news media are perpetually trying to achieve rather than a concrete
positive reality, a number of adjacent concepts -accuracy, public interest, neutrality, engagement, advocacy, trust and
accountability, define the uses of the key concept of objectivity within particular contexts. In the twenty-first century,
however, journalism as an occupation grounded on objectivity has become progressively redundant. The new
communications environment, marked by technological, social and political innovations, invites us to re-examine the
key concept objectivity and its related concepts as the ideal underpinning journalistic and news media practices.
4334
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Entertainment, Values, and Media Preferences
Mass Communication
Chair
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Genre Preference and Channel Loyalty: A Closer Look at the Role of Individual Values for Media Use
Merja Mahrt, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Klaus Schoenbach, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Correlating a Motivation Activation Measure With Media Preference
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Jacob Koruth, Indiana U, USA
Soyoung Bae, Indiana U, USA
Andrew J. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Sungkyoung Lee, Indiana U, USA
Bridget Rubenking, Indiana U, USA
Ock Tae Kim, Indiana U, USA
Defining Media Enjoyment as the Satisfaction of Intrinsic Needs
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
Matthew Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Reviving Action-Oriented Research on Media Choice
Tilo Hartmann, VU U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Vorderer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Techological U, SINGAPORE
4335
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
The Interplay Between the Media, the Economy, and Regulation
Mass Communication
Chair
Steffen Burkhardt, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Participants
A Cross-Level Theory of Media Effects: How the Economy Conditions Political Learning
Fei Chris Shen, Ohio State U, USA
Economic News Coverage and Economic Perceptions
Marko Bachl, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Mirror or Molder? A Study of Media Coverage, Stock Prices, and Trading Volumes in Germany.
Bertram T. Scheufele, Friedrich-Schiller-U of Jena, GERMANY
Alexander T. Haas, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Hans-Bernd Brosius, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Normative and Pragmatic Approach to Media Contribution in Democracy: The Analysis of Critical and Expressive
Dimensions of Media Diversity
Kim McCann, Northern Illinois U, USA
4336
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Provincializing Media Studies
Popular Communication
Participants
Media Studies and the Global South: The Arab World and Latin America as Axis of Theory
Marwan M. Kraidy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Dolly and Van Damme in Malawi
Jonathan Alan Gray, Fordham U, USA
Indian Idol: Reality TV and the Making of Mobile Publics
Aswin Punathambekar, U of Michigan, USA
No Happy Endings: Screenwriters and Corporations in Two Media Centers (1950s Havana and 1990s Bogota)
Yeidy M. Rivero, Indiana U, USA
Televising the Great Hungarian Reality
Timothy Havens, U of Iowa, USA
Disturbing News Disturbing Affects
Virginia Anne Nightingale, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Global Audiences
Michael Curtin, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
This panel proposes a roundtable, workshop-style approach to exploring theoretical, methodological, and practical
issues surrounding global reception and production studies. "Global Media Studies" often serves as a mere
placeholder for media studies outside Anglo-American academic settings, with "global" gesturing towards studies of
"Other" media ecologies. Such studies, furthermore, are often understood as mere case studies that test and refine
theoretical concepts developed within media studies proper. This panel brings together scholars who wrestle with the
simultaneous indispensability and inadequacy of Anglo-American theoretical and methodological paradigms in
contexts such as Hungary, Malawi, Australia, India, Lebanon, and Cuba. In what ways can we move away from the
"national" as the pre-eminent analytic frame? Can other modes and theories of feeling and affect reframe our
approach to media reception? How do industry professionals in the global south grapple with the challenges and
opportunities of globalization? How might we reframe the relationship between media and the public sphere? In
tackling these and other questions, we seek to explore ways in which theoretical and methodological developments in
diverse settings worldwide might inform and revitalize media and communications studies and, more importantly,
frame new problematics for the field at large.
4337
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
News and Citizen Participation
Journalism Studies
Chair
Jae-Hwa Shin, U of Southern Mississippi, USA
Participants
A Survey of Broadcast Journalism Viewers: How Comedic Editorial Analysis Impacts Democratic Participation
Amy Meader, San Diego State U, USA
Melissa Whaley, San Diego State U, USA
David M. Dozier, San Diego State U, USA
New Journalism on the Web: A Comparison of Hyper-Local Citizen Sites to Traditional Media Sites
Elizabeth Viall, Indiana U, USA
Not an Act of God: Anger in British Disaster Coverage
Mervi Pantti, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Agenda Setting Online: Interaction of Newspaper Content and User Feedback
Jason A. Martin, Indiana U, USA
Respondent
Theodore L. Glasser, Stanford U, USA
Citizen journalists, or as Jay Rosen refers to them, "The People Formerly Known As The Audience" are the subjects
of debate in newsrooms across the world. Giving voice to these citizen-consumers and collaborator-colleagues is
widespread in journalism -- but what kinds of news do these co-creative practices produce? The participants in this
session begin to answer this all-important question.
4340
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Denver
Channel Matters: Health Communication in Interpersonal and Technologically Mediated Contexts
Health Communication
Chair
Ambar Basu, U of South Florida, USA
Participants
Determinants of Healthcare Web Portals' Continued Usage: An Empirical Examination With Satisfaction and Trust
Pallavi Rao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Shalini Chandra, NanyangTechnological U, SINGAPORE
Health Communication in 3D Virtual Environments
Seung-A Annie Jin, Boston College, USA
Predicting the Impact of Campaign Conversation on Campaign Evaluation: Conversation Participant Matters
Yoori Hwang, U of Minnesota, USA
Brian Southwell, U of Minnesota, USA
Talk-Centered Blood Donation: Tracing the Path to Becoming a Blood Donor
Eulalia Puig Abril, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
4341
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Houston
Messages to Moderate Youth Behavior (High Density)
Health Communication
Chair
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Episodic Heavy Drinking Cognition, Affect, and Behavior: A Formative Research Approach
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
Jeffrey Carlson, U of Connecticut, USA
Alissa K Ryan, U of Connecticut, USA
Second-Level Agenda Setting in Health Public Service Announcements: How the PSA Influences the Public Agenda
on Teen Prescription Drug Abuse Issue
Mi Rosie Jahng, U of Missouri, USA
The Effects of Sensation Seeking on Cognitive Processing of Attack vs. Blame Antitobacco Advertisements
Jensen Joann Moore, West Virginia U, USA
Theorizing College Students' High-Risk Drinking Behavior: An Exploratory Study
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
Jeffrey Carlson, U of Connecticut, USA
Beyond Losing Baby Fats: Investigating Gender Specific Adolescent Dieting Motivators
May O. Lwin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Social Norms and Sanctioning Through Social Networks: A Theoretical Study of Body Image
Chien-fei Chen, Washington State U, USA
Lu Tang, U of Tennessee - Knoxville, USA
The Impact of the Individual's Locus of Control on Health Campaign Persuasiveness
Ying Kong, Towson U, USA
Effects of Past and Anticipated Guilt on Individuals' Health Intentions and Behavior and the Moderating Role of Past
Behavior
Xiao Wang, Eastern Connecticut State U, USA
4342
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Kansas City
Debates
Political Communication
Chair
Salma Ghanem, U of Texas - Pan American, USA
Participants
Debating With YouTube: Examining the Effects of a Targeted Debate Message on the Intended Audience
Mitchell S. McKinney, U of Missouri, USA
Lesile A. Rill, U of Missouri, USA
The Abuse of Attacks: A Functional Analysis of the 2008 Spanish Presidential Debates
Julio Cesar Perez Herrero, CEU San Pablo, SPAIN
William L. Benoit, U of Missouri, USA
The Effects of the 2008 Biden-Palin Vice Presidential Debate: Credibility/Competence, Social Attraction, Attitude
Homophily, and Voter Preference
Peter A. Andersen, San Diego State U, USA
The Use and Effectiveness of Negativity in Televised Debates
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, USA
Michaela Maier, DGPuk - Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Publizistikommunikation, GERMANY
Juergen Maier, U of Kaiserslautern, GERMANY
Respondent
Salma Ghanem, U of Texas - Pan American, USA
4343
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Los Angeles
The Environment and the Media
Mass Communication
Chair
Taehyun Kim, California State U- Northridge, USA
Participants
Mobilizing Disaster Relief: U.S. Media Coverage of the 2004-2005 Tsunami and Pakistan Earthquake
Brooke Weberling, U of North Carolina -Chapel Hill, USA
There Is Water Everywhere: How News Framing Amplified the Effect of Ecological Worldviews on Preference for
Flooding Protection Policy
Timothy K. F. Fung, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Isabella Ng, U of London
Environmental Worldviews and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Theoretical Extension of the Persuasion
Knowledge Model
Robert G. Magee, Virginia Tech, USA
The Influence of Environmental Values and Media Use on Predispositions for Public Engagement in Wildlife
Management Decision Making
Philip Solomon Hart, Cornell U, USA
Erik C Nisbet, Ohio State U, USA
James Shanahan, Fairfield U, USA
.
4344
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Miami
The Politics of Researching Culture
Philosophy of Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Bhabha and Habermas: Beyond the Impasse of the Modern and Postmodern
Maria T. Hegbloom, Bridgewater State, USA
Communitarianism and Cultural Studies: A Strategic Connection
Claudia Alvares, Lusofona U, PORTUGAL
Cultural Studies: A (Still) Progressive Project to Challenge Power or an Anachronistic Project Unwittingly in the
Service of Power?
Ferruh Yilmaz, U of California - San Diego, USA
Toward a Critical Articulation of Cultural Studies and Global Human Rights
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Keywords in Communication: What Is Theory?
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
Debates continue about how cultural studies can renew itself, whether it remains radical or has now been
institutionally appropriated, what is the most useful on which cultural research can draw. We can also ask: what is
theory anyway? These papers address these current controversies.
4345
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Scottsdale
Reporting the World: Comparative Evidence on Foreign Television News Across the Globe
Journalism Studies
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
The Foreign News on TV Project: Background, Scope, and Methodology
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Thorsten Quandt, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
The Global and the Local: Comparing Foreign and Domestic News
Abby A. Goodrum, Ryerson U, CANADA
Adrian Hadland, Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
Agnieszka Magdalena Stepinska, Adam Mickiewicz U, POLAND
Xu Xiaoge, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Who Has a Say? - On the Construction of Authority in Foreign News
Rasha Kamhawi, U of Florida, USA
Knut De Swert, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Does Ownership Matter? - How Foreign News Is Covered by Private and Public TV
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Angie Nguyen Vu, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Juergen Wilke, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Baohua Zhou, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
This panel reports evidence from a large-scale cross-national study of foreign television news content in nearly 20
countries. The first paper outlines the background, scope and methodology of the project. Each of the subsequent
three papers deals with a specific feature of foreign news: the relationship between foreign and domestic news, the
use of actors and sources in TV news, and the way ownership influences foreign TV news content in different cultural
contexts.
4351
Saturday
10:30-11:45
Belmont
Keyword "Play": Taking Computer Games and Game Play Seriously
Game Studies
Chair
Thomas K. Nakayama, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
Jihad Worlds of Warcraft: Surveillance and Racialization in Digital Cultures of Play
Lisa Nakamura, U of Illinois, USA
Moral Economies of Play
Douglas Thomas, U of Southern California, USA
Fighting for the Franchise: Marvel Comics Films, Video Games, and Fan Culture
Robert Brookey, Northern Illinois U, USA
Comparing Real & Virtual Quality of Life Data Using a Virtual Assisted Self-Interview Method
Edward Castronova, Indiana U, USA
Mark Bell, Indiana U, USA
Keeping it Real: Playing With Reality in MMORPGs
David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U, USA
This panel, composed of noted scholars in game studies, is organized around the keyword "play." Although play has
often been marginalized in scholarly work, recent theoretical innovations and investigations in computer gaming have
demonstrated the cultural importance of play, the critical insights that games and game play can provide, and the need
for scholars of communication to take play seriously. The panel, therefore, seeks to demonstrate that play is in fact
very serious business.
4401
Saturday
12:00-13:15
Grand Ballroom I
Projections of the Future From Reflections on the Past: Media Issues
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Alan M. Rubin, Kent State U, USA
Participants
The Questions That Mattered
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Children and the Media: Why a Developmental Perspective Matters
Barbara J. Wilson, U of Illinois, USA
Adolescents and the Internet: An Empirical Assessment of the Risks and Opportunities
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Joanne Cantor, U of Wisconsin, USA
ICA honors its New Fellows each year with a special program that focuses on their life work and contributions to the
field of communication.
4430
Saturday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
ICA Miniplenary: Alternative Modes of Academic Work
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Gerry Power, BBC World Service Trust, UNITED KINGDOM
J. Alison Bryant, Nickelodeon/MTV Networks, USA
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Nicole Stremlau, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Shih-Hung Lo, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
David Gleason, Publicis, USA
Though the majority of job-seekers with PhDs find employment in the academy in one form or another, alternative
modes of academic work exist -- in NGOs, in journalism, in media industries, among others. This panel addresses
some of the alternative career trajectories available beyond the ivory tower.
4433
Saturday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
ICA Miniplenary: On Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Paddy Scannell, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
Milly Buonanno, U of Rome La Sapienza, ITALY
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Tamar Katriel, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Winston Mano, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel addresses the idea of communication as an originary term for the field of study by the same name. What do
we mean by "communication"? Scholars from across the world and across the field of communication offer their
perspectives on this keyword.
4434
Saturday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
ICA Miniplenary: The City
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The Urbanizing of Everything: From Imaginations to Finance
Saskia Sassen, Columbia U, USA
Public Space: Or, the Homeless as Indicator Species
Don Mitchell, Syracuse U, USA
Sweet Home Chicago: Activists in the Heartland
William Ayers, U of Illinois- Chicago, USA
The city has long provided a setting for collective action and understanding, but which kind of action and
understanding and on whose terms have been variable. This panel addresses the city's possibilities and limits,
considering the multiple sources for its growing significance, the battles raised by the homeless over rights to the city,
and the parameters available for activism.
4501
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Grand Ballroom I
Keyword: Technology (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Communication History
Game Studies
Communication and Technology
Philosophy of Communication
Language & Social Interaction
Mass Communication
Chair
Deborah Lubken, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Mass Communication Perspective on Technology
Joseph Turow, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Post-Technology?: The Romance of Associations
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Continuum or Conundrum?: Conceptualizing Technology's Influence in Communication and Technology Research
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Beyond the Content: Emphasizing Technological Features in Programmatic Variable-Centered Video Game Research
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Interactional Materiality and the Consequential Contexts of Technological (Re)Production
Patricia G. Lange, U of Southern California, USA
The meaning of technology is occasionally subject to definition but more often shifts, chameleon-like, from context to
context. Are technologies machines? Complex sets of practices, habits and beliefs? Matrices of reason? In
consideration of the 2009 ICA conference theme, the Communication History Interest Group invites participants from
the Game Studies Interest Group and the Communication and Technology, Philosophy of Communication, Language
and Social Interaction, and Mass Communication Divisions to a cross-division conversation about this keyword. How
does your corner of the field understand technology, and how does this understanding influence the inquiries you
pursue? Responses will be formulated in terms of recent scholarship produced within the presenter's Division or
Interest Group.
4510
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Illinois
Twenty Years of Free Media and the Public Sphere in Central Europe
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
Participants
Public Sphere and the Media at the New European Union Countries in the Central Europe
Robert Wiszniowski, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
How Small is Very Small? Assessing Pluralism, Diversity, and Media Democratic Performance in a Small Country
Auksė Balčytienė, Vytautas Magnus U Kaunas, LITHUANIA
Halliki Harro-Loit, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Quality Press and (or) Economic Success? Czech Journalists 20 Years After the Collapse of the Old Media System
Jaromir Volek, Masaryk U in Brno, CZECH REPUBLIC
Politicization of Polish Media and Its Consequences for the Public Sphere
Michal Bartosz Glowacki, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
The Public Sphere and Media in Slovakia
Andrej Skolkay, School of Communication and Media, SLOVAK REPUBLIC
Respondent
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
In this session sponsored by the Polish Communication Association the participants will present and discuss their
respective research regarding the public sphere in their countries. We have invited some scholars from countries that
are the neighbors of Poland - Czech Republic, Slovakia and Lithuania. We try to compare a role that media play in
each of these countries. We are looking for similarities and differences among this four political and media systems.
A common understanding in contemporary media studies is that convergence of media systems and homogenization
of journalism is becoming a worldwide trend. Is this process present in the Central Europe? According to the public
sphere model, media are than just profit - making components of large conglomerates. This model views people as
citizens rather than consumers. It contends that media should serve these citizens rather than target potential
consumers. The session will explore how much "market" and how much "public sphere" are in the Central Europe and
reconstruct the relationship between them. Poland represents a big market and a one of the numerous populations in
this region, Czech Republic and Slovakia are medium size market, Lithuania is an example of small nation and small
market. From the public sphere perspective, the potential contribution of media to participatory democracy is in the
work of creating and sustaining a citizenry that is prepared for participation in public life. Do Polish, Czech, Slovak
and Lithuanian media create and sustain a citizenry? Do they help and motivate their citizens to participation in the
public sphere? Is this work easier in small or bigger "market"?
4511
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Indiana
Organizational Communication Technology and Knowledge Management: Multiple Approaches
Organizational Communication
Chair
Kristen Lucas, U of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA
Participants
Knowledge Management Technology, Information Visibility, and the Social Construction of Expertise
Paul Leonardi, Northwestern U, USA
Jeffrey William Treem, Northwestern U, USA
The Utility of Information and Communication Technologies in Organizational Knowledge Management
Andrew Flanagin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Melissa Bator, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Understanding the Paradox of Autonomy and Control: Toward a Dialectical Model of Telework
Guowei Jian, Cleveland State U, USA
Susan Rosiek, Cleveland State U, USA
Understanding the Structures, Antecedents, and Outcomes of Organizational Learning and Knowledge Transfer: A
Multitheoretical and Multilevel Network Analysis
Chunke Su, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Meikuan Huang, California State U - Stanislaus, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Marshall Scott Poole, U of Illinois, USA
4512
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Iowa
Storytelling, Traditional Media, New Technologies, and Development
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
John K. Mayo, Florida State U, USA
Participants
Challenges of Storytelling in Unfamiliar Cultures: Exploring the Dramatist's Decisions in Drama for Development
Emily G LeRoux-Rutledge, BBC World Service Trust, UNITED KINGDOM
Gerry Power, BBC World Service Trust, UNITED KINGDOM
Carol Morgan, BBC World Service Trust, UNITED KINGDOM
Changing the World With a "Crappy" Documentary: A Media-Based, Youth-Driven Advocacy Campaign in Northern
Uganda
Brian Ekdale, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Cultural Participation and Stronger Community Life: Multilevel Analysis of Participation in Community
Organizations and Cultural Events as an Indicator of Strong Community Belonging and Local Storytelling
Network
Yujung Nam, U of Southern California, USA
Communicating Emerging Infectious Diseases in Globalized Society:A Case Study of WHO's SARS Discourse
Nien Tsu Nancy Chen, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
4513
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Michigan
Public Relations, Communitarianism, and CSR: (Re)Conceptualizing the Role of PR in Response to the
"Credit Crunch"
Public Relations
Participants
An Analysis of the Tenets of CSR Practice in Relation to Stakeholder Theory and Consumers' Responses to it Past,
Present, and Future
Emma Wood, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Public Relations, Dialogue, and Sustainability: Alleviating Anxiety and Changing Perceptions Through Face-to-Face
Communication
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
C. Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Corporate Communication From Economic Bubble to Credit Crunch: Researching, Evaluating, and Reporting CSR in
Irish Financial Institutions
Ian Somerville, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Perceptions of Responsibility and Irresponsibility in Corporate Reporting and Behaviour
Ralph Tench, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
The recent dramatic change in the global economic climate is a result of an era of financial liquidity or 'easy money'
being replaced by the 'credit crunch'. This has led to an erosion of trust in financial institutions and indeed for some a
questioning of the very foundations of capitalism. This panel will argue that at this time it is apposite to reinvestigate
communitarian conceptualizations of public relations (Leeper, 2001, Wilson, 2001, Kruckenberg and Stark 2001) an
approach underpinned by stakeholder theory and often applied as corporate social responsibility. The panel includes
four papers from different countries which explore the impact of these concepts on the development of public
relations theory and practice as well as specifying areas for future research. Debate centres on how PR impacts on
society and considers how 'keywords' such as CSR and Stakeholderism have lost resonance in recent years but may
now be re-evaluated as governments are forced to intervene in corporate practice.
4514
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Michigan State
Children, Adolescents, and the Media Top Papers
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
J. Alison Bryant, Nickelodeon/MTV Networks, USA
Participants
Infant and Preschool Exposure to Television: Relations With Cognitive Outcomes at Age Four in a Low-Risk Sample
Alexis Lauricella, Georgetown U, USA
Rachel Barr, Georgetown U, USA
Elizabeth Zack, Georgetown U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
The Role of Media Literacy in Changing Adolescents' Responses to Alcohol Advertising
Yi-Chun Chen, Virginia Tech, USA
How Children Mediate Connections Between Home and Community: The Case of Latinos in South Los Angeles
Vikki Sara Katz, U of Southern California, USA
Kid Tested, Parent Approved: Parental Determination of Appropriate Television Content for Their Children
Rebecca Ortiz Langford, Syracuse U, USA
4515
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Minnesota
Liberalization and Policy Reform: International Perspectives
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Rekha Jain, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, INDIA
Participants
Comparative Study of the Communications Law and Policy Reforms in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and China
Richard Wu, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Grace L K Leung, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Globalization, Regulatory Competition, and Audiovisual Regulation: The French, German, and UK Cases
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Neoliberalism and Space: Privatizing Intergovernmental Satellite Organizations
Patricia McCormick, Wayne State U, USA
Telecommunications Reforms, the State, and Markets: A Comparative Case of Mobile Telephony in India and China
Ray-shyng Chou, U of California - San Diego, USA
Respondent
Rekha Jain, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, INDIA
Papers in this session examine communication policy reforms in a variety of national settings, and in international
satellite organizations. Sectors examined include wireless, satellite, and audiovisual services, as well as regulatory
models attempting to address technological convergence.
4516
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Nothwestern
Keywords in Communication: Women's Voices and Organizational Communication Around the World
Feminist Scholarship
Organizational Communication
Chair
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
Women's Minority Voices in Organizational Life in the United States
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Sorin Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Women's Voices in Organizational Life in Romania
Diana Cismaru, National U of Political Studies and Public Administration, ROMANIA
Loredana Ivan, College of Communication and PublicRelations, ROMANIA
Women's Voices in Organizational Life in Kyrgyzstan
Alya Naumova, Westwood College, USA
Women's Voices in Organizational Life in Fiji
Charu Uppal, U of South Pacific, FIJI
Respondent
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
This panel has the purpose of proposing to position women's voices as a keyword in organizational communication, of
particular interest when considering organizational settings around the world. The panelists, a team of scholars having
different cultural and educational backgrounds, will analyze the specificities of women's voices in organizational life
in four countries within four regions of the world (the United States of America, Romania, Kyrgyzstan, and Fiji), and
will reflect upon the similarities and the differences between these case studies.
4517
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Ohio State
Islam, Culture, and Identity: Moving Beyond False Binaries
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Ferruh Yılmaz, Tulane U
Participants
The Uses of Islam: U.S. Foreign Policy in the "Muslim" World and News Media Representations From 1945-2008
Deepa Kumar, Rutgers U, USA
Islamism and the Roots of Liberal Rage
Arun Kundnani, Institute of Race Relations, UNITED KINGDOM
Seeking Justice: The Veil, Race, and Feminist Politics
Gholam Khiabany, London Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Milly Williamson, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Dilemma of Recognition: Muslim Responses to European Public Discourses on Islam
Roza Tsagarousianou, U of Westminster , UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Ferruh lmaz, Tulane U, USA
All too often studying 'Islam' and 'Muslims' resembles 'stamp collecting', carrying the danger of putting together
pieces of information without considering the broader context. Associated with this perceived and constructed
'singular community' is the idea that the Muslims form a cultural unity, based upon a common cultural core that only
the Orientalist is equipped to decipher. The 'debate' on 'Islam' is overshadowed by false binaries and a very narrow
optic of modernisation dichotomies: modern v tradition, Islam v West, secular v religious fundamentalism. Such
binaries suppress the diversities of histories, cultures, struggles and aspirations, and obscure and eliminate the real
'divides' In the dominant imperialist narratives of Muslim's histories and cultures are discussed in terms of how they
cause Muslims to fit or deviate from the narrative of the West's modernity. This panel directs attention to the
multivalent and multilocal characteristics of orientalist knowledge production, challenging the assumptions of an
exclusively Western agency in orientalist knowledge production.
4518
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Purdue
Top 4 interpersonal papers
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Pamela J. Kalbfleisch, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
Trait Affection and Asymmetry in the Prefrontal Cortex: Toward a Neurological Profile of Affectionate
Communicators
Robert Joel Lewis, Michigan State U, USA
Parents' and Children's Cortisol and α-Amylase Reactance to Parents' Inappropriate Disclosures and Interparental
Conflict
Tamara D. Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Doug Granger, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Andrea Lynn Joseph, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Desiree Aldeis, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Actor-Partner Effects for the Associations Between Relationship Characteristics and Reactions to Sex in Marriage
Jennifer A. Theiss, Rutgers U, USA
Mary Elizabeth Nagy, Rutgers U, USA
Factors Affecting How Individuals Explain Their Behavioral Intentions to Others
HyeJeong Choi, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
4519
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Wisconsin
The Utility of Metadiscourse as an Analytic Concept
Language & Social Interaction
Participants
Metadiscourse and Social Accountability
Richard Buttny, Syracuse U, USA
Terms About Communication at Work and in Professional Life: Metadiscourse in Sensemaking and Reflection in
Online Discussion
Mark Aakhus, Rutgers U, USA
Cultural Terms for Communication: A Conceptual Framework and Literature
Donal Carbaugh, U of Massachusetts, USA
Beyond the Conduit Metaphor: Multiple Vocabularies in the Rhetoric of Communication
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
The notion of "metacommunication" has had a significant impact on communication studies, particularly Bateson's
(1972) claim that the subject of discourse can be the relationship between interlocutors, (e.g., "This is play"). More
recently, LSI-oriented scholars have extended this self-reflexive practice under the rubric: "meta-talk" (Schriffin,
1980), "metalanguage" (Lucy, 1993), "metapragmatics" (Verschueren, 1999), "metadiscourse" (Craig, 2005), or
simply "going meta" (Simons, 1994). Most of the time interlocutors speak about content issues using an object
language, e.g., tables and chairs or immaterial objects such as the future or numbers. But at times participants use
language to address the discourse itself in order to comment on it. "Metadiscourse" may be characterized as "the
pragmatic use of language to comment reflexively on discourse itself" (Craig, 2008). Metadiscourse is a pervasive
feature of talk and social interaction (Lucy, 1993) in that speakers have the language awareness to comment on
features of their own or others' discourse.
4521
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Lincolnshire II
The Best of Information Systems
Information Systems
Chair
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Participants
A Primer for Communication Researchers on Probing Single-Degree-of-Freedom Interactions in Regression Models,
With SPSS and SAS Implementations
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Effects of Sudden Audio Disappearance and Audio Complexity on Attention and Message Recognition
Yevgeniya Solodovnikova, Washington State U, USA
Examining the Influence of Emotional, Sexy, and Humorous Content on Motivated Cognitive Processing of
Television Advertisements
Johnny V. Sparks, U of Alabama, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
The Influence of Explicitly and Implicitly Measured Prejudice on Interpretations of and Reactions to Black Film
Cassie Eno, U of Alabama, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
The Influence of Incidental Discrete Emotions on Health Risk Perceptions and Persuasion
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
4523
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Great America II
Face, Humility, Self-Censor, and Police: Cross-Cultural Comparisons
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Cecilia B. Ikeguchi, Tsukuba Gakuin Un, JAPAN
Participants
Cultural Differences in the Relationships Among Face Needs, Avoidance, and Confrontation
Wonsun Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Xiaowen Guan, U of St. Thomas, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Is It Humility or Self-Deprecation: A Cross-Cultural Study on the Moderating Impact of Humility on Source
Credibility
Sang-Yeon Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Maria Knight Lapinski, Michigan State U, USA
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Edward Lawrence Glazer, Michigan State U, USA
Reiko Nebashi-Nakahara, Meiji U, JAPAN
Benjamin H. Detenber, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dispositional Fear of Social Isolation and Willingness to Self-Censor: A Cross-Cultural Test of Spiral of Silence
Theory
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Fei Chris Shen, Ohio State U, USA
Reported Compliance in Police-Civilian Encounters: The Roles of Accommodation and Trust in Bulgaria and the
United States
Charles W. Choi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Tolya Stoitsova, New Bulgarian U, BULGARIA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Valerie E. Barker, San Diego State U, USA
Christopher S. Hajek, U of Texas – San Antonio, USA
Respondent
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
4530
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Building Capital and Bridging Community With ICTs
Communication and Technology
Chair
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Participants
What People Make of Social Capital Online: Empirical Study on Capital Conversion via Networking Sites
Dominik Johannes Leiner, Ludwig-Maximilians-U München, GERMANY
Ralf Hohlfeld, Katholische U Eichstaett-Ingolstadt, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Ludwig-Maximilians-U Muenchen, GERMANY
Policy Hacking: Politicizing Communication Technology in Community WiFi and Media Reform
Alison Powell, OII, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
ICT Solutions for Increasing Social Capital Among Rural Youth
Pamela S. Whitten, Michigan State U, USA
Andrew Smock, Michigan State U, USA
Kurt DeMaagd, Michigan State U, USA
Internet Use and the Concentration of Disadvantage: Glocalization and the Urban Underclass
Keith N. Hampton, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Beyond "Dudecore"? Challenging Gendered and "Raced" Technologies Through Media Activism
Christina Dunbar-Hester, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4531
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Uses, Users & Usability
Communication and Technology
Chair
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Participants
Environmental Communication Online: A Content Analysis of U.S. National Environmental Websites
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Ubiquitous City: An Analysis From an Information Society Perspective
Dong-Hee Shin, Towson U, USA
Yeolib Kim, U of Texas, USA
Understanding the Relationship Among Intentions in a Multifunctional System: An Extension of the Theory of
Planned Behavior
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Chan Hock Chuan, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
"Understand Users, Then Ignore Them": The Construction of the "User" Within Web Design Texts
Adrienne L. Massanari, Loyola U - Chicago, USA
4532
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Popular Culture, Entertainment, and Politics
Political Communication
Chair
Xiaoxia Cao, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Profound Distraction: Popular Music in the Aftermath of 9/11
Mark Pedelty, U of Minnesota, USA
Melissa Emily Thompson, U of Minnesota, USA
Adding Nuance to Political Humor Effects: Experimental Research on Juvenalian Satire Versus Horatian Satire
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Jay D. Hmielowski, Washington State U, USA
Parul Jain, Ohio State U, USA
Julie Lather, Ohio State U, USA
Alyssa Morey, Ohio State U, USA
Making Sense of The Daily Show: Understanding the Role of Partisan Heuristics in Political Comedy Effects
Michael Andrew Xenos, Louisiana State U, USA
Patricia Moy, U of Washington, USA
Amy B. Becker, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
The Impact of Content Preferences on Political Knowledge and Voter Turnout: The Differential Effects of News and
Entertainment
Kyuchan Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Su Jung Kim, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Bruce A. Williams, U of Virginia, USA
4533
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Cultures of the Media and Politics Relationship: Comparative Angles and National Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Katrin Voltmer, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Journalist-Source Relations: Mediated Reflexivity and the Politics of Politics
Aeron Davis, Dept. of Media and Communications, UNITED KINGDOM
Between Love and Hate: A Comparative Study on the Frequency and Formality of Interactions Between Politicians
and Journalists
Peter Van Aelst, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
Toril Aalberg, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
Media-Politics Relationship in Japan: Cultural Dimensions of Newsgathering and Discourse
Ofer Feldman, Doshisha U, JAPAN
Concurrence and Conflict Over Strategic Communication Between Politicians and Journalists
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
Peter Maurer, Free U- Berlin, GERMANY
Eva Mayerhoeffer, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Politicians' News Management Style and Journalists' Response: Determinants of Political News Cultures in Britain,
Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Spain, and the United States
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
The panel investigates the interaction between politicians and journalists and its outcomes in comparative perspective.
It is based on the assumption that the nature and the conditions of the working relationship between politicians as
information sources and journalists as gatekeepers to the public may only be fully understood if we take a look
beyond the professional orientations of information gathering, news selection and news production. The papers tackle
the assumption that normative underpinnings as well as national political cultures play a significant role as
explanatory variables for the media politics relationship and its manifest outcomes. Moreover from a methodological
point of view, the question is raised how we can measure and compare such manifest and latent aspects of the politics
media relationship in comparative studies with respect to national political or news cultures.
4534
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Emotions and Mass Media: Current and Future Perspectives
Mass Communication
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The Need for Research on Emotions and Mass Media
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Theoretical Approaches From a Communications and Entertainment Perspective
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
How Neurophysiological Findings Can Enrich Media-Emotions Research
Joanne Cantor, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Looks Into the Future of Emotions and Mass Media: Algorithmic Detection of Emotion and Behavior in Digital
Media Using Computer Vision
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Cyber Emotions: The Challenges of Individual and Collective Emotions in Cyberspace
Arvid Kappas, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Respondent
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
After laying out the field and its relevance to communication research (Robin Nabi), fundamental theoretical
perspectives will be considered from a communication studies' and entertainment perspective (Mary Beth Oliver).
Furthermore, recent developments in neurophysiological perspectives (Joanne Cantor) are reflected upon, before
heading into the future of emotion research (Jeremy Bailenson) and cyber emotions (Arvid Kappas). After short
presentations, a roundtable discussion will address the implications and challenges of the future of emotion research
in mass communication. The chair/respondents will challenge a discussion in reflecting upon the presentations and
addressing the question "where to go from here with research on emotions in mass media".
4535
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
The Media, Terrorists, and Other Bad Guys
Mass Communication
Chair
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
Participants
Media Framing of Terrorism in the U.S. and U.K.: Implications for Public Opinion & Civil Liberties
Mary Elizabeth Danis, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Michael Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Effects of Terrorism News on Spanish Population: Developing a Model for Information Processing
Ubaldo Cuesta, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Tania Menéndez, Complutense U, SPAIN
The Role of Key Words in Terrorism Coverage: Framing Analysis From the Dramatism Perspective
Mario Gurrionero, U Complutense- Madrid, SPAIN
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Media Framing of 'Axis-of-Evil' Leaders: A Study on the Effects of News Framing on Audiences' Evaluations of
Foreign Leaders
Hyunjin Seo, Syracuse U, USA
Philip Ryan Johnson, Syracuse U, USA
Jonathan Stein, Syracuse U, USA
4536
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Media Audiences Between Production and Consumption
Popular Communication
Chair
Liesbet van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Discourse Swings in Understanding Audiences: Case Studies on Hollywood's Co-Optation of Activity as Emergent
Discourse
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Digitisation, Multiplatform Productions, and Audience Reception
Goran Bolin, Sodertorn U, SWEDEN
The Media and Male Identities: Audience Research in Media, Religion, and Masculinities
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
Curtis Coats, U of Colorado, USA
Some Kind of Religious Figure? The Smiths, Catholicism, and Fan Devotion
Eoin Devereux, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Fan/Celebrity Symbiotic Social Relationships: A Participant-Observer Etthnography of Fan Clubs
Gayle S. Stever, Arizona State U, USA
4537
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
Emerging News Practices
Journalism Studies
Communication and Technology
Chair
David Domingo, U Rovira i Virgili, SPAIN
Participants
ugc@thebbc: A Production Study Examining the Ways in Which Audience Material is Used at the BBC (Top Three
Faculty Paper)
Claire Wardle, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Andrew Williams, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Networked News: Stewart, Colbert, and the New Public Sphere
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Between Tradition and Change: A Review of Recent Research on Online News Production
Maria Eugenia Mitchelstein, Northwestern U, USA
Pablo J. Boczkowski, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
As the proliferation of new news genres, formats and channels accelerates, the journalism profession responds, to a
large extent, by reproducing existing ways of doing things. The scholars brought together in this session explore the
themes and tensions of an occupation looking into the abyss of monumental change while balancing on the edge of
resilient structures.
4540
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Denver
Health Communication Education and Collaboration
Health Communication
Chair
Virginia McDermott, U of New Mexico, USA
Participants
Applied Health Communication Pedagogy: An Interdisciplinary and Service-Learning Approach
Michael P. Pagano, Fairfield U, USA
Philip Greiner, School of Nursing, Fairfield U, USA
Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) in Indian Country: Tensions and Implications for Health
Communication
Jeffery Chaichana Peterson, Washington State U, USA
Creative Processes for Health Communication: Entertainment-Education Collaboration
Martine P.A. Bouman, Center for Media and Health, THE NETHERLANDS
William J. Brown, Regent U, USA
Health Communication Syllabus Project: Graduate Instruction in Health Communication
Jo Ellen Stryker, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA
Jay M. Bernhardt, National Center for Health Marketing / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
What's in a Name? Health Literacy Leaders Say Plenty!
Jeesun Kim, U of Missouri, USA
Young Ah Lee, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Elizabeth L. Gardner, U of Missouri, USA
Hyojung Park, U of Missouri, USA
Glen T. Cameron, U of Missouri, USA
4541
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Houston
Health in the News (High Density)
Health Communication
Chair
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Effects of Self-Efficacy and Response Efficacy in Health News: Changing Health Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions
Cortney M. Moriarty, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Framing Public Discourse on Physician-Assisted Suicide: Analysis of Newspaper Coverage and Death With Dignity
Press Releases
Kyle J Holody, Bowling Green State U, USA
Pro- and Antialcohol and Tobacco Advertising in Newspapers: Targeting With Models and Social Cues?
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
Charlene A. Caburnay, Saint Louis U, USA
Shelly Rodgers, U of Missouri, USA
Talking Back Against the Grain: Australian News Media and Postpsychiatry
Kate Holland, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Richard Warwick Blood, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Jane Pirkis, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Andrew Dare, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Threat and Efficacy Messages in Newspaper Articles on Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes
Susana Peinado, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Watching Health Threats on the News: Predicting Health Risk Perceptions, Fear, and Behavior Intentions
Marijke Lemal, Katholieke U - Leuven, BELGIUM
"Where'd That Come From?": The Impact of Aggregation on Source Citations in Internet-Based Cancer News
Ryan James Hurley, Wake Forest U, USA
Julius Riles, U of Illinois, USA
Jeffrey Rauch, U of Illinois, USA
Angeline Sangalang, U of Illinois, USA
Testing the Impact of Public Health Framing and Rich Sourcing
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Lee Wilkins, U of Missouri, USA
Ethical Health Communication: A Content Analysis of Predominant Themes in Public Service Advertisements
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
Lesa Hatley Major, Indiana U, USA
News Coverage of Public Health Risk Issues: The Role of News Sources and the Process of News Construction
Tsung-Jen Shih, U of Wisconsin, USA
Rosalyna Wijaya, U of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
A Study of Quantitative Content Analysis of Health Messages in United States Media From 1985-2005
Jennifer A. Manganello, SUNY - Albany, USA
Nancy Blake, U at Albany School of Public Health
4542
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Kansas City
Domestic and Foreign TV Coverage of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Primaries: A Comparative Analysis of
Agenda Setting and Framing
Political Communication
Participants
The U.S. Primaries on Domestic and Foreign TV News: Concepts and Methods
David H. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Lars Willnat, Indiana U, USA
Foreign Media Coverage of the U.S. Primaries: Prominence and Themes
Angie Nguyen Vu, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Agnieszka Magdalena Stepinska, Adam Mickiewicz U, POLAND
Sources and Actors in Foreign News About the U.S. Primaries
Knut De Swert, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Volkan Uce, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Ruud Wouters, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Structure of Foreign News About the U.S. Primaries
Xiaoge Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Abby A. Goodrum, Ryerson U, CANADA
This panel presents an analysis of how the 2008 U.S. primaries were covered on television news in the United States
and 21 other nations. The data for this comparative study come from a 4-week content analysis conducted in early
2008 on each country's public broadcasting station and its most popular commercial station. The panel includes four
papers that focus on the agenda-setting and framing aspects of international election coverage, including the sources
and actors that dominated the news about the primaries and the journalistic styles that were used to cover them.
4543
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Los Angeles
Popular Communication beyond the Nation: from the Global to the Local
Popular Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
An Analysis of National Adaptations of Yo Soy Betty, La Fea
Lothar Mikos, U of Film and Television, GERMANY
Marta Perrotta, U Roma Tré, ITALY
English as a Foreign Language in Advertising: Generic Intertextuality in a Globalizing Media Environment
An Helene Kuppens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Liberalization, Liberal Media, and Aspirations of Muslim Women of Jamia Nagar, New Delhi
Tabassum Khan, U of California - Riverside, USA
Nollywood Films and the Cultural Imperialism Hypothesis
Eno Akpabio, U of Botswana, BOTSWANA
"Global Corporate Cultural Capital" as a Drag on Glocalization: Disneyland's Promotion of the Halloween Festival
Sui Kwong Sunny Lam, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Hyper-Fundamentalism? Mediating Islam From the Halal Website to the Islamic Talk Show
Nabil Echchaibi, U of Colorado-Boulder, USA
4544
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Miami
Keyword "Truth": Philosophy, Communication, and Technology
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Is There Truth in a Virtual World?
Heidi Ann Campbell, Texas A&M U, USA
Truth Without Borders
Clifford Christians, U of Illinois, USA
Research Ethics: Trust, Truth, and Reuse in Databanks
Elizabeth Buchanan, U of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA
To Tell the Truth: Epistemology, Ethics, and Technology
David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U, USA
This research panel, composed of notable scholars working in the fields of communication studies, philosophy, and
communication technology, examines the current status and situation of truth in an increasingly technological age.
Panelists investigate the history of the concept of truth in communication studies, the new challenges and
opportunities introduced by recent advancements in information and communication technology, and the
consequences of these innovations for our understanding of truth and its effective communication.
4545
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Scottsdale
Globalizing Journalism: Where, How, How Much, So What?
Journalism Studies
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
Changes in Journalism in the "Chindia" Half of the World
Daya Thussu, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
The National Interest on Global Web Sites
Bella Mody, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Global Journalism: Myth or Reality? In Search of a Theoretical Base
Kai Hafez, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Transnational Media and National Connections
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Journalism continues to be quintessentially national in spite of the roll back of the state in the 1980s as illustrated by
the pre-Iraq War US press drumbeat in 2003. This panel will focus on nuanced specifics of slowly globalizing
journalism to warn against premature theorizing and utopian predictions of a universal public sphere and
cosmopolitanism. Four researchers with roots in Asia, Europe, and the US will share diverse viewpoints grounded in
the following: who are the few new globalizing news sources, what capital investment and national political interests
do they represent, how did these news organizations originate, how different are they from previous international
propaganda news sources and the national printed press, what proportion of journalism around the world do they
represent today, and what impacts might they be expected to have, e.g. homogenization of news production structures,
substitutes for political parties in authoritarian states, strengthening of transnational elite classes or destabilization by
international contagion like the Wall Street crisis of 2008.
4551
Saturday
13:30-14:45
Belmont
Location-Based Mobile Games: Transforming Urban Spaces Via Locative Media
Game Studies
Chair
Adriana A. de Souza e Silva, North Carolina State U, USA
Participants
Locative Social Media: Challenging the Aleatory and the Social in the Urban Landscape
Dan Sutko, North Carolina State U, USA
Adriana A. de Souza e Silva, North Carolina State U, USA
Mediated Coproximity and its Dangers in a Location Aware Community: The Problem of "Stalking"
Christian Licoppe, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Yoriko Inada, Institut Telecol, FRANCE
Designing Location-Based Mobile Games: The CityExplorer Case Study
Sebastian Matyas, U of Bamberg, GERMANY
Christian Matyas, U of Bamberg, GERMANY
Hiroko Mitarai, Keio U, JAPAN
Peter Kiefer, U of Bamberg, GERMANY
Christoph Schlieder, U of Bramberg, GERMANY
CitySneak: Play, Pedagogy, Surveillance
Robert Sweeny, Indiana U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ryan Patton, Indiana U of Pennsylvania, USA
Location-Based Technology and Game-Based Learning in Secondary Education: Learning About Medieval
Amsterdam
Wilfried Admiraal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sanne Akkerman, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Jantina Huizenga, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Henk van Zeijts, Waag Society, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Julian Bleecker, Nokia Design / Near Future Laboratory, USA
This panel includes essays that critically investigate the interrelations among mobile technologies, location-based
activities, and playful/educational/social spaces, with the ultimate goal of finding connections among mobile
technologies, games and social networks, thus providing a broad overview of the emerging field of location-aware
urban games. The panel is organized to reflect this goal, containing essays that deal with these games from a
theoretical, design and educational perspective. Essays in the panel also reflect the international nature of these
games, which were first developed and gained popularity in European and Asian countries.
4601
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Grand Ballroom I
Framing as a Keyword in Communication Research: New Directions in Research, Conceptualization, and
Methodology (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Popular Communication
Visual Communication Studies
Journalism Studies
Mass Communication
Political Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Participants
Framing in Political Communication Research
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Visual Framing in Presidential Election Campaigns
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Frames in Mass Communication: Sites of Fracture
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Permeable Boundaries: Framing Reality/[Re]framing the Image in Cinema Studies
Cynthia A. Lucia, Rider U, USA
Respondent
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
One of the strengths of framing research has been to bridge several subfields in our discipline as it deals with sources
and production, content and effects of texts. This panels brings together schoalrs representing six differnt units of ICA
to discuss framing as a keyword in communication research. As the presentations in this panel demonstrate, there is
little consensus between scholars from the different traditions as to what framing actually means. The aim of this
panel is to try to create a cross-disciplinary discourse on framing, and to update scholars from different divisions on
progress in framing research in other subfields.
4610
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Illinois
4611
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Indiana
Communication History Interest Group Business Meeting
Communication History
Examining Organizational Management and Strategic Change: Multiple Perspectives
Organizational Communication
Chair
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
Adoption Barriers in a High-Risk Agricultural Environment
Shari Veil, U of Oklahoma, USA
Examining Emergent Communication Strategies: A Reconceptualization for Business Communication Research
Cynthia L. King, Naval Postgraduate School, USA
The Selection, Detection, and Correction of Organizational Errors: The Role of Communication
Phillip G. Clampitt, U of Wisconsin - Green Bay, USA
M. Lee Williams, Texas State U - San Marcos, USA
When One Institution Demands Change From Another: Stakeholder Interactions as Key Determinants of Outcomes
Laurie K. Lewis, Rutgers U, USA
Brent D. Ruben, Rutgers U, USA
Louise Sandmeyer, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Travis L. Russ, Fordham U, USA
Stacy Smulowitz, Rutgers U, USA
Respondent
Catrin E. Johansson, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
4612
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Iowa
Iran and the Political and Popular Imaginations
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Balancing the "Truth" About Iran With Fiction: A Literary Road to Kinship
Fatemeh Keshavarz, Washington U, USA
American Pop Culture Representation of Iran
Hamid Naficy, Northwestern U, USA
Double Blackmails and Dark Alleys: How Large Swaths of the Western Left Get Iran Wrong
Danny Postel, Activist Author, USA
Respondent
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
In the post-Cold War geopolitics the Middle East and Islam play a significant role. One of the main beneficiaries of
the recent Anglo-American policies in the Middle East (the removal of Saddam Hussein and the Taliban, and the
establishment in Iraq of a political structure friendly to Iran) has been Iran. Other factors marking Iran's strategic
importance are its role in the world energy sector. Various attempts by the West to "contain" or to topple the Islamic
Republic of Iran since its inception in 1979 have failed. That IRI is in a position to pursue nuclear technology (e.g.,
successfully enriching uranium) even in the face of these policies is a telling sign that Iran has become a key player
internationally. And yet, Iran continues to be misunderstood and often dismissed as a "fundamentalist state." In the
context of the possibility of starting a new war in the Middle East, the demonization of Iran, whether deserved or not,
has led to a point where President Bush's invoking of WWIII in relation to Iran does not constitute hyperbolic
rhetoric. The question is: why? The contributors to this panel, among the distinguished specialists on the subject of
Iran, investigate the cultural and communicative constituents of this framework in which not only Iran is constituted
as an intelligible yet frightening object but also how contradictory policies by the West seem consistent and
productive.
4613
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Michigan
Identifying Trends and Practices in Public Relations: International Research Insights and Methodological
Challenges
Public Relations
Chair
Ralph Tench, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Ansgar Zerfass, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Jerry Swerling, U of Southern California, USA
Jay Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Angeles Moreno, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Participants
Monitoring Communication Management in Europe: Expereiences of a Research Study
Ansgar Zerfass, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
International Research Collaboration: Opportunities and Obstacles - Learnings From the United States
Jerry Swerling, U of Southern California, USA
Researching Corporate Communications Trends in China
Jay Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Methodological Challenges for International and Cross-Cultural Research in Public Relations Practice
Angeles Moreno, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Respondent
Dejan Vercic, Pristop d.o.o., SLOVENIA
The panel will present a meta-analysis of research data and related literature which identifies and explores different
problems in methodology, terminology, definitions and context which should be understood and overcome to support
and foster research surveys that provide reliability and comparability. The panel fits with the overarching conference
theme of 'Keywords' in communication by exploring how problems and issues with nomenclature and label choice
influence research question design, methodology and also practice comparison and compatibility. This panel aims to
discuss how we can explore the issues raised by striving for or building 'key terms of reference by which they (we)
collectively make sense of things around them (us)'(www.icahdq.org/conferences/2009/2009CFP.pdf, p. 3 accessed 1
October 2008). The panel aims to use experienced researchers' understanding and practice of context bound and cross
boundary studies to build knowledge and understanding to support research and researchers on future projects.
Specific issues and problems with comparative research methodology and practice will be presented, discussed and
debated by the panel and with the participating delegates. This will involve questioning terms and definitions with
differing meanings and interpretations such as "public companies" (US versus European meaning) as well as
structural questions like comparing company size, turnover etc. in different countries, regions and cultures
(discussions from Europe, the US and China).
4614
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Michigan State
4615
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Minnesota
4616
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Nothwestern
Children, Adolescents and the Media Business Meeting
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
GLBT Studies Interest Group Business Meeting
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Women, Politics, Media: Truth and Fiction
Feminist Scholarship
Political Communication
Chair
Amit Kama, Emek Yezreel College, ISRAEL
Participants
Pit Bulls, Politics, and Gender Performance: A Feminist Analysis of Sarah Palin on Major News Websites
Dustin M. Harp, U of Texas, USA
Jaime Loke, U of Texas, USA
Ingrid Bachmann, U of Texas, USA
Women, the Economy, and News: Analysis of the 2008 U.S. Primary Coverage
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
A President in the Headlines: President Dalia Itzik as Reflected in the Israeli Media
Dalia Liran Alper, College of Management, ISRAEL
Madame President and the First Gentleman: Gender and Power in "Commander in Chief"
Guillermo E. Avila-Saavedra, Salem State U, USA
4617
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Ohio State
Discourses of Diversity in Media Production
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
David Monje, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
Consuming the Latina Body: Ethnicity, Race, and Gender in U.S. Popular Media
Isabel Molina Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
The Identity Politics of My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Dina Gavrilos, U of St. Thomas, USA
The Portrayals of Women, Minorities, and Work in Primetime Television
Siobhan E. Smith, U of Missouri, USA
E-raceing Color: Gender and Transnational Visual Economies of Beauty in India - ERIC Top Paper
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
An Historical Perspective on Whiteness in U.S. Broadcasting
Joy Elizabeth Hayes, U of Iowa, USA
4618
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Purdue
Interpersonal Communication Division Business Meeting
Interpersonal Communication
Participants
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Pamela J. Kalbfleisch, U of North Dakota, USA
4621
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Lincolnshire II
4623
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Great America II
Information Systems Division Business Meeting
Information Systems
Chair
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Self, Identity, and Ethnocentrism: Issues in Intercultural Communication
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Yoko Nadamitsu, Seikei U, JAPAN
Participants
Can Self-Construal Be Primed?
Mary Jiang Bresnahan, Michigan State U, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Kitae Kim, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Problematizing Authenticity: Regimes Of "Authentic" Truth
Jennifer Huynh Thi Anh Morrison, U of Denver, USA
Sorting Out a Sojourn: An Analysis of Study Abroad Research and the Challenge of Measuring Personal Identity
Transformations
Adriane Stoner, U of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Ethnocentrism, Intercultural Willingness to Communicate, and International Interaction Among U.S. College
Students
Julie R Massengill, the U of Tennessee, USA
M. Woods Nash, the U of Tennessee, USA
Respondent
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
4630
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Critical and Cultural Perspectives on ICTs
Communication and Technology
Chair
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Participants
Critical Theory of Information and Communication Technologies & Society (ICT&S) as Keyword in Communication
Technology Research
Christian Fuchs, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
You as a Commodity of Google: Examining Audience Commodification of Google
Hyunjin Kang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
In Search of a Niche: Differentiation Among Internet Search Engines, 1993-2000
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Bruggeman, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Television Through Internet: Copyrights vs. Cultural Democracy
Hannu Veli Nieminen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
4631
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Online Disclosure and Nondisclosure
Communication and Technology
Chair
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Participants
"When I Was Your Age, Pluto Was a Planet": Impression Management and Need to Belong as Motives for Joining
Groups on Social Networking Sites
Nina Haferkamp, U Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Nicole C. Kramer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
A Sociocognitive Model of Information Disclosure in Human-Computer Interaction
Doohwang Lee, U of Alabama, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Motivations, Impression Management, and Self-Disclosure in Social Network Sites
Namkee Park, U of Oklahoma, USA
Borae Jin, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Seung-A Annie Jin, Boston College, USA
Online Social Networks as a Constraint to Deception in Online Resumes
Jamie Elizabeth Guillory, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
4632
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
New Opportunities and New Choices for Campaign and Election Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The 2008 Annenberg Election Study: New Designs, New Challenges
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Diana C. Mutz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Richard Johnston, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Seth K. Goldman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Bruce William Hardy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Kate Kenski, U of Arizona, USA
Distinguishing Ads and News Effects in Multiple Wave Panel Studies
Chappell H. Lawson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Measuring News Exposure in Contemporary Media Systems: Lessons From American National Election Studies
Scott L. Althaus, U of Illinois, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Campaign Dynamics in the 2009 European Elections: Designing a Dynamic Cross-National Study
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Joost Van Spanje, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rachid Azrout, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Matthijs Elenbaas, U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The German Longitudinal Election Study GLES
Ruediger Schmitt-Beck, U of Duisburg, GERMANY
Respondent
Ansolabehere Stephen, Harvard U, USA
A new generation of dynamic and elaborate campaign and election studies are designed and fielded across the world
in the context of a changed media environment. This poses new challenges and opportunities for communication
scholars. This panel brings together scholars from several continents who have been involved in designing and
conducting recent large scale campaign and election studies. It contrasts different designs and the scholars will reflect
on the choices made when beginning a new generation of election studies
4633
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
Keywords in Communication: Conceptualizing Publics in Public Relations
Theme Sessions
Chair
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
The Decline of the All-Issue Public: Examining Activism in the Narrowcasting Age
Bey-Ling Sha, San Diego State U, USA
Hegel, Habermas, and Community: The Public in the New Media Era
Charles Self, U of Oklahoma, USA
Reconceptualizing Activism: Integrating Resource Mobilization Theory into Activist Public Relations
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Oklahoma, USA
Love and Hate in the Time of Stakeholders
Vilma L. Luoma-Aho, Stanford U, USA
Respondent
Derina R. Holtzhausen, Oklahoma State U, USA
The panel brings together four scholars to discuss new and alternative perspectives on publics in public relations
research. Each paper of the panel contributes to the evolution of thought surrounding the nature of publics in public
relations, exemplifying a range of ways by which the field can consider publics. The papers of the panel also engage
in challenging traditional conceptualizations of publics through incorporating theories from other disciplines and
classical theory, suggesting that emotional factors should be included in considerations of organizational stakeholders,
and questions whether the contemporary classification of all-issue publics is still possible. As such, this panel
inherently emphasizes the need for continual investigation into the nature of publics, which has significant heuristic
potential for the study and practice of public relations.
4634
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Role Remodel: New Directions for Journalistic Role Conception Research
Mass Communication
Chair
Timothy P. Vos, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Participants
Theorizing Journalistic Role Conceptions
Timothy P. Vos, U of Missouri, USA
Journalistic Roles and Levels of Analysis
David H. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Journalistic Roles in Comparative Context
Jyotika Ramaprasad, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Role Perceptions, Professional Milieus, and the Journalistic Field: Putting Theory to Test
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Respondent
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
This panel reexamines the place of 'journalistic role conception' on the mass communication research agenda. Born a
half century ago when functionalism was at its ascendancy, role conception research has sometimes struggled against
and with its own theoretical assumptions. The panel explores how role conceptions, long studied at the individual
level of analysis, might be examined in new ways. Panelists revisit how journalistic role conception might better be
studied as an individual level phenomemon, but also how it might be studied and is being studied at other levels of
analysis. The panel explores how the theorizing of Bourdieu, Giddens, and others alters the research agenda on
journalistic role conception, leading not only to a new vocabulary (e.g., role perception instead of conception) but
more importantly to new ways of understanding the relationship between an individual journalist's role conception
and the organizational and cultural context in which role conceptions are formulated and enacted. The panelists draw
on their own research programs, ranging from the landmark 'American Journalist' project to the ongoing 'Worlds of
Journalisms' project, to demonstrate how new approaches yield new possibilities for role conception research.
4635
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Narrative Persuasion
Mass Communication
Chair
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Mediating Mechanisms in Narrative Persuasion: The Importance of Identification
Anneke de Graaf, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Hans Hoeken, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
José Sanders, Vrije U-Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Johannes W. J. Beentjes, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
The Influence of Television Fiction on Real World Victim Sympathy: The Roles of Narrative Engagement and
Counterarguing
Rick W. Busselle, Washington State U, USA
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Yushu Zhou, Washington State U, USA
Loss of Self or Merging Self and Other? Transportation, Empathy, and Self-Thoughts
Daniel G. McDonald, Ohio State U, USA
Shu-Fang Lin, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
Mu Hu, West Virginia Wesleyan U, USA
Melanie Sarge, Ohio State U, USA
Movies, Meaning, and Social Influence: A Developmental-Interactionist Theory of Film Communication
Stephen Stifano, U of Connecticut, USA
4636
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Are We Free Yet? Popular Media Production and Scholarship Today
Popular Communication
Participants
Why Production Still Matters
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Producing Women: Rethinking Feminism in Production Studies
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Premeditating Performances in Reality and Interactive TV: A Scripting Approach to Media Production
Espen Ytreberg, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Private Places, Public Forums: Speech Rights in the New Spaces of Media Production
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Media production research traditions developed in the age of mass media are often dismissed in the digital media era,
which is increasingly theorized as dissolving old boundaries between professionals and amateurs, creation and
consumption, script and improvisation, and traditional divisions of labor. This panel offers a corrective by addressing
new and enduring forms of power in contemporary media production, which structure and channel the free play of
creative agency, participatory culture, and meaning.
4637
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
Fairness, Balance, Objectivity
Journalism Studies
Chair
Herman Wasserman, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Bias in Dutch Media
Nel Ruigrok, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van Atteveldt, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andre Krouwel, Vrije U – Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Otto Scholten, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Second Casualty? A Look at Objectivity in the Second Iraq War
Lanier Frush Holt, Indiana U, USA
Inescapable Reality: Professionalism, Objectivity, and the Press in the New Orleans School Desegregation Crisis of
1960-61
Frank D. Durham, U of Iowa, USA
Respondent
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U - Jerusalem, ISRAEL
4640
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Denver
Research From the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research
Health Communication
Chairs
Robert P. Hawkins, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Bradford W. Hesse, National Cancer Institute, NIH, USA
Participants
Effects of Public Information in Cancer: Findings and New Directions
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Increasing Reach and Effectiveness of Cancer Communication to Eliminate Health Disparities
Matthew W. Kreuter, Saint Louis U, USA
Integrating eHealth With Human Systems to Support Cancer Patients and Their Families
Robert P. Hawkins, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
An Organizational Perspective on Improving Cancer Communication
James W. Dearing, Kaiser Permanente, USA
Respondent
Bradford W. Hesse, National Cancer Institute, NIH, USA
In 2003, the National Cancer Institute dedicated $40 million to fund four Centers of Excellence in Cancer
Communication Research to speed the pace of cancer communication research, so that useful findings could more
rapidly inform the struggle to prevent and treat cancer. Representatives of three of these four CECCRs will present
key findings, and, since each has been refunded as part of the second five-year CECCR initiative (along with KPDenver), the four will also describe plans for the second generation CECCRs.
4641
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Houston
Persuasive Messages (High Density)
Health Communication
Chair
Brian L. Quick, U of Illinois- Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
Cross-Cultural Comparison of TPB: A Comparison of Americans and Koreans in the Context of Organ Donation
Doshik Yun, Michigan State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Impulsive Sensation Seeking Mediates the Relationship Between BIS/BAS and Risky Health Behaviors
Kurt Howard Braddock, Pennsylvania State U, USA
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Danielle C. Voigt, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael T. Stephenson, Texas A&M U, USA
Pradeep Sopory, Wayne State U, USA
Jason Wayne Anderson, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Injecting Values: The Influence of Ideology and Attribute Framing on HPV Vaccine Mandate Opinion
Cabral A Bigman, Annenberg School for Communication, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Involved, Transported, or Emotional? Exploring the Determinants of Change in Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior
in Entertainment Education
Sheila Teresa Murphy, U of Southern California, USA
Lauren B. Frank, U of Southern California, USA
Meghan Brigid Moran, U of Southen California, USA
Paula Woodley, U of Southen California, USA
Structure of Carver and White's BIS/BAS Scales and Their Relationship to Risky Health Behaviors
Danielle C. Voigt, Pennsylvania State U, USA
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Kurt Howard Braddock, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Jason Wayne Anderson, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Pradeep Sopory, Wayne State U, USA
Michael T. Stephenson, Texas A&M U, USA
Talking Then Walking: How Premessage Exposure Conversation Changes Relations Among Theory of Planned
Behavior Variables
John G. Wirtz, U of Minnesota - Twin Cities, USA
The Effects of Drug-Prevention Messages on the Accessibility of Identity-Related Constructs
Maria Leonora ('Nori') G. Comello, Ohio State U, USA
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
The Interactive Effects of Visual Images and Message Framing on Health-Related Persuasion
Kiwon Seo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Fuyuan Shen, Pennsylvania State U, USA
The Unintended Consequences of Disclosure: Explicit Sponsor Identification on Smoking Cessation Ads
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Alan Mathios, Cornell U, USA
Rosemary Avery, Cornell U, USA
Philip Solomon Hart, Cornell U, USA
4642
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Kansas City
The Internet and Politics
Political Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Ying Wei Esther Chin, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
E-Democracy Writ Small: The Impact of the Internet on Citizen Access to Local
R. Kelly Garrett, Ohio State U, USA
Michael J. Jensen, U of California, Irvine, USA
Image of the United States in Arab Blogsphere
Ahmed Mohamed El Gody, Orebro U, SWEDEN
The Internet and the Visibility of Oppression in Nondemocratic States: The Online Exposure of Human Rights
Violations and Other Repressive Acts
James Stanyer, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
scott Davidson, De Monfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
Perceptions of and Attitudes Toward Extreme Nationalistic Messages in Chinese Online Forums: A Third-Person
Perspective
Jiawen Zheng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Benjamin H. Detenber, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
4643
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Los Angeles
Science Fiction: Science and Society, Communicating the Future
Popular Communication
Participants
Nanotech, Science (Fiction), and Ethical Quandaries
Sean Ferguson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Science Fiction, Promises, and Threats in Popular Communication
Gareth A Edel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Troping Technoscience in the Classroom: Exploring Science-Fictional Approaches
Brandon Costelloe-Kuehn, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Science fiction (Sci-fi) often functions to produce and describe anxieties, frame possibilities and declare probabilities
of the future. Looking at Sci-fi as a point of productive permeability between popular and expert communication, the
authors examine the role of Sci-fi as both a bridge for popular ideas about science to be communicated to scientists
and as a mechanism for scientists to have their work translated to a general audience. Thus Sci-fi performs an
important communicative and framing role as science and technology become increasingly complex and pervasive.
Stories about "bio-terrorism", "nanotechnology" or "transhumanism" offer a language for scientists to portray their
research with concepts that arose initially in fiction, thus giving the popular audience a referent for conceptualizing
scientific practice and production. Stories act to describe potential communicative conventions, determine credibility,
and mark as fictional or 'real' the content of other stories. The acceptance of stories in popular culture often
demarcates Science's fictions from Science-Fiction. The panelists draw on a variety of case studies to suggest the
boundaries between science and science fiction is more tenuous than usually considered and that examination of each
can be contributive to the other. Science's fictions are examined in the accepted use of fictive and literary metaphors
by policy makers, nano-scientists, teachers and scientists in the construction and promotion of futures and threats.
Centrally the panelists look at the way genre convention is used as a shared vocabulary to describe some potentials as
likely.
4644
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Miami
War, Risk, and Biopolitics
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
American Strategic Communication in Iraq: the "Rapid Reaction Media Team"
James Pamment, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Factoring the 'Terrorist' Class: No-Fly Lists in Canada
Kenneth C. Werbin, Ryerson U, CANADA
The Bottom of the Pool: Gray Affect and the Smell of Aging
Scott Selberg, New York U, USA
Networked Risk or Cosmopolitan Society as the Top Social Agenda of Global Governance and Communication?
Sui Kwong Sunny Lam, Chinese U - Hong Kong, HONG KONG
The Biopolitical Otherization of North Korea: The Visual Formation of Gendering and Ethnicizing the Korean Nation
Minkyu Sung, U of Iowa, USA
This session examines the heterogeneous processes through which the state defends and constructs its boundaries,
from problems of aging to terror, from cultural conflict to permanent war. In so doing, the panel addresses the
question of where critical theory today can be found.
4645
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Scottsdale
Mediatization as Keyword Between Civilization, Domestication, Authority, and Media Culture
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Knut Lundby, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
Civilization/Mediatization
Friedrich Lothar Krotz, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Domesticated Mediatization?
Maren Hartmann, U of the Arts (UdK) Berlin, GERMANY
Authority, Media, and the Meaning of Signs: An Exploration of the Mediatization of Religion
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
Media Culture and Mediatization: Outlining a Framework for Critical Media Analysis
Tanja Thomas, U of Lueneburg, GERMANY
Respondent
Stig Hjarvard, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
The concept of mediatization addresses the increased importance of media in society at both macro and micro levels
as well as it concerns the embeddedness of media in other cultural processes of modern society: globalization,
individualization etc. In Scandinavian and German research traditions mediatization has been used as a key concept
for the study of changes within political affairs, and more recently applied to research on religious change in modern.
Mediatization may be seen as a particular historical phase in which media become an independent institution at the
same time as they become integrated into the everyday life of civil society. Some scholars adopts a civilizational
perspective on mediatization, while other consider mediatization as part of a general theory of modernity. Although
conceptualizations of mediatization may differ and controversy exists over its scope and usefulness, the study of
mediatization processes has received renewed attention in recent years. The aim of this panel is to stimulate this
development by discussing key concepts relating to the application of the mediatization concept in various research
fields. Inspired by the overall theme of this year's ICA conference, the panel addresses four other selected keywords
for the study of mediatization: civilization, domestication, authority, and media culture. By examining the
interconnections between mediatization and other key concepts of media studies, social theory, and cultural studies,
the usefulness and limitations of current mediatization theory for the study of both media developments and broader
social change will be highlighted.
4651
Saturday
15:00-16:15
Belmont
What You See is What You Get? Applying Eye-Tracking Methodology in Visual Communication Research
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Participants
Seeing is Believing? Methodological Considerations and Complications in Combining Eye-Tracking With Other
Methods Researching Visuals
Arvid Kappas, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Bettina Olk, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
EyeTracking the News: The Report of EyeTrack 07A Study of Print and Online Reading
Pegie Stark Adam, Poynter Institute, USA
Sara Quinn, Poynter Institute, USA
Myths and Truths About Readers' Interaction With Complex Visual Documents
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Kenneth Holmqvist, Lund U, SWEDEN
Audience Research and Multimodality: What Eye Tracking Reveals about Newspaper Reading
Hans-Juergen Bucher, Universität Trier, GERMANY
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Illuminating Blind Spots in Visual Perception: Combining Gestalt Principles and Eyetracking Patterns to Explain
Perception of Online and Printed Media
Peter Schumacher, U of Trier, GERMANY
Respondent
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
This panel brings the leading international teams in the field of eye-tracking research together to present and discuss
their varying approaches, methods, tools as well as research questions and designs. Thus, the panel presents a glimpse
into the state of the art of international research on cognitive and affective processes in perceiving visuals. A
particular focus will be placed on the perception and the measurement of eye movements while reading the newspaper
or perceiving press photographs, concentrating on print and online media.
4701
Saturday
16:30-17:45
Grand Ballroom I
International Communication Association Annual Awards and Presidential Address
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
4820
ICA Fellows' Reception
Saturday
18:00-19:00
Linclonshire I
Sponsored Sessions
4850
Pennsylvania State U Reception for Alumni & Friends
Saturday
19:00-21:00
Armitage
4860
Saturday
19:00-21:00
Kane
This reception is open to all ICA Fellows
Sponsored Sessions
Jointly hosted by the Department of Communication Arts & Sciences and the College of Communications,
Pennsylvania State U, U Park, PA, USA.
Feminist Scholarship Awards Ceremony
Feminist Scholarship
5201
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Grand Ballroom I
Putting the Aesthetic Back Into Communication, and Vice Versa (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Philosophy of Communication
Communication History
Popular Communication
Mass Communication
Chair
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Liberation Through Attention: Multiscreen Aesthetics in World War II America
Frederick C. Turner, Stanford U, USA
Defending (Some Kind of) Aesthetic Autonomy
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Exploring the Digital Aesthetic
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Iowa, USA
For an Analytics of Media Aesthetics
Georgina E. M. Born, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
In Raymond Williams' influential 1976 volume Keywords, the first term to appear is one that has since nearly
disappeared in mainstream communication research: "Aesthetic." Thirty years later, this session revisits Williams'
keyword with an eye to restoring its centrality to the analysis of communication. Moving between empirical case
studies and theoretical analyses, showing their interdependence, it demonstrates that aesthetics are a driving force in
contemporary communication and should become an important element in communication research. Since philosophy
was the original home of aesthetics, the Philosophy of Communication division is a good place from where to
encourage this debate, across four divisions and interest groups. The panelists blend case studies and theoretical
analyses in order to demonstrate the importance of an analytics of the aesthetic in both production and reception
research.
5210
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Illinois
Media Histories in Global Perspective
Communication History
Chair
Megan Mullen, U of Wisconsin - Parkside, USA
Participants
Communicating the Philippines Into the United States Master Script
George Allen Onas Villanueva, U of Southern California, USA
Communication and Empire: A Critique of "Conventional Knowledge" and an Outline of a New Theoretical
Approach to Global Media History
Dwayne Roy Winseck, Carleton U, CANADA
Freedom of the Press Under Attack During the 1938 Labor Risings in Jamaica: The Prosecution of the Publishers of
the Jamaica Labour Weekly
Roxanne Sabrina Watson, U of South Florida, USA
The Eagle and the Sun: Mexico's First Newspaper War
Juanita Marie Darling, San Francisco State U, USA
The Grenada Invasion and the Domestic Costs of Empire
Mark Nimkoff, U of Illinois, USA
Respondent
Megan Mullen, U of Wisconsin - Parkside, USA
This session provides an opportunity for a broader sense of media history, one that gets beyond U.S. or anglophone
limits.
5211
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Indiana
Communication and Organizational Socialization: Current Research
Organizational Communication
Chair
Anne Marie Bulow, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Participants
Organizational Socialization and Communication Processes
Vernon D. Miller, Michigan State U, USA
Jayson Lee Dibble, U of Hawaii - Manoa, USA
Vocational Anticipatory Socialization (VAS) Related to Science and Math: A Model of Academic and Career
Interests
Karen Kroman Myers, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jody Jahn, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Bernadette Marie Gailliard, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Kimberly A. Stoltzfus, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Vocational Anticipatory Socialization: The Role of Schemas in Generating Adolescent Interest in Math and Science
Careers
Jody Jahn, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
What are the Benefits?: The Effects of Orientation on New Employee Information Seeking
Stephanie Layne Dailey, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
5212
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Iowa
Theory Development in International Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Bella Mody, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Participants
Opinion Leaders Do Matter!: Diffusion of Innovations for Climate Change Communication Research and
Intervention
Do Kyun Kim, U of Louisiana - Lafayette, USA
Edward Maibach, George Mason U, USA
James W. Dearing, Kaiser Permanente, USA
Considering Transactive Memory Systems Within the Entertainment Education Context: Extending the Study of
Interpersonal Communication in Relation to Mass Media and Social Change
Janel S. Schuh, U of Southern California, USA
Joyee Shairee Chatterjee, U of Southern California, USA
Jessica Janine Gould, U of Southern California, USA
Stereotypes of Americans and Information Source Use in South Korea: A Cognitive Processing Model
Alex Tan, Washington State U, USA
Eun-Jeong Han, Washington State U, USA
Francis Dalisay, Washington State U, USA
Yunying Zhang, Washington State U, USA
Mariyah Merchant, Washington State U, USA
Patterns of Media Expenditures in China: Beyond the Principle of Relative Constancy
Linsen Su, Renmin U - China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Kenneth Fleming, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
The International Network Structure of News Media: An Analysis of Hyperlinks Usage in News Websites Worldwide
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Respondent
Bella Mody, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
This session revisits well-known theoretical constructs and introduces novel approaches to move them in new
directions.
5213
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Michigan
Corporation Be Good: Corporate Social Responsibility and Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
An Experimental Analysis of the Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives on Beliefs, Attitudes, and
Behavioral Intention
Ashlea Marie Hudak, U of South Florida, USA
Kelly Page Werder, U of South Florida, USA
Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility and Brand Sincerity: Chipotle Mexican Grill's "Food With Integrity"
Public Relations
Matthew Wade Ragas, U of Florida, USA
Corporate Social Responsibility as an Organizational Attractiveness/Relationship Building Role for Prospective
Public Relations Practitioners
Soo-Yeon Kim, U of Florida, USA
Hyojung Park, U of Missouri, USA
The Effects of the Tobacco Industry's Corporate Social Responsible Practices: Focusing on Phillip Morris
Yeon soo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Youjin Choi, U of Florida, USA
5214
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Michigan State
Perspectives on Infant Media: Lessons From the Children's Digital Media Center
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
The Formal Production Features of Infant-Directed Media
Samantha Goodrich, U of Connecticut, USA
Tiffany Pempek, Washington and Lee U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
Interactional Modeling in Infant-Directed Media
Susan Fenstermacher, Georgetown U, USA
Rachel Barr, Georgetown U, USA
Deborah L. Linebarger, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Tiffany Pempek, Washington and Lee U, USA
Annie Moses, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Sarah Ellen Vaala, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Maureen Ryan, Georgetown U, USA
Amaya Garcia, Georgetown U, USA
Elizabeth Brey, Georgetown U, USA
Integrating Information Across Cuts During Video Viewing: Eye Movement Research
Heather Kirkorian, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
Daniel R. Anderson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Infants' Content Learning From Educational Videos
Rebekah Richert, U of California - Riverside, USA
Michael Robb, U of California, Riverside, USA
Ellen Wartella, U of California - Riverside, USA
Respondent
Ellen Wartella, U of California - Riverside, USA
Despite the increasing amounts of time infants and toddlers spend with screen media, relatively little is know about
whether, what, and how children learn from screen media at these young ages. In an effort to study these questions
from multiple perspectives, our group has received funding for the Children's Digital Media Center from the National
Science Foundation. After two years of collaborating research across multiple sites, we are gaining broader insight
into the factors involved in young children's media exposure. The goal of this panel is to share these insights with the
broader community interested in children, adolescents, and the media. The four papers in this panel represent the
different perspectives we have taken to studying media exposure in the infant and toddler years. The perspectives
have included conducting content analysis of products marketed for infant audiences, studies of how toddlers interpret
the formal features of infant-directed media, and studies of whether toddlers learn content from infant-directed media.
Our research suggests infant-directed media may not be either well-produced or effective for this special audience.
The panel session will conclude with a discussion of the implication of these findings for researchers interested in
children and media.
5215
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Minnesota
Game Studies: Impacts and Influences
Game Studies
Chair
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Emotionally Adapted Games: An Example of a First Person Shooter
Timo Seppo Saari, Temple U, USA
Marko Turpeinen, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, FINLAND
Niklas Ravaja, Helsinki School of Economics, FINLAND
Rated "E" for Everyone? A Content Analysis of Televised Video Game Commercials
Lindsay B. Demers, U of Massachusetts, USA
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
Alison Denise Brzenchek, U of Massachusetts, USA
Chris Boulton, U of Massachusetts, USA
More Than Just a Game: Competence Goals and Video Game Playing Motivation
Elaine Y. Chan, San Francisco State U, USA
He Doesn't Look Like the Games Made Him Do It: Racial Stereotype Activation in Estimates of Violent Video
Games' Influence on Violent Crimes
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Omar M. Maglalang, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Papers presenting aspects of why people play games, and how games can impact players. Topics include racial
stereotype activation, violence in game commercials, competence goals that players bring to games, and emotional
adaptation of games to players.
5216
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Nothwestern
Feminist Voices, Histories, and Cross-Cultural Interactions
Feminist Scholarship
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Nancy E. Worthington, Quinnipiac U, USA
Participants
A Brown Woman's Standpoint: Feminist Standpoint Theory and the Search for Voice in American Academia
Suchitra Shenoy, Purdue U, USA
Feminist History, Gender, and Critical Intercultural Communication Studies: An Interdisciplinary Study
Lara B. Lengel, Bowling Green State U, USA
Scott C. Martin, Bowling Green State U, USA
Venus and Mars Speaking: An Empirical Test of Muted Group Theory
Tracy Kracker, Unaffiliated, USA
Sharon R. Mazzarella, Clemson U, USA
"Mars and Venus" in Virtual Space: Postfeminist Humor and the Internet
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U - Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
5217
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Ohio State
Social Networking and Community Building in Appropriations of Media and Communication Technologies
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Isabel Molina Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Social Networks and Niche Media Competitive Advantage
Jiran Hou, U of Georgia, USA
Cheryl Ann Hollifield, U of Georgia, USA
Can Turkish Women in the Diaspora Build Social Capital? Evidence From the Netherlands and Belgium
Christine L. Ogan, Indiana U, USA
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Nationalism Among Chinese Diasporas: An Analysis of Online Chinese Responses to the Overseas Leg of the Beijing
Olympic Torch Relay
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania/Georgia State Univ., USA
Remembering Heroes From Another Homeland: Web Memorializing Puerto Rican Soldiers in the 21st Century
Manuel Gerardo Aviles-Santiago, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Latinos Online: Exploring Social Support Messages in Univision Online's Immigration Forum - ERIC Top Paper
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Bodies of Tango: Communities and Dancing Encounters Between the Transnational and the Local
Eduardo Santana, U of Califorrnia - San Diego, USA
5218
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Purdue
Identity, Esteem, and Support in Interpersonal Encounters
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Masaki Matsunaga, Waseda U, JAPAN
Participants
Towards a Model of Experimentation With Identity-Seeking Behaviors
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Who, What, and When: A Naturalistic Study of Esteem Support Messages
Amanda J. Holmstrom, Michigan State U, USA
Examining the Causal Direction Between Subjective Well-Being and Sense of Relatedness
Mingyu Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun Joo Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Communication With Significant Others About Weight Management: The Role of Confirmation in Weight
Management Attitudes and Behaviors
Rene M. Dailey, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Andrea A. Richards, U of Texas at Austin, USA
Lynsey Kluever Romo, U of Texas at Austin, USA
5219
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Wisconsin
Advances in Theory and Research on Instructors and Instruction
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Kevin Westmoreland Bowers, U of Florida, USA
Participants
The Development and Testing of the Instructional Interaction Theory
Keith David Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Matthew M. Martin, West Virginia U, USA
The Relationship Between Teacher Communicator Style and Student Outcomes in a Substance Use Prevention
Program
Steven Michael Giles, Wake Forest U, USA
Melinda Pankratz, Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation, USA
Chris Ringwalt, Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation, USA
Julia Jackson-Newsom, U of North Carolina-Greensboro, USA
William B Hansen, Tanglewood Research, USA
Linda Dusenbury, Tanglewood Research, USA
Nisha Gottfredson, Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation, USA
A Healthy Mix: UNC-Chapel Hill's Health Certificate: A Case Study of Interdisciplinary Programs
Sherine Mahfouz El-Toukhy, U of North Carolina, USA
Lynette Holman, U of North Carolina, USA
Communicating Through the Visuals: An Experimental Study on Creativity and Advertising Design
Ming Cheung, City U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
5221
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Attitudes (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Responding to News Coverage of Immigrant Threats: An Experimental Test of Mortality Salience Effects on Attitude
Against "Others"
Po-Lin Pan, U of Alabama, USA
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Testing the Relationship Between (Tele)presence and Transportation: The Case of Mental Illness
Bridget E Rubenking, Indiana U, USA
Cheryl Campanella Bracken, Cleveland State U, USA
The Effects of Advergames on Game Players' Processing of Embedded Brands
Sara Peters, U of Missouri, USA
Glenn M. Leshner, U of Missouri, USA
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
The Effects of Exposure to Pornographic Depictions Featuring Youthful-Looking Females on Viewer Cognitions and
Attitudes
Bryant M. Paul, Indiana U, USA
Matthew John Kobach, Indiana U, USA
The Effects of Violent Video Games on Desensitization: The Role of Input Device
Ock Tae Kim, Indiana U, USA
The Impact of Individual Differences on the Process of Negative Information on Product Attitudes
Jia Lu, Florida State U, USA
Laura M. Arpan, Florida State U, USA
The Influence of Online Comments on Perceptions of Antimarijuana Public Service Announcements on YouTube
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Jinsuk Kim, Michigan State U, USA
David Christopher DeAndrea, Michigan State U, USA
The Information Processing of Political Advertisements: Attitude Accessibility, Psychological Processing, and Party
Affiliation
Glenn M. Leshner, U of Missouri, USA
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Rachel L. Bailey, U of Missouri, USA
Seth Ashley, U of Missouri, USA
Hyunmin Lee, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
5223
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Great America II
Top Four Papers in Intergroup Communication
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
Participants
Explicating Mediated Intergroup Contact: A Synthesis of the Intergroup Contact Theory and Media Stereotype
Research
Sung-Yeon Park, Bowling Green State U, USA
Virtual Gender Identity: The Linguistic Assimilation to Gendered Avatars in Computer-Mediated Communication
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
A Test of a Dual-Process "Leash" Model of First- and Third-Person Perceptions
Jinguang Zhang, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Social Identity Model of Media Usage and Effects: A Proposal to Integrate Agenda Setting and Reconciliation
Ryan B. Medders, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Respondent
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
5230
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Online Privacy
Communication and Technology
Chair
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Blogging Privacy Management Rule Development: The Impact of Self-Monitoring Skills, Concern for
Appropriateness, and Blogging Frequency
Jeffrey T. Child, Kent State U, USA
Esther Agyeman-Budu, Kent State U, USA
Teens and Communication Technology: The Coconstruction of Privacy and Friendship in Mediated Communication
Brooke Foucault, Northwestern U, USA
Alex Markov, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Teen Online Privacy and POS (Parent Over Shoulder): Effects of Parental Mediation on Online Teen Disclose of
Personal Information
Wonsun Shin, U of Minnesota, USA
Maureen M. Schriner, U of Minnesota, USA
Soyoen Cho, U of Minnesota, USA
The Social Structure of Privacy in Sociotechnological Realms
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
5231
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Keyword Analysis in Communication: Methodological Issues and Practical Applications
Communication and Technology
Participants
A Pragmatic View on the Integration of Text Analysis Techniques
Normand Peladeau, Provalis Research, USA
Words Still Mean Things
Dennis Thomas Lowry, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
News Slant in the Failure of Policy Change: Social Security Reform, 2004-05
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Using Keyword Analysis and Data Mining Techniques to Explore the Impact of Culture on Distributed Decision
Making Processes of Transnational Civil Society
Norhayati Zakaria, U Utara, MALAYSIA
Derrick L. Cogburn, Syracuse U, USA
Katy Calbreath, Syracuse U, USA
Pradnya Satish Khadapkar, Syracuse U, USA
Sudharshan Krishnan, Syracuse U, USA
We have seen in the last two decades an enormous increase in text data readily available in electronic form. With such
new sources of data available for scholarly research, we have also witness developments of text analysis techniques
for tapping into large amounts of text more efficiently. This paper session provides an overview of some of those
techniques, their benefits and limitations and show how they may be used to analyze large amounts of newspaper or
network TV news transcripts, emails, blogs, etc..
5232
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Comparing Media Systems Beyond the Western World
Political Communication
Chair
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Participants
Small Can Also be Multicultural: Rediscovering Baltic Media Characteristics in a Mixed Model
Aukse Balcytiene, Vytautas Magnus U, LITHUANIA
How Far Can Media Systems Travel? Applying the Hallin/Mancini Framework Outside the Western World
Katrin Voltmer, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Modern Egyptian Media: A Transitional Press Model in a Comparative Context
Sahar Mohamed Khamis, U of Maryland - College Park, USA
State-Media Relations in an Emerging Democracy: The Paradox of Commercialisation
Adrian Hadland, Human Sciences Research Council, SOUTH AFRICA
Respondents
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel brings together scholars who study a number of cases outside the group of countries covered by Hallin and
Mancini to explore the question of how the framework of their book does and does not apply to other kinds of
systems, to consider what other concepts, variables and media system models might need to be developed to extend
the kind of comparative analysis proposed in their book beyond Western Europe and North America. It arises out of a
series of meetings in which scholars from many parts of the world have met to compare their respective cases and to
discuss frameworks for comparative analysis. A panel based on one set of papers from this group appeared on the
program at the 2008 conference in Montreal. This panel includes a second set of papers, and reflects the continued
evolution the project.
5233
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
Communication and Coping With Cancer
Health Communication
Chair
Cortney M. Moriarty, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
Patient Perceptions of Oncologist-Patient Communication: From Initial Diagnosis to Cancer Recurrence
Mary M Step, Case Western Reserve U, USA
Eileen Berlin Ray, Cleveland State U, USA
QUOTEchemo: A Patient-Centered Instrument to Measure the Quality of Communication Preceding Chemotherapy
Treatment Through the Patients' Eyes
Julia van Weert, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jesse Jansen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gert-Jan de Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sandra van Dulmen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jozien Bensing, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Significance of Religious Coping and Growth Among Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients in India
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas, USA
Allen C Sherman, U of Arkansas, USA
Expressions of Coping With Cancer: A Content Analysis of 'Blog for a Cure'
Lisa J Forster, U of Oregon, USA
Expressive Writing Improves Subjective Health Among Testicular Cancer Survivors: A Randomized, Controlled
Trial
Perry M. Pauley, Arizona State U, USA
Mark T. Morman, Baylor U, USA
Kory Floyd, Arizona State U, USA
5234
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Science and the Media
Mass Communication
Chair
Nancy Rhodes, IUPUI, USA
Participants
Distorting Genetic Research About Cancer: From Bench Science to Press Release to Published News
Jean Brechman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Chul-joo Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Understanding Civic Scientific Literacy: Perspectives From Knowledge-Gap Research
Ialeah Fernandez, Michigan State U, USA
Karina Garcia-Ruano, Michigan State U, USA
Jon D Miller, Michigan State U, USA
Carlos Rios, Michigan State U, USA
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Making Sense of Policy Choices: A Closer Look at the Mediating Roles of Elaborative Processing and Interpersonal
Discussion on Public Perceptions of Nanotechnology
Shirley S. Ho, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Elizabeth A. Corley, Arizona State U, USA
Knowledge Acquisition Following Exposure to Cancer News Articles: A Test of the Cognitive Mediation Model
Jakob D. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
5235
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Media, Power, and the Collective
Mass Communication
Chair
Christian Fuchs, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
Participants
Networks of Dissent: Emergent Forms in Media Based Collective Action
Ted Matthew Coopman, San Jose State U, USA
Struggles for Political Space in Postcolonial Zimbabwe: An Analysis of Competing News Discourse in 2000
Cleophas Taurai Muneri, U of New Mexico, USA
State Discourse Politics and the Political Economy of the Global Mediascape: The Case of the South Korean Film
Industry
Woongjae Ryoo, Honam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Media and Cultural Classification: Cultural Hierarchy in European and U.S. Elite Newspapers, 1955 to 2005
Susanne Janssen, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Giselinde Kuipers, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marc Verboord, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5236
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Denoting Danger, Connoting Freedom: Everyday Life in the (Post)Global Network
Popular Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Steve Jones, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Participants
Popular vs. Public Intelligence Networks: the 9/11 Truth Movement, Collective Intelligence, and Regimes of Truth
Jack Zeljko Bratich, Rutgers U, USA
(Dis)Embodied Practices of Identity Production: Race at 3D Intersections of SecondLife
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Google Health 2.0 and Managing Individual Care in the Network
Marina Levina, U of California, USA
Private Lives and Web 2.0: Managed Presence, Everywhere, Everytime
Grant E. Kien, U of Illinois, USA
We argue that network has become an always-already condition--we are the network, and as such are living in a state
of post-global network. As a result, it is no longer fitting to examine the network as an external force, but rather as a
somewhat banal aspect of our everyday environment. Each presentation will provide analysis of case studies that
illustrate new - and old - ways in which everyday life is lived within network.
5237
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
Patterns in News Sourcing
Journalism Studies
Chair
Asa Kroon Lundell, Orebro U, SWEDEN
Participants
Exploring the Association Between Physical Attractiveness and News Coverage: Correlational and Experimental
Evidence
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Dana Markovich, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Israel Waismel-Manor, U. of Haifa, ISRAEL
The Conditionality of Source Use: Comparing Source Use in U.S. and Swedish Television News
Daniela V. Dimitrova, Iowa State U, USA
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, USA
The Use of Technology in Communication Between Reporters and Their Sources
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Google as a Contacts Book: Uses of, and Attitudes Towards, Internet Technology Among Irish Journalists
Eddie Richard Brennan, Dublin Institute of Technology, IRELAND
Respondent
D. Charles Whitney, U of California - Riverside, USA
5241
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Houston
Efficacy, Information, and Health Messages
Health Communication
Chair
Norman C. H. Wong, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Examining Subcomponents of Efficacy Judgments as Factors in Health Promotion Message Design
Abby Leigh Prestin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Peer Communication About Sexual Health: Effects of Anxiety, Outcome Expectancy, and Efficacy on Young Adults'
Information-Seeking Decisions
Leanne Chang, National U - Singapore, SINGAPORE
Concern as Motivation for Protection: An Investigation of Mothers' Concern About Their Daughters' Breast Cancer
Risk
Lindsay Beth Neuberger, Michigan State U, USA
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
Doshik Yun, Michigan State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Jennifer Anderson, Michigan State U, USA
Risk, Efficacy, and Information Seeking: Applying the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA) Framework to Understand
Seeking of General, Breast, and Prostate Cancer Information
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Jill Cornelius Underhill, U of Maryland, USA
Hua Jiang, U of Maryland, USA
Hongmei Shen, U of Maryland, USA
Beth Kuch, U of Maryland, USA
5242
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Kansas City
The Emerging Futures of War Reporting
Political Communication
Chair
Donald Matheson, U of Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Visual Truth-Telling: The Future of Photojournalism in Wartime
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Political Power of Personal Media in Wartime
Donald Matheson, U of Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND
War Reporting 2.0: Social Media and Soldier Content
Melissa A. Wall, California State U - Northridge, USA
Emerging Contours of Reporting Small Wars and Insurgencies in India
Prasun Sonwalkar, U of the West of England - Bristol, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
James S. Ettema, Northwestern U, USA
The changing nature of warfare, the emergence of new technologies and changing conceptions of foreign news have
been signifcant factors in a dramatic shift in the practices of war reporting. To some, these changes mark an end to the
tradition of independent war correspondence that bears witness to political violence around the globe. Yet, as this
panel seeks to explore, to cast journalists - and the public - as passive victims of these trends is to neglect the ways in
which information media are adapting to new contexts. For, particularly at times of violent conflict, existing
categorisations of journalism and journalists and existing news practices are being rethought. In recent conflicts from
Iraq to Afghanistan, Lebanon to South Ossetia, political violence in Gujarat to the oppression in Zimbabwe,
alternatives to the traditional foreign correspondent have become established as forms of war reporting. It is therefore
important to begin to assess the role these media practices play within journalism and in the representation of conflict,
in order to open up questions on their political impact.
5243
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Los Angeles
How the Media Impact Perceptions of the Self and Others
Mass Communication
Chair
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
Advertising Viewing and Pluralistic Ignorance: Examining Advertising Effects on College Students' Misperception of
Peers' Materialism
Stella C. Chia, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Audience Perceptions of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder on Monk: Social Identity, Presumed Media Influence, and
Behavioral Outcomes
Cynthia A. Hoffner, Georgia State U, USA
Elizabeth L. Cohen, Georgia State U, USA
Testing a Projection Explanation for Exemplar Effects
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Kwangjun Heo, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Timothy K.F. Fung, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Media Usage and Perceived Opinion Diversity: Chinese Public's Perceptions of Public Opinion Toward Beijing
Olympics
Mena Ning Wang, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
5244
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Miami
What's Left of "Public Service?" Retheorizing a Key Concept in Media Studies
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
John McMurria, U of California - San Diego, USA
Participants
Neoliberalism and the Diminution of Public Broadcasting
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
Defending "Broadcasting" as a Public Service Principal in an On-Demand Media World
Paddy Scannell, U of Michigan, USA
Beyond Markets and Paternalistic Provision: Public Service for the Digital Age
Des Freedman, U of London, Goldsmiths College, UNITED KINGDOM
Citizen Brand: Private Broadcasting and Public Service in the Neoliberal Era
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
New Media and Concepts of Public Service
John McMurria, U of California - San Diego, USA
Aqui Para Ti: The Transformation of Spanish-Language Television Into a Public Service for Latinos
Mari Castaneda, U of Massachusetts, USA
Respondent
Jessica Clark, Center for Social Media, USA
This roundtable theorizes the reconfiguration of public service as a key concept in broadcasting and new media. For
over half a century the concept of public service in media has been most closely tied to the enlistment of broadcast
television to instill 'good citizenship' via commitments to particular cultural values and authorized behavior in the
name of national heritage, collective belonging, an informed citizenry, a stable society, decency, local identities
and/or democratic participation. The proliferation of commercial channels, deregulation and neoliberal rationalities of
governing have changed these arrangements. Public service is now largely conceived within the logic of the market.
Across the globe, public broadcasters are "reinventing" themselves as efficient corporate ventures that exist to serve
viewers conceived less as citizens than as customers. At the same time, broadcast and cable networks are promoting
brand identification with niche markets through entertainment-based corporate citizenship initiatives (e.g. MTV
Think, Planet Green, ABC Better Community). New technologies have, meanwhile, facilitated increasingly diffused
and privatized systems of citizenship training in the form of social networking platforms, voluntary forms of media
production such as Wikipedia, and online fan sites that constitute personalized spaces of cultural belonging with
codes of conduct that transcend national borders and cultures. Our roundtable -- comprised of experts in critical
cultural approaches to policy - will revisit concepts of public serves through addressing the broader neoliberal
movement, the state of public broadcasting in Europe, citizen branding, public service in new media, and Spanish
language public service in the US.
5245
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Scottsdale
ICA Publications Committee Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Krishnamurthy Sriramesh, Sri Guruduth Agencies, INDIA
Participants
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Dale Hample, U of Maryland, USA
Mike West, International Communication Association, USA
ICA members are invited to share isues and concerns with the publications committee.
5251
Sunday
09:00-10:15
Belmont
Top Papers in Visual Communication Studies
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Participants
Towards a Dialogic Model of the Cinematic Experience
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
A Comparison of Gender Role Portrayals in Magazine Advertisements From Germany, Poland, and the United States
Malgorzata Skorek, U of California - Merced, USA
Margrit Schreier, International U Bremen, GERMANY
Amateur Images in the Professional News Stream
Helle Sjøvaag, U of Bergen, NORWAY
John Bridge, U of California – Los Angeles, USA
5301
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Grand Ballroom I
Body Talk (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Philosophy of Communication
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Health Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Popular Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Girls, Zines, and the Limits of the Body
Janice Radway, Northwestern U, USA
Tolerated Bodies
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
From Bodies to Physical Traits and Affective States
Carrie Rentschler, McGill U, CANADA
Body, Writing, Telecommunication
Thomas Streeter, U of Vermont, USA
Body Optimism
Lisa Henderson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Targeted Bodies
Jennifer Horner, U of Pennsylvania, USA
New Keywords offers the term "body," where Williams' original volume had not. This is one indication that
embodiment has moved downstage in communication and cultural studies since 1976. This session proposed by
Philosophy of Communication and organised by Lisa Henderson (long-term member of both Philosophy of
Communication division and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Interest Group) brings into
conversation scholars from Philosophy of Communication (Erni), Health Communication (Jennifer Horner), Feminist
Studies (Carrie Rentschler), Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Interest Group (Henderson as well as
Erni), Popular Communication (Janice Radway) and Communication and Technology (Thomas Streeter). Six scholars
from six divisions/interest groups consider what the body as concept, object and practice can do for communication.
Drawing from projects on girls' zines, human rights, feminist theory, the politics of health, computing, and queer
cinema, we ask how embodiment mediates such key terms as subjectivity, governmentality, ontology, modernity, and
affect.
5310
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Illinois
5311
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Indiana
Communication, Culture & Critique Editorial Board Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Isabel Molina Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Financial/Failure/Crisis/Communication: Organizational Communication, Public Relations, and the 2008
Global Financial Meltdown
Organizational Communication
Chair
William J. Kinsella, North Carolina State U, USA
Participants
Banking on Bust: Rethinking the Economics of the 2008 Credit Crisis
Dana DeSoto, U of North Carolina, USA
Carey Richter, U of North Carolina, USA
The "Mortgage Meltdown" as a Fractal Event
Edward A. Mabry, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Smoke and Mirrors: The End of Rhetoric?
Charles Conrad, Texas A&M U, USA
Silencing Ethics in Discourses of the U.S. Financial Crisis
Steven K. May, U of North Carolina, USA
Two linked panel sessions examine the communicative dimensions of the global financial crisis that became manifest
in 2008. The roots of the crisis encompass organizational strategy and culture, the development of innovative
financial instruments, promotion of new attitudes toward risk, and the globalization of markets. These factors led to a
series of interlinked events culminating in severe investment losses for organizations and individuals, widespread
mortgage failures, and the rapid development and deployment of government "rescue" or "bailout" packages. The
consequences of this crisis are likely to persist and evolve for years to come. Lessons are to be learned in the areas of
government regulation and oversight; corporate governance and social responsibility; public relations and crisis
communication; stakeholder communication; communication ethics; and organizational systems, culture, and
strategy. Examining the role of communication in the production of these events, and in the emerging responses, can
yield valuable insights for theory and practice. The fields of Organizational Communication and Public Relations
offer particularly relevant resources for reflexive engagement with the origins and consequences of the global
financial crisis. Thus we have developed two conference panels, jointly sponsored by the two divisions, to facilitate
an extended dialog among the presenters and others who attend the sessions. The discussants plan to keep their
overall comments concise, and to serve primarily as facilitators for substantive open and interactive discussions.
5312
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Iowa
Local-Global Tensions in News and Entertainment
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Participants
The Rise of the Anglophone in an Increasingly Multilayered, Transnational Danish Television System and Audience?
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Stig Hjarvard, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Hans-Peter Degn, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Lacuna or Universal? New Keywords for Understanding Cross-Cultural Success and Failure of Media Content
Ulrike Rohn, FSU Jena, GERMANY
Discourses of Oneness Versus Discourses of Particularity: Global Identity Politics of World News Slideshows
Anna Roosvall, Örebro U, SWEDEN
Kiasu Offenders, Islandness Anxiety, and Corporate Discipline: "Browsing Madness" in Borders Bookstore in
Singapore
Kim D Trager Bohley, Manhattan College, USA
Respondent
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
5313
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Michigan
Discourse and Dialogue: A Public Relations Approach to Organizational Rhetoric
Public Relations
Chair
Lee Edwards, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Rhetoric and Civil Society: An Examination of How Different Organizational Types Engage in Dialogue
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Rhetoric of Self-Regulation: Correctives or Quiescence?
W. Timothy Coombs, Illinois State U, USA
Sherry J. Holladay, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Climate Changes: Saved by Rhetoric?The Greening of Corporate Public Relations
Finn Frandsen, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Winni Johansen, Aarhus School of Business, U, DENMARK
Respondent
Robert L. Heath, U of Houston, USA
Rhetoric and public relations embody "Keywords in Communication". This panel addresses the gulf between
organizational (management) and communication (public relations) scholarship, with the intent of narrowing it, and
working to make organizations more reflective as rhetors. The central focal point of analysis of this panel is how
organizations enact the multiple voices in what Burke (1969) called the wrangle in the marketplace of ideas.
Organizations play a role in our communities and public relations scholars need to analyze their discourse. This panel
explores the rhetorical challenges facing organizations as they are called on to make communities better places in
which to live. The central theme is how can organizational rhetors work to make societies or communities more fully
functioning?
5314
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Michigan State
The Dark Side of Children's and Adolescents' Media Use
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Cynthia A. Hoffner, Georgia State U, USA
Participants
Television Exposure as a Risk Factor for Aggressive Behavior Among 3-Year-Olds
Jennifer A. Manganello, SUNY - Albany, USA
Catherine A Taylor, Tulane U, USA
Seeds of Deviance: Sensation Seeking and Children's Media Use
Jakob D. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Rebecca Ivic, Purdue U, USA
Kristen Imboden, Purdue U, USA
Psychosocial Antecedents of Online Game Addiction Among Adolescents
Jeroen S Lemmens, U van Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Children and Video Games: Addiction, Engagement, and Scholastic Achievement
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Linda Lay Ching Teo, Silkplus Pte Ltd, SINGAPORE
Rachel Neo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Media Influences on Mexican-Heritage Youth Alcohol Use: Moderating Role of Media Language Preference and
Parent-Child Communication About Alcohol Use
Jeong Kyu Lee, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael L. Hecht, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Youjeong Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
YoungJu Shin, Ball State U, USA
5315
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Minnesota
Media Policy in Transition: Comparative Cases
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Digital Terrestrial Television in Italy 5 Years On: Information Society Discourse, Market Realities
Alessandro D'Arma, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Moroccan Media in a Democratic Transition
Bouziane Zaid, Al Akhawayn U - Ifrane, MOROCCO
Of Winners and Losers in the Digital Conversion in Bulgaria
Elza Nistorova Ibroscheva, Southern Illinois U - Edwardsville, USA
Maria Raicheva-Stover, Washburn U, USA
"…And the Children of Israel Sang This Song": The Role of Israeli Law and Policy in the Advancement of Israeli
Music (Top Three Paper)
Amit M Schejter, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Charles Michael Elavsky, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Respondent
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
Shifts in communication and media policies are examined, whether addressing a move to digital technologies, a
consideration of the role of media in the information society, the promotion of culture, or more widespread
democratic reforms.
5316
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Nothwestern
Papers in Russian Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Viatcheslav B. Kashkin, Voronezh State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Participants
Digital Media and Computer-Mediated Communication Effects on Meaningful Educational Contexts Simulation
Irina Nickolaevna Rozina, RCA - Russian Communication Association, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Victoria I. Tuzlukova, Sultan Qaboos U, OMAN
Computer-Mediated Communication in Foreign Language Learning
Elena Nikolaevna Galichkina, Astrakhan State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Metacommunication and Translation
Viatcheslav B. Kashkin, Voronezh State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Postmass, Postpersonal Communication
Nataliya Kirillovna Ikonnikova, Russian Institute of Cultural Studies, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Dialogic--Paralogic--Mythologic: There and Back
Elena Nikitina, SAGE Publications, USA
The Cryptotype: Knowledge Representation and Implementation From a Human-Computer Interaction Perspective
Olga Boriskina, Voronezh State U, RUSSIA
Hypotesting Windt: Nixon's Crisis Rhetoric and the 1972 Presidential Election
Maureen Minielli, CUNY - Kingsborough, USA
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
Drinking as Communication in Russian Culture
Elena Khatskevich, U of Massachusetts, USA
Metaphoric Reorientations of Disease
Svetlana Polyakova, Perm State U, USA
Svetlana Mishlanova, Perm State U, USA
The study of communication in Russia (and the former Soviet states) and about Russia (and the former Soviet states)
is rapidly expanding in the post-Soviet era. The directions taken also vary widely but they represent a blossoming of
creative ways of viewing human communication. The papers on this panel explore communication in ways that will
be both familiar and new to audiences outside of Russia. They will treat issues related to technology, issues of intercultural communication and public discourse, both contemporary and historical.
5317
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Ohio State
Keywords: Conceptualisations, Naming, and Meanings of Ethnicity, Race, and Diaspora
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
John L. Jackson, Annenberg School for Communication, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
What's in a Date? Looking Beyond the Keyword of "9/11" for a Polyethnic "Word Order"
Debashish Munshi, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Priya Kurian, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Kirsten Broadfoot, Colorado State U, USA
In the Know? Media, Migration, and Public Beliefs
Eoin Devereux, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Michael J. Breen, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Amanda Louise Haynes, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Key Terms in Political Advocacy: A Gendered Perspective
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Names as Keywords: Theorizing Immigration-Influenced Name Changes in Canada
Diane Yvonne Dechief, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Effect of English as a "Cool Medium" on Asian Ethnic Background Sojourners' Personal Security in Australian
Context: A Case Study
Noparat-Tananuraksakul, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
John L. Jackson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
5318
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Purdue
Goal- and Message-Centered Approaches to Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Erin Donovan-Kicken, U of Texas, USA
Participants
The Nature of Interpersonal Communication: A Message-Centered Approach
Brant R. Burleson, Purdue U, USA
The Effects of Interaction Goals on Negotiation Tactics and Outcomes: A Dyad-level Analysis Across Two Cultures
Meina Liu, U of Maryland, USA
Steven Wilson, Purdue U, USA
The Dynamics of Goal Congruency and Cognitive Busyness in Goal Detection
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Indirect Ingratiation
Nurit Talor, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Compensatory Self-Presentation in Upward Comparison Situations
James M. Tyler, Purdue U, USA
5319
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Wisconsin
The Interactional Achievement of Family Roles and Family Relationships
Language & Social Interaction
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Two Practices for Criticizing Food and Family at the "Ceremonial" Dinner Table
Jenny Mandelbaum, Rutgers U, USA
When "Authority" Lacks "Legitimate Power": Twin Sisters Negotiating Face and Relational Concerns in Advice
Episodes
Melissa McFall, Eastern Illinois U, USA
On the Interactional Hazards of Intimate Family Ties: Negotiating Voicing and "Voicelessness" in Multi-Party Family
Conflict
Shirley Ann Staske-Bell, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Big Sis/Little Sis: Achieving and Resisting Authority as Requisites of Sibling Role Enactment
Miranda Woolever, Monmouth College, USA
Respondent
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
This panel is composed of scholars who employ LSI methodologies to examine the ordinary conversations that
constitute family "roles" and family relationships. Each of the four studies presented here concerns itself with the
conversational practices family members utilize in their interactional construction of family activities (conflict, advice
episodes, ceremonial dinners) and the ways in which those practices contribute to Parent/Child, Sibling, and Extended
Family relationships.
5321
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Priming (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Bryant M. Paul, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Analytic Intuition and Intuitive Rationality: Interacting Systems Processing Threatening Anecdotes
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
Key Jung Lee, Stanford U, USA
Examining the Possible Impact of Mediated Sports Programming on Racial Stereotype Formation
Matthew John Kobach, Indiana U, USA
Priming Prejudice: Can Exemplification and Voiceover Gender in News Story Slideshows Influence Activation of
Stereotypes of Mental Illness?
Lynette Marie Holman, U of North Carolina, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Same Prime, Different Result: How the Evaluation Object Might Determine the Entertainment Media Effect
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Smile and the Virtual World Smiles With You: Electromyographic Response to Avatar Facial Expressions
James J Cummings, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Hwanjun Chung, Indiana U, USA
Media Primes and Their Effects on Bicultural Individuals
Han Ei Chew, Michigan State U, USA
Benjamin H. Detenber, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Red and Blue (and perhaps Green) Lines on Television: Political Moderation of Heuristic Cultivation Effects
Curtis Matthews, Texas Tech U, USA
Olan Farnall, Texas Tech U, USA
Brandon H. Nutting, Texas Tech U, USA
Wendy A. Maxian, Texas Tech U, USA
Samuel D. Bradley, Texas Tech U, USA
5323
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Great America II
5330
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Intergroup Communication Interest Group Business Meeting
Intergroup Communication
Members of the Intergroup Communication Interest Group are invited to join us for our annual ICA business meeting.
In Your Face-book Cues
Communication and Technology
Chair
Yoram M. Kalman, Northwestern U, USA
Participants
Better Without Face? Gender Difference in Visual Cue Use When Initiating Friendship on Facebook
Shaojung Sharon Wang, SUNY Buffalo, USA
Shinil Moon, SUNY Buffalo, USA
Kyounghee Hazel Kwon, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Carolyn A. Evans, U at Buffalo, USA
Michael A. Stefanone, U at Buffalo, USA
Cool, Revealing, or Annoying?: Measuring the Effects of Facebook Applications on Interpersonal Perceptions
Julia K. Woolley, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Anthony M. Limperos, Pennsylvania State U
Daniel J Tamul, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Connection Strategies: Relationship Formation and Maintenance on Social Network Sites
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Steinfield, Michigan State U, USA
Cliff Lampe, Michigan State U, USA
Face-ism on Facebook: An Analysis of Self-Inflicted Face-ism in Online Profile Pictures
Lauren M Reichart, U of Alabama, USA
Skye C Cooley, U of Alabama, USA
5331
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Social Movement Communication: Technologies, Organizations, and Discourses
Communication and Technology
Participants
Collaborating and Contesting Buddhist Protests: Networking Buddhist Activists and Debating Religious Narratives
During the 2007 Monastic Protests in Burma.
Laura Busch, U of Washington, USA
Missions and Methods: A Comparative Analysis of the Global Indymedia Network
Ted Matthew Coopman, San Jose State U, USA
Collaborating Against Human Trafficking
Kirsten A. Foot, U of Washington, USA
The Discursive Constriction of Power Through Specialization: The Role of Communication, Technology, and Agency
in Homeless Coalitional Politics
Amoshaun Toft, U of Washington, USA
Respondent
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
This panel presents scholarship at the confluence of communication, technology studies and social movement
research. As technologies evolve, and theory responds, methods for the research of social movements have expanded
as well. These fours papers represent important work on the cutting edge of both methodology and theory. The
research presented here examines the use of language in online environments, as well as the specific role that digital
communication technologies play in processes of organizing for social change.
5332
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Opinion Perception and Expression
Political Communication
Chair
Michael W. Traugott, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
A Spiral of Silence for Some: Attitude Certainty and the Expression of Political Minority Opinions
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Kimberly Rios Morrison, Ohio State U, USA
Christian Schemer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
So You Think You Are Popular? Fear of Isolation Triggers Motivated Perceptions of Consensus
Kimberly Rios Morrison, Ohio State U, USA
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Testing the Spiral of Silence in the Virtual World: Monitoring Opinion-Climate Online and Individuals' Willingness
to Express Personal Opinions in Online Versus Offline Settings
Xudong Liu, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
What Underlies the False Consensus Effect? How Personal Opinion and Disagreement Affect Perception of Public
Opinion
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Vincent Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Michael W. Traugott, U of Michigan, USA
5333
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Keyword: Urban Communication
Theme Sessions
Chair
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The Urban Keyword Unlocks Doors to Understand Cities and Communication
Gene Burd, U of Texas, USA
Urban Communication and the Transformation of the Urban Landscape
Susan Drucker, Hofstra U, USA
Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation, USA
What the City Has to Teach Us
Harvey Jassem, U of Hartford, USA
Communicating the City in the Age of Cyber-Capitalism
Steve Macek, North Central College, USA
City Life and the Origins of Communication Theory
John Pauly, Marquette U, USA
Chameleon Strategies of BBOT-BNA, a Brussels Digital Storytelling Organization: Dealing With the Urban
Community, Institutional Politics, and Participation
Nico Carpentier, Vrije U Brussel, BELGIUM
Respondent
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Urban communication examines the role of communication in the city and community. For the first time, in 2007,
more than half the world's population lives in urban areas. The city is a complex context that shapes and is shaped by
communication. Urban communication speaks to 1) how a city communicates and 2) how cities facilitate
communication. The city is, as has always been, a media environment yet as resilient and timeless as the form and
function of the city may be, communication technologies alter the parameters of the urban landscape. Urban
communication research ranges from traditional settings to suburban sprawl. Urban communication is a fairly new
"keyword" embodying a longstanding seam of research. The form of urbanity and community was an intrinsic part of
this theme in the scholarship of James W. Carey. He was concerned with the impact of time and spaced media upon
the changing form of the urban domain and the consequence of accelerated change upon community. Urban
communication research explores urban social interaction and civic engagement in an age of global communication. It
crosses the communication discipline and brings communication to other disciplines. It represents theoretical and
applied research.
5334
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Representations of the Audience, and Their Implications, in the Digital Media Age
Mass Communication
Chair
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
The Duality of Media: How Public Measures Shape Public Attention
James G. Webster, Northwestern U, USA
A Taste for Obscurity? Media Consumption in the Digital Age
Anita Elberse, London Business School, UNITED KINGDOM
Audience Evolution and the Future of Ratings Analysis
Philip M. Napoli, Fordham U, USA
Repertoires of Media Use Across Platforms: An Integrated Approach to Understanding Patterns of Audience
Duplication Through Network Analysis
Thomas Burton Ksiazek, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
The new media environment is facilitating new manifestations of audience behavior as well as new mechanisms for
monitoring and analyzing audience behavior. Developments such as increased interactivity, increased fragmentation,
increased multi-media usage, increased control, and increased opportunities for audiences to provide feedback to
content providers (and even to become content providers) all reflect the changing nature of media audiences. At the
same time, technological advances have facilitated the gathering and analysis of data related to these, and other,
aspects of the audience, as newer media leave a variety of more tangible and observable indicators of media usage and
response than do traditional electronic and print media. It is this relationship between audiences' media usage and the
institutionalized systems for observing and analyzing this media usage that is the focus of this panel. This panel will
explore the ways that the digital media environment is both challenging traditional institutionalized representations of
the audience, as well as generating new representations of the audience. In addition, this panel will consider the
broader cultural and political repercussions of the dynamics of contemporary representations of the audience and how
they are used by various stakeholders. These issues will be addressed from theoretical, methodological, and empirical
perspectives.
5335
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
Evolving Perspectives on Media Choice
Mass Communication
Participants
Affect as a Predictor of Entertainment Choice: The Utility of Looking Beyond Pleasure
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Social Cognitive Theories of Media Selection
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Action Theory, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Media Choice
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Media Choice in Social Networks
Thomas N. Friemel, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Research on media choice deals with the big question of how and why people turn to the media. The panel will
provide fresh insights into evolving perspectives on media choice. It will focus on four of the most promising
developments in the field: non-hedonic choices, habitual or automatic choices, planned choices, and media choices
embedded in social networks. All presented approaches stress different, though related factors. Thus, the overall
composition of the current panel offers integrative insight, but also allows for a fruitful debate about potentially
incompatible assumptions in the field.
5336
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Communication Research in the U.S./Mexican Border Region
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Experiencing Compression in a Rural Mexican Migrant Sending Community: Communication Technology Usage
Among First Adopters
Barry Brown, U of California, San Diego, USA
Tricia Wang, U of California- San Diego, USA
Independent Documentary in the U.S. Mexican Border Region
Fernando A Mancillas, Universidad de Sonora, MEXICO
Interaction in Cyberspace: Analysis of a Global Political Network of Water Use
Hugo Edgardo Mendez, Universidad Autónoma de Baja, MEXICO
Spanish or English? Assessing Language Preference of Television Viewing for Latino Families
Kristin C. Moran, U of San Diego, USA
Respondent
Raul Fuentes-Navarro, ITESO U, MEXICO
This panel presents research from members of the Binational Association of Schools of Communication, an
association of Colleges and Universities primarily in the San Diego/Baja California border region that promotes
scholarly cooperation and exchange between the U.S. and Mexico and research on the border region.
5337
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
Methodological Issues in Studying Journalism
Journalism Studies
Chair
Juanita Marie Darling, San Francisco State U, USA
Participants
Measuring and Mapping Development Journalism
Xiaoge Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Freezing the Flow of Online News: Exploring Approaches to Study the Liquidity of Online News
Michael B. Karlsson, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, USA
Online Methodology: Analyzing News Flows of Online Journalism
Robert Kautsky, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Andreas Widholm, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Virtual Worlds: Where the Journalist and the Avatar Combine New Research Paradigm for Journalism Scholarship,
Professional Journalism Training
Amy SchmitzWeiss, San Diego State U, USA
Respondent
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
5341
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Houston
Healthcare Provider and Patient Communication
Health Communication
Chair
Allison Marie Scott, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
Coping with Women's Cancer: Patients' Type of Cancer, Coping Styles, and Perceived Importance of Information and
Emotional Support from Physicians and from Nurses.
Tamar Ginossar, U of New Mexico, USA
Linda K. Larkey, U of Arizona, USA
Nancy Howe, Arizona State U, USA
Nidhi Goel, U of Arizona, USA
An Exploration of the Relationship Between Patient Participation and Outcomes of Quality of Care
Tara Gascoigne, The U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
How Do I Ask About Your Disability? An Examination of Interpersonal Communication Processes Between Medical
Students and Patients With Disabilities
Ashley P. Duggan, Boston College, USA
Ylisabyth S. Bradshaw, Tufts U, USA
Wayne Altman, Tufts U, USA
An Integrated Personal Health Management System: What Are the Possibilities?
Kylene Baker, Texas A&M U, USA
If You Must Be Hospitalized, Television is Not the Place: Diagnosis, Survival Rate, and Demographic Characteristics
of Inpatients in TV Hospital Drama
Amir Hetsroni, Yezreel Valley College, ISRAEL
5343
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Los Angeles
The News: Credibility, Bias, and Mood
Mass Communication
Chair
Pradeep Sopory, Wayne State U, USA
Participants
The Impact of Mood and Story Frame on Information Processing of News Stories
Michel M. Haigh, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Pamela Brubaker, The Pennsylvania State U, USA
Aaron Heresco, The Pennsylvania State U, USA
Does Humor Attenuate Hostility? A Comparison of Hostile Media Perceptions of News and Late-Night Comedy
Laura M. Arpan, Florida State U, USA
Beom Jun Bae, Florida State U, USA
Yen-Shen Chen, Florida State U, USA
Gary Harold Greene, Florida State U, USA
Correcting Innuendo Effects in Media
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
Woo Young Chun, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Getting the Same Message: The Effect of Audio-Visual Translation on Perceived Truthfulness
Sinuk Kang, SUNY Buffalo, USA
Yoonjae Nam, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Daejoong Kim, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Melissa A Menasco, SUNY – Buffalo, USA
5344
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Miami
Media, Emotion, and Order
Philosophy of Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Eric W. Rothenbuhler, Texas A&M U, USA
Participants
Media and Ritual: A Challenge for the Anthropological Thought
Mihai Coman, U of Bucuresti, ROMANIA
Narrativizing A Media Disaster: The Case of the Jokela School Massacre
Johanna Maaria Sumiala-Seppänen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
News as a Looking Glass: Shame and Mediated Exposure
Maria Mirca Madianou, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Towards a Media Incidents Theory: How "Adversarial Guests" Ruin Programs and Liberate the Audience
Mirjam Gollmitzer, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Respondent
Eric W. Rothenbuhler, Texas A&M U, USA
Debate continues about the contribution of emotional bonds and ritual challenges to the construction and sustaining of
social order. This panel brings together recent empirical work on media, emotion and ritual with a theoretical
overview of how a deeper appreciation of ritual might enrich communication theory.
5345
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Scottsdale
News in Election Season
Journalism Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Hillel Nossek, College of Management Academic Studies, ISRAEL
Participants
Conjuring Abraham, Martin, and John: Memory, Myth, and News of the Obama Presidential Campaign (Top Three
Faculty Paper)
Daniel A. Berkowitz, U of Iowa, USA
Sarah Raaii, U of Iowa, USA
Reporting, the Moral Compass, What Voters Want, and the Third Person Effect: An Analysis of Frames in Political
Columnists' News Magazine Coverage of the 2004 Presidential Campaign
Corey B Davis, U of Missouri, USA
Answering the Talking Snowman: The CNN/YouTube Debates and the Challenge of the Third Voice
Matthew A. Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
Eran N. Ben-Porath, Social Science Research Solutions, USA
Look Who's Talking: Journalists and Media Pundits as Actors in Television News
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Respondent
Doris Graber, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Collectively, the four papers of this session offer in-depth analysis of election news story content. In particular,
narrative patterns and the assortment of voices contained in election news are parsed and probed in making sense of
contemporary media politics.
5351
Sunday
10:30-11:45
Belmont
5450
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Armitage
Visual Communication Studies Division Business Meeting
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Communication Review Editorial Board Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
Participants
Bruce A. Williams, U of Virginia, USA
Aniko Bodroghkozy, U of Alberta, CANADA
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Elizabeth Cole, U Of Michigan, USA
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania - Annenberg School for Communication, USA
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
Justin Lewis, Cardiff U - JOMEC, UNITED KINGDOM
Tamar Liebes, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Peter Lunt, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
Shoshana Magnet, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U - Ohio, USA
Angela McRobbie, Goldsmith College - London, UNITED KINGDOM
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
Graham Murdock, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Jeremy Packer, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Elspeth Probyn, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Craig Robertson, Northeastern U, USA
Christina Slade, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
John Macgregor Wise, Arizona State U West, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Children, Adolescents, and the Media Poster Session
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
1. Adolescent Media Preferences: A 'Window' to Their Development?
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Nancy A. Gonzales, Arizona State U, USA
Larry E. Dumka, Arizona State U, USA
2.
3.
4.
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Children, Citizenship, and the BBC's 'Newsround'
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Maire Messenger-Davies, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Kaitlynn D Mendes, U of Nottingham, UNITED KINGDOM
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Knowledge Gap in the Media-Saturated '08 Presidential Election
Joonghwa Lee, U of Missouri, USA
Chang Dae Ham, U of Missouri, USA
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Reinventing Media Literacy in Canada: Embracing and Transcending Eclecticism
Stuart R. Poyntz, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Michael Hoechsmann, McGill U, CANADA
Communication History Poster Session
Communication History
Participants
5. Hollywood or "The Sticks"?: Domestic Runaway Film Production in the 1970s and '80s
Camille Johnson-Yale, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
6. The First Scientific Mass Communications Research in Latin America: The Brazilian Survey, FebruaryMay 1941
Jose Luis Ortiz-Garza, U Panamericana, MEXICO
7. Was "Taste" Passive for Addison?
Jon Leon Torn, Northern Arizona U, USA
8. Writing the History of the Discipline: A Sociology of Science Approach to the History of Communication
Research
Andreas Scheu, U of Munich, GERMANY
Maria Loeblich, DGPuk - Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Publizistik-, GERMANY
Communication Law and Policy Poster Session
Communication Law & Policy
Participants
9. A Third Way for the Public Airwaves: Opportunistic Unlicensed Reuse of Government Spectrum
Victor W. Pickard, U of Illinois, USA
Sascha D. Meinrath, New America Foundation, USA
10. Tensions and Strategies in Intellectual Property Policy and Peer-to-Peer Practice in Higher Education
Networks
Steven James Jackson, U of Michigan, USA
Alok Vimawala, U of Michigan, USA
11. The U.S. Broadband Market Conditions and Barriers to Entry
Eun-A Park, U of New Haven, USA
12. "Eyes Have They, But They See Not": Israeli Election Laws, Freedom of Expression, and the Need for
Speech Transparency
Amit M Schejter, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Moran Yemini, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Respondents
Patricia A. Aufderheide, American U, USA
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Communication and Technology (CAT) Poster Session
Communication and Technology
Chair
Donald Matheson, U of Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
13. Similarities Between Terrorist Networks in Antiquity and Present-Day Cyberterrorist Networks
Jonathan Matusitz, U of Central Florida, USA
14. Chinese Ethnic Online Communities: Analysis of User Patterns and Cultural Adaptation
Nan Ke, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
15. Network Performance: Sociocultural Aspects of Playing Music Over the Internet
Mark Latonero, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Alain Renaud, Queens U Belfast, UNITED KINGDOM
16. Extending the Technology-Community-Management Model to Disaster Recovery: Assessing Vulnerability
in Rural Asia
Arul Chib, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
A L E Komathi, School of Communication and Information, SINGAPORE
17. Technology, Modernity, and Islam: Technological Culture in Iran
Mehdi Semati, Eastern Illinois U, USA
18. Organizational Responses to Negative Online Consumer Reviews: Effects on Producer, Product, and
Reviewer Evaluations
Peter Kerkhof, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
19. Gaining Insight Into the Chinese Journalists' Blogs: What Information is Being Disseminated and How
(Top Two Student Paper)
Fangfang Gao, U of Florida, USA
20. Convergence and Diversity of Online News
Jeongsub Lim, Austin Peay State U, USA
21. Internet RFCs as Social Policy: Network Design From a Regulatory Perspective
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Poster Session
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chairs
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
22. From the Football Field to the Global Arena: Hines Ward and the Creation of a New Korean National
Identity
Myra Susan Washington, U of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA
23. Mapping Irishness in Contemporary America: The Racial Implications of Riverdance
Natasha Casey, McGill U, USA
24. New Media and Empowerment of Communities of Color in the U.S. Urban Heartland
Jennifer L. Gregg, U of Louisville, USA
Catherine Fosl, U of Louisville, USA
Amber Duke, U of Louisville, USA
Attica Scott, Kentucky Jobs with Justice, USA
25. Consumption as Communication: A View From the Shopping Malls of San Salvador, El Salvador
Cecilia M. Rivas, U of California - Santa Cruz, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Feminist Scholarship Poster Session
Feminist Scholarship
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jessica Enevold, IT U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Participants
26. Are You Feeling Better About Your Body Image?: Self-Disclosure and Psychosocial Benefits in Dove's
"Campaign for Real Beauty" Online Discussion Forum
Jeesun Kim, U of Missouri, USA
27. Body Image in Second Life: Improving Physical Insecurities or Perpetuating Them?
Alina D Padilla-Miller, U of Oregon, USA
28. Mixed Medium: Trolls, Authority, and Blog Comments in a Feminist Space
Elizabeth Ellcessor, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
29. Gender Stereotypes in Olympic Online Visuals
Andra Raisa Petca, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Timo Alexander Graf, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Eliza Bivolaru, Jacobs U, Bremen, GERMANY
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
GLBT Poster Session
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Participants
30. Camp 2.0: A Queer Performance of Camp on YouTube
Aymar Jean Christian, U of Pennsylvania, USA
31. Strategic Ambiguity at Work: A Thematic Analysis of the Use of Strategic Ambiguity in International
Sexuality-Based Organizations' Websites
Rebecca L. Dohrman, Purdue U, USA
Game Studies Poster Session
Game Studies
Participants
32. Good Clean Fun? A Content Analysis of Profanity in Video Games and its Prevalence Across Game
Systems and Ratings
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Nicole Martins, Indiana U, USA
Mia L. Consalvo, Ohio U, USA
33. MISSI: A Hybrid Framework for Interactive Storytelling
Michael F. Lynch, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
34. A Different or Just an Older Breed of Gamer: The Use of Digital Games in Middle Adulthood
Bob De Schutter, Group T Engineering School, BELGIUM
Steven Malliet, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Global Communication and Social Change Poster Session
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
35. A Regional Mosaic: Linguistic Diversity and India's Film Trade
Sunitha Chitrapu, Indiana U, USA
36. Bodies for Sale: The Documentary Discourse of the Black Market Organ Trade
Jennifer A Sandoval, U of New Mexico, USA
37. Copying Copyright: Copyright's Travel into China
Wei Wei, U of Minnesota, USA
38. Entertainment, Education, or Propaganda? A Longitudinal Analysis of China Central Television's Spring
Festival Galas
Xiao Wang, Eastern Connecticut State U, USA
39. The Structure of International Migration
Chung Joo Chung, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
George A. Barnett, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Yon Soo Lim, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Shinil Moon, SUNY Buffalo, USA
40. Torch Relay: Sustaining and Enhancing Professionalism and Objectives in Olympics Coverage: A Survey
of Chinese TV Professionals
Xin Zhong, Renmin U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Guosong Shao, U of Alabama, USA
Health Communication Poster Session
Health Communication
Participants
41. Some Health-Risk Correlates of Adult Video Game Playing
James B. Weaver, III, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Darren Mays, National Center for Health Marketing , USA
Wendi Kannenberg, Andrews U, USA
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Stephanie Sargent Weaver, Weaver Consulting Group, USA
Gary L. Hopkins, Andrews U, USA
Dogan Eroglu, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
Jay M. Bernhardt, National Center for Health Marketing, USA
The Depiction of Illness and Related Matters in Two Top-Ranked Primetime Network Medical Dramas in
the U.S.: A Content Analysis
Yinjiao Ye, U of Rhode Island, USA
Towards a Lexicon For Holistic Health: An Analysis of Constructs of Health, Wellness, and Spirituality
Stephanie Webster, U of Florida, USA
Beauty and Fashion Magazines and College-Age Women's Appearance Disturbances
Fan Hu, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The Effects of Using Celebrity Versus Noncelebrity Spokescharacters to Promote Healthy Versus
Unhealthy Food to Children
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Tim Smits, K.U.Leuven and U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Tim Van Stevens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Formative Belief-Elicitation Research: Lessons From the Temporal Construal Theory
Yuliya Lutchyn, U of Minnesota, USA
Marco C. Kopiëren, U of Minnesota, USA
The Beliefs Behind the Behavior: Using Theory to Understand College Students' STD-Testing Intentions
Vanessa Boudewyns, U of Maryland, USA
Ryan S. Paquin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Perpetuating the "Scientific Motherhood": The Medicalization of Infant Feeding in Parents' Magazine,
1930—2007
Katherine Foss, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
Information Systems Poster Session
Information Systems
Participants
49. A Method of Evaluating the Impact of Scholars
Mike Allen, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Anna Antos, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Jessica M. Hample, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Matthew Hebl, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Kimberly Kulovitz, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Xuan Liang, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Matthew Ogi, U of Wisconson - Milwaukee, USA
Xuan Zhao, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Joshua Ray Pederson, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
50. Cultivation Theory and Cultural Models of Romantic Relationships
Kristen Allison, U of Alabama, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Nancy Rhodes, Indiana U/Purdue U Indianapolis, USA
51. Quantifying Telework in the United States
Pamela Lynn Morris, Purdue U, USA
52. Sexuality Difference and Sexually Oriented Advertising: An Exploratory Analysis of the Third-Person
Effect
Po-Lin Pan, U of Alabama, USA
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Juan Meng, U of Alabama, USA
53. The Perceived Social Context Effect on Situation and Color: An ERP Study
Kyeong-Jeong Han, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
jihye min, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
byoungkyong MIN, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Haejeong Park, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Instructional & Developmental Communication Poster Session
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participants
54. Undergraduates Demystify Research: The Power of Nutrition Public Service Announcements on Children
Sarah F. Rosaen, U of Michigan - Flint, USA
Sarah Durish, U of Michigan-Flint, USA
Lindsay Mello, U of Michigan-Flint, USA
Anthony Mills, U of Michigan-Flint, USA
Amy Marie Ramin, U of Michigan-Flint
55. Authenticity and Subcultural Style in Adolescents' Self-Presentation on Social Network Sites
Katrien Van Cleemput, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Intercultural Communication Poster Session
Intercultural Communication
Participants
56. Culture and Self-Expression in Online Social Networking: An Examination of Self-Construals on Facebook
David Christopher DeAndrea, Michigan State U, USA
Allison Soo-Jung Shaw, Michigan State U, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
57. Make a Cultural Difference: Cyworld and MySpace
chunhyo Kim, Southern Illinios U, USA
58. Predicting the Spatial Pattern of Global News Flow
Seung Joon Jun, U at Buffalo, USA
Ju-Yong Ha, Inha U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Intergroup Communication Poster Session
Intergroup Communication
Participants
59. China's AIDS NGOs Networking: A Social Network Analysis
Shuya Pan, U of Southern California, USA
60. Hospice Chaplains' Strategies for Handling Preconceptions of Religious Professionals When Interacting
With Patients and Families
Kristin Lindholm, Trinity International U, USA
Interpersonal Communication Poster Session
Interpersonal Communication
Participants
61. Theory of Motivated Information Management 2.0: The Role of Emotion Appraisals
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Christopher Morse, Bryant U, USA
62. Flirtatious Communication: An Experimental Examination of Perceptions of Social-Sexual Communication
Motivated by Evolutionary Forces
Brandi N Frisby, West Virginia U, USA
Megan R. Dillow, West Virginia U, USA
Shelbie Gaughan, West Virginia U, USA
John Nordlund, West Virginia U, USA
63. The Effects of Satisfaction and Commitment on Avoidance Following a Partner's Deception:
Communication Efficacy as a Mediator
Su Ahn Jang, U of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
64. The Pitfalls and Promise of Neuroscientific Methods: The Case of the Elaboration Likelihood Model
Amber L. Westcott-Baker, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Journalism Studies Poster Session
Journalism Studies
Participants
65. Advertising in the Alternative Media Field of Production
Jeffrey Cannon, Indiana U, USA
66. Creative Journalism: What Do Print Journalists Think?
Janet Michelle Fulton, U of Newcastle, AUSTRALIA
Phillip McIntyre, U of Newcastle, AUSTRALIA
67. A Cross-National Bibliometric Analysis: Five Decades of Latin American Journalist Studies
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
68. Academic vs. Professional Education: Epistmology and Journalism Educator's Academic Work
Patty Jo Wharton-Michael, U of Pittsburgh - Johnstown, USA
69. Rethinking the Impact of Real-World Conditions on Media Agenda-Setting
Seong Choul Hong, Indiana U, USA
70. How Do Journalists Do Research on the Internet? An Observation and a Survey on the Research Performed
by Journalists Working for Daily Newspapers, Radio, Television, and Online
Marcel Machill, U of Leipzig - Institute of Communication and Media Science, GERMANY
Markus Beiler, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Johannes R. Gerstner, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
71. The Effects of Interactive News Presentation on Perceived User Satisfaction of Online Community
Newspapers
Deborah S. Chung, U of Kentucky, USA
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
72. Blogging as a Form of Journalism: A Model Linking Perception, Motivation, and Behavior
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
Seth Lewis, U of Texas, USA
Amber Willard, Uof Texas, USA
Sebastian Valenzuela, U of Texas, USA
Jae Kook Lee, U of Texas, USA
Brian Baresch, U of Texas, USA
73. Journalism as Social Networking: The Australian youdecide project and the 2007 Federal election
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Respondents
Matthew A. Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
David M. Ryfe, U of Nevada - Reno, USA
Yusuf Kalyango, Jr., Ohio U, USA
Sharon Meraz, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Language & Social Interaction Poster Session
Language & Social Interaction
Participants
74. Interpreting the Complexity of the Ballpark: Perspectives From the Public Spaces of the Baseball Stadium
Brian Swafford, Ohio U, USA
75. Crossing the Line: Spatial Representations and Metaphors in the Discourse of Israeli Military Refuseniks
Oren Livio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
76. The Use of Nonliteral Language Forms in Personal Blog Texts
Juanita M Whalen, U of Calgary, CANADA
Penny M Pexman, U of Calgary, CANADA
Alastair Gill, Northwestern U, USA
Scott Nowson, Appen Pty Ltd, AUSTRALIA
Mass Communication Poster Session
Mass Communication
Participants
77. The CSI Cultivation Effect. Exploring the Influence of Need for Closure and the Disposition for Narrative
Engagement
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Rick W. Busselle, Washington State U, USA
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Franziska Spitzner, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Anja Kalch, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Sabine Reich, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
The Strength of Causality on Narrative Persuasion in the Face of Contradictory Belief Structures
Michael Field Dahlstrom, Iowa State U, USA
Issue Knowledge and Campaign Interest in "Battleground Ohio": Did the Media—and Political
Advertising—Matter?
Jennette Paige Lovejoy, Ohio U, USA
Daniel Riffe, U of North Carolina, USA
Hong Cheng, Ohio U, USA
Political Cynicism, Instability, and Volatility: Democratic Crisis or Critical Electorate?
Maud Adriaansen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Predictors and Impacts of TV Multitasking and Simultaneous Multiple Media Use
Jingbo Meng, U of Southern California, USA
Daniel G. McDonald, Ohio State U, USA
Revisiting "Mass Communication" and the "Work" of the Audience in the New Media Environment
Philip M. Napoli, Fordham U, USA
The Effectiveness of the Length of Commercials in Different Types of Television Programs
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
The Impact of Attention on Promotional Effectiveness: The Case of Congruity Effects
Sela Sar, Iowa State U, USA
The Study of Media Effects in the Era of Internet Communication
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Theoretical Implications for Change Management When Local Television News Becomes Personal and
Portable
George L. Daniels, U of Alabama, USA
"Intruder or Victim:" An Analysis of National Versus Local Newspaper Coverage of Hurricane Survivors
Displaced by Katrina
Sumana Chattopadhyay, Marquette U, USA
Organizational Communication Poster Session
Organizational Communication
Participants
88. Family Currency: Family Business Daughters' Business and Familial Contributions
Angela Marie Day, Ball State U, USA
89. Organization-Based Self-Esteem, Media Preferences, and Informal Communication
Xuan Zhao, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
90. The Violation of Prescriptive Stereotypes on Job Resumes
James M. Tyler, Purdue U, USA
Jennifer McCullough, Purdue U, USA
91. Virtual Organizations and Resource Partitioning Theory: How New Communication Technologies Enable
Blending Processes
Courtney Margaret Schultz, U of Southern California, USA
92. E-Mail Privacy at Work: Testing a Structural-Perceptual Model of the Panoptic Effects of Electronic
Monitoring
Jason L. Snyder, Central Connecticut State U, USA
Mark Cistulli, U of Hartford, USA
Philosophy of Communication Poster Session
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
93. NGOs and GMOs: A Case Study in Alternative Public Communication of Science and Technology
Pieter Alexander Maeseele, Ghent U, BELGIUM
94. Agency Unshackled: The Origin of 'Agency' in Sociology, Identity, and Text
Mario George Rodriguez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
95. Notes on Mediation of Politics and Journalism: Ming-Zwei and its Field of Practices
Shih-che Tang, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
96. Rethinking the Remix: Audio Mash-Ups and the Metaphysics of Recording
David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U, USA
97. William James on "Possible Selves": Implications for Studying Identity in Communication Contexts
Maria Leonora ('Nori') G. Comello, Ohio State U, USA
98. "To Catch a Predator:" An Ethical Analysis of Sting Journalism
Michael Thomas Martinez, U of Missouri, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Political Communication Poster Session
Political Communication
Participants
99. Changing Currents in Environmental Documentary: Drama and Depoliticization in An Inconvenient Truth
Shawna Feldmar, U of Southern California, USA
100. Equality: The Necessary Key Word in the Political Economy of U.S. Campaign Finance
Dana DeSoto, The U Of North Carolina, USA
101. Innovation or Legitimation? Consultancy Services and Functions in Political Communication
Jochen Hoffmann, U of Bern, SWITZERLAND
Adrian Steiner, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
102. Pesticide Applicators on the Job: Creating Greener Pastures in Scientific Citizenship
Laura N Rickard, Cornell U, USA
103. Political Substance in the Mediated Discourse Surrounding Controversial Docudramas
Keren Tenenboim Weinblatt, U of Pennsylvania, USA
104. Religious Issues in News and Their Effect on Public Attitudes Towards the EU
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van der Brug, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sara Binzer Hobolt, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
105. The Common Grounds and Grand Canyons Between Liberals and Conservatives: A Life Style Analysis
Tien-Tsung Lee, U of Kansas, USA
Christopher Brott, U of Kansas, USA
106. The Internet and News: Changes in Content on Newspaper Websites
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
107. The Moral Politics of Censorship: Family Communication Patterns, Political Ideology, and Support for
Censorship
Jason B. Reineke, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
108. YouTube Ads: An Issue Ownership Study of the 2008 Presidential Primary Campaign
Pradeep Thomas Joseph Antony, Marquette U, USA
109. Exploring the Social Dynamics in the U.S. Democracy: Presidential and Public Opinions About, and Media
Coverage of, Environmental Issues
Qingjiang Yao, U of Iowa, USA
Zhaoxi Liu, The U of Iowa, USA
Lowndes Stephens, U of South Carolina, USA
110. The Candidacy of Stephen Colbert: Fake News as Political Argument, Not Political Information
Michael Barthel, Syracuse U, USA
111. How Persuasive Are Ads? Cognitive Dissonance and Political Advertisements
Emily K. Vraga, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Popular Communication Poster Session
Popular Communication
Participants
112. Digital (In)Justice: Mediating Sex Panic and Online Predation
Bradley Houston Lane, Indiana U, USA
113. Domesticating Vacations: Containing Sex and Gender in Postwar Magazine Narratives
Richard K. Popp, Louisiana State U, USA
114. East Side, West Side, But Not Worldwide: The Politics of Asian Crossover in Hip-Hop Music
Myra Susan Washington, U of Illinois, USA
115. Film and Celebrity Authenticity: Mel Gibson, Apocalypto, and the Promotional Culture Industry
James H. Wittebols, U of Windsor, USA
116. Philosophical Sociopaths
Chandra Mukerji, Center for Advanced Study, USA
117. Prediction Markets: The Future as Control
Daniel H. Kim, U of Colorado, USA
118. Relocating Gamer Studies: Two Case Studies in Solitary Gaming
Adrienne Shaw, U of Pennsylvania, USA
119. The Shepherd's Play, Media Icons, Morality, Mass Entertainment, and Popular Religion in Michoacan,
Mexico
Pavel Shlossberg, Montclair State/Fairleigh Dickinson, USA
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
5452
Sunday
12:00-13:15
Halsted
Public Relations Poster Session
Public Relations
Participants
120. Developing a Publics-Driven, Emotion-Based Conceptualization in Crisis Communication: Final Stage
Testing of the Integrated Crisis Mapping (ICM) Model
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Glen T. Cameron, U of Missouri, USA
121. Public Relations in Guatemala: A Testimony of the Genesis, Development, and Challenges of a Growing
Profession
Karina Judith Garcia-Ruano, Michigan State U, USA
122. The Influence of News Sources on Health News Content: Does Localization Really Matter?
Hyejoon Rim, Syracuse U, USA
Byung Gu Lee, Syracuse U, USA
Ji Won Han, Syracuse U, USA
123. What do PR Professionals do?: Exploring the Core Factors Affecting PR Practitioners' Perceptions of Their
Job Roles in Global PR Firms in Korea
Jiyeon Jeong, U of Missouri, USA
124. Yellow Journalism and the Genesis of the Publicity Industries
Ian Kivelin Davis, U of Illinois, USA
Theme Poster Session
Theme Sessions
Participants
125. "Communication" and "Media" as "Clustering" Keywords in Raymond Williams
Paul Kelvin Jones, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
126. Deconvergence: A Shifting Business Trend in the Digital Media Industries
Dal Yong Jin, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
127. Broadcast Ratings as Audience Control Device: How Rating Work as Bureaucratic Simulation of Property
Jin Kim, U of Iowa, USA
128. Battling "The Urban" in North Hollywood
Paul Mason Fotsch, California State U - Northridge, USA
Visual Communication Studies Poster Session
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
129. Local Views and Global News: Practices of News Photography in Nairobi, Kenya
Robert Kautsky, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
130. The Impact of Honor Crime Visuals
Pinar Yildiz, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Eliza Bivolaru, Jacobs U, Bremen, GERMANY
Hana Sherin Galal, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Anna Koehler, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Hannah Scheibner, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
131. "Story Branding" in the News: Recurring Folio Banners and the Visual Grouping of Persistent Disaster
Stories
Jeffrey Cannon, Indiana U, USA
132. Visual Cues of Avatars: Credibility and Assumptions Attributed to the User
Kelly Norris Martin, North Carolina State U, USA
Nicholas Temple, North Carolina State U, USA
5501
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Grand Ballroom I
Keyword: The Interview (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Journalism Studies
Communication History
Popular Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Participants
Why Did Americans Invent the News Interview?
Michael Schudson, U of California - San Diego, USA
Repressed Origins, Schizophrenic Results: The Focused Interview in the Social and Intellectual History of
Communication
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Giving Audiences a Voice: On the Radical Potential of the Interview for Popular Communication
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
The Interview as 'Discourse'
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
The term interview indexes a family of practices that have helped shape the core of both objects and methods of study
in communication. This panel addresses that middle-range keyword in historical and cross-national perspective. It
sketches the development and dissemination of journalistic and social scientific interviews from the late nineteenth
century to the present, and considers the contemporary significance of the interview as research method, cultural
practice, and object of continued scholarly inquiry.
5510
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Illinois
Forging a Coherent Disciplinary Identity: Readings in the History of British Communication Studies
Communication History
Participants
The Institutionalisation of Communications Research in England and Its Relationship to the Media Industry: The
Case of the Centre for Mass Communications Research at the U of Leicester
David E. Morrison, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Culture From Below: The Role of Polytechnics in the Establishment of Media Studies in the UK
Paddy Scannell, U of Michigan, USA
Looking Back: A Reflection on Jim Halloran, Richard Hoggart, and the Making of the Broadcasting Research Unit
Michael Tracey, U of Colorado, USA
The Polytechnic Agenda: An Opportunity Lost?
Philip Lodge, Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel begins with the premise that 'British communication studies' is in itself a contested term, and, if it has an
agreed meaning, then it represents a fragmented disciplinary environment. The contours of this fragmented
environment were mapped historically by the circumstances which influenced the acceptance of communication as a
field of study in British tertiary education, in particular the influence of the thorough-going sociological methodology
of the members of the Centre for Mass Communication Research at the U of Leicester in the early 1960s. The tertiary
divide between older universities and polytechnics had the effect of marginalising the modern disciplines, notably
communication, into the polytechnic agenda, where it was reconfigured into a form of vocationalism. The relationship
between the sectors was and is one of historical transition and complexity, not least due to the influence of
geographical factors: north versus south; particular regions - but not recognisable schools of influence; Leicester,
Leeds, London, Birmingham. With networking at the individual level but with the lack of a national organisation, the
landscape is one of disciplinary and physical fragmentation. In this context, this panel will explore from the
perspective of key practitioners the factors which created this situation, and ask if there is still the possibility of a
unified disciplinary identity for British Communication studies.
5511
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Indiana
Current Research on Organizational Groups and Teams
Organizational Communication
Chair
Jo Ann M. Brooks, MITRE, USA
Participants
Exploring the Sequential Nature of Humor in Task Groups
Matthew Jacob Hebl, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Joshua Ray Pederson, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Rachael Hill, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Renee A. Meyers, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Simone Kauffeld, U of Braunschweig, GERMANY
Group Communication Processes in Social Support Groups: Sources of Functions and Dysfunctions
Jiyeon So, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Relationships Between Supervisory Communication and Commitment to Workgroup: A Multilevel Analysis
Approach
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara - Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
Using Multiple Technologies in Organizational Meetings: A Meso-Level Model of Contemporary Meeting
Communication
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Jennifer Deering Davis, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Linda L. Putnam, U of California, USA
5512
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Iowa
Public Opinions and Information Ecologies: Assessing the Role of the Media in Conflict Environments
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Texts in a Crisis: The Flow of Information in Postelection Ethiopia
Ignio Gagliardone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Civic Life and Information Flows in Somaliland
Nicole Stremlau, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Roles for Traditional and Mediated Communication During Times of Change in Darfur
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Anthony Foreman, Stanhope Centre for Communications Policy Research
Network Analysis as a Tool to Make Sense of Relationships and Media Use in Conflict Situations
Marya L. Doerfel, Rutgers U, USA
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
This panel explores how media and information flows influence public opinion in three complex environments in
Eastern Africa. Three of the four researchers on this panel have collected data in Ethiopia, Somaliland, and Sudan.
The fourth paper is a future directions paper tying the findings together and proposing network analysis as an
additional step in measuring interpersonal and media influences in these contexts.
5513
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Michigan
It Is Not Our Fault: Crisis Communication In Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
W. Timothy Coombs, Illinois State U, USA
Participants
Placing Crisis Management Research in Context: An Analysis and a Call for The State of Crisis Management
Research in Public Relations
Chang Dae Ham, U of Missouri, USA
Sungwook Hwang, Myongji U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Silence as Contextual and Contested: A Dual-Level Analysis of Silence in the Roman Catholic Clergy Sex Abuse
Crisis
Suzanne Elizabeth Boys, U of Cincinnati, USA
The Estimation of a Corporate Crisis Communication Based on Perceived CEO's Leadership, Perceived Severity of
Threats, and Perceived Opposing Public's Size
Sungwook Hwang, Myongji U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Through the Looking Glass: A Decade of Red Cross Crisis Response and Situational Crisis Communication Theory
Hilary Fussell Sisco, Quinnipiac U, USA
Erik Collins, U of South Carolina, USA
Lynn M. Zoch, Radford U, USA
5514
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Michigan State
Entertaining and Educating Young Children
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Educationally/Insufficient? An Analysis of the Availability and Educational Quality of Children's E/I Programming
Barbara J. Wilson, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Dale Kunkel, U of Arizona, USA
Kristin L. Drogos, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
"The Opportunity of a Lifetime": Examining the Production of Maya & Miguel
Emily S. Kinsky, Pepperdine U, USA
"They Are Kind of Like Magic": Why Parents Use Baby Videos With 12- to 24-Month-Olds
Erin Leigh Ryan, U of Alabama, USA
Can Repeat Exposure and Social Relevancy Help Infants and Toddlers Learn from Television?
Marina Krcmar, Wake Forest U, USA
Don't Sit Next to Girls! The Challenges of Fostering Tolerance via Prosocial TV Programming
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Emily Acosta, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
5515
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Minnesota
Sex, Love, Money, and Marriage
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Participants
Gay Marriage in Television News: Voice and Visual Representation in the Same-Sex Marriage Debate
Leigh M Moscowitz, College of Charleston, USA
Guy Love: A Queer Straight Masculinity for a Postcloset Era?
Ron Becker, Miami U, USA
Different Strokes: Comparing Girl-on-Girl and Dyke Cyberporn
Adrienne Shaw, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Selling Gay Friendly: Consumers and Social Movements
David Gudelunas, Fairfield U, USA
5516
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Nothwestern
International Encyclopedia Editorial Board Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Participants
Jennings Bryant, U of Alabama, USA
Klaus Bruhn Jensen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado - Boulder, USA
Hans-Bernd Brosius, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
Robert N. Gaines, U of Maryland, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
John O. Greene, Purdue U, USA
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Peter Vorderer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hans Mathias Kepplinger, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Carroll J. Glynn, Ohio State U, USA
Winfried Schulz, U Erlangen-Nurnberg, GERMANY
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rebecca B. Rubin, Kent State U, USA
Katherine Miller, Texas A&M U, USA
K. Viswanath, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U - JOMEC, UNITED KINGDOM
Debra L. Merskin, U of Oregon, USA
John Downing, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Juergen Wilke, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Janet Wasko, U of Oregon, USA
Stuart Allan, U of the West of England - Bristol, UNITED KINGDOM
Kyu Ho Youm, U of Oregon, USA
Robin Mansell, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Robert L. Heath, U of Houston, USA
Elizabeth P. Swayze, Blackwell Publishing, USA
Ken Provencher, Blackwell Publishing, USA
5517
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Ohio State
Figuring Barack Obama: Media, Politics, and Race in the Postcivil-Rights Era
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Participants
Barack Obama: The Postsoul President?
Bambi Haggins, Arizona State U, USA
Reducing Race: News Framing of Obama and Racial Issues in the 2008 Primaries
Catherine R. Squires, U of Minnesota, USA
Sarah Janel jackson, U of Minnesota, USA
Understanding Media 'Bias': Helping and Hurting Obama and McCain
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
The Containment of Whiteness: Barack Obama's 2008 Presidential Campaign as a Redemption Drama
Michael G. Lacy, Colorado State U, USA
One can hardly overstate the historic significance of Senator Barack Obama's 2008 run for the U.S. presidency. The
first African American to be nominated to the highest political office by a major political party, media coverage of
Obama's candidacy has spurred a vibrant and, for some, unprecedented exchange within the public sphere. Pollsters
and pundits alike note rising levels of public excitement and attentiveness to presidential politics suggesting that the
current moment represents a break from public apathy and disengagement that have described political culture in the
United States in recent decades. As Obama himself takes shape as an enigmatic yet absorbing figure in public
opinion, a number of questions emerge that are of particular significance for media and communication scholars.
What cultural attitudes about race, racial equality, and the American nation do we find circulating in media coverage
of Obama and his viability as a candidate? How might we trace the influences of racial mythologies inherited from
history as well as those invented in the trenches of the 2008 presidential campaigns? What confusions and
complexities do we find the Obama candidacy fomenting within circulating discourses of a "post-racial," "colorblind"
America? Approaching these questions from a variety of methodological perspectives, speakers on this panel offer
rhetorical, cultural, and news analyses animated by and responding to Barack Obama and the 2008 Presidential
campaigns as they fire up public engagement, shift voting patterns, and redraw racial allegiances in the post-civil
rights moment.
5518
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Purdue
Relational Maintenance in the Face of Challenging Circumstances
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Megan R. Dillow, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
The Effects of Equity and Maintenance Behaviors on Relational Uncertainty and Quality Indicators in Long Distance
and Geographically Close Relationships
Daniel James Canary, Arizona State U, USA
Danielle Jackson, Arizona State U, USA
Alison Alhgrim, Arizona State U, USA
Relationship Maintenance After a Residential Move: The Difference Gender Makes
Irina A. Shklovski, U of California - Irvine, USA
Robert E. Kraut, Carnegie Mellon U, USA
In the Wake of Transgressions: Forgiveness Communication, Offense Attributes, Offender Response, and
Proximal/Distal Outcomes
Andy J. Merolla, Colorado State U, USA
Shuangyue Zhang, Sam Houston State U, USA
A Meta-Analysis of Sex Differences in Responses to Sexual vs. Emotional Infidelity
Christopher John Carpenter, Michigan State U, USA
5519
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Wisconsin
Studying Preschool Audiences: Methodological Innovations and Practical Implications
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Norma Pecora, Ohio U, USA
Participants
Can Children Learn Global Citizenship From Educational Media?: An International Assessment
Shalom M. Fisch, MediaKidz Research and Consulting, USA
Yeh Hsueh, U of Memphis, USA
Maissa Hamed, Enjoy Islam, CANADA
Gabriela M. Noriega, Gemark, MEXICO
Allison Druin, Human-Computer Interaction Lab, U of Maryland, USA
Preschoolers and Their Reconstructions of Emotions, Motivations, and Narratives
Sabrina Bachmann, U of Munich, GERMANY
Fear in the Context of Family Television Viewing
Andrea Holler, International Central Institute of Youth and Educational Television, GERMANY
The 'Parent Bar' as Opportunity for Family Television Viewing
Maya Goetz, IZI International Central Institute, GERMANY
Respondent
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Preschool children are among the most sensitive target audiences for television. Therefore it is particularly important
to conduct appropriate research into providing as high-quality programming as possible, the kind which offers
children support and clarifies problem areas. Using four research examples involving preschool children, the panel
illustrates how academic research and its translation into actual television programming practice can operate. A
multimedia platform for learning global citizenship, the understanding of gestures and facial expressions of cartoon
characters, fear during television viewing within the family circle and an innovation in quality television for
preschoolers the "parent bar" have been studied. Alongside questions of content, methodological questions are
addressed.
5521
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Emotion (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Vanessa Vega, Stanford U, USA
Participants
Coactivation: An Examination on Subjective Feelings, Physiological Responses, and Adaptive Functions
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Code Switching and Consequences: Anti-Diabetes Public Service Announcements Targeting Rural Hispanics
Sungwon Chung, Texas Tech U, USA
Samuel D. Bradley, Texas Tech U, USA
Mugur Valentin Geana, U of Missouri, USA
Wendy A. Maxian, Texas Tech U, USA
Wes Wise, Texas Tech U, USA
Alex Ortiz, Texas State U, USA
Kenton T. Wilkinson, Texas Tech U, USA
L. Todd Chambers, Texas State U, USA
Robert Anthony Galvez, Texas State U, USA
Emotional Responding to Violent and Risky Video Game Content
Sarah E. Watkins, U of Alabama, USA
Johnny V. Sparks, U of Alabama, USA
Extremely Sensational, Relatively Close: Cognitive and Emotional Processing of Domestic and Foreign Sensational
Television News About Natural Disasters and Accidents
Anastasia Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
Rachel L. Bailey, U of Missouri, USA
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
Ji Yeon Jeong, U of Missouri, USA
Dynamics of Processing Emotional Political Ads
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Alyssa Morey, Ohio State U, USA
Jatin Srivastava, Ohio State U, USA
April Kruczkowski, Ohio State U, USA
Neural Effects of Exposure to Emotional Faces in Media Content: Type (Human vs. Animal), Form (Cartoon vs.
Real), and Emotion (Positive, Negative, and Neutral)
Sungkyoung Lee, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Sunah Kim, Indiana U, USA
Ryan Andrew Stevenson, Indiana U, USA
Thomas Wellington James, Indiana U, USA
The Roles of Positive Affect and Risk Perception in Risky Driving
Nancy Rhodes, Indiana U/Purdue U Indianapolis, USA
Kelly Pivik, U of Alabama, USA
Cognitive and Emotional Processing of Music
Wes Wise, Texas Tech U, USA
5523
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Great America II
Moral Values, Social Status, Stigma, and Internet: Related Communication in Four Cultures
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Douglas A. Boyd, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
A Chinese Folk Theory of Social Influence: Cultivating Moral Values in High Schools in Contemporary China
Yanrong Chang, U of Texas - Pan American, USA
The Power Shift and Rhetorical Battle: The Noblesse Oblige Discourse in the South Korean Press During 1995-2006
Tae Joon Moon, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Su Jung Kim, Northwestern U, USA
When Soutoura (Dignity, Respect, and Privacy) Matters Most: Understanding HIV/AIDS Stigma in the Family
Context in Senegal
Khadidiatou Ndiaye, Michigan State U, USA
An Exploration of the Internet Explosion in Iran and its Effects on Openness
Victoria Stodden, Harvard U, USA
Sadia Ahsanuddin, Harvard U, USA
Respondent
Rebecca Merkin, Baruch College - CUNY, USA
5530
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Offline Culture, Online Behavior
Communication and Technology
Chair
Muneo Kaigo, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Participants
New Life, Old Friends: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Communication Technology Use in Freshmen's Social Life
Mariek Vanden Abeele, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Keith Roe, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
The Relationship Between the Information Request and Information Privacy: A Comparative Analysis of Web Sites
Based in Korea and the United States
Jiyoung Cha, U of Flordia, USA
Youth 2 Youth: Changing Palestinian-American Images and Stereotypes Through Facebook
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Journalism School, U of Missouri, USA
Are Highly Tailored Messages Always More Effective? The Influence of Cultural Psychology on Web-Based
Customization
Cong Li, U of Miami, USA
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
5531
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Mobility, Media, and Everyday Life: An Interdisciplinary Framework for Communications
Communication and Technology
Chair
Joachim Robert Hoeflich, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Isabel Schlote, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Christine Ursula Dietmar, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Habitualized Mobility
Georg Florian Kircher, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Communication and Mobility: Communication Technology in Travel Situations
Isabel Schlote, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Mobile Relationships: Communication Technologies in Families' Everyday Life
Christine Ursula Dietmar, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Mobile communication technology has become a natural part of everyday life. On this account communication
research should focus on the impacts the use of mobile media has on existing (media) situations. This panel therefore
centers three keywords in communication: Mobility, Media, and Everyday Life and offers an integrative theoretical
framework for communication. All three presentations will contribute empirical based arguments to the framework
which will be focused in the interactive panel discussion.
5532
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Gender and Politics
Political Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Krysha Gregorowicz, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
From First Lady to Presidential Candidate: How Have the Media Framed the Image of Hillary Rodham Clinton?
Shih-Hsien Hsu, U of Texas, USA
Gender in Political News Reportage: Messenger and Message
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Lelia Samson, Indiana U, USA
Narine S. Yegiyan, U of California - Davis, USA
Asta Zelenkauskaite, Indiana U, USA
Gender, Emotion, and Politics: A Comparison of National Press Coverage of Female Political Leaders' Emotional
Management
Ingrid Bachmann, U of Texas, USA
To Cry or Not to Cry: Media Framing of Hillary Clinton in the Wake of the New Hampshire Primary
Daniela V. Dimitrova, Iowa State U, USA
Elizabeth Geske, Iowa State U, USA
Respondent
Marian J. Meyers, Georgia State U, USA
5533
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Public Deliberation and the Engaged Citizenry: "Democracy" as a Keyword in the Internet Age
Theme Sessions
Chair
Marco Adria, U of Alberta, CANADA
Participants
Laura W. Black, Ohio U, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Maria Bakardjieva, U of Calgary, CANADA
Yuping Mao, U of Alberta, CANADA
Public deliberation is the direct involvement of citizens in making decisions on behalf of society after due
consideration of alternative courses of action and using rational methods of analysis. It may be distinguished from the
simple feedback mechanisms of media programming (such as phone-in radio shows, television talk shows, and web
polls), because as Habermas points out, these well-known methods are formalized, emphasize etiquette, and seek to
avoid substantive conflict. The Internet provides citizens with new access to information about public institutions.
Public processes for participation have not kept pace with this increase in information. This panel will consider public
deliberation from a number of perspectives. Public deliberation online allows members of the public to become more
knowledgeable about social and political issues in ways that are both straightforward and subtle. The panelists will
discuss current scholarship in the area, including the results from three large studies that suggest that online
deliberation may lead to more varied argument repertoire, more informed opinion, and increased discrimination
among policy decisions.
5534
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Diffusion of Innovations: Retrospective and the Future
Mass Communication
Chair
Robert G. Magee, Virginia Tech, USA
Participants
Diffusion of Innovations: Integration and Media-Related Extensions of This Communication Keyword
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
From the Diffusion of Innovations to a General Model for Opinion Formation
David P. Fan, U of Minnesota, USA
Haoyu Yu, U of Minnesota, USA
Viral Marketing: Industry Insiders' Insight on the Impact of Diffusion, Variation, and Selective Retention
Troy Elias, Ohio State U, USA
Stacy Malden, Ohio State U, USA
Tiphane Deas, Ohio State U, USA
Alternative Platforms and the Audience: Exploring the Predictors in the Audience's Adoption of Online Media
Platforms
Yan Yang, U of Florida, USA
Sylvia M. Chan-Olmsted, U of Florida, USA
5535
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
Media Representations
Mass Communication
Chair
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
Participants
Equal Rights for Women: Representations in British and American Popular Press, 1968-1982
Kaitlynn D Mendes, U of Nottingham, UNITED KINGDOM
Exploratory Analysis of Photographic Imagery as Used in Irish Printed Daily Newspapers
Michael J. Breen, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Grace O'Sullivan, U of Limerick, IRELAND
Media Representation of Suicide in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China: A Comparative Study
KW Fu, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Media Representations of Appalachian Poverty: Culture or Capital; Corruption or Coal?
Lawrence Wood, Ohio U, USA
Melissa Hendricks, Ohio U - USA
5536
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
The Politics of Commercial Culture
Popular Communication
Chair
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Participants
Empowerment Through Endorsement? Polysemic Meaning in Dove User-Generated Advertising
Brooke Erin Duffy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Expressing the Self Through Sentiment: Working Theories of Authentic Communication in a Commercial Form
Emily Elizabeth West, U of Massachusetts, USA
Baby Boomers: Marketing and Collective Memory
Karen E. Riggs, Ohio U, USA
Do Fans Own Digital Comic Books?: Examining the Copyright and Intellectual Property Attitudes of Comic Book
Fans
J. Richard Stevens, U of Colorado, USA
Christopher Bell, U of Colorado, USA
The Body Politic: T-Shirts From the 2008 Presidential Campaign
Joel Penney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
"Freedom - So Easy to Choose, So Easy to Abuse": Degrassi Talks About Canada in a Moment of Neoliberalization
Elizabeth Ault, U of Minnesota, USA
5537
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
News as Business
Journalism Studies
Organizational Communication
Chair
Adrienne Russell, U of Denver, USA
Participants
Channel One TV News Coverage in 2004 and 2008: The Framing of Protestors and Presidential Campaign Issues
Under Two Different Owners and Conditions
Anne Golden Worsham, Brigham Young U, USA
Corporate Newspapers, Global Warming, and Editorial Vigor Hypothesis
Taehyun Kim, California State U Northridge, USA
Monopoly Offline and Oligopoly Online: An Empirical Analysis of U.S. Newspapers' Local Online Market Structure
Mengchieh Jacie Yang, U of Texas, USA
The News Organization in Uncertain Times: Business or Institution?
Wilson Hugh Lowrey, U of Alabama, USA
Chang Wan Woo, U of Alabama, USA
Respondent
Bella Mody, U of Colorado, USA
5541
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Houston
Communication in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Health Communication
Chair
Jessie M. Quintero Johnson, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Refining Health Risk Communication Strategies: An Analysis of Avian Influenza Communication Campaigns in
Egypt, 2005-2008
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg, USA
Mixing It Up: Investigating Engagement in Multiple Vector-Control Behaviors to Prevent Malaria in Mozambique
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Scott Hull, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Danielle Catona, The College of New Jersey, USA
The Persuasiveness of Exemplars and Message Framing in Promoting Healthy Behaviors
Jia Lu, Florida State U, USA
Visual Attention to Nutrition Information on Food Products: The Influence of Motivation and Ability
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland, USA
Lucinda L. Austin, U of Maryland, USA
Meryl Brooke Lubran, U of Maryland, USA
Sejal Patel, U of Maryland, USA
Christine Skubisz, U of Maryland, USA
5542
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Kansas City
Perceptions and Realities of Media Bias
Political Communication
Chair
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Participants
Hostile Media Perception in the Politics of Global Warming
Kyun Soo Kim, Grambling State U, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Moderator Bias in the Television Coverage of an Election Campaign With No Political Advertising
Magne M. Haug, Norwegian School of Management BI, NORWAY
Haavard Koppang, Norwegian School of Management BI, NORWAY
Jan Svennevig, U of Oslo, NORWAY
The Extreme Right and Its Media in Italy
Cinzia Padovani, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Perceptions of Partisan Bias in a News Article
Natalie Jomini Stroud, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Respondent
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
5543
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Los Angeles
Experiencing Place in and Through Popular Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Itinerant Experts or Tourists With Typewriters: Creative Labour in the Making of Travel Guidebooks
Ana Alacovska, Copenhagen Buiness School, DENMARK
Places of the Imagination. An Ethnography of the TV Detective Tour
Stijn Reijnders, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Protecting Place From Politics: The "Re-Placement" of George W. Bush in Texas Monthly Magazine
Susan Currie Sivek, California State U, Fresno, USA
Relieving History: Altering 'Place' and 'Space' at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Canada
Piotr Michal Szpunar, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Exploring Self Through the Other: Reception of Foreign Programming in a Developing Nation
Charu Uppal, U of South Pacific, FIJI
5544
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Miami
New Directions in Media Theory
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Andreas Hepp, U of Bremen - IMKI, GERMANY
Participants
Some Theoretical Foundations of Critical Media Studies: Karl Marx's Philosophy of Communication
Christian Fuchs, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
Social Contagion: A Communicable Approach To Communication
Chris Russill, U of Minnesota, USA
Theorizing and Historicizing the Media Dependence Model
Andrew C. Kennis, U of Illinois, USA
Whispering: The Murmur of Power in a Lo-Fi World
Xinghua Li, U of Iowa, USA
Respondent
Andreas Hepp, U of Bremen - IMKI, GERMANY
Recent media theory has concentrated heavily on digitalization, but there is not the only direction in which media
theory can renew itself. This panel brings together work on both the spread of ideas and media dependency, on Karl
Marx as a neglected communication theorist and on the neglected valence of whispering (the last being the Division's
top student paper).
5545
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Scottsdale
Fake News: International Perspectives on the Intermeshing of Entertainment and Politics
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Gabriele Cosentino, New York U, USA
Participants
Grappling With Fake News: Beyond the Real/Unreal Dichotomy
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Silly Citizenship: Comedy Journalism and the Democratization of Newsmaking
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
"Find Out Exactly What to Think, After this Break": News Satire and Symbolic Power
Graham Meikle, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
The Comical Inquisition: Political News on Italian Television in the Age of Entertainment
Gabriele Cosentino, New York U, USA
This panel offers a cross-national examination of fake news content in different formats, taking examples from the
United States, Italy, England and Australia. The aim is to evaluate the larger implications of this phenomenon within
modern liberal democracies, in particular by analyzing its structural relation with specific political-economic
conditions and by observing the models of political representation and citizenship the genre articulates. The panel
thus interrogates the increasing popularity of fake news programs by moving beyond their immediately visible
function of satirizing institutional actors and information sources. The panelists' main goal is to contribute to an
understanding of the functioning of the fake news genre as an emerging legitimate space for political discourse, in
particular by corroborating the current body of knowledge with an array of international case studies.
5551
Sunday
13:30-14:45
Belmont
Visual Expertise/Education and Issues of Globalization and Popularization
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Giorgia Aiello, Colorado State U, USA
Participants
The Effect of Media Literacy Education on Susceptibility to Media Bias
Elisha Babad, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Eyal Peer, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Renee Hobbs, Temple U, USA
Global Visual Communication: Cross-Cultural Visual Expressions on Global Cultural Artifacts and Events
Andrzej Antoni Gwizdalski, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Triangulation of Methods: The Key to Analyze Visuals and Production Contexts
Stefanie Pannier, U Ludwigsburg, GERMANY
Jeldrik Pannier, U Ludwigsburg, GERMANY
Toward a Simple Science: Comparing Popular Visual and Verbal Science Messages in Meteorology
Gina M. Eosco, U of Oklahoma, USA
5601
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Grand Ballroom I
Key Visuals: Concepts, Methods, and Theories (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Visual Communication Studies
Political Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Communication and Technology
Chair
Peter H. Ludes, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Participants
Key Visuals as Public Art: Images, Allegories, Spectators
Robert Hariman, Northwestern U, USA
Magnum Photos and the New Europeans: Key Visual Resources for a Transnational Identity in the Making
Giorgia Aiello, Colorado State U, USA
Iconic Image Bites as Key Visuals
Erik P. Bucy, Indiana U, USA
The World Language of Key Visuals
Peter H. Ludes, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
In the process of multimedia globalization a pool of both culturally specific and global "Key Visuals" has been
established. Key Visuals may originate from very diverse fields like journalism, entertainment, science, politics, art,
technology, or popular culture. They can be indexed according to the type(s) of media, the time horizons and scopes
of viewerships, are canonized in outstanding mediated events and can have a dramatic impact on co-orienting and
coordinating social activities beyond any verbal communication. These multifaceted dimensions of visualizing and
imagining key components of public, intermediate, and private spheres require a review of the state of key visual
concepts, methods, and theories as well as a preview of future challenges. This cross-unit panel (Visual
Communication Studies Division, Political Communication Division, Global Communication / Social Change
Division, Communication and Technology Division), examines these key visuals and their impact from diverse
conceptual, methodological and theoretical angles.
5610
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Illinois
Communication History: Technologies, Cohesion and Dissent
Communication History
Chair
Carolyn Marvin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Battling Evil-Doers: Visual Education and the Antifly Crusade of 1910
Bill Marsh, CUNY - Queensborough, USA
Rhetorics Of Dynamite
Karen Allison Sichler, U of Georgia, USA
The Part Played by Bells in the Emergence of American National Consciousness (Top Student Paper)
Deborah Lubken, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Wanamaker Wireless Stations and the Origins of Electronic Media, 1910 - 1920
Noah Arceneaux, San Diego State U, USA
The "Age of Super-Contact": Communication, Machines, and Mobility in the Interwar United States
Richard K. Popp, Louisiana State U, USA
Respondent
Carolyn Marvin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The papers included in this session involve varying approaches (obliquely or directly) to the history of
communication technology. Moving beyond mere discursive constructions of technology, we find a wealth of
approaches to this important topic.
5611
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Indiana
Top 3 Papers in Organizational Communication
Organizational Communication
Chair
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Communication Policies in the Workplace: Tensions Surrounding Identifiability and Anonymity of Technology Users
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Scott Seung Woo Choi, Michigan State U, USA
Discourses, Imagination, and Material Realities: Children in the United States and China Talk About Work
Brenda L. Berkelaar, Purdue U, USA
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
The Innovation Imperative: How the Managerial Discourse of Creativity/Innovation Shapes Worldviews, Organizing
Practices, and Work-Based Identities in the Knowledge Economy
Mark Holt, U of North Carolina, USA
Respondent
Stanley A. Deetz, U of Colorado, USA
5612
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Iowa
Mexican Communication Research Today: Theoretical and Methodological Issues
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
Challenges for the Mexican Communication Policies and Regulations within the Context of the Security and
Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP)
Maria de la Luz Casas-Perez, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Cuernavaca, MEXICO
Audiences and Screens: The New, the Old, and the Forthcoming
Guillermo Orozco-Gomez, U of Guadalajara, MEXICO
Communication Research in Mexico: Institutionalization and Professionalization
Raul Fuentes-Navarro, ITESO U, MEXICO
For the Human Rights of Women and Girls: The Social Representation of Violence of Gender in the Mexican Media
Agenda
Aimee Vega, UNAM, MEXICO
Respondent
Dan Hallin, BINACOM - Binational Assoc. of Schls of Comm of the Californias, USA
With the participation of renowned Mexican scholars in the field of media and communication studies, this panel
provides an overview of the topics, theoretical approaches, methodological strategies and findings of Mexican
research today. The papers discuss general trends as well as the strengths and limitations of theoretical
approximations and empirical work in the areas of political economy, media and cultural studies and mass
communication in Mexico. Through the discussion of their recent work, the participants will provide insight about
some trends in Mexican communication research today, the conceptual approaches and the research techniques
predominant in the studies, the lines of research more relevant in the country, and the obstacles and shortcomings of
contemporary research in the country. The panel provides an overview of current work in one of the most important
and influential Latin American countries.
5613
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Michigan
Leadership and Roles In Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Bey-Ling Sha, San Diego State U, USA
Participants
Excellent Leadership in Public Relations: An Integrating Conceptual Framework
Juan Meng, U of Alabama, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
Karla K. Gower, U of Alabama, USA
Perception Discrepancy of Public Relations Roles and Conflict Among Disciplines: Comparing Public Relations and
Marketing Practitioners
Jinhong Ha, U of Florida, USA
Daewook Kim, U of Florida, USA
Gender, Leadership, and Teams: Examining Female Leadership in Public Relations from a New Perspective
Hua Jiang, U of Maryland, USA
Emotional Leadership as a Key Dimension of Public Relations Leadership: A National Survey of Public Relations
Leaders in the U.S.
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
5614
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Michigan State
Global Communication Textbook Needs for Present and Future Communication and Journalism Curricula
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Richard C Vincent, Indiana State U, USA
Participants
Global Communication and Its Transition From a Craft to a Social Science
Richard C Vincent, Indiana State U, USA
American Hegemony and Countertrends in the Media
Tom McPhail, U Of Missouri, St Louis, USA
Description and Prediction: Understanding Global Communication
John C. Merrill, U of Missouri, USA
Internationalizing the Study of International Communication: A Critique of the Epistemological Limitations of the
Study of International Communication
Daya Thussu, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Finding Order in a Fragmented Field: Curriculum and Textbook Development for International Communication
Dennis K. Davis, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Respondent
Douglas A. Boyd, U of Kentucky, USA
Writing the Global/International Communication textbook can be quite a challenge. Global Communication has long
been featured as coursework in many Communication and Journalism Departments, but we continue to debate which
philosophical foundations should guide such a course, as well what content should be featured. The course varies
greatly depending on 1) in which program the course is offered—Communication, Mass Media, Telecommunications
or Journalism, 2) where in the world the course may be taught—United States, Europe, the Developing World, etc.,
and 3) the instructor's educational and professional background. In early years, efforts to provide students with an
overview of Global Communication often resulted in a comparative examination of certain national approaches to
media practices, structures and regulation. About two decades ago, we saw a marked shift in focus away from the
"comparative" media approach in favor of a newer "umbrella" model. Under the new model, greater emphasis was
placed on culture and politics and media systems were deemphasized. The purpose of the panel is to discuss the
advantages and disadvantages of the various perspectives with disciplinary future as well as student needs in mind.
Panelists will explore the many factors that have influenced Global Communication education which range from
industry needs to societal demands. The effectiveness of the various disciplinary approaches will be examined. The
ultimate purpose is to better understand the dilemma that faces Global Communication education today, and
formulate solutions which may rectify the curricular problem.
5615
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Minnesota
"...And Communications for All:" A Policy Agenda for the New Administration
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Amit M Schejter, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Digital Media, Modern Democracy, and Our Truncated National Debate
Ernest J. Wilson III, U of Southern California, USA
Public Scholarship and the Communications Policy Agenda
Robert W. McChesney, U of Illinois, USA
International Benchmarks: The Crisis in U.S. Communications Policy Through a Comparative Lens
Amit M Schejter, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Rethinking the Media Ownership Policy Agenda
Philip M. Napoli, Fordham U, USA
America's Forgotten Challenge: Rural Access
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
Creating a Media Policy Agenda for the Digital Generation
Kathryn C. Montgomery, American U, USA
This panel highlights the work of 16 policy researchers from 11 American universities (6 will take part in this
presentation) that put together a comprehensive agenda for the new federal administration to be entering office in
January 2009. The work of the group was funded by the Media Democracy Fund, is to be published as an edited
volume by Lexington Books on the week of the new President's inauguration, and will be launched in Washington
D.C., with the participation of Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein of the FCC and Gene Kimmelman, Vice President
of Consumers Union. The policy prescriptions offered by this group take into account the current crisis plaguing U.S.
communications policy, and offer a path which policymakers should take in order to support a future in which the
United States will reclaim its position as a leader, trendsetter and inovator in the field while ensuring an emphasis is
put on the potential of information technologies for improving democratic discourse, social responsibility, and the
quality of life, and on the means by which information technologies can be made available to all Americans. Indeed,
policy alone will not suffice, but it is an indispensable tool in this effort. The presentations in the panel will address
background theoretical concerns, a discussion of the role of academics in public life, a comparison of American
communication policies with those of European and Asian powerhouses, and policy prescriptions in three of the
topics covered in the book: rural connectivity, media ownership and children in the digital age.
5616
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Nothwestern
Race and Identity Matters to Feminists
Feminist Scholarship
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Sung-Yeon Park, Bowling Green State U, USA
Participants
Domesticating Diversity, Negotiating Feminism: The Liberal Capitalist Public Sphere of "The View"
Rebecca Jurisz, U of Minnesota, USA
Beauty Through the Eyes of Cosmetics: The Construction of Beautiful Faces Through Cosmetic Advertising in Black
Magazines
Wanjiru Mbure, U of Missouri, USA
The Third-Person Effect in Israeli Women's Attitude to TV Commercials and Their Images
Sigal Barak Brandes, The School of Media Studies, College of Management Academic Studies, Israel.,
ISRAEL
M.I.A.: A Production Analysis of Musical Subversion
Meenakshi Gigi Durham, U of Iowa, USA
5617
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Ohio State
Information Technology and Media Literacy in the Classroom
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Diane Millette, U of Miami, USA
Participants
Student Perceptions of Broadband Visual Communication Technology in the Virtual Classroom: A Case Study
Bruno Emond, National Research Council, CANADA
Heather Ann Molyneaux, National Research Council, CANADA
John Spence, National Research Council, CANADA
Martin Brooks, National Research Council, CANADA
It Looks So Cool to Use Podcast!: Exploring Motivations, Gratifications, and Attitudes Toward Using Podcasts
Among College Students
Mun-Young Chung, Kansas State U, USA
Hyang Sook Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
YouTube and Media Literacy: Testing the Effectiveness of YouTube Media Literacy Campaigns About Body Image
Targeted Toward Adolescent Girls and College Women
Juan Meng, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
Exploring the Role of Need for Cognition in Media Literacy Education: From Gratifications Sought to Learning
Outcomes
Hans Martens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
5618
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Purdue
Experiences in Developing Relationships: Satisfaction, Trust, Skepticism, and Lies
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Grace Leigh Anderson, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Communication Qualities, Quantity, Satisfaction, and Talk Impact in Newly Developing Relationships: A
Longitudinal Analysis
Amy S. Ebesu Hubbard, U of Hawaii, USA
Krystyna S. Aune, U of Hawaii, USA
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
A Healthy Dose of Trust: Communicating Trust Improves Health in Romantic Relationships
Iris K. Schneider, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Caryl E. Rusbult, Vrije U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Testing Error Management Theory: Two Tests of the Commitment Skepticism Bias and the Sexual Overperception
Bias
David Dryden Henningsen, Northern Illinois U, USA
Mary Lynn Miller Henningsen, Northern Illinois U, USA
The Prevalence of Everyday Lies
Kim B. Serota, Michigan State U, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Franklin J. Boster, Michigan State U, USA
5619
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Wisconsin
Top Four Papers From the Language & Social Interaction Division
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Robert E. Sanders, SUNY - Albany, USA
Participants
Announced Refusal to Answer: A Study of Norms and Accountability in Broadcast Political Interviews
Mats Erik Ekstrom, Orebro U, SWEDEN
How Limiting Linguistic Freedoms Influences the Cultural Adaptation Process: An Analysis of the French-Muslim
Population
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Keywords in Interaction: Grammatical and Interactional Projections of Discourse Markers
Yael Maschler, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Patients' Enactment of Normative Stances Toward Reported Substance Use Conduct: Managing Identity During
Routine History Taking
Paul M. Denvir, U at Albany, USA
Respondent
Robert E. Sanders, SUNY - Albany, USA
5621
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Lincolnshire II
International Federation of Communication Associations (IFCA) - Business Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrick Roessler, DGPuk - Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Publizistik-, GERMANY
Participant
Nina Reiswich, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Representatives of the International Federation of Communication Associations (IFCA) meet and discuss current
affairs of networking and collaboration.
5623
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Great America II
Corporate Social Responsibility, Serial Argument, Discussion Network: Crosscultural Comparisons
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Ming-Yi Wu, Western Illinois U, USA
Participants
A Cross-Cultural Approach to Serial Arguing in Dating Relationships: The Case of Malagasy Romantic Partners
Marie Louise Radanielina Hita, U of Georgia, USA
A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices in America and China
Christine Ray, U of Tennessee, USA
Lu Tang, U of Tennessee, USA
Michelle T. Violanti, U of Tennessee, USA
Core Discussion Networks in Japan and America
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
Kenichi Ikeda, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Cross-Cultural Differences in Approach-Avoidance Communication in South Korea and the U.S.
Rebecca Merkin, Baruch College - CUNY, USA
Respondent
Mary Jiang Bresnahan, Michigan State U, USA
The session include comparative studies between two or more cultures on specific communication aspects.
5630
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Self Presentation, Representation, and Affiliation
Communication and Technology
Chair
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Explicating and Applying Boundary Conditions in Theories of Behavior on Social Network Sites
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Uses of Brands and Objects in Virtual World Social Interaction: An Analysis of Long Interviews With Game Players
Sara Steffes Hansen, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Measuring Instant Messaging: Chatting vs. Being Signed In
Mariek Vanden Abeele, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Keith Roe, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Will You Be My Friend? An Exploration of Adolescent Friendship Formation Online in Teen Second Life
Brooke Foucault, Northwestern U, USA
Mengxiao Zhu, Northwestern U, USA
Yun Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Zeina Atrash, Northwestern U, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
5631
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Physical and Emotional Health Online
Communication and Technology
Chair
Yan Tian, U of Missouri - St Louis, USA
Participants
Utilization of Evidence Strategies by Breast Cancer Websites Targeting Diverse Audiences
Pamela S. Whitten, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Sandi Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Carolyn Kay LaPlante, Michigan State U, USA
Promoting Exercise Self-Efficacy With an Exergame: The Effect of Seeing Oneself Onscreen Among Individuals
With High vs. Low Body Image Dissatisfaction
Hayeon Song, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Examining Effective Use of an Interactive Health Communication System (IHCS)
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
The "Face" of Facebook: Emotional Responses During Social Networking
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Journalism School, U of Missouri, USA
Jeremy Littau, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Petya Dimitrova Eckler, U of Missouri, USA
Anastasia Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
5632
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
Protest, Conflict and Social Action
Political Communication
Chair
Eytan Gilboa, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Participants
Calibrating Social Movement Rhetorical Theory: The Politics of Loving Kindness Amidst the Exigencies in Burma
(Top Student Paper)
Craig M. Pinkerton, Ohio U, USA
Peace Communication: A Call for a New Approach in Peacebuilding
Hannah Neumann, Technical U - Ilmenau, GERMANY
Martin J. Emmer, Illmenau U of Technology, GERMANY
Jens Wolling, Ludwig-Maximilians-U Munchen, GERMANY
Presidential Rationales for War From WWII to Iraq: Consistency or Variation?
Kevin Coe, U of Arizona, USA
Social Movements, Political Goals, and the May 1st Marches: Communicating Protest in Polysemic Media
Environments
Louisa Edgerly, U of Washington, USA
Amoshaun Toft, U of Washington, USA
Mary Lynn Veden, U of Washington, USA
Respondent
Eytan Gilboa, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
5633
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
Mediatization as an Integrative Concept for Political Communication Research
Political Communication
Chair
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Participants
Mediatization of Politics: A Conceptual Framework
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Mediatization of Political Reality
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Mediatization of Political Organizations
Patrick Donges, IPMZ - U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Mediatization of Political Decision-Making Processes
Frank Marcinkowski, U Munster - D, GERMANY
Respondent
Gianpietro Mazzoleni, U of Milan, ITALY
The panel discusses the theoretical value as well as the empirical evidence of mediatization as an analytical and
integrative concept for political communication research. Mediatization describes a distinctive stage in the long-term
development of contemporary mass democracies in which many political processes have grown more or less
dependent on the mass media and their specific media logic. In contrast to models of a one-sided dependency, the
concept of mediatization focuses on the dynamic interaction and complex interdependence in the media/politics
relationships on various levels and dimensions. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between the more dynamic
and complex concept of "mediatization of politics" and the more descriptive and static concept of "mediated politics".
But in order to cope with the complexity and interdependency, it is important to formulate clear theoretical
assumptions and derive clear empirical indicators to measure the degree of mediatization on different levels.
5634
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Top Four Papers in Mass Communication
Mass Communication
Chair
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
The Great FCC Blue Book Debate: Determining the Role of Broadcast Media in a Democratic Society, 1945-1949
Victor W. Pickard, U of Illinois, USA
The Evolution of Media Effects Theory: Fifty Years of Cumulative Research
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
Lauren Guggenheim, U of Michigan, USA
Testing Causal Direction in the Influence of Presumed Media Influence
Nurit Talor, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
The Influence of Morality Subcultures on the Acceptance and Appeal of Violence
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Matthew Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Kenneth Alan Lachlan, Boston College, USA
Respondent
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
5635
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Korean American Communication Association Research Panel
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Sungeun Chung, Western Illinois U, USA
Participants
Third Person Effect in Relation to Media Coverage of Virginia Tech Shooting Incident in April of 2007
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Doshik Yun, Michigan State U, USA
Hye Jeong Choi, Michigan State U, USA
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii - Manoa, USA
Dong Wook Lee, Cheju National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Ji Young Ahn, Chung-Ang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Possibility of Establishing Universal Mobile Phone Service Policy: The Case of South Korea
Hyunwoo Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
A Comparative Study of the N-Generation's Mobile Phone Use: Between the U.S. and Korean Society
Sun Kyong Lee, Rutgers U, USA
The Role of the Internet for Civil Action: The Case of Candlelight Rallies Against U.S. Beef Imports in South Korea
Jinae Kang, U of Alabama, USA
Seon-Kyoung An, U of Alabama, USA
Kyun Soo Kim, Grambling State U, USA
Kyung Yoon Kwak, Sogang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Influence of Famousness of Bloggers on Their Sociopolitical Participation
Nohil Noh Park, U of Missouri, USA
Ji Yeon Jeong, U of Missouri, USA
Jung Ho Han, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Korean American Communication Association continues the tradition of presenting state-of-the-art research
endeavors relating to various Korea-related communication themes.
5636
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Popular Communication Keynote Panel: Studying Popular Communication in its Global and Transnational
Context
Popular Communication
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Studying Popular Communication Globally: Politics and Contention
Marwan M. Kraidy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
International Communication and Geohistorical Explanation
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Creating Transnational Popular Culture Genres: The 60-Year Rise of the Telenovela
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Internationalizing Media Studies in the West: Skyping, Blogging, and YouTubing to Inclusion
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Television and Popular Culture in the Digital Public Sphere
Jostein Gripsrud, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Pop, Queer, Asia
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Popular Communication is global communication: in the face of media convergence traditional boundaries of national
communication maintained and enforced through national broadcasters and publishing houses, both reflective of the
mercantile formation of the nation state and its institutional power, are increasingly eroded and crossed. Economic
globalization driven by the capitalist imperative of market expansion in term has fuelled the concentration of media
and cultural industries on supernational levels, leading to the formation of distinct cores and peripheries in the
production of popular communication around the globe. This economic globalization of media and cultural industries
in turn is furthered by political forces of deregulation and free trade which have facilitated the transationalization and
diversification of national and local media markets. Migration driven by social and economic macro foces has in turn
further challenged national boundaries in popular communication through the formation of diasporic and hybrid
cultures. This keynote panel aims to explore the interplay between popular communication and forces of globalization
and trasnsnationalization and to assess its impact on media production and consumption. The panel will therefore
addresses fundamental concerns of popular communication research including questions of gender and sexuality, of
participation and the public sphere, nationalism and regionalism, the impact of new media, Western hegemony and
modernity. In this analysis the roundtable builds on the 2008 Popular Communication keynote panel by assessing the
methodological and conceptual challenges of Popular Communication in the 21st century.
5637
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
Framing the News
Journalism Studies
Chair
Eno Akpabio, U of Botswana, BOTSWANA
Participants
The EU Constitution in the News: Cross-National Analysis of News Frames in the Quality Press
Anna Van Cauwenberge, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Dave Gelders, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Willem Joris, K.U. Leuven, BELGIUM
The Interactive Newspaper: Online Multimedia and the Framing of the Iraq War (Top Three Graduate Student Paper)
Bartosz Wojtek Wojdynski, U of North Carolina, USA
Keywords and Frames as Related Tools of Analysis
Sandrine Boudana, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Fragmented Globalization, Contested Realities: American and Indian Newspaper Coverage of the Outsourcing Issue
Bhuvana Narayanamurthy, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Paul D'Angelo, College of New Jersey, USA
5641
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Houston
Health Communciation Top Four Papers
Health Communication
Chair
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Participants
Audience Segmentation as a Social Marketing Tool in Health Promotion: Use of the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA)
Framework in HIV Prevention in Malawi
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Jane Brown, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Glory Mkandawire, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Lisa Folda, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Kirsten Patricia Bose, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Predicting Pediatricians' Communication With Parents About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine: An
Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action
Anthony J. Roberto, Arizona State U, USA
Janice Lee Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Mira L Katz, Ohio State U, USA
Ryan Christopher Goei, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Parul Jain, Ohio State U, USA
Addressing the Slow Uptake of HIV Testing in Malawi: The Role of Stigma, Self-Efficacy, and Knowledge in the
Malawi BRIDGE Project
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Sima Berendes, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Glory Mkandawire, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Kirsten Patricia Bose, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Jane Brown, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Lisa Folda, Johns Hopkins U, USA
On the Role of Campaigns in Reducing, Maintaining, or Widening Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviors
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
5642
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Kansas City
The Press and the Political Establishment: Toward a Better Understanding of Political Journalism
Political Communication
Chair
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Participants
Marking Journalistic Independence: Official Dominance and the Rule of Product Substitution in Swedish Press
Coverage
Adam Mahmoud Shehata, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Members of Parliament, Equal Competitors for Media Attention? An Analysis of Personal Contacts Between MPs
and Political Journalists in Five European Countries
Peter Van Aelst, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
Adam Mahmoud Shehata, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Arjen Van Dalen, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Press Exceptionalism: An Analysis of Technology and Event-Driven Reporting, The "CNN Effect," and Press
Independence in Relation to the Hegemonic Models of News Media Analysis
Andrew C. Kennis, U of Illinois, USA
Press-Party Parallelism Regarding "Openness of Agriculture" During Three Political Regimes (1993-2008) in South
Korea
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
Poong Oh, Iowa State U, USA
Youngchul Yoon, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
5643
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Los Angeles
New Networks, New Dialogues: Digital Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Corporate Environmental Responsibility and Website: A Content Analysis of 2007 Fortune Global 500 Companies
Websites
Daejoong Kim, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Sinuk Kang, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Yoonjae Nam, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Microdialogues in Cyberspace: McDonalds Blogging Efforts in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility
Online
Matthes Fleck, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Johannes Christian Fieseler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Tubers Talk: Examining the Comments on Presidential YouTube Videos Using Dialogic Theory
Kristin Nicole English, U of Georgia, USA
Webbed Public Diplomacy: Examining the Dialogic Features of U.S. Embassy Web Sites in the Western Hemisphere
Maria De Moya, U of Florida, USA
Jooyun Hwang, U of Florida, USA
5644
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Miami
Media as Environment
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Karen E. Riggs, Ohio U, USA
Participants
"Total Decentring, Total Community": The Googleplex and Informational Culture
Fredrik Stiernstedt, Sodertom U, SWEDEN
Peter Jakobsson, Södertörn U, SWEDEN
The Lifeworld, Systematic Distortion, and the Problem of Intelligibility in Habermas's Theory of Communicative
Action
Shazia Iftkhar, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Toward a Pervasive Communication Environment Perspective
Ted Matthew Coopman, San Jose State U, USA
Rerepresenting Space: Critical Junctures in the Production of Early Radio and Broadband
Kathleen Frazer Oswald, North Carolina State U, USA
Respondent
Karen E. Riggs, Ohio U, USA
This session brings together theoretical and empirical perspectives on how media provides us with a lifeworld or last
an environment for living adn working, covering both historical research and contemporary transformations from
early radio to the 'googleplex'
5645
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Scottsdale
ECREA Panel - Debating 'Quality' in Communication Research: Publications
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles ULB, BELGIUM
Participants
John Downing, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Denis McQuail, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Kaarle Nordenstreng, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Jan E. Servaes, U of Massachusetts, USA
Linda L. Putnam, U of California, USA
Academic institutions worldwide are under increasing pressure to comply with norms and requirements regarding the
"quality" of their research. The "audit culture" is often imposed upon research communities on the basis of crude and
standardized sets of criteria derived from other contexts. Research in social science and humanities is being
increasingly evaluated using quantitative indicators that often appear unfit and were not debated within the
community. This panel will discuss one particular area of quality assessment, that of academic publications. The
criteria and the rationale of journals ranking will be debated, with a view to understand how new means of
dissemination will reconfigure the issue. Indications about how these issues are perceived by the research community
will be presented. Panel hosted by: the ECREA, IAMCR and ICA joint Working Group on Quality in Communication
Research and Education.
5651
Sunday
15:00-16:15
Belmont
Game Studies Top Papers
Game Studies
Chair
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
How Can Wii Learn From Video Games? Examining Relationships Between Technological Affordances &
Sociocognitive Determinates on Affective and Behavioral Outcomes.
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Multimodality and Interactivity: Connecting Properties of Serious Games With Educational Outcomes
Ute Ritterfeld, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
Hua Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Luciano Nocera, U of Southern California, USA
Wee Ling Wong, U of Southern California, USA
Mood Management and Highly Interactive Video Games: An Experimental Examination of Wii Playing on Mood
Change and Enjoyment
Yen-Shen Chen, Florida State U, USA
Arthur A. Raney, Florida State U, USA
Perceived Realism in Digital Games: A Quantitative Exploration of its Structure
Wannes Ribbens, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Steven Malliet, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
The top three papers, and top student paper, from all those submitted to the Game Studies SIG this year.
5701
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Grand Ballroom I
Keywords: Culture, Communication Competence, and Intercultural Communication (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Visual Communication Studies
Political Communication
Intergroup Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Intercultural Communication
Chairs
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Claudia L. Hale, Ohio U, USA
Participants
Identity Negotiation in Intercultural Communication Studies
Ronald L. Jackson II, U of Illinois, USA
Functional Analyses of Political Leaders' Debates around the World
William L. Benoit, U of Missouri, USA
'This Is Not a Pipe': Approaches to Cross-Cultural Visual Competence
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
An Intergroup Perspective on Keywords in Intercultural Communication: Culture, Communication Competence, and
the Management of Multiple Identities
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
Working with the selected keywords, participants from five divisions (Visual Communication, Political
Communication, Intergroup Communication, Interpersonal Communication, and Intercultural Communication) will
make a brief presentation of their research featuring the keyword concepts, each with a different focus. All will
present their work related to intercultural communication a) as a keyword along with two more, e.g., culture and
Communication competence, or identity and social interaction, etc. From different perspectives, the presentation will
center on the selected keywords, and elaborate what they mean or how they are relevant to respective areas of
intercultural communication, political communication, visual communication and intergroup communication, in terms
of academic research and professional/social practice.
5711
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Indiana
5712
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Iowa
Organizational Communication Division Business Meeting
Organizational Communication
Social Movements Across Media: Song, News, and New Technologies
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Participants
A Green Virtual Space for Social Changes in China: Internet Activism and Chinese Environmental NGOs
Jingfang Liu, U of Southern California, USA
The Appearance of Smart Mobs: Candlelight Vigils in South Korea
chunhyo Kim, Southern Illinios U, USA
Notes on the Wire: Music, News, and the Political Economy of Corridos
Christopher Joseph Westgate, Texas A&M U, USA
Latvian Liberation and Western Media: Redirecting the CNN Effect Beyond Television and Away From Washington
Janis Kent Chakars, U of North Carolina - Wilmington, USA
Respondent
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
5713
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Michigan
New Frontiers of Public Relations Theory Development
Public Relations
Chair
Jae-Hwa Shin, U of Southern Mississippi, USA
Participants
Testing a Model of Resource Assessment as a Basis for Developing Strategic Communication Plans
Young Ah Lee, U of Missouri, USA
Issue Identities as an Emergent Network Property
Dawn R. Gilpin, Arizona State U, USA
Towards an Integrated Model of Communication: The Case of South Africa
Derina R. Holtzhausen, Oklahoma State U, USA
Natalie T. Tindall, U of Oklahoma, USA
Constructing Public Relations as a Gendered Profession
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
5714
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Michigan State
Children and Adolescents Online (High Density)
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Jeroen S Lemmens, U van Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The Possible Contribution of the Design-Based Research Method in Generating Cognitive Theories of Media and
Digital Literacy
Rebecca B. Reynolds, Syracuse U, USA
Looking for "Generation C": Online Content Creation Practices of Estonian Schoolchildren in Comparative
Perspective
Veronika Kalmus, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, U of Tartu , ESTONIA
Pille Runnel, Tartu U, ESTONIA
Andra Siibak, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Mobile Phones in Peer Culture: Teenagers' Messaging as a Metalinguistic Performance
Letizia Caronia, U of Bologna, ITALY
Identity Under Construction: Chilean Adolescents' Self-Disclosure Through the Use of Fotolog
Veronica Donoso, Catholic U of Leuven , BELGIUM
Wannes Ribbens, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
In Search of Youth Social Fingerprints on the Web: The Communication Strategies Used by the Chilean Teenagers in
the Educational Movement of May, 2006
Ana Rayén Condeza Dall'Orso, U de Montréal, CANADA
Is the Web Making Rural Children Less Rural? A Study of the Internet's Impact on Nonurban Youth
Robert Andrew Dunn, U of Alabama, USA
New Spaces of Immigrant Youth Expression on the Web
henry mainsah, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Unwillingness to Communicate Impact on Motives for Facebook Use
Pavica Sheldon, Louisiana State U, USA
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
5715
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Minnesota
5716
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Nothwestern
Communication Law and Policy Business Meeting
Communication Law & Policy
All members are welcome to attend. The top paper and top student paper awards winners will be recognized.
Global Women: Deconstructing Images, Changing Perceptions
Feminist Scholarship
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Donna Halper, Lesley U, USA
Participants
Standpoint of Always-Single Japanese Women Through Interpersonal Relationships
Eriko Maeda, California State U - Long Beach, USA
Michael L. Hecht, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Portrayal of Women's Consumption in Globalized Korea: Focusing on the Media Discourse of Gold Miss
Sunyoung Kwak, U of Colorado, USA
The Beijing Olympics and the Construction of Chinese Women
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania/Georgia State Univ., USA
The Soviet Woman Android: A Myth or Reality? A Content Analysis
Elza Nistorova Ibroscheva, Southern Illinois U - Edwardsville, USA
5717
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Ohio State
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Division Business Meeting
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Participant
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
ERIC's Business Meeting is open to all members and non-members interested in the division's activities.
5718
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Purdue
Conflict, Aggression, and Abuse in Relational Contexts
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Melissa Ann Tafoya, Arizona State U, USA
Participants
Mothers' Child Abuse Potential and Children's Home Environment as a Context for Cognitive and Social
Development: Preliminary Evidence for an Association Between the Child Abuse Potential and HOME
Inventories
Elizabeth Munz, Purdue U, USA
Steven Wilson, Purdue U, USA
Suzanne Marie D'Enbeau, Purdue U, USA
The Role of Conflict Resolution Styles in Mediating the Relationship Between Enduring Vulnerabilities and Marital
Quality
Alesia Diane Hanzal, U of Kansas, USA
Chris Segrin, U of Arizona, USA
A Roles Approach: Modeling the Effect of Self- and Other-Role Enactment on Conflict Strategies
Xiaoying Xie, U of Maryland, USA
Deborah A. Cai, U of Maryland, USA
Indirect Aggression Among Women Explained by Competitive Mating Strategies and Digit Ratio Asymmetry
Grace Leigh Anderson, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
5719
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Wisconsin
Business Meeting of the Language & Social Interaction Division
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Mark Aakhus, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
Theresa R. Castor, U of Wisconsin - Parkside, USA
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
5721
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Cognitive Resources (High Density)
Information Systems
Chair
Wendy A. Maxian, Texas Tech U, USA
Participants
A Cognitive Processing Explanation of the Disrupt-Then-Reframe Compliance Gaining Technique
Christopher John Carpenter, Michigan State U, USA
Franklin J. Boster, Michigan State U, USA
Applying the Limited-Capacity Model by Annie Lang to Printed News
Wolfgang Wichmann, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Dimension of Information Density and Cognitive Load
Ya Gao, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Ontological Dualism: An Information Processing-Based Differentiation Between Objective and Subjective Reality
David Voelker, Stanford U, USA
Processing Complex Information on the Web: The Perceptual Load Approach
Chen-Chao Tao, National Chiao Tung U, TAIWAN
The Influence of Structural Complexity, Audio-Video Redundancy, and Emotion on the Processing of Broadcast
News
Sungkyoung Lee, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
The Role of Imagery in the Cognitive Processing of Text and Audio News Stories
Jessica Diane Freeman, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
'Twas a Dark and Stormy…: The Effects of Content and Structural Complexity on Processing News
Tamara Makana Chock, Syracuse U, USA
Pamela J. Shoemaker, Syracuse U, USA
Hyunjin Seo, Syracuse U, USA
Philip Ryan Johnson, Syracuse U, USA
Di Zhang, Syracuse U, USA
Michael Barthel, Syracuse U, USA
5723
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Great America II
Immigrants, Sojourners, and Retirees: Crosscultural Adaptation in Context
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Michael B. Hinner, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, GERMANY
Participants
Becoming American
Indira S. Somani, Washington and Lee U, USA
Intercultural Networking: An Analysis of International Students' Friendship Networks and Satisfaction
Blake Hendrickson, U of Hawaii, USA
Devan Rosen, U of Hawaii, USA
Virtual Story, Real Life: An Examination of Chinese Students' Acculturation in the United States Through Blogs
Lin Zhang, New York U, USA
Negotiating Culture in the Golden Years: The Case of U.S. Retirement Migration to Mexico
Viviana C. Rojas, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
H. Paul LeBlanc III, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
Thakam S. Sunil, U of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Respondent
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
5730
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom A
Technology Diffusion at Home, Work, and Community
Communication and Technology
Chair
Lidwien van de Wijngaert, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The Diffusion of a Task Recommendation System To
Y. Connie Yuan, Cornell U, USA
Daniel Cosley, Cornell U, USA
Ling Xia, Cornell U, USA
Ted Welser, Ohio U, USA
Geri Gay, Cornell U, USA
Diffusion and Usage of E-Mail in a Grassroots Community Organization
Sharon M. Shafrir, Cornell U, USA
Y. Connie Yuan, Cornell U, USA
ICT's Effects on Diffusion Curves, E-Mail Networks, and Semantic Networks in an Organization: The Emergence of
Herding, Bandwagons, and Information Cascades With Less Interpersonal Communication
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Julia C. Gluesing, Wayne State U, USA
Ken Riopelle, Wayne State U, USA
Stumbling Mobile? A Longitudinal Field Study on the Appropriation of Mobile Television
Thilo von Pape, U Paul Verlaine, FRANCE
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Tracking the Flow of Information Into the Home: An Empirical Assessment of the Digital Revolution in the U.S.
From 1960 - 2005
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
Yong Jin Park, U of Michigan, USA
Elliot T. Panek, U of Michigan, USA
5731
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom B
Listening for the Wisdom of Crowds: New Media and New Forms of Knowledge
Communication and Technology
Chair
Christian E. Sandvig, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
A Crowded Newsroom: Social Capital and Deliberative Decision-Making on Wikipedia
Brian Keegan, Northwestern U, USA
Modeling Media Influences on a Prediction Market
Andrew Rojecki, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Milblogs as a Networked Public Sphere: The Case of Haditha
Ericka Menchen-Trevino, Northwestern U, USA
Striving for NPOV: Reconciling Knowledge Claims in Wikipedia
Lindsay Fullerton, Northwestern U, USA
James S. Ettema, Northwestern U, USA
Respondent
Christian E. Sandvig, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Harnessing the wisdom of crowds engages three problems: (1) cognition, the problem of focusing information held by
dispersed individuals on generating knowledge, making forecasts, etc.; (2) coordination, setting procedures to pursue
these tasks; (3) cooperation, getting self-interested individuals to work together. This panel explores these problems in
several technological settings using both qualitative and quantitative methods. It addresses not only the processes of
production but also the quality of knowledge and nature of discourse generated within and through new ITCs.
5732
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom C
Campaign Effects (High Density)
Political Communication
Chair
Holli A. Semetko, Emory U, USA
Participants
Economic Communication: Effects of Political Campaign Advertisements on Personal Financial Evaluations
Rosanne M. Scholl, Louisiana State U, USA
Effects of the Media on Intent to Vote
Sarah Aquino, U of the Pacific, USA
Gregory Joksch, U of the Pacific, USA
Megan Turco, U of the Pacific, USA
Alyssa Reinecker, U of the Pacific, USA
Examining the Perceptual Gap and Behavioral Outcomes in Perceived Effects of Coverage of Media Polls in the 2008
Taiwan Presidential Election
Ven-Hwei Lo, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Hung-yi NMN Lu, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
Judicial Advertising and Partisan Cueing: An Experimental Study of the 2007 Pennsylvania Supreme Court Election
Jeffrey A. Gottfried, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Mind the Gap: The Bandwagon Effect and the Trailing Candidate
Melissa Emily Thompson, U of Minnesota, USA
Nathan David Gilkerson, U of Minnesota, USA
Deborah Carver, U of Minnesota, USA
Santiago Merea, U of Minnesota, USA
Ashleigh K. Shelton, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Spanish 2004 Elections and the March 11 Madrid Attacks: An Intercandidate Agenda-Setting Approach to the
Strategic Campaigns of Parties and its Impact on Electoral Outcomes
Angeles Moreno, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
Maria Luisa Humanes, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Strategic Voting Behaviors and Mass Media Uses in 1997 Korean Presidential Election
Jeong-Heon Chang, Michigan State U, USA
Tell Me Something I Already Know: Testing Intensification Effects of News Media Use on Attitudes and Vote
Choice
Andrew R. Binder, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
The Effect of Media Dependency on Voting Decisions
John J. Davies, Brigham Young U, USA
5733
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom D
Keywords in Communication: Community
Theme Sessions
Chair
Kevin Howley, DePauw U, USA
Participants
Closings and Openings: Community Responses to a Shifting Public Sphere
Bernadette Barker-Plummer, U of San Francisco, USA
Dorothy Kidd, U of San Francisco, USA
Intranet Technology, Participatory Infrastructure, and Public Set-Asides: Putting the Community Back in Community
Media
Victor W. Pickard, U of Illinois, USA
Sascha D. Meinrath, New America Foundation, USA
The Revolution of Speaking and Listening: Communication and Community Building in the Zapatista Commune
Fiona Jeffries, CUNY Graduate Center, USA
Community Music, Community Media, and Residual Social Change in Britain
George McKay, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
This conference theme panel examines the keyword "community." Featuring leading scholars in the emerging field of
community media studies, the panel explores the fundamental relationship between communication and community.
We start from the premise that "community" has significant heuristic value for taking stock of the field of
communication. Indeed, community seems an appropriate starting point to (re)consider the place of the field in
contemporary society. What's more, if, as John Dewey famously observed, "there is more than a verbal tie between
the words common, community, and communication" then community media studies--with its focus on participatory
communication, community development, and local cultural expression--is well suited to interrogate this fundamental
relationship. Specifically, the panel features four papers that consider the keyword community through the lens of
community media studies.
5734
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom E
Mass Communication Business Meeting
Mass Communication
Chair
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Dana Mastro, U of Arizona, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
5735
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom F
5736
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom G
Korean American Communication Association Business Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Hye-Ryeon Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Popular Communication Business Meeting
Popular Communication
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Katalin Lustyik, Ithaca College, USA
Jason Shim, Michigan Technological U, USA
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Jonathan Corpus Ong, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
The Popular Communication Business meeting is open to all members and those interested in the Division. Topics
will include review of 2009 conference paper submissions, announcement of the Division's Top Papers, report from
the Divisions journal and the planning of the 2010 conference programme.
5737
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Chicago
Ballroom H
5741
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Houston
Journalism Studies Division Business Meeting
Journalism Studies
Health Communication Division Business Meeting
Health Communication
Chair
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Participants
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois, USA
Seth M. Noar, U of Kentucky, USA
5742
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Kansas City
Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood Film Screening
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Michael O. Rich, Center on Media and Child Health, USA
Participant
Alex Peterson, Media Education Foundation, USA
Consuming Kids throws desperately needed light on the practices of a relentless multi-billion dollar marketing
machine that now sells kids and their parents everything from junk food and violent video games to bogus educational
products and the family car. Drawing on the insights of health care professionals, children's advocates, and industry
insiders, the film focuses on the explosive growth of child marketing in the wake of deregulation, showing how youth
marketers have used the latest advances in psychology, anthropology, and neuroscience to transform American
children into one of the most powerful and profitable consumer demographics in the world. Consuming Kids pushes
back against the wholesale commercialization of childhood, raising urgent questions about the ethics of children's
marketing and its impact on the health and well-being of kids. The screening will be followed by a Question and
Answer discussion with Dr. Michael Rich, director of the Center on Media and Child Health and Alex Peterson,
Marketing Director of the Media Education Foundation
5743
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Los Angeles
Fragility: Towards a New Vocabulary of Culture and Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
The Ethics of Fragility
Sonja Altnoeder, Justus Liebig U - Giessen, GERMANY
Terrorism as Mass Mediated Fragility
Rita Figueiras, U de Católica Portuguesa, PORTUGAL
Fragile Values: Media Scandals and Their Ambivalent Role in Cultural Change
Martin Zierold, Justus-Liebig U - Giessen, GERMANY
Mobile Fragility: On Women and the Mobile Phone
Carla Ganito, U de Católica Portuguesa, PORTUGAL
Catia Ferreira, Portuguese Catholic U, PORTUGAL
Respondent
Isabel Maria Capeloa Gil, U de Católica Portuguesa, PORTUGAL
The panel discusses fragility as new key word in communication research with impact on the level of communication
ethics, media representation and the use of new technologies. Fragility addresses both the nature of media agents as
well as the complex and changing nature of communication research in a globalized world, which is unequal and
sometimes contradictory. The presentations focus on media performances of fragility in view of the representation of
city cultures, media scandals and terrorism, whilst revealing the interconnectedness arising from technology, namely
from the mobile phone, as a platform that induces social and gender fragility.
5744
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Miami
Spectacle/ Narrative/ Truth
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Occasioning the Real: Lacan, Deleuze, and Cinematic Structuring of Sense
Emanuelle Wessels, U of Minnesota, USA
The Production of Spectacle / The Spectacle of Production: An Ethnographic Study of Film/TV Media Production
Sylvia Janet Martin, U of California - Irvine, USA
On Rational Madness: Love and Reason in Socrates and Lacan
Dora E. Martinez, U of Monterrey, MEXICO
Traces of Rhetoric: Derrida's Eulogy of Roland Barthes
Yun Ding, Tennessee Tech U, USA
Narrative is integral to the real, and this session brings together both philosophical and empirical perspectives on the
entanglement of truth, narrative and media. The session includes the Divison's top paper (Martinez).
5745
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Scottsdale
Feminist Media Studies Editorial Board Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Jane Anne Arthurs, U of the West of England, UNITED KINGDOM
Alison C.M. Beale, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Mary Caudle Beltran, U of Wisconsin, USA
Elizabeth Bird, U of South Florida, USA
Martha M. Burkle, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, CANADA
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Robin R. Means Coleman, U of Michigan, USA
Kirsten Drotner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Meenakshi Gigi Durham, U of Iowa, USA
Romy Froehlich, U of Munich, GERMANY
Margaret Gallagher, independent researcher, UNITED KINGDOM
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
Lisa Henderson, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
Lena Jayyusi, Muwatin, ISRAEL
Ammu Joseph, Independent Journalist, INDIA
Ullamaija Kivikuru, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Deepa Kumar, Rutgers U, USA
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Lisa Leung, Lingnan U, HONG KONG
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Myra Macdonald, U of Sunderland, UNITED KINGDOM
Angela McRobbie, Goldsmith College - London, UNITED KINGDOM
Carmen Manning-Miller, U of Mississippi, USA
Eileen R. Meehan, Southern Illinois U, USA
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
Sujata Moorti, Middlebury College, USA
Nancy W. Muturi, Kansas State U, USA
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
Elspeth Probyn, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
Jane Rhodes, Macalester College, USA
Gertrude J. Robinson, McGill U, CANADA
Clemencia Rodriguez, U of Oklahoma, USA
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Annabelle Sreberny-Mohammadi, U Of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Linda C. Steiner, U of Maryland, USA
C. Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Usha Zacharias, Westfield State College, USA
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5751
Sunday
16:30-17:45
Belmont
5811
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Indiana
5815
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Minnesota
5819
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Wisconsin
5834
Sunday
18:00-19:00
Chicago
Ballroom E
5835
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Game Studies Business Meeting
Game Studies
Join us to discuss SIG activities and future directions, and to mingle with like-minded colleagues.
Organizational Communication Division Reception
Organizational Communication
Communication Law and Policy Division Reception
Communication Law & Policy
Reception for the Language & Social Interaction Division
Language & Social Interaction
The location for the reception will be announced at the Language & Social Interaction Business Meeting
Joint Reception of Mass Communication Division and Children, Adolescents, and the Media Interest Group
Mass Communication
Children Adolescents and Media
Korean American Communication Association Reception
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Hye-Ryeon Lee, U of Hawaii, USA.
5836
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
5837
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
5841
Sunday
18:00-19:15
Houston
5901
Sunday
19:30-20:45
Grand Ballroom I
Popular Communication Reception
Popular Communication
The Popular Communication invites all members and those interested in the Division cordially to its 2009 reception.
The reception will be held at offsite location.
Journalism Studies Division Reception
Journalism Studies
Health Communication Division Reception
Health Communication
Participants
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Seth M. Noar, U of Kentucky, USA
ICA's 59th Annual Conference Closing Reception - Murphy Auditorium 50 E. Erie Street
Sponsored Sessions
The closing reception is open to all conference attendees, BUT TICKETS ARE REQUIRED. Murphy Auditorium
is a short 3 block walk from the hotel. Murphy Auditorium is Chicago's newest and most elegant venue! Completed in
1926, it was designed to host meeting of the American College of Surgeons and serve as a center for education is
surgery. The architectural design of this auditorium is in the French Renaissance style. Restoration of the auditorium
was completed in June, 2006 and returned it to its original splendor. Virtually every detail has been restored or
replicated to its original design. The Murphy Auditorium is truly one of Chicago's finest architectural jewels.
6132
Monday
08:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom C
2010 Conference Planning Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Francois Cooren, U de Montreal, CANADA
Participants
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
J. Alison Bryant, Nickelodeon/MTV Networks, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Antonio C LaPastina, Texas A&M U, USA
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
Lisa Sparks, U of California, Irvine, USA
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Richard Buttny, Syracuse U, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
This meeting is for all division and special interest group progrm planners for the 2010 conference in Singapore. All
sections need to be represented.
6140
Monday
08:30-10:15
Denver
Academic Serials in Communication - Unified System: Envisioning and Planning a Social Networking Site for
the Communication Discipline
Sponsored Sessions
Web 2.0 technologies are fostering new opportunities for social and professional engagement. A social networking
site, modeled loosely on Facebook or MySpace, may be used to promote collaborative opportunities for research and
other professional activity if such a technological capability was available to members of the communication
discipline. In this working session, attendees will envision the scope, functionality, and attributes of a social
networking site for the communication discipline. We will have a discussion in which we sketch out the design and
parameters of a site, and we will focus attention on these questions: what should the site include? what characteristics
would stimulate dynamic and constructive participation? how can we maximize the likelihood that users will view the
siteas valuable and productive? Attendees are asked to bring their ideas to this brainstorming session.
6201
Monday
09:00-10:15
Grand Ballroom I
The Power of News Images: Multidisciplinary Perspectives (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Journalism Studies
Political Communication
Information Systems
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Studying Visuals From a Journalism Perspective: The Role of Images in the News
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Studying Visuals From a Political Communication Perspective: The Framing and Agenda-Setting Effects of News
Images.
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
Studying Visuals From a Political Psychology Perspective: Audiovisuals = Emotions = Political Action: A Power
Formula
Doris Graber, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Studying Visuals From an Information Systems Perspective: A Picture is Worth 1000 Words... Plus or Minus 2
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Studying Visuals From a Visual Communication Perspective: The Multidisciplinary Approach to "Believing is
Seeing"
David D. Perlmutter, U of Kansas, USA
The study of visuals cuts across a wide range of disciplinary perspectives. This panel brings together scholars from
five areas: journalism studies, political communication, political psychology, information systems, and visual
communication. The aim is to discuss common research goals and stimulate collaborations across boundaries in the
study of mass mediated visual information.
6211
Monday
09:00-10:15
Indiana
Research in Organizational Membership and Identification Processes
Organizational Communication
Chair
Kristen Lucas, U of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA
Participants
A Legacy of Charismatic Leadership: An Examination of Individual, Social, and Organizational Identification
Sasha Meena Grant, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Fostering Identification for Many Organizations Through One: A Case Study of ArtLink
Rebecca L. Dohrman, Purdue U, USA
Organizational Identification Strategies of a Low Face-to-Face Member Contact Organization
Deepa Oommen, Bowling Green State U, USA
Revered, Valued, Silent, and Invisible: A Typology of Organizational Member Positionality
Brittany L. Peterson, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Kristen Lucas, U of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA
6212
Monday
09:00-10:15
Iowa
Historical and Contemporary Transitions in Communication Theory and Practice
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Kekeli Kwabla Nuviadenu, Bethune-Cookman U, USA
Participants
Havana as a 1940s-1950s Latin American Media Capital
Yeidy M. Rivero, Indiana U - Bloomington, USA
South African Media in Transition
Colin Stuart Sparks, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
One Game, Different Players: The Coverage of 2008 Olympics by Three Chinese Newspapers
Lin Zhang, New York U, USA
Global Communication and its Transition From a Craft to a Social Science
Richard C. Vincent, Indiana State U - Department of Communication, USA
Tom McPhail, U Of Missouri, St Louis, USA
John C. Merrill, U of Missouri, USA
Respondent
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas - Austin, USA
6213
Monday
09:00-10:15
Michigan
Towards a Theory of Public Relations Using Keywords From Sociology
Public Relations
Participants
Keywords in the Demonization of Soft Power
Richard C. Stanton, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Relations of Ruling: Using Dorothy E. Smith's Concept for Public Relations Theorizing
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Public Relations and Understanding
Roland Burkart, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Learning by Doing and the Heresy of Building Trust
Vilma L. Luoma-Aho, Stanford U, USA
Public Trust: Theoretical Foundations and a New Research Instrument
Guenter Bentele, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
The purpose of this panel session is to discuss how a focus on sociological "keywords" such as trust, reflexivity,
legitimacy, influence and power can drive public relations theory towards a greater understanding of its ontological
place in the global. It also asks how these keyword concepts can help us gain a wider understanding of the practice of
public relations. The questions this panel will attempt to answer are not simply whether sociologists and sociological
keywords have contributed positively or negatively to the development of the sociology of public relations, as this
topic was framed substantially in 2006. Rather it is to question of whether sociological keywords, seen previously as
minor sociological representations of public relations, are of greater epistemological, methodological or technological
value. Keywords such as trust, legitimacy and power must be seen as crucial to the theoretical development and
ethical practice of public relations and contribute towards a theory "of" public relations rather than a theory "for"
public relations.
6215
Monday
09:00-10:15
Minnesota
Policy and Global Communication: International Law and Communication Rights
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Freedom of Expression and the Right to Know: New Conceptualizations in International Human Rights Law
Cheryl Ann Bishop, Quinnipiac U, USA
Global Debates on the Right to Communicate (Top Student Paper)
Lauren B. Movius, U of Southern California, USA
Globalizing Media Law and Policy
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
The Mohammed Cartoons Affair and the New International Right of "Respect for Religion"
Lyombe S. Eko, U of Iowa, USA
Respondent
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The 1948 Universal Declaration on Human Rights states that, "Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and
expression," and that, "Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country." Papers in this panel
examine a number of claims to international communication law and communication rights.
6216
Monday
09:00-10:15
Nothwestern
Challenging Gender and Race Barriers in the Media
Feminist Scholarship
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Viviana C. Rojas, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
Participants
Violence Against Women in the Black Press: The Case of Juanita Bynum
Marian J. Meyers, Georgia State U, USA
Darcey West, Georgia State U, USA
"I'd Rather Be Doing Something Else:" Male Resistance to Rape Prevention Programs
Marc Rich, California State U, Long Beach, USA
Ebony Utley, California State U, Long Beach, USA
Kelly Janke, California State U, Long Beach, USA
Minodora Moldoveanu, California State U, Long Beach, USA
Naming Women: Gender, Language, and Ideology in the Internet Culture of South Korea
Kang Hui Baek, U of Texas, USA
Jin Sook Im, The U of Texas, USA
Gender-Specific Behavior on Information and Communication Platforms: Gender Barriers to Access and Gender
Barriers to Usage
Uta Russmann, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
6217
Monday
09:00-10:15
Ohio State
Race, Representation, and the Failures of Authenticity: A Panel on Critical Mixed-Race Media Studies
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Catherine R. Squires, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Before Tiger and Halle: Media Framing of Prince, Jennifer Beals, and Lisa Bonet
Catherine R. Squires, U of Minnesota, USA
A New World Order?: Envisioning Multiracial Families and Transnational Adoption in Battlestar Galactica
LeiLani Nishime, U of Washington, USA
Televising the New Millennium "Mulatta": Jennifer Beals and the Punishment of Mixed-Race Blackness on The L
Word
Ralina Landwehr Joseph, U of Washington, USA
All in the Family: The Meaning of Tiger Woods for Black/ Mixed Racial "Kinship"
Habiba Ibrahim, U of Washington, USA
Respondent
Jane Rhodes, Macalester College, USA
This panel uses the keywords of race and representation to investigate how mixed-race bodies are imagined in the
media. We tease out the ways in which multiracial people's ability or failure to adequately represent a racial ideal
defines racial differences, as multiracial people have been branded as racially marginal. We argue that skepticism
about racial authenticity and seeming resistance to easy categorization helps clarify the processes of racial
signification for multiracial bodies in the media.
6218
Monday
09:00-10:15
Purdue
Attractiveness as Multimodal Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Kerri L. Johnson, U of California, Los Angeles, USA
Participants
Swagger and Sway: The Functional Significance of Attractiveness in Body Shape and Motion
Kerri L. Johnson, U of California, Los Angeles, USA
Olfactory Attractiveness: The Role of Scent Cues in Attraction and Mate Choice
Martie Gail Haselton, U of California – Los Angeles, USA
Female Voices and Acoustic Choices: Attraction and Ovulation
Greg Bryant, U of California – Los Angeles, USA
Respondent
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The sayings, "Pretty is as pretty does," "Beauty is only skin deep," and "You can't judge a book by its cover" provide
cautionary messages that recognize a simple fact - beauty persuades. Not surprisingly, therefore, the persuasive
effects of beauty have been the focus of considerable research within the communication sciences. The vast majority
of empirical work examining the effects of beauty has focused on the efficacy of using facial beauty to serve
commercial interests through advertising. Such work places a heavy emphasis on visual communication typical of
print, film, and on-line media. Yet the communicative function of beauty is not restricted to the visual modality or
facial cues. Such narrow focus is likely to overlook other cues used by observers who evolved to perceive cues across
multiple channels. Far from being merely a means to an end, attractiveness appears to communicate important
information about oneself to observers. This paper panel examines the functional role of attractiveness in
interpersonal communication. Each paper focuses on one mode of communication (visual, auditory, and olfactory),
and explicates the role of attractiveness therein.
6219
Monday
09:00-10:15
Wisconsin
Instructional and Entertainment Communication in the Home: Parental and Media Processes
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The Relationships of the Family Communication Patterns to Effective Drug-Prevention Parenting Practices
Yi-Chun Chen, Virginia Tech, USA
Rebecca Van de Vord, Washington State U, USA
Sensation Seeking and Narrative Transportation: High Sensation-Seeking Children's Interest in Reading and Writing
Outside of School
Jakob D. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Kristen Imboden, Purdue U, USA
Rebecca Ivic, Purdue U, USA
Helping Hands? The Use of American Sign Language in Nickelodeon's Blue's Clues
Erin Leigh Ryan, U of Alabama, USA
Cynthia Nichols, U of Alabama, USA
Melissa Galin Weinstein, U of Georgia, USA
Rebecca Burton, The U of Georgia, USA
The Multiple Meanings of Age for Television Content Preferences
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Ye Sun, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
6221
Monday
09:00-10:15
Lincolnshire II
Keywords in Information Systems: Interactivity (High Density)
Information Systems
Communication and Technology
Chair
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Participants
Blogging vs. Diary-Keeping: Psychological Empowerment
Carmen Stavrositu, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Control Ergo Cogito: An Experimental Investigation of the Interactivity-as-Information Control Perspective
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
Kristin Ito, U of North Carolina -Chapel Hill, USA
Christina Malik, U. of North Carolina, USA
Elizabeth Ferris, U of North Carolina, USA
Determinants of Risk Perception on Internet Piracy
Siyoung Chung, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Hichang Cho, National U - Singapore, SINGAPORE
Examining the Role of Cognitive Absorption for Information Sharing in Virtual Worlds
Shalini Chandra, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
May O. Lwin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Schubert Shou-Boon Foo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
How the Internet Changes Public Diplomacy: A Case Study of Online Community Run by U.S. Embassy in South
Korea
Hyunjin Seo, Syracuse U, USA
Of Wikis, Blogs, and Social Networks: The Role of Online Communities in Disseminating News, Entertainment, and
Information
Debashis Aikat, U of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, USA
On Conditionality of Social Responses to Computers: Effects of Anthropomorphism, User Rationality, and Cognitive
Busyness
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
This Is Your Brain on Interactivity: Alpha-Blocking While Processing Online News
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Saraswathi Bellur, Pennsylvania State U, USA
6223
Monday
09:00-10:15
Great America II
Relationships, Marriage, Business, and Technology as Cultural Institutions
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Yang-Soo Kim, II, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
Participants
Business Negotiation and Chinese Relationship Building: The Case of KTV Singing
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Richard Holt, Northern Illinois U, USA
Gratitude and Apology in Olympic Athlete Interviews
Seungcheol Austin Lee, Michigan State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Xing Liu, Michigan State U, USA
Tatsuya Imai, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Seoyeon Hong, Michigan State U, USA
Ho Bum Shin, Michigan State U, USA
Yiqing Hou, Michigan State U, USA
Xiaowen Guan, U of St. Thomas, USA
Theorizing the Role of Relational Communication and Cultural Concepts in Marital Roles and Marriage Conceptions:
Comparisons Between Asian and U.S. Young Adults
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Shuangyue Zhang, Sam Houston State U, USA
Brian W. Horton, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Sung Jin Ryu, Ohio State U, USA
Renu Pariyadath, Ohio State U, USA
Hong Kong Disneyland: How Disney Has Successfully Adapted the Principles of Glocalization Theory
Jonathan Matusitz, U of Central Florida, USA
A Japanese Social Network Site mixi and the Imagined Boundary of "Japan"
Ryuta Komaki, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Respondent
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
6230
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Social Interactions in Virtual Groups
Communication and Technology
Chair
Pertti T. Hurme, U Jyvaskyla, FINLAND
Participants
The Effects of Social Norms on Electronic Word-of-Mouth Intention: A Comparision of Three Models
Dongyoung Sohn, Ohio State U, USA
Schmoozing and Smiting: Trust and Communication Patterns in an MMO
Rabindra A. Ratan, U of Southern California, USA
Jae Eun Chung, U of Southern California, USA
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
Brooke Foucault, Northwestern U, USA
Marshall Scott Poole, U of Illinois, USA
The Effects of Social Orienting During a Lecture Delivered in a Virtual Environment
Cade McCall, U of California – Santa Barbara, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Jim J Blascovich, U of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Masaki Miyanohara, U of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Andrew Beall, U of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Interpersonal Presence in Virtual and Blended Workplaces
N. Lamar Reinsch, Georgetown U, USA
Jeanine Warisse Turner, Georgetown U, USA
Rebecca Heino, Georgetown U, USA
The Effect of Familiarity and Coordination on Designing Online Discussion Environments
D'Arcy John Oaks, Ohio State U, USA
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Prabu David, Ohio State U, USA
6231
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
Offline Selves, Online Personas
Communication and Technology
Chair
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Redundancy Revisited: Information and Technology Sequences, Message Redundancy, and Persuasive
Communication
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas - Austin, USA
Steve Rains, U of Arizona, USA
Changing Identity Through Self-Presentation: The Effect of New Media on the Self-Perception Process
Amy L Gonzales, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Associations Between Interactants' Personality Traits and Their Feelings of Rapport in Interactions With Virtual
Humans
Sin-Hwa Kang, U of Southern California, USA
James H. Watt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Jonathan Gratch, U of Southern California, USA
Ning Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Online Relational Maintenance in Mixed-Mode Relationships
Erin Katrina Ruppel, U of Arizona, USA
6233
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
Women in a Digital World: Conceptual Models of Inclusion
Theme Sessions
Chair
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois Chicago, USA
Participants
Ellen Balka, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Paul M.A. Baker, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Abbe E Forman, Temple U, USA
Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern U, USA
Jarice Hanson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Notions of gender and information technologies have moved from home and work to span the real and the virtual
worlds. In each environment, relationships among gender, technology, and the expression of identity, have become
more complex. Panelists explore keywords such as "gender, "information technology," "digital divide," and "identity"
to discuss how each, in combination, creates different communication contexts as well as models leading to greater
inclusion or exclusion of women in both worlds.
6234
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Framing Global Climate Change: Advancing Theory and Methodology
Mass Communication
Chair
James Shanahan, Fairfield U, USA
Participants
Segmentation of the American Public To Identify Effective Climate Change Issue Frames
Connie Roser-Renouf, Center for Climate Change Communication, USA
Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale U, USA
Edward Maibach, George Mason U, USA
Tracking the Public Health Frame in Coverage of Climate Change
Matthew C. Nisbet, American U, USA
Paola Pascual-Ferra, American U, USA
Framing Responsibility: Collective Norms and Collective Action About Global Climate Change
Angela Poe Dossett, The Ohio State U, USA
Teresa Myers, Ohio State U, USA
Myiah Hutchens Hively, Ohio State U, USA
Framing Global Climate Change: Cognitive and Emotional Responses within a Competitive Message Environment
Erik C. Nisbet, Ohio State U, USA
Philip Solomon Hart, Cornell U, USA
Respondent
James Shanahan, Fairfield U, USA
This panel combines a focus on advancing framing theory, employing GCC as a context, with producing research that
has important implications for science and health communicators. The four papers on the panel represent a diversity
of scholars, approaches, and methodologies that examine the roles of institutions, messages, and audiences in framing
theory. By placing papers that approach framing from very different perspectives, but at the same time all focus on
GCC, the panel provides an opportunity to compare and contrast differing dimensions of framing theory, better
understand its overall explanatory potential, and further integrate framing into a more cohesive theoretical paradigm.
6235
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
Our Relationships With Media Characters
Mass Communication
Chair
Rick W. Busselle, Washington State U, USA
Participants
Testing Affective Disposition Theory: A Comparison of the Enjoyment of Hero and Antihero Narratives
Arthur A. Raney, Florida State U, USA
Hannah Schmid, Hannover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Julia Niemann, Hannover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Michael Ellensohn, Hannover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
When Good Characters Do Bad Things: Examining the Effect of Moral Ambiguity on Enjoyment
K. Maja Krakowiak, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Moral Disengagement for Enjoyment's Sake: Judging the Actions of Fictional Characters
Daniel Mark Shafer, Florida State U, USA
Real and Reel Relationships: Comparing Models of Commitment and Closeness in Friendships and Parasocial
Relationships
Keren Eyal, The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, ISRAEL
Rene M. Dailey, U of Texas - Austin, USA
6236
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
(Re)Producing Celebrity in the New Media Landscape
Popular Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
Walter, Louella, and Perez: A Historical Perspective on the Celebrity and Gossip in 'Old' and 'New' Media
Erin Meyers, Middlebury College, USA
The Bitch is Back: Celebrity Gossip Blogging, Postfeminism, and Bitch Narratives.
Kirsty Fairclough, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Stereotypes, Cybercelebrity, and Jordan's YouTube Experiment
Anne Ciecko, U of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA
Black Female Subjectivity and Reality TV
Demetria Rougeaux Shabazz, U of Massachusetts, USA
New media formats, including reality television and the Internet, extend the sites where celebrity images can be
consumed. Yet new media also re-constitutes the relationship between celebrity and audience by seeming to offer
audience more discursive control over celebrity images. This panel explores the impact of new media on the
construction, circulation, and consumption of the celebrity image in contemporary culture, interrogating the
transgressive possibilities and ideological limitations of celebrity in the new media landscape.
6237
Monday
09:00-10:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
News User Evaluations of Professional Journalism
Journalism Studies
Chair
Jacob Groshek, Iowa State U, USA
Participants
The Ethics Gap: Why Germans Have Little Esteem and No Trust in Journalists (Top Three Faculty Paper)
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Mathias Rentsch, U of Dresden, GERMANY
Anna-Maria Mende, U of Dresden, GERMANY
The Origins of Media Perceptions: Judgments of News Accuracy and Bias Among Adolescents
Porismita Borah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Emily K. Vraga, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Historical References in Political News Stories: Credibility, Perceived Newsworthiness, and Understanding the News
Betty Houchin Winfield, U of Missouri, USA
Glenn M. Leshner, U of Missouri, USA
Anastasia Kononova, U of Missouri , USA
Minji Jung, U of Missouri, USA
Press Accountability and Political Interest in the East African Community
Yusuf Kalyango, Jr., Ohio U, USA
Respondent
Anne-Katrin Arnold, U of Pennsylvania, USA
6241
Monday
09:00-10:15
Houston
HIV and STD Prevention: Messages, Channels, and Strategies
Health Communication
Chair
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Living in Discrepant Worlds: Exploring the Cultural Context of Sexuality Among Turkish and Moroccan Adolescents
Barbara Schouten, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mass Media as an HIV-Prevention Strategy: Using Culturally Sensitive Messages to Reduce HIV-Associated Sexual
Behavior of High-Risk African-American Youth
Sharon Rodner Sznitman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Daniel Romer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael Hennessy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ralph DiClemente, Emory U, USA
Laura F Salazar, Emory U, USA
Peter A Vanable, Syracuse U, USA
Michael P Carey, Syracuse U, USA
Brown K Larry, Brown U, USA
Robert F Valois, U of South Carolina, USA
Bonita F Stanton, Wayne State U, USA
Thierry Fortune, MEE Productions, USA
Ivan Juzang, MEE Productions, USA
PowerON: The Use of Instant Message Counseling and the Internet to Facilitate HIV/STD Education and Prevention
David Andrew Moskowitz, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA
Dan Melton, NonProfit Technologies, LLC, USA
Jill Owczarzak, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA
Effectiveness of Media Interventions to Prevent HIV, 1986-2006: A Meta-Analysis
Leslie Snyder, U of Connecticut, USA
Blair T. Johnston, U of Connecticut, USA
Tania Huedo-Medina, U of Connecticut, USA
Jessica M LaCroix, Illinois Wesleyan U, USA
Natalie D. Smoak, U of Idaho, USA
Mark Cistulli, U of Hartford, USA
6242
Monday
09:00-10:15
Kansas City
Cynicism, Efficacy, and Social Capital
Political Communication
Chair
Jocelyn Ilana Landau, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Substance Matters. How News Content Can Reduce Political Cynicism
Maud Adriaansen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Philip Van Praag, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Internet Use, Cynicism, and Skepticism in Young Citizens' Attitudes Towards Political Decision Making
Hua Chang, Washington State U, USA
Lingling Zhang, Towson U, USA
Bruce Pinkleton, Washington State U, USA
Is There Truth Out There? Neutral Reporting and Epistemic Political Efficacy
Raymond J. Pingree, Ohio State U, USA
Political Efficacy and Political Cynicism: A Structural Equation Model to Explain How Personal Cynicism and Media
Use Affects People's Political Views
Jennifer Marie Kowalewski, U of North Carolina, USA
Everyday Internet Use, Online Social Capital, and Social Movement Participation: A Study on the Korean Protest
Against U.S. Beef Imports in 2008
Kyounghee Hazel Kwon, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Yoonjae Nam, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
6243
Monday
09:00-10:15
Los Angeles
Pathways to Political Communication: Selectivity, Effects, and Statistics
Mass Communication
Chair
Ece Inan, Marmara U, TURKEY
Participants
Reinforcement of the Political Self Through Selective Exposure to Political Messages
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Jingbo Meng, U of Southern California, USA
Online Political Ads and the Third-Person Effect
Hyunjung Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Common Ground? First- and Second-Level Media Agendas of Multilanguage Web Sites
Sherine Mahfouz El-Toukhy, U of North Carolina, USA
Latent Variable Approaches in Structural Equation Modeling in Communication Studies
Hyunjung Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
6244
Monday
09:00-10:15
Miami
The New Media City
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
James Hay, U Of Illinois, USA
Participants
Broadcasting Global Cities: Architecture as Mediated Centrality
Staffan Ericson, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Kristina Maj Riegert, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Place Marketing the Reservation: The Tribal Digital Village
Christian E. Sandvig, U of Illinois, USA
Simulation and Citizen Participation: Learning From the Past
Jennifer S. Light, Northwestern U, USA
The Birth of the "Neoliberal" City and its Media
James Hay, U Of Illinois, USA
Retroactive Futurity in the Media City of Shanghai
Amanda Lagerkvist, Uppsala U, SWEDEN
The city is the most important locus of emergent communication technologies and networks (Graham 2004). Recently
communication scholar Scott Mcquire (2008) has argued against seeing media as something separate from the city
and called for conceiving the spatial experience of modern social life emerging through a complex process of coconstitution between architectural structures and urban territories, social practices and media technologies/practices.
Still the dominant theorization and conceptualization of cities and media has occurred outside the field of media and
communication studies, e.g. within cultural geography (addressing the 'networked' or 'cyber' city), sociology
(delineating the 'informational' or 'global' city) and architecture theory and urban planning (forecasting the 'city of
bits' or the postmodern theme park). This panel seeks to draw on the interdisciplinary work carried out within urban
studies, while presenting an alternative to dominant trends. The papers in this panel range from addressing
emplacement and identity the digital city, the centrality of ubiquitous media through the interdependence of
architecture and mediation in cities, the roles of nostalgia and memory within the new technologized city, the long
history of new media cities and of simulations in urban spaces. The aim is to advance these discussions by
highlighting the various aspects and forms of convergence of media and cities, and by thoroughly historisizing the
'new.' In this pursuit the papers elaborate several important keywords in communication such as space, mediation,
mobility, simulation and networks.
6245
Monday
09:00-10:15
Scottsdale
What We Now Call Communications: 20th-Century Transitions in Computers and Representation
Communication History
Participants
Signals in Suspense: Batteries, Recording, and Data Processing
Peter D. Schaefer, U of Iowa, USA
Infrared Perception, or, How We Came to Trust the Representation of Invisible Data
Carolyn Lee Kane, New York U, USA
Feedback and its Philosophers
Benjamin John Paulsen Peters, Columbia U, USA
Databases as Communication Devices
Geof Bowker, Santa Clara U, USA
Respondent
Frederick C. Turner, Stanford U, USA
In this panel, a mix of established and young scholars reexamine specific technologies and technological systems in
the important though significantly understudied history of computing. The panel generally seeks to enrich
understanding of how computer-related modes of data representation have come to embody and construct modern
communication discourse. How have the concepts surrounding technologies of representation evolved in the twentieth
century? And furthermore, how can such a genealogy help critically reassess the field's assumptions about
communications technologies?
6251
Monday
09:00-10:15
Belmont
Moving Pictures: Representation, Style, and Technology
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Karen Annette Ritzenhoff, Central Connecticut State U, USA
Participants
Visualising the Rwandan Genocide in Feature Films: On Trauma Cinema, Collective and Public Memories, and the
Boundaries of Representability
Daniel Biltereyst, U of Ghent, BELGIUM
Selling the Familar Other on the Screen: An Analysis of Chinese Movie Trailers in the U.S.
Ying Huang, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Surfing With the Surreal in Tsui Hark's Wave: Collage Practice, Hybrid Texts, and Flexible Citizenship
Tan See Kam, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Mumblecore: Networked Film and the Digital Aesthetic
Aymar Jean Christian, U of Pennsylvania, USA
6301
Monday
10:30-11:45
Grand Ballroom I
ICA Closing Plenary: Communication and Shock Resistance: The Role of Narrative in Meeting the Current
Crises
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participant
Naomi Klein, Author and Journalist, CANADA
Certain kinds of apocalyptic stories encourage us to forget, while blinding us to the impact of our actions on others
and the environment. What kinds of stories can form powerful counter-narratives, encouraging longer memories and a
genuinely sustainable relationship with the natural world? This talk will look at how various resistance movements
around the world use memory and non-apocalyptic narratives to resist attempts to offload the burden of the global
financial crisis on the poor, and to construct living alternatives to our current economic model.
6401
Monday
12:00-13:15
Grand Ballroom I
Evolution (Cross Unit)
Theme Sessions
Health Communication
Communication Law & Policy
Information Systems
Journalism Studies
Mass Communication
Participants
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Matthew John Kobach, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Bryant M. Paul, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
This panel will explore the keyword of evolution from five perspectives: Survival, as opposed to the fittest, part of
this evolutionary mantra. Survival is the key to winning the evolution game and there are two sides to survival –
staying alive and reproduction. Public policy makers seldom consider that the process of constructing regulations
aimed at effecting or controlling human behavior might be vastly improved through an initial consideration of human
evolutionary history by natural selection. The Darwinian concept of evolution can itself be described as the outcome
of an information system -- one where biological organisms compete for survival against members of their own
species, members of other species, and environmental variables. What results from this ongoing process are naturallyselected attributes which at one time, and for an extended period of time, prove beneficial in the search for
nourishment and procreation, as well as the fending off of predators. Drawing from research in political and cognitive
science, as well as evolutionary psychology, the idea that television news is doing a disservice to the public sphere is
not only wrong – it prevents us from understanding this medium’s potential as an information source.; Who is to
blame for stereotypes: The media or evolution? Much of the media research is focused on the inclusion of
stereotypical portrayals in mediated messages, but does not investigate further to examine what cognitive mechanisms
are at work. By investigating, and subsequently better understanding these different mechanisms, researchers will be
able to more fruitfully understand the media’s role in audience’s perceptions of certain groups.
6411
Monday
12:00-13:15
Indiana
Communication and Organizational Knowledge: Issues for Theory and Practice
Organizational Communication
Participants
Knowledge Sharing Errors in Groups
Andrea B. Hollingshead, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Promises and Challenges of Computerized Knowledge Management in a Best-Case Scenario
Steven R. Corman, Arizona State U, USA
Understanding Contributions to the Next Generation of Knowledge Management Systems
Michelle D. Shumate, U of Illinois, USA
Managing Community Risks Through a Community-Communication Infrastructure Approach
H. Dan O'Hair, U of Oklahoma, USA
Respondent
Marshall Scott Poole, U of Illinois, USA
Scholars across disciplines address what constitutes knowledge, how knowledge functions within and across
organizations, and how organizational members develop and manage knowledge for organizational purposes. Many
communication scholars are engaged in theoretical and applied research projects that reveal the communicative nature
of organizational knowledge and knowing. This panel presents several approaches to organizational knowledge being
pursued within the communication discipline and in collaborations across disciplinary boundaries, representing a
range of theoretical perspectives and methodologies.
6412
Monday
12:00-13:15
Iowa
Public Diplomacy and Intersections With Public Opinion
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Won Yong Jang, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, USA
Participants
"Why Do They Like Us?" Deconstructing Muslim Public Opinion Across Regional Contexts
Erik C. Nisbet, Ohio State U, USA
Convergence or Globalization: An Examination of the Influence of the Superstructures on Korean Public Opinion on
the Internet
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
Tulika Maneesh Varma, Louisiana State U, USA
Reaz Mahmood, Fresno State U, USA
Pop Culture as an Instrument for Global Public Diplomacy
Jiyeon So, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
U.S. Public Diplomacy: A Theoretical Treatise
Foad Izadi, Louisiana State U, USA
Respondent
Elfriede Fursich, Boston College, USA
6413
Monday
12:00-13:15
Michigan
It Is Just Politics: Government Communication And Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Ralph Tench, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Government and Corporate Public Relations Practitioners: Peas in a Pod or Polar Opposites?
Brooke Fisher Liu, DePaul U, USA
Suzanne Horsley, U of Utah, USA
Abbey Blake Levenshus, U of Maryland, USA
The Blair Years 1997-2007: Understanding the Strengths and Weaknesses of Strategic Communication
Karen Sanders, San Pablo U, SPAIN
Congressional Agenda-Building: Examining the Influence of Congressional Communications From the Speaker of the
House
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
Alexander V. Laskin, U of Florida, USA
Ji Young Kim, U of Florida, USA
Public Communication About Potential Policies: Mind the Gap
Dave Gelders, Katholeike ULeuven, BELGIUM
6415
Monday
12:00-13:15
Minnesota
Global Sexualities
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Participants
Cinema's Scope: Gay and Lesbian Visibility in Contemporary Indian Cinema
Betsy Jose, Indiana U, USA
The Globalization of Sexuality: Examining the Transnational Queer Imagination and Representation in Stanley
Kwan's Lan Yu
Chih-Yun Chiang, U of Denver, USA
Liminalities, Borders, Bodies: Gay Identities And Representational Strategies In Contemporary Spain.
Begonya Enguix, U Oberta de Catalunya, SPAIN
Co-Optation, Integration, Immersion, or Assimilation? Israeli Lesbigay's Struggles to be Included Within the
Mainstream
Amit Kama, Emek Yezreel College, ISRAEL
6416
Monday
12:00-13:15
Nothwestern
Gender, Race, Sexuality, and the Palin Factor
Feminist Scholarship
Popular Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Participants
Who's Afraid of Sarah Palin? Or, How Sarah Palin is Forcing Us to Sort Out Our Feminisms
Bernadette Barker-Plummer, U of San Francisco, USA
Race-ing Sarah Palin
Kumarini Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Your Mama Wears Combat Boots, Y Tu Mamá Tambien: Palin and Cultural/Ethnic Contradictions in the Framing of
Motherhood
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Gail Lavielle, U of Connecticut, USA
Dudes for Sarah!: Sportin' and Courtin' Election Affect(ions)
Joy V. Fuqua, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Fakin' It: Sarah Palin from Photoshop to Saturday Night Live
Patrick Kinsman, Indiana U – Purdue U Indianapolis, USA
"Who's Nailin' Paylin?": Political Commentary and the Pornographic Imagination
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
A Pale Impression of Her Former Self
Toby Miller, U of California - Riverside, USA
When a Hockey Mom Met the RNC Platinum Card
Brenda Weber, Indiana U, USA
Republican Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin has been the subject of much discussion and debate in the United
States news and entertainment. Her surprise pick as John McCain's running mate during the 2008 Presidential election
catapulted her into the national media spotlight. Virtually overnight, the self-proclaimed "hockey mom" turned
political maverick was positioned as the rising star of the Republican Party. On the campaign trail, Palin cultivated an
image as an "ordinary Jane," invoking just enough sex appeal to court the "average"—and presumably white and
heterosexual—"Joe Six Pack." This roundtable draws together a diverse group feminist critics and scholars of race,
ethnicity, and sexuality to examine the complicated and contradictory public constructions of, and discourses
surrounding, Sarah Palin. How has her candidacy been constructed and framed by the popular press and media? The
participants on this roundtable analyze different aspects of Palin's public image—as an object of political parody, a
gendered makeover project, a signifier of whiteness and racial tension, an example of conservative feminism, for
example—and suggest that her political persona blurs traditional gender norms while simultaneously reinforcing
racial and class divisions and heteronormative ideals of beauty and desire. Collectively, these papers reveal the
importance of critical cultural analyses of the "Palin factor" that address the intersection of feminist theory,
scholarship on race/ethnicity, and queer studies.
6417
Monday
12:00-13:15
Ohio State
Transforming Media Landscape: Ongoing Articulation Processes Among Audiences and Mass Media
Industries in the Americas
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Juliet Gill Pinto, Florida International U, USA
Participants
Keeping Up With the Martinezes: Explaining Changes in The Miami Herald Coverage of Cuba and Issues of Import
for the Cuban-American Community, 1959-2007
Juliet Gill Pinto, Florida International U, USA
Gonzalo Soruco, U of Miami, USA
Inequality in the Making? Professionals' Perceptions of the Impact of the Central America-Dominican RepublicUnited States Free Trade Agreement on the Local Advertising Industry
Luis Ernesto Lopez-Preciado, U of Miami, USA
Immigration and Spanish-Language Television News: Covering Immigration for the Spanish Speaking USA in the
2008 Primary Season.
Mercedes Vigon, Florida International U, USA
Beyond crossing the digital Divide: Digitally Savvy in the Americas
Elizabeth Marsh, Florida International U, USA
Respondent
Federico Subervi, Texas State U, USA
This panel provides a deeper examination of keywords in communication, particularly in terms of ongoing processes
of articulation between ethnically diverse audiences and media organizations, as well as the shifting economic and
political contexts in which media exist. Impacts of sweeping demographic shifts and international influence in media
markets, political communication in Spanish-language broadcasting, and exploring digital savvy in the digital divide
are discussed in terms of scholarly trajectories and evolving understanding. A case study of organizational response to
dramatic transformations in audience demographics informs our understanding of how and why media interpret the
world as they do for their audiences by providing important illumination of the boundaries between organizational
and institutional variables in an historical context. Shades of meaning in Spanish-language U.S. broadcasting political
communication during the 2008 primary season represent important instances of interpretation and schematic
6418
Monday
12:00-13:15
Purdue
Social Influence Processes in Interpersonal Settings
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Abby Leigh Prestin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Does the "Personality Strength" Scale Actually Identify Opinion Leaders?
René Jainsch, Dresden U of Technology, GERMANY
Extreme Members and Group Polarization
Lyn M. Van Swol, U of Wisconsin, USA
Influentials in America: A National Study of the Connector, Persuader, and Health Maven Scales
Franklin J. Boster, Michigan State U, USA
Kim B. Serota, Michigan State U, USA
Kyle R. Andrews, Michigan State U, USA
Christopher John Carpenter, Michigan State U, USA
Media Affordances as Plan-Furthering Resources: The Case of Information Control
John Christian Feaster, U of Richmond, USA
6419
Monday
12:00-13:15
Wisconsin
Studies in Coconstruction and Context
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Participants
"Here's the Deal": Socialization Into Morality Through Negotiations of Media Time Use
Elisa Pigeron, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Collaborative Idea Construction: The Repetition of Gestures and Talk During Brainstorming
Eiko Yasui, U of Texas -Austin, USA
Going Beyond the Checklist: Developing Communication Environment in Mediation Introductions
Erik W Green, U of Texas, USA
Kelly Renee Rossetto, U of Texas, USA
Andrew Craig Tollison, U of Texas , USA
Madeline Maxwell, U Of Texas, USA
Jill M Kelly, U of Texas, USA
Disambiguating the Context: The Interpretation of Utterances as Components of Activities
Robert E. Sanders, SUNY - Albany, USA
6421
Monday
12:00-13:15
Lincolnshire II
Mediated Referendums and Elections: New Perspectives From Latin America and the U.S.
Political Communication
Chair
Mauro Pereira Porto, Tulane U, USA
Participants
Democratization and Media Opening in Brazil: TV Globo's Coverage of Five Presidential Elections
Mauro Pereira Porto, Tulane U, USA
Going Positive: Television Advertising Effects in Chile's 1988 Plebiscite
Taylor Boas, U of California - Berkeley, USA
Mediated Deliberation and Dilemmas in Consolidating Democracy in Brazil: The 2005 Referendum for Banning
Firearm Sales
Rousiley Maia, U de Federal de Minas Gerais, BRAZIL
Same-Sex Marriage as Contested Political Terrain: Media Coverage of California's Proposition 8
Raul Reis, California State U, Long Beach, USA
This panel examines the role of the media in shaping elections, referendums, and plebiscites in new and old
democracies. It adopts a comparative approach by analyzing mediated deliberation and voting behavior in Brazil,
Chile, and the United States. The papers discuss several examples of voting processes where communication played a
central role, including the 1988 plebiscite that inaugurated Chile's transition to democracy, the 2005 national
referendum for banning firearm and ammunition sales in Brazil, and the 2008 ballot initiative to prohibit same-sex
marriage in California. It also discusses television news coverage of five presidential elections in Brazil. These cases
of mediated voting are analyzed from a diversity of theoretical perspectives, including framing theory, deliberative
democracy, and theories of political representation. They also consider a variety of forms of communication,
including television and print news coverage and political advertising. The panel contributes to broaden political
communication research by comparing how mechanisms of civic participation are shaped by the different political
environments of new and older democracies.
6423
Monday
12:00-13:15
Great America II
Mediated and Digital Communication in Intergroup Contexts
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California, Irvine, USA
Participants
Asian American Television Viewing: Is It Related to Outgroup Vitality?
Jessica R. Abrams, California State U - Long Beach, USA
Digital Storytelling as Participatory Media Practice for Empowerment: The Case of the Chinese Immigrants in the
San Gabriel Valley
Ying Li, U of Macau, MACAO
Hypothetical Scenarios Versus Actual Interactions: Validating the Black Sheep Effect in Online Group
Communication
Zuoming Wang, U of North Texas, USA
Older Adolescents' Motivations for Use of SNS: The Influence of Gender, Group Identity, and Collective Self-Esteem
Valerie E. Barker, San Diego State U, USA
Respondent
Lisa Sparks, U of California, Irvine, USA
6430
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom A
Old and New Media
Communication and Technology
Chair
Christine L. Ogan, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Implementing Digital Television Newsrooms: Strategies, Mediation Activities, and Innovation Responses
Trisha Tsui-Chuan Lin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Print Culture in a Digital World: Technology's Impact on the Practice of Book Collection
Elizabeth Lenaghan, Northwestern U, USA
The Age Factor: The Maturity of Technology as an Influence on Public Creation of Content
Juanita Marie Darling, San Francisco State U, USA
Symbolic Models of Mobile Phone Appropriation: A Content Analysis of TV-Serials
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
6431
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom B
The KEY to CAT
Communication and Technology
Participants
Erik P. Bucy, Indiana U, USA
Arun Vishwanath, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Rich Ling, Telenor Research and Development, NORWAY
Lidwien van de Wijngaert, Twente U, THE NETHERLANDS
Information and Communication technologies have changed daily as well as organizational life. For example, the
internet has moved from being an innovative technology to a commodity. Consequenlty, the Communication and
Technology division needs to rethink what the central issues are that need investigation. Also, the board of ICA has
asked the divisions to examine their charter statements. During the Communication and Technology (CAT) Business
Meeting in Montreal in 2008 it was decided that the division needed to measure its member profile through keywords
used by CAT members. A task force consisting of the people that propose this panel was formed. In the early summer
of 2008 we asked CAT members to fill out an online questionnaire. The focus of the questionnaire was on the degree
to which respondents feel affiliated to each of the ICA divisions as well as a broad set of keywords. In the panel we
will first present the results of the research which includes a network analysis among CAT members (N=177). After
that we will open the floor for discussion on the keywords within the Communication and Technology Division. This
discussion can serve as a basis for a new charter statement of the CAT Division.
6433
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom D
Mediation and Emotion
Theme Sessions
Chair
Maria Mirca Madianou, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Mediation, Emotions, and the Dispositions for Ethical Action
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Mediation, Symbolic Power, and the Emotions of Recognition
Maria Mirca Madianou, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
How Does It Feel? Mediation and Imagination
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
The Mediation of Vulnerability: Towards a Postemotional Humanitarian Sensibility
Lilie Chouliaraki, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Mediation, a concept with a long history in philosophy, linguistics, critical theory and sociology and one of the
keywords in Williams' original book, has been receiving considerable attention in media studies in recent years
(Silverstone 1999 and 2005; Chouliaraki 2006; Couldry 2008; Livingstone 2008). Similarly, emotions are being
studied as inextricable parts of social and political life signalling an 'emotional turn' in social sciences and humanities.
The relationship between mediation and emotion, however, has not yet been adequately addressed. How can we best
conceptualise this relationship? Which theoretical perspectives can inform the articulation between mediation and the
production of emotions? What is the distinctive analytical value of a mediational approach and what can it contribute
to the understanding of media and the expression of emotions in our contemporary worlds?
6434
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom E
Media Selection
Mass Communication
Chair
Robert Andrew Dunn, Unversity of Alabama, USA
Participants
Age Identity, Gratification Opportunities, and Genre Choice of Mobile TV Viewing
Hyunjoo Lee, U of Georgia, USA
Jungho Ryu, Internet Election News Deliberation Commission, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sungjoon Lee, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Daejoong Kim, U at Buffalo, USA
Media Habits
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Toward a Comprehensive Causal Process Model of Media Selection
Atouba Ada Christian Yannick Lionel, U of Illinois, USA
Channel- Versus Content-Oriented Media Use
Jin Woo Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
6435
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom F
The Feminine, Masculine, and Sports
Mass Communication
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Effects of Exposure to Agents' Sexualized Appearance and Gaze in an Immersive Virtual Environment
Jesse A. Fox, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Gendered Profiles of Olympic History: Sportscaster Dialogue in the 2008 Beijing Olympics
Andrew C. Billings, Clemson U, USA
James Reynolds Angelini, U of Delaware, USA
Andrea H. Duke, U of Alabama, USA
More Than "Just the Facts"? Portrayals of Masculinity in Police and Detective Programs Over Time
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts - Amherst, USA
The Golden Ticket: Visualizing "Guy Talk" in Dallas-Ft. Worth
Joshua Beaty, U of Pittsburgh, USA
6436
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom G
Expedient Culture: Negotiating Identity, Materiality, and Otherness in Global Music Cultures
Popular Communication
Participants
Production vs Consumption: Analyzing the Cultural Formation of Bangla Rock
Sangeet Kumar, U of Iowa, USA
From Zines to Myspace: Articulations of New Media in the Puerto Rican Underground Punk Scene.
Ruben Ramirez, U of Puerto Rico, USA
Disciplining Popular Culture: National Anxieties and Gypsy/Romany Music
Alina Haliliuc, U of Iowa, USA
Sound, Affect, and Social Change: The Case of Hip Hop in Japan
David Morris, U of Iowa, USA
Our panel brings together instances of cultural analysis from four global sites (India, Romania, Japan and Puerto
Rico) in order to problematize the old debates within Cultural Studies. Specifically our study of music cultures
transcends and eschew the binaries of hegemony and resistance and hence claims that the uses of culture in a global
context are far more complex and varied. Hence we seek to expand the rubric for studying global culture by showing
its malleability. We do this by fore-grounding the idea of negotiation as a key term around which to anchor our
analyses and show how each of these heterogenous instance of global musical cultural formation entails an act of
negotiation.
6437
Monday
12:00-13:15
Chicago
Ballroom H
News and Gender
Journalism Studies
Chair
Erik M. Peterson, DePaul U, USA
Participants
Do Men and Women Read News Differently? Effects of Story Structure on Cognitive Processing
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Breaking the "Glass Ceiling" in the Newsroom:The Empowerment Experience of Female Journalists
Paul S. N. Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Yu Ching Man, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Women War Correspondents: Does Gender Make a Difference on the Front Line?
Milly Buonanno, U of Rome La Sapienza, ITALY
Silencing Ana: Framing and Censoring Identity in News Media
Siobahn Tara Stiles, Temple U, USA
Respondent
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
This session's papers showcase enormous diversity in method and focus but together they tackle the the complexities
of gender in news. Included here are analyses of content, in depth-interviews with working journalists, and an
experimental study focused on gender as an audience variable in processing news. The findings of these scholars are
not likely to offer assurance to those who hope for a gender-neutral news sphere. Indeed, these papers renew the
urgency for more research to understand the dwindling number of female news consumers and the persistence of
discriminatory routines in newsrooms and in news content across the world.
6441
Monday
12:00-13:15
Houston
Communication in Healthcare Organizations
Health Communication
Chair
John C. Lammers, U of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign, USA
Participants
A Communication Competence Approach to Examining Healthcare Worker Conflict, Social Support, Stress, Burnout,
and Job Satisfaction.
Kevin B. Wright, U of Oklahoma, USA
Daniel Bernard, U of Oklahoma, USA
John A. Banas, U of Oklahoma, USA
Eating Their Young: A Problematic Integration Approach to Understanding Hospital-Based Nurses' Experience and
Management of Conflict
LaKesha Nichole Anderson, George Mason U, USA
Health Belief Model in Healthcare Settings: Knowledge, Perceived Effectiveness, and Cues to Action on Staff
Behaviors*
Vinita Agarwal, Purdue U, USA
Howard E. Sypher, Purdue U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Reconceptualizing Trust: A Theoretical Framework of Macro-Level Relational Trust in Health Care Organizations
Vinita Agarwal, Purdue U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Howard E. Sypher, Purdue U, USA
6442
Monday
12:00-13:15
Kansas City
Deliberation and Political Discussion
Political Communication
Chair
Donatella Campus, U of Bologna, ITALY
Participants
Deliberative Democracy and Inequality: Two Cheers for Enclave Deliberation Among the Disempowered
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Allen S. Hammond, Jr., Santa Clara U, USA
Christopher Karpowitz, Brigham Young U, USA
Political Discussion and News Use in the Contemporary Public Sphere: The "Accessibility" and "Traversability" of
the Internet
Jennifer Brundidge, U of Texas, USA
Qualitative Interviews With Journalists About Deliberative Public Engagement
John C. Besley, U of South Carolina, USA
Chris Roberts, U of Alabama, USA
The Various Types of Interaction on Israeli Radio Phone-In Programs and the Public Sphere
Gonen Dori-Hacohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Respondent
Donatella Campus, U of Bologna, ITALY
6443
Monday
12:00-13:15
Los Angeles
Body, Beauty, and Well-Being
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Esther Rozendaal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Entertaining and Educating: Exploring the Presentation of Health Content in Teen Magazines
Jessie M. Quintero Johnson, U of Illinois, USA
Anjali Shankar, U of Illinois, USA
Influence of Presumed Influence on Thinness as a Beauty Ideal for Girls
Soh Wai Siong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGPORE
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Perspective Taking and Attitude Change Among Adolescent Participants Using Video Technologies: A Case Study
Deanne Catharine Simms, National Research Council, CANADA
Heather Ann Molyneaux, National Research Council, CANADA
Helene Fournier, National Research Council, CANADA
Susan O'Donnell, National Research Council, CANADA
The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: Beauty Ideals on the Disney & Nickelodeon Channels
Temple Northup, U of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA
Carol M. Liebler, Syracuse U, USA
The Multidimensional Media Influence Scale: Confirmatory Factor Structure and Relationship With Body
Dissatisfaction Among Children
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
6444
Monday
12:00-13:15
Miami
Cross-National Comparative Research in Question: Challenges of Theory, Method, and Contextualization
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Global Scope or Radical Contextualism? The Lure and Hazards of Comparative Research on Audiences
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Comparative Media Analysis: Why Some Fuzzy Thinking Might Help
John Downey, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Transnational Communities in Cross-National Comparative Research: Neither the National Nor the Global
Myria Georgiou, Leeds U, UNITED KINGDOM
Satellite Television as a Subnational Public Terrain
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Andreas Hepp, U of Bremen - IMKI, GERMANY
Cross-national comparative research has become a popular strategy for conducting globally influential and policy
relevant large scale research; it has also become an opportunity for the cosmopolitanization of media and
communication research, for scholarly cross-boundary collaborations and for the systematic study of phenomena and
practices that surpass singular cultural and geographical zones. At the same time, cross-national comparative research
has presented some major epistemological challenges, especially in relation to conducting large scale research and
empirical studies in global contexts. For example, cross-national comparative research requires a reflexive outlook
that, while adopting the national as a privileged context for research conduct, it can produce outcomes with
transnational relevance; it also demands sensitivity towards differences within and across systems, while sustaining a
comparative approach. As it becomes a popular choice among funding bodies and academic networks, cross-national
comparative research presents an opportunity to expand our understanding of the relevance and comparability of
cross-boundary phenomena and practices. It also presents us with the opportunity to develop a reflexive outlook on
the relation between the particular and the universal/global. Having engaged in various cross-national comparative
research projects, the members of this panel ask a number of questions around the practice, the theoretical
contribution and the future of this kind of research.
6445
Monday
12:00-13:15
Scottsdale
The Decline of the Gatekeeper? Findings From a Multinational Study on Leading Online Newspapers' UGC
Practices
Journalism Studies
Participants
Open Spaces, Closed Structures: The Integration of UGC Management in the Routines of the Online Newsroom
Alfred Hermida, U of British Columbia, CANADA
David Domingo, U Rovira i Virgili, SPAIN
Weaving the Thread: Gatekeeping and Filtering Strategies for User Comments
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
The Market Logic of User-Generated Content
Marina Vujnovic, U of Iowa, USA
User-Generated Content as a Challenge to "Traditional" Journalistic Ideology
Thorsten Quandt, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Ari Heinonen, U of Tampere, FINLAND
This panel presents up-to-date findings of a multi-national interview study on the inclusion of user-generated content
in mainstream online media. The collaborative project is based on a large number of in-depth interviews with chief
editors, online journalists and community managers of 23 online news media in 10 countries. By contrasting the
developments in these countries from different perspectives, we are able to identify national differences and
similarities, extracting general developments, regional trends and some idiosyncrasies.
6451
Monday
12:00-13:15
Belmont
Game Studies High Density Paper Session
Game Studies
Chair
Andrew Boyan, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
"It Wasn't Me, It Was My Avatar!" Exploring BIRGing and CORFing Behaviors in the Context of Video Game Play.
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Challenge and Video Game Play: Aligning Mental Models With Game Models
Andrew Boyan, Michigan State U, USA
Exploring Expertise in Gaming: A Self-Determination Approach
Joyce L.D. Neys, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Games at Work: The Recreational Use of Computer Games During Working Hours
Leonard Reinecke, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Looking for Gender (LFG): Roles and Behaviors Among Online Gamers
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Mia L. Consalvo, Ohio U, USA
Scott Caplan, U of Delaware, USA
Nick Kenlun Yee, Stanford U, USA
Modifying Video Games on Web2.0: An Exploration of Motives for Publishing Creative Game Content
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jesper Theodorsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Political Internet Games: Engaging an Audience
Joyce L.D. Neys, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Competitive Edge: An Investigation Into the Effects of Team Identification and Competition on Video Game
Effects
Robert Peter Griffiths, Ohio State U, USA
Matthew S Eastin, U of Texas at Austin, USA
The Flow of Virtual Resources:Capital Manifestation and Exchange in WoW
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Vivian Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
A rapid-fire series of brief introductions of 10 papers from the Game Studies SIG, followed by an interactive poster
session.