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Astronomy Magazine Article Title Index
10 rising stars of astronomy, 8:60–8:63
1.5 million galaxies revealed, 3:41–3:43
185 million years before the dinosaurs’ demise, did an asteroid nearly end life on Earth?, 4:34–4:39
A
Aligned aurorae, 8:27
All about the Veil Nebula, 6:56–6:61
Amateur astronomy’s greatest generation, 8:68–8:71
Amateurs see fireballs from U.S. satellite kill, 7:24
Another Earth, 6:13
Another super-Earth discovered, 9:21
Antares gang, The, 7:18
Antimatter traced, 5:23
Are big-planet systems uncommon?, 10:23
Are super-sized Earths the new frontier?, 11:26–11:31
Are these space rocks from Mercury?, 11:32–11:37
Are we done yet?, 4:14
Are we looking for life in the right places?, 7:28–7:33
Ask the aliens, 3:12
Asteroid sleuths find the dino killer, 1:20
Astro-humiliation, 10:14
Astroimaging over ancient Greece, 12:64–12:69
Astronaut rescue rocket revs up, 11:22
Astronomers spy a giant particle accelerator in the sky, 5:21
Astronomers unearth a star’s death secrets, 10:18
Astronomers witness alien star flip-out, 6:27
Astronomy magazine’s first 35 years, 8:supplement
Astronomy’s guide to Go-to telescopes, 10:supplement
Auroral storm trigger confirmed, 11:18
B
Backstage at Astronomy, 8:76–8:82
Basking in the Sun, 5:16
Biggest planet’s 5 deepest mysteries, The, 1:38–1:43
Binary pulsar test affirms relativity, 10:21
Binocular Telescope snaps first image, 6:21
Black hole sets a record, 2:20
Black holes wind up galaxy arms, 9:19
Brightest starburst galaxy discovered, 12:23
C
Calling all space probes, 10:64–10:65
Calling on Cassiopeia, 11:76
Canada to launch new asteroid hunter, 11:19
Canada’s handy robot, 1:24
Cannibal next door, The, 3:38
Capture images of our local star, 4:66–4:67
Cassini confirms Titan lakes, 12:27
Cassini scopes Saturn’s two-toned moon, 1:25
Cassini “tastes” Enceladus’ plumes, 7:26
Cepheus’ fall delights, 10:85
Choose the dome that’s right for you, 5:70–5:71
Clearing the air about seeing vs. transparency, 11:75
Cluster crash-up reveals dark matter, 12:26
Comet Hale-Bopp still going strong, 7:25
Coming solar superstorm, The, 9:34–9:39
Cool blue to hot stars, 10:12–10:13
Cool stuff for a hot ride, 9:20
Could changing channels tune into alien civilizations?, 5:38–5:43
Crystal Palace, A, 1:16–1:17
Cygnus Arm flexes its muscle, 9:68
D
Dark reserve, 1:25
Darkest sky under the stars, The, 2:64–2:65
Day the Sun crawled, The, 11:14–11:15
“Death star” blasts neighboring galaxy, 4:23
Defect or discovery?, 12:18–12:19
Did ancient astronomers build Stonehenge?, 7:52–7:57
Did molecules from space seed life in the cosmos?, 4:50–4:55
Discover 10 top Milky Way delights, 9:60–9:63
Distant galaxy gets a weigh-in, 1:26
Distant gamma-ray burst sets a record, 5:20
Do cosmic flashes reveal secrets of the infant universe?, 6:34–6:39
Dogging Apophis, 6:25
E
Earth flybys reveal mystery speed change, 6:20
Earth impacts at a glance, 1:60–1:61
Earth through alien eyes, 5:23
Earth-forming stars are common in the Milky Way, 6:18
Earth’s troubled adolescence, 5:32–5:37
Easy imaging with the DSI III, 9:64–9:65
Enceladus jets form deep in fractures, 12:23
Encyclopedia galactica, 3:45–3:51
Entire Moon is within reach, 10:26
Europe’s space revolution, 9:28–9:33
Explore Jupiter’s moons, 2:56–2:57
Explore the southern Milky Way’s dark clouds, 9:54–9:57
Exploring a Messier line-up, 8:18
Exploring galaxy evolution, 3:16
Exploring Iapetus’ dark side, 3:60–3:63
Eyepiece ABCs, 1:78
Eyewitness to Apollo 8: A personal memoir, 12:20
F
Find your way through the summer sky, 7:70–7:71
First light for Palomar’s new optics, 1:26
Found: the solar system’s oldest rocks, 7:25
G
Galactic mergers in cyberspace, 3:30–3:31
Galactic mistaken identity corrected, 10:20
Galaxies on fire, 3:64–3:69
Get a head start on the Hydra, 4:18
Get ready for summer’s total solar eclipse, 7:66–7:69
Giant stars may have little helpers, 6:24
GLOBE at Night 2008, 8:27
Going the distance, 1:25
Google me to the Moon, 6:25
Great quasar round-up, The, 3:20
H
Harmony arrives at space station, 2:17
Hide-and-seek galaxy surprises astronomers, 4:23
High-tech skin keeps satellites cool, 12:28
Hinode captures solar “fountains”, 8:27
How astronomers cracked the Einstein code, 9:22–9:27
How comets shaped history, 2:23–2:27
How historic observatories will survive, 4:62–4:63
How life could thrive on hostile worlds, 12:54–12:59
How scientists discovered a solar system “superhighway”/nl, 11:38–11:43
How the Milky Way devours its neighbors, 3:34–3:39
How the Sun will die, 12:38–12:43
How to find a Space Needle in a haystack, 4:20–4:21
How to observe artificial satellites, 6:74
How to observe dark nebulae, 5:64–5:67
How to observe the Sun, 4:64–4:65
How to shoot stars with a webcam, 11:68–11:71
How to take a black hole’s temperature, 12:24
How we junked up outer space, 6:40–6:43
How we’ll fix Hubble, 10:28–10:33
Hubble captures little spot’s demise, 11:22
Hubble finds most distant galaxies yet, 11:19
Hubble gazes at red alien sunsets and “star spots”, 4:22
Hubble identifies exoplanet’s methane, 6:22
Hubble identifies weird “blue blobs”, 5:22
Hubble images interstellar ribbon, 10:24
Hubble peers into a Milky Way starburst, 2:16
Hubble spies Comet Holmes’ heart, 3:18
Hubble uncovers white-dwarf age paradox, 10:20
Hubble’s rising odometer, 12:28
I
IAU names a new plutoid, 11:16
India goes to the Moon, 8:26
Inside Arizona’s meteorite treasure chest, 10:80–10:82
Inside Earth’s magnetic shield, 11:52–11:53
Inside NASA’s Deep Space Network, 5:56–5:61
Intense storm triggers Saturn lightning, 8:22
Internal heat drives Jupiter’s weather, 5:21
Is Eta Carinae the brightest star of all?, 11:24
Is there a rover in Hebes Chasma’s future?, 8:24
Is there an end to cosmology?, 8:28–8:29
It’s a Wonderful Star, 12:76
J
Journey to the heart of the Milky Way, 2:28–2:33
Jupiter’s new spot, 9:14
K
King’s astronomer, The, 8:16
L
Life and death of super suns, The, 7:34–7:39
Little meteors pack a big punch, 5:24
Longer-lived oceans on Venus?, 1:27
Lunar crater is older and possibly icier, 12:24
M
Magic canvas, The, 9:11
Marinating the news, 7:14
Mars: colder and stiffer inside, 9:20
Mars’ dynamic, icy past, 9:18
Mars Express sees martian “landfill”, 2:17
Mars likely had water, 4:26
Mars shows its shady side, 5:24
Martian probe witnesses avalanches, 6:16
Master the art of wide-field imaging, 6:66–6:69
Meade’s LX90-ACF eliminates coma, 12:70–12:71
Meade’s mySKY teaches you the stars, 2:66–2:67
Meet the colorful Gemini twins, 2:70
Meet the cosmic Cheshire Cat, 10:25
Mercury reveals its hidden side, 5:26–5:31
Merging galaxies come closer to home, 9:16
MESSENGER reveals Mercury’s volcanic past, 10:22
Meteors rock Phobos, 9:48–9:49
Milky Way disarmed, 9:21
Milky Way’s youngest supernova, The, 9:18
Moon clock, 5:23
Moon had water--lots of it, 10:24
MRO finds new signs of a wet early Mars, 11:16
N
Naked-eye denizens of the galactic deep, 9:12–9:13
NASA budget woes spare Spirit rover, 6:22
NASA’s lunar sandbox, 6:25
NASA’s new gamma-ray eye in the sky, 6:20
NASA’S Phoenix digs Mars, 9:50–9:53
New findings help explain two-faced Mars, 10:21
New greenhouse solution keeps early Earth warm, 10:26
New ocean eye in orbit, 10:26
New periodic comet found, 1:23
New pictures from old plates, 1:70–1:73
New radio telescope opens for business, 1:26
New space molecule, 7:25
New spin on Moon’s birth, 2:18
New Spitzer mosaic unveils galaxy’s heart, 9:14
New technique peers into dark space clouds, 6:25
North Korea’s phantom space program, 2:20
Northern sky’s top 10 galaxies, The, 11:58–11:61
NTT refines distance to key yardstick stars, 6:23
O
Observe celestial odd couples, 1:64–1:67
Observe winter’s forgotten star clusters, 2:60–2:63
Observing the way it was meant to be, 7:62–7:65
Obsession’s new 18-inch scope, 4:68–4:69
Omega Centauri harbors a black hole, 7:22
On the trail of hydrogen’s heavy sibling, 2:34–2:39
Orion capsule prepared for short test flights, 7:23
Orion’s new binocular telescope tested, 3:72–3:73
Orion’s phantom loop, part 1, 2:14–2:15
Orion’s phantom loop, part 2, 3:14–3:15
Other dimensions, 2:12
Our galaxy’s date with destruction, 6:28–6:33
P
Peruse the Water Snake’s other half, 5:74
Phoenix powers down, 5:22
Piece of π, A, 11:12
Pit and the Pendulum, The, 10:16–10:17
Pitch from space, A, 8:27
Plenty of nothing, 12:16
Pulsar push, 1:25
Q
Quark nova explains record-breaking blasts, 9:20
Quest for the first galaxies, 3:22–3:27
R
Radar maps Moon’s south pole in detail, 6:19
Readers report, 6:14–6:15
Reap the awards of amateur astronomy, 4:16
Recipe for a great comet, 2:25
Remembering 2007’s comet double feature, 5:18–5:19
Riding fireballs, 9:16
Ringed planet may have ringed moon, 6:27
Rocket pad for rent, 12:28
Rotating radio star mystery solved, 4:26
Runaway star is not from our neighborhood, 6:25
S
Saturn revolution, 10:34–10:39
Saturn’s rings carry extra weight, 1:22
Scientists unearth ancient impact’s secrets, 12:32–12:37
SDSS III begins, 12:28
Searching for the shape of the universe, 4:28–4:33
Seasons change on Neptune, 1:24
See double tonight, 3:74
See the final shuttle fireball, 10:22
See the red star round-up, 10:84
SELENE beams back lunar HDTV, 7:26
Servicing Hubble, 5:23
Sharpest snapshots ever of Pluto’s tiny moons, 2:21
Shortlist for TMT site announced, 9:20
Shuttle legacy, 10:26
Signposts of the sky, 7:16
Six-wheelin’ with NASA’s Moon truck, 7:27
Sky testing Orion’s 102mm f/7 ED, 10:78–10:79
Small galaxies weigh plenty, 8:25
Soap bubbles hint at stormy processes, 8:22
Space Age anniversary, 1:25
Space station robot helpmate goes to work, 6:25
Space-bound robot dives under icy Wisconsin lake, 6:23
Spitzer finds organic-free zone in Pinwheel Galaxy, 11:23
Spitzer snaps dusty family portrait, 12:20
Spitzer witnesses cosmic ice storm, 1:27
Spot spring’s 11 best globular clusters, 4:58–4:61
Spots and flares mapped on Sun-like star, 4:25
Staring contest, 8:14
Stars born in the boondocks, 8:23
Stars form in a galaxy’s “tail”, 1:27
Stars found ripe to make planets, 1:22
Stars on the Sun, 9:36
Studies reveal stony asteroid surprise, 6:24
Study explains meteorite origins, 12:20
Sure bet for observing fun, A, 9:67
Surf the skies, 2:68
Surprises from Comet Wild 2, 5:23
Swim the southern sea, 12:14–12:15
T
Take a small tour of the Big Dog, 3:76
Take the Soyuz tour, 11:19
Taking Venus by storm, 10:66–10:71
Tele Vue’s new eyepiece field tested, 5:68–5:69
Through alien eyes, 11:19
Titan may sport a subsurface sea, 6:22
Top 10 discoveries of the last 35 years, 8:36–8:43
Top 10 space stories of 2007, 1:28–1:37
Tour the sky with a small scope, 6:71
Tour two more clusters in Taurus, 1:80
Transform telescope trash into treasure, 5:72
Twelve months of strangeness, 1:14
Twin stars show surprising differences, 10:26
U
Uncommon Moon, 3:18
U.S. return to the Moon begins, The, 11:20
V
Vanguard 1 satellite marks 50 years in space, 3:20
Vanishing acts, part 1, 7:20–7:21
Vanishing acts, part 2, 8:20–8:21
View to a launch, A, 4:24
Vixen’s giant binoculars among largest sold, 11:72–11:73
Volcanic trio on Mars could erupt again, 3:17
Voyager 2 makes a shocking discovery, 10:18
W
Watching a giant die, 10:23
Watching a stellar tantrum, 11:23
Watery Moon, 7:25
Wee black hole, 7:25
What happens when galaxies collide?, 3:28–3:33
Where has all the water gone?, 2:52–2:55
Where the northern lights dance, 11:62–11:67
Where will astronomy be in 35 years?, 8:30–8:35
Who really invented the telescope?, 8:84–8:86
“Whopper” GRB blazes to naked-eye brightness, 7:24
Wide-field imager’s dream scope, A, 1:74–1:77
Will you see the stars tonight?, 6:64–6:65
WMAP finds cosmic neutrino background, 7:23
X
X-rated astronomy, 12:74
X-ray satellite spots nearly overlooked nova, 12:28
Y
Your 20-year solar eclipse planner, 10:74–10:77
Your scope and the seven dwarfs, 8:64–8:66
Youthful galaxy grows up, 2:19
Astronomy Magazine Article Author Index
A
Ayiomamitis, Anthony
Astroimaging over ancient Greece, 12:64–12:69
B
Bakich, Michael E.
Amateur astronomy’s greatest generation, 8:68–8:71
Darkest sky under the stars, The, 2:64–2:65
Discover 10 top Milky Way delights, 9:60–9:63
Find your way through the summer sky, 7:70–7:71
Get ready for summer’s total solar eclipse, 7:66–7:69
How to observe the Sun, 4:64–4:65
The northern sky’s top 10 galaxies, 11:58–11:61
Observing the way it was meant to be, 7:62–7:65
Your 20-year solar eclipse planner, 10:74–10:77
Balick, Bruce
How the Sun will die, 12:38–12:43
Bäsemann, Hinrich
Where the northern lights dance, 11:62–11:67
Berman, Bob
Another Earth, 6:13
Are we done yet?, 4:14
Ask the aliens, 3:12
Astro-humiliation, 10:14
Basking in the Sun, 5:16
The magic canvas, 9:11
Marinating the news, 7:14
Other dimensions, 2:12
A piece of π, 11:12
Plenty of nothing, 12:16
Staring contest, 8:14
Twelve months of strangeness, 1:14
Burbine Jr., Thomas H.
Are these space rocks from Mercury?, 11:32–11:37
Burnell, Jim
Wide-field imager’s dream scope, A, 1:74–1:77
C
Carroll, Michael
Biggest planet’s 5 deepest mysteries, The, 1:38–1:43
Chaple, Glenn
Clearing the air about seeing vs. transparency, 11:75
Eyepiece ABCs, 1:78
The King’s astronomer, 8:16
Reap the awards of amateur astronomy, 4:16
See double tonight, 3:74
See the red star round-up, 10:84
Signposts of the sky, 7:16
A sure bet for observing fun, 9:67
Surf the skies, 2:68
Tour the sky with a small scope, 6:71
Transform telescope trash into treasure, 5:72
X-rated astronomy, 12:74
Coe, Steve
How to observe dark nebulae, 5:64–5:67
Observe winter’s forgotten star clusters, 2:60–2:63
Spot spring’s 11 best globular clusters, 4:58–4:61
Cox, T. J.
Our galaxy’s date with destruction, 6:28–6:33
Crossen, Craig
Explore the southern Milky Way’s dark clouds, 9:54–9:57
D
Davis, Joel
185 million years before the dinosaurs’ demise, did an asteroid nearly end life on Earth?, 4:34–4:39
Dorminey, Bruce
Did molecules from space seed life in the cosmos?, 4:50–4:55
Europe’s space revolution, 9:28–9:33
On the trail of hydrogen’s heavy sibling, 2:34–2:39
Dvorak, John
Journey to the heart of the Milky Way, 2:28–2:33
E
Eicher, David J./nl
Astronomy magazine’s first 35 years, 8:supplement
Ellis, Richard S.
Quest for the first galaxies, 3:22–3:27
F
Falk, Dan
Did ancient astronomers build Stonehenge?, 7:52–7:57
Frank, Adam
How astronomers cracked the Einstein code, 9:22–9:27
G
Goldstein, Alan
Observe celestial odd couples, 1:64–1:67
H
Harrington, Phil
The Antares gang, 7:18
Astronomy’s guide to Go-to telescopes, 10:supplement
Calling on Cassiopeia, 11:76
Cepheus’ fall delights, 10:85
The Cygnus Arm flexes its muscle, 9:68
Exploring a Messier line-up, 8:18
Get a head start on the Hydra, 4:18
How to observe artificial satellites, 6:74
It’s a Wonderful Star, 12:76
Meet the colorful Gemini twins, 2:70
Orion’s new binocular telescope tested, 3:72–3:73
Peruse the Water Snake’s other half, 5:74
Take a small tour of the Big Dog, 3:76
Tour two more clusters in Taurus, 1:80
Vixen’s giant binoculars among largest sold, 11:72–11:73
I
Impey, Chris
How life could thrive on hostile worlds, 12:54–12:59
J
Jakiel, Richard
How comets shaped history, 2:23–2:27
Your scope and the seven dwarfs, 8:64–8:66
Jarrett, Thomas H.
1.5 million galaxies revealed, 3:41–3:43
Jayawardhana, Ray
Are super-sized Earths the new frontier?, 11:26–11:31
Cannibal next door, The, 3:38
How the Milky Way devours its neighbors, 3:34–3:39
Jirsa, Mark
Scientists unearth ancient impact’s secrets, 12:32–12:37
Joson, Imelda B./nl
Master the art of wide-field imaging, 6:66–6:69
L
Layton, Laura
Dark reserve, 1:25
Distant galaxy gets a weigh-in, 1:26
Exploring galaxy evolution, 3:16
Hubble spies Comet Holmes’ heart, 3:18
Mars likely had water, 4:26
New periodic comet found, 1:23
Pulsar push, 1:25
Seasons change on Neptune, 1:24
Stars form in a galaxy’s “tail”, 1:27
Stars found ripe to make planets, 1:22
Uncommon Moon, 3:18
Loeb, Abraham
Is there an end to cosmology?, 8:28–8:29
Our galaxy’s date with destruction, 6:28–6:33
M
Marcotte, Mark M./nl
Meade’s LX90-ACF eliminates coma, 12:70–12:71
McChain, Megan
Antimatter traced, 5:23
Astronaut rescue rocket revs up, 11:22
Brightest starburst galaxy discovered, 12:23
Canada to launch new asteroid hunter, 11:19
Distant gamma-ray burst sets a record, 5:20
Earth-forming stars are common in the Milky Way, 6:18
Found: the solar system’s oldest rocks, 7:25
Giant stars may have little helpers, 6:24
Hubble identifies weird “blue blobs”, 5:22
Hubble’s rising odometer, 12:28
IAU names a new plutoid, 11:16
MRO finds new signs of a wet early Mars, 11:16
Rocket pad for rent, 12:28
SDSS III begins, 12:28
Servicing Hubble, 5:23
Study explains meteorite origins, 12:20
Take the Soyuz tour, 11:19
McGovern, Jeremy
How historic observatories will survive, 4:62–4:63
Runaway star is not from our neighborhood, 6:25
McNally, Dick
Backstage at Astronomy, 8:76–8:82
Moomaw, Bruce
NASA’S Phoenix digs Mars, 9:50–9:53
N
Nadis, Steve
Could changing channels tune into alien civilizations?, 5:38–5:43
Do cosmic flashes reveal secrets of the infant universe?, 6:34–6:39
Searching for the shape of the universe, 4:28–4:33
What happens when galaxies collide?, 3:28–3:33
O
Oberg, James
Amateurs see fireballs from U.S. satellite kill, 7:24
Canada’s handy robot, 1:24
Eyewitness to Apollo 8: A personal memoir, 12:20
India goes to the Moon, 8:26
NASA’s new gamma-ray eye in the sky, 6:20
North Korea’s phantom space program, 2:20
Phoenix powers down, 5:22
Riding fireballs, 9:16
See the final shuttle fireball, 10:22
The U.S. return to the Moon begins, 11:20
Vanguard 1 satellite marks 50 years in space, 3:20
A view to a launch, 4:24
Odenwald, Sten
The coming solar superstorm, 9:34–9:39
O’Meara, Stephen James
Crystal Palace, A, 1:16–1:17
The day the Sun crawled, 11:14–11:15
Defect or discovery?, 12:18–12:19
How to find a Space Needle in a haystack, 4:20–4:21
Naked-eye denizens of the galactic deep, 9:12–9:13
Orion’s phantom loop, part 1, 2:14–2:15
Orion’s phantom loop, part 2, 3:14–3:15
The Pit and the Pendulum, 10:16–10:17
Readers report, 6:14–6:15
Remembering 2007’s comet double feature, 5:18–5:19
Tele Vue’s new eyepiece field tested, 5:68–5:69
Vanishing acts, part 1, 7:20–7:21
Vanishing acts, part 2, 8:20–8:21
P
Peach, Damian A.
Capture images of our local star, 4:66–4:67
Pendick, Daniel
10 rising stars of astronomy, 8:60–8:63
Another super-Earth discovered, 9:21
Are big-planet systems uncommon?, 10:23
Are we looking for life in the right places?, 7:28–7:33
Asteroid sleuths find the dino killer, 1:20
Astronomers spy a giant particle accelerator in the sky, 5:21
Astronomers unearth a star’s death secrets, 10:18
Auroral storm trigger confirmed, 11:18
Binary pulsar test affirms relativity, 10:21
Binocular Telescope snaps first image, 6:21
Cassini scopes Saturn’s two-toned moon, 1:25
Cluster crash-up reveals dark matter, 12:26
Cool stuff for a hot ride, 9:20
“Death star” blasts neighboring galaxy, 4:23
Dogging Apophis, 6:25
Earth through alien eyes, 5:23
Entire Moon is within reach, 10:26
First light for Palomar’s new optics, 1:26
Galactic mistaken identity corrected, 10:20
Galaxies on fire, 3:64–3:69
GLOBE at Night 2008, 8:27
Going the distance, 1:25
Google me to the Moon, 6:25
Great quasar round-up, The, 3:20
Hide-and-seek galaxy surprises astronomers, 4:23
High-tech skin keeps satellites cool, 12:28
How to take a black hole’s temperature, 12:24
Hubble captures little spot’s demise, 11:22
Hubble finds most distant galaxies yet, 11:19
Hubble gazes at red alien sunsets and “star spots”, 4:22
Hubble images interstellar ribbon, 10:24
Hubble uncovers white-dwarf age paradox, 10:20
Internal heat drives Jupiter’s weather, 5:21
Is Eta Carinae the brightest star of all?, 11:24
Jupiter’s new spot, 9:14
Little meteors pack a big punch, 5:24
Lunar crater is older and possibly icier, 12:24
Mars: colder and stiffer inside, 9:20
Mars’ dynamic, icy past, 9:18
Mars shows its shady side, 5:24
Meet the cosmic Cheshire Cat, 10:25
Merging galaxies come closer to home, 9:16
MESSENGER reveals Mercury’s volcanic past, 10:22
Milky Way disarmed, 9:21
The Milky Way’s youngest supernova, 9:18
Moon clock, 5:23
The Moon had water--lots of it, 10:24
NASA’s lunar sandbox, 6:25
New findings help explain two-faced Mars, 10:21
New greenhouse solution keeps early Earth warm, 10:26
New ocean eye in orbit, 10:26
New radio telescope opens for business, 1:26
New technique peers into dark space clouds, 6:25
NTT refines distance to key yardstick stars, 6:23
Quark nova explains record-breaking blasts, 9:20
Rotating radio star mystery solved, 4:26
Sharpest snapshots ever of Pluto’s tiny moons, 2:21
Shortlist for TMT site announced, 9:20
Shuttle legacy, 10:26
Space Age anniversary, 1:25
Space station robot helpmate goes to work, 6:25
Spitzer finds organic-free zone in Pinwheel Galaxy, 11:23
Spitzer snaps dusty family portrait, 12:20
Spitzer witnesses cosmic ice storm, 1:27
Spots and flares mapped on Sun-like star, 4:25
Surprises from Comet Wild 2, 5:23
Through alien eyes, 11:19
Twin stars show surprising differences, 10:26
Volcanic trio on Mars could erupt again, 3:17
Voyager 2 makes a shocking discovery, 10:18
Watching a giant die, 10:23
Watching a stellar tantrum, 11:23
X-ray satellite spots nearly overlooked nova, 12:28
Youthful galaxy grows up, 2:19
R
Reddy, Francis
Aligned aurorae, 8:27
Astronomers witness alien star flip-out, 6:27
Black hole sets a record, 2:20
Black holes wind up galaxy arms, 9:19
Calling all space probes, 10:64–10:65
Comet Hale-Bopp still going strong, 7:25
Earth flybys reveal mystery speed change, 6:20
Earth impacts at a glance, 1:60–1:61
Encyclopedia galactica, 3:45–3:51
Explore Jupiter’s moons, 2:56–2:57
Harmony arrives at space station, 2:17
Hinode captures solar “fountains”, 8:27
How scientists discovered a solar system “superhighway”/nl, 11:38–11:43
Hubble identifies exoplanet’s methane, 6:22
Hubble peers into a Milky Way starburst, 2:16
Inside Earth’s magnetic shield, 11:52–11:53
Inside NASA’s Deep Space Network, 5:56–5:61
Is there a rover in Hebes Chasma’s future?, 8:24
Mars Express sees martian “landfill”, 2:17
Martian probe witnesses avalanches, 6:16
NASA budget woes spare Spirit rover, 6:22
New Spitzer mosaic unveils galaxy’s heart, 9:14
Omega Centauri harbors a black hole, 7:22
Orion capsule prepared for short test flights, 7:23
Recipe for a great comet, 2:25
Ringed planet may have ringed moon, 6:27
Six-wheelin’ with NASA’s Moon truck, 7:27
Soap bubbles hint at stormy processes, 8:22
Space-bound robot dives under icy Wisconsin lake, 6:23
Stars on the Sun, 9:36
Titan may sport a subsurface sea, 6:22
Top 10 space stories of 2007, 1:28–1:37
Watery Moon, 7:25
Where will astronomy be in 35 years?, 8:30–8:35
“Whopper” GRB blazes to naked-eye brightness, 7:24
Will you see the stars tonight?, 6:64–6:65
Reynolds, Mike D.
Choose the dome that’s right for you, 5:70–5:71
Easy imaging with the DSI III, 9:64–9:65
Meade’s mySKY teaches you the stars, 2:66–2:67
Ringwald, Fred
How to shoot stars with a webcam, 11:68–11:71
S
Shahar, Charles
New pictures from old plates, 1:70–1:73
Shibley, John
Obsession’s new 18-inch scope, 4:68–4:69
Shubinski, Raymond
All about the Veil Nebula, 6:56–6:61
Who really invented the telescope?, 8:84–8:86
Shubinski, Raymond/nl
Inside Arizona’s meteorite treasure chest, 10:80–10:82
Spilker, Linda
Saturn revolution, 10:34–10:39
T
Talcott, Richard
Cassini confirms Titan lakes, 12:27
Cassini “tastes” Enceladus’ plumes, 7:26
Earth’s troubled adolescence, 5:32–5:37
Enceladus jets form deep in fractures, 12:23
Exploring Iapetus’ dark side, 3:60–3:63
How we junked up outer space, 6:40–6:43
How we’ll fix Hubble, 10:28–10:33
Intense storm triggers Saturn lightning, 8:22
Longer-lived oceans on Venus?, 1:27
Mercury reveals its hidden side, 5:26–5:31
Meteors rock Phobos, 9:48–9:49
New space molecule, 7:25
New spin on Moon’s birth, 2:18
A pitch from space, 8:27
Radar maps Moon’s south pole in detail, 6:19
Saturn’s rings carry extra weight, 1:22
SELENE beams back lunar HDTV, 7:26
Small galaxies weigh plenty, 8:25
Stars born in the boondocks, 8:23
Studies reveal stony asteroid surprise, 6:24
Top 10 discoveries of the last 35 years, 8:36–8:43
Wee black hole, 7:25
Where has all the water gone?, 2:52–2:55
WMAP finds cosmic neutrino background, 7:23
Trusock, Tom
Sky testing Orion’s 102mm f/7 ED, 10:78–10:79
Z
Zimmerman, Robert
The life and death of super suns, 7:34–7:39
Taking Venus by storm, 10:66–10:71
Astronomy Magazine Subject Index
2MASS Galaxy Redshift Catalog, 3:41–43
3C 273 (galaxy), 1:22
3C 321 (dual galaxy system), 4:23
1982 SH (asteroid), 1:25
1987A (supernova), 8:38–39, 12:62
2001 SN263 (asteroid), 6:23
2005ap (supernova), 1:34–35
2006gy (supernova), 1:34–35
2007 RR9 (potentially hazardous asteroid), 2:21
2007 TU24 (near-Earth asteroid), 5:20
2009 International Year of Astronomy, 5:21
2867 Steins (asteroid), 11:22
6344 P-L (minor planet), 2:21
A
Abell 2218 (galaxy cluster), 11:19
Abell 3128 (galaxy cluster), 4:23
Alcor (star), 8:20–21
Alderamin (Alpha [α] Cephei) (star), 10:85
Alfvén waves, 1:22
Allen Telescope Array, 1:26
Alpha (α) Cephei (Alderamin), 10:85
Alpha Centauri A (star), 7:58
Alpha Centauri B (star), 6:23, 7:58
Altair lunar lander, 10:26
ALUNA Moon clock, 5:23
Amber Heart (asterism), 9:68
amino acetonitrile (NH2CH2CN), 7:25
Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
black hole at center of, 9:19
evidence of “cannibalism”, 3:38
future collision with Milky Way, 1:32, 6:28–33
observing, 11:59
Antares (star), 7:18, 12:86–87
Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9), 7:10–11, 9:16
antimatter, 5:23
antimatter stars, 1:63
Apollo 8 (manned space mission), 12:22
Apophis 99942 (near-Earth asteroid), 4:14, 6:25
arcs, 1:16–17, 6:14
Ares I rocket, 1:22, 7:23, 11:22, 12:23
Ares V cargo lifter, 10:26
Arizona Sky Village, 2:64–65
Arizona State University (ASU), 10:80–82
Arp’s Loop (galaxy group), 5:22
asterisms, 7:16, 9:68
asteroids. See alsonames of specific asteroids
collisions with Earth, 1:20, 60–61, 4:14, 34–39
compared to comets, 9:58
near-Earth, 4:14, 5:20, 6:25, 12:22
oldest, 7:25
possible collision with Mars, 10:21
potentially hazardous, 2:21
roundness of, 8:74
with shortest rotation rate, 10:21
Astronautica (asteroid), 1:25
astronauts
Canadian, 6:23
proposed tether system, 2:17
radiation risks, 1:22
youngest woman, first Korean, 7:23
astronomy
amateur, 4:16, 8:68–71
astroimaging over ancient Greece, 12:64–69
book recommendations, 10:72
embarrassing moments in, 10:14
evolving art of, 9:11
future of, in 35 years, 8:30–35
rising stars of, 8:60–63
top 10 discoveries of past 35 years, 8:36–43
top ten stories of 2007, 1:28–37
web sites, 2:68
Astronomy magazine
2009 Sky Guide, 12:supplement
first 35 years, 8:supplement
production of, 8:76–82
ASU (Arizona State University), 10:80–82
aurorae
best places to view, 6:62
observing in Norway, 11:62–67
polarized light, 8:27
THEMIS mission, 11:18
auroral surges, 4:23
Austria, 8:23
B
Baby Boom (starburst galaxy), 12:23
Barnard 92 (dark nebula), 8:18
Barnard 93 (dark nebula), 8:18
Barnard 148 (dark nebula), 9:79
Barnard 149 (dark nebula), 9:79
Barnard 150 (dark nebula), 9:79
Barnard’s Loop (dark sky object), 2:14–15, 5:87
Beijing Planetarium, 12:23
Bernes 157 (small molecular cloud), 9:54, 57
Big Dipper (constellation), 9:79
binary star systems
Cygnus X-1, 10:26
in Orion Nebula, 10:26
stellar core and pulsar, 2:21
black holes
antimatter stars and, 1:63
at center of Andromeda Galaxy, 9:19
at center of Milky Way Galaxy, 2:28–33
changes in, 7:59
computer simulation of mergers of, 9:22–27
discovery of, 3:20, 8:40–41
exiting galaxies, 9:20
with greatest mass, 2:20
growth of, 4:57
with lowest mass, 10:21
measurement of mass, 9:58–59
neutrinos and, 2:59
in Omega Centauri, 7:22
smallest, 7:25
temperature of, 12:24
Blue Snowball (NGC 7662) (planetary nebula), 9:63
BO Microscopii (star), 4:25
Bodes Galaxy (M81), 11:58–59
Bok globules, 9:59
Boötes (constellation), 7:24
Bose-Einstein condensates, 7:14
brownleeite, 10:21
BT70 binocular telescope, 3:72–73
Butterfly Cluster (M6) (open cluster), 7:78
C
Canada
Canadian Space Agency, 6:23
Dextre robot manipulator, 1:24
NEOSSat, 11:19
carbon dioxide, 10:26
Cas A (Cassiopeia A) supernova remnant, 4:26, 10:18
Cassini (spacecraft)
begins 2-year extended mission, 10:20
extension of mission, 7:22
findings by, 10:34–39
images of Iapetus, 1:25
Titan flyby, 1:32–33
Cassiopeia (constellation), 11:76
Cassiopeia A (Cas A) (supernova remnant), 4:26, 10:18
Castor (star), 2:70
Cat’s Eye Nebula, 1:26
CCD (charge-coupled device) cameras, 9:64–65, 10:supplement
celestial coordinates, 6:63
Celestis company, 7:23
Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS), 10:80–82
Cepheid variable stars, 6:23
Cepheus (constellation), 10:85
CG4 (cometary globule), 6:9–10, 9:56
Chamaeleon Cloud Complex, 9:54–55
Chandrayaan 1 (lunar orbiter), 1:37
Chandrayaan-1 (lunar orbiter), 8:26
Chang’e-1 (lunar probe), 2:17
charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras, 9:64–65, 10:supplement
Charon (Pluto’s moon), 2:21
Cheshire Cat (gravitational lens system), 10:25
Chile, 12:20
China
Chang’e-1, 2:17
Double Star satellites, 2:17
potential lunar base, 1:22
Chryse region (feature on Mars), 6:85
Cigar Galaxy (M82), 11:61
Clear Sky Chart, 6:64–65
CMB (cosmic microwave background), 3:18, 8:40–41
CMEs (coronal mass ejections), 3:18, 10:72
CMS (Center for Meteorite Studies), 10:80–82
Cocoon Nebula (IC 5146), 9:62–63
Collinder 463 (open cluster), 11:76
Comet 17P/Holmes, 2:78–80, 3:18, 5:18–19, 83, 8:95
Comet 81P/Wild 2, 5:23
Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), 7:25
Comet C/2006 M4 (Swan), 12:85
Comet C/2006 VZ13 (Linear), 1:91
Comet C/2007 E2 (Lovejoy), 1:91
Comet Encke, 2:17
Comet Hartley 2, 4:23
Comet McNaught, 1:30, 5:18–19
Comet P/2007 R5, 1:23
comets. See also names of specific comets
ancient observations of, 8:75
brownleeite, 10:21
classification as “great”, 2:25
collisions with Earth, 1:60–61
compared to asteroids, 9:58
discoveries of by SOHO spacecraft, 10:21
elongated orbits of, 1:62
hazards from debris, 3:71
historical significance of, 2:23–27
naming of, 7:58–59
origin of, 1:62
Communicating Science to the Public (journal), 4:23
conjunctions
of Moon, Venus and Mercury, 8:95
of Moon and Venus, 5:88
constellations, 7:16. See also names of specific constellations
corals, reproduction of, 1:22
Corona Australis (molecular cloud), 6:25
coronal mass ejections (CMEs), 3:18, 10:72
COROT satellite, 11:23
Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), 1:34–35
cosmic ice storms, 1:27
cosmic inflation, 9:28–33
cosmic microwave background (CMB), 3:18, 8:40–41
cosmological expansion, 2:59, 8:28–29
COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey), 1:34–35
craters, see names of specific craters
Cygnus Arm (feature of Milky Way), 9:68
Cygnus X-1 (binary system), 9:68
D
dark energy, 8:43
dark matter
3-D map of, 1:34–35
collision with normal matter, 12:26
dark nebulae, 5:64–67. See also names of specific dark nebulae
dark sky objects, 2:14–15, 5:87
Deep Impact (space probe), 4:23, 6:23, 11:19
Deep Sky Imager (DSI) III CCD camera, 9:64–65
Deep Space Network (DSN), 5:56–61, 6:23
deuterium, 2:34–39
Dextre (special-purpose dexterous manipulator), 1:24, 6:25
dimensions, other, 2:12
dinosaurs, extinction of, 1:20
Dione (Saturn’s moon), 9:20
Double Star satellites, 2:17
DSI (Deep Sky Imager) III CCD camera, 9:64–65
DSN (Deep Space Network), 5:56–61, 6:23
Dumbbell Nebula (M27), 9:61
dwarf galaxies. See also names of specific dwarf galaxies
debris from cannibalized, 8:38
observable with small/medium telescopes, 8:64–66
spherical, 11:57
weight of, 1:26
dwarf planets, 3:71
E
Eagle Nebula (M16), 5:10–11, 8:18
Earth. See also Moon
carbon dioxide in early atmosphere of, 10:26
development of, 5:32–37
effects of nearby supernovae, 1:62–63
magnetosphere, 11:52–53
molten stage, 3:18
tides, 3:18
transit of by Moon, 11:19
what could be discovered about from another planet, 5:23
eclipses
20-year planning guide, 10:74–77
lunar, 1:14, 4:78, 6:83, 85, 87–88
solar, 7:67–69, 10:74–77, 11:86–88
Einstein, Albert, 9:22–27, 10:21
Elephant Trunk Nebula (IC 1396), 8:95
elliptical galaxies, 3:16, 9:59, 11:56
emission nebulae, see names of specific emission nebulae
empty space, 12:16
Enceladus (Saturn’s moon), 7:26, 12:23
Environmentally Non-Disturbing Under-Ice Robotic Antarctic Explorer (ENDURANCE), 6:23
ESA. See European Space Agency
Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392), 7:79
ESO (European Southern Observatory), 8:23
ESO 137-001 (galaxy), 1:27
ESO 257-19 (spiral galaxy), 6:9–10
Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372), 12:88
Eta Carinae (star), 1:63, 11:24
Ethos eyepiece, 5:68–69
European Southern Observatory (ESO), 8:23
European Space Agency (ESA)
Lunar Robotics Challenge, 11:23
missions to explore cosmic background radiation, 9:28–33
recruitment push, 10:21
EV Lacertae (dwarf star), 9:20
exoplanets
atmosphere on, 4:23
discovery of, 8:23, 42, 9:20
free oxygen in atmospheres of, 6:13
methane atmosphere, 6:22
Neptune-mass, 1:30–31
sunsets on, 4:22
super-Earths, 9:21, 11:26–31
eyepieces, telescope, 1:78
F
Falcon 1 rocket, 11:23
FastSat (microsatellite), 4:23
Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, 12:23
Fireworks Galaxy (NGC 6946), 11:58
Foton-M bio-satellite, 1:22
free oxygen, 6:13
G
G1.9+0.3 (supernova), 9:18
G350.1-0.3 (supernova remnant), 10:20
galaxies
collisions of, 3:28–33
high-energy jet from, 4:23
most distant discovered by Hubble, 11:19
star formation in, 4:23
study of distant, 3:22–27
top 10 visible in northern skies, 11:58–61
weight of, 8:25
galaxy clusters, 4:23, 5:21, 11:19, 12:26
Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) (probe), 3:16
galaxy groups, 5:22, 10:92
gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)
in constellation Boötes, 7:24
discovery of, 8:39
earliest known, 5:20
learning from, 6:34–39
Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), 6:20, 12:23
Gemini (constellation), 2:70
GLOBE at Night project, 8:27
globular clusters. See also names of specific globular clusters
observing, 4:58–61, 9:12–13
size of, 11:57
Google Lunar X Prize, 6:25
Google Sky (viewing tool), 2:21
GP-B (Gravity Probe B) satellite, 1:36–37
GRAIL mission, 4:23
gravitational lens systems, 10:25
gravity, bending of light by, 8:74–75
Gravity Probe B (GP-B) (satellite), 1:36–37
GRBs. See gamma-ray bursts
Great Attractor, The, 8:37
H
Hα (Hydrogen-alpha) telescopes, 12:84
Hale-Bopp (Comet C/1995 O1), 7:25
Halley’s comet, 2:24–27
halos, 1:16–17
Harmony (ISS unit), 2:17
Hawaii, 1:22
Hawking, Stephen, 8:23
HD 0437-5439 (star), 6:25
HD 189733b (exoplanet), 6:22
HD 189773b (exoplanet), 4:22
HE 1523-0901 (red giant star), 1:33, 9:58
Hebes Chasma (feature on Mars), 8:24
Herschel, William, 8:16, 12:18–19
Herschel space mission, 9:28–33
Hickson 44 (galaxy group), 10:92
Hickson 92 (galaxy group), 10:92
Hind’s crimson star (R Leporis), 6:87
HIP 56948 (star), 3:18
Hipparcos satellite, 1:25
Hoag’s object (ring galaxy), 3:86
hot Jupiters, 4:22
Hubble constant, 3:70–71
Hubble Space Telescope
2008 servicing mission, 1:22, 5:23, 10:28–33
completion of 100,000th orbit, 12:28
enhancement of images from, 1:70–73
most distant galaxies discovered by, 11:19
hurricanes, 7:23
Hydra (constellation), 4:18, 5:74
Hydra (Pluto’s moon), 2:21
Hydrogen-alpha (Hα) telescopes, 12:84
I
I Zwicky 18 (dwarf galaxy), 2:19
Iapetus (Saturn’s moon), 1:25, 3:60–63
IAU (International Astronomical Union), 4:23
IC 10 X-1 (black hole), 2:20
IC 239 (spiral galaxy), 3:87
IC 1295 (planetary nebula), 12:85
IC 1396 (Elephant Trunk Nebula), 8:95
IC 1396 (open cluster), 10:85
IC 2944 (emission nebula), 6:85, 9:80
IC 4628 (Prawn Nebula), 10:93
IC 5070 (Pelican Nebula), 5:86
IC 5146 (Cocoon Nebula), 9:62–63
India, 1:37, 8:26
infrared (IR) light
map of distant universe, 8:23
panorama of Milky Way, 9:14
International Astronomical Union (IAU), 4:23
International Dark-Sky Association, 1:25
International Space Station (ISS)
ammonia container from, 11:23
baseball pitched from, 8:27
Canadian astronauts, 6:23
Harmony unit, 2:17
hazards from comet debris, 3:71
launch of heat-proof paper airplanes from, 9:20
plant research on, 11:23
Internet Archive library, 11:23
Interplanetary Superhighway, 11:38–43
IR light. See infrared light
ISS. See International Space Station
Italian Space Agency, 12:23
J
J2-X engine, 9:20
James Webb Space Telescope, 5:21
Japan
first minister of space development, 10:21
launch of heat-proof paper airplanes from ISS, 9:20
Jason-2 satellite, 10:26
Jules Verne (spacecraft), 1:37
Jupiter
5 deepest mysteries of, 1:38–43
appearance in 2008, 1:14
demise of Little Red Spot, 11:22
images of, 10:93
moons of, 2:56–57
New Horizons flyby, 1:30–31
new spot, 9:14
weather, 5:21
K
KazSat satellite, 10:21
Korea, 7:23
L
Lagoon Nebula (M8), 9:60
Lambda Orionis Nebula, 5:87
Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), 6:21
Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 1:35–36, 5:21
Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), 10:12–13
Large Molecule Heimat, 7:25
Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), 5:21
LBT (Large Binocular Telescope), 6:21
LCROSS (Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite), 11:20
LDN 673 (dark nebula), 5:86
Leo 1 (dwarf galaxy), 1:64–65
Leonid meteor shower, 6:14–15
LH 95 (star-forming region), 10:12–13
LHC (Large Hadron Collider), 1:35–36, 5:21
life
extremophiles, 12:54–59
origin of, 4:50–55, 56–57
search for, 7:28–33
light
bending of by gravity, 8:74–75
blocking of by dust, 9:20
light pollution, 1:25, 2:64–65, 8:27
Linear (Comet C/2006 VZ13), 1:91
LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud), 10:12–13
Local Group galaxies, 2:59
LOFAR radio telescope, 4:23
Lovejoy (Comet C/2007 E2), 1:91
Lowell Observatory, 12:23
LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), 5:21
Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), 11:20
lunar eclipses, 1:14, 4:78, 6:83, 85, 87–88
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, 2:17, 10:21, 11:20
Lunar Robotics Challenge, 11:23
lunar rover, 7:27
LX90-ACF telescope, 12:70–71
M
M6 (Butterfly Cluster), 7:78
M8 (Lagoon Nebula), 9:60
M11 (Wild Duck Cluster), 9:61
M16 (Eagle Nebula), 5:10–11, 8:18
M17 (Swan Nebula), 8:18
M18 (open cluster), 8:18
M22 (globular cluster), 9:60
M23 (open cluster), 8:18
M24 (Small Sagittarius Star Cloud), 8:18
M25 (open cluster), 8:18
M27 (Dumbbell Nebula), 9:61
M28 (globular cluster), 6:85
M29 (NGC 6913) (open cluster), 9:68
M31. See Andromeda Galaxy
M42. See Orion Nebula
M46 (open cluster), 1:64
M47 (open cluster), 6:86
M51 (Whirlpool Galaxy), 11:60
M57 (Ring Nebula), 9:61–62
M63 (Sunflower Galaxy), 11:59–60
M67 (open cluster), 4:79
M81 (Bodes Galaxy), 11:58–59
M82 (Cigar Galaxy), 11:61
M83 (Southern Whirlpool Galaxy), 10:95
M96 (spiral galaxy), 1:90
M100 (spiral galaxy), 3:87
M101 (Pinwheel Galaxy), 4:79, 11:23, 60–61
M103 (open cluster), 5:85
M106 (spiral galaxy), 6:84
M108 (spiral galaxy), 1:91
M109 (spiral galaxy), 3:86
MACSJ0025.4-1222 (galaxy cluster collision), 12:26
magnetosphere, 11:52–53
Makemake (plutoid), 11:16
Many Worlds Interpretation, 2:12
Mars
ancient river delta, 11:16
avalanches, 6:16
Chryse region, 6:85
clouds of frozen carbon-dioxide crystals, 5:24
future sample return mission, 10:23
glacial ice formations on, 9:18
Hebes Chasma, 8:24
interior of, 9:20
large debris blocks, 6:23
Maunder Crater, 2:17
molten stage, 3:18
occultation of by Moon, 8:95
Phobos (moon), 9:48–49
possible asteroid collision with, 10:21
sand dunes, 8:23
surface changes, 2:58–59
volcanic activity, 3:17, 9:20
water, 2:52–55, 4:26
Mars Express orbiter
5,000th orbit, 3:18
flyby of Phobos, 11:23
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), 11:16
Mars Science Laboratory, 2:17
Maunder Crater (feature on Mars), 2:17
Meade DSI III CCD camera, 9:64–65
Meade LX90-ACF telescope, 12:70–71
Meade mySKY handheld star finder, 2:66–67
Mercury
conjunction with Moon and Venus, 8:95
image of, 10:96
MESSENGER spacecraft, 5:26–31, 10:22
possible meteorites from, 11:32–37
transit of Sun, 6:14
Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, 1:37, 5:26–31,
10:22
Messier 110, 11:57
Messier objects, 3:74
meteorites
2007 impact in Carancas, Peru, 6:24
angrite, 11:32–37
origin of, 12:22
Sudbury Basin impact, 12:32–37
meteors
1908 explosion over Siberia, 5:24, 10:21
Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS), 10:80–82
database of impact sites, 7:59
impacts on Phobos, 9:48–49
map of impact sites, 1:60–61
observing, 8:74
sonic boom from, 11:56
Milky Way Galaxy
antimatter cloud around center of, 5:23
arms of, 9:21
Cygnus Arm, 9:68
digital optical survey of, 4:23
future collision with Andromeda, 6:28–33
infrared panorama of, 9:14
optical digital survey of, 5:21
pending collision with Andromeda Galaxy, 1:32
radio emission from, 3:18
structure of, 8:37
supermassive black hole at center of, 2:28–33
theories of origin, 3:34–39
Millstone Hill Radar antenna, 12:23
Mira (variable star), 12:76
Mizar (star), 8:20–21
Moon (Earth’s)
birth of, 3:18
conjunction with Venus, 5:88
conjunction with Venus and Mercury, 8:95
coral reproduction synchronized to, 1:22
creation of, 5:32–37
eclipses of, 1:14, 4:78, 6:83, 85, 87–88
formation of, 2:18
images of, 5:86, 10:93, 96
international efforts to explore, 11:16
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, 11:20
lunar rover, 7:27
mapping of south pole, 6:19
occultation of Mars by, 8:95
occultation of stars by Earth as seen from, 8:75
potential Chinese lunar base, 1:22
Ptolemaeus Crater, 5:86
Shackleton Crater, 12:24
transit of Earth, 11:19
water on, 7:25, 10:24
wobbling of, 4:57
moons, roundness of, 8:74. See also names of specific moons
MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), 11:16
Mu (µ) Cephei (star), 10:85
Murchison Wide-Field Array radio telescope, 5:38–43
mySKY handheld star finder, 2:66–67
N
NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)
2009 budget, 6:22–23
Deep Space Network (DSN), 5:56–61, 6:23
development of GPS system, 11:23
Government Invention of the Year award, 9:20
image repository website, 11:23
J2-X engine, 9:20
Regolith Excavation Challenge, 6:25
return to Moon, 11:20
student awards, 12:23
Web-based historical tour of, 12:23
Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite (NEOSSat), 11:19
near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 4:14, 5:20, 6:25, 12:22
nebulae, see names of specific nebulae
Needle Galaxy (NGC 4565), 11:60
NEOSSat (Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite), 11:19
Neptune, seasons on, 1:24
neutrinos, 2:59, 7:23
neutron stars, 2:59
New Exploration of Tempel 1 (NExT) mission, 4:56
New Horizons (spacecraft)
crosses Saturn’s orbit, 10:18
distance from Earth, 11:56–57
Jupiter flyby, 1:30–31
New Technology Telescope (NTT), 6:25
NExT (New Exploration of Tempel 1) mission, 4:56
NGC 247 (spiral galaxy), 3:87
NGC 300 (spiral galaxy), 3:16
NGC 457 (Owl Cluster), 9:63
NGC 869 (star cluster), 11:76
NGC 884 (star cluster), 11:76
NGC 1097 (barred spiral galaxy), 3:86
NGC 1291 (galaxy), 3:16
NGC 1316 (elliptical galaxy), 3:16
NGC 1514 (planetary nebula), 6:86
NGC 1532 (spiral galaxy), 10:95
NGC 1647 (open cluster), 1:80
NGC 1672 (spiral galaxy), 12:14–15
NGC 1746 (open cluster), 1:80
NGC 2237-9 (Rosette Nebula), 7:79
NGC 2392 (Eskimo Nebula), 7:79
NGC 2403 (galaxy), 1:92, 11:58
NGC 2438 (planetary nebula), 1:64
NGC 2736 (emission nebula), 4:20–21
NGC 3199 (emission nebula), 7:80
NGC 3372 (Eta Carinae Nebula), 12:88
NGC 3521 (spiral galaxy), 3:88
NGC 3603 (star cluster), 2:16
NGC 3718 (spiral galaxy), 7:79
NGC 3729 (spiral galaxy), 7:79
NGC 4013 (spiral galaxy), 6:86
NGC 4038/9 (Antennae galaxies), 7:10–11, 9:16
NGC 4485 (galaxy), 8:94
NGC 4490 (galaxy), 8:94
NGC 4565 (Needle Galaxy), 11:60
NGC 4567 (spiral galaxy), 3:86
NGC 4568 (spiral galaxy), 3:86
NGC 4569 (galaxy), 3:16
NGC 4631 (Whale Galaxy), 11:61
NGC 4649 (galaxy), 12:24
NGC 5367 (reflection nebula), 9:55, 57
NGC 5371 (spiral galaxy), 12:85
NGC 5963 (spiral galaxy), 3:85
NGC 5965 (spiral galaxy), 3:85
NGC 6188 (emission nebula), 10:94–95
NGC 6193 (open cluster), 9:55–57
NGC 6231 (star cluster), 9:56–57
NGC 6712 (globular cluster), 12:85
NGC 6752 (globular cluster), 5:87
NGC 6781 (planetary nebula), 9:61
NGC 6791 (star cluster), 10:20
NGC 6834 (open cluster), 6:84
NGC 6871 (open cluster), 9:68
NGC 6913 (M29) open cluster, 9:68
NGC 6946 (Fireworks Galaxy), 11:58
NGC 7000 (North America Nebula), 9:62
NGC 7160 (star cluster), 10:85
NGC 7662 (Blue Snowball), 9:63
NH2CH2CN (amino acetonitrile), 7:25
Nix (Pluto’s moon), 2:21
North America Nebula (NGC 7000), 9:62
North Korea, 2:20
Norway, 11:62–67
novae, 11:23, 12:28. See also supernovae
Novaya-Zemlya effect, 11:12
NP101is (telescope), 1:74–77
NTT (New Technology Telescope), 6:25
NuSTAR mission, 1:22
O
observation, astronomical
of “odd-couples”, 1:64–67
summertime, 7:70–71
observatories. See also names of specific observatories
domes, 5:70–71
historic, 4:62–63
Obsession 18 inch Ultra Compact telescope, 4:68–69
occultation
of Mars by Moon, 8:95
of stars by Earth, 8:75
Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) satellite, 12:23
Omega Centauri (globular star cluster), 7:22
open clusters, 2:60–63. See also names of specific open clusters
Ophiuchus (galaxy cluster), 5:21
Opportunity rover
budget cuts, 6:22
climbs out of Victoria Crater, 12:23
loss of tool-carrying arm, 8:23
Orion 102mm f/7 ED telescope, 10:78–79
Orion BT70 binocular telescope, 3:72–73
Orion jettison engine, 11:22
Orion Nebula (M42)
binary star system in, 10:26
distance to, 2:17
star-forming regions in, 10:23
Orion spacecraft, 7:23
OSTM (Ocean Surface Topography Mission) satellite, 12:23
Owl Cluster (NGC 457), 9:63
oxygen, free, 6:13
ozone layer, 2:17
P
π (pi), 11:12
PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), 11:23
Palomar Mountain Observatory, 1:26
panspermia hypothesis, 4:56–57
Pan-STARRS-1 telescope, 1:22
particle entanglement theory, 7:14
Pelican Nebula (IC 5070), 5:86
Pencil Nebula, 4:20–21
Peony Nebula star, 11:24
Permian period, 4:39
Perseid meteors, 8:14
PHAs (potentially hazardous asteroids), 2:21
Phobos (Mars’ moon), 9:48–49
Phoenix lander
landing date, 1:37
landing technique, 5:22
microscopic images from, 9:18–19
overview of, 9:50–53
photons, 8:74–75
pi (π), 11:12
Pinwheel Galaxy (M101), 4:79, 11:23, 60–61
Planck space mission, 9:28–33
planemos, 7:58
planetariums, 12:23
planetary nebulae, see names of specific planetary nebulae
planetesimals, 3:71
planets. See also exoplanets; names of specific planets
dwarf, 3:71
formation of giant, 10:23
rings around, 1:22
roundness of, 8:74
Pleiades star cluster, 1:14
Pluto, 2:21
plutoids, 11:16
Polaris (star), 8:94
Pollux (star), 2:70
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 11:23
potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), 2:21
Prawn Nebula (IC 4628), 10:93
Ptolemaeus Crater (feature on Moon), 5:86
Pulsar Search Collaboratory, 1:25
pulsars
affirmation of theory of relativity through observation of, 10:21
binary system, 2:21
student efforts to document, 1:25
pulsating carbon white dwarves, 8:22
Q
quark stars, 9:20
QuickSCAT satellite, 10:21
R
R Leporis (Hind’s crimson star), 6:87
radiation
converting to electricity, 7:23
risks to astronauts, 1:22
radio telescopes. See also names of specific radio telescopes
Deep Space Network (DSN), 5:56–61, 6:23
for Moon’s far side, 6:23
Murchison Wide-Field Array, 5:38–43
study of 3C273 (galaxy), 1:22
radio waves, effect on ionosphere, 5:21
radio-emitting stars, 4:26
red giant stars, 1:33, 9:58, 10:84
reflection nebulae, 4:79, 9:55, 57
Regolith Excavation Challenge, 6:25
Regulus (star), 1:64–65
relativity, theory of, 9:22–27, 10:21
Rhea (Saturn’s moon), 6:27
right ascension and declination, 6:63
ring galaxies, 3:86
Ring Nebula (M57), 9:61–62
rings, plantary, 1:22, 12:18–19
rockets, see names of specific rockets
Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237-9), 7:79
RS Pup (Cepheid variable star), 6:23
Ruprecht 173 (open cluster), 9:68
Russia
experiments on missions to Mars, 2:17
Foton-M bio-satellite, 1:22
space tourism, 11:19
Yasniy satellite launch site, 4:24
S
Saggese, Enrico, 12:23
satellites. See also names of specific satellites
heat-regulating skin for, 12:28
redistributing thruster fuel on, 2:17
viewing, 6:74
Saturn. See also names of moons orbiting
Cassini mission, 10:28–33
image of, 9:79
rings of, 1:22
storms on, 8:22
wave-like pattern of temperature change, 9:20
SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey), 3:45–51, 12:28
Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE), 7:26
Shackleton Crater (feature on Moon), 12:24
Sharpless 2-9 (emission nebula), 1:91
Sharpless 2-16 (emission nebula), 10:95
Sharpless 2-17 (emission nebula), 10:95
Sharpless 2-18 (emission nebula), 10:95
Sharpless 2-19 (emission nebula), 10:95
Sharpless 2-20 (emission nebula), 10:95
Sharpless 2-82 (emission and reflection nebula), 4:79
Sharpless 2-124 (emission nebula), 4:80
Sharpless 2-263 (emission nebula), 8:95
Sharpless 2-276 (emission nebula), 3:14–15
Sharpless 2-278 (emission nebula), 5:87
Sharpless 2-302 (emission nebula), 6:87
SLC (Space Launch Complex) 36, 12:28
Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 3:45–51, 12:28
small molecular clouds (SMCs), 9:54, 57
Small Sagittarius Star Cloud (M24), 8:18
small-aperture telescopes, 6:71
SMCs (small molecular clouds), 9:54, 57
SN 1006 (supernova remnant), 10:24
SOFIA (jet-based infrared telescope), 5:21
SOHO spacecraft, 10:21
solar eclipses, 7:67–69, 10:74–77, 11:86–88
solar flares
on BO Microscopii, 4:25
on EV Lacertae, 9:20
superstorms, 9:34–39
Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite, 3:18
solar system, shape of, 4:26
solar wind, 4:26
Southern Whirlpool Galaxy (M83), 10:95
Soyuz TMA-11 (spacecraft), 9:16
Space Adventures company, 11:19
Space Age, 50th anniversary of, 1:25
space elevators, 7:23
space junk, 6:40–43
Space Launch Complex (SLC) 36, 12:28
Space Shuttle
Columbia xenon experiment data, 10:26
final observable fireball from, 10:22
rotation of after launch, 12:63
space tourism, 11:19
spacecraft. See also names of specific spacecraft
Interplanetary Superhighway, 11:38–43
profile of current, 10:64–65
velocity of flybys, 6:20
SpaceShipTwo (space plane), 5:21
SpaceWorks Engineering company, 6:25
SpaceX company, 11:23
special-purpose dexterous manipulator (Dextre), 1:24, 6:25
spiral galaxies, 3:86, 9:59, 11:56. See also names of specific spiral galaxies
Spirit rover, 6:22
Spitzer Space Telescope
cosmic ice storm, 1:27
W5 (star-forming cloud), 12:20
SS Cygni (star), 9:67
star clusters, 5:22. See also names of specific star clusters
star diagonals, 4:56–57
starbursts, 3:64–69
Stardust (spacecraft), 4:56
star-forming regions, 10:12–13, 23
Starmaster telescope, 7:62–65
stars. See also names of specific stars
antimatter, 1:63
apparent motion of, 10:16–17
binary systems, 2:21, 10:26
direct versus indirect observation of, 7:20–21
formation of far from galactic center, 8:23
formation of in galaxy’s “tail”, 1:27
Hipparcos catalog of distances to, 1:25
imaging disks of, 6:62
methods of measuring diameters of, 12:62–63
neutron, 2:59
pulsating carbon white dwarves, 8:22
quark, 9:20
radio emissions from, 4:26
radio-emitting, 4:26
red giant, 1:33, 9:58, 10:84
Sun-like “helper stars”, 6:24
Sun-like with dust disks, 6:18
variable, 6:23, 12:76
visibility of disks of, 10:73
white-dwarf, 3:18, 8:22, 10:20
Wolf-Rayet, 7:34–39
STEREO spacecraft, 11:23
Stern, S. Alan (planetary scientist), 7:23
Stock 2 (open cluster), 11:76
Stock 5 (open cluster), 11:76
Stonehenge, 7:52–57
storms
on Jupiter, 9:14, 11:22
on Saturn, 8:22
soap bubbles reveal process of, 8:22
solar, 9:34–39
Subaru telescope (Hawaii), 4:26
Sun
Alfvén waves, 1:22
arcs, 1:16–17
coronal mass ejections (CMEs), 3:18
death of, 12:38–43
eclipses of, 7:67–69, 10:74–77, 11:86–88
halos, 1:16–17
heat of corona, 3:70
Hydrogen-alpha images of, 5:84–85, 12:84
Novaya-Zemlya effect, 11:14–15
observing, 4:64–65
photographing, 4:66–67
physical makeup of, 5:16
Solar Cycle 24, 5:21
solar fountains, 8:27
Sunflower Galaxy (M63), 11:59–60
super-Earths, 9:21, 11:26–31
supernovae. See also names of specific supernovae
dust from, 4:26
effects on Earth of nearby, 1:62–63
frequency of, 10:72–73
quark star birth, 9:20
Swan (Comet C/2006 M4), 12:85
Swan Nebula (M17), 8:18
T
Tau Boötis (star), 6:27
Tele Vue Ethos eyepiece, 5:68–69
Tele Vue NP101is (telescope), 1:74–77
telescopes. See also names of specific telescopes: radio telescopes
23 best, 10:supplement
care and maintenance of, 12:74
eyepieces, 1:78
factors affecting visibility, 11:75
Hydrogen-alpha, 12:84
invention of, 8:84–86
modifying old, 5:72
small-aperture, 6:71
star diagonals, 4:56–57
Sun-observing UV, 2:17
visibility of stars’ disks by, 10:73
Texas Petawatt Laser, 7:23
THEMIS mission, 11:18
Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), 9:20
thunderstorms, 6:23
tides, 3:18
Titan (Saturn’ moon)
confirmation of liquid ethane lakes on, 12:27
liquid hydrocarbons, 5:21
possible seas on, 1:32–33
possible underground ocean, 6:22
TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope), 9:20
Trumpler 1 (open cluster), 5:85
Tunguska incident, 5:24, 10:21
Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), 3:41–43
U
Ulysses spacecraft
extension of mission, 3:21
orbit of, 4:24
shutdown of, 9:14
unidentified flying objects (UFOs), 3:12
universe
blocking of light by dust, 9:20
expansion of, 2:59, 7:14
looking backward in time at distant objects, 6:62–63
shape of, 4:28–33
uranium, 9:58
Uranus, rings of, 12:18–19
U.S. Professor of the Year Award, 3:21
USA-193 (spy satellite), 7:24
V
V598 Puppis (nova), 12:28
V1280 Scorpii (star), 11:23
Van Allen Belts, 3:18
Van den Bergh 152 (VdB 152) (molecular cloud), 9:78
Vanguard 1 (satellite), 3:20
variable stars, 6:23, 12:76
VdB 152 (Van den Bergh 152) molecular cloud, 9:78
Veil Nebula, 6:56–61
Venus
conjunction with Moon, 5:88
conjunction with Moon and Mercury, 8:95
exploration of, 10:66–71
hydroxyl molecules in atmosphere of, 9:20
images of, 9:79, 10:93
possible existence of water, 1:27
Venus Express mission, 3:18, 10:66–71, 11:23
Very Large Telescope
new wide-angle, near-infrared camera, 2:17
role in movie, 7:23
Vixen BT-125-A binoculars, 11:72–73
volcanos, 3:17, 9:20
Voyager 1 (spacecraft), 8:41–42
Voyager 2 (spacecraft), 4:23, 8:41–42, 10:18
W
W5 (star-forming cloud), 12:20
web sites, astronomy-related, 2:68
webcams, 11:68–71
Whale Galaxy (NGC 4631), 11:61
Whirlpool Galaxy (M51), 11:60
white-dwarf stars, 3:18, 8:22, 10:20
wide-field imaging, 6:66–69
Wild Duck Cluster (M11), 9:61
Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), 4:28–33, 7:23
Winter Triangle, 3:76
Witch Head Nebula, 5:85
WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe), 4:28–33, 7:23
WMAP satellite, 6:23
WOH G64 (star), 10:23
Wolf-Rayet stars, 7:34–39
Y
Yasniy satellite launch site, 4:24
Yi So-yeon (astronaut), 7:23
Z
Zeta (ζ) Cephei (star), 10:85
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