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SWBR Project No. 14635.00
FINAL REPORT
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE
2015-2020 FACILITIES
MASTER PLAN
And Five Year Capital Plan
Prepared By:
SWBR Architects
Final Report:
JULY 22, 2015
2015-2020 Facilities Master Plan
Adopted by the Board of Trustees in April of 2015 for submission to the State University of New York
Corning Community College
1 Academic Drive
Corning, New York 14830
Dr. Katherine Douglas, President
Thomas Carr, Vice President of Administrative Services
Calvin Williams, Director of the Physical Plant
Prepared by:
SWBR Architects
387 East Main Street
Rochester, NY 14604
with
Rickes Associates, Boston MA
ME Engineering, Rochester, NY
Paul Tankel, Rochester, NY
Baer Associates, Buffalo, NY
PAUL
TANKEL
Table of Contents
I.
Executive Summary................................................................................................1
Mission Statement
Vision
Values
Strategic Approach
Existing Conditions
2015 Planning Principles & Highlights
5-Year Capital Plan
II.
Space Utilization & Program ................................................................................ 9
Introduction
Quantitative Data
Distribution of Existing Space
Instructional Space Utilization
Space Program
Space Program Summary
III.
Facility Condition ................................................................................................ 46
Campus Locations
Corning Spencer Hill Campus
Site Issues
Campus Infrastructure
Administration Building (A)
Classroom Building (C)
Planetarium (E)
Gymnasium (G)
Ceramics/ Chemical Storage Building (K)
Library (L)
The Commons (M)
Nursing Building (N)
Observatory (O)
Physical Plant (P)
Perry Hall (Dormitory) (PH)
Automotive Technology (Q)
Learning Resource Center (R)
Science Building (S)
Spencer Crest Nature Center (V)
President’s House (Residence)
Boiler House
Wastewater Treatment
Business Development Center (B) and Child Care Center (D)
Goff Road (J)
Airport Corporate Park (T)
Elmira Academic Center (U)
IV.
Master Plan ......................................................................................................... 158
Strategic Approach
Corning CC System-Wide
Spencer Hill Campus
Elmira Academic Center
ACP (Airport Corporate Park) Center
Goff Road Center
Business Development Center
Potential New Centers
Sustainability
Capital Plan
V.
Document B: Space, Projects & Plans ...................................................................
Community SWOT & Participation Process
Space Utilization Appendices
Existing Building Plans
Master Deficiencies List
Master Plan Drawings
Project Budget & Prioritization Matrix
Executive Summary
Corning Community College was established in 1956,
being housed in several buildings in the City of
Corning. In 1963 the Campus was consolidated on 520
acres on a hillside south of Corning, at its current
Spencer Hill Campus. Today, the College operates out
of five locations and owns or leases over 500,000
square feet of space.
Consistent with the five-year facility master planning
cycle recommended by SUNY, Corning Community
College is updating its Plan that was last adopted in
2008. Significant improvements have been completed
since that plan was prepared, including the expansion
of the Library, the Gymnasium and the Commons. A
new 300 bed dormitory was also constructed, bringing
with it new demands for residential life.
At a Glance
2952 Student Headcount (2014)
501 Faculty & Staff (2014)
40 + Programs
50 +/- Articulation Agreements
A New Four Year Bachelor Degree Program
5 Locations
Serving 3 Counties
520 + Acres of Land
550,000 + SF of Building
A Planetarium, Observatory & Nature Center
The stated purpose of this 2015 Facility Master Plan is
to poise the College for Student Success, Implement
the College’s 2014 Strategic Plan, Provide a roadmap
for 5-Years of Capital Investment; all while
maintaining the College’s Affordable Market
Position.
Mission Statement
Corning Community College serves life-long learners in
our region by providing access to high-quality,
affordable transfer, career, and workforce development
educational opportunities. Our learning environment
fosters diversity, empowerment, leadership, and
teamwork for academic, professional, and personal
success. We collaborate locally and promote global
awareness for social, environmental, and economic
sustainability.
Corning Community College System:
Three Counties & Five Locations
Vision
Corning Community College will be a premier
community college where learning transforms lives.
Values
Student Focus; Excellence; Opportunity; Creativity;
Caring Community; Diversity; Sustainability
Picturesque Spencer Hill Campus
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
1
Strategic Approach
Corning Community College updated its Strategic Plan
in 2014. This plan is the basis for the development of
special area plans, including the Academic Plan also
prepared in 2014. The four Primary Themes drive
Objectives and Strategies of the Strategic Plan,
including:
Theme 1 - Student Focus and Engagement: CCC
will identify and meet enrollment targets and increase
the engagement, retention, and overall success of
students by enhancing the depth and breadth of the
learning experience.
This strategic plan established the foundation for a
multiphase planning process, from September 2014
through February 2015 the SWBR Team, met with the
College’s master plan steering committee, task force,
and open forums with students, faculty and staff. This
was an iterative process of gathering information,
developing planning guidelines, suggesting initiatives
and vetting project alternatives.
Theme 2 - Excellent, Innovative, In-demand
Education Programs: CCC will demonstrate
innovation and creativity in programming and promote
faculty development opportunities to achieve
pedagogical excellence.
Theme 3 - Quality Resources: CCC will act on
needs for people, financial, technological, spatial, and
material resources to optimize program delivery,
support services, and communication at all locations.
Theme 4 - Caring and Inclusive Community: CCC
will create an inclusive environment for students and
employees.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
2
Existing Conditions
Space Utilization: A thorough space utilization
analysis was conducted. The following summarizes the
overarching trends and findings associated with the
study.
210,000

190,000



As is being seen across the country, there is a
decline in the high school population, directly
affecting enrollment at the area institutions. Since
2010, CCC has experience an overall decline;
Overall, the amount of space is adequate with
sufficient capacity to support increase in
enrollment with adjustment to scheduling and
utilization;
209,020206,163
202,719
199,036
200,000
194,602
189,167
182,867
180,000
176,140
170,000
2000
2010
2020
Facility Condition: A detailed Facility Condition
Analysis was performed with the following general
findings:
2040
Total Population Living in Service Area 2000-2040
Utilizing current best practices, national averages
and preferred teaching pedagogies, the analysis
suggests a need for additional classrooms assuming
Child Care Center 2,950 ASF
Criminal Justice Center 10,840 ASF
recommended “right-sizing” and building
consolidation occurs;
Business Development Center 12,861 ASF
The proposed lab space needs are based on the
supposition of the disaggregation of the Integrated
Science Courses. This analysis identified a need for
the following labs, Anatomy and Physiology,
Biology, Chemistry, and Microbiology.
2030
Main Campus 309,561 ASF
Airport Corporate Park 23,412 ASF
Elmira Academic Center 23,538 ASF
Assignable Square Footage Distribution
Figure 8: Spencer Hill ASF by FICM Space Category
FICM Space Type Category
Percent
of
ASF
Total
ASF
32,606
10.5%

The structure and finishes of buildings are
generally in good shape

Technology is outdated
200 Laboratory Facilities
52,385
16.9%

Fully conditioned space for year-round activity is
only available in select buildings
300 Office Facilities
49,627
16.0%
400 Study Facilities
500 Special Use Facilities
Athletics, Media, Greenhouse,
Field Bldg., etc.
600 General Use Facilities
Assembly, Exhibition, Food,
Lounge, (student centered) etc.
700 Support Facilities
17,276
24,701
5.6%
8.0%
39,265
12.7%
25,316
8.2%

The current heating and cooling systems are taxed
and need updating

Furnishings do not reflect current trends in
pedagogy

Circulation conflicts existing between vehicles and
pedestrians
100 Classroom Facilities
800 Health Care Facilities
453
0.1%
241,629
78.1%
900 Residential Facilities
64,450
20.8%
000 Unclassified Facilities
3,482
1.1%
309,561
100.0%
Subtotal ASF
Grand Total
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
3
2015 Planning Principles & Highlights
The College hosted a three day issue and opportunities
workshop with faculty, staff, administration, Board of
Trustee members and other stakeholders. Community
outreach with regional planners, the business
community and government officials was conducted.
Analysis of existing space and facility conditions was
professionally performed. Based on this and other
analysis, research and exploration, the following
Planning Principals were developed and confirmed:

Identity & Mission: Lead by example; tell great
stories; utilize meaningful place-names & building
names; prepare consistent & quality design
guidelines; serve your market (with location &
product); value sustainability practices; celebrate
victories;

Stellar & Signature Programs: Develop
signature programs around an Earth & Sky theme;
focus investment on existing exemplary programs
(labs, classrooms, technology, furnishings, &
“homes”); consolidate exemplary program
components in singular locations;

Learning Environment: Create 21st century
learning environments; third spaces; collaborative
learning opportunities; technology; new
furnishings; more classroom space per student;
conditioned environment; environmental
sustainability;

Strengthen the Core: Strengthen as a center for
residential life; correct building and infrastructure
deficiencies; landscape improvements;
administrative & office space investment;
circulation & parking;

Enrollment Growth or Stability: Brand value;
great academic programs; welcome experience;
first year experience; student life; athletics; quality
facilities;

Engage the Community: Business relationships;
high school relationships, year–round design (AC);
shared facilities (planetarium, theater, nature
center, preserve, dorms); events & programming;

Maximize Resources: Multi-function spaces;
purposeful buildings & locations; strategic
financial investment.
Signature Program & Identity
Mission of Student Success
Strengthen the Core: Spencer Hill
Community Engagement: Downtown Corning
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
4
5-Year Capital Plan
In considering each element of the Facility master Plan
the purpose of the 2015 Facility Master Plan is restated.
This Plan will to poise the College for Student
Success, Implement the College’s 2014 Strategic
Plan, Provide a roadmap for 5-Years of Capital
Investment; all while maintaining the College’s
Affordable Market Position.
Spencer Hill Campus
The following projects are recommended for the
Spencer Hill Campus:
Academic Programs

Earth & Sky Institute “Home”

Observatory & Nature Center Renovation

Earth & Sky Site & Preserve Improvements

Solar Field & Wind Turbine
To accomplish this, and in support of the seven
Planning Principles, Corning Community College will
strive to progress the following projects over the
coming 5-years (pending available funding).

Special Investment for Exemplary Programs

“Right Sizing” Classrooms and Providing
Dedicated Lab Spaces
Starred projects are noted as having particular priority
based on their critical relationship to stated criteria,
including 1) support of the Strategic Plan, 2)
consistency with Planning Principles, and 3) whether
they are a life safety or code issue.

21st Century Labs & Mechanicals

21st Century Classrooms w/Collaborative
Furnishings & Technology
21st Century Classrooms
Correcting Missing Spaces

Multi-Use Assembly & Performance Building
Stewardship of Assets

Heating and Cooling Expansion and Upgrades
Throughout

Correct Known Structural, Mechanical and Code
Deficiencies
The Welcome Experience & Curb Appeal

Entry Redesign, Signage, Way-finding &
Landscape Plan

East parking Lot Improvements and Completion
of Ring Road

Landscape Plan for New “North Quad”

Landscape Plan for “Campus Green”

“Green Infrastructure” Storm-water
Improvements
The Community

Athletics - Spectator Improvements

Commons Entry Exhibit

Public Art
“Strengthen the Spencer Hill Core"
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
5
Elmira Academic Center
The following projects are recommended for the
Elmira Academic Center:
Goff Road Center
The following projects are recommended for the Goff
Road Center:
Academic Programs
Serving the Market, Academics & Efficiency

Special Investment for Workforce Development
Program

Close the Center and Sell or Lease


Land Acquisition Program to Accommodate
Future Growth
Relocate Classes, Labs & Offices to the Spencer
Hill Campus
Stewardship of Assets

Correct Known Structural, Mechanical and Code
Deficiencies
Business Development Center
The following projects are recommended for the
Business Development Center:
Serving the Market, Academics & Efficiency
The Welcome Experience & Curb Appeal

End the Lease and Close the Center


Relocate Classes, Labs & Offices to the Spencer
Hill Campus, Elmira Academic Center and/or a
new Corning College-town Center
Site, Circulation, Signage & Way-Finding
Improvements
The Community

Entry Exhibit

Public Art
ACP Center (Airport Corporate Park)
The following projects are recommended for the ACP
Center:
Potential New Centers
The following projects are recommended relative to
where and how Corning Community College should be
teaching and/or operating:
Serving the Market, Academics & Efficiency

Feasibility Study for Corning College-town Center
Academic Programs

Feasibility Study for Seneca Lake Center

Building Addition to Accommodate Consolidated
Auto Program

Open a new Corning College-town Center
Pending Positive Feasibility & Funding

Special Investment for Auto Tech Program

Open a new Seneca Lake Center Pending Positive
Feasibility & Funding
Stewardship of Assets

Correct Known Structural, Mechanical and Code
Deficiencies
System-wide Projects
The following projects are recommended relative to the
Corning Community College System:
The Welcome Experience & Curb Appeal

Landscape, Signage & Site Improvements
Serving the Market, Academics & Efficiency

Transportation Program
Stewardship of Assets

Design & Construction Standards Document
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
6
Five-Year Investment Strategy
A five-year investment strategy has been illustrated
representing budget level cost estimates for each
project recommendation. The projects were assessed
and ranked against criteria including 1) support of the
Strategic Plan, 2) consistency with Planning Principles,
and 3) whether they are a life safety or code issue.
Additionally, projects were scheduled over the five-year
period based on 1) Cost, 2) Potential funding source,
and 3) implementation requirements. All project
recommendations are included in the $73 million
Capital Plan. $50 +/- million is scheduled to be
invested over the next five years (2015-2020).
Approximately $23 million in projects are noted as
being either funding or market driven. These projects
would be accomplished beyond the five-year period if
project-specific funding is not identified. Important
components of projects noted as having “particular
priority” in the previous section could be accomplished
for approximately $14 million. Project costs are listed
below in 2015 thousands of dollars without escalation.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
7
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
8
Space Utilization & Program
Introduction
In the spring of 2014, Rickes Associates (RA) was
engaged to support SWBR Architects in the formation of
a Facilities Master Plan for Corning Community College
(CCC). The primary role of RA was to provide a detailed
instructional space utilization study as well as to
determine current and future space needs for the College,
at the aggregate level.
The preparation of space planning projections is an
exercise in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. RA
has developed a proven methodology that integrates both
of these aspects into a holistic space planning process
that includes the following:
Quantitative:

Personnel: faculty and staffing levels, current
and projected (full- and part-time),

Enrollment: historical, current and projected
(headcount and FTE),

Space Inventory: organizational structure, space
assignments and distribution on campus, and

Instructional: detailed utilization analysis by
room related to hours, occupancy, and square
footage.
Qualitative:

Plans: review current space use and future plans
such as strategic plans, prior master plans, etc.,

Programs: identify any programmatic or
pedagogical changes related to space use,

Interview: meet with a cross-section of
stakeholders (faculty, staff, and students), and

Integrate: interpret all of this data through the
qualitative lens of the College’s perspective.
Collectively, these data and observations establish a basis
for the development of an order-of-magnitude (OOM)
space program. The OOM is driven by the application of
broad, generally accepted space planning guidelines,
which, in turn, are based on the space categories defined
by the Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual (FICM).
The end product provides the College with a
quantification of space needs and, in concert with the
efforts of SWBR, lays the foundation for identifying how
that space may be allocated.
The following summarizes the quantitative and
qualitative findings for CCC related to enrollment, space
distribution, instructional space utilization analysis, and
interview findings. The focus of this study is on the
Spencer Hill Campus and, unless otherwise noted, all
data and associated results refer to this campus.
Quantitative Data
Demographics
Corning Community College, located in Corning, New
York, serves Chemung, Schuyler, and Steuben counties in
the Southern Tier region of New York State. Since 2000,
the population of the College’s service area has been
decreasing and aging, according to Census data. This
trend is anticipated to continue, based upon projections
from the Cornell Program on Applied Demographics at
Cornell University.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
9
The following tables and charts show actual 2000 and
2010 and projected 2015 through 2040 total populations
for Chemung, Schuyler, and Steuben counties as a whole,
and by age group.
Examined by age group, projected data indicates a net
decrease in all age groups between 2010 and 2040, with
the exception of the 65-plus category. The decreases are
likely a combination of aging-in-place as well as some
out-migration from the College’s service area. These
trends are displayed in Figure 2.
Figure 1: Service Area Total Population 2000-2040
209,020
210,000
206,163
Total Population
202,719
Actual
199,036
200,000
Projected
194,602
189,167
190,000
182,867
180,000
176,140
170,000
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
Sources: United States Census and he Cornell Program on Applied Demographics at Cornell University
Figure 2: Service Area Population 2000 to 2040 by Age Group
70,000
60,564
60,000
50,000
54,562
48,826
49,684
47,474
49,943
47,339
46,163
41,639
38,478
40,000
32,777
32,008
30,000
58,976
57,681
26,183
30,591
26,419
25,864
20,000
12,637
46,849
44,188
43,208
35,015
45,449
42,245
42,147
44,831
40,354
39,834
0-4
5-14
15-24
25-44
45-64
25,105
24,475
24,174
23,022
23,640
22,897
65 plus
21,990
21,197
22,209
21,475
11,949
11,674
20,858
11,461
11,008
20,053
10,550
10,178
9,871
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
Actual
Projected
10,000
0
2000
2005
Sources: United States Census and the Cornell Program on Applied Demographics at Cornell University
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
10
Figure 3 summarizes actual and projected population for
Chemung, Schuyler, and Steuben counties, as presented
above.
Figure 3: Service Area Population 2000 to 2040 by Age Group
Actual
2000
2010
12,637
11,949
30,591
26,183
26,419
25,864
57,681
48,826
49,684
60,564
32,008
32,777
209,020
206,163
Year
0-4
5-14
15-24
25-44
45-64
65 plus
Total
2015
11,674
25,105
24,475
47,474
58,976
35,015
202,719
2020
11,461
24,174
23,022
47,339
54,562
38,478
199,036
Projected
2025
2030
11,008
10,550
23,640
22,897
22,209
21,475
46,163
44,188
49,943
46,849
41,639
43,208
194,602
189,167
2035
10,178
21,990
20,858
42,147
45,449
42,245
182,867
2040
9,871
21,197
20,053
40,354
44,831
39,834
176,140
Enrollment
Enrollment is clearly one of the main drivers of space
needs calculations. Following the general trend of its
service area population, the College’s enrollment has seen
an overall decline since 2010. Fall semester headcount
enrollment, which represents the total number of
students enrolled at the College (not counting ACE
students), has dropped by 832 students over the past four
years. Fall full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment (which
converts semester credits to a common denominator of
full-time students), has seen a lesser decline of 306 FTEs.
This may be attributable to a change in the proportion of
full- to part-time students or the courses of study
pursued by students over time.
Figure 4: Headcount and FTE Enrollment 2010-2014
4,000
3,784
3,592
3,340
3,500
3,414
Headcount
FTEs
2,952
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,448
1,375
1,262
1,317
1,142
2012
2013
2014
1,000
500
0
2010
2011
Enrollment figures exclude ACE students.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
11
Personnel
501 employees. The chart below presents the current
distribution of personnel by type. Overall, almost 43
percent of the personnel at CCC are part-time.
A second major driver of space needs is the number and
types of personnel employed by the College. The current
personnel data provided by Corning indicates a total of
Figure 5: Distribution of Personnel by Type
Total Personnel = 501
Faculty, 17.6%
Part-Time Employees, 13.6%
Administrative, 25.0%
Service/Maintenance, 6.6%
Adjunct, 29.3%
Clerical, 5.8%
Other Civil Service, 1.8%
Temporary Employees, 0.4%
The amount of space allocated to personnel type varies
depending on the proportion of shared to dedicated
space needed to carry out their functions. For example,
the amount of assignable square footage assigned to
service/maintenance personnel is a different space factor
than that applied to adjunct faculty.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
12
Distribution of Existing Space
The following analysis is based on the updated 2014
space inventory, reflecting changes/adjustments
occurring or expected to occur by Spring 2015.
Figure 6: FICM Space Categories
FICM Category
Classrooms/100
Analyzed Space
The College, at its Spencer Hill Campus and five off-site
locations, comprises 556,475 net square feet (NSF). This
figure is composed of both assignable and non-assignable
square feet. Assignable square feet (ASF) is contained in
spaces in which specific functions occur and which can
be assigned to a particular activity, such as classrooms,
offices, and dining facilities. Non-assignable square feet is
in spaces such as stairways, corridors, rest rooms,
mechanical closets, and other spaces that cannot be
assigned to a specific activity.
Laboratory/200
Office/300
Study/Library/400
Special Use/500
General Use/600
Support/700
Health Care/800
Unclassified/000
This study focuses on ASF – the space in which the CCC
community lives – as this is the space in which the
instructional, administrative, and support functions of the
College are carried out. Space located in facilities not
owned by the College was not within the scope of this
study.
This study also uses a system of classifying space
developed by the U.S. Department of Education’s
National Center for Education Statistics and contained in
its Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and
Classification Manual (FICM). The manual contains an
array of space types, each bearing a three digit FICM
code, that are arranged into space categories as listed in
Figure 6.
Category Description
General-purpose instructional
spaces
Specialized instructional
spaces
Academic/administrative
offices and related spaces
Traditional library space and
related study spaces
Athletic, media, demonstration
spaces
Dining, bookstore, day care,
student activities spaces
Shops, storage, mailroom,
printing service spaces
Examination rooms, nurse
station, waiting area
Inactive, unassigned,
unfinished, or renovation
areas
This type of coding allows a campus to be compared
against peer or aspirational campuses for benchmarking
purposes. For the purposes of this study, the Physical
Space Inventory Coding System specific to the State of
New York has been converted and cross-linked to the
appropriate FICM categories.
Net Square Feet (NSF) = Assignable Square Feet (ASF) + Non-assignable Square Feet
at CCC, this translates to:
556,475 NSF = 383,162 ASF + 173,313 Non-assignable Square Feet
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
13
Locations
Distribution of Space by Location
Aside from its Spencer Hill Campus, Corning
Community College has five off-site locations, each of
which provides a unique range of services and programs:
The chart below illustrates the distribution of the
College’s ASF among the six sites.
Figure 7: Distribution of Assignable Space by
Airport Corporate Park:
Location
This location, in Horseheads, contains specialized
facilities for instruction in Automotive and Auto Body
Technology. Some courses in other disciplines are also
Child Care Center 2,950 ASF
Main Campus 309,561 ASF
offered.
Criminal Justice Center 10,840 ASF
Business Development Center 12,861 ASF
Business Development Center:
Located in downtown Corning, this building hosts the
Small Business Development Center at CCC, Workforce
Development and Community Education, and general
instructional space.
Child Care Center:
This facility is located adjacent to the Business
Development Center and provides childcare for the CCC
community.
Criminal Justice Center:
The Criminal Justice Center on Goff Road in Corning,
originally a site for law-enforcement training, now offers
instruction in a variety of subjects.
Airport Corporate Park 23,412 ASF
Elmira Academic Center 23,538 ASF
Distribution of Space by Type – Spencer Hill
The table below shows the categories of space present on
the Spencer Hill Campus along with the assignable
square feet occupied by each and the share of total ASF
attributable to each.
Figure 8: Spencer Hill ASF by FICM Space Category
FICM Space Type Category
Elmira Academic Center:
This facility, located in Elmira, now hosts the College’s
welding program in new instructional space opened
within the past year. In addition to general instruction,
this location also hosts a branch office of the Small
Business Development Center and the Admissions
Office.
100 Classroom Facilities
Percent
of
ASF
Total
ASF
32,606
10.5%
200 Laboratory Facilities
52,385
16.9%
300 Office Facilities
49,627
16.0%
400 Study Facilities
500 Special Use Facilities
Athletics, Media, Greenhouse,
Field Bldg., etc.
600 General Use Facilities
Assembly, Exhibition, Food,
Lounge, (student centered) etc.
700 Support Facilities
17,276
24,701
5.6%
8.0%
39,265
12.7%
25,316
8.2%
453
0.1%
241,629
78.1%
900 Residential Facilities
64,450
20.8%
000 Unclassified Facilities
3,482
1.1%
309,561
100.0%
800 Health Care Facilities
Subtotal ASF
Grand Total
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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14
The previous table separates out the ASF of Residential
Facilities as this represents the single largest block of
assignable space on campus and is ancillary to the spaces
used to carry out the day-to-day functions of the College.
Likewise, Unclassified Facilities – those spaces that are
not currently assigned a particular function -- are also
separated out because they are not currently in use.
Instructional spaces, which include Classroom Facilities
and Laboratory Facilities, represent the largest share of
non-residential on-campus space, accounting for 27.4
percent of on-campus ASF.
Distribution of Space by Type – Off-Campus
Of the almost 74,000 ASF of space in off-campus
facilities, almost 70 percent is assigned to instructional
space. The following table presents each FICM category’s
share of ASF for the five sites (excluding Spencer Hill).
Figure 9: Off-Campus ASF by FICM Space Category
100 Classroom Facilities
22,557
Percent of
Total ASF
30.6%
200 Laboratory Facilities
28,270
38.4%
300 Office Facilities
15,862
21.6%
380
0.5%
6,414
8.7%
FICM Space Type Category
500 Special Use Facilities
600 General Use Facilities
700 Support Facilities
Grand Total
ASF
118
0.2%
73,601
100.0%
The majority of off-campus ASF is found at the Elmira
Academic Center and Airport Corporate Park, because of
the types of instructional programs and quantity of
instruction offered at each.




The Airport Corporate Park is home to an
automotive program, which, by its nature,
requires large spaces for vehicles and
equipment.
The Elmira Academic Center houses a welding
training facility, which also requires a large
amount of space. These two sites are also the
busiest of the four off-campus instructional
sites.
Elmira Center has 57 courses scheduled,
totaling 173.47 hours of instruction, which is
the most of any off-campus site.
Airport Corporate Park ranks second, with 18
courses scheduled, totaling 73.66 hours of
instruction.
Instructional Space Utilization
Overview
This section presents a review of the statistical
methodology used for the analysis of instructional space
and course-scheduling data, discusses applicable planning
guidelines, outlines the assumptions included in the
analysis, and reviews issues that affect the assignment and
use of instructional spaces for the Spencer Hill campus as
a whole. All general-purpose classrooms and specialized
instructional (SI) spaces have been reviewed for weekly
hours of use, seat or station occupancy rates, and, where
applicable, assignable square footage per station.
Classroom and SI spaces are examined separately, given
the varying planning guidelines that apply to each.
The analysis of instructional space utilization and need
was based on Fall 2013 Registrar’s data and the
complement of instructional spaces in use at that time.
As of Fall 2014, a flux in space use was created by
construction of the new Library and renovations to the
Gym and Wellness Center, which impacted the space
available for scheduling.
Applied Metrics
The primary purpose of the instructional space analysis is
to inform facilities planning decisions and support the
allocation of capital resources within the context of a
campus Master Plan. The outcome of this detailed
analysis of instructional space is intended to ensure the
provision of the right type of space, in the right amount,
in the right location, and at the right time. The statistical
methodology applied by RA to the instructional space
utilization analysis is widely used and accepted in higher
education.
The three metrics used to determine how well an
institution is able to satisfy instructional demand are
utilization, occupancy, and capacity, and are defined and
applied as follows. Adherence to the guidelines
associated with these three variables provides credible
and defensible findings to support the planning and
prioritization of space needs.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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15
Utilization: is the percent of weekly hours available
during which a space is scheduled.
An institution’s “scheduling window” refers to that
block of time within which it is possible to schedule
all or most coursework. Since weekly room hour
utilization rates are calculated based on the
institution’s scheduling window, it is essential to
define the hours of this window. The formal
Spencer Hill daytime scheduling window begins each
day at 7:30 a.m. and ends Mondays, Wednesdays,
and Fridays at 5:05 p.m. and Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:50 p.m. There is a common hour on
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:15 p.m. to 1:40
p.m.
The practiced daytime scheduling window, derived
from Registrar’s course data, begins the day at 8:35
a.m. and ends at 4:50 p.m. This, minus the common
hour, yields a practiced daytime window of 37.42
hours per week. This is the scheduling window used
in the analysis. The defined scheduling window has a
direct impact on the total number of instructional
spaces required. The more compressed the
scheduling window, the more instructional spaces
will be needed to support institutional course
offerings.
General-Purpose Classrooms
The recommended schedule planning guideline
for general-purpose classrooms is to schedule
67 percent of available hours within the
scheduling window, or 25 of the 37 hours in the
CCC window. Since classroom sizes, amenities,
and course sizes all vary, this flexibility allows
the Registrar to optimize potential matches
between course needs and available classrooms.
There are several other reasons that the 67
percent utilization rate is considered standard in
academic planning:




Needed additional capacity is provided at
the start of a semester, when the most
number of course changes occur.
Special and extracurricular events are able
to schedule and use classroom space.
Faculty are more likely to obtain some of
their preferred teaching spaces.
Classrooms can “air out” between uses.


Access is needed for maintenance in
between routine maintenance periods.
Scheduling flexibility is provided
throughout the semester.
Specialized Instructional Spaces
The target weekly room hour utilization rate is
lower for SI spaces at 50 percent of the
scheduling window, or 18.5 of CCC’s 37 hours.
The rationale for the more conservative target is
to allow adequate time for course set-up and
break-down, as well as free time to permit
students the opportunity to explore selfdirected study or research in these spaces. In
the case of some individual SI spaces – and at
campuses with smaller enrollments – the 50
percent rate may be unattainable for every
course taught in an SI space, as there may be
not be enough students who need to take these
specialized courses.
Occupancy: is the percent of seats or stations that
are occupied when a room is scheduled for
instruction.
The “seat or station occupancy rate” refers to the
proportion of seats or stations that are occupied
during the time an instructional space is scheduled,
relative to the total seating capacity of the space. As
is the case with the target weekly room use hours,
the seat and station occupancy rates proposed here
reflect planning guidelines in consistent use
throughout higher education.
General-Purpose Classrooms
When general-purpose classrooms are occupied,
it is suggested that 67 percent of the available
seats be filled. This is an average, and lower and
higher occupancy rates will exist on a room-byroom basis.
Specialized Instructional Spaces
The comparable station occupancy guideline for
specialized instructional spaces is 80 percent of
all stations, on average. Since these spaces cost
more to build than general-purpose classrooms,
a more intensive use of these spaces is desirable.
Also, these course sizes tend to be more
predictable and controllable than courses held
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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16
in general-purpose classrooms, because a closer
match is possible between the space and the
students enrolled.
Capacity: is the amount of assignable space per
seat or station in an instructional space. This metric
is calculated by dividing the total assignable square
feet in a room by the number of student seats or
stations available in the room.
General-Purpose Classrooms
An average of 20 to 25 ASF /seat is
recommended in a typical flat floor classroom.
This figure can be lower or higher, depending
upon the total number of seats (rooms with a
higher number of seats generally have lower
seat sizes) as well as the technology and type of
furniture to be accommodated (when program
needs call for furniture to be reconfigurable,
more space is needed). Large lecture halls may
work with 12 to 15 ASF/seat, whereas case
room-style seating may require upwards of 40
ASF/seat.
For the purposes of this analysis, a planning
guideline of 22 ASF/station in general-purpose
classrooms of 100 seats or fewer was applied to
determine total classroom square footage needs.
Although a mix of classroom types and
capacities is needed, the total square footage
figure provides the institution with a pool of
space from which it can draw to determine its
appropriate classroom capacity distribution.
Actual classrooms are expected to fall both
above and below this average ASF/seat.
Specialized Instructional Spaces
The ASF/station requirements for specialized
instructional spaces vary dramatically, from 30
ASF/station in computer labs to well over 100
ASF/station in engineering or allied health labs.
The total space needs for specialized
instructional spaces were calculated by applying
a multiplier determined by the relative space
needs of the particular discipline. As with the
general-purpose classrooms, the intent was to
determine a total order-of-magnitude square
footage for specialized instructional spaces that
can then be configured to meet institutional
needs.
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Classrooms – Spencer Hill
Classrooms Having 100 or Fewer Seats
There were 41 Registrar-controlled classrooms and two
proprietary classrooms (Campus Auto Technology Q103
and Observatory O110) at the Spencer Hill Campus
during Fall 2013. This analysis focuses on the Registrarcontrolled spaces, which are divided into two clusters:
those having 100 or fewer seats, and those with more
than 100 seats. This was done because slightly different
metrics apply to each cluster.
CCC has 40 classrooms having 100 or fewer seats. These
spaces have a target hour utilization and seat occupancy
of 67 to 70 percent. The ASF per seat goal for such
spaces is between 20 and 25 ASF per seat. The table
below shows the distribution of these classrooms, along
with average utilization, occupancy, and ASF per seat
findings.
Figure 10: Spencer Hill Classroom Distribution and Summary Findings – 100 or Fewer Seats
Seat Occupancy
ASF per Seat
25.1
22.3
18.3
20.1
12.5
17.7
16.2
Spaces
12
2
16
8
2
40
Hour Utilization
47%
71%
53%
67%
88%
Overall
Avg.
Seat Occupancy
60%
54%
64%
59%
68%
Overall Average
ASF per Station
18.8
29.8
19.3
19.2
19.5
2
1
1
The overall daytime hour utilization is 56 percent of
the scheduling window, which is below the 67
percent guideline. Aside from Classroom Building
C204A, which was unscheduled during Fall 2013,
hour utilization per room ranged from 14 percent
for Classroom Building C001 (averaged across three
courses) to 98 percent for Science Building S206
22
77%
65%
68%
47%
42%
33%
48%
4
3
3
1
1
1
67%
45%
62%
57%
61%
45%
53%
63%
Overall
Avg.
1 to 20
21 to 30
31 to 40
41 to 50
51 to 60
61 to 70
71 to 80
2
7
15
13
1
2
1
1
67%
Hour Utilization
2
4
1
Rooms
Nursing Building
1
5
8
Science Building
Learning Resource Center
Gymnasium/Wellness
Center
Seat
Range
Goal:
Classroom Building
< 100 Seats
56%
Overall
Avg.
62%
Overall Average
Overall
Avg.
19.6
(averaged across eight courses). Figure 11 shows the
average hour utilization for each classroom on
campus. A detailed use of each room is provided in
the Appendix.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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18
Figure 11: Average Daytime Hour Utilization per Spencer Hill Classroom – 100 or Fewer Seats
97% 97% 98%
100%
90%
77% 77%
80%
70%
60%
66% 66% 67% 67%
Guideline Hr. Utilization = 67%
CCC Average Hr. Utilization = 56%
54%
50%
50%
57%
59% 59% 59% 61%
69%
79%
71% 72% 72%
63%
52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 53%
45% 45%
37%
40%
33%
30%
30%
24% 24%
20%


8 courses
Average seat occupancy is 62 percent, with
most individual rooms within 10 percent of the
guideline. Smaller capacity rooms, in the 1 to 20
seat range, are occupied at higher rates (77
percent seat occupancy). However, courses of
this size are relatively more predictable and this
fill rate is acceptable. CCC seat occupancy is
also on target up to 40 seat capacity rooms
before seat occupancy begins to fall off in the
larger capacity classrooms.
Average seat size is somewhat tight at 19.6 ASF
per seat, and particularly tight in classrooms
having between 31 and 60 seats. This suggests

Classroom Building C107
Gymnasium/Wellness Center G120
Nursing Building N207
Science Building S208
Nursing Building N203
Learning Resource Center R106
Nursing Building N204
Learning Resource Center R212
Nursing Building N333
Learning Resource Center R207
Nursing Building N202
Classroom Building C202A
Nursing Building N137
Learning Resource Center R208
Classroom Building C203
Learning Resource Center R206
Learning Resource Center R102
Nursing Building N206
Classroom Building C204
Classroom Building C106
Learning Resource Center R103
Learning Resource Center R214
Learning Resource Center R003
Learning Resource Center R213
Classroom Building C005
Learning Resource Center R105
Learning Resource Center R211
Classroom Building C202
Classroom Building C206
Learning Resource Center R210
Nursing Building N205
Gymnasium/Wellness Center G121
Classroom Building C105
Learning Resource Center R005
Classroom Building C006
Learning Resource Center R219
Learning Resource Center R019
0%
0%
Science Building S206
10%
Classroom Building C204A
Classroom Building C001 3 courses
14%
that these classrooms are generally
“overcapacity” in that there are more seats in
the allocated square footage than
recommended. The goal, on average, is 22 ASF
per seat – and more in those classrooms where
problem-based instruction is desirable.
The number of courses scheduled per room
range from three in C001 to eight in S206.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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19
Distribution by Day and Time
While Figure 12 displays the percentage of daytime courses
scheduled on a given day or combination of days, Figure
13 reflects the distribution of all individual course meetings
across the days of the week. Fully 78 percent of CCC’s
300 day courses are in the traditional or balanced MWF
or TR pattern, while upwards of 13 percent of all courses
meet once per week.
Meanwhile, there are 719 individual course meetings per
week on campus, the majority (26 percent) of which are
held on Mondays. (This include courses that met only on
Figure 12: Course Meeting Day Combinations
Day
Daytime
Percent of
Combinations Courses Daytime Courses
MWF
153
51%
TR
80
27%
MW
26
9%
T
18
6%
R
8
3%
F
7
2%
M
4
1%
W
2
1%
MTWRF
1
<1%
MWRF
1
<1%
Total
300
100%
Mondays, as well as courses that met on a combination
of weekdays such as MW, or MWF.) Theoretically, if all
courses were distributed evenly across five days, 20
percent of all course meetings would occur each day. It is
important to note that scheduling flexibility decreases as
course offerings increase on any given day. Conversely,
many campuses exhibit low use on Friday, reserving a
portion of that day for labs, special curricular events, or
as discussion days. CCC is unusual in that 23 percent of
all weekly course meetings are held on Fridays.
Figure 13: Course Meetings Per Weekday (Total = 719)
Monday
185
Tuesday
99
Wednesday
26%
14%
25%
183
Thursday
13%
90
Friday
23%
162
0
50
100
150
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
200
20
Time Blocks
Corning’s formal scheduling window contains 14 official
time blocks to organize start and end times of classes.
Twelve of these time blocks occurred within the practiced
daytime window -- and only 11 of these 12 standard time
blocks were used. Of the 300 daytime courses, 73 percent
were scheduled in standard time blocks.
An additional 63 non-standard time blocks were used for
the remaining 37 percent of day classes. Use of standard
time blocks is a key factor in effective classroom
utilization as it prevents courses from “running into”
schedulable standard blocks and precluding their
utilization during these periods.
The number of courses scheduled drops off sharply at
2:00 p.m., especially on Fridays. Figure 14, below,
illustrates this by showing the number of course meetings
occurring per five minute interval during each weekday.
Figure 14: Distribution of Day Courses
8:35 to 4:50
Monday
41
Tuesday
Course Meetings
41
Wednesday
41
Thursday
41
7:00 AM
7:30 AM
8:00 AM
8:30 AM
9:00 AM
9:30 AM
10:00 AM
10:30 AM
11:00 AM
11:30 AM
12:00 PM
12:30 PM
1:00 PM
1:30 PM
2:00 PM
2:30 PM
3:00 PM
3:30 PM
4:00 PM
4:30 PM
5:00 PM
5:30 PM
6:00 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM
7:30 PM
8:00 PM
8:30 PM
9:00 PM
9:30 PM
10:00 PM
10:30 PM
11:00 PM
Friday



Although the official time block schedule begins
at 7:30 a.m., courses actually do not fully begin
until 8:35 a.m. on all five days.
Peak use occurs on Tuesdays between 10:10
a.m. and 10:15 a.m. with all 41 classrooms in
simultaneous use.
Mondays and Thursdays have the next highest
use, with 38 classrooms scheduled between 9:40
and 10:20 a.m. Thirty-six rooms are scheduled
during the same period on Wednesdays.


Friday’s highest use is 36 classrooms between
10:45 and 11:25 a.m.
The prime times are from 8:35 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays and from
9:00 a.m. to noon, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Daytime use of classrooms on Fridays declines
at 2:00 p.m., with only four classrooms in use
by day’s end.
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21
Classroom Having Greater than 100 Seats
At CCC, there is only one room with over 100 seats,
Nursing Building N221, with 116 seats. While the
guideline for weekly room hour utilization is the same for
such rooms as for those having 100 or fewer seats, the 80
percent guideline for seat occupancy and 15 to 18 ASF
per seat guideline are different for such rooms because of
the greater capital investment they require and their
configuration and seating types. While weekly room hour
utilization for this room was high, at 73 percent, seat
occupancy was low, at only 58 percent. This means that
there is additional seating capacity -- more students could
be enrolled in individual courses -- but the room is at
capacity in terms of weekly hours of use.
Of the eight courses scheduled in this space, six courses
and 20.7 hours of instruction enrolled 64 or fewer
students. Such medium size courses are more
appropriately scheduled in general-purpose classrooms,
rather than in a lecture halls with 116 seats. It is necessary
to determine if these courses were scheduled in the
lecture hall because of its technology, location,
availability, or other reasons. The enrollments and
scheduled hours for these courses are included in one of
the classroom demand scenarios
Additional Considerations
During data “scrubbing,” courses were identified that
were scheduled in non-instructional or departmentallycontrolled spaces. Many of these spaces were appropriate
for the courses scheduled in them, although some may
have been in particular spaces because they were the only
spaces available at preferred times. Each of the space
types in which these courses were scheduled, and their
associated space type codes, are listed below.
Figure 15: Non-Instructional Spaces in which Classroom Courses were Scheduled
Room
Learning Resource Center R004
Course
HUSR 1010 003 Human Services I
BUSN 1040 005 Principles of Business
HUSR 1030 002 Intro Helping Skills &Pre-Pract
HUSR 1590 002 Work with Child & Youth @ Risk
Total
Room
Library L102
Course
RUSS 1010 001 Elementary Russian I
ARAB 1010 001 Elem Mod Stand Arabic Con&StrI
FREN 2010 005 Intermediate French
GERM 2010 001 Intermediate German
HEBR 1010 001 Elem Classical (Bible) Hebrew I
MATH 0960 006 Pre algebra
MATH 0960 013 Pre algebra
Total
Room Type
610 Assembly
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
11
Room Type
W06 Public
Corridor
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
19.25
ASF
1,535
Seats
34
Enrollment
32
32
21
19
104
ASF
Courses
1
1
1
1
4
Seats
579
24
Enrollment
13
5
5
3
2
17
24
Courses
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Room
Library L103
Course
MATH 1015 001 Introductory Algebra
SIGN 1010 001 American Sign Language I
SPAN 1010 004 Elem Spanish Conv & Struct I
SPAN 1020 001 Elem Spanish Conver Struct II
Total
Room
Nursing Building N309A
Course
NURS 1100 076 Nursing I - lab
Total
Room
Nursing Building N324B
Course
NURS 1100 071 Nursing I - lab
NURS 1100 079 Nursing I - lab
Total
Room
Nursing Building N337
Course
NURS 2110 001 Seminar for Entry/Nursing III
HLTH 2007 004 Advanced First Aid
HUSR 2960 001 Human Services Practicum I
NURS 1100 053 Nursing I - Rec/Sas
NURS 1100 054 Nursing I - Rec/Sas
NURS 1100 056 Nursing I - Rec/Sas
NURS 1100 057 Nursing I - Rec/Sas
NURS 2100 050 Nursing III - Rec/Sas
NURS 2100 053 Nursing III - Rec/Sas
Total
Room
Science Building S010A/S010B
Course
CRJ 1050 001 Penal Law
Total
Room Type
430 Open-Stack
Study Room
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75
11
Room Type
350 Conference
Room
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
9
9
Room Type
350 Conference
Room
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
9
9
18
Room Type
350 Conference
Room
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
16
0
3
1.33
0.67
1.33
1.33
1.33
1.33
26.32
Room Type
610 Assembly
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
2.83
2.83
ASF
Seats
4,123
24
Enrollment
23
14
21
6
Courses
1
1
1
1
4
ASF
Seats
141
10
Enrollment
9
ASF
Courses
1
1
Seats
251
20
Enrollment
8
8
ASF
Courses
1
1
2
Seats
642
22
Enrollment
1
11
18
11
17
17
19
18
15
Courses
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
Seats
127
ASF
1,946
Enrollment
24
Courses
1
1
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23
Room
Science Building S143
Course
BIOL 1560 001 Curr Iss Life Science (Honors)
Total
Room
Science Building S205
Course
HIST 1050 001 Contemporary World Affairs
Total
Grand Total
Room Type
220 Open
Laboratory
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
2.75
2.75
Room Type
220 Open
Laboratory
Weekly Hours
of Instruction
0.92
0.92
101.07
ASF
Seats
608
22
Enrollment
12
ASF
Courses
1
1
Seats
464
22
Enrollment
21
Courses
1
1
30
The enrollments and hours for courses scheduled in
these spaces are incorporated into the demand Scenarios
identified in the next section.
Other Use of Instructional Spaces
General-purpose classrooms on academic campuses are
used for more than just instruction. They are valuable
community resources for all kinds of events and special
functions, as well as for informal student study/work
groups, student organization meetings, non-credit
courses, community activities, and partnership programs.
These special uses are typically scheduled only after all
credit-bearing courses are accommodated. Part of the
rationale for setting a 67 percent utilization rate goal is to
provide for these other, important community-building
uses of classrooms and lecture halls.
It should be noted at this point that the available
classrooms have been reduced from the originally
analyzed 41 classrooms to 37 classrooms. This change
includes the re-assignment of four rooms to that of
other use spaces and as such, are not available for
right sizing or repurposing.
Current Optimal Classroom Need
Current classroom need is the number of classrooms and
the amount of space needed to appropriately support the
College’s current enrollment and course schedule.
Calculations were based on Fall 2013 course data, a
defined 37.42-hour daytime scheduling window, hours
and number of courses of instruction, and applied
metrics of 67 percent weekly hour utilization and 67
percent average seat occupancy. The following table
describes each option, building from the most basic of
maintaining status quo to the full incorporation of all
identified courses and hours to the Spencer Hill Campus.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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24
2
1
1
0
0
51-60
61-70
71-80
81-90
91-100
37
1
36
0
0
3
2
8
34
1
33
1
2
8
13
9
Spencer Hill Campus
2013 Need
BDC
Need
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
Goff Road
Need
Total with
Goff & BDC
Scenario 2: Addition of Goff and BDC courses to Spencer Hill
11
37
1
36
0
0
1
0
0
2
8
14
5
2
3
4
1
3
42
1
41
0
0
1
0
0
2
8
15
15
46
1
45
0
0
1
0
0
2
8
16
18
5
1
1
3
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
25
Scenario 4: In addition to Scenario 1 to 3, the associated courses taught in other spaces such as conference rooms, meeting spaces, etc. are considered scheduled in classrooms based on hours and associated enrollment.
Summary: CCC general‐purpose classroom need ranges from 34 to 50 rooms of differentiated stations and associated assignable square footage, based on the associated scenario. This does not include enrollment growth.
Scenario 3: The addition of Lectures occurring in labs is predicated on the estimated number of lectures that may occur based on the disaggregation of Integrated Science Courses. For detailed programming this would need confirmation
50
1
49
0
0
1
0
0
2
8
17
21
Scenario 3:
Addition of both existing lectures in SI spaces and estimated lectures Scenario 4:
identified from Integrated Science Courses
Addition of courses taught in non‐instructional space
SI Lecture
Total Existing & Goff
All:
SI Lecture
Total Existing & Goff &
Estimated
& BDC & SI Lecture
Courses in nonTotal Existing and Goff and
Actual
related to
BDC & SI Lecture Actual
Actual
instructional space
BDC & SI Lect
Integrated
& Estimated
Act and Est & Non Inst
Scenario 1: All extension campuses remain where they are located. Based on current scheduling practices, Spencer HIll would be able to schedule existing courses in 34 appropriately sized instructional classrooms. This presumes an even distribution of 2/3 hours and 2/3 ocupancy.
Scenario 2: The courses scheduled at Goff and BDC are scheduled onto the Spencer Hill Campus. It should be noted that this is not a one‐to‐one addition of rooms needed at the extension campuses and those needed The Scenarios build on each other.
1
37
116
TOTAL
Lecture: Held
Room
Classrooms
36
0
1
41-50
Subtotal,
1
12
31-40
5
17
5
14
Right-Sized
(n=37)
22 ASF/seat
1-20
Revised
Existing (n=37)
21-30
Capacity
Range
Alll calculations apply a 67% factor for hour and occupancy
Scenario 1: Extension campuses stay as located.
Figure 16: Scenario Matrix for Classroom Demand
Scenario 1:
The Spencer Hill Campus Registrar-controlled
classrooms are somewhat underutilized, although when
scheduled, the average percent of seats occupied
approaches the 67 percent guideline. The details of these
metrics, along with a list of courses held in each room,
are detailed in the Appendix.
This scenario assumes a weekly room hour utilization
rate of 67 percent, an average seat occupancy rate of 67
percent, an average of 22 ASF/seat, and expanded
scheduling across the day/week between 8:35 a.m. and
4:50 p.m. This incorporate the 300 courses and 871.6
hours currently scheduled in the existing classrooms. The
calculations result in a current need for 34 classrooms,
compared to the existing 37.
Scenario 2:
There is discussion of returning the courses currently
taught at the BDC and Goff Road to Spencer Hill. When
these hours of instruction and enrollment are combined
with Spencer Hill courses, there is a need for 37 generalpurpose classrooms, equal to the existing count of
rooms. If some classrooms are selectively right-sized,
Spencer Hill can carry these additional courses in existing
classrooms with some flexibility, particularly given the
ability to schedule into the slightly larger 51 to 60 seat
rooms.
Scenario 3: (Builds on Scenario 2)
Based on 2013 enrollment, the laboratory spaces have the
capacity to incorporate lectures and provide a didactic
experience for students. At the time of this analysis, 140
hours of instruction and 50 courses of associated lecture
are scheduled in laboratories. Also in process is the
disaggregation of the Integrated Science Courses (SCIN
1010 and 1020) into specified labs and associated section
of instruction for Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology,
and Chemistry. An estimated 35 courses and 99 hours
have been identified. The resulting 85 courses and 239
hours of instruction -- would require nine additional
classrooms. This would allow open time in laboratory
spaces for independent study and lab instruction.
Scenario 4: (Builds on Scenario 2 & 3)
There are roughly 100 hours of courses scheduled in
non-instructional “other space” on campus. The spaces
where some of these courses are scheduled may continue
to be preferred - for example, by Nursing using one of its
meeting rooms. In theory, if these 100 hours of courses
were re-scheduled into general-purpose classrooms, then
upwards of 50 general-purpose classrooms would be
needed to support a total of 1,200 hours of instruction.
Right-sizing
Another option is provided in the third column for
“right-sizing” the classrooms. “Right-sizing” is a
theoretical exercise of changing the seating capacity of
existing classrooms by adding or decanting stations to
attain a desired number of assignable square feet per seat.
While right-sizing does not change the total number of
classrooms available, it can bring the distribution of
classroom capacities into better alignment with course
section sizes -- or exacerbate a misalignment. This
exercise permits the optimal use of classrooms by
selectively right-sizing rooms, especially those currently
overcrowded.
A target of 22 ASF/seat was established in this exercise
to provide flexibility in determining the final mix of
classroom capacities. Given an existing average of 19
ASF/seat at CCC, right-sizing would require a net
adjustment of decanting over 140 seats in 25 rooms,
while adding seats to a number of others. This approach
cannot be implemented wholesale without considering
the consequences, as it could leave the College with
rooms of inadequate seating capacity for course needs. It
must only be applied with careful consideration on a
room-by-room basis.
When the existing classrooms (not including the lecture
hall) are theoretically rightsized, the major shift is in the
21 to 40 seat capacity rooms. The number of existing 31
to 40 seat capacity rooms are reduced from 12 to eight,
while the 21 to 30 rooms increase from 14 to 17. One 41
to 50-seat room and one 51 to 60 seat room are added,
and the existing 61 to 70 seat room disappears.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
26
Figure 16a: Right-Sized Matrix for Classrooms
Current
Seats
Right-Sized
(22 ASF/Seat)
Building
Room
ASF
Delta
Classroom Building
C005
530
30
24
-6
Classroom Building
C105
268
20
12
-8
Classroom Building
C106
1,135
64
52
-12
Classroom Building
C107
402
20
18
-2
Classroom Building
C202
468
28
21
-7
Classroom Building
C202A
689
35
31
-4
Classroom Building
C203
923
46
42
-4
Classroom Building
C204
404
40
18
-22
Classroom Building
C206
455
24
21
-3
Gymnasium/Wellness Center G120
874
30
40
10
Gymnasium/Wellness Center G121
912
30
41
11
Learning Resource Center
R003
734
59
59
0
Learning Resource Center
R005
744
59
59
0
Learning Resource Center
R102
712
35
32
-3
Learning Resource Center
R103
744
34
34
0
Learning Resource Center
R105
746
30
34
4
Learning Resource Center
R106
711
36
32
-4
Learning Resource Center
R206
608
30
28
-2
Learning Resource Center
R207
587
32
27
-5
Learning Resource Center
R208
569
34
25
-9
Learning Resource Center
R210
556
34
25
-9
Learning Resource Center
R211
560
32
25
-7
Learning Resource Center
R212
558
32
25
-7
Learning Resource Center
R213
880
30
40
10
Learning Resource Center
R214
526
26
24
-2
Learning Resource Center
R219
554
14
25
11
Nursing Building
N137
1,294
80
80
0
Nursing Building
N202
537
28
25
-3
Nursing Building
N203
637
28
29
1
Nursing Building
N204
384
22
17
-5
Nursing Building
N205
384
20
17
-3
Nursing Building
N206
632
32
29
-3
Nursing Building
N207
536
28
24
-4
Nursing Building
N221
1692
116
116
0
Nursing Building
N333
543
20
25
5
Science Building
S206
464
24
21
-3
Science Building
S208
689
35
31
-4
The planning guidelines presented here do
not factor in institution-specific issues such
as faculty contracts, geographical
distribution, or classroom assignment based
on individual faculty preference. These
considerations, along with the use of
classrooms for other functions, would need
be taken into account if/when right-sizing is
undertaken. In addition, courses would need
to be re-assigned to other classrooms on
campus, as many would no longer fit into
the spaces in which they are currently
scheduled.
Summary
A weekly room hour utilization rate of 67
percent, an average seat occupancy rate of 67
percent, an average of 22 ASF/seat, and
expanded scheduling across the day/week
between 8:35 a.m. and 4:50 p.m., results in a
total current need for 33 classrooms. When
instruction occurring in labs and lectures
occurring in non-instructional spaces are
added into the mix, along with the
consolidation of BDC and Goff, the current
need rises to 50 classrooms. In all cases,
increasing the weekly scheduling ratio from
the proposed 67 percent to 70 percent of the
hours would decrease the total number of
classrooms required.
The changing profile of the student body –
more residential vs. commuter, more fulltime vs. part-time, etc. -- will also begin to
shape future scheduling practices on campus.
As CCC shifts towards more full-time
students and an increasingly residential
population, the opportunity exists to
reconsider the overall scheduling window.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
27
Non-Capital Recommendations
In addition to right-sizing classrooms, additional
opportunities include addressing low-use rooms, review
of time block scheduling, addressing quality issues, and
maintaining a steady review of instructional use.
1. Review Low-Use Classrooms:
Just over one-quarter of the classrooms have weekly
room hour utilization rates of 49 percent or less, in
contrast with the target rate of 67 percent. Excluding the
unscheduled room (C204A), the lowest use spaces are
Classroom C001 at 14 percent (averaged across three
courses), Classroom Building C006 (24 percent, three
courses), and Learning Resource Center R219 (24
percent, three courses).
These spaces should be examined to determine the
reason for the low use. If these spaces are underutilized
because of quality issues, inexpensive upgrades and/or
minor aesthetic adjustments may make them more
desirable and more likely to be scheduled. The spaces
may also be too small and/or somewhat “specialized” in
terms of their departmental use. Or, it may simply be that
there is more than adequate space available, thereby
resulting in the low use of some spaces. Interestingly,
each of the low-use spaces averages roughly 30
ASF/seat, which provides considerable potential
flexibility in the use of each space.
each department’s courses are scheduled in the
“shoulder” periods of early morning or late afternoon.
Required courses are always good candidates for these
particular time periods.
3. Utilization Updates and User Review:
Classroom utilization should be assessed every two to
three years to test the stability of the last projections and
to identify any changes in the intervening period. For
example: Are course sections being added? Are course
enrollments increasing? Has a new program been
implemented that may require additional, or even a
different type, of instructional space? Has overall student
enrollment increased unexpectedly? The answers to these
kinds of questions often trigger the need to recalibrate
classroom needs.
Reviews of space could occur through faculty and
student surveys, which can explain why some classrooms
are underutilized, what is a desirable suite of technology
(if not standardized), what classroom furniture is
preferred, and whether classroom maintenance or repair
is an issue.
4.
Standardize Spaces:
Design and implement a campus-wide standard for
classroom fixtures, furnishings, equipment, and
educational technology. Devise and follow a regular
maintenance and renewal cycle.
2. Develop and enforce consistent scheduling policies, practices,
and procedures:
Adherence to standard scheduling time blocks for all
courses is imperative to ensure optimal classroom use.
While it is understood that there are exceptions – such as
an expanded course meeting time or the legitimate needs
of a specific faculty member – a large number of
exceptions results in fractured time blocks that have a
ripple effect across the week, making scheduling
challenging and space utilization inefficient. Corning
Community College has 75 identified time blocks of
which only 14 are standard, although 73 percent of all
course offerings are scheduled within 11 of the standard
time blocks. Because of this and what appears to be
“excess” space available, CCC has not yet experienced
these scheduling challenges. If there were less space
available, there would be a collision of demand and
classroom availability on campus. One way to improve
utilization is policy requiring that some percentage of
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
28
Capital Suggestions
Utilization:
The detailed analysis of general-purpose classrooms
results in the recommendation for upwards of 50
appropriately sized classrooms to meet the optimal
current need and incorporate all levels of courses and
enrollments. It is based on the assumption that courses
that are appropriate for classrooms are indeed scheduled
in those spaces within the scheduling window. Some of
this need can be met through renovation of existing
classrooms, to improve rooms that are improperly sized,
lack technology, or are poorly located. Alternatively,
where renovation is not feasible, some classrooms may
be converted to other uses needed by the campus and
replaced with newly constructed classrooms. Currently,
CCC has the near-term opportunity to begin the process
of right-sizing existing classrooms and incorporating upto-date technology. Regardless of the approach, the
selection of classrooms to be renovated or built new
should be coordinated with the proposed array of
classroom capacities required to ensure the appropriate
mix of classrooms.
CCC’s average daytime weekly hour utilization for SI
spaces was 41 percent, which begins to approach the 50
percent goal. Weekly hour utilization ranged from seven
percent for the Analytical Chemistry Lab in Science
Building S117 (one course) to 90 percent for the
Biology/Anatomy and Physiology Lab in Nursing
Building N108 (averaged across eight courses). Aside
from the labs in N212 and N213 (neither of which
appeared as scheduled – but may be open use labs), 10 SI
spaces have weekly hour utilization rates of 30 percent or
less, indicating that they have additional scheduling
capacity.
A general-purpose classroom and lecture hall phasing
and implementation plan should be developed to identify
candidates for right-sizing, improved maintenance,
renovation, new construction, and other upgrades. This
plan should consider the enrollment, course schedule,
and potential need for expanded facilities to support new
programs, adjusting as the institution grows. This will
provide CCC with the appropriate array of classrooms,
both now and in the future.
Specialized Instructional Spaces – Spencer Hill Campus
An instructional space utilization analysis was also
conducted for the 37 specialized instructional (SI) spaces
on the Spencer Hill Campus. Daytime use was analyzed,
as this was the driver of SI space demand. The weekly
hour utilization guideline for SI spaces is for scheduling
50 percent of the scheduling window to allow for setup/break-down of equipment for classes and for out-ofclass use by students for project assignments. Due to the
comparatively large capital investment in these rooms,
the occupancy goal is 80 percent of student stations
when a room is scheduled for instruction. ASF per
station guidelines vary by discipline, ranging from 30 to
200 ASF per station.
Occupancy:
Average station occupancy for SI spaces was 61 percent,
ranging from 29 percent for the Analytical Chemistry Lab
in Science Building S117 (one course) to 105 percent for
the Biology Lab in Science Building S101 (averaged
across eight courses). Three SI spaces, R009, N213B, and
S101, had average station occupancies of 100 percent or
more, indicating that students were likely sharing stations
during some lab sections.
The Specialized Instructional Spaces – Day Appendix
lists the average station occupancy and average weekly
hour utilization for each SI space on the Spencer Hill
Campus.
Need:
The numbers, types, and sizes of SI spaces needed to
satisfy current instructional demand was calculated based
upon Fall 2013 course data, the current 37.42-hour
daytime scheduling window, a weekly target utilization
rate of 50 percent of the scheduling window, and a
station occupancy rate of 80 percent. Course data was
aggregated by discipline to determine demand for various
room types. Based on input by CCC, it was assumed for
the purposes of this analysis that SCIN 1010 and SCIN
1020 Integrated Science Courses would be replaced by an
equal number of sections of Anatomy and Physiology,
Biology, Chemistry, and Microbiology, with the same
enrollments.
An ideal quantity of optimally-sized SI spaces was
determined for each discipline and compared to existing
SI spaces on campus. In recognition of the high cost of
construction of SI space, RA held CCC’s existing SI
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
29
spaces constant, and calculated the need for four
additional SI spaces. Including the potential to make five
current SI spaces available for other uses, the calculations
were for a net decrease of one SI space.
The following table presents current SI space needs. It is
based on present knowledge of how these rooms are
scheduled, along with a supposition of how the
integrated science courses will be distributed in the
future.
.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
30
14
16
24
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
Biology Lab
Ceramics Studio
Chemistry Lab
Computer Lab
Computer Lab - Digital
Imaging
Computer Lab Engineering/Science
Computer Networking
Lab
Computer System
Configuration/Hardware
Lab
12
24
Rooms
16
12
1
1
24
14
24
24
Stations
(Each Space)
Discipline Proposed
Analytical Chemistry Lab
Anatomy and Physiology
Lab
Automotive Lab
ASF/Station
60
40
40
40
60
60
60
40
180
60
60
ASF
720
640
960
640
2,880
840
2,880
1,920
2,520
720
2,880
Spaces
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
Total Stations
16
18
49
22
16
18
20
120
30
27
24
ASF/Station
51.3
30.3
46.6
31.9
76.6
47.1
67.0
39.7
156.0
42.6
43.9
821
545
2,285
702
1,226
847
1,340
4,759
4,680
1,149
1,054
ASF
Rooms
0
0
-1
0
1
0
1
-3
0
0
1
Incremental
Need
0
0
-25
0
32
0
28
-72
0
0
24
Total Stations
Existing Space (2013)
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
Rooms
Existing +
Incremental
16
18
24
22
48
18
48
48
30
27
48
821
545
960
702
2,666
847
2,780
1,920
4,680
1,149
2,494
Maintains existing space.
31
Negative incremental need reflects
total number of spaces, stations, and
ASF that could be made available for
other uses if the supply of
Engineering/Science computer labs
were brought in line with demand.
Maintains existing space.
Assumes five garage bays and six
students per bay.
Maintains existing and adds one space.
Maintains existing space.
Maintains existing and adds one space.
Negative incremental need reflects
total number of spaces, stations, and
ASF that could be made available for
other uses if the supply of general
computer labs were brought in line
with demand.
Maintains existing space.
Note
Maintains existing space.
Maintains existing and adds one space.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
-1,325
0
1,440
0
1,440
-2,839
0
0
1,440
ASF
Optimal Need
Total Stations
Figure 17: Current SI Space Needs
ASF
18
12
18
10
12
24
16
16
16
24
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Organic Chemistry Lab
Physics Lab
24
24
12
Rooms
1
60
60
100
100
60
80
60
80
80
40
60
25
40
Stations
(Each
Space)
ASF/Station
Discipline Proposed
Computer Systems/Web
Design Lab
Drawing/Painting Studio
Early Childhood
Development Lab
Electrical Lab
Electronics Microprocessor Lab
Electronics Lab
Geology/Astronomy Lab
Hydraulics and
Pneumatics Lab
Manufacturing/Machining
Materials Testing Lab
Microbiology Lab
ASF
1,440
1,440
1,600
1,600
2,880
960
1,440
1,280
1,440
400
2,160
300
480
Spaces
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Total
Stations
20
37
14
15
24
22
28
21
16
22
39
26
20
ASF/Station
67.0
56.9
190.1
116.1
43.4
40.2
49.0
52.1
55.3
40.4
68.9
34.3
29.3
ASF
1,340
2,104
2,662
1,742
1,042
884
1,372
1,095
884
888
2,689
893
586
Rooms
0
-1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-13
0
0
24
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
Stations
Incremental
Need
0
-664
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Rooms
Existing +
Incremental
20
24
14
15
48
22
28
21
16
22
39
26
20
1,340
1,440
2,662
1,742
2,482
884
1,372
1,095
884
888
2,689
893
586
32
Maintain existing space.
Maintain existing space.
N104 is currently an Integrated
Sciences (Biology/Chemistry) lab. A
total of two Microbiology labs are
needed.
Maintain existing space.
Negative incremental need reflects
total number of spaces, stations, and
ASF that could be made available for
other uses if the supply of Physics labs
were brought in line with demand.
Maintain existing space.
Maintain existing space.
Maintain existing space.
Maintains existing space.
Maintains existing space.
Maintains existing space.
Maintains existing space.
Note
Maintains existing space.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
0
0
1,440
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ASF
Existing Space (2013)
Total
Stations
Optimal Need
ASF
-110
735
-5
36
Net Existing + Incremental
845
108
6
4
737
8
Incremental Need Space Potentially Available
1
7
48
41
400
1
2
Subtotal
6
4
1
1
36
100
480
2,880
4
4
Rooms
1
ASF/Station
60
60
ASF
Incremental Additional Space Needed
8
24
Spaces
1
1
37
Stations
(Each Space)
1
2
Total Stations
966
526
40,272
Discipline Proposed
Piano Studio
Plant/Environmental
Science/Ecology/Food
Science Lab
Simulation and Home
Health Lab
Nursing Skills Lab
Nursing Lab
Totals
ASF/Station
161.0
131.5
59.8
54.6
95.1
ASF
43,155
-4,828
47,983
5,760
966
526
42,223
478
382
2,282
Rooms
0
0
-1
0
0
0
Total Stations
0
0
-26
0
0
0
Existing +
Incremental
1
1
36
1
1
2
6
4
735
8
7
48
966
526
43,155
478
382
2,282
33
Assumes four beds and two students
per bed.
Maintain existing space.
Maintain existing space.
Note
Maintain existing space.
Maintain existing space.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
JULY 2015
0
0
932
0
0
0
ASF
Incremental
Need
Rooms
Existing
Total Stations
Optimal Need
ASF
Needed Spaces:
The lab spaces identified as needed based on the
disaggregation of the Integrated Science Courses are in
Anatomy and Physiology, Biology, Chemistry, and
Microbiology. The need for these SI spaces would largely
be driven by additional sections of courses in these
disciplines, effectively replacing Integrated Science
courses SCIN 1010 and 1020.
Nursing Building N108, but it was assumed to become a
dedicated Anatomy and Physiology lab in this scenario.
Likewise, the current Integrated Science Lab in Nursing
Building N104 was assumed to become a dedicated
Microbiology lab. These assumptions are not meant to be
prescriptive recommendations, but should be regarded as
placeholders indicating a need for dedicated space that
could be located in these rooms or elsewhere.
Space Potentially Available:
Classrooms Off-Campus
Analysis indicated the opportunity to consolidate the
courses currently offered in five general computer labs
into two general computer labs. These five labs are
Classroom Building rooms C108, C109, and C205, and
Science Building rooms S205 and 211. This study makes
no recommendation as to which rooms should be
maintained, although, ideally, there would be two spaces
each with 24 stations, occupying a total of 1,920 ASF.
There are 91 courses at the four off-campus sites
analyzed in this study, in 27 classrooms occupying 22,557
ASF. Fall 2013 daytime data was used to determine the
current need for classrooms at each site. Based solely on
this data and guidelines of 67 percent for seat occupancy
and weekly room hour utilization, there is a current need
for 15 off-campus classrooms -- slightly less than half
the existing number -- to satisfy current instructional
demand. There is a corresponding decrease of just over
10,000 ASF in the total space needed for off-campus
classrooms.
Courses in the Engineering/Science Computer labs in
Science Building S122 and S123 could also possibly be
consolidated into one lab, as can courses held in the two
Physics labs in Nursing Building N117 and N119. Once
again, this study makes no recommendations as to which
of these spaces should be maintained, but does indicate
the total number of spaces, stations, and square footage
needed to meet demand in these disciplines.
It is recognized, however, the Registrar’s course data may
not fully represent the extent of the use and scheduling
of these rooms. Departmental scheduling, Workforce
Development and Community Education programs, and
non-instructional use all drive classroom demand, though
data regarding such usage was not available for this study.
Dedicated Space:
The table below summarizes the data regarding courses,
hours of instruction, and current and needed classrooms
for Airport Corporate Park, the Business Development
Center, the Criminal Justice Facility, and Elmira Center.
Calculation of need also involved the consolidation of
courses into dedicated spaces when possible. For
example, Anatomy and Physiology, Environmental
Science, Biology, and Microbiology are all taught in
Figure 18: Current and Needed Off-Campus Classrooms
Building
Airport Corporate Park (Big Flats)
Business Development Center
Criminal Justice Facility (Goff Road)
Elmira Center
Totals
Current
Needed
Hours of
Current
Needed
Classrooms Classrooms
Courses Instruction Classrooms Classrooms
ASF
ASF
19
5
10
57
91
94.15
40.00
33.48
173.47
341.10
7
8
4
8
27
4
2
2
7
15
4,537
5,976
4,720
5,467
20,700
2,250
1,250
1,600
5,230
10,330
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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34
Space Program
The foundation for CCC’s space program is the set of
detailed space guidelines that Rickes Associates has
developed over time based on extensive experience with
the metrics of the Council of Educational Facility
Planners International (CEFPI), best practices from
representative public and private post-secondary
institutions, and various published methodologies. The
space guidelines and subsequent projections are also
informed by RA’s experience, knowledge of higher
education planning trends and pedagogical changes, and
familiarity of technological advances. The recommended
space program for CCC is supported by the qualitative
information collected during the interviews and surveys,
and informed by observations made during the campus
walkthrough.
Planning Methodology
It is critical to note that order-of-magnitude space
projections or calculations represent a first iteration of
campus space needs. Proposed in the aggregate, they
provide an overall sense of current space needs. They are
shown as “pools” of space to be applied according to
defined campus space needs and are not intended as
program specifications for any particular building or
facility. However, where specific space challenges were
strongly identified in the interviews and/or via other
documentation, RA has provided more targeted
recommendations for the distribution and reorganization of spaces.
Inventory Challenges
A space inventory will always be a work in progress that
requires continuous refining and updating. According to
the Spencer Hill Campus’s 2014/2015 working space
inventory, the total estimated square footage on campus
is 309,561 ASF, excluding space in auxiliary sites offcampus. There is a working total of 241,629 ASF after
residential space is excluded. Because the inventory is
“pre-updated” to match the re-alignment of the
renovated buildings and the addition of new space, there
will be some discrepancies between the current analysis
and the existing space inventory.
Overview
The following sections compare the existing assignable
square footage (ASF) by FICM category with the
calculated current need, adjusted according to campus
culture, interview findings, and trends in higher
education. Each section also presents qualitative insights
gathered during the interview process. A summary table
is provided at the end of this section.
Space can be categorized in terms of both Gross Square
Feet (GSF) and Assignable Square Feet (ASF), as defined
below. For the purpose of this study, all calculations of
space needs are ASF.


GSF: the sum of all areas on all floors of a
building to the outside face of the exterior walls
and includes hallways, stairwells, mechanical
rooms, rest rooms, etc.
ASF: the amount of space assigned to people or
programs, measured within the interior walls of
the defined spaces and includes classrooms,
laboratories, offices, study areas, athletics
(interior) spaces, bookstores, dining, etc.
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General-Purpose Instructional Spaces (100)
Definition:
General–purpose classrooms, lecture halls, recitation rooms, seminar rooms, and
other spaces used primarily for scheduled non–laboratory instruction.
Planning Calculations:
The statistical methodology applied by RA to the
instructional space utilization analysis is widely used and
accepted in the realm of higher education. The analysis
incorporates suggested guidelines for classroom
utilization of 67 to 70 percent weekly hour utilization and
seat occupancy. The guideline for seat size is a graduated
average ranging from12 to 15 ASF/seat in large auditoria
and lecture rooms to 25 ASF per seat in flat floor lecture
rooms, with an overall average of 22 ASF/seat. These
averages provide flexibility during the detailed
programming process, but it is critical to note that these
sizes are planning guidelines or factors and not design
standards.
Based on 2013 use, Corning Community College has a
total of 27,054 ASF in a combination of general-purpose
classrooms (25,362 ASF) and lecture halls (1,692 ASF).
Based on Fall 2013 enrollments, the current calculated
need is for upwards of 50 appropriately-sized rooms
(34,000 ASF) and associated support (3,400 ASF), a total
current need of 38,000 ASF.
This current need was calculated with the assumption
that courses will be scheduled evenly across the
day/week, rather than continuing the current practice of
scheduling the majority of courses between 8:30 a.m. and
2:00 p.m. It also assumes that courses currently not
taught in core academic classroom space -- such as
lectures in labs and courses in conference rooms -- are
included, along with courses taught at BDC and Goff
Road.
Specialized Instructional Spaces | Laboratories (200)
Open Laboratory (220)
Laboratory | Research Space (250)
Definition:
Rooms or spaces characterized by special purpose equipment or a specific
configuration that ties instructional activities to a particular discipline or a closely
related group of disciplines.
Planning Calculations:
For the most part, CEFP space planning guidelines
provide clear multipliers for the various space clusters in
FICM’s 200 category. Rickes Associates, however,
applies a more detailed and proven methodology that
parallels that of the general-purpose classrooms, and
provides a room-by-room review with associated
recommendations.
 Specialized Instructional (42,223 ASF + 7,374 ASF
support = 49,597 ASF)
Specialized Instructional (SI) spaces are in the FICM
210/215 series and consist of formally scheduled
instructional spaces, ranging from Biology labs to
Art studios.
o
o
o
o
o
A detailed analysis of these spaces was
conducted and the findings appear in a prior
section, with a detailed listing in the Appendix.
The analysis assumed that these rooms would
be scheduled for 50% of the scheduling window
on average, with a target station occupancy rate
of 80%. The target station size is based on
discipline and can range broadly from 30 ASF
to over 200 ASF. These sizes are planning factors
used for this study and not intended as room–
by–room design standards.
The calculated current need is for an overall
total of 41 SI spaces in 47,983 ASF more than
the existing.
When individual room use is examined, some SI
spaces have minimal to no use. These spaces
could be reviewed for possible repurposing.
This adjustment indicates a final need for 36 SI
rooms and a 43,155 ASF Included in this
analysis was the suggested impact of
disaggregating Integrated Science labs into
dedicated spaces. For example, where
Microbiology may have been taught in an
integrated lab for a small portion of the
semester, it would now need a dedicated lab to
be offered as a full-semester course.
The main comment related to specialized
instructional spaces - particularly in the science
areas - was that equipment was outdated, the
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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36
number of courses offered are limited based on
the number of available faculty, and there is a
lack of storage for general and hazardous
materials.

o
Open Laboratory (2,788 ASF):
Non-formal instruction that is critical to student
learning occurs in open laboratory spaces, such as
open/drop-in computer labs, studio space in visual
arts dedicated to majors, or individual practice
rooms for music majors.
o Open labs are calculated for the campus as a
whole based on student FTE.
o The calculated need is for 4,225 ASF and was
maintained as the current need. If provided, this
space would address some of the concerns

raised during the interviews about a lack of
open/drop-in labs on the campus.
Computer lab space need may be tempered by
computers becoming available in the Library
when it re-opens.
Research Laboratory (0 ASF):
Coded as FICM 250/255, research space is generally
assigned to faculty for individual research for faculty
and students.
o There are set guidelines to calculate space. In
this instance, although community colleges are
beginning to offer some research options at
their institution, no research space has been
allocated for Corning Community College.
Figure: 19 Specialized Instructional Open Lab Space
2,788 4,225
4,225
2,788
Open Lab
56,102 56,102
52,354
49,597
SI Space
0
10,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
Adjusted Current Need (ASF)
Proposed Current Need (ASF)
Calculated Current Need (ASF)
Existing Space (ASF)
50,000
60,000
This space type is typically one of the more expensive for
a campus. When the time comes, more detailed space
programming will be needed.
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Offices (300)
Definition:
Offices and conference rooms specifically assigned to each of the various academic,
administrative, and service function.

There may also be an “overage” if some spaces are
in “legacy” areas (e.g., historically oversized offices)
vs. guideline recommendations.
Planning Calculations:
Office space is the FICM 300 series that encompasses
both academic and administrative offices, including
support space such as reception areas, conference rooms,
workrooms, storage, and dedicated lounges. Student
government offices are also in this category. While
offices are all generally coded as 310 space, the academic,
administrative, student, and related support spaces
should be coded separately to permit a finer-grained
analysis. This allows for a more effective review of space
distribution by department, faculty, administrative levels,
and students.
Office space needs are based on a multiplier per faculty
or staff FTE by organizational level such as Executive,
Dean, Faculty, Professional, Manager, Technician, etc.
The level is important as some areas require less office
space than others due to the nature of their work. For
example, maintenance staff in Facilities do not need
private offices or workstations, but do need access to
some support space, so these formulas are adjusted to
reflect a “reduced” staff multiplier.
Academic and administrative office clusters include
reception areas, conference rooms, workrooms, storage,
and lounges. Current personnel figures were collected
from the campus and converted to FTE. The FTE by
department/area was multiplied by the appropriate ASF
multiplier to provide the base need for offices and
associated support spaces, thereby defining a general
pool of office space for the campus.






A total of 501 headcount personnel was converted
to 337 FTE.
49,627 ASF of office and support space was
identified.
Assuming appropriately-sized and outfitted office
spaces, 50,500 ASF of office and support space is
needed.
Interviewees identified challenges with location,
access, and design of offices.
Additional office space was requested to meet the
demand associated with new hires.
It was also noted that there is a significant lack of
storage space, in general.
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Study / Library (400):
Definition:
Study rooms, stacks, open–stack reading rooms, and library processing spaces.
Library space is coded as FCIM 400 and space needs are
derived from CEFPI guidelines. The library collection is
converted into a “book volume equivalent” based on
various components of the collection and a multiplier is
applied. Space for reading and study areas is calculated
based on a proportion of the number of student and
faculty FTE as users. It should be noted that “study”
space also includes departmental libraries or spaces such
as resource and skill centers, learning labs, and small
group study rooms that may be located elsewhere on
campus. Space is separately calculated for stacks,
processing space, and support. Note that Library staff
office space and support appears under the calculation
for administrative offices in the FICM 300 category.
Libraries have been evolving rapidly over the past decade
or two. Gone are the days where all students gathered at
the library to simply study and read. Learning commons,
gathering spaces, and group study areas are now the
norm along with the inclusion of computer labs,
classrooms, and student study/learning support areas.
Access to food is also highly desirable.
CCC is currently in the process of renovating and
updating its existing library. The re-designed library will
encompass 21,090 ASF of compact shelving, study areas,
office space, computer areas, learning centers, café, and
event space. “Pure” library space, consisting only of
those spaces coded as FICM 400 located in the library
proper, is 16,592 ASF. Other support space elsewhere on
campus brings the total for the Library and Study 400
category to 17,276 ASF.
For the purpose of this study, the proposed ASF for the
building has been held constant in both current and
projected need scenarios.
Special Use Spaces (500)
Definition:
Spaces sufficiently specialized in their primary activity or function to merit a
unique room code: military training rooms, athletic and physical education
spaces, media production rooms, clinics, demonstration areas, field buildings,
animal quarters, and greenhouses.
Planning Calculations:
By definition, the spaces contained within the FICM 500
series constitute “special use” and so are challenging to
appropriately quantify. While CEFPI provides guidance
in the way of suggesting “core” space allowances, in
some instances the approach is designated as “ad hoc”
with the intent that the space needs be based on the type
and culture of the institution.

Athletics (22,474 ASF):
o Currently 22,474 ASF is assigned to Athletics
and Physical Education in the
Gymnasium/Wellness Center.
o The Athletics core space suggested by planning
guidelines is 35,000 ASF, but this figure has
been adjusted in the program to match the
culture and size of this campus.
o The building has had recent renovations to
improve internal space, lockers, team rooms,
and offices. Additional updates include adding
computers to the entry area, and tables and
chairs for students to gather and study. It is a
popular hang-out spot, particularly for those
engaged in athletics.
o The existing space meets both current and
projected needs, including possible change of a
part-time person to full-time, and the addition
of a full-time person if men’s lacrosse is added.
o Principal challenges are related to the need for
additional exterior space. In particular, the
baseball team plays off-campus on a poorlykept field. The preference is to provide oncampus fields to help recruit students to CCC
and to potentially increase the residential
population (of which an estimated 80 to 100 are
athletes). Students also requested other types of
fields and basketball courts for pick-up games.
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
Media Production (1,292 ASF):
o This refers to TV and radio studios, distribution
of materials and signals, etc. A TV station of
1,292 ASF is located in the Learning Resource
Center, which supports Communications and
Humanities.
o The projected need is for a slightly larger
allocation of 2,000 ASF.

Greenhouse/Field Buildings/Animal Quarters (935
ASF):
o CCC currently has a Greenhouse on campus of
935 ASF, slightly more than what would be
allocated for a campus of this size. The existing
ASF has been held constant.
o As there are no identified Field Buildings,
Animal Quarters, or other identified specialized
spaces, the balance of these ad hoc categories
have been zeroed out in the calculation and the
current need.
Figure 20: Special Use Space
935
935
343
935
1,292 2,000
2,000
1,292
Greenhouse, Field Bldg, etc
Media
22,474 22,474
22,474
Athletics
0
5,000
35,000
10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000
Adjusted Current Need (ASF)
Proposed Current Need (ASF)
Calculated Current Need (ASF)
Existing Space (ASF)
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General Use Spaces (600)
Definition:
General Use includes a broad range of categories serving the campus and greater
community, such as: assembly rooms, exhibition space, food facilities, lounges,
merchandising facilities, recreational facilities, meeting rooms, child and adult
care rooms.
Planning Calculations:
For the most part, CEFPI space planning guidelines
provide clear multipliers for the various space clusters in
the 600 category, as they are substantially linked to
student enrollment.
 Assembly (5,278 ASF):
Assembly space generally supports campus and
community events, such as auditoria, theatre, arenas,
and chapels.
o At CCC, it also includes the Learning Resources
Center (R004, R004A, and R104), the
Planetarium, and Science 010A and B.
o The calculated need is for 14,000 ASF to
support the core needs of a campus with an
enrollment less than 5,000 FTE and with a
limited performing arts program. It is
acknowledged, however, that the existing
Assembly space is insufficient based on
location, design, etc. For example, Theatre is
currently using what was once a science lecture
hall and creating ad hoc space under the stage
for costume rooms, etc.
o Better and more appropriate assembly space
should be developed in a proper location on
campus. A black box theater option may be
considered for 150 to 200 persons. This would
provide some flexibility in use and also serve as
a testing ground to expand a burgeoning
Theater program.
o A working Assembly space with 300 seats for
Theatre, Music, and Dance programs, plus
space for stage, control room, construction,
storage, dressing rooms, etc., would support a
campus up to 5,000 FTE. It was deemed too
large for CCC’s needs.



Exhibition (808 ASF)
Exhibition space provides areas for display of
materials, art, and artifacts, and includes
departmental and institution-wide galleries,
museums, etc., available for viewing by campus and
community members.
o Currently, this space type is located only on the
Spencer Crest Nature Center, which has limited
to no existing use.
o The calculated minimum need based on square
footage per FTE is 2,000 ASF, although 1,000
ASF has been proposed as a placeholder. The
fate of the Nature Center will help define what
type of exhibition space is needed and where it
may be accommodated, based on institutional
preferences.
Food Service (11,534 ASF)
Food and dining facilities, including dining halls,
snack bars, etc., are included in this category.
o The main dining area of 10,655 ASF is located
in the Commons. Additional square footage is
distributed across Perry Hall, the Nursing
Building, and the Library.
o The existing ASF has been held constant.
o While dining does perform an excellent service
meeting current demand, the current design is
outmoded. A revamping/re-design is in order
to include contemporary trends in food service
such as brand markets, individual choices, and
contemporary seating areas.
Lounge (15,971 ASF)
Lounge space for students, faculty, and staff to
gather is generally distributed across campus and
provides soft seating areas.
o At CCC, the two main lounge areas located in
The Commons (10,623 ASF) and Perry Hall
(3,015 ASF) total 13,638 ASF.
o The calculated need for the campus is
significantly less than existing, at just under
3,000 ASF, based on student FTE.
o The existing ASF has been held constant as it
also supports events, assembly, and meeting
needs.
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

Merchandising (5,189 ASF)
Merchandising space includes bookstores, supply
stores, vending areas, etc.
o The existing inventory identifies 5,189 ASF,
mainly assigned to the bookstore.
o The calculated need for merchandising activities
based on current FTE is less than the existing
square footage at 3,400 ASF.
o The existing ASF has been held constant.
o

Recreation (485 ASF)
Recreation includes game rooms, table tennis rooms,
TV rooms, general exercise and fitness areas.
o Just 485 ASF is identified at CCC as recreation
space and is located in the Commons (M118,
128, 129).
o The calculated need is for 1,000 ASF, which has
been accepted as the current need.
Spaces that should be coded as Recreation may
be coded under Lounge, leading to an
overstatement in the Lounge category while
showing a deficit in the Recreation and Meeting
Room categories.
Meeting Rooms (0 ASF)
Meeting rooms or multi-purpose spaces are generally
used by the institution or the public for non-class
meetings and may be equipped with various types of
furniture. Meeting Rooms can be cross-coded to
Lounge space if the primary use of the space is not
clear.
o The calculated need is for 2,200 ASF. However,
a proposed current need of 1,000 ASF is
suggested, under the assumption some space is
categorized under Lounge space.
Figure 21: General Use
0
Meeting Room
1,000
2,284
0
1000
1,000
1,000
485
Recreation
Merchandising
3,426
5189
5,189
5,189
13997
Lounge
15,971
15,971
2,855
0
0
0
0
Day Care
Food Service
10,320
11,534
11,534
11,534
808 1,000
2,000
808
Exhibition
5,278 5,278
5,278
Assembly
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
14,000
8,000
10,000
12,000
14,000
Adjusted Current Need (ASF)
Proposed Current Need (ASF)
Calculated Current Need (ASF)
Existing Space (ASF)
16,000
18,000
The FICM 600 space category appears to have
“opportunity space” that could be re-purposed to address
other space needs. For example, lounge space can be
reduced in the formal setting if balanced with “collision”
spaces in the hallways and in other small group areas on
campus.
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Central Facilities (700)
Definition:
Central Facilities are the “back-of-the-house” campus spaces such as centralized
areas for computer–based data processing and telecommunications, shop
services, general storage and supply, vehicle storage (parking structures), central
services (e.g., printing and duplicating, mail, shipping and receiving,
environmental testing or monitoring, laundry, or food stores), and hazardous
materials area.
Planning Calculations:
CEFPI guidelines apportion a percentage of total campus
space to this function.
 In this category, the campus appears almost on par
with calculated need. The adjusted calculated need is
for 24,000 ASF, just slightly less than the existing
25,300 ASF.
 These spaces include large warehouses and Physical
Plant shops, while others are dispersed across
campus.
Unclassified (000)
Definition:
Assignable areas that are inactive, unassigned, unfinished, or in alteration.
Typically, about one percent of a campus’s space is
undergoing alteration or is off-line at any given time. For
the purpose of this analysis, 3,482 ASF of the
Gymnasium/Wellness Center (now temporarily occupied
by the Library) has been assigned as Unclassified. This
space was the original home of Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation, which is temporarily housed
elsewhere on campus during construction of the Library.
Health Services (800)
Definition:
Housing facilities for students, faculty, staff, and visitors to the campus.
This category refers to student health services, or
“wellness centers” in contemporary parlance. CEFPI
metrics provide for a per student FTE allowance,
augmented as needed. CCC has 453 ASF of space
assigned to three spaces in the Commons (M227, 228,
229). As the calculated need is for 500 ASF, the existing
ASF of 453 has been held constant.
Residential (900)
Definition:
Housing facilities for students, faculty, staff, and visitors to the campus.
Perry Hall is the student residence building. Built to
support up to 320 students in 57,771 ASF, it is currently
occupied by approximately 190 students. The goal is to
continue to build the residential population by expanding
student activities and engagement. The balance of the
space (6,679 ASF) in this category is assigned as the
President’s Residence. The existing ASF has been held
constant.
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Space Program Summary
Currently, CCC encompasses 383,162 assignable square
feet of space across six sites, with 309,500 ASF on the
Spencer Hill Campus, including 64,500 ASF of residential
facilities and unclassified facilities. Excluding the
Residential and Unclassified space results in an academic
“core” of 241,629 ASF. With a Fall 2013 enrollment of
1,142 FTE students, this calculates to 212 ASF/FTE.
The following table summarizes Existing, Current
Calculated, Proposed, and Adjusted Current space needs,
excluding residential, that informs this ASF/FTE
calculation.
Figure 22: Summary
FTE
Existing
Current Calculated
Proposed Current
Need
Adjusted Current
Need
Projected (TBD)
ASF
1,142
1,142
1,142
241,629
260,159
258,699
ASF/
FTE
212
228
227
1,142
253,114
222
1,448
253,114
175
Adjusted Current Need: This is an additional
adjustment to the proposed current need. The proposed
current need for exhibition and meeting space has been
adjusted, and some lounge space in Spencer Crest was
removed. The assumption is that exhibition and meeting
space can be addressed in the ASF assigned to the
category of lounge space. The ASF for open/drop-in labs
has been reduced to existing ASF, assuming computers
available in the renovated library will compensate for this
need.
The campus currently has the existing capacity to support
proposed growth to 1,448 FTE , or an estimated 3,000
headcount students. The challenge is the lack of
appropriately-sized instructional space, including
classrooms, specialized instructional spaces, and open
labs. There are also quality and design issues with existing
assembly and event space on campus.
The following graphically summarizes space needs by
FICM category for Current, Proposed, and Adjusted
Current Need.
Current Calculated: The calculated space needs are
pure mathematical calculations based on space guidelines.
If the calculated space needs were to be accepted,
without adjustment, then the ASF/FTE would rise to
228.
Proposed Current Need: This includes some
adjustments, described in the prior sections, based on
existing data and tempered by the campus culture. For
example, some of the working space guidelines would
provide an excess amount of space for a campus the size
of Corning, so the space has been reduced accordingly.
This yields 227 ASF/FTE based on current enrollment.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Figure 23: Summary by Space Type
As noted previously, space needs are grounded in the
application of commonly accepted space planning
guidelines, tempered by the institution’s strategic
direction. As enrollment grows, the campus can begin to
align with metrics at comparable institutions.
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Facility Condition
SWBR and ME Engineering worked with staff at
Corning Community College to assess the condition of
each building, the site, and campus infrastructure.
Assessment tours of the facilities, interviews with
Physical Plant senior staff, and workshops were used to
identify existing deficiencies and identify potential future
needs. Based upon this work, and additional assessment
included in the 2008 Master Plan, numerous deficiencies
were identified and assessed. Projects to correct these
deficiencies are included in the proposed Capital
Improvement Program.
While many buildings are dated, the College’s facilities
continue to be very well-maintained. In addition, the
College has made several significant improvements in the
last few years, including the addition of a residence hall
(Perry Hall), construction of a Fitness Center,
renovations to the Gymnasium, and the recentlycompleted Library expansion and Commons renovations.
A number of the older buildings, however, have not yet
had significant renovations or upgrades, and are
beginning to show signs of their age. The College should
continue to invest in existing facilities to keep them up to
date while, at the same time, planning for future changes
to and expansion of instructional programs offered on
campus. Facilities will need to accommodate everchanging pedagogy used and technological needs for
current and future programs in order to remain viable
teaching locations.
Campus Locations
Established in 1956, Corning Community College was
originally housed in several buildings in the City of
Corning, New York. Seven years later the College
consolidated with the construction of eight buildings on
approximately 520 acres of land south of the city. The
College now offers transfer, career, certificate, and
training programs at the Spencer Hill Campus as well as
at the Business Development Center in downtown
Corning, the Goff Road Center in East Corning, the
Technology Building at Airport Corporate Park in Big
Flats, and the Elmira Center in Elmira.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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46
Corning Spencer Hill Campus
The Corning Community College’s Spencer Hill Campus
is situated on a hilltop on 520 acres south of Corning,
New York. The Campus is within two miles of this
vibrant City, with convenient access to schools, housing,
business, retail, lodging, and business. Despite this
proximity, the distance does present challenges relative to
transportation and the Campus’ identity.
The first eight buildings on the Spencer Hill Campus
were constructed in 1963-1964. The Administration
Building, Commons, Classroom Building, Library, and
Science Building are all located around the main quad.
The Gymnasium is located to the west of the academic
buildings and now has a lower Fitness Center addition
(completed in 2011) facing back to the main academic
quadrangle. The aesthetic of the original structures is
unabashedly modern, composed primarily of dark red
brick with exposed concrete structural frame and wall
panels. Some of the buildings constructed in the years
following the initial ones also echo this look and material
pallette. The Boiler House and Wastewater Treatment
Plant (located away from the main campus center) were
also part of the original campus.
The Nursing Building was constructed adjacent to the
Science Building in 1968. The Learning Center was
added on the south side of the main quad in 1982,
connecting to the Classroom Building and Library. The
light beige brick and horizontal windows of the Learning
Center marked a distinct stylistic departure from the
materials and articulation of the earlier buildings. Later
additions to the Spencer Hill Campus include the
Planetarium, Eileen M. Collins Observatory, Ceramics
Building, and Physical Plant. The original Physical Plant
building was converted into the Automotive Technology
Building when a new Physical Plant facility was
constructed in 1999 near the Wastewater Treatment
Plant.
Spencer Hill Campus Relationship to the City of Corning
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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47
Spencer Hill Campus
Campus Center
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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48
Site Issues
Identity
Corning Community College currently names its
buildings by letter, which is functional for in-house
record keeping, but misses an opportunity to offer
building and place-names in support of the College’s
Mission and Brand.
The existing way-finding signage on campus is in good
condition. Additional signs are needed, however, to help
guide visitors through the campus.
The existing vehicular arrival path has been
compromised in aesthetics and functionality over the
course of the past four decades. The Marland Road
Main Entrance has road geometry that does not meet
current best practices, striping is inadequate, the new
driveway to Perry Hall is confusing and redundant, and
the main inner drop-off loop is aged and deteriorated.
Project Opportunities:

Replace Deteriorated Areas of the Existing Parking
Lots and Roadways (consistent w/East Side Loop
Road Plan)

Complete East Side Loop Road, Parking &
Pedestrian Improvements

Rebuild Marland Road Entry

Rebuild Main Entry, Admissions Parking & MultiModal Transportation Loop

Rebuild Perry Hall Driveway Loop

Rebuild Spencer Crest Nature Center Parking Lot &
Access

Stripe Bike Lanes & Cross-Walks on Identified
Campus Roads
Project Opportunities:

Name & Promote Campuses, Buildings & Outdoor
Spaces/Places Consistent with Brand

Prepare & Implement a Comprehensive WayFinding and Signage Program Supporting the Brand
Vehicular Circulation
The main entrance to the campus from Spencer Hill
Road leads visitors to a traffic circle then to parking lots
located to the east and west of the main quad. Several
improvements on the west side of campus (completed in
2006) include the relocation of the loop road to minimize
vehicular/pedestrian conflicts and construction of
additional parking lots for faculty and students. As
recommended in the 2003 Master Plan Update, the
College plans to continue with these improvements on
the east side of campus. It was noted that several areas
within the original parking lots and roadways have severe
(and frequent) cracking, depressions, and edge failure.
Annual patching and overlays have helped to lengthen
the life of these surfaces, but they should be replaced in
the near future. The College should fully box-out the
most severely deteriorated areas, install perforated pipe
under-drains where appropriate, and replace the stone
base, binder and asphalt top with stabilization fabric
placed over compacted subgrade. This will provide a
long-term and more cost-effective solution for the worst
sections of pavement.
Pedestrian & Bicycle Circulation
Many of the walkways are showing signs of deterioration,
especially the wide asphalt walkway to the Library. It has
perpendicular cracking and will eventually need to be
repaired before it begins to present a tripping hazard.
A hierarchy and the purpose of walkways is not evident
and some buildings are not well connected. Walkways
should include those that function strictly for circulation,
recreation and interpretation.
Bicycle infrastructure is essentially missing from campus,
including striped bike lanes on drives, multi-use walkways
and bicycle parking.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Project Opportunities:
Project Opportunities:

Prepare Sidewalk & Landscape Master Plan with
New & Replaced Walkways

Work with Existing Providers to Modify Schedule


Replace walkway surfaces that are showing signs of
deterioration.
Purchase a Fleet of Busses to either replace or
complement existing public transportation – focused
on evenings, weekends and school breaks

Construct New Walkways According to the Master
Plan

Provide Shelters & Facilities

Add Bike Carriers

Identify Bike Routes and Facilities

Complete & Improve Trail System
Public Transportation
Corning Community College is currently served by four
different public transit providers. In general, the middle
of the weekday is fairly well served by public transit, but
evenings, weekends and school breaks are severely
underserved.

CEATS (Corning Erwin Area Transportation
System): Provides 12 stops per day Monday through
Friday, between Corning Community College and
the downtown Corning area (including the Corning
Transportation Center).

C TRAN (Chemung County Transit System:
CTRAN has an additional 8 stops per day Monday
through Friday, including connections to ACP and
Elmira.

Schuyler County Transit has 4 stops per day Monday
through Friday running between the Watkins Glen
area and the Corning Transportation Center. Free
transfer to C TRAN and CEATS is available with
that fare.

Stueben County Transit has 10 stops per day
Monday through Friday running between the Bath
area and the Corning Transportation Center. Free
transfer to C TRAN and CEATS is available with
that fare.
Site Lighting
The site lighting on the west side of campus was
upgraded in 2007. The renovations included the removal
of all exterior light fixtures and the installation of new
fixtures from the outermost roadway to the western edge
of the Commons. New fixtures were installed at locations
to meet IESNA light level recommendations.
Project Opportunities:

Upgrade lighting on the east side of campus

Upgrade pedestrian scale lighting within the center
campus consistent with new Library lighting
Emergency Call Boxes
Emergency call boxes should be installed at all remote
locations on campus (and Elmira) to ensure a safe
environment for students and faculty. This includes the
Auto-Tech Building, Science Building Parking Lot,
Spencer Crest Nature Center, and Administration
Building Parking Lot.
Project Opportunities:

Install emergency call boxes at remote campus
locations (including Elmira).
Outdoor Athletic Facilities
A new softball field with dugouts, bleachers and fencing
was recently constructed along with a new turf field.
Baseball is not accommodated on-campus, forcing the
College’s team to play in Corning. It is our
understanding that a new field will be construction in the
summer of 2015.
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Campus Infrastructure
Heating and Cooling
The roof of the underground utility tunnel was replaced
in 2001. At that time most of the hot water piping
running through the tunnel was also replaced.
Water Supply
A ten-inch South Corning water main bisects the site and
provides a consistent 56 PSI of pressure and flow to a
750,000-gallon water tank. Backflow preventers have
been discussed but are not mandated by the Health
Department. The water distribution system is adequate
and without problems. There is a well (with water
treatment to remove barium) serving the Auto-Tech
Building that functions as designed.
Local Area Network (LAN)
The Spencer Hill Campus buildings are connected by an
optical fiber backbone that originates in the Learning
Center. The cable, which is a combination of singlemode and multi-mode fiber, is physically routed in a ring
to provide redundant links between the campus
buildings. Horizontal station cabling terminates in
telecommunication rooms in each building. These
telecommunication rooms are linked together and then
connected to the campus-wide fiber backbone. Most of
the horizontal station cabling is category 5, Siamese (2
cables in one jacket) riser-rated copper cable. It was
originally installed by the College in 1994, but extensions
have been installed, when needed, with updated category
6 cabling.
Sewage Collection and Treatment
The Spencer Hill Campus has a sanitary sewer system
that conveys waste water to a nearby treatment plant.
The Wastewater Treatment Plant has a capacity of 50,000
gallons per day but averages only about 17,000 when the
College is in session.
Project Opportunities:
Storm Water Control
Parking Lots D and E sheet flow to a central swale with
drainage inlets. Other paved roads and parking lots drain
more conventionally into catch basins along curb lines
with piping, culverts, and swales that convey runoff to
tributaries of Bailey Creek.
Wide Area Network (WAN)
The four off-campus sites are connected to the Spencer
Hill Campus via Dark Fiber provided by the Finger
Lakes Technologies Group. Each location is capable of 1
Gb/s transmission speeds back to the main campus.
Electrical System
The high voltage electric service provided by New York
State Electric and Gas enters the campus at the east side
of the Classroom Building. Transformers are located at
each building to step down the 12.47kV to 120/208V.
See individual building sections for system deficiencies.
Campus Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system is in good condition. However, the
systems in some of the buildings should be upgraded. See
individual building evaluations for system deficiencies.

Existing category 5 cabling should be considered for
replacement for category 6 or newer cabling.

See individual building sections for system
deficiencies.
Telephone System
The Spencer Hill Campus and all off-campus sites have
been served by Cisco VOIP Telephone System since
2007. This system consists of 2 Cisco C200 M2 servers
running 7 virtual servers, 5 Cisco 2821 routers, 163
various Cisco Switches, and 555 phones. The Cisco
servers are located in the Data Center (R110) of the
Learning Center Building and IT CER (P117) of the
Physical Plant Building to provide failover. The system
includes voice mail, auto attendant, call centers,
emergency response, emergency notification, unified
messaging, and call data recording systems. There are 2
PRI circuits that allow for a total of 48 inbound or
outbound calls and 27 POTs circuits to provide
emergency services and backup. These circuits are
provided by Finger Lakes Technologies Group
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51
Project Opportunity:
provide for better coverage and performance in recent
renovated spaces.

All Cisco phones models 7941, 7942, 7961, 7936,
and ATA 186 should be replaced due to the age
(2007) and EOL (End of Life, January 2015).

All 5 Cisco 2821 routers which allow for provided
circuit access should also be replaced due to their
age (2007) and upcoming EOL (October 2016).


End of Life is expected for the 2 Cisco C200 M2
servers on January 2017 and will require
replacement.


See individual building sections for system
deficiencies.
Project Recommendations:

All Cisco switch models 2900, 3600, and 3700 series
should be considered for replacement due to their
age (2007) and upcoming EOL (January 2018).
Continue to install additional Wireless Access Points
into all buildings except those that have been
recently renovated to improve coverage and
performance.
See individual building sections for system
deficiencies.
Network Electronics
The network electronics were replaced in 2007 with
Cisco networking equipment at all locations. This
network equipment provides secure communication for
all devices attached to the college’s network including the
power and operability of the 555 phones and 132
Wireless Access Points. The Aruba wireless networking
controller was recently upgraded (Summer 2014) to
handle additional Aruba Wireless Access Points to
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Administration Building (A)
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
Building Data
Building History

1963

1980
Administration and Classroom
Buildings connected with an enclosed 3-level, 2story entrance link

1985
New single-ply, ballasted EPDM roof

1989
First floor renovations

1992
First floor exterior walls moved to the
face of Second floor to provide additional
interior space;
First floor windows replaced
Original construction

2000

2005
New single-ply adhered EPDM roof
(20 yr. warranty; expires in 2025)

2006
Second floor renovations
Two accessible toilet rooms provided
B Business
Type I - Noncombustible
Use Summary
This 13,982 gross square foot building houses the
administrative staff of the College. The Second floor
lobby provides space for the exhibition of student and
faculty artwork. Student Services functions currently
occupy much of the First floor.
Functional Analysis
The simple organization of this building works
efficiently, providing an open area in the center of each
floor that is surrounded by offices and conference
rooms. The common area on the First floor
accommodates support staff with direct access to the
perimeter offices and conference rooms. All perimeter
rooms have exterior windows overlooking the campus,
providing views and natural light.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The two-story Administration building has a concrete
structural frame comprised of pre-cast concrete columns
and beams with cast concrete floor and roof decks.
Exterior walls are masonry infill between the concrete
frame elements, brick veneer with concrete block backup, and pre-cast concrete roof fascia panels. The
exposed concrete frame and panels have an exposedaggregate finish that is in good condition considering it is
over fifty years old. While the First floor windows were
new in 1992, the operable casement windows at the
Second floor need replacement. The majority of these
windows will no longer fully close from the interior, and
must be manual pushed shut from the outside each year
in preparation for the heating season.

The roof was replaced in 2005 and is in good
condition. There are 10 years remaining on the
in-place warranty. The shingle roofing at the
central pyramidal skylight element appears to be
in good repair also.

The caulking around the exterior pre-cast
concrete panels and at brick expansion joints is
dry and cracked; this should be raked out and
replaced with new sealant and backer rod.
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
The concrete coating on the backs of exterior
precast concrete soffit panels is peeling and
faded, particularly at the open corners
conditions. The panels should be prepped and
recoated.

A clear sealer to protect the exposed concrete
surfaces should be considered for protection
into the future.

Replace Second floor windows with new,
thermally-broken aluminum windows with 1”
Low-E insulated glass.
Building Interior
The finishes in the majority the building are in good
condition. The Second floor gallery is a well-lit and
modern space. It is assumed that the First floor
common area may be renovated in the future when
Student Service functions are relocated to the Commons
building.


The dimension between the stair railing
balusters on both stairs of the building is larger
than the 4” maximum allowed by the NYS
Building Code. Additionally, the railing lacks a
42” high guardrail at stair runs, and the diameter
of the existing wood handrail is too large. All
of these issues predate the establishment of the
Code language that now requires greater
protection. The railing should be modified or
replaced to correct these issues, either as a
stand-alone effort, or as part of a larger building
renovation project similar to what has occurred
in the Commons or Library projects recently
completed.
The original three-stop hydraulic elevator is still
in use. This has a single-bottom (non-jacketed),
in-ground cylinder. This type of cylinder is
susceptible to in-ground corrosion over time
that can caused has been associated with
hydraulic oil leakage, and even catastrophic
failure. The elevator should be replaced with a
new hole-less hydraulic, or machine room-less
overhead traction model; and the old cylinder
and shaft removed..
ADA
accessible. Some rooms still have locksets with knobs;
these should be replaced with lever handle hardware.

Accessible door hardware should be installed in
all areas of the building as they are renovated.

Stair handrails should be replaced to meet ADA
and NYS Building Code requirements, as noted
above.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Administration Building is served by one dual deck
air-handling unit, located in the basement. The unit has
multiple zones of ductwork that all split off the unit in
the basement. This unit provides heating and ventilation
to the building thru ductwork routed from basement thru
a common chase that feeds multiple floors. Perimeter hot
water fin radiation is also provided throughout the
building.
Heating water is provided to the air handling unit and
building hot water fin radiation by a water/water heat
exchanger system that receives high temperature hot
water from the Boiler House. The heat exchanger and
associated pumps are located in the mechanical room of
the attached Classroom Building.

All of the equipment is near the end of its
useful life and should be replaced during the
next funding cycle.

In order to provide air-conditioning in the
building an air cooled chiller would be required.
This building is one of the buildings that would
be connected to the new boiler plant located
near the Learning Center. Major modifications
to the ductwork distribution system and the
replacement of the multi-zone air-handling unit
would also be required. Currently the unit is
returning all its air to the unit thru louvers in the
mechanical room doors and using the hallways
and mechanical room as plenums. This is an
issue that will need to be corrected when unit is
replaced. Return air will need to be ducted to
the air handling unit.

See boiler house for new boilers and chillers to
feed this building.
Two accessible toilet rooms on the second floor were
provided in 2006. The first floor water fountain is
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Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
The building shares primary and secondary power with
the classroom building. Refer to classroom building
primary power. In 2006, the antiquated Federal Pacific
panels were replaced.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in the
Boiler House.
Domestic Water
The hot and cold domestic water system for the
Administration Building is supplied from the Classroom
Building. The piping appears to be in good condition.
Sanitary Sewer
An existing four-inch sanitary sewer ties into the
Classroom Building sanitary drain before discharging to
the exterior. The above grade piping appears to be in
good condition. No interior inspection was performed.
This is typical for all buildings.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building appears to be sufficient.
The existing fixtures, however, are a mix of T8 and T12
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures in
order to reduce energy costs.

Replace lighting fixtures/lamps with high efficiency
models to decrease energy costs and promote a
green campus.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting appears to be sufficient around the immediate
area of the building. Walkway lighting is also sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Storm Sewer
An existing eight-inch storm sewer ties into the
Classroom Building before discharging to the exterior.
The above grade piping appears to be in good condition.
No interior inspection of the piping was performed. This
is typical for all buildings.
Plumbing Fixtures
There are ADA-compliant toilet rooms on the second
floor of the building. The drinking fountains on the first
and second floor of the building are not the ADAcomplaint dual height (hi-lo) type. The first floor
drinking fountain location makes it a convenient spot to
dispose coffee. Over time the coffee grounds clog the
drain making it unusable. A stainless steel break room
sink should be added to provide a location to brew
coffee and to clean cups. Architectural floor plan
revisions would be required to add a sink.

Replace drinking fountains with dual height
electric water coolers.

Provide new break room sink for coffee station.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
A - Administration
1963
13,892
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/0
B - Business
IV
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
Building Framing
X
X
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
X
X
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
Safety/Security
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
X
X
Compliance
Building
Component
X
C
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
NC
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
Boiler/Heat
PC
NYS/ADA
X
Elevators
X
Signage
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
X
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Classroom Building (C)
Building Data
Functional Analysis
Year Constructed

1963

1980
Classroom and Administration
Buildings connected with an enclosed 3-level, 2story entrance link

1982
Classroom and Learning Center
Buildings connected with an enclosed 2-level
entrance link

1985

2005
New single-ply adhered EPDM roof
(20 yr. warranty; expires in 2025)
Original construction
New single-ply, ballasted EPDM roof
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible
The building layout is a simple double-loaded corridor
plan with classroom and laboratory space on either side,
except at the north end, where the corridor turns to the
west to connect to the Administration Building at the
common 2-story entrance link. A ramped corridor
connects the south end of the building to the Learning
Center, and provides exit there to the east and west sides
of the link. The open stair at the north end is an nice
amenity, however it is “grandfathered” in the Building
Code sense, today only 2-story open stairs are permitted
outside of atria in most instances. A significant
renovation project involving more than 50% of this
building might trigger requirements to enclose the stair in
some fashion.
Building History and Use Summary
This 37,392 square foot building includes many of the
general classrooms, computer classrooms/labs, faculty
offices, Admissions, and some administrative services
offices on the Spencer Hill Campus.
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Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The Classroom Building has two stories and a basement.
The structure consists of pre-cast concrete columns, and
concrete floor and roof decks similar to the adjacent
Administration Building. Exterior walls are masonry infill
between the concrete frame elements, brick veneer with
concrete block back-up, and pre-cast concrete roof fascia
panels. The exposed concrete frame and panels have an
exposed-aggregate finish in varied condition. Some of
the pre-cast columns are beginning to spall and should be
monitored. The exterior walls are brick veneer with
concrete masonry back-up and precast concrete panels.

The fully-adhered EPDM roof is in good
condition, with 10 years of warranty remaining.
The roof should be monitored for leaks or
bubbling areas and repairs made as needed.

The caulking around the exterior pre-cast
concrete panels and at brick expansion joints is
dry and cracked; this should be raked out and
replaced with new sealant and backer rod.

The concrete coating on the backs of exterior
precast concrete soffit panels is peeling and
faded, particularly at the open corners
conditions. The panels should be prepped and
recoated.

A clear sealer to protect the exposed concrete
surfaces should be considered for protection
into the future.

Existing sliding sash windows are difficult to
operate in most locations and are not thermally
efficient. Replace all with new, thermallybroken aluminum windows with 1” Low-E
insulated glass.

Exposed steel anchor bolts at the base of
precast concrete columns on the east side of the
building are beginning to rust. These should be
cleaned to bare steel and coated with a high
performance coating. Cracking and spalled
concrete around the column bases should be
repaired at the same time.

The existing entrance area on the east side of
the building (adjacent to Mechanical C016) is in
poor condition and should be renovated. The
steel doors and adjacent louvers are rusted and
beginning to rot. The air intakes associated
with these louvers may no longer be functional,
presenting the opportunity to close these off
with a more weatherproof enclosure. The
interior concrete floor inside the doors is
cracked and spalled and needs repair, as it is a
tripping hazard and is not ADA-compliant.
This entrance is also the route from the
assigned accessible parking spaces in the service
entrance area, so automatic door operators
should be added to at least one door leaf – a
challenging installation, as there is no headroom
under the existing concrete deck above.
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Building Interior
Interior finishes throughout the building are generally in
good condition. Corridor carpet will require replacement
as wear increases.

The dimension between the stair railing
balusters on the open stair is larger than the 4”
maximum allowed by the NYS Building Code.
Additionally, the railing lacks a 42” high
guardrail at stair runs, and the diameter of the
existing wood handrail is too large. All of these
ADA
While accessibility to instructional areas and offices is
good, and seating accommodations are made as required,
there are a number opportunities to make significant
overall accessibility improvements in the Classroom
issues predate the establishment of the Code
language that now requires greater protection.
The railing should be modified or replaced to
correct these issues, either as a stand-alone
effort, or as part of a larger building renovation
project.

Lower stair runs need a railing or other canedetectable feature to prevent the visually
impaired from running into the mid landing or
upper stair run.
building. While toilet rooms have been altered to
provide the best accessibility achievable without
wholesale renovation of these rooms, there are multiple
issues involved that likely require physical relocation (and
probable replacement) of the designated fixtures, new
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stall partitions, accessories, and reconfiguration of the
entrances, which do not meet clearance requirements for
entrance or exit, at least at the Men’s toilet rooms. Stair
railings at the open stairs are not compliant either, but
the greater need from a vertical circulation standpoint is
the lack of an elevator in this building. Currently, one
must travel to the elevator in either the Administration or
Learning Center buildings. Addition of an elevator
would alleviate this issue, but would likely need to be part
of a larger building renovation project. Drinking
fountain accessibility is also an existing issue.

Replace drinking fountains in the building,
preferably in new alcoves to prevent them from
projecting into the area above cane detection
range for the visually impaired.

Renovate toilet rooms to provide accessible
route, stalls, lavatories, and accessories to meet
current NYS Building Code and ADA
requirements.

Add a holeless hydraulic or machine room-less
overhead traction type elevator in a new shaft,
preferably with 3500# capacity car that will
accommodate a stretcher and can serve as a
freight elevator when needed.

Stair handrails should be replaced to meet
current NYS Building Code and ADA
requirements, as noted above.
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The building is served by three air-handling units located
in the basement that provide heating and ventilation.
One air-handling unit serves the basement level activity
areas and the other units serve the first and second floor
office areas. Hot water unit ventilators provide heating
and ventilation to the classrooms. Perimeter hot water fin
radiation is also provided throughout the building. All the
equipment listed above in fair condition and should be
replaced to achieve upgrades from equipment energy
efficiencies and controls that newer equipment can
provide.
Currently the building does not have any cooling. In
order to provide cooling for this building the existing
AHU would need to be replaced. A new unit would need
to be provided with a cooling coil and all existing
downstream supply ductwork would need to be insulated
so it does not sweat in concealed spaces. All existing unit
ventilators would also need to be replaced and new unit
should be provided with cooling coils. An air-cooled
chiller would also be required. See boiler house for new
boilers and chillers to feed this building.
Heating water is provided to the building mechanical
systems by a water/water heat exchanger system that
receives high temperature hot water from the Boiler
House. The heat exchanger and associated pumps are
located in the ground floor mechanical room. All this
equipment is near the end of its useful life and should be
replaced to achieve increased energy efficiencies that
newer equipment can provide.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
Electrical Systems
Nursing Building, and Science Building. The voltage
steps down on the secondary side of the transformer to
120/208V. In 2006 the outdated electrical panels in this
building were replaced. The main switchboard including
transformer and medium voltage switch are obsolete and
should be replaced.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building appears to be sufficient.
The existing fixtures, however, are a mix of T8 and T12
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures in
order to reduce energy costs.

Replace lighting fixtures/lamps with high
efficiency models to decrease energy costs and
promote a green campus.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting also appears sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system is antiquated and should be
completely replaced with a new code compliant system.

Replace the fire alarm system and all associated
devices.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Primary Power
Fire Protection Systems
Primary power enters the Spencer Hill Campus and goes
directly to a substation located in the Classroom Building
and then continues to the Boiler House, Commons,
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
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Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A 2-1/2 inch domestic water service enters into the
Classroom Building from the pipe tunnel. This service
supplies the Administration, Classroom and Learning
Resource Center Buildings. The piping appears to be in
good condition. The service is equipped with a 2 in.
water meter. The service is not protected by a backflow
preventer.
Domestic hot water for the Classroom and
Administration Building is generated from a high
temperature water supplied heat exchanger located in the
mechanical room of the Classroom Building. This heat
exchanger system operates only when the central boilers
are operational meaning there are times when no hot
water is available to the buildings. This equipment is
original and should be replaced. The piping appears to
be in good condition.

Provide a backflow preventer at the building
water service entrance. Extend drain to
backflow location.

If new localized boilers are installed, provide a
gas fired high efficiency water heater and
storage tank with a thermostatic mixing valve to
limit the distribution temperature.

Provide thermostatic mixing valve on existing
water heater if localized boilers are not installed.
Sanitary Sewer
A five-inch sanitary house trap in a pit inside the
Classroom Building should be removed, as it is
susceptible to collecting debris. The above grade piping
appears to be in good condition.

Remove the five-inch sanitary house trap, fresh
air inlet and install a spool piece in its place.
Storm Sewer
A ten-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The above grade piping appears to
be in good condition. The roof drain on the connector
link between the Classroom and Learning Resource
Center frequently backs up during heavy rainfall events.
The drain and the conductor piping should be replaced
with a larger size.

Replace roof drain and storm conductor piping
with larger size at the Connector Link.
Plumbing Fixtures
The fixtures are original and non-water conserving type.
The basement toilet room fixtures have been modified
over the years in an attempt to conform to ADA
requirements. All toilet rooms should be modified to
conform to the latest ADA requirements and water
conservation guidelines. The building drinking fountains
are not ADA compliant.

Replace fixtures and modify toilet rooms for
handicapped accessibility on all floors.

Replace all drinking fountains with dual height
type.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
C - Classroom
1963
37,392
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/1
B - Business
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
X
Building Framing
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
X
Lighting Systems
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
Safety/Security
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
X
Compliance
Building
Component
X
C
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
Chiller/Controls
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Specialty Systems
NC
X
X
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
PC
NYS/ADA
X
X
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Planetarium (E)
Building Data
Building History and Use Summary
Year Constructed
A unique feature of the Spencer Hill Campus, the
Planetarium, is in very good condition overall. It is used
by the public

1999
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible
Functional Analysis
This building is primarily used for classes, but also
provides space for movies and other recreational events.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior walls of the building are split-face concrete
masonry units (CMU). The building has a steel frame and
metal roof deck. The single-ply EPDM membrane
roofing is original to the building and is in its 16th year of
service. The original 10-year warranty expired in 2009.
The condition of this roof should be observed regularly,
with particular attention to roof edge areas.

There are a number of caulk joints at masonry
control joints that are beginning to deteriorate.
These joints should be raked and re-caulked.

The College has requested that the dome be
replaced.

Exposed steel lintels at the entrance canopy
overhang should be prepped and repainted. A
few CMU joints above lintels need to be
repointed with matching white mortar.

The site wall at the north side of the entrance
(east) face is beginning to show signs of
deterioration from water penetration.
Installation of a foundation drain and
waterproofing at the back side of this retaining
wall is recommended.
Building Interior
The Planetarium’s interior finishes are in generally good
condition.
ADA
The building is compliant with NYS Building Code and
ADA standards.
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
Emergency Power
The building is heated and air-conditioned with one large
air-handling unit serving the theater area and two smaller
air-handling units serving the lobby and office areas. It
has three four-pipe fan coil units, cabinet unit heaters,
perimeter fin radiation, and a toilet exhaust fan. The
equipment is original to the building and in good
condition.
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Heating water is provided to the mechanical system by
three high-efficiency boilers with an additional boiler
provided for humidification. The humidification boiler is
not functioning. The remaining boilers are located in the
buildings boiler room and are in good condition.
Chilled water is provided by a packaged air cooled chiller
located outside the building at grade level. It is also in
good condition.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Power is fed from the Boiler House (12.47kV) to a padmounted transformer that feeds the Planetarium with a
stepped-down voltage of 120/208V. The service enters
the building at the northeast corner and goes to a series
of panels that power the building.
Lighting
Light fixtures throughout the building are high efficiency
fixtures that are sufficient for the tasks at hand.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient in the parking lot, as well as
along the walkways leading to the building.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system has consistent problems and
should be replaced with a new point addressable system.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
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Fire Protection Systems
Natural Gas
Sprinklers
A two-inch gas service enters the building in the
Mechanical Room and supplies the building's boilers.
The gas meter is located outside the building. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
Plumbing Fixtures
Water is supplied to the building through a two-inch
water service. At the service entrance there is a two-inch
meter and valved bypass. There is no backflow
preventer.
The toilet rooms are ADA compliant but lack insulation
on the piping below the lavatories. The fixtures all
appear to be in very good condition. The faucets are
original and should be replaced.
Makeup water to the boilers is protected by a backflow
preventer. There is a water softening system that is
presently disconnected.

Install insulation on the lavatory piping in the
Men’s Room.

Replace lavatory faucets.
Hot water to the building plumbing fixtures is supplied
from an electric water heater.

Provide a backflow preventer at the building
water service.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems with the building's fourinch sanitary drain.
Storm Sewer
An eight-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
E - Planetarium
1999
4,745
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
Compliance
Building
Component
C
X
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
X
Assistive Listening Device
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Gymnasium (G)
Building Data
Year Constructed

1964

1985
Original window glazing was replaced
with insulated glazing on the east and west sides

1993
New fully-adhered, single-ply
membrane roof
Original construction

2007
An addition was constructed on the
west side of the building to provide a formal
entrance from the athletic fields and new loop
road

2009
New single-ply adhered EPDM roof at
original building area (15 yr. warranty; expires in
2024)

2011
2-story Fitness Center addition built
on the east side

2014
Renovations to the original
Gymnasium area of the First floor, including
locker rooms and the athletic administration
area
Occupancy Group:
B – Business, A – Assembly
(Main Gym)
Construction Type:
Type IV - Heavy Timber
Building History and Use Summary
This 43,242 square foot building houses the gymnasium,
lockers rooms, weight rooms, training rooms, faculty
offices, a small wrestling gym, a small classroom, and a
dance studio. The Fitness Center addition constructed in
2011 at the east side of the Gymnasium added additional
physical education program space, classroom, and office
area.
Functional Analysis
A recently completed renovation corrected most
functional and finish issues in the original gym structure,
and along with the Fitness Center addition, the facility is
now in excellent condition to continue service well into
the future.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
This three-story structure is composed of cast-in-place
concrete columns and waffle slabs. The exterior walls
consist of painted concrete masonry units with a few
areas of brick veneer. The arched roof is framed with
heavy timber and finished with wood panel decking.
Roofing is fairly recent, all in good condition and under
warranty. The overall exterior envelope is in very good
condition at this time.
Building Interior
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This building has been well-maintained over the years,
and with recent additions and renovations, the interior
finishes are new or in very good condition.
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ADA Issues
Lighting
The recent renovations appear to have corrected any
observable compliance issues, and locker rooms with
associated toilet and shower facilities have been
improved to be compliant with current ADA and NYS
Building Code requirements.
The majority of the lighting in the building appears to be
sufficient. The lighting in the gymnasium should be
upgraded to new energy efficient T5 high output fixtures.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Gymnasium is served by multiple hot water heating
and ventilating air-handling units, chilled beams, highefficiency boilers, air cooled chiller, exhaust fans, and hot
water terminal units. The terminal units are fin radiation
and unit heaters. The equipment has just been replaced
as part of a 2014 construction project and is in good
condition.

A new mechanical room has been recently
added as part of the 2014 project that included
the addition of air cooled chillers, new heat
recovery locker room air handling units, chilled
beams, and new exhaust fans.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new work included
DDC upgrades.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Primary power is 12.47 kV. The building is supplied with
120/208 volt power from a pad mounted transformer
through recently installed switchgear. In 2006 all
electrical panel boards were replaced and additional
circuits were added to provide sufficient power to
electrical receptacles. There is one building original
distribution panel that is obsolete and should be replaced.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the Gymnasium. In 2006 an exterior lighting project
was completed on the west side of campus that included
the area around this building.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system has been recently replaced and is in
excellent condition.
Telephone/Data System
Phones are approaching the end of their useful life.

Replace phones with new.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A four-inch domestic water service enters the building
and reduces to a two-and-one-half-inch size. It includes a
shut-off valve, backflow preventer and water meter.
The domestic hot water system has recently been
replaced and consists of two (2) Weil McLain water
heaters with two (2) 119 gallon storage tanks. Hot water
is stored at 140°F and mixed to 110° hot water for
distribution to the building fixtures. Piping is new and in
excellent condition.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems. The piping appears to
be in good condition.
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Storm Sewer
An eight-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
The fixtures are ADA-compliant. Toilet Rooms and
Locker Rooms have recently been remodeled. The
fixtures are new and in excellent condition.
Natural Gas
A three-inch gas service enters at the southwest corner of
the building. The service supplies the domestic hot water
heater and HVAC equipment. The meter assembly
consists of a shut-off valve, meter and regulator. The
piping appears to be in good condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
G - Gymnasium
1964, Fitness Center Add'n. - 2011
43,242
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2
A, B
Type IV
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Building Interior
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
Compliance
Building
Component
C
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Ceramics/ Chemical Storage Building (K)
Building Data
Year Constructed

1986

2003
Construction of exterior wood-fired
kilns and shelter

2009
New green (planted) roof w/ EPDM
membrane below (20 yr. warranty; expires in
2029)
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
Hazard Storage
B – Business; S-1 – Moderate
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
The First floor of this two-story building contains the
Ceramics Studio. The Second floor is used as a central
Campus-wide storage space for chemicals and other
moderately-hazardous materials. In 2003, exterior woodfired kilns were added, located to the south of the
building in an open, wood-framed shed structure with
metal roofing. A planted “green” roof was installed in
2009, the area of single-story roof visible appears to be
thriving.
Functional Analysis
The Ceramics Building is remotely located from the
Learning Center where the rest of the art studios are
located; other than this, this building works reasonably
well as a Ceramics Studio with the adjacent exterior kiln.
The storage area is adequate for materials stored within
it, but this function could be relocated if necessary
without major impact. There are no toilet facilities in the
building. The two levels are not connected vertically,
although this does not affect function
.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior walls of the building are brick and precast
concrete panel veneer with concrete masonry back-up.
The building appears to be in good condition.

The exterior door on the west side of the
building does not close properly and should be
adjusted for proper operation.

The steel lintels above doors and windows are
beginning to rust and should be prepped,
primed, and painted.

Exterior caulking is dry and cracked, and is
missing in a few locations. All old caulking
should be removed, and new backer rod and
sealant installed at exterior joints.

On the south side, east end, there are a number
of abandoned penetrations through brick and
precast concrete wall areas that should be filled
to prevent water and vermin infiltration.
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Building Interior
The interior of the building is in reasonable condition for its use and age.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Ceramics Studio is served by an in space hung hot
water heating and ventilation air handling unit. The space
also consists of a large canopy exhaust hood for space
needs. The air handling units air in fair condition. The
large canopy exhaust hood and exhaust fan have been
recently replaced and are in good conditions. The airhandling unit serving the Ceramics Studio should be
replaced during the next funding cycle and upgrades to
controls and possible DX coil should be considered.
The hazardous materials storage area is served by a space
hung hot water heating and ventilation air handling unit.
The space also consists of a exhaust fan system that is in
good condition. The hot water unit heater that serves the
receiving area is also in good working order.
Heating water is provided to the mechanical systems by
three high-efficiency hot water boilers located in the
building’s boiler room. The boilers have been relocated
from the library and are in good condition.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Power that is fed from the Boiler House enters the
building through a modern 200A, three phase panel that
feeds both the Ceramics Studio and the hazardous
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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materials storage area. Power and power distribution are
both sufficient at this facility.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Lighting
Lighting throughout this building is outdated but appears
to be sufficient for the tasks at hand. The existing
fixtures should be replaced with energy efficient T8 type.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building including the parking lot that serves both
this building and the adjacent Boiler House.
Fire Alarm System
Heat detectors should be revised to explosion-proof type
in the chemical storage area.
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Telephone/Data System
Storm Sewer
Phones are approaching the end of their useful life. Data
cables are Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near
capacity.
There are roof scuppers that discharge to grade that
appear to be in fair condition.

Replace phones with new.
Natural Gas

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
A one-and-one-half-inch gas service supplies the
domestic hot water heater and HVAC equipment. The
gas meter is located outside the building on the north
side. The piping appears to be in good condition.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A one-inch domestic water service is supplied from the
Boiler House. The domestic hot water system consists of
a gas-fired water heater with a 40-gallon capacity and
40,000 BTU input. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
There are no toilet rooms in this building. Within the
Chemical Storage Area, there is a laundry style sink and
emergency shower. They appear to be in fair condition.
There is no emergency eye/face wash fixture. Within the
Ceramics Area, there is a double laundry style sink which
is in poor condition.

Replace sink with stainless steel scullery style
sink with double bowl and drainboard.

Provide eye/face wash near existing emergency
shower in the Chemical Storage Area.
Sanitary Sewer
Sanitary piping receives waste discharge from a sink in
the Ceramics Studio and a laundry tub located in the
hazardous materials storage area. The sink in the
Ceramics Studio has a sediment trap located below the
sink. The trap is in poor condition and is small for the
application. There are no floor drains located in the
hazardous materials storage area. The piping appears to
be in fair condition.

Replace the sediment trap and locate where it
can easily be maintained.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
K - Ceramics/Chemical Storage
1986
2,407
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/0
B - Business
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Building Interior
Floors
X
Walls
X
Ceilings
X
X
Safety/Security
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Interior Door Control
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
C
X
Building Heating/Cooling
HVAC Distribution & Controls
Exterior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Library (L)
Building Data
Year Constructed
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B – Business
Type I – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary

1964
Original construction

1983
New single-ply EPDM roof

2005
New brick switchgear building
constructed

2005
New EPDM and asphalt single roof
(20 yr. warranty; expires 8/2025)

2006
Elevator upgraded to comply with
current accessibility codes
Functional Analysis

2014
Renovation and Learning
Center/entrance addition to the north
completed
The layout of this building works well. Its central
location on the main quad makes it easily accessible from
other buildings and an ideal location.
This two-story building contains the General, Special,
and Reference Collections for the College. Group study
space is also provided, and the recently-completed
addition houses various discipline-specific academic
Learning Centers.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior walls consist of brick veneer and precast
concrete panels with concrete masonry backup. The
building structure is pre-cast columns with concrete floor
and roof decks.

Many of the first floor windows are original,
single-glazed units with non-thermally broken
metal frames. They should be replaced with
double glazed, energy-efficient units. Skylight
units should also be replaced.
Building Interior
It is assumed that all finishes, materials, and systems are
new or in good condition, as the renovation and
expansion project is now complete.
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ADA
Emergency Power
The College has recently renovated and expanded the
entire facility, and it should be fully ADA-compliant to
current standards as an outcome of the renovations.
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House
Mechanical Systems
The lighting appears sufficient as the entire building has
recently been renovated and system upgraded.
Heating and Cooling
Lighting
The complete MEP system is new, and is a mixture of
chilled beam and VAV. An air cooled chiller and hot
water boilers is being provided as part of this project.
Exterior Lighting
Building Controls
Fire Alarm System
Building controls have been upgraded to direct digital
controls (DDC) that are connected to the Campus-Wide
Network.
System has been upgraded as part of the recent building
renovation.
Electrical Systems
Telephone/Data System
Primary Power
Primary power is fed from a pad-mounted transformer,
just installed in 2014. In 2006, all electrical panel boards
in the building were replaced. The entire building has
recently been renovated and system upgraded.
The lighting appears sufficient as the entire building has
recently been renovated and system upgraded.
Phones are approaching the end of their useful life.

Replace all remaining phones with new.
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Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
The entire building has recently been renovated and
system upgraded.
Sanitary Sewer
A four-inch sanitary line exits the building. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Storm Sewer
A ten-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
Natural Gas
A natural gas service feeds the Library. The gas meter
and regulator are located outside the building.
Plumbing Fixtures
The fixtures appear sufficient as the entire building has
recently been renovated.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
L - Library
1964, w/ 2014 Addition
34,230
Condition
Building
Component
F
2/0
B - Business
Type IV - Heavy Timber
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
P
E
Foundations
X
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Roof
X
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
X
X
Building Interior
Floors
X
Lighting Systems
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Security Cameras
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
X
Building Heating/Cooling
X
Compliance
Building
Component
C
Exterior Doors
NC
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Specialty Systems
PC
NYS/ADA
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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The Commons (M)
Building Data
Building History and Use Summary
Year Constructed
This two-level Commons facility is a central hub of the
campus for students, staff, and faculty. Campus dining
services including student and faculty dining rooms,
student lounge space, meeting rooms, the Bookstore, the
Career Development Center, the Office of Student
Disability Services, Student Life Offices, and Public
Safety are all located here, along with offices for student
organizations and clubs. The recently completed
renovation and courtyard infill provides expanded lounge
space and a Student Support Center in a high-ceilinged
area with clerestory windows admitting natural light
around the perimeter of a curved roof form.

1964

1984
New roof installed over original
portion of the building

1991
Serving area renovations

1994
Fire alarm system upgrades

1995
Western addition constructed

2004
New single-ply EPDM roof installed
over the entire building (20 yr. warranty; expires
in 2024); and
existing skylights repaired

2006

2014
Renovations to original portion of the
building completed; original courtyard infilled
to create additional student service and lounge
area; food service elevator opened
Original construction
Main entrance stair and ramp replaced
Occupancy Group:
B Business
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible,
w/ timber-framed roof structure over 20 feet above
Second floor
Functional Analysis
There is a generous amount of lounge, dining, and office
space within the building. The Public Safety offices are
also being reorganized in the western side of the building.
The Kitchen layout could be improved functionally,
perhaps with a significant reorganization to consolidate
the dishwashing area and reclaim the abandoned tray
drop-off area. As some of the primary kitchen
equipment is due for replacement, this could be done as a
single renovation project.
Building Survey Summary
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Building Exterior
The Commons is a 51,823 gross square foot structure
consisting of pre-cast concrete columns, floor, and roof
decks, other than above the main cafeteria, and the newly
enclosed courtyard area, which have metal roof decks
supported by curved glue-lam wood beams. The exterior
walls are pre-cast concrete aggregate panels and brick
veneer. The sinuous curve of the new lounge roof is the
reverse of the one over the main dining area, providing
an interesting visual counterpoint, and linking the
building to the curved roof forms of the Gymnasium and
the Fitness Center addition.



The caulking around the exterior pre-cast
concrete panels and at brick expansion joints is
dry and cracked in many locations; this should
be raked out and replaced with new sealant and
backer rod where not already recently replaced.
Exposed rebar at spalled areas at beams at the
north and south sides of the building should be
cleaned, coated, and the concrete repaired to
match the existing finish.
The concrete site wall outside of the Student
Success Center has had some cracks repaired,
but continues to deteriorate. Recommend re-
facing or replacement of the most heavily
damaged areas.

Water collecting on the slab outside the
vestibule on the south side of the building, west
end, is entering the wall cavity at the railing
posts above the loading dock causing the brick
below to deteriorate, and is also leaking through
the ceiling of the receiving area below. The walk
should be replaced with positive drainage away
from the building, which may require
replacement of the vestibule storefront and
entrance doors as part of the scope to correct
this properly. The brick above the loading dock
door will likely need to be reconstructed.

Replace all remaining original windows
(including those with single-pane glazing) that
have not been previously replaced as part of
other projects with new, thermally-broken
aluminum windows with 1” Low-E insulated
glass.

The mortar has washed out of the joints in the
brick walls along west side of the exterior stair,
at the north side between the Cafeteria and
Faculty Dining spaces. Rake and re-point
deteriorated areas.
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Building Interior
The interior finishes in this building are in good
condition; many are new as a result of the recent
renovations. The Serving area counters and finishes were
upgraded about 6 years ago, but will require another
renovation within a few more years just from the volume
of use and wear, if not from changes in food offerings
over time. The main kitchen is in need of renovation and
a functional revision of its layout. Primary cooking
equipment is well-worn, although currently functional,
but should certainly be considered for replacement as
part of a kitchen renovation. Quarry tile flooring is in
need of replacement, possibly with a slip-resistant
seamless epoxy resin system over a new waterproofing
membrane.
ADA
Mechanical Systems
No significant issues were identified. There appear to be
accessible routes to all primary functions, and accessible
toilet rooms and drinking fountains are provided. The
handrails of the eastern stair just north of the building
entrance has had its’ non-compliant handrails corrected
as part of the renovations. The small sunken seating area
below this stair at the First floor level is not accessible.
Signage indicating this and directing the reader to
accessible lounge space could be provided to identify
this.
Heating and Cooling
The Commons is served by multiple air-handling units,
located in the basement, that provide heating and
ventilation to the building. The air handling units connect
to ductwork that is routed throughout the building
serving a mixture of different spaces. Hot water fin
radiation is provided for areas not served by the airhandling units to provide heating. Exhaust fans are
provided for each different kitchen exhaust hood and
also for toilet rooms. These fans are located on the roof.
The main Kitchen hood does not have a dedicated make
up air unit. A new unit should be provided to track with
the main hood exhaust fans.
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Five high-efficiency boilers, located in the basement of
the 1995 addition, provide hot water to the mechanical
equipment in the building. The mechanical equipment in
the addition (boilers, air-handling units, fin radiation, etc.)
is in good condition. The 5 existing hot water boilers are
nearing the end of their useful life. These boilers should
be replaced with (3) high efficiency condensing boilers.
The 2014 project renovation and expansion project has
provided new air handling units and pumps to feed the
east side of the building. Air cooled chillers have been
provided in this project to provided cooling for this
portion of the building and associated chilled beams.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new work included
DDC upgrades.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Primary power is 12.47kV. The Commons has its own
substation to step down the voltage to 120/208V, threephase power. The main breaker provides an ample
amount of power throughout the building. In 2006 all
electrical panel boards were replaced and additional
circuits were added to provide sufficient power to
electrical receptacles. The main switchboard has recently
been replaced and is in excellent condition.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House. An emergency generator should be
considered to supply power to the kitchen equipment
during an extended power outage.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building appears to be sufficient.
The existing fixtures are T8 fixtures.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting also appears to be
sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system has recently been replaced and is in
excellent condition.
Telephone/Data System
Phones are approaching the end of their useful life. Data
cables are Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near
capacity.

Replace phones with new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
The original building, recently undergoing renovations, is
protected with an automatic sprinkler system. The 1995
addition does not have a fire sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A three-inch domestic water service supplies the
building. There is no backflow preventer on the building
water service.
The domestic hot water system has recently been
replaced and consists of two (2) Weil McLain water
heaters with two (2) 119 gallon storage tanks. The piping
appears to be in good condition.

Provide a backflow preventer at the building
water service. Extend drain to backflow
location.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems with the sanitary
building drain.
A floor drain located in the vicinity of the dishwasher
periodically backs up during heavy use periods.
A grease trap below the kitchen automatically removes
grease. The piping appears to be in good condition.
Storm Sewer
A ten-inch storm sewer collects storm-water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
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Natural Gas
A three-inch gas service enters the building from the
utility tunnel and supplies the gas-fired kitchen
equipment. The piping appears to be in good condition.
A four-inch gas service enters the building within the
mechanical equipment room to serve the boilers.

Provide insulation on the waste and water
piping below the lavatory.
Plumbing Fixtures
The building has ADA-compliant toilet rooms.
However, there is no insulation on the piping below
some of the lavatories. The fixtures are in good
condition.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
M - Commons
1964, w/ 1995 & 2014 Additions/Reno.
51,490
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/0
B - Business
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
X
Fire Alarm System
X
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Electrical Distribution
X
X
Building Framing
X
Windows/Louvers
X
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
Power Wiring
Roof
X
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Lighting Systems
Building Interior
X
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
X
Walls
X
X
Perimeter Door Control
Ceilings
X
X
Interior Door Control
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
X
Stairs
X
X
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
Safety/Security
C
X
Exterior Doors
X
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
NC
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
PC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Boiler/Heat
X
Compliance
Building
Component
X
X
X
X
X
Elevators
X
Signage
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
Nursing Building (N)
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87
Building Data
Building History and Use Summary
Year Constructed
This 37,332 square foot building houses nursing labs,
science labs, classrooms, faculty offices, and two large
lecture halls that seat 78 and 114.

1968
Original construction

1986
New single-ply ballasted roof

2004
Elevator upgraded
Functional Analysis

2006
Third floor renovations

2006
New single-ply EPDM roof (15 yr.
warranty; expires in 2021)
This facility continues to serve the Nursing Program
reasonably well, although upgrades to laboratories and
simulation facilities in the building would improve
instructional capability.
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B – Business
Type I – Noncombustible
Building Survey Summary
deteriorating mortar joints, stress cracking, and
efflorescence.
Building Exterior
The Nursing Building is three stories above grade with a
full basement. Similar to the other original campus
buildings; the structure is cast-in-place concrete columns,
waffle slab floors, and a concrete roof deck. Exterior
walls are precast concrete and brick exterior walls with
concrete masonry back-up.

The building is primarily of Type I
construction, with the exception of the steelframed roof of Classroom 337.

The fully adhered EPDM roof is in good
condition. The current warranty expires in
2021.

The brick veneer is not aging as well as that on
the 1963-1964 constructed buildings on
campus; different detailing and/or construction
methods were likely employed. There are
numerous areas on all sides of the building
where distress can be observed, evident by

Efflorescence is the result of water infiltration,
and while it typically can be successfully cleaned
from the brick, the sources need to be identified
and corrected or the white deposits will
reappear. There are two apparent sources
visible, although there may be others such as at
roof edges. A number of efflorescence areas
are below precast copings, where there is either
no through-wall flashing below, or the flashing
is deteriorated. Proper installation of flashings
should correct the water infiltration from this
source, which involves removal and
replacement of the copings. Other areas, often
combined with deteriorated mortar joints, are
around building entrance doors and the exterior
exit stair from the upper level of Lecture Hall
221. These areas are likely to have piled snow
around them, and also to be in contact with deicing materials such as rock salt. The salted
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water soaks into the brick, and combined with
freeze-thaw action accelerates the aging of the
mortar joints and brick faces.

Mortar joints at several locations around the
building are beginning to deteriorate allowing
water into the exterior wall cavity. All
deteriorated mortar joints should be raked out
and re-pointed.

Some sealant joints around the building have
been redone, although not always successfully.
The remaining joints should be cleaned out and
re-caulked.

Exterior entrance doors are in fair condition
and should be replaced with new aluminum
entrances and appropriate hardware, including
automatic door operators at primary entrance
points.
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Building Interior

Some vinyl asbestos floor tile (VAT) still
remains at the first floor. This should be abated
and replaced with new vinyl tile or other
flooring.

Laboratories are generally in need of upgrades
to finishes, lab tables, fume hoods, lighting, and
HVAC. Existing labs have a dated appearance
to them and should be completely modernized
with new equipment, casework, systems and
finishes. Renovations should include the
installation of additional fume hoods, and the
addition of storage space.

The dimension between the stair railing
balusters on the open stair is larger than the 4”
maximum allowed by the NYS Building Code.
Additionally, the railing lacks a 42” high
guardrail at stair runs, and the diameter of the
existing wood handrail is too large. All of these
issues predate the establishment of the Code
language that now requires greater protection.
The railing should be modified or replaced to
correct these issues, either as a stand-alone
effort, or as part of a larger building renovation
project.
ADA

Existing toilet rooms are not fully accessible,
and need a few modifications to make them
fully compliant with current regulation.
Redesigned, fully accessible toilet rooms might
be considered as part of a future building-wide
renovation.

Lecture Halls 137 and 221 have accessible
seating positions, but lack assistive listening
systems.

Some doors still lack lever door hardware, or
lack required clearances at the latch side of the
door due to masonry wall construction that is
difficult to modify.

High-low type, accessible drinking fountains
should be provided.

The ramp next to Lecture Hall 137 lacks a
compliant handrail or landing.

A railing or other means for cane detection
should be provided at the bottom of the stair
next to the Lecture Halls to prevent the visually
impaired from walking into the underside of the
stair run.

Replace or modify existing stair railings to meet
current NYS Building Code requirements as
noted above.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The basement and interior spaces on the upper floors are
served by air handling unit that is located in the
basement. This unit provides constant volume heat and
ventilation only to these spaces. Heating is achieved in
these spaces from duct mounted re-heat coils.
Hot water only unit ventilators serve the first and second
floor classrooms. The third floor office areas have
perimeter fin radiation. Operable windows are utilized in
this area for ventilation. The Lecture Hall is heated and
air-conditioned by its own packaged air-handling
equipment that is located in an upper mechanical room.
All equipment is original to the building and in fair
condition. All this equipment is at the end of its useful
life and should be replaced.
In order to provide air-conditioning in the building, the
basement air-handling unit and unit ventilators would
need to be replaced with units that incorporate chilled
water coils. Four-pipe fan coils would need to be
provided in the office areas. In addition, the installation
of an air-cooled chiller would be required. This unit and
associated pumps can be located in the renovated boiler
house and the piping can be routed underground over to
the building
High temperature heating water is provided to the
mechanical systems by a water/water heat exchanger
system. The piping is connected to the Boiler House and
located in the basement mechanical room. The college
has a desire to decommission the existing high
temperature boiler plant. A new high efficiency
condensing boiler has can be provided in the renovated
boiler house with associated pumps. New piping can be
routed from boiler house underground to building.
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The lab spaces within the building are original and are in
need of upgrade. All lab space shall be renovated and
upgraded MEP systems should be provided to match
architectural changes. When required new hoods, lab
controls, fixtures, lights, and all other equipment to meet
needs of the renovated space shall be provided.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
Electrical Systems
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Primary Power
Plumbing Systems
Primary power is 12.47 kV. In 2006, new electrical
panels were installed throughout the facility. The
building’s original switchboard, including transformer
and medium voltage switch, are obsolete and should be
replaced. Class laboratories are outdated and should be
completely renovated.
Domestic Water
Emergency Power
The domestic hot water system consists of a gas-fired
water heater (100-gallon storage capacity, 150,000 BTU
input). There is no insulation on piping at the water
heater and service entrance. The piping appears to be in
good condition.
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building is a mix of T12 and T8
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the facility, including Parking Lot E and all walkways
leading to the building. The exterior lighting project on
the west side of campus that was completed in 2006
included the area around this building.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system is obsolete and should be replaced
with a new point addressable system.
A three-inch domestic water service enters the Nursing
Building from the utility tunnel and feeds both the
Nursing Building and Lecture Halls. It includes a shut-off
valve and water meter. There is no backflow preventer
on the building water service.

A backflow preventer should be provided at the
building water service. Extend drain to floor
drain.

Insulate water piping at service entrance and
water heater.
Sanitary Sewer
The Nursing Building sanitary drain exits on the
southwest corner of the building. It is 5 inch size and
contains a house trap located within a pit inside the
building.
The sanitary drain for the Lecture Hall exits on the
northwest side of the building. It is 4 inch in size and has
a 4 inch house trap.
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Each building has a separate acid waste system that
connects to the sanitary drain. Each system originally
was installed with a neutralization basin. The basin for
the Nursing Building has been disconnected and
connects directly to the sanitary drain.

Remove the five-inch sanitary house trap in the
Nursing Building and the four-inch sanitary
house trap in the lecture halls. Install a spool
piece at each location.
Storm Sewer
There is an eight-inch storm sewer in the Nursing
Building and a six-inch storm sewer in the lecture halls
that collect storm water from building roof drains. The
piping appears to be in good condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
The fixtures are original and are the non-conserving type.
The basement toilet room fixtures have been modified
over the years in an attempt to conform to ADA
requirements. All toilet rooms should be modified to
conform to the latest ADA requirements and water
conservation guidelines. The building water coolers are
not ADA compliant.

Replace fixtures and modify toilet rooms for
handicapped accessibility on all floors.

Replace water coolers with dual height type.
Natural Gas
A two-and-one-half-inch gas service enters the Nursing
Building from the utility tunnel space. This gas line feeds
gas-fired equipment and laboratory bench outlets in both
the Nursing Building and lecture halls. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Compressed Air
A five-horsepower air-compressor delivers compressed
air to laboratory table outlets. The piping appears to be in
good condition.
Vacuum
Two (2) 3/4 horsepower vacuum pumps provide vacuum
to the nursing labs vacuum inlets. The piping appears to
be in good condition.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
N - Nursing
1968
37,332
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
3/1
B - Business
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
Fire Alarm System
X
Building Framing
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Windows/Louvers
Doors/Frames/Hardware
Roof
X
X
Lighting Systems
X
X
Electrical Distribution
X
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Ceilings
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Interior Door Control
X
Security Cameras
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
Safety/Security
X
Built-In Furnishings
Specialty Systems
X
Compliance
Building
Component
X
C
X
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
X
Interior Doors
AHU/Controls
X
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
Chiller/Controls
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
NC
X
X
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
PC
NYS/ADA
X
Elevators
Signage
X
X
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Observatory (O)
Building Data
Building History and Use Summary
Year Constructed
The Eileen M. Collins Observatory, constructed in 1990,
houses a 1/10th scale fully operational model of the Hale
Telescope. The smaller observatory structure located to
the southwest of the main building was constructed by
the College to house the telescope from the original
observatory. The roof of the smaller observatory rolls
away to reveal the original telescope.

1990

2013
Roof replaced, new fully-adhered
EPDM membrane roofing (20-year warranty;
expires 2033)
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B – Business
Type I – Noncombustible
Materials
Functional Analysis
The Observatory is used by the College and other
members of the community to view the night sky.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior walls of the building are split face concrete
masonry units. The building has a steel frame and metal
deck.

The metal fascia needs to be reattached to the
building is several locations.

Some areas of the dome are beginning to rust
and should be refinished.

The spiral ramp and steps are spalling at edges
and railing posts, and there are several visible
cracks in the concrete surfaces. There is also
rust staining on areas of concrete.

There are numerous areas of the white CMU
for both structures that have vertical stains and
discoloration.
Building Interior
The interior finishes are in good condition and the
building is well maintained.
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
Primary Power
The Observatory is served by a high efficiency gas-fired
hot water boiler and associated pumps. This system
provides hot water to the buildings terminal heating
units. The terminal units are perimeter fin radiation and
cabinet unit heaters. A hot water unit ventilator (along
with perimeter fin radiation) is also provided for the
multi-purpose room to meet the rooms heating and
ventilation requirements. Operable windows are utilized
for ventilation in the office areas. Exhaust fans are
provided for the toilet rooms and dark room. The
equipment is in good condition.
Power is fed from the Gymnasium and enters the
building through a 100A three-phase panel that feeds the
entire building. Power and power distribution appear to
be sufficient.
Currently cooling is not provided in this building. In
order to provide air-conditioning in the building, a VRV
system can be provided for each office space and to serve
the large multipurpose room.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network.
Emergency Power
Building lacks emergency power. Battery pack
emergency lighting should be provided.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building is a mix of T12 and T8
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the facility. Walkway lighting should be provided.
Electrical Systems
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Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
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Fire Protection Systems
Storm Sewer
Sprinklers
There are no roof drains for this building. Storm water is
collected in gutters and discharged to the site storm
system.
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Natural Gas
Domestic Water
A one-inch gas service enters the building in the
Mechanical Room and supplies the building's boiler. The
gas meter is located outside the building. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Water is supplied to the building through a two-inch
water service. At the service entrance there is a shutoff
valve and water meter. There is no backflow preventer.
Hot water to the fixtures is supplied from an AO Smith,
10 gallon, 1.5 kW electric water heater. The heater is
located on an overhead shelf in the Mechanical Room.
The heater appears to be new and in good condition.

Provide a backflow preventer at the building
water service.
Plumbing Fixtures
The toilet rooms are ADA compliant but lack insulation
on the piping located below the lavatory. The fixtures all
appear to be in good condition.

Install insulation on the lavatory piping.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems with the four-inch
sanitary building drain.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
O - Observatory
1990
3,125
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business
IB - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Building Interior
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
HVAC Distribution & Controls
AHU/Controls
X
X
Chiller/Controls
Exterior Doors
X
Interior Doors
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
Elevators
Signage
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Physical Plant (P)
Building Data
ADA
Year Constructed
The building has accessible public and employee
entrances, lever hardware throughout and an accessible
water fountain adjacent to the Break Room. The toilet
rooms are accessible.

1999
Original construction
Occupancy Groups:
B – Business, S-1 – Moderate
Hazard Storage
Construction Type:
Type II – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
The Physical Plant Department moved into this building
in 1999; vacating the complex that now houses the Auto
Technology Department. The main Physical Plant
building houses offices, workshops, storage areas, locker
rooms, and a garage. There are also outbuildings at this
location: a salt shed and a vehicle storage shed are nearby
to the east of the main building. The sheds are also in
good condition. Some storage is maintained at the
western building in the Auto Tech complex, and also in a
wood-framed pole barn to the west of those buildings.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Physical Plant is served by two constant volume airhandling units for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The
air is distributed to the multiple spaces and controlled
duct mounted reheat coils. The building is equipped with
hot water fin radiation and cabinet unit heaters. The
garage areas are provided with gas-fired, infrared heaters,
and hot water unit heaters. The carpentry shop and paint
shop doesn't have separate exhaust systems. When
system needs to be replaced a new variable air volume
system should be provide to serve this building.
The new building is a welcome upgrade from the
previous facility located north of campus and meets all
the needs of the Physical Plant Department.
Heating water is provided by five gas-fired high
efficiency boilers. All equipment is original to the
building and in excellent condition. All new equipment
that is provided in future projects shall be provided with
DDC integration. Controls should be updated DDC in
future projects.
Building Survey Summary
Building Controls
Building Exterior
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network.
Functional Analysis
The exterior walls of the office building are split-face
concrete masonry units with aluminum-framed windows.
Walls and windows appear to be in good condition. This
building is steel framed with a corrugated metal roof deck
and single-ply EPDM membrane roofing. The roof is
original to the building and is in its 16th year of service.
The original 10-year warranty expired in 2009. The
condition of this roof should be observed regularly, with
particular attention to roof edge areas.
Building Interior
Interior finishes are generally in good condition and the
building is well-maintained.
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Electrical Systems
Plumbing Systems
Primary Power
Domestic Water
Primary power is supplied by the Utility Company at
120/208V. The main breaker provides an ample amount
of power throughout the building. All electrical systems
are current and in good condition.
The building water is supplied from a drilled well located
on the west side of the building. The water service size is
one-inch. The water is softened prior to distribution to
the building domestic water system. The system is
equipped with an AO Smith 85 gallon hydro pneumatic
tank.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided for the computers in the
building.
Lighting
Light fixtures throughout the building are high efficiency
fixtures that are sufficient for the tasks at hand.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting also appears to be
sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Water for the building is heated through an AO Smith
FPD-50 direct vent water heater. The heater is rated at
42,000 BTU/hr. input and has a 50 gallon capacity.
There are no reported problems with the water piping.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems with the four-inch
sanitary drain.
Storm Sewer
An eight-inch and a six-inch storm sewer collect storm
water from building roof drains. The piping appears to
be in good condition.
Natural Gas
A two-and-one-half-inch gas service enters the building
and feeds the domestic hot water heater and HVAC
equipment. The gas meter and regulator are located on
the exterior of the building on the west side. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
There are ADA-compliant fixtures in the building. The
toilet room fixtures are in good condition.
Service sink fixtures are located throughout the building
and are in fair condition.
Compressed Air
Compressed air to the work areas is supplied from a tank
mounted Ingersoll Rand #T30, 5 HP air compressor.
The compressed air system appears to be in good
condition.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
P - Physical Plant
1999
17,592
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business/Storage, Moderate Hazard
2B - Noncombustible unprotected
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Roof
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Perry Hall (Dormitory) (PH)
Building Data
Use Summary
Year Constructed
The building is a dormitory with sleeping rooms, lounge
space, meeting spaces, and support.

2012
Original Construction
Occupancy Group:
(Dormitory)
R-2 – Residential
Construction Type:
Unprotected
IIB – Noncombustible,
Functional Analysis
Functions as intended: a fairly new facility. It has
not yet been filled to capacity.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
Heating and Cooling
Exterior Insulated Finish System (EIFS) on light gauge
metal framed backup walls. Metal windows, roof,
entrances are all
All systems are new and in good working order. Upon
walk thru of new building first floor mechanical room it
was noticed that room was very warm and with no
ventilation provided for space.
Building Interior
Finishes are in very good condition. Steel structure with
concrete floor slabs is relatively new.
ADA
The building is compliant with NYS Building Code and
ADA standards.
Mechanical Systems
This is a new building constructed in 2012, therefore all
systems are new.

In order to provide temperature control, a
mechanical room exhaust fan and new intake
louver is required.

The boiler flue from first floor boilers
terminates in a location that is a nuisance to
second floor dormitory room. The flue should
be extended to roof and boxed in.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of direct digital controls (DDC)
that are connected to the Campus-Wide Network.
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Electrical Systems
Systems are new and in excellent condition.
Power and lighting systems are new and in very good
condition.
Emergency Power
There is no emergency generator provided for the
building. The building will be uninhabitable during a
prolonged power outage. An emergency generator
should be provided to supply minimal heating equipment
and minimal lighting during a power outage to allow
students to continue to occupy the building.
Telephone/Data System
Office phones are approaching the end of their useful
life.

Replace office phones with new.
Fire Protection Systems
The building is protected with an automatic fire sprinkler
system.
Plumbing Systems
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
PH - Perry Hall (Dormitory)
2012
84,200
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
4/0
R-2 - Residential
2A - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Building Interior
Floors
X
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
Safety/Security
Compliance
Building
Component
C
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
X
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Specialty Systems
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Automotive Technology (Q)
Building Data
Building History and Use Summary
Year Constructed
This complex was home to CCC’s Physical Plant
Department until the new Physical Plant buildings were
constructed in 1999. The Automotive Technology
Department moved into the former garage and central
building, which has space for classroom, offices, toilet
rooms, storage space, and a student lounge. The College
uses the warehouse structure for general storage. The
total area of all three buildings is 13,973 gross square feet.

1972-1975

1999
Converted from Physical
Plant to Auto Technology program use

2006
New asphalt shingle roof
installed on all 3 buildings (30 yr. warranty;
expires in 2036)
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
S-1 Moderate Hazard Storage
(Storage & garage buildings); B Business (Classroom
building)
Construction Type:
Type V – Any Material
Functional Analysis
The garage works very well as the Automotive
Technology Lab. The central building’s facilities are
functional on a basic level, but have much room for
improvement as regards finishes, furniture, lighting,
acoustics, and technology.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The central building is a one-story structure constructed
of unprotected steel and concrete block with exterior
wood siding. The one-story garage (now used as an
Automotive Technology Lab) is a metal structure with
concrete block walls. The two-story warehouse is framed
with steel and fire-treated wood.

There windows in the warehouse that should be
replaced; many are broken or have rotting
frames.

The cement parging on the concrete block wall
of the garage is beginning to spall and should be
recoated.

The asphalt outside the receiving area of the
warehouse is in poor condition and should be
replaced.

The wood siding on the central building and
warehouse is in poor condition and should be
replaced.
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
The concrete block foundation walls at all of
the buildings are in poor condition. In some
cases the mortar is beginning to deteriorate, and
in others the concrete block itself is showing
signs of deterioration. The College should take
steps to remediate these problems to prevent
further damage to the foundation walls.

Many of the single-glazed, wood windows are
not energy-efficient and in poor condition. All
windows should be replaced with doubleglazed, energy-efficient units.
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Building Interior
Some of the interior finishes and lighting (primarily in the
classroom and offices) have recently been replaced. In
other areas, however, the interior finishes are showing
signs of their age and should be replaced. Finishes in the
link between the central classroom building and the
warehouse are in need of replacement, and the steelframed windows are starting to rust.
ADA
Primary facility features appear to be accessible. It is
difficult to assess accessibility for garage activities;
however toilet rooms and accessible path features are
compliant for the central classroom and office structure.
The main level of the storage building is accessible from
the link entrance to the central building, but the upper
level storage areas are not.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The central office and classroom building is served by a
perimeter hot water fin tube radiation. A gas fired boiler
and associated pumps that are located in a centralized
mechanical room provide hot water to the system. The
system is original to the building and at the end of its
useful life. A new gas fired boiler and hot water pumps
shall be provided. In order to provide ventilation for
large spaces unit ventilators shall be provided with
heating coils. In order to provide cooling a VRV system
can be provided to serve the multiple spaces.
The garage is served by the following pieces of
equipment; gas-fired unit heaters, two make-up airhandling units, gas-fired heaters, and a vehicle exhaust
system.
The unit heaters appear seem to be in fair working order.
The makeup air-handling units and exhaust systems are
in good working order at the time of our field visit. The
warehouse is served by gas-fired unit heaters and a PTAC
unit that serves the Record Storage Room. The gas-fired
unit heater appears to be original to the building and is
working order. The PTAC unit was installed in recent
years and in good working order.
The garage is served by gas-fired unit heaters, two makeup air-handling units with duct mounted, gas-fired
heaters, and a vehicle exhaust system. The unit heaters
appear to be in fair condition. The air-handling units and
exhaust system appear to be in good condition.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of
electromagnetics and direct digital controls (DDC) that
are connected to the Campus-Wide Network. All new
equipment that is provided in future projects shall be
provided with DDC integration. Controls should be
updated DDC in future projects.
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Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Primary power is 12.47kV and is stepped down to
120/208V before feeding the main panel. This 275A
panel (the main distribution for the building) has recently
been installed. Since a large portion of this facility has
been turned into storage space for records, only minor
space conditioning is needed. Therefore, power
consumption is not a major concern.
Building lacks wireless data access.
Emergency Power
Sprinklers
There is no emergency power for this building.
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Lighting
Plumbing Systems
Lighting throughout the warehouse is poor and outdated.
In the garage, however, the lighting is modern and
sufficient for the task at hand.
Domestic Water
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting in the parking lot appears to be
sufficient. Lighting around the immediate surroundings
of the building, however, is minimal and does not give a
sense of security at night.

The College should measure light levels around
the exterior of the building. Additional lighting
should be added where light levels fall below 0.5
foot candles. Any outdated or inadequate
fixtures that are identified in the investigation
should be replaced.

Fire Protection Systems
A one-and-one-quarter-inch domestic water service
enters the building from a well. Water treatment
equipment consists of a pressure tank, chlorine contact
tank, backwash surge tank, chlorine injection system,
barium removal system, and water softener. There are
signs throughout the facility that read “DO NOT
DRINK TAP WATER.” The water service includes a
shut-off valve and water meter. There is no backflow
preventer on the building water service. The domestic
hot water system consists of a gas-fired water heater (40gallon capacity, 33,000 BTU input) in the Central
Building and a gas-fired water heater (50-gallon capacity,
40,000 BTU input) in the garage. The piping appears to
be in fair condition.

Fire Alarm System
The classroom and garage areas of the building have fire
detection equipment but the attached warehouse area has
none. Heat detectors should be added to the warehouse
area and connected to the existing fire alarm system.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Add wireless data access units.
Replace the existing Central Building water
heater.
Sanitary Sewer
The backwash surge tank discharges to a floor drain and
ties into the sanitary sewer along with the plumbing
fixtures. The garage does not have any floor drains. The
piping appears to be in fair condition.
Storm Sewer
The gutters and downspouts were replaced in 2006 when
the roofs were replaced. They appear to be in good
condition.
Natural Gas
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An existing 2-1/2 inch gas service enters the building and
feeds the domestic hot water heater and HVAC
equipment. It includes a shut-off valve, meter, and
regulator located inside the building. The piping appears
to be in fair condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
There are toilet rooms in the central building that have
been remodeled. The garage has a wash fountain and an
emergency eyewash/shower unit. The garage fixtures are
old and should be replaced.

Replace the wash fountain and
eyewash/shower.
Miscellaneous
The garage has a ten-horsepower air compressor that
delivers air to compressed air outlet stations. The piping
appears to be in good condition. The College has
requested that the air-compressor be replaced.

Replace the existing air compressor and provide
a refrigerated air dryer, pre-filter and coalescing
filter.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
Q - Campus Auto Tech
1972-1975
13,973
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0 (2/0 at Storage building)
B - Business/Storage, Moderate Hazard
V - Ordinary
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
Building Framing
X
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
X
Building Interior
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Floors
X
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
Roof
X
Safety/Security
X
X
Security Cameras
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Chiller/Controls
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Learning Resource Center (R)
Building Data
Year Constructed

1982

1998
New adhered single-ply EPDM
membrane roof (10-year warranty expired 2008)

2006
Central skylight removed due to
perpetual leaks

2006
Halon fire extinguishing system in
computer room replaced with new FM 2000
system

Original construction
2012
Carpenter Center air conditioning
replaced
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B – Business
Type I – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
This 31,832 gross square foot facility includes
classrooms, faculty offices, art studios, music practice
rooms, a television studio, and a small assembly
room/lecture hall with tiered seating.
Functional Analysis
This building provides a link between the Classroom
Building and Library, and contains many general and
Liberal Arts classrooms and studios. The building
appears to meet its intended functions.
Building Survey Summary
movement at expansion joints, deflection of
steel lintels, and water infiltration. A number of
cracked bricks were observed at building
corners, stair towers, and around openings.
Fine surface cracking known as “crazing” can
also be seen on the faces of this glazed brick.
Clear sealers that might retard water penetration
should be considered.
Building Exterior
The three-story structure consists of cast-in-place
concrete columns and concrete waffle slabs, as well as a
concrete roof slab. The exterior walls are buff colored
brick veneer with metal studs and exterior sheathing.
The brick is unique on campus to this building.


The roof was replaced in 1998 and is still in
good condition, although its 10-year warranty
expired in 2008. The condition of this roof
should be regularly monitored. Some ponding
was observed at the center of the roof.
Cracks in the exterior brick walls were observed
at several locations around the building. These
cracks may have been caused by restrained

Individual bricks and brick panels have started
shifting at several locations around the building,
particularly at exterior corners and control
joints. This may be due to improper placement
of control joints, or too great a distance
between them. The installation of new control
joints may prevent additional movement.
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

entrance are rusting and will require
replacement soon.
The rebar in the concrete steps at the first floor
entrance is beginning to rust through the
concrete. The rebar should be cleaned to bare
metal, coated, and the concrete steps should be
repaired.

The caulking at the windows is beginning to
deteriorate. The joints should be raked out and
replaced with new backer rod and sealant.
The exterior concrete stairs near the west
entrance are cracking, and have extensive rust
staining from railings. These should be repaired
or reconstructed.

The red brick link to the Library is cracked and
there is visible efflorescence. Cracked brick
should be replaced. Recent reroofing of this
link may have solved the water penetration
issues causing the efflorescence and freeze-thaw
related cracking; further periodic observation
should confirm this.

A window in the southeast stair has a broken
seal allowing water to enter the building. The
windows throughout the stairwell should be
replaced, and the sill and other finishes at the
interior side should be repaired and repainted.

The steel overhead and man door, their frames,
and the thresholds at the eastern service
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Building Interior
ADA
The interior finishes are in generally good condition, and
should be replaced as wear becomes visible. Similar to
the original campus buildings, however, stair railings are
non-compliant with ADA guidelines and NYS Building
Code for extensions, guardrail height, and openings.
Railings should be replaced or modified to compliance.
Accessibility is generally provided throughout the
building. As areas of the building are renovated,
accessible toilet rooms should be established, as the
existing facilities are not fully in compliance with current
standards
Wood sills between exterior windows and perimeter
heating covers are damaged from humidity and are losing
their finish. Replacement with a non-absorptive material
such as solid surfacing is recommended.
.
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
A custom site built air handling unit located in the
basement serves the entire building, with the exception
of the TV Studio and Computer Room, which have been
provided with separate air-conditioning systems. The
custom air-handling unit provides heating and ventilation
only to the building. The corridors are also utilized for
returning air back to the central air-handling unit via
return air transfer grilles. The return method previously
mention is not acceptable in current code, but it is
acceptable in an existing building. The air handling unit is
not currently operating due to water located in the supply
ductwork. All existing supply ductwork that has water
damage should be replaced and existing ductwork that
remains should be cleaned. This items needs to be
addressed as currently there is no ventilation being
provided to the building. Perimeter hot water fin
radiation is also provided throughout the building.
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
High temperature heating water is provided to the
mechanical systems by a water/water heat exchanger
system that is connected to the Boiler House. The
exchanger and associated pumps are located in the
ground floor mechanical room. All equipment appears
to be in fair condition. The college has a desire to
decommission the high temperature hot water system.
See boiler house section for new boilers to feed this
building.
Currently there is no cooling provided for this building.
In order to provide air conditioning in the building, a
chilled water coil would need to be added to the custom
air-handling unit. When designed a empty section was
design for the future cooling coil. The current duct
configuration from the custom unit is not zoned properly
to allow desired space control. Major duct
reconfiguration would be required to add cooling and
achieve desired space control. In addition chilled water
would need to be provided to the building. See the boiler
house section for chillers to feed this building.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that is connected to the
Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
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Electrical Systems
Sprinklers
Primary Power
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Primary power is fed from the Classroom Building at a
voltage of 12.47kV and stepped down to 120/208V at
the Learning Center.
Plumbing Systems
Emergency Power
Emergency power for the computer center is provided by
a generator located outside this building.
Lighting
There is a mix of T8 and T12 fixtures in the building that
should be replaced with all T8 fixtures.
Domestic Water
The domestic cold water system in the Learning
Commons is connected to the Classroom Building water
service. Domestic hot water is generated through a
Patterson-Kelley semi-instantaneous water heater. This
heater is original to the building and is nearing the end of
its useful life and should be replaced. During summer
when the central boilers are not operating, hot water is
supplied to the building from the Library.

Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting also appears to be
sufficient
If new localized boilers are installed for the
Classroom Building, hot water to the Learning
Center shall be supplied from that system.
Small capacity electric water heaters are located in the
cabinet below the two sinks in the art studio. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system is a zoned system and should be
replaced with a new point addressable system.
Panic Alarm System
System consists of pushbutton stations in a number of
rooms. The entire building reports in to Campus
Security as one alarm with the individual alarms indicated
on an annunciator panel in the main lobby. The system
is unsupervised so the operating condition of the stations
is unknown. The system provides a false sense of
security and should be removed.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Sanitary Sewer
A six-inch sanitary line exits the building. A drainage
problem exists at each toilet room containing urinals.
The horizontal waste piping does not have the proper
pitch and the drain lines are constantly plugging up.
Otherwise, piping appears to be in good condition.

The existing urinals, carriers, and horizontal
drainage piping should be removed on each
floor of the building. New drainage piping (with
the proper pitch) should be provided and the
existing urinals and carriers should be
reinstalled. One of the urinals in each toilet
room should be mounted at regular height,
instead of the present condition. This will allow
more flexibility for the horizontal pitch.
Storm Sewer
An eight-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition and there are no reported problems.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
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Plumbing Fixtures
The toilet rooms are ADA compliant but lack insulation
in the piping below the lavatory. The fixtures appear to
be in good condition. The water coolers are not dual
height for accessibility.


Provide dual height water coolers to replace
present water coolers.
Install insulation on the lavatory piping.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
R - Learning Resource Center
1982
31,832
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
3/0
B - Business
1B - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
Fire Alarm System
X
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
X
C
X
AHU/Controls
Chiller/Controls
Exterior Doors
X
X
Interior Doors
X
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
HVAC Distribution & Controls
Compliance
Building
Component
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
X
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
Science Building (S)
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Building Data
Year Constructed
Functional Analysis

1963

1991
Construction of south addition and
renovations to original building

1996
New roof installed over original
building

2006

2007
New single-ply EPDM roof installed
over entire building (15-year warranty; expires
2022)

2007
Original construction
Science Amphitheater renovations
Elevator upgrades
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B – Business
Type I – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
Spatially the Science Building works well as a classroom
building, although the labs are becoming rather outdated
(although basically functional). The Amphitheater,
however, is not set up for its current use for theatrical
productions, as it was designed as a lecture hall. The
stage area is level with the floor and there are no wing or
backstage areas. Dressing rooms are undersized,
somewhat remote, and do not have toilet or shower
facilities. The ad hoc scene shop is in the same room as
the main electrical equipment – a non-compatible and
potentially hazardous use - and the multi-level route from
the shop to the stage makes it very difficult to use this
shop for construction of any large set items
.
This 53,215 square foot building houses general
classrooms, science teaching laboratories, faculty offices,
support space, and a 126-seat amphitheater.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The Science Building was originally constructed in 1963.
It has precast concrete columns, and a concrete floor and
roof structure. The exterior walls consist of brick veneer
and pre-cast wall panels with concrete masonry backup.
The area around the southern loading dock has been
improved recently.

The greenhouse addition on the west side is
aging and will require replacement soon.

Windows are old and have functional and
energy efficiency issues. Replacement in the
next five years should be considered

Numerous areas of brick efflorescence were
observed on the exterior brick walls. The walls
of the building should be monitored to ensure
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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118
that the efflorescence is not the result of water
infiltration. The efflorescence can be cleaned
with approved cleaners and stiff brushes.
Sealing the brick with a clear sealer might help
slow water penetration

The caulking around the exterior pre-cast panels
is dry and cracked. The joints should be raked
and re-caulked.

Several areas of deteriorating mortar joints
around the building were noted. Over time,
these will allow water penetration into the
exterior wall cavity. All deteriorating areas
should have the joints raked and re-pointed.

Water is entering the exterior wall cavity
through the pre-cast cornice at the addition. A
coping should be installed over the top of the
cornice stones to protect it and the brick ledge,
and to limit water from entering the wall cavity.

Brick around the base near entrances have had
the mortar between them washed out from
splashing water and freeze-thaw action. These
areas should be re-pointed.
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Building Interior
In general, the interior finishes throughout the building
are in reasonably good condition, with room for
improvement as areas are renovated.

Some vinyl asbestos floor tile (VAT) was noted
on the first floor of the building. It should be
abated when areas of the building are renovated
or if it begins to deteriorate.

The floor tile on the ramped portion of the
second floor corridor is in fair condition and
should be replaced with new vinyl composite
tile.

Laboratories are generally in need of
replacement of finishes, lab tables, fume hoods,
lighting, and HVAC. Existing labs have a dated
appearance to them and should be modernized
with current technology.
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120
ADA
The College has done an excellent job of modifying
existing toilet rooms to make them as accessible as
possible. As areas of the building are renovated, however,
fully accessible toilet rooms should be provided. The
Amphitheater was originally designed as a lecture hall.
The Scene Shop shares space with the main electrical
equipment. Typical science laboratories lack accessible
lab tables and hoods.

The appropriate number of accessible stations
should be created in the Amphitheater, Biology
Lab 101, Forensic Lab 103, Chemistry 140,
Physical Science 210, and Organic Chemistry
240.

Lever door hardware, accessible water
fountains, and ADA-compliant signage should
be installed throughout the building as areas of
the building are renovated.

The ramp adjacent to the Amphitheater does
not have the code required handrail or landing.
A code-compliant handrail should be installed
to make the ramp as accessible as possible for
individuals that need access to the
Amphitheater.

There is no assistive listening system in the
Amphitheater. The College should consider
installing such a system for the hearing
impaired.

A cane detection rail should be installed at the
base of Stairs One and Four to prevent visuallyimpaired individuals from walking into the
underside of the stairs.
The General and Organic Chemistry Labs contain
multiple fume hoods. They have their own makeup airhandling unit located in a mechanical room across the
corridor from each room. The fume hoods and airhandling units appear to be in excellent condition. The
fan scrolls in the hood exhaust fans located at the roof
level, however, are beginning to deteriorate (possibly due
to exhaust fumes) and need to be replaced.
The Amphitheater that is connected to the Science
Building is served by its own heating, and ventilating airhandling unit that is in fair condition.
Three existing heating only air handling units that feed
the lobby and corridor are original and should be
replaced during the next funding cycle.
Heating water is provided by ten high-efficiency, gasfired hot water boilers located in the basement
mechanical room and are in fair condition. The college
has a desire to replace these units with three bigger high
efficiency units that are sized to feed the whole building.
All existing pumps should be replaced and new should be
provided with drives.
Currently there is no cooling provided for this building.
To achieve cooling in this building a air cooled chiller
would need to be provided along with the associated
pumps and piping. All existing equipment would need to
be replaced or incorporated with cooling coils. For office
areas a 4-pipe fan coil unit system could be provided.
Mechanical Systems
The lab spaces within the building are original and are in
need of upgrade. All lab space shall be renovated and
upgraded MEP systems should be provided to match
architectural changes. When required new hoods, lab
controls, fixtures, lights, and all other equipment to meet
needs of the renovated space shall be provided.
Heating and Cooling
Building Controls
The building is equipped with hot water unit ventilators
that feed all Classrooms in the building. The office spaces
in the building are served with hot water fin radiation,
while there support spaces are served by cabinet unit
heaters. Operable windows are utilized for ventilation in
the office areas. The equipment is original to the building
and in fair condition. The equipment is near the end of
its useful and should be replaced during the next funding
cycle. By upgrading to newer equipment great energy
efficiency will be achieved.
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All new equipment that is
provided in future projects shall be provided with DDC
integration. Controls should be updated DDC in future
projects.
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Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Primary power is fed through the main breaker located in
the basement. The size of the main breaker is 800A at a
voltage of 120/208V, three phase. In 2006 the electrical
panels were upgraded throughout the building.
Emergency Power
Emergency power is provided by a generator located in
the Boiler House.
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building is a mix of T12 and T8
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting also appears sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The existing zoned fire alarm system makes it difficult to
identify the devices in alarm. The system should be
replaced with a new point addressable system.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.
 Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There are sprinklers located around the perimeter of the
central stairway opening. Water is supplied from the
domestic water system. Maintenance personnel indicated
that the existing sprinkler system does not have an
inspector test valve connection to test the flow switch.

Provide inspector's test connection.
The building otherwise has no fire protection sprinkler
system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A three-inch domestic water service enters the building
from the utility tunnel. It includes a shutoff valve and
water meter. There is no backflow preventer on the
building water service. A reduced-pressure zone-type
backflow preventer is installed on the cold water piping
supplying the laboratory domestic cold water system.
Domestic hot water is generated from a high temperature
water supplied heat exchanger. This heat exchanger
system operates only when the central boilers are
operational meaning there are times when no hot water is
available to the building. The piping appears to be in
good condition.

Provide a backflow preventer at the building
water service entrance.

If new localized boilers are installed, provide a
gas fired high efficiency water heater and
storage tank with a thermostatic mixing valve to
limit the distribution temperature.
Sanitary Sewer
There are no reported problems with the five-inch
sanitary drain. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
Storm Sewer
A ten-inch and a six-inch storm sewer collect storm
water from building roof drains. The piping appears to
be in good condition.
Natural Gas
The Science Building has two separate gas service
entrances. The first service enters into the building from
the utility tunnel. This service supplies gas-fired
equipment and lab bench outlets. The second service
enters the building on the south end of the building.
This service supplies the Boiler Room

Disconnect gas supply from tunnel and supply
entire Science Building from the south side gas
service.
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Compressed Air
Plumbing Fixtures
Compressed air to the building is supplied from a tank
mounted Ingersoll Rand #T30, 5 HP air compressor.
The air is conditioned utilizing a refrigerated air dryer.
The compressor and dryer appear to be in good
condition.
The fixtures are original and are the non-water
conserving type. The basement toilet room fixtures have
been modified over the years in an attempt to conform
to ADA requirements. All first floor toilet rooms should
be modified to conform to the latest ADA requirements
and water conservation guidelines. The building drinking
fountains are not ADA compliant.
Vacuum
A Monogram Products liquid ring vacuum pump
provides vacuum to laboratory table outlets. There is no
reported problem with the vacuum pump. The piping
appears to be in good condition.

Replace fixtures and modify toilet rooms for
handicapped accessibility on the first floor.

Replace drinking fountains with dual height
type electric water coolers.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
S - Science
1963
53,215
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/1
B - Business
IA - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
Fire Alarm System
X
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Power Wiring
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
Roof
X
X
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
Safety/Security
Compliance
Building
Component
X
C
X
Building Heating/Cooling
PC
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
X
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
NC
NYS/ADA
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
X
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Spencer Crest Nature Center (V)
Building Data
Year Constructed
Functional Analysis

1973

2013
New adhered single-ply EPDM roof
installed (20-year warranty; expires 2033)
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Construction Type:
Type V – Any materials
permitted
Building History and Use Summary
This 4,839 SF building was constructed in 1973 by the
Spencer Crest Nature Center on land owned by the
College. The College has acquired the building, once run
by the conservancy. The College uses the facility for
academic and recreational purposes, including a cooking
class. There are seven miles of nature trails that connect
to the Nature Center, and about 250 acres of
undeveloped land with woods, fields, ponds, and streams.
The Spencer Crest Nature Center is a challenging facility
with regards to accessibility and services. There is no
sanitary sewer service available; necessitating the use of
composting toilets. The nature of the building, built on
the side of a fairly steep slope creates challenges with
regard to wheelchair accessibility – that is, if one can first
navigate the unpaved gravel parking area. The College
has done much to provide accessibility, security, and
other amenities; and also to preserve the wood-framed
structure from deterioration, but this facility may
continue to have higher maintenance needs than the
more robust buildings on the main campus. The lower
level has residential-style kitchen facilities. As a home for
the nature collections that occupy it, it is suitable. If the
building is to be developed further for academic use and
other programs, it will require upgrades to toilet rooms,
services, and other amenities.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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125
Building Survey Summary

Site
As the College is now the steward of this facility,
improvements to the site associated with parking and
building access should be considered


Parking lot is gravel, and is uneven with areas of
greater slope than is desirable for accessibility
and erosion control. As municipal storm sewer
service is not available, pervious paving or onsite water detention solutions should be
considered to reduce surface runoff that can
lead to erosion and topsoil migration.
Designated handicapped parking spaces should
also be identified and placed along an accessible
route into the facility. Low cut-off lighting for
the parking area and pathways to the building is
recommended for safety and security.
The wood ramp that leads to the entrance
bridge is not fully compliant with current ADA
standards, and should be modified to reach
compliance. Any rotted or damaged wood
should be replaced, and different options for
decking that allow drainage and offer good slip
resistance should be evaluated.
Building Exterior
The exterior walls of the building are wood-framed with
cedar shingles. The roof of the building is wood-framed
with asphalt shingles on the sloped portion and single-ply
EPDM membrane on the flat portion that was replaced
in 2013.

Some areas of cedar shingles on the exterior
walls of the building are deteriorating and will
need replacement soon. During shingle
replacement, any exterior sheathing discovered
to be in poor condition should also be replaced.

Many of the windows in the building are single
glazed units with thermally unbroken metal
panes. They should be replaced with double
glazed, energy-efficient units.
The wood bridge to the main building entrance
is aging and should be replaced; similar to the
ramp, decking options should be considered for
maintenance and traction.
Building Interior
Most of the interior walls, floors, and ceilings are
unfinished and in fair to good condition. There is an
acoustic tile ceiling above the mezzanine and area rugs on
floors throughout the building.

The large crack in the chimney (possibly due to
building settlement) should be monitored and
repaired if needed.

The heavy timber framing and insulation on the
first and second floors of the building are
stained and cracked, both signs of water
damage. The building should be monitored to
ensure that water infiltration is not an issue.
ADA Issues
The exterior ramp that extends from the parking area to
the main entrance of the building does not have the
required number of landings or the proper slope to
comply with current ADA requirements. In addition, the
handrails on the ramp are not compliant.

The ramp connecting the parking area to the
main entrance should be redesigned and
reconstructed to provide a compliant accessible
route.

The toilet rooms are not accessible. Fully
accessible toilet rooms should be provided in
the building, and the existing toilet rooms
should be renovated to meet ADA
requirements.

A ramp connects the lowest level of the
building to the intermediate level. A handicap
lift was installed to negotiate the upper and
lower levels, and is functional.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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126
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Spencer Crest Nature Center has a new furnace in
2011 installed and reconnected to existing ductwork.

A new unit should be provided to serve
ventilation for the classroom space located on
the first floor.
Electrical Systems

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Primary Power
Primary power is fed from a pole-mounted transformer
owned by the utility company. The voltage provided to
the building is 240/120V and fed through below ground
lines. The 200A main breaker provides adequate power
to the building.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
The Nature Center has no emergency power.
The domestic water service feeding the building is
supplied from an underground well. The building has a
non-transient/non-community water system. Bottled
water is used for drinking purposes. The domestic hot
water system consists of a 50 gallon electric water heater.
The piping appears to be in good condition.
Lighting
Sanitary Sewer
Lighting in the Nature Center appears to be sufficient.
Additional lighting is needed in the basement, however,
to provide adequate lighting for access to the mechanical
equipment.
Public sanitary sewer is not available at the site. Current
toilet rooms utilize composting toilets.
Emergency Power

Provide additional lighting in the basement.
Exterior Lighting
There is minimal exterior lighting serving the parking lot
and walkway/ramp leading to the Nature Center.

Storm Sewer
Storm water is collected from building roof drains by a
rain collection system that discharges to planted areas
around the building. The system is reported to be not
operational.

Provide additional site lighting.
Refurbish tank and piping and make
operational.
Fire Alarm System
Plumbing Fixtures
The Faraday Multiplex fire alarm system performs its
intended functions well. The fire alarm devices
throughout the building are sufficient and meet all
applicable code requirements. It appears that the fire
alarm system was installed within the past five years.
There are no ADA-compliant toilet fixtures in the
building. The plumbing fixtures consist of two
composting water closets, two urinals, two lavatories, and
a laundry tub sink. The urinals are not operational. The
fixtures are in fair condition. The toilet room floor plan
will need to be modified to ADA standards.
Telephone/Data System
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 and are near capacity.

Replace urinals with low flow water conserving
type.

Replace lavatory faucets and insulate piping
below lavatories.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
V - Spencer Crest Nature Center
1973
4,839
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/1
B - Business
V - Ordinary
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
X
Building Framing
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Lighting Systems
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
Safety/Security
Security Cameras
Compliance
Building
Component
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
X
X
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Elevators
X
Chiller/Controls
Boiler/Heat
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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President’s House (Residence)
Building Data
Electrical Systems
Occupancy Group:
R3 - Residential
Primary Power
Construction Type:
Type V B – Combustible
The building has a 200 amp, 120/240 volt service
supplied from a utility company 25 kVA pole
mounted transformer.
Building History and Use Summary
Located on Spencer Crest Road near the Spencer Crest
Nature Center Facility, this home was acquired to house
the Corning Community College’s President, and is also
used for entertainment of guests of the College and
related social events. This home is not used for
educational purposes.
This is a residential structure that is relatively new
and all electrical equipment appears sufficient to
handle the load and is in excellent condition.
Lighting
The lighting is sufficient for the building type
Fire Alarm System
Functional Analysis
The President’s House functions well for its use as a
residence. A single-story addition to the first floor of the
home to provide a room for hosting social functions has
been proposed. Such an addition would add flexibility to
how the facility could be used.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior of the wood-framed house is in generally
good condition and repair. The site area around the
home appears well-maintained.
The system is modern and performs its intended
function.
Telephone/Data System
Service is provided by local utility company and
appears sufficient.
Emergency Power
An emergency generator is scheduled to be installed
for the building.
Plumbing Systems
There are no reported issues with the plumbing
systems.
Building Interior
The interior and finishes of the home are in good
condition.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Presidents house is served two fan coil units
zoned to serve the first and second floor levels of the
house. The house has a hot water boiler and
associated pumps and split condensing units that
feeds the dx coils on the fan coil units. The unit's
equipment is relatively new and in good working
order. The fan coil units are equipment with packaged
wall mounted controls.
If a future expansion is added to the home another
fan coil unit with remote DX condensing unit can be
added and feed from the existing boiler.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
President's House
Unknown
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
2/1
R-3 - Residential
V B - Any, Combustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Boiler House
Building Data
Building Survey Summary
Year Constructed
Building Exterior

1963

2010
New single-ply adhered EPDM roof
(15 yr. warranty; expires in 2025)
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
The exterior walls of the building are brick veneer with
concrete masonry back-up.
B Business
Type I - Noncombustible

The mortar joints are beginning to deteriorate at
several locations around the building. All mortar
joints showing signs of deterioration should be
raked and repointed.

Windows are old, single glazed type with
insulated panels below in continuous steel sash
frames. Frames are rusting and beginning to
leak, indicated by additional sealant applied to
joints. Windows should be replaced.
Use Summary
This 2,090 gross square foot building contains the boilers
that serve most of the original campus buildings, and is
located immediately west of the Nursing building. Its
utility piping feeds through an east-west underground
tunnel that extends to other buildings on campus.
Functional Analysis
The Boiler House has served the College well since the
Spencer Hill Campus was constructed in 1963, but the
boilers and related equipment are approaching the end of
their useful life.
Hollow metal (steel) exterior doors and frames are rusted
and rotting, and should be replaced also
Building Interior
The interior of the building is in reasonable condition for
its use.
.
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The Boiler House consists of two operational high
temperature hot water boilers. These boilers provide high
temperature hot water to the Science Building, Nursing
Building, Administration Building, Classroom Building,
and Learning Center. The boilers are original to the
building and in fair condition. A third existing boiler has
already been disconnected and pulled off line from the
high temperature loop.
High temperature hot water is distributed from the Boiler
House to the buildings on campus thru piping located
within an underground utility tunnel. The roof of the
tunnel was replaced in 2001 and most of the hot water
piping running through the tunnel was replaced at that
time. Some piping is still original and should be replaced.

At the direction of the college remove all
existing high temperature boilers and associated
pumps and replace with gas fired boilers to feed
Nursing building. Place boiler and pumps in
boiler house and run piping underground to
mechanical room. All remaining building feed
from high temperature boiler plant should also
have separate gas fired boiler to feed their
respective buildings. A new Boiler and Chiller
building will need to be provided near the
Learning Center building to house Gas fired
boilers, Pumps, and Chillers to feed the
Learning Center, Administration, and
Classroom building.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Primary power is fed from New York State Electric and
Gas (at a voltage of 12.47kV) via four #2 15kV lines.
The service enters the campus via overhead lines and
goes underground near the Classroom Building. The
building original switchboard including transformer and
medium voltage switch, are obsolete and should be
replaced.
Emergency Power
The 1984-vintage emergency generator and associated
automatic transfer switches are approaching the end of
their useful life and should be replaced.
Lighting
The Boiler House is served by four-foot fluorescent light
fixtures that provide adequate lighting for performing
maintenance on the electrical and mechanical equipment
in the building.
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Exterior Lighting
Sanitary Sewer
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the immediate area
of the building. Walkway lighting appears to be sufficient
as well.
A four-inch sanitary building drain exits to the site sewer
on the north side of the Power House. There are no
reported problems with the drain. The building drain has
a house trap and fresh air inlet. The college has been
removing these as they tend to collect debris and
eventually clog the drain.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and fire devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Phones are approaching the end of their useful life. Data
cables are Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near
capacity.

Replace phones with new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
A two-inch domestic water service provides water to the
Boiler House and Ceramics/Chemical Storage Building.
There is no backflow preventer on the water service.
The piping appears to be in good condition.

Provide a backflow preventer on the domestic
water service.

Remove house trap and fresh air inlet.
Storm Sewer
A four-inch storm sewer exits the building. Storm water
is collected from building roof drains, floor drains, and a
sump pump that handles the utility tunnel drainage. The
drain exits the building at one location. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Natural Gas
A six-inch gas service enters the building from the
exterior and uses the utility tunnel for distribution to
other buildings. The piping appears to be in good
condition. Gas is distributed to the Campus at a pressure
of 11 in. w.c. Gas to the boilers in the Boiler House is
supplied at 6 psi.

If boilers are removed, remove all utility piping.
Plumbing Fixtures
There are no toilet rooms in this building.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
Boiler House
1963
2,090
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
U - Utility
I - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
Fire Alarm System
X
Building Framing
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Roof
X
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
Ceilings
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
X
Interior Door Control
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
HVAC Distribution & Controls
Interior Doors
AHU/Controls
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
Chiller/Controls
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Wastewater Treatment
Building Data
Construction Type:
Year Constructed

1964
Original construction

1997
Filter Bed building roof replaced

2008
Sewage Plant roof replaced with
single-ply EPDM membrane (20-year warranty;
expires 2028)
Process equipment upgrades to
equalization tank, fine-bubble aeration, and
mechanical screen
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Building Survey Summary
permitted
Use Summary
The Wastewater Treatment Plant was originally
constructed in 1964, and serves the entire Spencer Hill
campus.
Functional Analysis
The Wastewater Treatment Plant has served the College
well since the Spencer Hill Campus was constructed in
1963.

Building Exterior
The Sand Filter Building is a wood-framed structure with
corrugated metal siding. The other buildings on the site
are constructed of either concrete masonry units or brick
veneer with concrete masonry back-up. The cover for the
Effluent Tank is constructed primarily of unpainted
wood.

Building roofs on all of the buildings appear to
be in good condition. The plywood cover for
the Effluent Tank is in poor condition and
should be replaced.

The metal siding on the Sand Filter Building is
in poor condition and should be replaced.

The spalling concrete at the base of the
buildings should be removed to sound concrete
and repaired.
Type V – Any material
The Laboratory Building’s single-glazed
windows should be replaced with double glazed,
energy-efficient units.
Building Interior
The interior of the Laboratory Building is in good
condition. However, areas of mold on the ceiling of the
laboratory and toilet room indicate that the building may
suffer from high humidity levels.

The concrete floor of the laboratory should be
repainted.

A dehumidifier should be installed to alleviate
the high humidity levels in the building.
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Mechanical Systems
Telephone/Data System
Heating
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 installed in the mid 1990's and are near capacity.
The building is heated with gas fired boiler and
associated pumps that serve fin tube radiation and unit
heaters. The units are original and at the end of their
useful life. There is an existing fume hood in building
that is currently not is use and should be removed.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
The toilet room within the main building has no toilet
exhaust fan.
Building lacks wireless data access.
The existing sand filter building is served with radiant gas
fired heaters. The equipment is original and currently not
working. This should be replaced.
Fire Protection Systems
Electrical Systems
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Primary Power
Power is supplied by the Utility Company at 120/240
volts, 3 phase. The service supplies sufficient power for
the facility.
The electrical equipment in the clarifier building is
rusting and should be replaced.

Add wireless data access units.
Sprinklers
Plumbing Systems
Plumbing Fixtures
The lab countertop with sink and faucet is in poor
condition and should be replaced.

Replace sink and faucet.
Emergency Power
Natural Gas
Emergency power is provided by a 100 kVA generator.
Re-pipe gas supply to radiant heaters in sand filter.
Lighting

Replace piping.
A number of fixtures in the office are rusting due to high
humidity conditions and should be replaced.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
Waste Treatment Plant
1964
N/A (Multiple Structures)
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business
V - Ordinary
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
Roof
X
X
X
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
X
Built-In Furnishings
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
AHU/Controls
Chiller/Controls
Exterior Doors
X
Interior Doors
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Elevators
Signage
Assistive Listening Device
X
Drinking Fountains
Toilet Rooms
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Business Development Center (B) and Child Care Center (D)
Building Data
Year Constructed

1962
Original construction

1984
College occupies the building

1987
Day Care Center constructed

1989
New single-ply rubber membrane roof
installed over the Business Development Center

2007
New single-ply EPDM membrane
roof installed
Occupancy Group:
B – Business (BDC), E –
Educational (Child Care Center)
Construction Type:
Type IIB – Noncombustible,
Unprotected
Building History and Use Summary
to the BDC. Together, these facilities provide
approximately 28,500 square feet of space.
Functional Analysis
The BDC provides Corning Community College with
educational and office space in downtown Corning, off
of the Spencer Hill campus. The Child Care Center
serves the students, faculty, and staff of Corning
Community College. Both facilities are leased from the
College Foundation; however the College has
responsibility for maintenance of the mechanical systems.
The dedicated parking area lacks an adequate number of
spaces to accommodate the building occupants and
visitors, which can be an issue at times.
The two-story Business Development Center (BDC) is
located on the Denison Parkway in downtown Corning.
In 1987, the Child Care Center was constructed adjacent
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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138
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The building structure consists of unprotected steel
columns and beams. The exterior brick veneer is
supported by concrete block masonry back-up walls.

Holes on the exterior walls of the building,
from signs that have been removed, should be
caulked.

Some separation of brick was observed at the
exterior corner of the Child Care Center. These
joints should be raked and re-pointed.

The single-paned windows in the stairways of
the BDC and toilet rooms of the Child Care
Center should be replaced with insulated,
energy-efficient window units.
Building Interior
The interior finishes appear to generally be in good
condition, with a few exceptions. Carpet tile in some of
the classroom/meeting room spaces is showing signs of
wear and will need replacement in the next few years.
There is some wall damage to drywall and paint finishes
that needs repair.
Toilet Rooms are need of a complete “makeover”, with
new partitions, fixtures, finishes, and accessories.
Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
The BDC is served with heating and cooling by a heat
pump system. The system incorporates a gas-fired boiler,
cooling tower, circulation pumps, and a heating and
ventilation air-handling unit. The heat pumps are
designed to only serve the rooms, there is no heat pumps
serving the corridors. The system is original to the
building and near the end of its useful life. Due to the age
of equipment find service parts is very difficult and in
some cases impossible.
required in the classrooms when classes are not in
session) humid air is introduced into the building.
The cooling tower that feeds the heat pump loop is
original and near the end of its useful life. The cooling
tower is built into the basement mechanical room and
has future maintenance concerns. This piece of
equipment is very difficult to work on. Future
replacement of this piece of equipment would be very
difficult due to the location of the equipment. This needs
to be addressed in future building planning.
The Child Care Center is served by two hot water heating
and ventilating air-handling units that are ducted to
supply ceiling diffusers. A gas-fired hot water boiler
provides heating to the systems and to a small amount of
perimeter fin radiation. There are also paddle fans located
throughout the preschool and toddler area to help with
air circulation. The equipment in the Child Care Center is
in good condition.

To eliminate humidity problems in the BDC,
the College should provide a direct expansion
cooling coil in the ventilation air handling unit.
This may require the replacement of the entire
unit along with modifications to the ductwork,
an outdoor condensing unit, and insulation on
the supply air ductwork associated with the unit.

In order to provide air conditioning in the Child
Care Center, the air-handling units would need
to be replaced with units that incorporate direct
expansion (DX) refrigerant cooling coils. In
addition, an outdoor condensing unit would be
required for each air-handling unit, refrigerant
piping would need to be installed, and the
supply ductwork would need to be insulated.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network.
One issue that the BDC is experiencing has to do with
humidity throughout the building. The AHU that feeds
ventilation to the building doesn't have a cooling coil and
the heat pumps do not feed the corridor so there is no
system to combat this issue. Since the majority of the
spaces in the building are classrooms (and cooling is not
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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139
Electrical Systems
Fire Protection Systems
Primary Power
Sprinklers
Primary power is fed from a pole-mounted transformer
that is owned by the utility company. The voltage
provided to the building is 208/120V three-phase, and is
fed to the building through overhead lines. The main
breaker size for the BDC is 600A. There is ample power
for both the BDC and Child Care Center.
The Building Development Center is equipped with
sprinklers in the basement. The Child Care Center is
equipped with sprinklers. The fire department
connection for the building sprinkler system is located on
an exterior wall of the Child Care Center, but behind a
fenced in area. It should be made more accessible.
Emergency Power
Plumbing Systems
No emergency power is available at the BDC or the
Child Care Center.
Domestic Water
Lighting
Lighting throughout the building is a mix of T12 and T8
fixtures and should be replaced with all T8 fixtures.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting at the entrance to the BDC and the
Child Care Center is mainly provided by city street lights
and appears to be sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system in the BDC (Simplex 4001)
performs its intended functions well. The fire alarm
system in the Child Care Center also performs is
functions well. The fire alarm devices throughout both
buildings are sufficient and meet all applicable code
requirements. The system in the BDC is tested on a
periodic basis per manufacturer and local enforcement
recommendations.
Telephone/Data System
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

The water service is two-inch and includes a shut-off
valve, pressure-reducing valve, water meter, and two
reduced-pressure zone-type backflow preventers. There
is also a reduced pressure zone-type backflow preventer
on the cold water make-up for the HVAC equipment.
The domestic hot water system consists of a AO Smith
gas-fired water heater (40-gallon capacity, 34,000 BTU
input). There is no mixing valve on the hot water heater
outlet piping. Domestic hot water is re-circulated by
means of an in-line pump. Pipe insulation is missing on
the domestic hot and cold water piping in the mechanical
room and at the water service entrance. The piping
appears to be in fair condition.

Provide insulation on domestic water piping
where it is missing.

Provide thermostatic mixing valve at the water
heater
The Child Care Center (CCC) one-and-one-quarter-inch
domestic water service includes a shut-off valve and a 1
inch water meter. The domestic hot water system
consists of a Dayton gas-fired water heater (40-gallon
capacity with a 72-gallon per- hour recovery rate). The
hot water piping has a mixing valve at the heater.
Domestic hot water is re-circulated by means of an inline pump. Pipe insulation is missing on the domestic hot
and cold water piping at the water heater. The piping
appears to be in fair condition.

Provide insulation on domestic water piping
where it is missing.
Add wireless data access units.
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Sanitary Sewer
Plumbing Fixtures
Within the basement of the BDC, there is a duplex
sewage ejector pump system that is functioning properly
according to maintenance personnel. There were no
reported problems with the sanitary system. Piping
appears to be in fair condition.
Within the BDC there are ADA-compliant fixtures in the
building, but there is no insulation on the piping below
the lavatories. The fixtures on the first floor level are not
in particularly good condition. The basement fixtures are
original and non-water conserving type. The basement
toilet room fixtures have been modified over the years in
an attempt to conform to ADA requirements. All
basement toilet rooms should be modified to conform to
the latest ADA requirements and water conservation
guidelines. The building water coolers are not ADA
compliant as they are not the dual height type.
The CCC is slab on grade and has no basement. There
were no reported problems with the sanitary system.
Storm Sewer
Roof scuppers that discharge to splash blocks appear to
be in fair condition. There were no reported problems
with the storm systems of both buildings.

Replace fixtures and modify toilet rooms for
handicapped accessibility in the basement of
BDC.

Replace water coolers with dual height type.

Replace fixtures in CCC
Natural Gas
The BDC two-inch gas service enters the building in the
basement mechanical room and feeds the domestic hot
water heater and HVAC equipment. It includes a shutoff valve and meter. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
The CCC one-and-one-quarter-inch gas service enters
the building at grade level and feeds the domestic hot
water heater and HVAC equipment. It includes a shutoff valve and meter. The piping appears to be in good
condition. Access to the meter is limited as it is located in
a small space behind an access panel.

.
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
B - Business Development Center
1962
22,588
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/1
B - Business
2B - Noncombustible unprotected
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
Roof
X
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
X
Walls
X
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
X
Compliance
Building
Component
C
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
NC
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
X
Elevators
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Specialty Systems
PC
NYS/ADA
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
D - Child Care Center
1987
5,891
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
I-4 Child Care
2B - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
X
Building Framing
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
Roof
X
X
Building Interior
Fire Alarm System
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Lighting Systems
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Power Wiring
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Safety/Security
Walls
X
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Specialty Systems
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Goff Road (J)
Building Data
Year Constructed

1956
Original construction

1976
College occupies the building

1989
New single-ply rubber membrane roof

2007
New adhered single-ply EPDM
membrane roof (20-year warranty, expires 2027)
Occupancy Group
Construction Type:
B - Business
Type II – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
This one-story, 15,486 square foot building was originally
constructed an elementary school in 1956. The College
acquired the building in 1976, and it now houses the
Criminal Justice Program. The facility includes Criminal
Justice instruction spaces including a Critical Incident
Room, Crime Scene Room, Crime Lab, Firearms Target
Range, four classrooms, locker rooms, administration
offices, and faculty offices.
Functional Analysis
There currently is adequate amount of space in the
building for the Criminal Justice Program courses offered
here. There may be adequate space through increasing
scheduled hours to accommodate additional course
programming.
Building Survey Summary
Interior finishes are generally in good condition.
Building Exterior
ADA
This building has a steel frame with masonry exterior
walls. The flat roof is supported by bar joists and covered
with a single-ply EPDM membrane. There are 12 years
remaining on the warranty.
The building appears to be compliant ADA guidelines
and NYS Building Code requirements, with accessible
routes and toilet facilities.
There are masonry cracks at the headers of most of the
exterior windows. The cracks should be repaired by
replacing broken brick and repointing these areas. The
steel lintels at openings are rusting, and should be
prepped and repainted. Both conditions should be
monitored for further deterioration.
Building Interior
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Mechanical Systems
Heating and Cooling
In 2010 the building was completely renovated and a
mixture 4 pipe fan coil units and blower coils that feed
classrooms and offices.
Heating water is provided to the mechanical systems by
three high-efficiency boilers that appear to be in good
condition.

The equipment is new and seems to be in good
condition.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of direct
digital controls (DDC) that are connected to the
Campus-Wide Network.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
Primary power is fed from a pole-mounted transformer
owned by the utility company. The voltage provided to
the building is 208/120V, three-phase. The panels in the
building provide ample power and have capacity for
additional electrical loads. The entire building was
renovated in 2009 and system upgraded.
Emergency Power
There is no emergency power at the Criminal Justice
Center.
Lighting
The entire building was renovated in 2009 and system
was upgraded at that time.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting at the entrance to the building is mainly
provided by city street lights and appears to be sufficient.
Fire Alarm System
The entire building was renovated in 2009 and the system
was upgraded at that time.
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Telephone/Data System
Sanitary Sewer
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 and are near capacity.
The numerous sanitary sewer exits from the building tie
into a six-inch site sanitary sewer.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
Storm Sewer
A six-inch storm sewer collects storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in fair
condition.
Natural Gas
A three-inch gas service enters the building and feeds the
domestic hot water heater and HVAC equipment. The
gas meter is located outside the building. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
There is no fire protection sprinkler system.
Plumbing Fixtures
Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
The well (with chlorination) serving the Criminal Justice
Center appears to function as designed. The two-inch
domestic water service is equipped with a water meter
and backflow preventer. The domestic hot water system
consists of a gas fired water heater (160-gallon storage
capacity, 299,000 BTU input). The piping appears to be
in fair condition.
There are ADA-compliant toilet rooms in the building,
but there is no insulation on piping below the lavatories.
The locker room showers are not ADA-compliant
because they have curbs. The Crime Lab has an
emergency eyewash station at the sink. Two Photo Labs
in the building are no longer used. All fixtures are in fair
condition.

Install insulation on the lavatory piping.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
J - Goff Road Facility
1956
15,486
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business
2 - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Exterior Walls
X
Building Framing
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Lighting Systems
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
X
Building Interior
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
X
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
C
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
Specialty Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Airport Corporate Park (T)
Building Data
Year Constructed

Functional Analysis
1999
Original construction (15-year roof
warranty expired in 2014)
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible
Building History and Use Summary
Located in the Airport Corporate Park in Big Flats; the
Technology Building includes classrooms, computer labs,
automotive labs, machine tool lab, conference space, and
faculty offices.
The Technology Building was constructed in 1999 to
house the Automotive Technology Department. The
program has grown significantly, and the facility now
focuses on the Auto Body Program. The facility also
houses an Automotive Mechanics Lab and also a
Computer Numerical Control Lab with automated
machine tool equipment. Additional storage space for
the Automotive Technology program would be desirable.
Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
Building Interior
The building has a steel frame with exterior masonry
walls. Masonry is in generally good condition; as are
concrete pavement areas around the building. Barrel
vaulted roofs of the central bay have an elevated steel
truss structure that admits light into the building through
clerestory windows below the roof eaves. The original
roof warranty expired in 2014. Although its condition is
reported to be good, it should be monitored with regular
inspection.
The building has been well-maintained and is in good
condition for the nature of its use. Interiors were
renovated recently.
ADA
The building has an accessible entrance and toilet rooms.
The facility appears to be NYS Building Code and ADAcompliant.
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Mechanical Systems
Electrical Systems
Heating and Cooling
Primary Power
The building is equipped with a few different mechanical
systems. The classroom/office areas are heating and
cooled by ducted, above-ceiling four-pipe fan coil units.
These fan coil units are provided with ventilation air
from an air/air heat recovery air handling unit located in
the mechanical room.
Power is fed from a pad-mounted transformer and enters
the building through an 800A, fused switch. Since the
building was constructed in 1999, all electrical equipment
is relatively new and sufficient to handle existing loads.
The Shop area is served by an additional heat recovery
unit. These air-handling units incorporate duct mounted
reheat coils for individual room temperature control.
(The shop areas are not air conditioned.) The spray
booths and vehicle exhaust systems in the shop areas are
in good condition. The welding exhaust system in Shop
116, however, should be improved. Presently, there is
only one exhaust snorkel provided in an area where
fifteen people could be welding at one time. It is
recommended that additional snorkel exhaust arms and
associated fan be added to the space.
The Compressor Room that serves the shop areas does
not have enough cooling provided for the space and
when compressors are on the room over heats. It is
recommended that additional ventilation ductwork and
associated fans and louvers be added to properly ventilate
the space.
Heating water is provided to the mechanical systems by
three boilers located in the boiler room.
Chilled water is provided by an air-cooled condensing
unit located on the roof. The condensing unit has a
remote refrigerant/chiller bundle that is located in the
mechanical room.
Emergency Power
There is no emergency power to this building.
Lighting
Light fixtures throughout the building are high efficiency
fixtures that are sufficient for the tasks at hand.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the building,
including the parking lot and entry road.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life. Data cables are
Cat 5 and are near capacity.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.

Provide new Cat 6 data cables.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Building Controls
Building controls consist of a combination of pneumatics
and direct digital controls (DDC) that are connected to
the Campus-Wide Network. All equipment is original to
the building and is in good condition.
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Plumbing Systems
Domestic Water
Sanitary Sewer
A four-inch domestic water service enters the building
and reduces to a two-inch line. It includes a shut-off
valve, water meter with bypass, and two reduced-pressure
zone-type backflow preventers installed in parallel.
Discharge from backflow preventer relief valves spill into
a pail, which could cause flooding if there is a
catastrophic failure of either backflow preventer device.
The domestic hot water system consists of a gas-fired
water heater (98-gallon storage capacity, 75,100 BTU
input). There have been complaints from the staff
regarding the temperature of the hot water, especially in
the break room where it takes a very long time to get hot.
The piping appears to be in good condition.
The four-inch sanitary sewer that exits the building has
an exterior house trap and vent. There is a trench drain
in one shop area that ties into an oil separator before
discharging to the sanitary sewer. Shop 116 has floor
drains that also tie into an oil separator before
discharging to the sanitary sewer. Blockages in the drains
have caused flooding in the shop area. The piping
appears to be in good condition.


Provide an electric instantaneous water heater at
the break room sink.
The discharge from the backflow preventer
relief valves should be piped through the
exterior wall to eliminate the possibility of
flooding if the backflow preventers fail. A
flapper valve and insect screen should be
installed in the discharge piping.

Replace the two floor drains in Shop 116 with
two trench drains. Include catch basins for
removing sand and grit prior to tying into below
slab drainage piping.
Storm Sewer
Two eight-inch storm sewers, two six-inch storm sewers,
and one three-inch storm sewer collect storm water from
building roof drains. The piping appears to be in good
condition.
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Natural Gas
A two-and-one-half-inch gas service enters the building
and feeds the domestic hot water heater and HVAC
equipment. The gas meter and regulator are located
outside the building in a fenced enclosure. The piping
appears to be in good condition.
Compressed Air
The shop areas are served by an air compressor that
delivers air to compressed air outlet stations. The piping
and equipment appear to be in good condition.
Plumbing Fixtures
The toilet rooms in the building are ADA compliant.
There are wash fountains and emergency
eyewash/shower units located in the shop areas. The
fixtures are in good condition
.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
T - Airport Corporate Park
1999
29,732
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
1/0
B - Business/S-1 - Storage, Moderate Hazard
2 - Noncombustible
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
X
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
X
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Building Interior
Tel/Data Systems
X
Specialty Systems
X
Floors
X
Walls
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
Ceilings
X
Interior Door Control
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Security Cameras
Built-In Furnishings
Compliance
Building
Component
Stairs
Elevators/Escalators
Specialty Systems
C
X
Building Heating/Cooling
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
X
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Toilet Rooms
X
Specialty Systems
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Elmira Academic Center (U)
Building Data
Year Constructed

19??

2007
Addition and renovations to original
building; CCC Extension Center opened
Original construction
Occupancy Group:
B – Business
Construction Type:
Type I – Noncombustible &
Type III B
Building History and Use Summary
The Elmira Academic Center consists of a historic brick
and timber building in downtown Elmira that was added
to in 2007. The addition connected new and existing
levels of the facility and provided a central “heart” for
this satellite campus with a 3-story atrium space. Some
space in the facility is leased to workforce development
groups with a similar or common mission to CCC. A
variety of classes are offered at this Extension Center,
although it retains a workforce development focus.
Functional Analysis
The building appears to function well for its intended
use. The upper floor of the original structure area is of
unknown floor loading capacity, and as such is used for
faculty offices, casual interaction space and other unconcentrated uses. This appears to be prudent use of
this area, and denser use such as for assembly or events is
not recommended.
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Building Survey Summary
Building Exterior
The exterior of the facility, both original and newer
construction, is in good to very good condition, and
appears well-maintained. No significant building
envelope issues were observed. The flat roofed areas are
an EPDM system installed in 2007. The 15-year
warranty on this roofing expires in 2022.
Building Interior
The building has been well-maintained and is in good
condition. Interior finishes are less than 10 years old,
and in good condition with a few exceptions. Ceiling
tiles in the lowest level of the original building show
some wear and minor damage, likely due to lower heights
at this floor. Carpet tile joints are also more noticeable
and are showing signs of lifting at seams. This is likely
caused by the floor “flexing” under moving loads; as the
floor structure here consists of wood joists and decking.
Repetitive movement is causing some shifting between
tiles.
ADA
The building has an accessible entrance and toilet rooms,
however grab bars are missing from water closets at the
basement level. Otherwise, the facility appears to be
NYS Building Code and ADA-compliant.
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Mechanical Systems
Lighting
Heating and Cooling
Light fixtures throughout the building are high efficiency
fixtures that are sufficient for the tasks at hand.
The Elmira Building is served by two different types of
systems due to the mixed use of the building. The newly
renovated welding shop is served by roof top DX air
handling units that feed the shop areas and adjacent
classrooms. The shop area is served with multiple
welding stations with associated snorkel exhaust arms
that connect to a central exhaust system. The exhaust
system is a dust collection system. All the equipment in
this area is new and in good working order.
The main part of the building is served by heat pumps
and an associated ventilation air unit located in the
basement. The heat pump system consists of evaporative
towers located in the back of the building and hot water
boilers located in the basement. The main building is a
mix of classrooms and office spaces. Each classroom is
equipped with a heat pump and ducted ventilation air.
The core bathrooms have a central exhaust system
feeding them. All equipment and controls were provided
new in the renovation that took place in 2007. All
equipment is in good working order.
Exterior Lighting
Exterior lighting is sufficient around the building,
including the parking lot and entry road.
Fire Alarm System
The fire alarm system and devices are modern and
perform their intended functions.
Telephone/Data System
Existing VoIP telephone system was installed in 2007.
Telephone switch equipment and associated phones are
approaching the end of their useful life.

Replace switching equipment and phones with
new.
Data cables were installed new in 2007 and appear
sufficient.
Building lacks wireless data access.

Add wireless data access units.
Electrical Systems
Primary Power
There are two electrical services for the building. One is
a 120/208 volt, 1600 amp service from a utility company
pad mounted transformer that serves the majority of the
building. Since the building was completely renovated in
2007, all electrical equipment is relatively new and
sufficient to handle the existing loads.
Fire Protection Systems
Sprinklers
The building is equipped with a sprinkler system. 2-1/2
in. hose valves for fire department use are located in the
stairwells.
The second electrical service is a 480/277 volt service
from a second utility company pad mounted transformer
that serves the new Welding Lab. This lab has just been
completed and all electrical equipment is new and
sufficient to handle the load.
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Plumbing Systems
Natural Gas
Domestic Water
A 2 in. has service enters the building from the exterior.
Gas is supplied to the boilers and water heaters.
The building is served by a 2 in. water service. The
domestic water service includes a shut-off valve and
water meter. The domestic hot water system consists of
a gas-fired water heater (65-gallon capacity, 65,000 BTU
input, A.O. Smith #BT-65). The piping appears to be on
good condition:
Plumbing Fixtures
The present toilet rooms were updated in 2007. They
appear to be in good condition.
Sanitary Sewer
A 4 in. sanitary building drain exits the building to the
public sewer.
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Building Condition Assessment
Corning Community College Master Plan
Building Code/Name:
Construction Year:
GSF:
Floors Above/Below:
Occupancy Group:
Construction Type:
U - Elmira Academic Center
19??/2007
41,575
Condition
Building
Component
E
G
F
3/1
B - Business
II A/III B
Condition
Building
Component
P
E
G
F
P
Building Electrical
Building Exterior
Foundations
X
Fire Alarm System
Exterior Walls
X
Emergency Power/Lighting
Building Framing
X
Lighting Systems
X
Windows/Louvers
X
Electrical Distribution
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Power Wiring
X
Roof
X
Tel/Data Systems
Building Interior
X
X
X
Specialty Systems
Floors
X
Walls
X
Ceilings
X
Doors/Frames/Hardware
X
Built-In Furnishings
X
Stairs
X
Elevators/Escalators
X
Specialty Systems
X
Building Heating/Cooling
X
X
X
Safety/Security
Perimeter Door Control
X
Interior Door Control
X
Security Cameras
X
Compliance
Building
Component
C
PC
NC
NYS/ADA
Exterior Doors
X
HVAC Distribution & Controls
X
Interior Doors
AHU/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Horizontal)
X
Chiller/Controls
X
Accessible Routes (Vertical)
X
Boiler/Heat
X
Elevators
X
Pumps/Motors/Compressors
X
Signage
Fire Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems
X
Assistive Listening Device
Plumbing Systems/Fixtures
X
Drinking Fountains
X
Specialty Systems
X
Toilet Rooms
X
X
Not applicable
E - Excellent
Conditions generally at a "like new" level. Exemplary maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
G - Good
Conditions generally at an acceptable level. Routine maintenance and appropriate funding required to maintain this level.
F - Fair
Conditions at a minimally acceptable level. Improvements, involving greater than routine maintenance and additional funding,
required.
P - Poor
Conditions below minimally acceptable levels. Conditions require substantial funding and/or considerable maintenance
effort to be improved.
C - Compliant
Conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) and ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
PC - Partially Compliant Partially conforms with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA) due to
modifications of the building component/space.
NC - Non-Compliant
Does not conform with the most current version of the Building Code of New York State (NYS) or ICC/ANSI A177.1 (ADA).
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Master Plan
Strategic Approach
Corning Community College updated its Strategic Plan in
2014. This plan is the basis for the development of
special area plans, including the Academic Plan also
prepared in 2014. The four Primary Themes drive
Objectives and Strategies of the Strategic Plan, including:
Theme 1 - Student Focus and Engagement: CCC
will identify and meet enrollment targets and increase the
engagement, retention, and overall success of students by
enhancing the depth and breadth of the learning
experience.
This strategic plan also established the foundation for a
multiphase planning process, from September 2014
through February 2015 the SWBR Team, met with the
College’s master plan steering committee, task force, and
open forums with students, faculty and staff. This was an
iterative process of gathering information, developing
planning guidelines, suggesting initiatives and vetting
project alternatives.
Theme 2 - Excellent, Innovative, In-demand
Education Programs: CCC will demonstrate
innovation and creativity in programming and promote
faculty development opportunities to achieve pedagogical
excellence.
Theme 3 - Quality Resources: CCC will act on needs
for people, financial, technological, spatial, and material
resources to optimize program delivery, support services,
and communication at all locations.
Theme 4 - Caring and Inclusive Community: CCC
will create an inclusive environment for students and
employees.
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2015 Planning Principles & Highlights
The College hosted a three day issue and opportunities
workshop with faculty, staff, administration, Board of
Trustee members and other stakeholders. Community
outreach with regional planners, the business
community and government officials was conducted.
Analysis of existing space and facility conditions was
professionally performed. Based on this and other
analysis, research and exploration, the following
Planning Principals were developed and confirmed:

Identity & Mission: Lead by example; tell great
stories; utilize meaningful place-names & building
names; prepare consistent & quality design
guidelines; serve your market (with location &
product); value sustainability practices; celebrate
victories;

Stellar & Signature Programs: Develop
signature programs around an Earth & Sky theme;
focus investment on existing exemplary programs
(labs, classrooms, technology, furnishings, &
“homes”); consolidate exemplary program
components in singular locations;



Learning Environment: Create 21st century
learning environments; third spaces; collaborative
learning opportunities; technology; new
furnishings; more classroom space per student;
conditioned environment; environmental
sustainability;
Strengthen the Core: Strengthen as a center for
residential life; correct building and infrastructure
deficiencies; landscape improvements;
administrative & office space investment;
circulation & parking;
Enrollment Growth or Stability: Brand value;
great academic programs; welcome experience;
first year experience; student life; athletics; quality
facilities;

Engage the Community: Business relationships;
high school relationships, year–round design (AC);
shared facilities (planetarium, theater, nature
center, preserve, dorms); events & programming;

Maximize Resources: Multi-function spaces;
purposeful buildings & locations; strategic
financial investment.
Introduction:
The following Program Opportunities, Initiatives, and
Projects represent recommendations based on 1)
Understanding of Strategic and Academic directions; 2)
feedback from Master Planning Workshops; 3) space
analysis; 4) facility condition assessment; and 5)
professional judgment.
The Program Opportunities are generally outside the
scope of this Facility Master Plan but are included
because they were captured in Campus-wide
discussions. They generally represent areas of
discussion that the College can consider additional
study or action. Similarly, the Initiatives listed in this
chapter represent activities that have been discussed
that are not capital projects, but likely have an impact
on space and/or facilities.
The Projects listed in this chapter represent capital
recommendations for Corning Community College’s
facilities.
Consistent with an initially stated purpose, the
overriding emphasis is on:




Supporting Learning,
Implementing the Strategic Plan,
o Student Success
o Educational Programming
o Quality Resources
o Community Engagement
Preparing for a 5-Year Investment Strategy in
Academic/Curricular Programs to compliment
recent investment in Co-Curricular & Athletics,
and
Maintaining an Affordable Market Position of
CCC
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Corning CC System-Wide
The following Program Opportunities and Initiatives
relate to the College’s activities between, or at all of its
Campus and Extension Center locations.
Program Opportunities

Consolidate Criminal Justice Programs: Move All
Criminal Justice Classes/Programs from Goff
Road to Spencer Hill; Add/Renovate Space at
Spencer Hill as Necessary;

Consolidate Auto Tech Program: Move Auto
Tech Program to ACP after Construction of
Addition (see ACP Center discussion);

Small Business Development Center: Perform
Study to assess various locations (temporary
and/or permanent, alternate downtown Corning
location, Elmira Academic Center, temporarily
within partner businesses)
studied as part of a comprehensive Feasibility
and Site Selection Study.

Pursue a New Downtown Corning Presence:
Conduct a program definition, market & site
selection study with the following assumptions,
among others:
o
o
o
Initiatives:
o

Close Non-Strategic & Under-utilized Extension
Centers
o
o
Goff Road Center – The Goff Road Center is
recommended to be closed based on 1) the
academic objective of consolidating Criminal
Justice classes in a single location, 2) the
proximity of the Center to other CCC
facilities (duplication within a single
geographic market), 3) the challenges of
student transportation, and its 4) current
under-utilization (only using 34% of existing
ASF).
Corning Business Development Center
(BDC) – The BDCis recommended to be
closed based on its 1) high amount of physical
deficiency (approx. $1,360,900 worth of
corrections), 2) its current underutilization
(only using 20% of existing ASF), 3) parking
deficiencies, and 4) challenges in portraying a
positive brand image for the College. A
Downtown Corning presence for the College
is recommended, and the current BDC site is
recommended as being one of the sites to be
o
o
Establish a new downtown Corning Academic
Center with strong community ties
Criteria for Location: Supports proposed
programs (see below); visible; accessible;
pedestrian & mixed-use character; affordable
(maybe leased); close to visitor infrastructure;
adjacency of existing student housing; safe;
iconic; supports economic development
objectives of city & region;
Potential Sites: Location at former Guthrie
Hospital Site; Market Street site within
existing space; existing building stock; BDC
site with major investment; or possible others;
Programs may Include: Hospitality/Tourism
& Arts (within Business Program, potential
college run restaurant, art studio, and/or hotel
relationship); Small Business Development
Center, University Center(s); Health Care;
and/or Start-Up NY Space;
Potential Space Program of 20,000 +/- with
room for growth;
Consideration Given to Lease, Buy, or
Ground Lease and Build.
CORNING COLLEGETOWN CENTER: CONCEPTUAL SPACE PROGRAM
Lobby
Program Spaces
Faculty Offices (6)
Classrooms (4)
Conference Rooms (2)
500
750
3,000
900
Lab/Special Instruction Space
Specialty Space ‐ ie. Food Service; Health Services; other
Specialty Space ‐ ie. Gallery, Retail, other
Lab
Special Program Space
Offices (6)
Shared Assembly Space
720
1,350
Total Net Space Program
Grossing Factor (Net:Gross)
Gross Floor Area
12,220
0.60
20,367
3,000
1,000
1,000
...SAY 20,000 SF
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
Seneca Lake Center: Perform a feasibility study
relative to new Schuyler County/Finger Lakes
Location serving a northern demographic and
providing a Finger Lakes connection. Include
program definition, market & financial feasibility,
and facility design.
o
Criteria for Location: Supports Proposed
Programs (see below); Visible; Accessible;
Pedestrian & Mixed Use Character;
Affordable (maybe leased); Close to Visitor
Infrastructure; Adjacency of Existing Student
Housing; Safe; Iconic; Supports Economic
Development Objectives of City & Region;
and Access to Seneca Lake (assuming
limnology or water resources programming);
o
Potential Locations: Watkins Glen Site Near
Visitor Attractions & Lake; Sewage Treatment
Plant Site; Northern Gateway Site; Clute Park
(Natural History Interpretive Center);
Montour Falls Location paired with
previously identified Start-up NY Program;
among possible Others;
o
Programs may Include: Earth &
Sky/Environmental Science;
Limnology/Water Resources;
Tourism/Hospitality; Liberal Arts/Core
Classes; and/or Start-Up NY Space;
o
Potential Space Program of 15,000 +/- SF
(based on a complimentary, but smaller
program as Downtown Corning);
o
Consideration Given to Lease, Buy, or
Ground Lease and Build.
Potential Locations based on Drive-Time Market & Population
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
Transportation: perform a feasibility analysis to
define the best means of providing transportation
for students (college-owned service or work w/
public service to provide). Implement the
preferred scenario. Include at least the following
two services:
o
o


Spencer Hill – Downtown (Consistent and
Frequent 24/7 Schedule w/ Bike Racks)
Spencer Hill – Downtown – ACP – Elmira
(Regular & Frequent M-F Schedule to
Coincide w/ Class Schedules)
Facility Design Guidelines Book: Prepare a design
guidelines and standards book that provides
consistency in design, materials and quality of
facilities. Guidelines should address at least the
following items:
o
Sustainability;
o
Create a 21st Century Learning Environment;

Technology at Admissions

Technology in Classrooms & Labs

Collaborative Learning

3rd Spaces

Web Based Learning
o
Create a Sense of Place that is Memorable
(look and feel of the campus, entry, views,
landscape, hardscape, interpretation, roads,
lighting, art, etc);
o
Communicate the Mission/Vision through
Facilities;

Gateway/Career Pathways Mission

Conservation Brand/Mission
o
Accommodate the Student of the Future –
(International, Tech Savvy, and MultiCultural);
o
Maintain affordability.

Branding: A Brand Audit is underway. Prepare a
Brand Statement and Strategy in support of the
College’s Strategic and Academic Plans.
o
Mission & Values (Gateway, Academic Value
& Sustainability)
o
Signature Program: Earth & Sky
o
Exemplary & New Programs
o
Meaningful Learning Environments: Iconic
Spencer Hill Campus & Accessible/Urban
Extensions
Identity & Naming Opportunity: Strengthen the
identity and brand of campuses, centers, places
and buildings through naming. Potentially use as a
fundraising tool.
o
Spencer Hill Campus: Main Bucolic Campus;
Earth & Sky
o
Corning College-town Center: Urban &
Cultural Arm of Main Campus
o
ACP Center: Transportation & Technology
o
Elmira Academic Center: Eastern Urban
Alternative - Accessibility
o
Seneca Lake Center: Finger Lakes
Connection & Northern Alternative – Urban
& Accessible
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Spencer Hill Campus
The following Program Opportunities, Initiatives and
Projects relate to the College’s Spencer Hill Campus.
Initiatives

Program Opportunities


Criminal Justice: Identify space for Criminal
Justice classes/programs moved from Goff Road;
Potentially in space vacated by programs moving
to Corning College-town Center; Add/renovate
space as necessary.
Existing BDC Programs: Identify space for current
BDC classes/programs to Spencer Hill except the
Small Business Development Center.
Add/renovate space as necessary.
o
Computer Lab
o
Nursing Simulation Lab
o
Business Classes

Earth & Sky Institute: Continue the development
of the Program and create a “home” for the Earth
& Sky Institute.

Potential New Programs: Perform additional
feasibility analysis, as necessary, for potential new
programs. Prioritize the programs and document
and space needs.
o
Sports Management
o
Mechatronics
o
Art Concentrations (Performance, Music,
Techno Art)
o


21st Century Classrooms & Labs: Improve &
“right-size” classrooms & labs consistent with
recommendations in the Space Utilization
assessment, including:
o
Re-purpose and Right-size Room Capacity to
fit Existing Spaces;
o
Improve Scheduling;
o
Move Instruction out of Lab Spaces;
o
Leverage Technology (Web Casting of Classes
between Campuses & On-Line Teaching).
Residential Life: Improve residential life and
increased residential life activities.
o
Entertainment & Recreation (Movie Space,
Intramurals, Ropes Course, Mountain Biking)
o
More Food Options & Improved Retail
Hours
Mission, Brand & Stories: Seek opportunities to
discuss the College’s Mission and forward its
brand.
o

University Center Program: Further define the
University Center Program including goals,
growth, programs and facility impacts.
o
Feasibility Study for other University Center
Programs
o
Decision on Permanence of Alfred
U/Education UC Location (Spencer Hill or
future Downtown Corning)
Health Industry

Health Information Technology

Dental Hygiene

LPN

Physical Therapy

Occupational Therapy
o
Tourism & Hospitality (Corning College-town
Center & Seneca Lake Center)
o
Forensics
o
Cyber Security

Building & Place Names study; Consider as
fundraising tool
Community Programming: Increase community
programming through events, shared facilities and
programs.
o
Elderhostel/Summer Lodging (w/Hospitality
Program on Spencer Hill)
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
Unforeseen Growth Scenario: Be prepared for
future growth in terms of space, faculty and
program specific needs.
o
Location for Additional Instructional, Office
& Support Space
o
Location for Additional Residential
Future Growth to Help Define Proposed “North Quad”
Projects

Earth & Sky Institute: Develop facilities to
support the Signature Earth & Sky Institute
(umbrella laboratory & teaching facility supporting
programs that include STEM, Environmental
Studies, Sustainability, Energy, Recreation,
Interpretive Education, Hospitality, etc.).
Incorporate the following components, among
possible others:
o
Renovation of Observatory & Planetarium
(Technology, Telescope, Media, Finishes &
Projector);
o
Update Classrooms & Labs;
o
Spencer Crest Renovation (as Lab/Retreat
Center);
o
An Iconic Building Addition of approximately
22,000 SF (Interactive, Geothermal,
Monitoring Dashboards, Interpreted &
LEED Certified – with New Classroom, Lab
Space and/or Partner Space as needed);
o
Create a Pedestrian & Visual Connection to
Main Campus and to Spencer Crest;
o
Develop a substantial Solar Field (2+/- mw);
potentially through a 3rd Party Agreement;
include interactive and detailed monitoring
components;
o
Develop a Wind Turbine(s), potentially
through a 3rd Party Agreement; include
interactive and detailed monitoring
components.
Signature Program & Facility Leveraging Unique Assets!
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Concept for Iconic Building, Bridged Connection to Campus & Bio-Walk
Aerial View of Biowalk Connection to Proposed Earth & Sky Addition
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Site Concept Showing Location of Proposed Addition and Connection to Campus
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
Exemplary Programs: Improve facilities for
existing exemplary programs by providing a
budget allowance for programs to schedule.
o
Nursing: Provide a “Home”, Improved
Simulation Lab, Updated Labs
o
Engineering: Provide a “Home” & Improved
Labs
o
Criminal Justice: Provide a “Home” & Labs
o
Education: Provide a “Home”; Instructional
Space
o Fine Arts & Design: Provide a “Home”;
Studio Space; Exhibit Space

21st Century Classrooms & Labs: Existing
classrooms turned into 21st century classrooms.
o
Modernize Furnishings for collaborative
learning;
o
Implement the CCC Technology Plan.

New Classrooms: Correct a potential deficit of
classrooms with new classrooms in building
additions (Earth & Sky Addition and new MultiPurpose Assembly & Performance Bldg) and new
classrooms within existing space (11 classrooms
total based on current utilization, “right-sizing”,
and program consolidation)

New Lab Space: Create new lab space to
accommodate/support closures, moves and new
programming.

Support Spaces: Create new support space to
correct deficiencies, support closures, moves and
new programming.
o
Right Size and Add Office Space
o
Correct Identified Storage Needs
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
Multi-Purpose Event & Assembly Space:
Construct a new building w/ 300+/- capacity for
assembly and 200+/- capacity for performance.
Include new classrooms, offices and support
space.
Aerial View Showing Location on New “North Quad”
Multi-Use Assembly & Performance Venue
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

Infrastructure Investment: Invest in Corning CC’s
existing assets by correcting building deficiencies,
including value added and advanced improvements
(see detailed Building Deficiencies List in
Document B).
o
Correct Building Deficiencies
o
Provide Air Conditioning for all campus
spaces
o
Energy Projects (Lights, Fixtures)
Site & Landscape Master Plan Improvements:
Implement a Site & Landscape Master Plan to
improve the curb appeal of the Campus, provide
an enhanced visitor experience, improve
circulation, improve safety, and offer a more
sustainable environment.
o
New Arrival Sequence, Parking & Plaza
o
Improved Curb Appeal – Sustainable
Landscape Plan
o
Complete East Side Ring Road, Parking &
Lighting
o
Strengthen Pedestrian Spines & Circulation
o
Establish Bicycle Infrastructure
o
Spencer Crest Parking Lot, Pedestrian Access
o
Green Infrastructure
o
New “North Quad”
o
Refurbished “Campus Green”
o
Signage & Way-finding Program
o
Outdoor Performance/Event Spaces
o
Outdoor Classrooms
o
Ropes, Trails, Mountain Biking and
Adventure Facilities
o
Land Preserve, Habitat Enhancement, Blinds
& Interpretation
o
Concessions & Spectator Experience at
Athletic Fields
Site Plan Concept for Reimagined Entryway
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
Community Spaces: Design community spaces
and accessibility into building and site projects.
o
Veteran’s Lounge
o
Alumni Hall
o
Festival Space

Commons Entry Exhibit: Develop a high quality
exhibit at the entrance to the Commons building
that speaks to the Mission of CCC (Value of
Middle Skills; 4-Yr Options - Pipeline; Career
Exploration; Entrepreneurship, etc.)

Public Art: For brand development and cultural
enrichment, budget 1% of all capital budgets for
public art.
A Vision for a New North Quad, Complementing the Existing Campus Green
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Elmira Academic Center
The following Program Opportunities, Initiatives and
Projects relate to the College’s Elmira Academic
Center.
Projects:

Programs:

Offer Additional Classes to Fully Utilize Space
(Liberal Arts/Core Classes)

Potential Start-up NY Site on Grounds – filling
campus towards Church Street
o

Workforce Development: Provide a “Home”,
Improved Labs

Infrastructure Investment – Correct Building
Deficiencies

Site & Landscape Master Plan Improvements
Initiatives:

Improve Facilities for Existing Exemplary
Program
o
Consolidate Workforce Development
Administration in Elmira – Establish as “Home”
Presence on Church Street & New Arrival
Sequence
o
Signage & Way-finding
Improve & “Right-Size” Classrooms & Labs
o
Parking Lot Project
o
Areas for Future Growth
o
Improve Scheduling
o
Leverage Technology (Web Casting of Classes
between Campuses & On-Line Teaching)

Land Acquisition per Site Master Plan – Prepare
for Growth

Prepare for Growth – parking, residential, support


Residential Program (third party on surrounding
blocks)
Entry Exhibit telling Mission, Brand & Story:
Develop a high quality exhibit at the entrance to
the Commons building that speaks to the Mission
of CCC (Value of Middle Skills; 4-Yr Options Pipeline; Career Exploration; Entrepreneurship,
etc.)

Public Art: For brand development and cultural
enrichment, budget 1% of all capital budgets for
public art.
Opportunity for Growth & Church Street Engagement
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ACP (Airport Corporate Park) Center
The following Program Opportunities, Initiatives and
Projects relate to the College’s ACP Center.
Program Opportunity

Move All Auto Tech Classes/Programs from
Spencer Hill to ACP; Add/Renovate Space as
Necessary
Initiatives


Improve & “Right-Size” Classrooms & Labs
o
Improve Scheduling
o
Leverage Technology (Web Casting of Classes
between Campuses & On-Line Teaching)
Create a Sense of Campus Community
Projects


Building Addition to House Classes/Programs
Relocated from Spencer Hill
o
5,000 SF Auto Tech Lab
o
3 Offices
o
1 Classroom
o
Student Space
Landscape Master Plan
o
Signage & Way-finding Program
o
Green Infrastructure
o
Identity from I-86
o
Outdoor Student Space

Infrastructure Investment: Correct Building
Deficiencies

CCC Start-up NY Program: Signage/Branding of
Schweizer/Sikorsky Completion Center
Conceptual Addition & Landscaping
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Goff Road Center
Potential New Centers
The following Program Opportunity & Initiative relate
to the College’s Goff Road Center.
Program Opportunity
The following Projects relate to the College potentially
developing new locations, based on established
feasibility.

Projects
Potential Start-Up NY Site: Because of the good
condition of this building, an opportunity exists to
consider alternate uses for the structure, such as
leased space or additional space for the Start-up
New York program.
Initiative

Sell or Lease Property

Corning College-town Center
o Develop Consistent with the Findings of the
Feasibility Study

Seneca Lake Center
o Develop Consistent with the Findings of the
Feasibility Study
Business Development Center
The following Initiatives relate to the College’s
Business Development Center.
Initiatives

Assess Site Against Criteria for a “New”
Downtown Presence (Against other Potential
Locations – See Downtown Corning Presence
Above)

Discontinue Lease

Foundation should give consideration to Sale of
Property if not the Preferred Site for a Downtown
Presence (see discussion regarding “Downtown
Corning Presence” below)
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Sustainability
Triple-bottom-line sustainability includes discussion
around social good, financial stability and
environmental action. In this discussion, the social
good is addressed in the College’s Strategic Plan,
Academic Plan and operating approach. Financial
stability is discussed in the capital budget discussion,
enrollment targets and other aspects of operations.
The focus of these recommendations is on
environmental sustainability. The following specific
sustainability recommendations are in addition to the
recommendations of the College’s Sustainability Plan.
Energy
Solar Array: A 2 megawatt solar field is recommended
to be developed in conjunction with the development
of the Earth & Sky Institute. The array can be
creatively applied to rooftops, over parking, over
walkways and/or in a green-field area south of the
Planetarium. The array would be designed to be both a
research and a teaching tool.
Wind Turbine: A 750 +/- KW wind turbine is
recommended. The turbine would be designed to be
both a research and a teaching tool.
Geothermal: It is recommended that geothermal
heating and cooling be developed for the Earth & Sky
Institute addition.
Building Envelope: Building envelope continues to be
the energy improvement with the highest return on
investment. New roofing, window, and door projects
should be accomplished to tighten building envelopes.
Energy Efficiency: Recommendations have been made
in the Building Deficiencies report to implement
efficient new heating and cooling systems throughout
the Spencer Hill Campus.
Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design
(LEED): Build new Earth & Sky building to LEED
Platinum standards and build new Multi-Use Assembly
and Performance Building to LEED standards.
Smart Growth
Corning Community College should incorporate smart
growth practices in its current and future planning and
construction projects.

Density – develop or locate within dense areas to
facilitate pedestrian transportation, for efficiency,
and to preserve valuable land resources.

Alternative Transportation – Provide as many
modes of transportation as possible, including
pedestrian, bicycle and mass-transit.

Mixed-Use – develop mixed-use places that share
parking, share facilities and offer greater
opportunity for Live-work-play environments
Environmental Stewardship Guidelines
Outdoor environment - the Land - plant and animal
habitat
 Describe any environmentally sensitive areas – no
build zones

Build on sites that that have already been disturbed

Build intensively to minimize disruption to native
areas

Define and map zones as restricted, preserved,
conserved, restored, managed, developable land
(see Emory land policy map)

Identify trees – species, age, those prone to disease

Identify and remove non-native invasive species

Plant native, drought resistant plants
Storm-water (existing conditions)
 Develop a system wide storm-water management
plan

Understand storm-water as a resource – harvest
roof and site water for use

Maximize infiltration of rainfall to groundwater

Reduce runoff by providing detention – and as
needed improve quality of runoff

Avoid runoff without mitigation to open bodies of
water
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Hardscape
 Walkways, roads and parking areas – see stormwater consideration above, reduce heat island
effect

Indoor environmental quality

Indoor air quality strategies – both during and
after construction


Low emitting material

Thermal comfort – controls

Interior lighting – ability to control

Daylighting and views

Acoustic performance
Site lighting – focus light where needed – use darksky compliant LED fixtures
Develop a resiliency plan
 What are concerns/ causes – weather, energy
shortage, restricted travel, evacuation

What are risks – storm, drought, flooding, need for
increased housing, facility damage

What are needs - water, food, fuel, beds, building
materials

What exists – generator capacity, fuel capacity, grid
redundancy

Are utility lines protected?

Map out a 25 year storm
Review buildings and infrastructure for future use
 Commitment of funding to maintain and improve
existing building and infrastructure

Determine removal of buildings that are beyond
their useful life
Develop LEED type guidelines for renovations and
new construction
 Building site and surrounding area
Landscape, hardscape, storm-water, irrigation

Building mass and orientation

Efficient building plan and multi-function when
possible to maximize use

Energy efficiency
Building energy management system – building
shutdowns, set-points

Energy star / efficient equipment

Energy conserving lighting

Metering of buildings
Commitment to renewable energy – solar, wind,
geothermal – carbon offsets

Alternative fuels for vehicles – biodiesel, electric
charging stations

Pedestrians first, bicycles then vehicles

Locally sourced food

Purchasing

Solid and hazardous waste management – reduce,
reuse, recycle, compost
Learning Opportunities
Learning Lab: Utilize every sustainable practice as a
learning lab and teaching tool.
System Monitoring: Incorporate monitoring into all
sustainability activities as a means of research,
assessment and teaching.
Building commissioning/ retro commissioning

Optimize energy performance

Energy metering

Refrigerant management

Alternative energy sources

Materials use and resources

Manage demolition and building waste

Product disclosure

Product life cycle impact – recycled content

Regionally sourced materials
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Capital Plan
Five-Year Investment Strategy
A five-year investment strategy has been illustrated
representing budget level cost estimates for each
project recommendation. The projects were assessed
and ranked against criteria including:
An itemized breakdown of the Capital Plan is included
on the following pages, and is further defined in
Document B.
1) support of the Strategic Plan;
2) consistency with Planning Principles; and
3) whether they are a life safety or code issue.
Additionally, projects were scheduled over the five-year
period based on:
1) cost;
2) potential funding source; and
3) implementation requirements.
All project recommendations are included in the $73
million Capital Plan. $50 +/- million is scheduled to be
invested over the next five years (2015-2020).
Approximately $23 million in projects are noted as
being either funding or market driven. These projects
would be accomplished beyond the five-year period if
project-specific funding is not identified. Important
components of projects noted as having “particular
priority” in the previous section could be accomplished
for approximately $14 million. Project costs are listed
below in 2015 thousands of dollars without escalation.
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CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN
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Document B: Space, Projects & Plans
Community SWOT & Participation Process
Space Utilization Appendices
Existing Building Plans
Master Deficiencies List
Master Plan Drawings
Project Budget & Prioritization Matrix
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