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Transcript
JULY 2014
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• Telescopes & Binoculars
All sales support the production and free distribution of The Evening Sky Map.
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THE NIGHT SKY LOOKS
EARLY JUL 10 PM
LATE JUL 9 PM
SKY MAP DRAWN FOR
A LATITUDE OF 40°
NORTH AND IS
SUITABLE FOR
LATITUDES UP
TO 15° NORTH
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SAVE ON RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS • http://Skymaps.com/store
• Star Atlases & Planispheres
• Books for Sky Watchers
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Venus 4.1° N of Aldebaran (30° from Sun, morning sky) at 19h UT.
Mags. –3.9 and +0.9.
1 Moon near Regulus (evening sky) at 22h UT.
4 Earth at Aphelion (farthest from Sun) at 0h UT. The Sun-Earth
distance is 1.016682 a.u. or about 152.1 million km.
5 First Quarter Moon at 12:00 UT.
6 Moon very near Mars (evening sky) at 1h UT. Mag. +0.1.
Occultation visible from northern South America and
southern Central America.
6 Moon near Spica (evening sky) at 6h UT.
6 Moon, Mars and Spica within circle diameter 3.8°
(evening sky) at 8h UT. Mags. +0.1 and +1.0.
8 Moon very near Saturn (evening sky) at 2h UT.
Mag. +0.4. Occultation visible from southern
South America.
9 Moon near Antares (evening sky) at 18h UT.
12 Full Moon at 11:26 UT.
12 Mercury at greatest elongation, 21° west of Sun
(morning sky) at 18h UT. Mag +0.5.
13 Moon at perigee (closest to Earth) at 8h UT
(358,260 km; angular size 33.4').
14 Mars 1.3° NNE of Spica (92° from Sun, evening
sky) at 4h UT. Mags. +0.2 and +1.0.
16 Mercury 6.2° ESE of Venus (20° and 26° from Sun,
morning sky) at 19h UT. Mags. –0.1 and –3.9.
EC
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19 Last Quarter Moon at 2:09 UT.
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21 Moon near the Pleiades (morning sky) at 16h UT.
22 Moon near Aldebaran (morning sky) at 12h UT.
24 Moon near Venus (24° from Sun, morning sky) at 17h UT.
Mag. –3.9.
24 Jupiter at conjunction with the Sun at 21h UT. Passes into
the morning sky (not visible).
26 New Moon at 22:42 UT. Start of lunation 1133.
28 Moon at apogee (farthest from Earth) at 3h UT (distance 406,567
km; angular size 29.4').
29 Moon near Regulus (evening sky) at 4h UT.
More sky events and links at http://Skymaps.com/skycalendar/
All times in Universal Time (UT). (USA Eastern Summer Time = UT – 4 hours.)
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FREE* EACH MONTH FOR YOU TO EXPLORE, LEARN & ENJOY THE NIGHT SKY
Sky Calendar – July 2014
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The Evening Sky Map
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Copyright
©
2000–2014
Kym
Thalassoudis.
All
Rights
Reserved.
W
N THE S
AP SHO
KY.
INSTRUCTIONS: THE SKY M
* TERMS OF USE: FREE FOR NON-COMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL USE. ASTRONOMY EDUCATION GROUPS
Star Magnitudes
MAY FREELY DISTRIBUTE PRINTED HANDOUTS. FULL DETAILS AT http://Skymaps.com/terms.html
Tips for Observing the Night Sky
When observing the night sky, and in particular deep-sky objects such as star clusters,
nebulae, and galaxies, it’s always best to observe from a dark location. Avoid direct
light from street lights and other sources. If possible observe from a dark location
away from the light pollution that surrounds many of today’s large cities.
You will see more stars after your eyes adapt to the darkness—usually about 10 to
20 minutes after you go outside. Also, if you need to use a torch to view the sky
map, cover the light bulb with red cellophane. This will preserve your dark vision.
Finally, even though the Moon is one of the most stunning objects to view
through a telescope, its light is so bright that it brightens the sky and makes many of
the fainter objects very difficult to see. So try to observe the evening sky on
moonless nights around either New Moon or Last Quarter.
Astronomical Glossary
Conjunction – An alignment of two celestial bodies such that they present the least
angular separation as viewed from Earth.
Constellation – A defined area of the sky containing a star pattern.
Diffuse Nebula – A cloud of gas illuminated by nearby stars.
Double Star – Two stars that appear close to each other in the sky; either linked by
gravity so that they orbit each other (binary star) or lying at different distances from
Earth (optical double). Apparent separation of stars is given in seconds of arc (").
Ecliptic – The path of the Sun’s center on the celestial sphere as seen from Earth.
Elongation – The angular separation of two celestial bodies. For Mercury and Venus
the greatest elongation occurs when they are at their most angular distance from the
Sun as viewed from Earth.
Galaxy – A mass of up to several billion stars held together by gravity.
Globular Star Cluster – A ball-shaped group of several thousand old stars.
Light Year (ly) – The distance a beam of light travels at 300,000 km/sec in one year.
Magnitude – The brightness of a celestial object as it appears in the sky.
Open Star Cluster – A group of tens or hundreds of relatively young stars.
Opposition – When a celestial body is opposite the Sun in the sky.
Planetary Nebula – The remnants of a shell of gas blown off by a star.
Universal Time (UT) – A time system used by astronomers. Also known as Greenwich
Mean Time. USA Eastern Standard Time (for example, New York) is 5 hours behind UT.
Variable Star – A star that changes brightness over a period of time.
JULY 2014
CELESTIAL OBJECTS
Listed on this page are several of the brighter, more interesting celestial objects
visible in the evening sky this month (refer to the monthly sky map). The objects are
grouped into three categories. Those that can be easily seen with the naked eye (that
is, without optical aid), those easily seen with binoculars, and those requiring a
telescope to be appreciated. Note, all of the objects (except single stars) will
appear more impressive when viewed through a telescope or very large
binoculars. They are grouped in this way to highlight objects that can be seen using
the optical equipment that may be available to the star gazer.
NORTHERN HEMISPHERE
About the Celestial Objects
Easily Seen with the Naked Eye
Altair
Arcturus
δ Cephei
Deneb
α Herculis
Vega
Antares
Polaris
Spica
Aql
Boo
Cep
Cyg
Her
Lyr
Sco
UMi
Vir
Brightest star in Aquila. Name means "the flying eagle". Dist=16.7 ly.
Orange, giant K star. Name means "bear watcher". Dist=36.7 ly.
Cepheid prototype. Mag varies between 3.5 & 4.4 over 5.366 days. Mag 6 companion.
Brightest star in Cygnus. One of the greatest known supergiants. Dist=1,400±200 ly.
Semi-regular variable. Magnitude varies between 3.1 & 3.9 over 90 days. Mag 5.4 companion.
The 5th brightest star in the sky. A blue-white star. Dist=25.0 ly.
Red, supergiant star. Name means "rival of Mars". Dist=135.9 ly.
The North Pole Star. A telescope reveals an unrelated mag 8 companion star. Dist=433 ly.
Latin name means "ear of wheat" and shown held in Virgo's left hand. Dist=250 ly.
Easily Seen with Binoculars
η Aquilae
M3
μ Cephei
Mel 111
χ Cygni
M39
ν Draconis
M13
M92
ε Lyrae
R Lyrae
M12
M10
IC 4665
6633
M15
M8
M25
M22
M4
M6
M7
M5
Mizar & Alcor
Cr 399
Aql
CVn
Cep
Com
Cyg
Cyg
Dra
Her
Her
Lyr
Lyr
Oph
Oph
Oph
Oph
Peg
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sco
Sco
Sco
Ser
UMa
Vul
Bright Cepheid variable. Mag varies between 3.6 & 4.5 over 7.166 days. Dist=1,200 ly.
Easy to find in binoculars. Might be glimpsed with the naked eye.
Herschel's Garnet Star. One of the reddest stars. Mag 3.4 to 5.1 over 730 days.
Coma Berenices. 80 mag 5-6 stars in 5 deg. Dist=283 ly. Age=400 million years.
Long period pulsating red giant. Magnitude varies between 3.3 & 14.2 over 407 days.
May be visible to the naked eye under good conditions. Dist=900 ly.
Wide pair of white stars. One of the finest binocular pairs in the sky. Dist=100 ly.
Best globular in northern skies. Discovered by Halley in 1714. Dist=23,000 ly.
Fainter and smaller than M13. Use a telescope to resolve its stars.
Famous Double Double. Binoculars show a double star. High power reveals each a double.
Semi-regular variable. Magnitude varies between 3.9 & 5.0 over 46.0 days.
Close to the brighter M10. Dist=18,000 ly.
3 degrees from the fainter M12. Both may be glimpsed in binoculars. Dist=14,000 ly.
Large, scattered open cluster. Visible with binoculars.
Scattered open cluster. Visible with binoculars.
Only globular known to contain a planetary nebula (Mag 14, d=1"). Dist=30,000 ly.
Lagoon Nebula. Bright nebula bisected by a dark lane. Dist=5,200 ly.
Bright cluster located about 6 deg N of "teapot's" lid. Dist=1,900 ly.
A spectacular globular star cluster. Telescope will show stars. Dist=10,000 ly.
A close globular. May just be visible without optical aid. Dist=7,000 ly.
Butterfly Cluster. 30+ stars in 7x binoculars. Dist=1,960 ly.
Superb open cluster. Visible to the naked eye. Age=260 million years. Dist=780 ly.
Fine globular star cluster. Telescope will reveal individual stars. Dist=25,000 ly.
Good eyesight or binoculars reveals 2 stars. Not a binary. Mizar has a mag 4 companion.
Coathanger asterism or "Brocchi's Cluster". Not a true star cluster. Dist=218 to 1,140 ly.
Telescopic Objects
7009
ε Boötis
M94
M51
M64
Albireo
61 Cygni
γ Delphini
β Lyrae
M57
M23
M20
M21
M17
M11
M16
M81
M82
M27
Aqr
Boo
CVn
CVn
Com
Cyg
Cyg
Del
Lyr
Lyr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sgr
Sct
Ser
UMa
UMa
Vul
Saturn Nebula. Requires 8-inch telescope to see Saturn-like appendages.
Red giant star (mag 2.5) with a blue-green mag 4.9 companion. Sep=2.8". Difficult to split.
Compact nearly face-on spiral galaxy. Dist=15 million ly.
Whirlpool Galaxy. First recognised to have spiral structure. Dist=25 million ly.
Black-Eye Galaxy. Discovered by J.E. Bode in 1775 - "a small, nebulous star".
Beautiful double star. Contrasting colours of orange and blue-green. Sep=34.4".
Attractive double star. Mags 5.2 & 6.1 orange dwarfs. Dist=11.4 ly. Sep=28.4".
Appear yellow & white. Mags 4.3 & 5.2. Dist=100 ly. Struve 2725 double in same field.
Eclipsing binary. Mag varies between 3.3 & 4.3 over 12.940 days. Fainter mag 7.2 blue star.
Ring Nebula. Magnificent object. Smoke-ring shape. Dist=4,100 ly.
Elongated star cluster. Telescope required to show stars. Dist=2,100 ly.
Trifid Nebula. A telescope shows 3 dust lanes trisecting nebula. Dist=5,200 ly.
A fine and impressive cluster. Dist=4,200 ly.
Omega Nebula. Contains the star cluster NGC 6618. Dist=4,900 ly.
Wild Duck Cluster. Resembles a globular through binoculars. V-shaped. Dist=5,600 ly.
Eagle Nebula. Requires a telescope of large aperture. Dist=8,150 ly.
Beautiful spiral galaxy visible with binoculars. Easy to see in a telescope.
Close to M81 but much fainter and smaller.
Dumbbell Nebula. Large, twin-lobed shape. Most spectacular planetary. Dist=975 ly.
The Evening Sky Map (ISSN 1839-7735) Copyright © 2000–2014 Kym Thalassoudis. All Rights Reserved.
Calendario del Cielo - julio 2014
1
Venus 4.1 ° N de Aldebarán (30° del Sol, cielo matutino) a las 19h. Mags. -3,9 Y 0,9.
La Luna cerca de Regulus (cielo nocturno) a las 22h TU.
4
Tierra en el afelio (punto más alejada de Sol) a las 0h TU. La distancia Sol-Tierra es
1,016682 U.A. o alrededor de 152.100.000 kilómetros.
5
Luna Creciente a las 12:00 TU.
6
La Luna muy cerca de Marte (cielo nocturno) a 1h TU. Mag. 0.1. Ocultación visible desde el
norte de América del Sur y el sur de América Central.
La Luna cerca de Spica (cielo nocturno) a las 6h TU.
Luna, Marte y Spica dentro del diámetro del círculo de 3,8° (cielo nocturno) a las 8h de la
UT. Mags. 0,1 y 1,0.
8
La Luna muy cerca de Saturno (cielo nocturno) a las 2h TU. Mag. 0.4. Ocultación visible
desde el sur de Sudamérica.
9
La Luna cerca de Antares (cielo nocturno) a las 18h TU.
12
Luna Llena a las 11:26 UT.
Mercurio en su mayor elongación, 21° al oeste del Sol (cielo matutino) a las 18 h. Mag 0.5.
13
Luna en perigeo (el punto más cercano a la Tierra) a las 8h UT (358.260 kilómetros;
tamaño angular de 33,4 ').
14
Marte 1.3° NNE de Spica (92° del Sol, cielo nocturno) a las 4h TU. Mags. 0,2 y 1,0.
16
Mercurio 6.2° ESE de Venus (20° y 26° del Sol, cielo matutino) a las 19h. Mags. -0,1 y -3,9.
19
Cuarto Creciente a las 02:09 TU.
21
La Luna cerca de las Pléyades (cielo matutino) a las 16 h.
22
La Luna cerca de Aldebarán (cielo matutino) a las 12h.
24
La Luna cerca de Venus (24° del Sol, cielo matutino) a las 17h. Mag. -3.9.
Júpiter en conjunción con el Sol a las 21h. Pasa en el cielo de la mañana (no visible).
26
Luna Nueva a las 22:42 UT. Inicio de la lunación 1133.
28
La Luna en apogeo (punto más lejano de la Tierra) a 3h UT (distancia 406.567 kilómetros;
tamaño angular 29.4 ').
29
La Luna cerca de Regulus (cielo nocturno) a las 4h TU.
Todas las horas son en Tiempo Universal (TU). Un cielo despejado hasta el próximo mes!
¿Cómo se utiliza el mapa estelar?
En primer lugar, asegúrese de tener el mapa del cielo correspondiente a
su localidad y la fecha (por ejemplo, el hemisferio norte, febrero). A
continuación, imprima el mapa del cielo - que es para lo que sirve.
Ahora, mire de cerca el mapa estelar. Fíjese en las direcciones de la
brújula impresos alrededor del borde. Usted tendrá que girar el mapa del cielo
para que aparezca la dirección de la brújula a lo largo de la parte inferior del
mapa cuando esté enfrente a esa dirección en particular. Gire el mapa
alrededor de su centro para ver lo que el mapa quiere mostrar.
El centro del mapa es la parte del cielo que está directamente sobre la
cabeza (el cenit). Los objetos en el cielo de la noche se encuentran entre el
cenit y el horizonte. Así que un objeto celeste que se dibuja a medio camino
entre el borde del mapa y su centro aparecerá en el cielo a medio camino entre
el horizonte y el cenit.
Encuentre una estrella guía brillante en el mapa del cielo. Tenga en
cuenta la dirección de la brújula de la estrella guia en el mapa. Mire hacia el
cielo nocturno mientras se hacia la misma dirección de la brújula. ¿Puede
encontrar la estrella guia brillante? Puede ayudarle si se mantiene el mapa
hacia arriba. Trate de ir de estrella en estrella con el mapa estelar.