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MEPCO SCHLENK ENGINEERING COLLEGE, SIVAKASI
(AUTONOMOUS)
AFFILIATED TO ANNA UNIVERSITY, CHENNAI 600 025
REGULATIONS: MEPCO - R2015 (FULL TIME)
MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (MCA)
(CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM)
Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs)
Continual Learning
To prepare the Post Graduate students for a prolific career in IT and
Corporate Organizations and inculcate an urge for continuous learning
by providing an ambient environment of conducive teaching and learning
process in the core and emerging areas.
Core Competency
To offer ample context and flexible learning environment to the students
for enabling them to develop sound knowledge in effective utilization of
Computer Programming skills in various domains of applications.
Professionalism
To nurture and promote a social environment which moulds the students
to become competent Professionals augmented with pioneering skills to
render services in par with industry standards and in social context
ethically.
23
Programme Outcomes (POs)
On completion of the MCA Programme the Post Graduates are expected
to
Apply
software engineering methodologies in systems development
Demonstrate
their competency in programming skills as per industry
expectations
Implement
creative and innovative problem solving skills in various
real time applications
Design
and develop Software with complete satisfaction to the
Customer
Work
as a Team member, reach higher positions with good
interpersonal skills
Discharge
their duties with Professional and Ethical responsibilities
Communicate
Possess
effectively and be customer friendly
an urge for and lifelong learning based on the emerging
trends
Create
technical reports and presentations as per Industry Standards
Develop
into Entrepreneurs in the IT industry
24
R2015 - MCA Curriculum
(CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM)
SEMESTER I
SL. COURSE
COURSETITLE
NO CODE
THEORY
1
15CA101 Computer Organization
2
15CA102 Problem Solving and Programming in
C
3
15CA103 Database Management Systems
4
15CA104 Data Structures
5
15CA105 Accounting and Financial
Management
PRACTICAL
6
15CA151 Programming and Data Structures
7
15CA152 Laboratory
Database Management System
Laboratory
TOTAL
L
T
P
C
3
3
2
0
0
0
4
3
3
3
3
0
2
2
0
0
0
3
4
4
0
0
15
0
0
6
4
4
8
2
2
22
SEMESTER II
SL. COURSE
NO
CODE
THEORY
1
15CA201
2
15CA202
3
15CA203
4
15CA204
5
15CA205
PRACTICAL
6
15CA251
COURSETITLE
L
T
P
C
Mathematical Foundations of
Computer
Science
Resource using
Object Oriented
Programming
Management
Techniques
C++ & Java
Operating
Systems
Computer Networks
Design and Analysis of Algorithms
3
3
3
3
3
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
4
3
3
3
4
0
0
4
2
7
Object Oriented Programming
Laboratory
and Java)
15CA252 (C++
Operating
System Laboratory
0
0
4
2
8
15CA253 Algorithms Laboratory
0 0
15 4
4
12
2
23
TOTAL
25
SEMESTER III
SL. COURSE
NO
CODE
THEORY
1
15CA301
2
15CA302
3
15CA303
4
CE1
5
CE2
PRACTICAL
6
15CA351
7
15CA352
8
15CA353
COURSE TITLE
L
T
P
C
Software Engineering
Advanced Java Technologies
Software Development for Mobile
Devices
Core
Elective-I
Core Elective-II
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
3
Visual Programming Laboratory
Advanced Java Laboratory
Android Application Development
Laboratory
Total
0
0
0
15
0
0
0
0
4
4
4
12
2
2
2
21
L
T
P
C
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
4
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
4
4
2
2
0
0
4
2
15 2
9
25
SEMESTER IV
SL.
NO
COURSE
CODE
THEORY
1
15CA401
2
15CA402
3
15CA403
4
CE3
5
OE1
6
AE1
PRACTICAL
7
15CA451
8
15CA452
9
COURSE TITLE
Network Programming
Object Oriented Analysis and
Design
Software Testing
Core Elective-III
Open Elective-I
Allied Elective -I
Network Programming Laboratory
Software Development Laboratory
using CASE Tools
15CA453 Software Testing Laboratory
TOTAL
26
SEMESTER V
SL.
NO
COURSE
CODE
L
COURSE TITLE
THEORY
1
15CA501 Web Services and Cloud
Computing
2
15CA502 .NET Framework and C#
3
Core Elective-IV
CE4
4
Core Elective-V
CE5
5
Open Elective-II
OE2
6
7
8
T
P
C
3
0
0 3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15CA552 C# and .NET Programming
0
Laboratory
15CA553 Mini Project
0
TOTAL 15
0
PRACTICAL
15CA551 SOA and Cloud Computing
Laboratory
4
4
0 4
0 12
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
21
SEMESTER VI
SL.
NO
COURSE
CODE
COURSETITLE
PRACTICAL
1
15CA651 Project Work
TOTAL
L
T
P
C
0
0
0
0
24
24
12
12
Total No. of Credits: 124
CORE ELECTIVES - III SEM.
SL. COURSE
NO.
CODE
1
2
15CAC01
15CAC02
COURSE TITLE
L
T
P
C
SEMESTER III
System Software
Visual Programming
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
27
3
15CAC03
4
15CAC04
5
15CAC05
6
15CAC06
Enterprise Resource Planning
Business Data processing and
COBOL
Computer Graphics
Multimedia Systems and
Applications
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
L
T
P
C
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
0
0
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
2
0
4
3
0
0
3
L
T
P
C
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
0
4
CORE ELECTIVES - IV SEM.
SL. COURSE
NO.
CODE
1
2
15CAC07
15CAC08
3
15CAC09
4
5
6
15CAC10
15CAC11
15CAC12
7
15CAC13
8
15CAC14
COURSE TITLE
SEMESTER IV
E-Commerce
Human Resource Management
Management Information
System
Software Quality Management
Web Graphics
Big Data
Resource Management
Techniques
Middleware Technologies
CORE ELECTIVES - V SEM.
SL. COURSE
CODE
NO.
1
15CAC15
2
15CAC16
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
15CAC17
15CAC18
15CAC19
15CAC20
15CAC21
15CAC22
15CAC23
10
15CAC24
COURSE TITLE
SEMESTER V
Mobile Computing
Data Mining and Knowledge
Engineering
Advanced Databases
Business Analytics
Grid Computing
Design Patterns
Compiler Design
Software Agents
Web Engineering
Numerical and Statistical
Methods
28
Value Added Courses
SL. COURSE
NO.
CODE
15CAV01
1
15CAV02
2
15CAV03
3
15CA101
COURSE TITLE
Web Designing
Software Documentation
Application Development for
Android Devices
L
T
P
C
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
0
0
3
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand different digital circuit design methodologies
 To gain knowledge of the basic building blocks of a computer
 To learn about computer instructions, I/O and interrupts
 To get a comprehensible idea of peripheral devices and data
transfer modes
 To be acquainted with the various memory types and CPU
operations
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Recognize different types of number systems as they relate to
computers.
 Extrapolate the basics about binary codes and arithmetic
 Understand Boolean Algebra and minimization of Boolean
Functions
 Implement digital circuit designs
 Articulate about the basic structure and operational concepts of
computers
 Comprehend the Processor design mechanisms
 Exemplify the need for various memory components
29
 Understand about Input / Output systems and interrupts
UNIT I
DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS
12
Number Systems and Conversions – Binary Codes - Character Codes –
Binary Arithmetic – 1’s and 2’s Complements – 9’s and 10’s
Complements - Boolean Algebra and Simplification – Minimization of
Boolean Functions – Karnaugh Map, Logic Gates – NAND – NOR
Implementation.
UNIT II
COMBINATIONAL AND SEQUENTIAL
CIRCUITS
12
Design of Combinational Circuits – Adder / Subtracter – Encoder –
Decoder – Multiplexer –Demultiplexer – Comparators, Flip Flops –
Triggering – Master – Slave Flip Flop – State Diagram and Minimization
– Counters – Registers.
UNIT III
BASIC STRUCTURE OF COMPUTERS
12
Functional units – Basic operational concepts – Bus structures –
Performance and Metrics – Memory Location and Addresses – Memory
Operations - Instruction and Instruction Sequencing – Addressing modes
– Assembly Language – Basic I/O Operations – Stacks and Queues –
Subroutines – Additional Instructions – RISC and CISC – ALU design –
Fixed point and Floating point operation.
UNIT IV
PROCESSOR DESIGN
12
Processor basics – CPU Organization – Data path design – Control
design – Basic concepts – Hard wired control – Micro programmed
control – Pipeline control – Hazards – Super scalar operation.
UNIT V
MEMORY AND I/O SYSTEM
12
Memory technology – Memory systems – Virtual memory – Caches –
Design methods – Associative memories – Input / Output system –
Programmed I/O – Interrupts – Direct Memory Access – Buses - Input
Devices – Output Devices – Interface Circuits and Standard I/O
Interfaces.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
30
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Morris Mano M. and Michael D. Ciletti, “Digital Design”, Pearson
Education, Fourth Edition, 2008.
2. Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic and Safwat Zaky, “Computer
Organization”, McGraw Hill, Fifth Edition, 2002.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Charles H. Roth, Jr. and Larry L. Kinney, “Fundamentals of Logic
Design”, Cengage Learning, Sixth Edition, 2010.
2. Arivazhagan S. and Salivahanan S., “Digital Circuits and Design”,
Vikash Publishing House, Fourth Edition, 2012.
3. Morris Mano M., “Computer System Architecture”, Pearson Education,
Third Edition, 2007.
4. William Stallings, “Computer Organization and Architecture –
Designing for Performance”, Pearson Education, Sixth Edition, 2003.
5. David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy, “Computer Organization
and Design: The Hardware/Software interface”, Morgan Kaufmann,
Second Edition, 2002.
6. John P. Hayes, “Computer Architecture and Organization”, Tata
McGraw Hill, Third Edition, 1998.
15CA102
PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING
IN C
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To study problem solving strategies and techniques that can be
applied to computers.
 To develop the logic, ability to solve the problems efficiently using
C programming.
 To learn various concepts and techniques for problem solving
using C programs
COURSE OUTCOMES:
31
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Learn Different Problem Solving Techniques
 Understand the Complexity of different Algorithms
 Develop effective programs using functions and pointers
 Process the data and store for future use in structured and
unstructured format
 Develop modular C program for a given problem
UNIT I
Problem Solving Fundamentals
9
Programming life cycle phases–problem solving–implementation–– flow
charts - algorithms –– pseudo code- maintenance- representation of
algorithmic efficiency – complexity of algorithms.
UNIT II
Introduction to C
9
Introduction to C Programming – Operators and Expressions – Data
Input and Output– Program Structure – Stages of Compilation of a
Program.
UNIT III
Functions and Arrays
9
Control Statements – Introduction to Pointers - Functions – Defining a
Function – Accessing a Function – Function Prototypes – Passing
Arguments to a Function – Recursion – Storage classes - Arrays –
Defining and Processing Arrays – Passing arrays to a Function –
Multidimensional Arrays – String and array of strings - String processing
– Library functions
UNIT IV
Pointers and Structures
9
Pointer Declaration – Dynamic Memory Allocation – Arrays of Pointers –
Double pointers - Representing arrays using pointers – Pass by value
and Pass by reference – Strings representation using pointers - Defining
a Structure – Processing a Structure – Passing Structures to Functions Structure and arrays – Unions
UNIT V
File Processing and Preprocessors
9
Creation of Data Files – Text Files – Formatted Data Files – Unformatted
Data files- Binary Files - Reading and Writing Data Files – Processing
32
and updating Data Files – Register Variables – Bit Fields –
Enumerations – Command Line Arguments -Macros – C Preprocessors
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Byron S Gottfried ,”Programming with C”, Schaum’s Outlines, Tata
McGraw Hill, Second Edition, 2006.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. E. Balagurusamy, “Programming in ANSI C”, Tata McGraw-Hill
Education, 5th edition, 2010.
2. Deitel and Deitel, “C How to program”, Prentice Hall, 1994.
3. B.W. Kerninghan, D.M.Ritchie,” The C Programming Language”,
PHI, 2nd Edition, 1995.
15CA103
DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide basic knowledge on Databases
 To help the students know about Relational Data Model
 To know about the Storage Devices and Storage Methods of the
data
 To learn about Query Evaluation and Query Optimization
 To know about various issues in Transactions
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Knowledge about the structure of a database management
system
 Analyze the facilities of maintaining, managing and retrieving
databases
 Design the database using ER model.
 Work with relational algebra and relational calculus.
33
 Efficiently store and retrieve data using Indexing and Hashing.
 Optimizing the queries using query processing techniques.
 Reduce anomalies using normalization techniques.
 Manage and control concurrent transactions.
 Knowledge about Transaction Processing and Recovery.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
MODELING
AND
CONCEPTUAL
9
Historical perspective - Files versus Database Systems - Architecture E-R model - Security and Integrity - Data models - Introduction to
Network and Hierarchical Models - Relational Model .
UNIT II
RELATIONAL MODEL
9
The Relation - Keys - Constraints - Relational Algebra and Calculus Queries - Constraints - Triggers.
UNIT III
STORAGE AND INDEXING
9
Disks and Files - File Organizations - Indexing - Tree Structured
Indexing - Hash Based Indexing.
UNIT IV
QUERY EVALUATION AND DATABASE
DESIGN
9
External Sorting - Query Evaluation - Query Optimization - Schema
Refinement and Normal Forms - Physical Database Design and Tuning
– Security.
UNIT V
TRANSACTION MANAGEMENT
9
Transaction Concepts - Concurrency Control - Crash Recovery Decision Support.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Raghu RamaKrishnan and Johannes Gehrke, “Database
Management Systems”, McGraw Hill International Editions, 3rd
Edition, 2003.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Henry. F. Korth and S. Sudharshan, “Database
34
System Concepts”, Tata McGraw Hill, 6th Edition, 2010.
2. C. J. Date, “An Introduction to Database Systems”, Addison Wesley,
8th Edition, 2006.
15CA104
DATA STRUCTURES
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To revise basic C programming concepts.
 To learn the data structures like Lists, Stacks and Queues.
 To get familiar about the Non linear data structures like Binary tree
and Expression tree
 To introduce the concept of SET operations.
 To apply the real time Hash table concepts.
 To provide knowledge about Graphs and its applications.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Know the C programming as a tool to learn data structures.
 Understand the Basic Data Structures
 Able to use Binary tree concept for decision making application.
 Work with Set and Hashing techniques.
 Develop the various Graph data structure concepts.
 Apply the BFS and DFS traversal.
UNIT I
Introduction
12
Definition – Types – Abstract Data type – Array – Multidimensional Array
– Pointers on Arrays – Dynamic memory allocation - Structure concept –
Pointer to Structures – Application – Sorting – Linear Search – Binary
Search
UNIT II
LINEAR DATA STRUCTURES
12
List: Operations, Storage Representation – Array, Linked List and Cursor
based Implementation, Applications – Polynomial operations. Stack:
Operations, Storage Representation – Array and Linked list
35
Implementation, Application – Postfix expression evaluation, infix to
postfix conversion. Queue: Operations, Storage Representation – Array
and Linked list implementation, Applications.
UNIT III
NON-LINEAR DATA STRUCTURES
12
Trees: Preliminaries – Implementation of Trees, Tree traversals with
applications, Binary Trees: Implementation, Expression Trees, Search
tree ADT: Operations – MakeEmpty, Find, FindMin, FindMax, Insert and
Delete, Average-Case Analysis.
UNIT IV
SET AND HASHING
12
Set Operations – Representation – Implementation of Union – Find
operations – Smart Union algorithms – Path compression – Applications
of set – Hashing – Model – Implementation – Hash Function – Separate
Chaining – Open addressing – Rehashing – Extendible Hashing
UNIT V
GRAPH ALGORITHMS
12
Definitions, Representation of Graphs, Topological Sort, Graph
Traversals – Breadth First Search and Depth First Search, Shortest Path
Algorithms – Weighted Shortest Paths – Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Minimum
Spanning Tree – Prim’s Algorithm, Euler Circuits, Graph Applications.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”,
Second Edition, Pearson Education, 2006.
2. Tanaenbaum A.S., Langram Y., Augestein M.J.,“ Data Structures
using C” Pearson Education, 2004.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jean Paul Tremblay and Paul G. Sorenson, “ An Introduction to
data structure with applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi,
Second Edition, 1991.
2. Alfred V. Aho, John E. Hopcraft and Jeffry D..Ullman, “ Data
Structures and Algorithms “, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2006.
36
15CA105
ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL
MANAGEMENT
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart the fundamental concepts and applied aspects of
Financial Accounting
 To help the students learn about Accounting ratios, fund flow and
cash flow analysis
 To provide knowledge about Marginal Costing, Break even
analysis and Variances
 To know about Budgets and Budgeting Control
 To know about concepts of Financial Management like investment
decision and working capital management
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Knowledge of Accounting Principles, Journalizing, Ledger Posting
and Final Accounts.
 Analyze the efficiency and profitability of business using ratio
analysis.
 Analyze the changes in financial position of a firm by Fund flow
and Cash Flow
 Prepare Cost Sheet by identifying the Cost Elements.
 Knowledge about Marginal Costing and Standard Costing and
Compute variance between Budgeted and Actual expenses
incurred.
 Prepare different types of budgets.
 Compute the cost of various types of capital.
 Determine the Structure of Capital.
UNIT I
ACCOUNTING FUNDAMENTALS
12
Meaning and Scope of Accounting-Accounting Principles: Meaning of
Accounting Principles, Accounting Standards - Journalizing Transactions
– Ledger Posting and Trial Balance - Final Accounts: Trading Account,
Profit and Loss Account, Balance Sheet – Financial Statements: Ratio
37
Analysis - Funds Flow Statement - Cash Flow Statement
UNIT II
COST ACCOUNTING
12
Meaning of Cost Accounting– Objectives of Cost Accounting- Basic
Cost Concepts: Elements of Cost-Components of Total cost- Cost
Sheet - Marginal Costing: Absorption costing, Marginal costing and
Direct Costing, Contribution, Cost-Volume-profit analysis, Break-even
analysis - Standard Costing: Meaning of Standard Costing, Budgetary
Control and Standard Costing - Variance Analysis: Direct Material cost
variance, Direct Labor cost variances, Overhead cost variance, Sales
variances
UNIT III
BUDGETARY CONTROL
12
Meaning of Budget, Meaning of Budgetary Control - Classification of
Budgets: Sales Budget, Production Budget, Cost of Production Budget,
Cash Budget - Flexible Budget – Innovative Budgeting Techniques:
Zero Based Budgeting
UNIT IV
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND COST OF
CAPITAL
12
Nature of Financial Management: Scope of Finance, Finance Function,
Financial Manager’s role - Risk and Return: An overview of Capital
Market Theory –Concepts of Value and Return: Time Preference for
Money - Capital Budgeting Decisions: Nature of Investment Decisions,
Types of Investment Decisions, Net Present Value, Internal Rate of
Return, Payback – The Cost of Capital: Determining Component Costs
of Capital, Cost of Preference Capital, Cost of Equity capital, The
Weighted Average Cost of Capital
UNIT V
CAPITAL STRUCTURE AND WORKING
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
12
Capital Structure -Theory and Policy: Practical Considerations in
Determining Capital Structure - Dividend Policy: Objectives of Dividend
Policy, Practical Considerations in Dividend Policy, Forms of Dividends –
Principles of Working Capital Management: Concepts of Working
Capital, Determinants of Working Capital, Estimating Working Capital
38
Needs.
Case Studies: (not included for examination)
Tally 9.1
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. S. N. Maheswari, “A Text Book of Accounting for Management”, Vikas
Publications, 3rd Edition, 2012.
2. I. M. Pandey, ”Financial Management”, Vikas Publications, 10th
Edition, 2010.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. S. P. Iyengar, “Cost and Management Accounting”, Sultan Chand
& Co, 13th Edition, 2008.
2. I. M. Pandey, “Management Accounting” Vikas Publishing House, 3rd
Edition, 1997.
15CA151
PROGRAMMING AND DATA STRUCTURES
LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To write efficient C programs to implement the basic control
structures and looping concepts in the application level
 To understand the Function and Array concepts and their behavior
 To manipulate different methods like Pointers and Structures
 To code the various types of File concept and their use in real time
scenario
 Linear data structures such as lists, stacks and queues using
arrays and pointers
 Various non linear data structures like trees, binary trees, binary
search trees and indexing problems
 To implement the Graph problems
39
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Enlarge programming skill in high level programming skill using C
 To be able to work with group of data elements using Array and
Structures
 Develop the various linear data structures like List, Stack and
Queue
 Build the various non linear structures programming like Tree and
Binary tree
 Solve the real time problem using Graph data structure
List of Experiments
1. Programs using Control Structures
2. Programs using Looping Concept
3. Programs using Array concept
4. Programs using Structure concept
5. Programs using File concept
6. Implementation of Linked list
7. Implementation of stack data structure
8. Implementation of queue data structure
9. Implementation of Binary search tree
10. Implementation of Hash table
11. Implementation of Minimum Spanning Tree using Prim’s algorithm
12. Implementation of Topological sorting
15CA152
DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
LABORATORY
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To Create different database objects
 To Insert and Manipulate the data
40
L T P C
0 0 4 2
 To retrieve the data from the database
 To perform database operations in a procedural manner using
PL/SQL
 To learn various features like Cursors, Procedures and Functions.
 To know about Triggers in Oracle Server
 To develop packages in PL/SQL
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Ability to create different database objects
 Knowledge of Inserting and Manipulating the data
 Retrieve any data by issuing queries
 Execute programs in PL/SQL environment
 Use Cursors, Procedures and Functions in PL/SQL
 Implement Triggers in Oracle Server
 Build up packages in PL/SQL
List of Experiments
1. Client side installation of Oracle 9i.
2. Creation of base Tables and Views.
3. Data Manipulation
a. INSERT, DELETE and UPDATE in tables
b. SELECT, Sub Queries and JOIN
4. Data Control Commands.
5. Partition Concepts in Tables.
6. High Level Language extensions – PL/SQL.
7. Use of Cursors, Procedures and Functions.
8. Oracle or SQL Server Triggers.
9. PL/SQL Packages.
41
15CA201
MATHEMATICAL FOUNDATIONS OF
COMPUTER SCIENCE
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the basic concepts of graph theory and discuss its
applications
 To understand the combinatorial topics viz., Mathematical
Induction, Recurrence Relations, Generating Functions, etc.
 To introduce the concept of propositional and predicate logic and
their applications
 To understand formal models of computation and languages
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Apply graph theory in a real life situations
 Apply principles of counting, permutations, combinations and
recurrence relations
 Utilize the concept of propositional and predicate logic and their
applications
 Explain computational models and formal languages
UNIT I
BASIC GRAPH THEORY
12
Introduction to graphs – Terminology – directed and undirected graphs
– adjacency matrices – incidence matrices – paths – Euler and
Hamiltonian paths – Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm – Tree – Simple
applications – spanning tree – Kruskal algorithm.
UNIT II
COMBINATORICS
12
Permutations and Combinations – Mathematical Induction – Pigeonhole
principle – Principle of Inclusion and Exclusion – Recurrence relations –
Solution by generating functions and characteristics equations.
UNIT III
LOGIC AND PROOFS
12
Basic connective and truth tables – Logical equivalences and
implications - Propositional logic - First order Logic – Laws of logic Rules of Inference – Quantifiers – Universe of discourse - Statement
42
calculus - Predicate calculus - Inference Theory – Introduction to proofs Proof methods and strategy.
UNIT IV
FORMAL LANGUAGES
12
Languages and Grammars – Phrase Structure Grammar – Classification
of Grammars – Pumping Lemma for Regular Languages – Context Free
Languages.
UNIT V
FINITE STATE AUTOMATA
12
Finite State Automata – Deterministic Finite State Automata(DFA), Non
Deterministic Finite State Automata (NFA) – Equivalence of DFA and
NFA – Equivalence of NFA and Regular Languages.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Kenneth H.Rosen, “Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications”,
Tata McGraw Hill, Fourth Edition, 2002.
2. Hopcroft and Ullman, “Introduction to Automata Theory,
Languages and Computation”, Narosa Publishing House, Delhi,
2002. (Unit 4 & 5).
3. Trembley.J.P. and Manohar R. “Discrete Mathematical Structures
with Applications to Computer Science”, Tata McGraw – Hill
Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi. Reprinted in 2007.
4. Grimaldi R.P. and Ramana B.V., “Discrete and Combinatorial
Mathematics”, Pearson Edition, Reprinted in 2006. (5th Edition).
5. Thomas Koshy, “Discrete Mathematics
Academic Press, Reprinted in 2005.
with
Applications”,
6. M.K.Venkataraman, “Discrete Mathematics”, National Publishing
Company, 2000.
7. A.Tamilarasi & A.M.Natarajan, “Discrete Mathematics and its
Application”, Khanna Publishers, 2nd Edition 2005.
43
15CA202
OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING
USING C++ AND JAVA
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To study the key concepts of Object oriented Paradigm
 To design different ADTs through C++
 To develop basic programming skills of Java
 To code Java programs with Java packages, abstract class,
interface, Threads and Applets
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Understand the OOPS concepts
 Design the class with constructor and destructors
 Learn different kinds of polymorphism and template
 Handle exceptions
 Know the different inheritance models
 Understand the features of Java
 Design classes with Interface, package and threads
 Knowledge on applets and AWT classes
UNIT I
C++ Fundamentals
8
Object–Oriented Programming concepts – Structure of C++ programData types – Classes – Objects – lexical items of C++ - Reference
Variable - dynamic allocation – I/O Statements - control structures Constructors and Destructor.
UNIT II
Features of C++
9
Friend Function - Friend Class- Static-Members – inline functions –
Function overloading - Operator Overloading – Default Arguments –
Class and Function Templates – Various Inheritance Models – Abstract
class - Virtual and Pure Virtual Functions - Developing ADTs.
UNIT III
Java Fundamentals
8
Java features – Java Platform – lexical items of Java - Data types –
Arrays - type conversions – Operators - Control Structures – Classes –
44
Constructors - Wrapper classes - scope of Variables – I/O Streams in
Java.
UNIT IV
Features of Java
10
Interface – abstract class-packages – Inheritance in Java – Threads in
Java – Multithreading – Inter Thread communication and
synchronization – Exception Handling fundamentals - Garbage
Collection.
UNIT V
Designing Java Applets
10
Applets Fundamentals – passing parameters to applet - Event Handling
– AWT classes: working with windows, graphics and text – AWT
controls: Layout Managers – Menus.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. E. Balagurusamy, Object Oriented Programming with C++, TMH, 5th
Edition, 2011.
2. Herbert Schildt, “Java – The Complete Reference”, Tata McGraw Hill,
8th edition, 2011.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ira Pohl, “Object–Oriented Programming Using C++”, Pearson
Education, Second Edition, 2006.
2. Bjarne Stroustrup, “The C++ Programming Language”, Pearson
Education, 3rd ed., 2007.
3. Deitel and Deitel, “Java – How to program”, Pearson Education, 9th
ed., 2011.
4. Keyur shah, “Gateway to Java Programmer Sun Certification”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 2002.
5. Joshua Bloch,” Effective Java “, Addison Wesley, 2nd ed., 2008.
45
15CA203
OPERATING SYSTEMS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide basic knowledge about operating systems
 To help the students know about processes synchronization
 To make the students know about CPU Scheduling
 To provide knowledge about Memory Management
 To learn about Disk Structure
 To know about Linux and Windows operating systems
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Knowledge about the functions and services of an Operating
System
 Understand the Concept of Process Synchronization
 Learn about various CPU Scheduling Algorithms
 Knowledge about Memory Management Concepts
 Knowledge about Disk Structure and Disk Scheduling Algorithms
 Clear idea about the functioning of Linux and Windows Operating
Systems
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
11
Introduction – Computer Systems Structures: Computer System
Operation – I/O Structure – Storage Structure – Storage Hierarchy –
Hardware Protection – Operating System Structures: System
Components – Operating System Services – System Calls – Processes:
Process Concept – Process Scheduling – Operations on Processes –
Cooperating Processes – Inter-process Communication – Process
Synchronization: The Critical-Section Problem – Synchronization
Hardware – Semaphores – Classic Problems of Synchronization – Case
Study: Process Management in Linux.
UNIT II
CPU SCHEDULING
9
CPU Scheduling: Basic Concepts – Scheduling Criteria – Scheduling
Algorithms – Deadlocks: System Model – Deadlock Characterization –
46
Methods for Handling Deadlocks – Deadlock Prevention – Deadlock
Avoidance – Deadlock Detection – Recovery from Deadlocks. Case
Study: Scheduling in Linux.
UNIT III
MEMORY MANAGEMENT
9
Memory management: Swapping – Contiguous Memory Allocation –
Paging – Segmentation – Segmentation with Paging.- Virtual Memory:
Demand Paging – Process Creation – Page Replacement – Allocation of
Frames – Thrashing – Case Study: Memory Management in Linux.
UNIT IV
MASS STORAGE STRUCTURE
9
Mass Storage Structure – Disk Structure – Disk Scheduling – Disk
Management – Swap Space Management – RAID Structure.
UNIT V
FILE SYSTEM
7
File System Interface: File Concept – Access Methods – Directory
Structure – File System Mounting. Case Studies: Files Systems in Linux
and Windows.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Abraham Silberschatz Peter B. Galvin, G. Gagne, “Operating System
Concepts”, Wiley India Edition, 8th Edition, 2010.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. M. J. Bach, “Design of The Unix Operating System”, Prentice Hall,
1987.
2. Willam Stallings, “Operating System”, Fourth Edition, Pearson
Education, 2003.
15CA204
Computer Networks
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the concepts of data communications
 To study the function and protocols used in data link layer
47
 To study the IP addressing and routing algorithms used in the
Network Layer
 To study the various protocols used in the Transport Layer
 To learn the various network applications like HTTP, DNS, FTP, etc.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Understand the concepts of data communications
 Know the functions of protocols used in different layers
 Learn the IP addressing and routing algorithms
 To study the various protocols used in the Transport Layer
 Understand the importance of Session
 Learn the use of Application Layer
 To learn the various network applications
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
8
Data communications, Networks, The Internet, Protocol & Standards Network Models: Layered tasks, Internet model, OSI model
UNIT II
PHYSICAL LAYER
10
Signals: Analog and digital signals, data rate limits, Transmission
impairment, Signal measurements like throughput, propagation speed
and time, wave length - Digital Transmission: Line coding, block coding,
sampling, transmission mode - Analog Transmission: Modulation digital
data, telephone modem, Modulation analog signals - Transmission
Media: Guided media, unguided media - Circuit Switching & Telephone
Network: Circuit switching, telephone network.
UNIT III
DATA LINK LAYER
9
Error detection and Correction: Type of errors, detection and correction
of errors – Data Link Control & Protocol: Flow & error control, Stop-AndWait ARQ, Go-Back-N ARQ, Select Repeat ARQ- HDLC - Point-To-Point
Access: Point-to-point protocol, PPP stack Local Area Network:
Traditional Ethernet, fast and gigabit Ethernets.
UNIT IV
NETWORK LAYER
9
Internetworks - Addressing - Routing - Network Layer Protocols: ARP,
48
IP, ICMP, IPV6 - Unicast routing - Unicast routing protocols - Multi
routing - Multicast routing protocols – IMAP, VPN (Virtual Private
Network)
UNIT V
TRANSPORT
LAYER
LAYER
&
APPLICATION
9
Transport Layer : Process-To-Process delivery - user datagram Transmission control protocol - Application Layer: Client-Server Model:
Client-Server model, VOIP,SIP,VRS
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Data Communications and Networking, Behrouz A. Forouzan, Tata
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., 3rd Edition, 2007.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. William Stallings, “Data and Computer Communications”, PHI, Ninth
Edition, 2011.
2. William A Shay ,”Understanding Data Communications and Networks”
Vikas Publishing House, 3rd Edition, 1995.
15CA205
DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Knowing general problem solving strategies like divide and conquer
method greedy method, dynamic, backtracking and branch and
bound
 To introduce the mathematical aspects of Analyzing an algorithm
 Measuring algorithm performance for best-case, worst-case &
average-case
 To study the concepts of P-NP hard and complete problems
 To introduce the various advanced algorithm such as Approximation
algorithms and Randomized algorithms
49
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Analyze the iterative and Recursive algorithms
 Design and Implement Problem Solving Techniques such as
Divide and Conquer, Greedy method, Dynamic Programming,
Backtracking and Branch and Bound.
 Analyze the efficiency of NP Problems
 Work with advanced algorithms and its complexity analysis
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
10
Fundamentals of algorithmic problem solving - Important problem types Fundamentals of the analysis of algorithm efficiency - analysis frame
work Asymptotic notations - Mathematical analysis for recursive and
non-recursive algorithms.
UNIT II
DIVIDE AND CONQUER METHOD AND
GREEDY METHOD
12
Divide and conquer methodology - Merge sort - Quick sort - Binary
search - Binary tree traversal - Multiplication of large integers Strassen's matrix multiplication - Greedy method - Prim's algorithm Kruskal's algorithm - Dijkstra's algorithm.
UNIT III
DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING AND
RANDOMIZED ALGORTHM
12
Computing a binomial coefficient - Warshall's and Floyd' algorithm Optimal binary search tree - Knapsack problem - Memory functions –
Randomized algorithms.
UNIT IV
BACKTRACKING AND BRANCH AND
BOUND
13
Backtracking - N-Queens problem - Hamiltonian circuit problem – Subset
sum problem - Branch and bound - Assignment problem - Knapsack
problem - Traveling salesman problem.
UNIT V
NP-HARD AND NP-COMPLETE PROBLEMS
13
P & NP problems - NP-complete problems - Approximation algorithms
50
for NP-hard problems - Traveling salesman problem - Knapsack
problem.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Anany Levitin "Introduction to the Design and Analysis of
Algorithms" Pearson Education, 2003.
2. Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest,
"Introduction to algorithms", Prentice Hall, 1990.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Shani and Sanguthevar Rajasekaran,
“Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms”, Universities Press,
Hyderabad, Second Edition, 2008.
2. Sara Basse and Allen Van Gelder, “Computer Algorithms –
Introduction to Design & Analysis”, Pearson Education, New Delhi,
Third Edition, 2000
15CA251
OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING
LABORATORY (C++ AND JAVA)
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To implement the basic concepts of object-oriented programming
 To develop C++ ADTs with
constructor, destructor, static
members, friend functions and overloading functions
 To implement Inheritances and Templates
 To implement the fundamental concepts of Java
 To develop Java code using Interface , package and threads,
 To expertise in developing Java applets with event handling
mechanism
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Describe OOPs concepts
 Design the class with constructor and destructors
51
 Design the class with different kinds of polymorphism
 Develop generic code using template
 Design the class hierarchy using inheritance
 Develop an Interface
 Create and import a package
 Develop multi-thread based programs
 Develop Java applets with event handling mechanism
I. Implementation using C++
1. Program to illustrate the use of Constructors and Destructor
2. Program using Static members
3. Program using function overloading
4. Program using operator overloading
5. Program to incorporate various forms of Inheritance with virtual
functions
6. Program using template class and function
II. Implementation using Java
1. Program using arrays
2. Program to implement inheritance.
3. Program using interface.
4. Program using user defined packages.
5. Program using threads (Multi- threading, communication and
synchronization of threads)
6. Program to develop Applets
7. Program using event handling
8. Program using Menus
9. Program using Layout styles
TEXT BOOKS:
1. E. Balagurusamy, “Object Oriented Programming with C++ “,Tata
McGraw Hill, 5th Edition, 2011.
2. Herbert Schildt, “Java – The Complete Reference”, Tata McGraw
52
Hill, 8th edition, 2011.
3. Peter Haggar,” Practical Java Programming Language Guide”,
Addison Wesley Professional, 1st edition, 2001.
REFERENCES:
1. http://www.roseindia.net/java
2. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial
3. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cplusplus
4. http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial
15CA252
OPERATING SYSTEM LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To experiment file related system calls
 To practice on the process related system calls
 To synchronize processes using semaphores
 To experiment with IPC system calls
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Work with file related System calls
 Manage processes using fork, exec, etc.
 Establish communication between processes
 Apply Synchronization techniques
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Working with file system commands
2. Process creation and management
3. Development of routines for inter process communication
4. Simulation of CPU scheduling algorithms and performance analysis
5. Simulation of Producer-Consumer problem using semaphores.
6. Implementation of deadlock avoidance and prevention algorithms
7. Implementation of contiguous
53
and non contiguous memory
allocation algorithms
8. Implementation of Page replacement algorithms
9. Analysis of file allocation algorithms
10. Simulation of disk scheduling algorithms
11. Case Studies: Virtual Machine Creation using Virtual Box and
VMWare
REFERENCES :
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne, “Operating
System Concepts Essentials”, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2010.
2. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, “Modern Operating Systems”, Addison
Wesley, Second Edition, 2001.
3. D M Dhamdhere, “Operating Systems: A Concept - based
Approach”, Tata McGraw - Hill Education, Second Edition, 2007.
4. William Stallings, “Operating Systems: Internals and Design
Principles”, Prentice Hall, Seventh Edition, 2011.
15CA253
ALGORITHMS LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To write programs on Basic Sorting methods
 To write programs using Divide and Conquer
 To write programs on Tree and Graph applications
 To write programs using Greedy and Dynamic Programming
 To write programs using Back Tracking and Branch & Bound
COURSE OUTCOMES:
On completion of the course, students should be able to
 Write programs on Basic Algorithm design methods
 Write programs using Divide and Conquer
 Write programs on Tree and Graph applications
54
 Write programs using Greedy and Dynamic Programming
 Write programs to solve problems based on Back Tracking
 Write programs to solve problems on Branch & Bound
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Apply the divide and Conquer technique to arrange a set of numbers
using merge sort method.
2. Perform Strassen's matrix multiplication using divide and conquer
method.
3. Solve the knapsack problem using greedy method.
4. Construct a minimum spanning tree using greedy method.
5. Construct optimal binary search trees using dynamic programming
method of problem solving.
6. Find the solution for traveling salesperson problem using dynamic
programming approach.
7. Perform graph traversals.
8. Implement the 8 Queens Problem using backtracking.
9. Implement knapsack problem using backtracking.
10. Find the solution of traveling salesperson problem using branch
and bound technique.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”,
Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2006.
2. Anany Levitin “Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithms”,
Pearson Education, 2003.
3. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++”,
Pearson Education, Fourth Edition, 2013.
4. Tanaenbaum A.S., Langram Y. and Augestein M.J., “Data Structures
using C”, Pearson Education, 2004.
55
15CA301
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide information about wider engineering issues that form
the background to develop complex, evolving (software-intensive)
systems
 To plan a software engineering process to account for quality
issues and non-functional Requirements
 To employ a selection of concepts and techniques to complete a
small-scale analysis and design in mini projects
 To impart knowledge to translate requirement specifications into a
design, and then realize that design practically, all using an
appropriate software engineering methodology
 To provide basic knowledge about software project management
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 Familiarize with the basic concepts of Software Life Cycle
models
 Gather requirements for software system using various methods
 Perform design for development of software systems
 Perform software testing on various applications
 Concentrate on quality issues and types of maintenance for
software systems
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Software Engineering – Product and process – process models Waterfall Life cycle model – Spiral Model – Prototype Model – fourth
Generation Techniques – Agile methods.
UNIT II
REQUIREMENT ANALYSIS
9
Software Requirements Analysis and Specification – Software
Requirements – Problem Analysis – Requirements Specification –
Validation – Metrics – Estimation for Software Projects – Project
Scheduling
56
UNIT III
SOFTWARE DESIGN
9
Abstraction – Modularity – Software Architecture – Cohesion – Coupling
– Various Design Concepts and notations – Real time and Distributed
System Design – Documentation – Dataflow Oriented design –
Designing for reuse – Programming standards.
UNIT IV
SOFTWARE TESTING
9
Coding – Programming Practice – Top-down and Bottom-up - structured
programming – Information Hiding – Programming style – Internal
Documentation Verification – Code Reading – Static Analysis – Symbolic
Execution – Code Inspection or Reviews – Unit Testing – Fundamentals
– Functional Testing versus structural Testing Coding.
UNIT V
SOFTWARE
MAINTENANCE
SOFTWARE METRICS
AND
9
Need for Software maintenance – Maintenance models - SCM – Version
Control – SCM process – Software Configuration Items – Taxonomy –
Basics of Case tools - Scope of Software Metrics – Classification of
metrics – Measuring Process and Product attributes – Direct and Indirect
measures – Reliability – Software Quality Assurance – Standards.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Roger S. Pressman, “Software Engineering – A Practitioner’s
Approach”, Tata McGraw-Hill International Edition, Seventh
Edition, 2009.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Pankaj Jalote, “An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering”,
Narosa publications, Third Edition, 2011.
2. Ian Sommerville, “Software Engineering”, Pearson Education Asia,
Ninth Edition, 2010.
57
15CA302
ADVANCED JAVA TECHNOLOGIES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To gain knowledge in creating professional applets using swing
 To invoke the remote methods in application using
Method Invocation (RMI)
Remote
 To develop the distributed and multi-tier applications using JSP
and servlet with JDBC
 To learn the importance of struts and Hibernate
 To develop the applications based on JSF and Java FX
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Developing professional applets
 Able to call remote methods
 Capability to connect with database in various platforms
 Developing applications using JSP
 Developing web pages using servlet
 Ability to utilize the strut frameworks
 Developing applications using Hibernate
 Knowledge in developing JSF and Java FX oriented applications
UNIT I
Swing
8
Introduction to swing - Swing features - Components -Containers Create Swing Applet
Exploring Swing - Jlabel - JTextField - swing
buttons - JTabbedPane - JList - JTree- JTable
UNIT II
JDBC & Java RMI
9
Types of JDBC Drivers, The Connectivity Model,Navigating the
ResultSet object’s contents, Manipulating records of a ResultSet, object
through user Interface,Database Connectivity, Data Manipulation using
prepared Statements – Remote Method Invocation - RMI Architecture-A
simple server client applications using RMI.
58
UNIT III
Servlets & JSP
9
Background- Life cycle of servlet - A Simple servlet- Servlet APIjavax.servlet package - Get and Post request - Accessing a Servlet
using an HTML page - JSP – Basics and Overview - JSP architectureJSP tags and JSP expressions- Lifecycle of a JSP Model - View
Controller - JSP Objects - JSP Beans Tags- Working with Databases.
UNIT IV
Struts and Hibernate
11
MVC Architecture - Struts overview-Architecture - Struts Action ClassUsing Struts HTML Tags - Struts Validation Framework - Developing
Application with Struts -Introduction to Hibernate - Hibernate Architecture
- Hibernate Application
UNIT V
JSF and Java FX
8
Java Server Faces – overview – architecture - Life cycle - various tags data tables - JSF JDBC integration - Event handling – Application using
JSF - Introduction to Java FX, architecture – Graphics - User Interface
Components - 2D visual effects and Transformations
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Herbert Schildt, “The Complete Reference - Java 2”, McGraw Hill,
2002.
2. Hortsmann & Cornell, “CORE JAVA 2 - Advanced Features, VOL.II”,
Pearson Education, 2002.
3. Sharanam and Vaishali Shah, “Struts 2 for Beginners”, Shroff
Publishers, 2009.
4. M. T. Savaliya, “Advance Java Technology”, Wiley Publishers,
2013.
REFERENCES:
1. www.java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial
2. http://resources.coreservlets.com/java-ee-books.html
3. http://www.tutorialspoint.com
4. http://struts.apache.org/
59
5. http://html.net/tutorials/php/
6. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/javase-clienttechnologies.html
15CA303
SOFTWARE DEVELOPEMENT FOR MOBILE
DEVICES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Build your own Android apps
 Explain the differences between Android
development environments
and other mobile
 Understand how Android applications work, their life cycle,
manifest, Intents, and using external resources
 Design and develop useful Android applications with compelling
user interfaces by using, extending, and creating your own
layouts and Views and using Menus
 Take advantage of Android's APIs for data storage, retrieval,
user preferences, files, databases, and content providers
 Tap into location-based services, geocoder, compass sensors,
and create rich map-based applications
 Utilize the power of background services, threads, and
notifications
 Use Android's communication APIs for SMS, telephony, network
management, and internet resources (HTTP)
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall be able to:
 Understand the basic technologies used by the Android
platform, recognize the structure of an Android app project and
use the tools for Android app development
 Become familiar with creating graphical elements, handling
different screen resolutions, and how graphical elements in an
Android app are displayed.
 Create graphical user interfaces along with functionality for
60
Android apps.
 Create various graphical assets for Android apps and create
animations and transitions.
 Learn how the Android platform uses Intents. Write code to
deal with Content Providers.
 Gain experience in location-based apps, including GPS
sensors, and Maps API.
 Understand what is necessary to publish and distribute Android
apps. Investigate ways that Android apps can generate.
UNIT I
Introduction to Android
8
Introduction to Android Architecture: Introduction, History, Features and
Android Architecture. Android Application Environment, SDK, Tools:
Application Environment and Tools, Android SDK. Programming
paradigms and Application Components - Part 1: Application
Components, Activity, Manifest File, Programming paradigms and
Application Components Part 2: Intents, Content providers, Broadcast
receivers, Services.
UNIT II
User Interface Design
10
User Interface Design part 1: Views &View Groups, Views : Button, Text
Field, Radio Button, Toggle Button, Checkbox, Spinner, Image View,
Image switcher, Event Handling, Listeners, Layouts : Linear,Relative,
List View, Grid View, Table View, Web View, Adapters. User Interface
Design part 2: Menus, Action Bars, Notifications : Status, Toasts and
Dialogs, Styles and Themes, Creating Custom Widgets, Focus, Touch
Mode, Screen Orientation. Resources, Assets, Localization: Resources
and Assets, Creating Resources, Managing application resources and
assets, Resource-Switching in Android. Localization, Localization
Strategies, Testing Localized Applications, Publishing Localized
Applications.
UNIT III
Data Storage
10
Content Providers: Contents provider, Uri, CRUD access, Browser,
CallLog, Contacts, Media Store, and Setting. Data Access and Storage:
61
Shared Preferences, Storage External, Network Connection. SQLite SQLite Databases.
UNIT IV
Native Capabilities
10
Camera, Audio, Sensors and Bluetooth: Android Media API: Playing
audio/video, Media recording. Sensors - how sensors work, listening to
sensor readings. Bluetooth. Maps & Location: Android Communications:
GPS, Working with Location Manager, Working with Google Maps
extensions, Maps via intent and Map Activity, Location based Services.
Location Updates, location-based services (LBS),Location Providers,
Selecting a Location Provider, Finding Your Location, Map - Based
Activities, How to load maps, To finding map API key.
UNIT V
Testing
7
Testing and Commercializing Applications - Basics of Testing,
Testing from an IDE (Eclipse), Activity testing, Service testing, Content
provider testing, Test Classes, Debugging using DDMS, How to get
your app on the app store.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Reto Meier, “Professional Android 4 Development”, John Wiley and
Sons, 2012.
2. W. Frank Ableson, RobiSen, Chris King and C. Enrique Ortiz,
“Android in Action”, Third Edition, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Wei-Meng Lee, “Android Application Development Cookbook”, John
Wiley and Sons, 2013.
2. Grant Allen, “Beginning Android 4”, Apress, 2011.
62
15CA351
VISUAL PROGRAMMING LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To develop applications using Microsoft visual C++ 6.0
 To implement programs using Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Developing Visual Basic Application

Capability to connect with database with front end

Able to create Active X control

Ability to create Dynamic Link Libraries DLL

Knowledge in developing applications using VC++
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Design an application using VB Basic controls.
2. Create a database application using Data Control in VB.
3. SDK type programs code for GDI objects.
4. Program using SDI and MDI.
5. Create an application using ACTIVEX Controls.
6. Program using graphical device interface objects using MFC.
7. Program to display modal and modaless dialogs.
8. Program using static and dynamic controls.
9. Program using document - view architecture.
10.
Program with tool bars and status bars.
11.
Program to create dynamic link libraries using MFC.
12.
Program to interface with database using ADO and ODBC.
15CA352
ADVANCED JAVA LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To develop swing oriented applications
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 To establish the communication between Java and Data base
 To implement Remote Method Invocation (RMI) concepts
 To develop web pages using JSP and Servlet
 To make use of struts and Hibernate frameworks
 To implement Java FX and JSF oriented applications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Developing professional applets
 Capability to connect with database in various platforms
 Invoking remote methods using Java RMI
 Developing applications using JSP and servlet
 Ability to utilize the frameworks like struts and Hibernate
 Knowledge in developing applications using Java FX and JSF
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Developing Java applets using swing
2. Working with database using Java Database Connectivity
3. Invoking remote methods using Java RMI
4. Creating web pages using JSP
5. Creating web pages using Java servlet
6. Developing applications using struts
7. Storing and retrieving data objects with Hibernate
8. Developing applications using Java FX
9. Developing applications using JSF
15CA353
ANDROID APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Build your own Android apps
 Explain the differences between Android
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and other mobile
development environments
 Understand how Android applications work, their life cycle,
manifest, Intents, and using external resources
 Design and develop useful Android applications with compelling
user interfaces by using, extending, and creating your own layouts
and Views and using Menus
 Take advantage of Android's APIs for data storage, retrieval, user
preferences, files, databases, and content providers
 Tap into location-based services, geocoder, compass sensors, and
create rich map-based applications
 Utilize the power of background services, threads, and notifications
 Use Android's communication APIs for SMS, telephony, network
management, and internet resources (HTTP)
 Secure, tune, package, and deploy Android applications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, the student shall be able to:
 Understand the basic technologies used by the Android platform.
Recognize the structure of an Android app project. Be able to use
the tools for Android app development.
 Become familiar with creating graphical elements, handling
different screen resolutions, and how graphical elements in an
Android app are displayed.
 Create GUI along with functionality for Android apps.
 Create various graphical assets for Android apps and create
animations and transitions.
 Learn how the Android platform uses Intents. Write code to deal
with Content Providers.
 Gain experience in location-based apps, including GPS sensors,
and Maps API.
 Understand what is necessary to publish and distribute Android
apps. Investigate ways that Android apps can generate money.
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LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Display Hello World
2. Add two Edit Text. When a number is entered in Edit Text 1, the
square of that number should be displayed in Edit Text 2.
3. Add an Edit Text and a button. When the button is clicked, the text
inputted in Edit Text should be retrieved and displayed back to the
user.
4. Add two Edit Text and a button. When the button is clicked, the text
inputted in Edit Text should be retrieved and displayed in EditText2.
5. Program a calculator
6. Create a Module convertor for height and weight in the same
application. Selection of height/weight can be done using a spinner.
7. Add a spinner. When the spinner is selected, there should be three
options (e.g., android, java, testing). When you click on each option,
it should go to another page containing some other components.
Each of these pages should have a “back” button, which on pressing
will take you back to the page with the spinner.
8. Create applications to include Action Bar, Menus, Dialogs and
Notifications
9. Create a user login form and registration form. First time users have
to register through the registration form and the details should be
stored in the database. Then they can login using the login page.
10. Create a camera application, where you can click a picture and
then save it as the wallpaper.
11. Create a media player which plays an mp3 song.
12. Create a media recorder which will record the sound.
13. Graphics apps in android:
a. Create an application where different shapes of different colors
are displayed.
b. Create an application to show a cyclist moving from one direction
to another.
15. Animation apps like Bouncing ball, Moving arrow, etc.
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15CA401
NETWORK PROGRAMMING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand socket programming
 To understand usage of TCP/UDP / Raw sockets
 To understand inter process and inter-system communication

To understand how to build network applications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand network communication concepts
 Develop socket programming based applications
 Apply TCP/UDP programming for various applications
 Use Raw sockets in various domains
 Develop tools for debugging networks
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Overview of UNIX OS - Environment of a UNIX process - Process
control – Process relationships- Signals – Interprocess Communicationoverview of TCP/IP protocols
UNIT II
ELEMENTARY TCP SOCKETS
9
Introduction to Socket Programming –Introduction to Sockets – Socket
address Structures – Byte ordering functions – address conversion
functions – Elementary TCP Sockets – socket, connect, bind, listen,
accept, read, write , close functions – Iterative Server – Concurrent
Server.
UNIT III
APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
9
TCP Echo Server – TCP Echo Client – Posix Signal handling – Server
with multiple clients – boundary conditions: Server process Crashes,
Server host Crashes, Server Crashes and reboots, Server Shutdown –
I/O multiplexing – I/O Models – select function – shutdown function –
TCP echo Server (with multiplexing) – poll function – TCP echo Client
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(with Multiplexing).
UNIT IV
SOCKET OPTIONS,
SOCKETS
ELEMENTARY
UDP
9
Socket options – getsocket and setsocket functions – generic socket
options – IP socketoptions –ICMP socket options – TCP socket options
– Elementary UDP sockets – UDP echo Server – UDPecho Client –
Multiplexing TCP and UDP sockets – Domain name system –
gethostbyname function –Ipv6 support in DNS – gethostbyadr function –
getservbyname and getservbyport functions.
UNIT V
ADVANCED SOCKETS
9
Ipv4 and Ipv6 interoperability – threaded servers – thread creation and
termination – TCP echo server using threads – Mutexes – condition
variables – raw sockets – raw socket creation – raw socket output – raw
socket input – ping program – trace route program - Networking
debugging tools like netcat , tcpdump.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. W. Richard Stevens, B. Fenner, A.M. Rudoff, “Unix Network
Programming – The Sockets Networking API”, Volume 1, PHI
Learning Private Limited, 3rd edition, 2009.
2. W. Richard Stevens, “Advanced Programming in The UNIX
Environment”, Addison Wesley, 1999.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Behrouz A. Forouzan, “TCP / IP Protocol Suite”, McGraw-Hill,
Fourth Edition, 2009.
2. Douglas E. Comer, “Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol. 3, Clientserver Programming and Applications”, Prentice Hall Publishers
Ltd. Addison Wesley, 2000.
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15CA402
OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND
DESIGN
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the fundamental concepts of Object Oriented
System Development.
 To get familiar with Unified Modeling Language.
 To be articulate about Object Oriented Analysis and Design.
 To become acquainted in using UML notations for Object Oriented
System Development.
 To acquire a comprehensible knowledge about Software Quality &
Testing.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Recognize the object oriented concepts
 Extrapolate the basics object oriented systems development
 Articulate about the Unified Modeling Language
 Understand the use case driven object oriented analysis
 Comprehend the purpose of layered approach in software
development
 Exemplify the need for design axioms and corollaries
 Understand the various testing strategies
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
12
An overview – Object basics – Object state and properties – Behavior –
Methods – Messages – Information hiding – Class hierarchy –
Relationships – Associations – Aggregations- Identity – Dynamic binding
– Persistence – Meta classes – Object oriented system development life
cycle.
UNIT II
METHODOLOGY AND UML
12
Introduction – Survey – Rumbaugh, Booch, Jacobson methods –
Patterns, Case Study for Pattern – Frameworks – Unified Approach –
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Unified Modeling Language – Static and Dynamic models – UML
diagrams – Class diagram – Usecase diagrams – Dynamic modeling –
Model organization – Extensibility. UML diagrams for case study.
UNIT III
OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS
12
Identifying Usecase – Business object analysis – Usecase driven object
oriented analysis – Usecase model – Documentation – Classification –
Identifying object, relationships, attributes, methods – Super-sub class –
A part of relationships Identifying attributes and methods – Object
responsibility.
UNIT IV
OBJECT ORIENTED DESIGN
12
Design process – Axioms – Corollaries – Designing classes – Class
visibility – Refining attributes – Methods and protocols – Object storage
and object interoperability – Databases – Object relational systems –
Designing interface objects – Macro and Micro level processes – The
purpose of a view layer interface.
UNIT V
SOFTWARE QUALITY
12
Quality assurance – Testing strategies – Object Orientation Testing –
Test cases – Test Plan – Debugging principles – Usability – Satisfaction
– Usability testing – Satisfaction Testing.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Ali Bahrami, “Object Oriented System Development”, McGraw Hill
International Edition, 1999.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Craig Larman, “Applying UML and Patterns – An Introduction to
Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development”,
Pearson, 3rd Edition, 2006.
2. Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, “The Unified
Modeling Language User Guide”, Addison Wesley Long man,
1999.
3. Bernd Bruegge, Allen H. Dutoit, “Object Oriented Software
Engineering using UML, Patterns and Java”, Pearson, 2004.
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4. Michael Blaha and James Rumbaugh, “Object-oriented modeling
and design with UML”, Prentice-Hall of India, 2005.
5. Martin Fowler, “UML Distilled”, Pearson Education, 3rd edition,
2004.
15CA403
SOFTWARE TESTING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To determine software testing objectives and criteria
 To develop and validate a test plan
 To select and prepare test cases
 To identify the need for testing
 To prepare testing policies and standards
 To use testing aids and tools
 To test before buying a software package
 Test after maintenance and enhancement changes
 To measure the success of testing efforts
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be familiar with:

Various test processes and continuous quality improvement
 Types of errors and fault models
 Methods of test generation from requirements
 Behaviour modeling using UML: Finite state machines (FSM)
 Test generation from FSM models
 Input space modeling using combinatorial designs
 Combinatorial test generation
 Test adequacy assessment using: control flow, data flow, and
program mutations
 The use of various test tools
 Application of software testing techniques in commercial
environments
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UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Testing as an Engineering Activity – Testing as a Process – testing
axioms - Basic Definitions – Software Testing Principles – The
Tester’s Role in a Software Development Organization – Origins
of Defects – cost of defects - Defect Classes – The Defect
Repository
and
Test
Design
–
Defect
Examples
–
Developer/Tester Support for Developing a Defect Repository – Defect
Prevention Strategies
UNIT II
TEST CASE DESIGN
9
Test Case Design Strategies – Using Black Box Approach to Test
Case Design - Random Testing – Requirements based testing –
Boundary Value Analysis – Decision tables - Equivalence Class
Partitioning - State-based testing – Cause-effect graphing – Error
guessing - Compatibility testing – User documentation testing –
Domain testing Using White Box Approach to Test design – Test
Adequacy Criteria – static testing vs. structural testing – code
functional testing - Coverage and Control Flow Graphs – Covering
Code Logic – Paths – Their Role in White–box Based Test Design –
code complexity testing – Evaluating Test Adequacy Criteria.
UNIT III
LEVELS OF TESTING
9
The Need for Levels of Testing – Unit Test – Unit Test Planning –
Designing the Unit Tests - The Test Harness – Running the Unit tests
and Recording results – Integration tests – Designing Integration
Tests – Integration Test Planning – Scenario testing – Defect bash
elimination System Testing – Acceptance testing – Performance testing
- Regression Testing – Internationalization testing – Ad-hoc testing Alpha , Beta Tests – testing OO systems – Usability and Accessibility
testing – Configuration testing - Compatibility testing – Testing the
documentation – Website testing.
UNIT IV
TEST MANAGEMENT
9
People and organizational issues in testing – organization structures
for testing teams – testing services - Test Planning – Test Plan
Components – Test Plan Attachments – Locating Test Items – test
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management – test process - Reporting Test Results – The role of
three groups in Test Planning and Policy Development – Introducing
the test specialist – Skills needed by a test specialist – Building a
Testing Group.
UNIT V
TEST AUTOMATION
9
Software test automation – skills needed for automation – scope
of automation – design and architecture for automation –
requirements for a test tool – challenges in automation - Test
metrics and measurements – project, progress and productivity
metrics.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Srinivasan Desikan and Gopalaswamy Ramesh, “Software Testing
– Principles and Practices”, Pearson education, 2006.
2.
Ilene Burnstein, “ Practical
International Edition, 2012
Software
Testing”,
Springer
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ron Patton, “ Software Testing”,
Publishing, Pearson education, 2007
Second
Edition,
Sams
2. Renu Rajani, Pradeep Oak, “Software Testing – Effective
Methods, Tools and Techniques”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2004.
3. Edward Kit, “Software Testing in the Real World
Improving the Process”, Pearson Education, 1995.
–
4. Boris Beizer, “Software Testing Techniques”, Van Nostrand
Reinhold, New York, 2nd Edition, 1990.
5. Aditya P. Mathur, “Foundations of Software Testing –
Fundamental algorithms and
techniques”, Dorling Kindersley
(India) Pvt. Ltd., Pearson Education, 2008
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15CA451
NETWORK PROGRAMMING LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To develop the necessary skills for developing robust & scalable
network applications and to build necessary basic knowledge for
managing computer communication networks.
 To learn the basics of socket programming using TCP
 To learn basics of UDP sockets.
 To understand simple network management protocols & practical
issues.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Has a high degree of effectiveness and correctness in the design
and implementation of client server applications using socket
programming
 To understand and debug Networking applications
 To develop applications for Networking environment
List of Experiments
1. Socket Programming
a) TCP Sockets
b) UDP Sockets
c) Applications using Sockets
2. Simulation of Sliding Window Protocol
3. Simulation of Routing Protocols
4. Simulation of Remote Procedure Calls
5. Development of applications such as DNS / HTTP / E-mail / Multiuser chat
6. Development of applications such as message passing to multiple
clients using multicasting
NOTE: Implementation of the above exercises can be done using C or
JAVA language.
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15CA452
SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY L T P C
USING CASE TOOLS
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the software engineering methodologies for project
development.
 To gain knowledge about open source tools for Computer Aided
Software Engineering.
 To develop an efficient software using case tools.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Recognize the object oriented concepts
 Exemplify the intricacies of object oriented systems development
 Use open source CASE tools to develop software
 Analyze and design software requirements in an efficient manner
 Prepare Test Plan and perform testing
CASE Tools Required: Rational Suite/Umbrello/StarUML/UMLGraph
Prepare the following documents for each experiment and develop the
software using software engineering methodology.
Problem Analysis and Project Planning -Thorough study of the
problem – Identify Project scope - Objectives and Infrastructure.
1. Software Requirement Analysis - Describe the individual
Phases/modules of the project and Identify deliverables.
2. Data Modelling - Use work products – data dictionary - use case
diagrams and activity diagrams - build and test class diagrams sequence diagrams and add interface to class diagrams.
3. Software Development and Debugging – implement the design by
coding
4. Software Testing - Prepare test plan - perform validation testing coverage analysis memory leaks - develop test case hierarchy - Site
check and site monitor.
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SAMPLE EXPERIMENTS:
Academic domain
1. Course Registration System
2. Student Marks Analysing System
Railway domain
3. Ticket Reservation System
4. Suburban Ticketing System
Medicine domain
5. Expert system to prescribe medicines for the given symptoms
6. Health Care monitoring
Finance domain
7. Banking
8. Stock Maintenance
Human Resource management
9. Quiz System
10. Job Portal.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Craig Larman, “Applying UML and Patterns – An Introduction to
Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development”,
Pearson, 3rd Edition, 2006.
2. Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, “The Unified
Modeling Language User Guide”, Addison Wesley Long man, 1999.
3. Bernd Bruegge, Allen H. Dutoit, “Object Oriented Software
Engineering using UML, Patterns and Java”, Pearson, 2004.
4. Michael Blaha and James Rumbaugh, “Object-oriented modeling
and design with UML”, Prentice-Hall of India, 2005.
5. Martin Fowler, “UML Distilled”, Pearson Education, 3rd edition,
2004.
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15CA453
SOFTWARE TESTING LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn how to planning a test project, design test cases and
data, conduct testing operations, manage software problems and
defects, generate a testing report.
 To gain software testing experience by applying software testing
knowledge and methods to practice-oriented software testing
projects.
 To understand software test automation problems and solutions.
 To learn how to write software testing documents, and
communicate with engineers in various forms.
 To gain the techniques and skills on how to use modern software
testing tools to support software testing projects.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of the course, you should
 Have an ability to identify the needs of software test automation,
and define and develop a test tool to support test automation.
 Have an ability understand and identify various software testing
problems, and solve these problems by designing and selecting
software test models, criteria, strategies, and methods.
 Have an ability to use various communication methods and skills
to communicate with their teammates to conduct their practiceoriented software testing projects.
 Have basic understanding and knowledge of contemporary issues
in software testing, such as component-based software testing
problems
 Have an ability to use software testing methods and modern
software testing tools for their testing projects.
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List of exercises
1. Understand The Automation Testing Approach (Theory Concept)
2. Using Selenium IDE, Write a test suite containing minimum 4 test
cases.
3. Conduct a test suite for nay two web sites.
4. Install Selenium server and demonstrate it using a script in
Java/PHP
5. Write and test a program to login a specific web page.
6. Write and test a program to update 10 student records into table
into Excel file.
7. Write and test a program to select the number of students who
have scored more than 60 in any one subject ( or all subjects ).
8. Write and test a program to provide total number of objects
present / available on the page
9. Write and test a program to get the number of list items in a list /
combo box.
10. Write and test a program to count number of check boxes on the
page checked and unchecked count.
15CA501
WEB SERVICES AND CLOUD COMPUTING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the concept of cloud and utility computing.
 To understand the various issues in cloud computing.
 To familiarize themselves with the types of virtualization.
 To familiarize themselves with the lead players in cloud.
 To appreciate the emergence of cloud as the next generation
computing paradigm.
 To be able to set up a private cloud.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Recognize the strengths and limitations of cloud computing
78
 Discuss on various virtual machine products
 Identify the architecture, infrastructure and delivery models of
cloud computing Applications.
 Suggest solutions for the core issues of cloud computing such as
security, privacy and interoperability
 Decide the appropriate technologies, algorithms and approaches
for the related issues
UNIT I
WEB SERVICES
9
Web Services – Definition – Web Services and EAI – Web Services
Technologies – web services Architecture – SOAP – WSDL – UDDI –
WS-Addressing – WS-Routing – WS-Security – WS-Policy – Web
Service invocation framework - Web services using java – WS using
.NET.
UNIT II
VIRTUALIZATION
9
Implementation Levels of Virtualization - Virtualization Structures - Tools
and Mechanisms - Virtualization of CPU, Memory, I/O Devices - Virtual
Clusters and Resource Management – Virtualization for Data-Center
Automation.
UNIT III
CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE
9
Scalable Computing over the Internet – Technologies for Network based
Systems - System Models for Distributed and Cloud Computing –
Software Environments for Distributed Systems and Cloud –
Performance, Security and Energy Efficiency – Clustering for Massive
Parallelism – Computer Clusters and MPP Architecture – Design
principles of Computer Clusters.
UNIT IV
CLOUD ARCHITECTURE
9
Cloud Computing and Service models – Data centre design and
interconnection networks – Architectural Design of Compute and
Storage Clouds –Public Cloud Platforms – Inter Cloud resource
management – Cloud Security and Trust Management.
UNIT V
PROGRAMMING MODEL
9
Parallel and Distributed Programming Paradigms – MapReduce , Twister
79
and Iterative MapReduce – Hadoop Library from Apache – Mapping
Applications - Programming Support - Google App Engine, Amazon
AWS - Microsoft Azure – Eucalyptus – Nimbus - Open Nebula,
OpenStack. CloudSim – Architecture - Cloudlets – VM creation – Broker
– VM allocation – Hosts – Data Center.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Kai Hwang, Geoffrey C. Fox, Jack J Dongarra, “Distributed and
Cloud Computing, From Parallel Processing to the Internet of
Things”, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 2012.
2. Frank P Coyle, “XML, Web Services and the Data Revolution”,
Pearson Education, 2007.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ronald L. Krutz, Russell Dean Vines, “Cloud Security – A
comprehensive Guide to Secure Cloud Computing”, Wiley – India,
2010.
2. John W. Rittinghouse and James F. Ransome, “Cloud Computing:
Implementation, Management, and Security”, CRC Press, 2010.
3.
George Reese, “Cloud Application Architectures: Building
Applications and Infrastructure in the Cloud”, O'Reilly, 2009.
4. Rajkumar Buyya, Christian Vecchiola, S. TamaraiSelvi, “Mastering
Cloud Computing”, TMH, 2013.
5. James E. Smith, Ravi Nair, “Virtual Machines: Versatile Platforms
for Systems and Processes”, Elsevier/Morgan Kaufmann, 2005.
6. William von Hagen, “Professional Xen Virtualization”, Wrox
Publications, 2008.
15CA502
.NET FRAMEWORK AND C#
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the advanced C# programming.
80
 To become familiar with LINQ.
 To study the ADO.NET features.
 To gain knowledge in the concepts of the work flow and Windows
Presentation Foundations.
 To learn the basics of ASP.NET Web Forms.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 write Advanced C# Programs
 Understand the concept of Late Binding
 Write programs for database access using ADO.NET
 Developing WPF controls
 Developing ASP.NET web forms
UNIT I
Advanced C# programming
9
Collections and Generics - Delegates, Events, and Lambda Expressions
- Advanced C# Language Features.
UNIT II
LINQ
9
LINQ to Objects – Understanding Object Lifetime – Building and
Configuring Class Libraries – Understanding Late Binding - Introducing
LINQ to XML.
UNIT III
ADO.NET
9
ADO.NET Part I: The Connected Layer – ADO.NET Part II: The
Disconnected Layer.
UNIT IV
WF and WPF
9
Introducing Windows Workflow Foundation - Introducing Windows
Presentation Foundation and XAML – Programming with WPF Controls.
UNIT V
ASP.NET Web Forms
9
Introducing ASP.NET web forms – ASP.NET Web Controls, Master
Pages, and Themes.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
81
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Andrew Troelsen, “Pro C# 5.0 and the .NET 4.5 Framework”,
Apress, 6th edition, 2013.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ben Albahari, Peter Drayton and Brad Merrill, “C# Essentials”, 2nd
Edition, O`reilly, 2002.
2. Robert J. Oberg, “Introduction to C# using .NET”, PHI, 2002.
3. “Microsoft C# Language Specifications, WP Publishers and
Distributors Pvt. Ltd., 2001.
4. S. Thamarai Selvi, R. Murugesan, “A Text Book on C#”, Pearson
Education, 2003.
5. Jesse Liberty and Donald Xie, “Programming C# 3.0”, O’Reilly, 5th
Edition, 2008.
6. http:\\www.msdn.microsoft.com
15CA551
SOA AND CLOUD COMPUTING
LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn how to use Cloud Services.
 To implement Virtualization.
 To implement Task Scheduling algorithms.
 To implement Energy-conscious model.
 To build Private Cloud.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Analyze the use of Cloud Applications
Apply resource allocation, scheduling algorithms.
Implement Energy-conscious model.
Create virtual machines from available physical resources.
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List of Exercises
1. Study and Usage of Google Apps.
2. Implement Virtual OS using virtual box.
3. Simulate VM allocation algorithm using CloudSim.
4. Simulate Task Scheduling algorithm using CloudSim.
5. Simulate Energy-conscious model using CloudSim.
6. Setup a Private Cloud Using Open Stack or Eucalyptus.
7. Install and configure Open Stack Object Storage - Swift in Ubuntu.
8. Implement Open Stack Nova-Compute.
9. Implement Open Stack Image services – Glance.
10. Implement Map Reduce concept for an application.
15CA552
C# AND .NET PROGRAMMING
LABORATORY
L T
P C
0 0
4 2
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Understand the control structures in C#.
 To become familiar LINQ concepts.
 To learn WPF, WF and ADO.NET programs
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Ability to write programs using C#
 Develop the web applications using .NET.
 Ability to create web services using .NET.
 Develop ADO.NET programs
List of Exercises
1. C# program using Late Binding
2. Attribute based Programs using C#
3. Language Integrated Query (LINQ) based programs using C#
4. C# program that used Lambda Expressions
5. Program for creating web services using C#
6. C# program for Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)
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7. C# programs for Windows Workflow foundations (WF)
8. Program to perform ADO.NET
9. Design a web application in ASP using ADO.
10.Creating a Custom Data-Bound ASP.NET Web Control for
ASP.NET2.0
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Andrew Troelsen, “Pro C# 5.0 and the .NET 4.5 Framework”,
Apress, 6th edition, 2013.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Herbert Schildt, “The Complete Reference: C#", Tata McGrawHill, 2004.
2. Robinson, et al., “Professional C#", 2nd ed., Wrox Press, 2002.
3. Jesse Liberty and Donald Xie, “Programming C# 3.0”, O’Reilly,
5th Edition, 2008.
4. Ben Albahari, Peter Drayton and Brad Merrill, “C# Essentials”,
O`reilly, 2nd Edition, 2002.
5. Robert J.Oberg, “Introduction to C# using .NET”, PHI, 2002.
6. S. Thamarai Selvi, R. Murugesan, “A Text Book on C#”,
Pearson Education, 2003.
7. E. Balagurusamy, "Programming in C#", Tata McGraw-Hill,
2004.
8. “MSDN: Microsoft Developer Network”.
15CAC01
SYSTEM SOFTWARE
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the relationship between system software and
machine architecture
 To know the design and implementation of assemblers
 To know the design and implementation of linkers and loaders
 To have an understanding of macro-processors
84
 To have an understanding of system software tools
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Learn System Software and Machine Architecture
 Understand the functionality of Assemblers and its machine
independent and dependent features
 Be familiar with the loader features and its design options
 Gain knowledge about Macro Processor functions, features and
design options
 Understanding about the Text editors and Interactive Debugging
Systems
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction – System Software and Machine Architecture – The
Simplified Instructional Computer (SIC): SIC Machine Architecture –
SIC/XE Machine Architecture – SIC Programming examples.
UNIT II
ASSEMBLERS
9
Basic assembler functions: A simple SIC assembler – Assembler
algorithms and data structures – Machine dependent assembler
features: Instruction formats and Addressing modes – Program
Relocation – Machine independent assembler features: Literals –
Symbol-defining statements – Expressions – Program Blocks – Control
Sections and Program Linking – Assembler Design Options: One Pass
Assembler – Multi-Pass Assembler – Implementation examples: MASM
assembler.
UNIT III
LOADERS AND LINKERS
9
Basic Loader Functions: Design of an Absolute Loader – A Simple
Bootstrap Loader – Machine-Dependent Loader Features: Relocation –
Program Linking – Algorithm and Data Structures for a Linking Loader Machine-independent loader features: Automatic Library Search –
Loader Options - Loader Design Options: Linkage Editors – Dynamic
Linking – Bootstrap Loaders - Implementation Examples: MSDOS linker.
UNIT IV
MACRO PROCESSORS
9
Basic Macro Processor Functions – Macro Definition and Expansion –
85
Macro Processor Algorithm and Data structures – Machine- Independent
Macro Processor Features: Concatenation of Macro Parameters –
Generation of Unique Labels – Conditional Macro Expansion – Keyword
Macro Parameters – Macro Processor Design Options: Recursive
Macro Expansion – General Purpose macro Processors – Macro
Processing within Language Translators - Implementation Examples:
MASM Macro Processor – ANSI C Macro language.
UNIT V
OTHER SYSTEM SOFTWARE
9
Text Editors: Overview of Editing Process - User Interface – Editor
Structure – Interactive Debugging Systems: Debugging Functions and
Capabilities – Relationships with Other Parts of the System – UserInterface Criteria.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Leland Beck - “System Software – An Introduction to Systems
Programming”, Pearson Education Inc., Third Edition, 1999.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. D. M. Dhamdhere, “Systems Programming and Operating Systems",
Tata McGraw Hill Company, 1999.
2. John J. Donovan, “Systems Programming”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1991.
15CAC02
VISUAL PROGRAMMING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The objectives of this course is to
 To understand the concepts of windows Programming.
 To develop applications using Visual Basic.
 To develop applications using VC++.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
On completion of this course the students will be able to
86
 Explain the concepts of windows programming.
 Write pseudo code for windows program.
 Develop program using Visual Basic.
 Develop program using VC++.
 Develop real time applications using VB and VC++
UNIT I
WINDOWS PROGRAMMING
8
The windows programming Model – Event driven programming – GUI
concepts –Overview of Windows programming – Creating and displaying
the window – Message Processing in Windows Programming - Message
Boxes - Message Loop – windows procedure – WM_PAINT message –
WM_DESTROY message – Data types – Resources – An Introduction to
GDI – Device context – Text output – Scroll Bars – Keyboard – Mouse –
Menus.
UNIT II
VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING
10
Visual Basic Applications – Form and properties – Variables and
Constants – Variant type – Procedure scope – Main – Control
statements – control arrays – Creating and using Controls – Menus and
Dialogs – Programming fundamentals – Objects and instances –
Debugging – Responding to mouse events – Drag and Drag drop events
Responding to keyboard events – keypress, keyup, keydown events –
Using grid control – Graphics controls – shape and line control – File
system controls – Common dialog controls – Processing files –
Accessing databases with the data controls.
UNIT III
VISUAL C++ PROGRAMMING
9
Visual C++ components – Introduction to Microsoft Foundation Classes
Library – Getting started with AppWizard – Class Wizard – Event
handling – Keyboard and Mouse events - WM_SIZE, WM_CHAR
messages - Graphics Device Interface - Pen, Brush, Colors, Fonts Single and Multiple document interface - Reading and Writing
documents - Resources – Bitmaps creation, usage of BMP and
displaying a file existing as a BMP.
87
UNIT IV
CONTROLS
9
Dialog Based Applications, controls – Animate control, image list, CRect
tracker – Tree control – CtabControl – Dynamic controls – slider control
– progress control – Inheriting CTreeView – CRicheditView – Modal
Dialog, – Modeless Dialog – CColorDialog – CfileDialog.
UNIT V
ADVANCED CONCEPTS
9
Domain Name System – Email – World Wide Web (HTTP) – Simple
Status bars – Splitter windows and multiple views – Dynamic Link
Library – Data base Management with ODBC – TCP/IP – Winsock and
WinInet, – ActiveX control – creation and usage – Container class.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Charles Petzold, “Windows Programming”, Microsoft press, 1996.
2. J. David Kruglirski, “Programming Microsoft Visual C++”, Microsoft
press, Fifth Edition, 1998.
3. Marion Cottingham, “Visual Basic”, Peachpit Press, 1999.
4. Kanetkar Y., “Visual C++ Programming”, BPB Publications, 1998.
15CAC03
ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn about Supply Chain Management and Business
Engineering
 To know how to build a business model and implement an ERP
 To provide knowledge about Industrial and financial systems
 To explore the features of Baan and SAP
 To learn about user interface and application integration
 To know about system control, services, presentation and
database interfaces
88
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Knowledge about Supply Chain Management and Business
Engineering
 Build a Business model and implement an ERP
 Knowledge about Industrial and Financial systems
 An idea about Baan and SAP
 Knowledge about user interface and application integration
 Know about system control and different interfaces
UNIT I
Introduction
9
Integrated Management Information Seamless Integration - Supply
Chain Management - Integrated Data Model - Benefits Of ERP Business Engineering and ERP- Definition of Business Engineering Principles of business engineering - Business engineering with
Information Technology.
UNIT II
ERP Implementation
9
Building The Business model - ERP implementation an Overview Role of
Consultant, Vendors and Users, Customization – Precautions - ERP
Post implementation options – ERP Implementation Technology
Guidelines for ERP Implementation.
UNIT III
ERP Packages
9
ERP domain - MPG/PRO IFS/Avalon - Industrial and financial systems Baan IV SAP Market Dynamics and dynamic strategy.
UNIT IV
Client/Server Solutions
9
Description - Multi-Client Server solution - Open technology - User
Interface – Application Integration.
UNIT V
System Control and Interfaces
9
Basic architectural Concepts - The system control interfaces – Services Presentation interface - Database Interface.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
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TEXT BOOKS:
1. Vinod Kumar Garg and N.K.Venkita Krishnan, “Enterprise Resource
Planning Concepts and Practice”, PHI, 2nd edition, 2004.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jose Antonio Fernandz, “The SAP R/3 Handbook”, Tata McGraw Hill
Publications, 2006.
15CAC04
BUSINESS DATA PROCESSING WITH
COBOL
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the concepts of programming and business data
processing
 To understand the fundamentals of the COBOL language
 To understand the design and execution of COBOL programs
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completing this course, the students will be able to
 Know the concepts of Business data processing
 know the fundamental elements of the COBOL program
 apply the COBOL language to develop different business
applications
 Develop logic, designing and writing a well-structured program
 the student should be able to compile, execute and debug a
COBOL program
UNIT I
The Basics
9
Meaning and purpose of Business Data processing - input data
manipulation - output of information - data storage - file manipulation and
maintenance - Program Development Cycle - Advantages of using
COBOL for business applications - An introduction to structured program
design in COBOL - Basic Structure of a COBOL program - Identification
and Environment Divisions - Data division - Procedure division.
90
UNIT II
Designing Structured programs
9
Printing information and displaying output interactively – Different types
of MOVE statements - producing printed output and screen displays Displaying output interactively using screen input and output Computing in COBOL - The basic arithmetic verbs - the compute
statements - Decision making using the IF and EVALUATE statements Condition names – Iteration using PERFORM statements.
UNIT III
Writing High Level COBOL Programs
9
Array processing and Table handling - An introduction to Single level
OCCURS CLAUSES, Processing data stored in an array - Using an
OCCURS Clauses for table handling - use of the Search Statements for
Table and array processing - Multiple-Level OCCURS Clause.
UNIT IV
File Maintenance
9
Sequential file processing - Creating new master file using a previous
master file and transaction file - Validity checking in update procedures Updating a sequential file - sorting and merging - Indexed and relative
file processing.
UNIT V
Advanced Topics
9
Improving program productivity using the COPY, CALL and other
statements - text manipulation with the STRING and UNSTRING
statements - The Report Writer Module.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Tyler Welburn & Wilson Price, “Structured COBOL (Fundamentals
and Style)”, McGraw Hill, Fourth Edition, 1995.
2. A. S. Philippakis and L. J. Kazmier, “Advanced COBOL”, McGraw
Hill, 1991.
3. Roy M. K. and Ghopsh Dastidar, “COBOL Programming”, Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1989.
91
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Robert T. Grauer, “Structured COBOL Programming”, Prentice
Hall, 1985.
2. Gary DeWard Brown, “Advanced COBOL for Structured and
Object-Oriented Programming”, John Wiley and Sons, 3rd Edition,
1998.
15CAC05
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To know the basic output primitives of Graphics
 To develop algorithms for various output primitives
 To apply various 2D and 3D transformations
 To map window content to viewport
 Learn 3D transformation
 To perform parallel and perspective projections
 To detect 3D visible surfaces of 3D Objects
 Understand the basic concepts of color models
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Recognize different types of output primitives in graphics system
 Implement the basics transformations
 Understand the application of clipping algorithms
 Implement 2D clipping algorithms
 Understand the basic concepts of 3D
 Comprehend the role of 3D transformations and 3D viewing
 Exemplify the need of visible surface detection methods
 Understand the purpose of color models
92
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
8
Display devices – Raster - random devices - Output Primitives - Points
and Lines - DDA Line Drawing - Bresenham Line and Circle Drawing
Algorithms – Attributes of Output Primitives - Line, curve and Character
Attributes – color and Grayscale levels - Bundled Attributes.
UNIT II
2D TRANSFORMATIONS
8
Two dimensional transformations – Basic Transformations – Translation
– Scaling – Rotation- Matrix Representation - Homogeneous coordinates
- Composite transformations - fixed point scaling - pivot point rotationcomputational efficiency - special transformations – Shearing Reflection.
UNIT III
2D Viewing
10
Viewing Pipeline – Viewing Coordinate System - Window to Viewport
mapping – Clipping operations - Cohen Sutherland Line and polygon
clipping – Text Clipping – Exterior clipping.
UNIT IV
3D Transformations and 3D Viewing
10
3D Concepts - 3D Display methods - 3D Translation - Scaling – Rotation
- 3D viewing pipeline - Projections – Parallel – Perspective - View
volume - 3D Clipping – Normalized view volume.
UNIT V
Visible Surface
Models
Detection
and
Color
9
Visible Surface Detection – classification - Back face Detection – Depth
buffer - Scan line Method - Depth Sorting- Area Sub division – Color
model – Basic color models – RGB-CMY - HSV – HLSl.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Donald Hearn and M. Pauline Baker, “Computer Graphics in C
Version”, Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2007.
93
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. James D. Foley, Andries Van Dam, Steven K. Feiner, John F. Hughes,
“Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice in C”, Pearson
Education, 2007.
2. Zhigang Xiang, Roy A. Plastock, “Schaum’s Outline of Computer
Graphics, McGraw Hill Professional, 2000.
15CAC06
MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS AND ITS
APPLICATIONS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn about properties of Multimedia systems and Data stream
characteristics of continuous media
 To gain knowledge about the features of different types of media
like image, audio, video, animation
 To provide knowledge about various features of multimedia
communication systems
 To explore various issues in multimedia synchronization
 To learn about various applications of multimedia
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Knowledge about Multimedia system properties and Data stream
characteristics of continuous media
 Knowledge about the features of different types of multimedia.
 Idea about various features of multimedia communication systems
 An idea about various issues in multimedia synchronization
 Knowledge about various multimedia applications
UNIT I
MEDIA AND DATA STREAMS
9
Multimedia: Media and Data Streams: Medium – Main properties of
Multimedia System – Multimedia – Traditional Data Streams
Characteristics – Data Stream characteristics of continuous Media.
94
UNIT II
MULTIMEDIA
9
Sound / Audio: Basic Sound Concepts – Music – Speech – Images and
Graphics: Basic Concepts – Computer Image Processing – Video and
Animation: Basic Concepts – Television – Computer-Based Animation.
UNIT III
MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
9
Multimedia Communication Systems: Application Subsystem –
Collaborative Computing – Session Management - Transport Subsystem
– Transport Layer – Network Layer – Quality of Service and Resource
Management – Basic Concepts – Establishment and Closing of the
Multimedia Call – Managing Resources during Multimedia Transmission.
UNIT IV
SYNCHRONIZATION
9
Notion of Synchronization: Basic Synchronization Issues – Intra and
Inter-object synchronization – Live and Synthetic synchronization Presentation Requirements: Lip Synchronization Requirements – Pointer
Synchronization
Requirements
–
Multimedia
Synchronization
specification methods – Interval-based Synchronization – Axes-based
Synchronization – Synchronization in MHEG.
UNIT V
MULTIMEDIA APPLICATIONS
9
Media Composition: Text and Graphics Editors – Image Editors –
Animation Editors – Sound Editors – Video Editors – Media
Entertainment: Virtual Reality – Interactive Video – Interactive Audio –
Games.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1.
Ralf Steinmetz, Klara Nahrstedt, “Multimedia: Computing,
Communications & Applications”, Pearson Education Inc., 2011.
95
15CAC07
E-COMMERCE
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To introduce the students to:
 Various e-commerce business models
 Underlying telecommunication network, hardware, and software
technologies
 How companies use e-commerce to gain competitive advantages
 How to plan and execute e-commerce projects
 The competitive strategies of leading e-commerce companies in
the world
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 comprehend the underlying economic mechanisms and driving
forces of E-Commerce
 understand the critical building blocks of E-Commerce and
different types of prevailing business models employed by leading
industrial leaders
 appraise the opportunities and potential to apply and synthesize a
variety of E-Commerce concepts and solutions to create business
value for organizations, customers, and business partners
 formulate E-Commerce strategies that lever firms’ core
competencies, facilitate organizational transformation, and foster
innovation
 undertake planning, organizing, and implementing of E-Commerce
initiatives to effectively respond to of dynamic market
environments.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
6
Networks and Commercial Transactions - Internet and Other Novelties –
Electronic Transactions Today - Commercial Transactions - Establishing
Trust – Internet Environment - Internet Advantage - World Wide Web.
96
UNIT II
SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES
9
Why Internet Is Unsecure - Internet Security Holes - Cryptography:
Objective – Codes and Ciphers - Breaking Encryption Schemes - Data
Encryption Standard - Trusted Key Distribution and Verification Cryptographic Applications - Encryption - Digital Signature Nonrepudiation and Message Integrity.
UNIT III
ELECTRONIC PAYMENT METHODS
9
Traditional Transactions : Updating - Offline and Online Transactions Secure Web Servers - Required Facilities - Digital Currencies and
Payment Systems - Protocols for the Public Transport - Security
Protocols - SET - Credit Card Business Basics.
UNIT IV
ELECTRONIC COMMERCE PROVIDERS
9
Online Commerce Options - Functions and Features - Payment
Systems: Electronic, Digital and Virtual Internet Payment System Account Setup and Costs – Virtual Transaction Process - InfoHaus Security Considerations – CyberCash: Model - Security - Customer
Protection - Client Application - Selling through CyberCash.
UNIT V
ONLINE COMMERCE ENVIRONMENTS
12
Servers and Commercial Environments - Payment Methods - Server
Market Orientation - Netscape Commerce Server - Microsoft Internet
Servers - Digital Currencies - DigiCash - Using Ecash - Ecash Client
Software and Implementation - Smart Cards - The Chip - Electronic Data
Interchange - Internet Strategies, Techniques and Tools.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Pete Loshin, “Electronic Commerce”, 4th Edition, Firewall media, An
imprint of Laxmi Publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2004.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jeffrey F.Rayport and Bernard J. Jaworski, “Introduction to ECommerce”, Tata Mc-Graw Hill Pvt., Ltd., 2nd Edition, 2003.
2. Greenstein, “Electronic Commerce”, Tata Mc-Graw Hill, 2000.
97
15CAC08
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the importance of human resources.
 To describe the steps involved in the human resource planning
process.
 To understand the stages of employee socialization and training
needs.
 To know about the purposes of performance management
systems and appraisal.
 To know the list of occupational safety and health administration
enforcement priorities.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Identify the primary external influences affecting HRM.
 Outline the components and the goals of staffing, training and
development.
 Understand the selection procedure in various organizations.
 Understand the practices used to retain the employees and able to
evaluate their performance.
 Able to identify the stress and the cause of burn out.
UNIT I
FUNDAMENTALS OF HRM
9
Introduction- importance of HRM – functions of HR manager – Structure
of HR Department – Equal employment opportunities: legal and ethical
context – laws for discriminatory practices – equal opportunity
employment.
UNIT II
STAFFING, RECRUITMENT AND
SELECTION
9
Human resource planning and job analysis: An organizational framework
– Linking organizational strategy to Human Resource Planning – Job
analysis - recruiting goals – recruiting sources – selection process – preemployment testing – interviews.
98
UNIT III
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
9
Socializing, Orienting and Developing Employees: Socialization –
purpose of new employee orientation, training, employee development
methods – evaluating training and development effectiveness –
international training and development issues – Managing Careers:
Career development - value for organization
UNIT IV
PERFORMANCE EVALUATION, REWARDS
& BENEFITS
9
Establishing the performance Management System: Appraisal process –
Appraisal methods – factors that can distort appraisals – international
performance appraisal – rewards – Theories of motivation compensation administration – job evaluation and pay structure –
special cases of compensation – executive compensation programs –
employee benefits.
UNIT V
SAFE
AND
ENVIRONMENT
HEALTHY
WORK
9
Occupational safety and health act - issues – stress – assistance
program – labor management -employee unions – labor legislation.
Promotion, demotion, transfer and separation - employee grievances redressal methods.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Decenzo and Robbins, “Human Resource Management”, Wiley, 10th
edition, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mamoria C.B. and Mamoria. S., “Personnel Management”, Himalaya
Publishing Company, 1997.
2. Mirza S. Saiyadain, “HR Management ”,TMH , 4th edition, 2009.
99
15CAC09
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide students with basic concepts in information system and
the benefits with these systems in modern society
 To differentiate between data, information, and knowledge
 To understand systems definition, systems requirements, and
information needed for decision maker
 To understand several requirement and operations that the analyst
needed to analyze, design, and implement the systems in what is
called system development life cycle (SDLC)
 To identify several methods to enhance and develop information
systems and to manage the information system recourses
 To understand several ethical issues in information system
 To test system quality and how to enhance it
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 Define the concepts and definition of the information systems
 Differentiate between several types of information system
 Identify the threats to information security
 Show how to protect information recourses

Differentiate between transaction
functional area information system
processing
system
and
 Show how to maintaining and protecting information system
UNIT I
INFORMATION SYSTEM AND
ORGANIZATION
9
Matching the Information System Plan to the Organizational Strategic
Plan – Identifying Key Organizational Objective and Processes and
Developing an Information System Development – User role in Systems
Development Process – Maintainability and Recoverability in System
Design.
100
UNIT II
REPRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF
SYSTEM STRUCTURE
9
Models for Representing Systems: Mathematical, Graphical and
Hierarchical (Organization Chart, Tree Diagram) – Information Flow –
Process Flow – Methods and Heuristics – Decomposition and
Aggregation – Information Architecture - Application of System
Representation to Case Studies.
UNIT III
SYSTEMS, INFORMATION AND DECISION
THEORY
9
Information Theory – Information Content and Redundancy
Classification and Compression – Summarizing and Filtering –
Inferences and Uncertainty – Identifying Information needed to Support
Decision Making – Human Factors – Problem characteristics and
Information System Capabilities in Decision Making.
UNIT IV
INFORMATION SYSTEM APPLICATION
9
Transaction Processing Applications – Basic Accounting Application –
Applications for Budgeting and Planning – Other use of Information
Technology: Automation – Word Processing – Electronic Mail –
Evaluation Remote Conferencing and Graphics – System and Selection
– Cost Benefit – Centralized versus Decentralized Allocation Mechanism
UNIT V
DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
9
Systems analysis and design – System development life cycle –
Limitation – End User Development – Managing End Users – off-the
Shelf Software Packages – Outsourcing – Comparison of Different
Methodologies
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. K. C. Laudon, J. P. Laudon, M. E. Brabston, “Management
Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm”, Pearson Education,
2002.
2. K. C. Laudon, J. P. Laudon, “Management Information Systems,
101
Organization and Technology in the Networked Enterprise,” Prentice
Hall, Sixth Edition, 2000.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. E. F. Turban, R. K., R. E. Potter., “Introduction to Information
Technology”, Wiley, 2004.
2. M. E. Brabston, “Management Information Systems: Managing the
Digital Firm”, Pearson Education, 2002.
3. Jeffrey A. Hoffer, Joey F. George, Joseph S. Valachich, “Modern
Systems Analysis and Design”, Prentice Hall, Third Edition, 2002.
15CAC10
SOFTWARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To study fundamental concepts of software quality assurance,
including software quality control processes, standards, verification
methods, and measurement metrics
 To discuss various software quality assurance systems,
certification, auditing processes, and verification methods
 To learn how to select and define a software quality assurance
system and quality control process
 To understand the basics of popular quality assurance systems,
such as SEI-SW CMM, and ISO 9000, including their processes,
standards, techniques, and measurement metrics
 To gain practice-oriented software quality assurance experience
by working on a software quality assurance project and attending
workshops
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 Knows and applies quality models to identify and specify the
quality attributes a software system must satisfy
 Knows and determines the most appropriate verification and
102
validation techniques to be applied in a software development
project with the aim of assuring the quality level required
 Is able to identify and determine the practices needed to manage a
software system configuration
 Understands the mission of a quality
applicable standards and norms
system and knows the
Understands the interrelation between product and process Quality
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Software Process assessment overview - Assessment phases Assessment principles - Assessment conduct -Implementation
consideration - Quality management - Quality assurance plan Considerations – Verification and Validation.
UNIT II
CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT
9
Need for configuration Management - Software product nomenclature configuration management functions - Baselines - Responsibilities Need for automated tools - plan – SCM support functions - The
requirement phase Design control - The implementation phase - Test
phase - SCM Tools - Configuration accounting and audit.
UNIT III
SOFTWARE STANDARDS AND
INSPECTION
9
Definitions - Reason for software standards - Benefits - Establishing
standards - Guidelines - Types of reviews - Inspection of objectives Basic inspection principles - The conduct of inspection - Inspection
training.
UNIT IV
TESTING AND MANAGING SOFTWARE
QUALITY
9
Testing: principles - Types - Planning - Development - Execution and
reporting – Tools and methods - Real Time testing - quality management
paradigm - Quality motivation – Measurement criteria - Establishing a
software quality program - Estimating software quality.
103
UNIT V
DEFECT PREVENTION
9
Principles of software defect prevention - Process changes for defect
prevention - Defect prevention considerations - Managements role Framework for software process change - Managing resistance to
software process change - Case studies – memory space detection tools
like Net Memory Validator, C++ Memory Validator, Java Memory
Validator.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Watts S. Humphrey, “Managing the software process”, Addison
Wesley, 1999.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Tsum S.Chow, “Software Quality Assurance a Practical Approach”,
IEEE Computer Society press, 1985.
2. Richard E. Fairley, “Software Engineering - A Practitioner’s
Approach”, McGraw Hill, 1982.
15CAC11
WEB GRAPHICS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Understand the importance of the web as a medium of
communication.
 To learn about image editing tools that applies specifically to web
graphics, presentational graphics and image compression
 To learn how to create a mock-up of a Web page incorporating
browser-safe colours and special image effects such as bevelled
edges and drop shadows.
 To learn how to "slice" your graphics to selectively optimize areas
of your images for Web display. Develop skills in analysing the
usability of a web site.
104
 Learn the language of the web: HTML and CSS.
 Develop skills in digital imaging (Adobe Photoshop)
 Be able to embed multimedia content into web pages.
 Implement and understand how to interpret basic web analytics.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 Learning the importance of web as medium of communication.
 Knowing about the features of image editing tools.
 Applying various graphics effects l
 Learning HTML and CSS
 Developing skills using Adobe Photoshop
 Embedding multimedia content into web pages
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
HTML coding - Basic web graphics - Web page design and site building Image maps - Adding multimedia to the web- Vector and Raster
graphics.
UNIT II
RASTER IMAGE EDITING SOFTWARE
9
Introduction - Image Basics - File Formats - GIF - JPEG - Color Palette –
Color models - Layers - Creating new Images - Brushes – Grids and
Guides- Gradients – Scaling Images - Moving and Merging Layers - Tool
Palette - Dialogs - Masking – Filters – Adding text to images – Designing
icons and background images.
UNIT III
VECTOR IMAGE HANDLING
9
Introduction – Creating Simple Vector graphics – Creating banners Images – Working with layers – Tweening - Motion guide – Masking –
Frame by Frame animation – Onion Skin Effect – Creating special
effects - Text effects and animation – Action scripts.
UNIT IV
MULTIMEDIA
9
Creating clippings - Animations with sound effects - Adding audio or
Video – Windows Media Player ActiveX Control - Agent control Embedding VRML in a web page – Real Player ActiveX control
105
UNIT V
APPLICATIONS
9
Creating web site with a particular theme using all the utilities - Graphics
– Animations and Interaction
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Richard Schrand, “Photoshop 6 Visual Jumpstart”, Adobe Press,
2000.
2. James L. Mohles, “Flash 5.0 Graphics, Animation & Interaction”,
Macromedia, 2000.
3. Carey Bunks, “Grokking the Gimp”, New Riders Publishing, 2000.
4. Adobe creative team, “Adobe Photoshop elements 7 and Adobe
Premiere Elements 7 classroom in a book collection”, Adobe
Press, 2009.
5. Adobe creative team, “Adobe Flash CS4 professional classroom in
a book”, Adobe Press, 2009.
6. Tavmjong Bah, “Inkscape-Guide to Vector Drawing Program”, 2nd
Edition, 2006.
15CAC12
BIG DATA
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To explore the fundamental concepts of big data and analytics.
 To apply various techniques for mining data stream.
 To analyze the big data using intelligent techniques.
 To apply search methods and Visualization.
 To design applications using Map Reduce Concepts.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Work with big data platform and its analysis techniques.
 Design efficient algorithms for mining the data from large volumes.
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 Model a framework for Human Activity Recognition.
 Analyze the big data for useful business applications.
 Implement search methods and Visualization
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO BIG DATA
9
Introduction to Big Data Platform – Challenges of Conventional Systems
- Intelligent data analysis – Nature of Data - Analytic Processes and
Tools - Analysis Vs Reporting - Modern Data Analytic Tools - Statistical
Concepts: Sampling Distributions - Re-Sampling - Statistical Inference Prediction Error.
UNIT II
DATA ANALYSIS
9
Regression Modeling - Multivariate Analysis – Bayesian Methods –
Bayesian Paradigm - Bayesian Modeling - Inference and Bayesian
Networks - Support Vector and Kernel Methods - Analysis of Time
Series: Linear Systems Analysis - Nonlinear Dynamics - Rule Induction Fuzzy Logic: Extracting Fuzzy Models from Data - Fuzzy Decision Trees
UNIT III
SEARCH METHODS AND VISUALIZATION
9
Search by simulated Annealing – Stochastic, Adaptive search by
Evaluation – Evalution Strategies – Genetic Algorithm – Genetic
Programming – Visualization – Classification of Visual Data Analysis
Techniques – Data Types – Visualization Techniques – Interaction
techniques – Specific Visual data analysis Techniques.
UNIT IV
MINING DATA STREAMS
9
Introduction To Streams Concepts – Stream Data Model and
Architecture - Stream Computing - Sampling Data in a Stream – Filtering
Streams – Counting Distinct Elements in a Stream – Estimating
Moments – Counting Oneness in a Window – Decaying Window - Real
time Analytics Platform(RTAP) Applications - Case Studies - Real Time
Sentiment Analysis, Stock Market Predictions.
UNIT V
FRAMEWORKS
9
MapReduce – Hadoop, Hive, MapR – Sharding – NoSQL Databases S3 - Hadoop Distributed File Systems– Case Study- Preventing Private
Information Inference Attacks on Social Networks-Grand Challenge:
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Applying Regulatory Science and Big Data to Improve Medical Device
Innovation.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Grewal B.S, “ Numerical methods in Engineering and Science”,
Khanna Publishers, 2013. (Units - 1, 2 & 3)
2. John.E..Freund, Irwin Miller, Marylees Miller, “Mathematical
Statistics with Applications”, Prentice Hall of India, Seventh
Edition, 2004. (Units - 4 & 5)
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Michael Berthold, David J. Hand, “Intelligent Data Analysis”,
Springer, 2007.
2. Anand Rajaraman and Jeffrey David Ullman, “Mining of Massive
Datasets”, Cambridge University Press, 2012.
3. Bill Franks, “Taming the Big Data Tidal Wave: Finding
Opportunities in Huge Data Streams with Advanced Analytics”,
John Wiley & sons, 2012.
4. Glenn J. Myatt, “Making Sense of Data”, John Wiley & Sons, 2007
5. Pete Warden, “Big Data Glossary”, O’Reilly, 2011.
6. Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, “Data Mining Concepts and
Techniques”, Elsevier, Second Edition, Reprinted 2008.
7. Raymond Heatherly , Murat Kantarcioglu and Bhavani
Thuraisingham, “Preventing Private Information Inference Attacks
on Social Networks” IEEE Transaction on Knowledge and Data
Engineering, Vol 25, No.8, August 2013.
8. Arthur G. Erdman, Daniel F. Keefe and Randall Schiest, “Grand
Challenge: Applying Regulatory Science and Big Data to Improve
Medical Device Innovation”, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical
Engineering, Vol. 60, No. 3, March 2013.
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15CAC13
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the fundamental principles of optimization.
 To give an idea about mathematical modeling.
 To study the sequencing of jobs and replacement of equipment.
 To provide mathematical models of some real situations.
 To have a knowledge about use of optimization in Computer
Applications.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able to
 Identify and formulate mathematical models of real problems in
optimization.
 Obtain the solution of some real life problems using optimization
techniques.
 Sequence the jobs so that the duration for completion will be
minimum and identify the best time of replacement of equipment.
 Know the techniques of minimizing the project duration and cost.
 Identify and solve the problems in areas of bottlenecks between
waiting time and service.
UNIT I
LINEAR PROGRAMMING MODELS
12
Introduction to Optimization - Mathematical formulation of LPP –
Graphical solution of linear programming models – Canonical and
Standard forms of LPP – Simplex method – Artificial variable technique duality of LPP
UNIT II
TRANSPORTATION AND ASSIGNMENT
MODELS
12
Mathematical formulation of transportation problem – Methods for finding
initial basic feasible solution: NWC, LCM & VAM – Optimum solution:
MODI method – Degeneracy – Mathematical formulation of assignment
models – Hungarian Algorithm – Travelling Salesmen Problem.
109
UNIT III
SEQUENCING
PROBLEMS
AND
REPLACEMENT
12
Problem of Sequencing - Processing n jobs through 2 machines –
processing n jobs through k machines – Processing 2 jobs through k
machines – Replacement problems – Replacement of Equipment/Asset
that deteriorates gradually (value of money both does and does not
change with time) – Replacement of items that fails suddenly.
UNIT IV
SCHEDULING BY PERT AND CPM
12
Network Construction – Critical Path Method – Time – Cost trade off –
Project Evaluation and Review Technique – Resource Analysis in
Network Scheduling.
UNIT V
QUEUEING MODELS
12
Characteristics of Queuing Models – Markovian Queues – (M / M / 1) :
(FIFO / ∞ /∞), (M / M / 1) : (FIFO / N / ∞), (M / M / C) : (FIFO / ∞ / ∞),
(M / M / C) : (FIFO / N / ∞) models – Little’s formulae.
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Taha H.A., “Operations Research: An Introduction”, Pearson
Education, 9th Edition, 2012.
2. Kanti Swarup, Gupta P.K. & Man Mohan, “Operations Research”,
Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi, 16th edition, 2012.
3. Gupta P.K., Hira D.S., “Operations Research”, S. Chand & Company
Ltd., New Delhi, 2012.
15CAC14
MIDDLEWARE TECHNOLOGIES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the basics of Client/Server Computing
 To Learn the different Middleware Technologies
 To study and understand the uses of RMI, EJB, COM and CORBA
110
 To Learn the advantages of XML and Web Services
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Learning different Client/Service Technologies
 Working with RMI and EJB
 Developing Applications with COM and CORBA
 Comparing different Middleware Technologies
 Creating Web Services with Java and .NET
 To Learn the different Middleware Technologies
 To study and understand the uses of RMI, EJB, COM and CORBA
 To Learn the advantages of XML and Web Services
UNIT I
Client Server
9
Client/Server – File Server - Database server – Group Server – Object
Server - Web Server – Middleware – General Middleware – Server
Specific Middleware – Client / Server Building blocks - RPC – Messaging
- Peer to Peer
UNIT II
EJB Architecture
9
EJB – EJB architecture – Overview of EJB software architecture – View
of EJB – Conversation – Building and deploying EJBs – Roles in EJB.
UNIT III
EJB Applications
9
EJB Session Beans – EJB Entity Beans – EJB Clients – EJB
deployment – Building and application with EJB.
UNIT IV
CORBA
9
CORBA – Distributed Systems – Purpose – Exploring CORBA
Alternatives – Architecture overview – CORBA and Networking Model –
CORBA object Model – ID – ORB – Building an application with CORBA.
UNIT V
Component Object Model
9
COM data types – interfaces – Proxy and Stub – marshalling –
implementing server / client – interface pointers – Object creation –
Invocation – Destruction – Comparison of COM and CORBA.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
111
TEXT BOOKS:
1. R. Kayalvishi & R. Shramila, “Middleware Technologies”, SAMS
Publications, First Edition, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Robert Orfali, Dan Harkey and Jeri Edwards, “Client/Server
Survival Guide”, Wiley India Publishers, Third Edition, 1999.
2. Tom Valesky, “Enterprise Java Beans”, Pearson Education, 2009.
3. M. L. Liu, “Distributed Computing Principles and Applications”,
Pearson Education, 2004.
4. Rima Patel Sriganesh, Gerald Brose, Micah Silverman, “Mastering
Enterprise Java Beans 3.0”, Wiley India Edition, 2006.
5. Jason Pritchard, “COM and CORBA side by side”, Addison
Wesley, 2000.
15CAC15
MOBILE COMPUTING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To become articulate about Mobile Communication Systems.
 To gain knowledge of various Wireless Network Technologies.
 To understand the intricacies of Application-tailored Ad Hoc
Networks.
 To get acquainted with the features of the Network & Transport
Layers of Wireless Networks.
 To explore the diverse applications of Mobile Communication.
 To acquire familiarity about the recent trends and advances in
Mobile Computing.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Recognize the wireless communication fundamentals
 Extrapolate the basics about GSM Telecommunication Systems
112
 Articulate about the architecture and services of wireless networks
 Understand the purpose of Mobile IP
 Comprehend the routing algorithms for ad hoc networks
 Exemplify the need for modified TCP in wireless networks
 Understand about Wireless Application Protocol
UNIT I
WIRELESS
FUNDAMENTALS
COMMUNICATION
9
Introduction – Wireless transmission – Frequencies for radio
transmission – Signals – Antennas – Signal Propagation – Multiplexing –
Modulations – Spread Spectrum – MAC – SDMA – FDMA – TDMA –
CDMA – Cellular Wireless Networks.
UNIT II
TELECOMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
9
GSM – Mobile Services – System Architecture – Radio Interface –
Protocols – Localization and calling – Handover – Security – GPRS.
UNIT III
WIRELESS NETWORKS
9
Wireless LAN - IEEE 802.11 Standards – Architecture – Services HIPERLAN – Ad Hoc Network – Bluetooth.
UNIT IV
NETWORK LAYER
9
Mobile IP – Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol – Routing – DSDV –
DSR – AODV – ZRP – ODMR.
UNIT V
TRANSPORT AND APPLICATION LAYERS
9
TCP over Wireless Networks - Indirect TCP- Snooping TCP- Mobile
TCP- Fast retransmit / Fast Recovery – Transmission / Timeout Freezing
– Selective Retransmission- Transaction Oriented TCP – WAP – WAP
Architecture – WDP – WTLS – WTP – WSP – WML – WML Script –
WAE - WTA.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Jochen Schiller, “Mobile Communications”, Pearson Education,
Second Edition, 2003.
113
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. William Stallings, “Wireless Communications and Networks”,
Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2004.
2. Kaveh Pahlavan, Prasanth Krishnamoorthy, “Principles of Wireless
Networks”, Pearson Education, 2003.
3 William C. Y. Lee, “Mobile Communications Engineering”, Tata
McGraw Hill Publications, Second Edition, 2009.
4 Raj Kamal, “Mobile Computing”, Second Edition, Oxford University
Press, 2012.
5 Uwe Hansmann, Lothar Merk, Martin S. Nicklons and Thomas
Stober, “Principles of Mobile Computing”, Springer, New York,
2003.
6. C. K. Toh, “Ad Hoc Mobile Wireless Networks”, Prentice Hall Inc.,
2003.
15CAC16
DATA MINING AND KNOWLEDGE
ENGINEERING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To know the basic concepts of Data warehousing and Data Mining
 To study the methods applied in pre-processing and Association
Rules Mining .
 To differentiate classification and prediction
 To perform cluster analysis using various methods
 To apply mining techniques for complex objects
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Understanding the steps involved in data mining with architecture
 Applying systematic approach in pre-processing the data with
association rule mining
 Developing knowledge based models related to classification and
prediction
114
 Performing cluster analysis for the problems in various domains
 Simplifying the processes while mining complex objects
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Fundamentals of data mining – Data Mining Functionalities –
Classification – Major issues in Data Mining – Data Warehouse and
OLAP Technology for Data Mining and Data Warehouse. Multi dimensional Data Model, Architecture, Implementation.
UNIT II
DATA PREPROCESSING AND
ASSOCIATION RULE MINING
9
Need of preprocessing the data – Data cleaning – Data integration and
transformation – Data reduction – Data discretization and Concept
hierarchy generation. Efficient and Scalable Frequent Item set mining
methods – Mining various kinds of Association rules – Association
Mining to correlation analysis – Constraint based association mining.
UNIT III
CLASSIFICATION AND PREDICTION
9
Classification and Prediction – Classification by Decision Tree Induction
– Bayesian Classification –Rule based classification – Classification by
back propagation – Support Vector Machines – Lazy learners – Other
classification methods – Prediction – Accuracy and error measures –
Evaluating the accuracy of a classifier or predictor – Ensemble methods
– Model section.
UNIT IV
CLUSTER ANALYSIS
9
Types of data in cluster analysis – Categories – clustering methods –
Partitioning methods – Hierarchical methods – Density based Methods –
Grid based Methods – Model based clustering methods –clustering high
dimensional data – Constraint based cluster analysis – Outlier analysis.
UNIT V
MINING COMPLEX OBJECTS
9
Multidimensional analysis – Descriptive mining of complex data objects –
Spatial data mining –Multi-media data mining – Text mining – Mining the
World Wide Web..
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
115
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, “Data Mining Concepts and
Techniques”, Elsevier, 3rd Edition, 2011.
2. Alex Berson, Stephen J. Smith, “Data Warehousing, Data Mining &
OLAP”, Tata McGraw Hill, 10th Reprint, 2007.
3. K.P. Soman, Shyam Diwakar and V. Ajay, “Insight into Data mining
Theory and Practice”, Prentice Hall of India, 2nd Edition, 2006.
4. G. K. Gupta, “Introduction to Data Mining with Case Studies”,
Prentice Hall of India, 2nd Edition, 2011.
5. Pang-Ning Tan, Michael Steinbach and Vipin Kumar, “Introduction
to Data Mining”, Pearson Education, 2nd Edition, 2007.
15CAC17
ADVANCED DATABASES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn about the features of parallel databases and distributed
databases
 To explore the concepts of object oriented databases
 To provide knowledge about XML databases
 To know about spatial and temporal databases
 To learn about different Multimedia data structures
 To explore about different types of media like image, audio and
video
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Knowledge about parallel databases and distributed databases
 Knowledge about object oriented databases.
 Knowledge about XML databases
 Idea about Spatial and Temporal databases.
 Knowledge about Multimedia data structures
 Knowledge about different types of media like image, audio and
video
116
UNIT I
PARALLEL
DATABASES
AND
DISTRIBUTED
9
Database System Architectures: Centralized and Client-Server
Architectures – Server System Architectures – Parallel SystemsDistributed Systems – Parallel Databases: I/O Parallelism – Interquery
Parallelism - Intraquery Parallelism – Intraoperation Parallelism Interoperation Parallelism – Distributed Databases: - Homogeneous and
Heterogeneous Databases - Distributed Data Storage – Distributed
Transactions – Commit Protocols – Concurrency Control in Distributed
Databases – Distributed Query Processing.
UNIT II
OBJECT AND OBJECT RELATIONAL
DATABASES
9
Object-Based Databases: Complex Data Types – Structured Types and
Inheritance in SQL – Table Inheritance – Array and Multiset Types in
SQL – Object Identity and Reference Types in SQL – Implementing O-R
Features – Persistent Programming Languages – Object-Oriented
versus Object –Relational.
UNIT III
XML DATABASES
9
XML: Motivation – Structure of XML Data – XML Document Schema –
Querying and Transformation – Application Program Interfaces to XML –
Storage of XML Data – XML Applications.
UNIT IV
SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DATABASES
9
Spatial and Temporal Data and Mobility: Time in Databases – Spatial
and Geographic Data Mobility and Personal Databases.
UNIT V
MULTIMEDIA DATABASES
9
Multidimensional Data Structures: k-d Trees – Point Quadtrees – MXQuadtree – R-Tree - Image Databases: Representing Image DBs with
Relations – Representing Image DBs with R-Trees – Text/Document
Databases: TV Trees - Video Databases – Audio Databases.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
117
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth, S. Sudarshan, “Database
System Concepts”, McGraw-Hill International Edition, Sixth Edition,
2011.
2. V. S. Subramanian, “Principles of Multimedia Database Systems”,
Elsevier Publishers, 2001.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. R. Elmasri, S. B. Navathe, “Fundamentals of Database Systems”,
Pearson Education, Fifth Edition, 2007.
15CAC18
BUSINESS ANALYTICS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To gain an understanding of how managers use business analytics
(BA) to formulate and solve business problems and to support
managerial decision making.
 To become familiar with the processes needed to develop, report,
and analyze business data.
 To learn how to use and apply selected business analytics
software.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 describe and interpret the basic concepts of BA
 explain the analytics of Spreadsheets used in BA
 evaluate business problems and determine suitable analytical
methods and statistical measures
 compare and contrast different BA techniques
 interpret, analyze and validate the results
 synthesis the types of questions Business Analytics using data
mining can be answered
 evaluate different methods of data mining and how they compare
118
UNIT I
Foundations of Business Analytics
9
Introduction to Business Analytics - Learning Objectives -What Is
Business Analytics - Evolution of Business Analytics - Scope of Business
Analytics - Data for Business Analytics - Decision Models - Problem
Solving and Decision Making - Analytics on Spreadsheets – Learning
Objectives – Basic Excel Skills - Excel Functions - Spreadsheet Add-Ins
for Business Analytics - Spreadsheet Modeling and Spreadsheet
Engineering.
UNIT II
Descriptive Analytics
9
Visualizing and Exploring Data - Learning Objectives - Data Visualization
- Data Queries: Using Sorting and Filtering - Statistical Methods for
Summarizing Data - Exploring Data Using PivotTables -Descriptive
Statistical Measures - Learning Objectives - Populations and Samples Measures of Location - Measures of Dispersion - Measures of Shape Excel Descriptive Statistics Tool - Descriptive Statistics for Grouped
Data - Descriptive Statistics for Categorical Data: The Proportion Statistics in PivotTables - Measures of Association - Statistical Thinking
in Business Decisions.
UNIT III
Probability Distributions and Data Modeling
9
Learning Objectives - Basic Concepts of Probability - Random Variables
and Probability Distributions - Discrete Probability Distributions Continuous Probability Distributions - Random Sampling from Probability
Distributions - Data Modeling and Distribution Fitting - Sampling and
Estimation - Learning Objectives - Statistical Sampling - Estimating
Population Parameters - Sampling Error - Sampling Distributions Interval Estimates - Confidence Intervals - Using Confidence Intervals for
Decision Making - Prediction Intervals - Confidence Intervals and
Sample Size.
UNIT IV
Statistical Inference
9
Learning Objectives - Hypothesis Testing - One-Sample Hypothesis
Tests - Two-Sample Hypothesis Tests - Analysis of Variance - ChiSquare Test for Independence - Predictive Modeling and Analysis Learning Objectives - Logic-Driven Modeling - Data-Driven Modeling 119
Analyzing Uncertainty and Model Assumptions - Model Analysis Using
Risk Solver Platform
UNIT V
Introduction to Data Mining
9
Learning Objectives - The Scope of Data Mining - Data Exploration and
Reduction – Classification - Classification Techniques - Association Rule
Mining - Cause-and-Effect Modeling - Linear Optimization - Learning
Objectives - Building Linear Optimization Models - Implementing Linear
Optimization Models on Spreadsheets - Solving Linear Optimization
Models - Graphical Interpretation of Linear Optimization - How Solver
Works - Solver Outcomes and Solution Messages - Using Optimization
Models for Prediction and Insight.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. James R. Evans, “Business Analytics Methods, Models, and
Decisions” Pearson/PHI, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. E. Turban, R. Sharda, J. Aronson, and D. King, “Business
Intelligence: A Managerial Approach”, Pearson Prentice Hall,
2008.
2. R. Mosimann, P. Mosimann and M. Dussault, “The Performance
Manager: Proven Strategies for Turning Information into Higher
Business Performance”, Cognos Press, 2007.
15CAC19
GRID COMPUTING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand Grid Architecture and different types of grids
 To know about Grid standards
 To apply grid computing in various areas
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon Completion of the course, the students should be able to:
 Understand Grid Computing and Services
120
 Implement and monitor Grid architecture
 Comprehend data management and Knowledge Grid
 Create Grid Middleware architecture
 Utilize grid for various applications
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Parallel and Distributed Computing – Cluster computing - Grid
Computing Anatomy and Physiology of Grid - Web and Grid Services.
UNIT II
FRAMEWORK
9
Architecture – Implementation of Grid architecture – Grid Services OGSI – OGSA - WSRF – Grid Resource and Service Management –
Layers of Grid Computing – Grid monitoring – Grid Security.
UNIT III
DATA AND KNOWLEDGE GRID
9
Data Source – Collective Data Service - Data Management - Knowledge
Oriented Grid.
UNIT IV
GRID MIDDLEWARE
9
List of Globally available toolkits – GT3 – Architecture details – Security System level Services – Load Balancing.
UNIT V
APPLICATIONS
9
Scientific – Medical – Bioinformatics – Federated – ERM – Collaborative
Science – Case Study.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ian Foster, Carl Kesselman, “The Grid 2: Blueprint for a New
Computing Infrastructure”, Elsevier Series, 2004.
2. Vladimir Silva, “Grid Computing for Developers”, Charles River Media,
2006.
3. Parvin Asadzadeh, Rajkumar Buyya, Chun Ling Kei, Deepa Nayar,
and Srikumar Venugopal, “Global Grids and Software Toolkits: A
Study of Four Grid Middleware Technologies, High Performance
Computing: Paradigm and Infrastructure”, Laurence Yang and Minyi
Guo (editors), Wiley Press, New Jersey, USA, 2005.
121
15CAC20
DESIGN PATTERNS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To become familiar with good practices in Object Oriented
Systems Development.
 To become acquainted in using design patterns for Object
Oriented Design.
 To acquire a comprehensible knowledge about various Design
Patterns.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Work individually on fundamentals of design patterns.
 Become better object oriented programmers, as well as become
better at object oriented analysis and design.
 Comprehend application of a fundamental set of design patterns
utilizing object oriented principles to solve real world software
design problems.

Exemplify the need for design patterns
 Build a piece of software where multiple design patterns will be
applied.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Design Patterns – Template of Design Patterns – Catalog – organizing
the catalog – solving design problems – selecting a Design Pattern –
using a Design Pattern.
UNIT II
CASE STUDY: DESIGNING A DOCUMENT
EDITOR
9
Design Problems – Document Structure – Formatting – Embellishing the
user interface – supporting multiple look-and-feel standards – supporting
multiple window systems – user operations.
122
UNIT III
CREATIONAL PATTERNS
9
Abstract Factory – Builder – Factory Method – Prototype – Singleton –
Case Studies.
UNIT IV
STRUCTURAL PATTERNS
9
Adapter – Bridge – Composite – Decorator – Facade – Flyweight –
Proxy – Case Studies.
UNIT V
BEHAVIORAL PATTERNS
9
Chain of Responsibility – Command – Interpreter – Iterator – Mediator –
Memento – Observer – State – Strategy – Template Method – Visitor –
Case Studies.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson and John Vlissides,
Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software”,
Pearson Education, 1995.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Craig Larman, “Applying UML and Patterns – An Introduction to
Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development”,
Pearson Education, Third Edition, 2006.
2. Eric Freeman and Elisabeth Freeman, “Head First Design
Patterns”, O’Reilly, 2004.
3. Bernd Bruegge and Allen H. Dutoit, “Object Oriented Software
Engineering using UML, Patterns and Java”, Pearson Education,
2004.
4. Joshua Kerievsky, “Refractoring to Patterns”, Addison Wesley,
2005.
123
15CAC21
COMPILER DESIGN
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To expose the concepts of the internals of the compiler
 To show the specifications of tokens of a language and design a
scanner
 To define a grammar for syntactic structure of the sentence of the
language
 To study the different types of parser and design and implement a
parser for a given grammar
 To represent the source code in a suitable intermediate code for
the various programming language constructs
 To optimize the code at different levels for the reductions of size
and/or execution of the compiled program
 To generate the machine from the Intermediate code by
considering the target machine architecture
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to
 Realize the internals of compiler
 Design a lexical analyzer
 Analyze the different types of parsers
 Design and implement a predictive (Top down) parser for the given
grammar and recognize a String
 Design and implement a LR parser (Bottom up) parser for the
given grammar and recognize a string
 Able to choose the right storage structure for the language
constructs
 Able to select the appropriate intermediate code for the parsed
source language
 Represent the declarative statements into the appropriate
124
intermediate code
 Represent the executable statements into the appropriate
intermediate code
 Analyze the issues that arises during the design of a code
generator
 Design and implement a simple code generator
 Identify the principle sources of optimization
 Apply the optimization techniques on the intermediate code and
machine code
UNIT I
LEXICAL ANALYSIS
9
Introduction to Compiling- Compilers-Analysis of the source programThe phases-Cousins- The grouping of phases-Compiler construction
tools. The role of the lexical analyzer- Input buffering - Specification of
tokens-Recognition of tokens-A language for specifying lexical
analyzer.
UNIT II
SYNTAX ANALYSIS and RUN-TIME
ENVIRONMENTS
9
Syntax Analysis - The role of the parser - Context-free grammars Writing a grammar - Top-down parsing - Bottom-up Parsing - LR
parsers - Constructing an SLR(1) parsing table. Type Checking Type Systems - Specification of a simple type checker Run-Time
Environments - Source language issues-Storage organizationStorage-allocation strategies.
UNIT III
INTERMEDIATE CODE GENERATION
9
Intermediate languages - Declarations - Assignment statements Boolean expressions - Case statements - Back patching - Procedure
calls.
UNIT IV
CODE GENERATION
9
Issues in the design of a code generator - The target machine-Runtime storage management - Basic blocks and flow graphs - Next-use
information - A simple code generator - Register allocation and
assignment - The dag representation of basic blocks - Generating code
125
from DAGs.
UNIT V
CODE OPTIMIZATION
9
Introduction - The principle sources of optimization - Peephole
optimization - Optimization of basic blocks - Loops in flow graphs Introduction to global data-flow analysis - Code improving
transformations.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Alfred V. Aho, Ravi Sethi Jeffrey D. Ullman, “Compilers - Principles,
Techniques and Tools”, Pearson Education Asia, 2007.
REFERENCES:
1. David Galles, “Modern Compiler Design”, Pearson Education Asia,
2007.
2. Steven S. Muchnick, “Advanced Compiler Design & Implementation”,
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 2000.
3. C. N. Fisher and R. J. LeBlanc, “Crafting a Compiler with C”, Pearson
Education, 2000.
4. Alfred Aho, Monica S.Lam, Ravi Sethi and Jeffrey D Ullman,
“Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools”, Pearson Education
Asia, 2007.
5. http://www.onesmartclick.com/engineering/compiler-design.html
6. http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/Programming/CompilerDesign/hubs.html
7. http://www1.cs.columbia.edu/~aho
8. http://infolab.stanford.edu/~ullman/
9. http://dinosaur.compilertools.net/
10. http://epaperpress.com/lexandyacc/
126
15CAC22
SOFTWARE AGENTS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the characteristics of the agents, their design and
implementation.
 Definition of Agents, applications of Agent-based systems, state of
the art Agent-based systems. Agent
 Architectures, Agent theory, Software Agents, and Mobile Agents.
 to introduce the concepts, techniques and applications of software
agents
 to understand the nature, concepts and techniques of the
 Agent technology and its standards and to evaluate current
software agent systems.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand the basic concepts, techniques and applications of
software agents.
 Comprehend the implementation of software agents.
 Utilize multi-agent systems.
 Evaluate intelligent software agents.
 Explain the agent security issues
UNIT I
AGENTS – OVERVIEW
9
Agent Definition – Agent Programming Paradigms – Agent Vs Object –
Aglet – Mobile Agents – Agent Frameworks – Agent Reasoning.
UNIT II
JAVA AGENTS
9
Processes – Threads – Daemons – Components – Java Beans –
ActiveX – Sockets – RPCs – Distributed Computing – Aglets
Programming – Jini Architecture – Actors and Agents – Typed and
proactive messages.
127
UNIT III
MULTIAGENT SYSTEMS
9
Interaction between agents – Reactive Agents – Cognitive Agents –
Interaction protocols – Agent coordination – Agent negotiation – Agent
Cooperation – Agent Organization – Self-Interested agents in
Electronic Commerce Applications.
UNIT IV
INTELLIGENT SOFTWARE AGENTS
9
Interface Agents – Agent Communication Languages – Agent
Knowledge Representation – Agent Adaptability – Belief Desire
Intension – Mobile Agent Applications
UNIT V
AGENTS AND SECURITY
9
Agent Security Issues – Mobile Agents Security – Protecting Agents
against Malicious Hosts – Untrusted Agent – Black Box Security –
Authentication for agents – Security issues for Aglets.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Bigus & Bigus, “Constructing Intelligent agents with Java", Wiley,
1997.
2. Bradshaw, “Software Agents”, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Russel, Norvig, “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach",
Second Edition, Pearson Education, 2003.
2. Richard Murch, Tony Johnson, “Intelligent Software
Prentice Hall, 2000.
Agents",
3. Gerhard Weiss, “Multi Agent Systems – A Modern Approach to
Distributed Artificial Intelligence”, MIT Press, 2000.
128
15CAC23
WEB ENGINEERING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand and apply Web development processes
 To understand the concepts, principles, strategies,
methodologies of Web applications and development.
and
 To learn and apply current Web technologies
COURSE OUTCOMES:
By studying this course, the student can able to
 apply web engineering for web applications development
 learn the concepts, principles in Web Engineering

understand strategies, and methodologies of Web applications
and development
 develop web applications to meet current business models and
requirements
UNIT I
Requirements
Applications
Engineering
for
Web
9
Introduction to Requirements Engineering - Requirements Engineering
Activities in Web Engineering, Principles for Requirements Engineering
in Web Applications, Adapting Requirements Engineering Methods to
Web Application Development, Requirement Types, Notations, Tools
UNIT II
Technologies for Web Applications
9
Client-side Technologies, ActiveX Controls, Document-specific
Technologies, HTML-Hypertext Markup Language, DHTML, SMIL
Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, XML-eXtensible
Markup Language, XSL-eXtensible Style sheet Language, Java Script,
Server-side Technologies, Servelet, URI Handlers, Web Service,
Middleware Technologies
UNIT III
Web Application Architectures
9
Introduction to Web application Architecture, Developing Architectures
Categorizing Architectures, Specifics of Web Application Architectures,
129
Components of a Generic Web Application Architecture, Layered
Architectures, 2-Layer Architectures, N-Layer Architectures Dataaspect Architectures, Database-centric Architectures, Architectures for
Web Document Management, Architectures for Multimedia Data
UNIT IV
Modeling Web Applications
9
Modeling Specifics in Web Engineering, Levels, Aspects, Phases
Customization, Modeling Requirements, Hypertext Modeling, Hypertext
Structure Modeling Concepts, Access Modeling Concepts, Relation to
Content Modeling, Presentation Modeling, Relation to Hypertext
Modeling, Customization Modeling, Relation to Content, Hypertext, and
Presentation Modeling
UNIT V
Web Application Design
9
Web Design from an Evolutionary Perspective, Information Design,
Software Design: A Programming Activity, Merging Information Design
and Software Design, Problems and Restrictions in Integrated Web
Design, A Proposed Structural Approach, Presentation Design,
Presentation of Nodes and Meshes, Device-independent Development,
Approaches, Inter action Design, User Interaction User Interface
Organization, Navigation Design, Designing a Link Representation,
Designing Link Internals, Navigation and Orientation, Structured Dialog
for Complex Activities, Interplay with Technology and Architecture,
Functional Design.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Gerti Kappel, Birgit Proll, “Web Engineering”, John Wiley and Sons
Ltd, 2006.
2. Roger S.Pressman, David Lowe, “Web Engineering”, Tata McGraw
Hill Publication, 2007.
3. Guy W. Lecky-Thompson, “Web Programming”, Cengage Learning,
2008.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Moller, “An Introduction to XML and Web Technologies” , Pearson
130
Education New Delhi, 2009.
2. Chris Bates, “Web Programming: Building Internet Applications”,
Wiley India Edition, Third Edition, 2007.
3. John Paul Mueller, Web Development with Microsoft Visual Studio
2005”, Wiley Dreamtech, 2006.
15CAC24
NUMERICAL AND STATISTICAL METHODS
L T P C
3 2 0 4
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the fundamental principles of numerical and statistical
methods.
 To provide various methods of solving algebraic/transcendental
equations and system of simultaneous equations.
 To identify the areas applied in numerical interpolation,
differentiation, integration and differential equations and method of
finding solutions.
 To have knowledge in probability distributions and testing of
hypothesis
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 To solve problems using numerical methods.
 To obtain the solution of system of equations using matrix theory.
 To identify real life problems into Mathematical Models.
 To apply the probability theory in the field of Computer Science
Applications.
UNIT I
SOLUTION OF EQUATIONS
12
Fundamental principles of Numerical Methods - Solution of
algebraic/transcendental equations: method of false position, Newton
Raphson method – Solution of simultaneous linear equations – direct
methods: Gauss elimination and Gauss Jordan methods – iterative
methods: Gauss Jacobi and Gauss Seidel methods.
131
UNIT II
NUMERICAL INTERPOLATION,
DIFFERENTIATION & INTEGRATION
12
Interpolation: difference table - Newton’s forward and backward
interpolation – Lagrange’s interpolation – Differentiation formulae –
Integration: Trapezoidal, Simpson’s one-third rule and Gaussian
quadrature in one dimension.
UNIT III
ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
12
Solution of first order ordinary differential equations – Taylor Series and
Euler methods, Runge-Kutta
method of fourth order –
Predictor-corrector methods – Milne and Adam – Bash forth methods.
UNIT IV
PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
12
Probability axioms – Baye’s Theorem – Discrete random variables and
Continuous random variables – Density & Distribution functions –
expectation – moment generating function – Binomial, Poisson and
Normal distributions (problems only).
UNIT V
TESTING OF HYPOTHESIS
12
Sampling distributions – Error in sampling – confidence intervals – Small
sample tests: t-test for single mean and double mean, F-test, chi-square
test for goodness of fit and independence of attributes
TOTAL: 60 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Grewal B.S, “Numerical methods in Engineering and Science”,
Khanna Publishers, 2013. (Units - 1, 2 & 3).
2. John.E..Freund, Irwin Miller, Marylees Miller, “Mathematical
Statistics with Applications”, Prentice Hall of India, Seventh
Edition, 2004. (Units - 4 & 5).
3. Gupta, S. K.
“Numerical Methods for Engineers“, New age
International Publishers, 2012.
4. Gupta S.C. & Kapoor V.K., “Fundamentals of Mathematical
Statistics”, Sultan Chand & Sons, 2011.
132
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY CIVIL ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT
SL. COURSE
NO. CODE
COURSE TITLE
L T P C
1.
15SEA01 Condition Monitoring & Diagnostics
3 0 0 3
2.
15SEA02 Mechanics of Laminated Composites
3 0 0 3
3.
15SEA03 Advanced Metal Structures
3 0 0 3
4.
15SEA04 Manufacturing cost estimation
3 0 0 3
5.
15SEA05 Dam safety
3 0 0 3
6.
15SEA06 Bridge maintenance and management
3 0 0 3
7.
15SEA07 Experimental stress analysis
3 0 0 3
8.
15SEA08 Automobile Pollution Control
3 0 0 3
9.
15SEA09
Continuum mechanics -classical and FE
approach
3 0 0 3
ALLIED ELECTIVES
15SEA01
CONDITION MONITORING & DIAGNOSTICS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the maintenance and reliability of equipment.
 To outline the various types of maintenance.
 To introduce the essentials of condition monitoring.
 To provide an exposure on various types of condition monitoring.
 To illustrate the vibration monitoring of some simple machines.
133
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, the student will able to
 To conduct failure analysis.
 Disseminate
significance.
the
various
maintenance
activities
and
their
 Acquaint with the fundamental principles of condition monitoring.
 Identify the problem and apply the appropriate monitoring
technique.
 To assess the condition of equipment like pumps, motor through
vibration monitoring technique.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Productivity - Quality circle in Maintenance - Reliability, Reliability
assurance - Maintainability vs. Reliability - Failure analysis - Equipment
downtime analysis - breakdown analysis.
UNIT II
TYPES OF MAINTENANCE
9
Maintenance type - Breakdown maintenance - Corrective maintenance,
Opportunity maintenance - Routine maintenance - Preventive and
predictive maintenance - Condition based maintenance systems Design-out maintenance.
UNIT III
CONDITION MONITORING
9
Equipment health monitoring – Signals - Online & off-line monitoring Visual & temp. Monitoring - Leakage monitoring - Lubricant monitoring.
UNIT IV
DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES
9
Ferrography - Spectroscopy - Crack monitoring - Corrosion monitoring thickness monitoring - Noise/sound monitoring - Smell/Odour monitoring
- Thermography.
134
UNIT V
VIBRATION MONITORING
9
Vibration characteristics - Vibration monitoring - causes - identification measurement of machine vibration - C.M. of lubes and hydraulic systems C.M. of pipe lines, Selection of C.M. techniques Advantages.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Davies, "Handbook of Condition Monitoring", Chapman &Hall, 2012.
2. Rao B.K.N, “Handbook on condition monitoring” Elsevier Science Ltd.,
1996.
3. Armstrong, "Condition Monitoring", BSIRSA, 1988.
WEB REFERENCE:
http://bin95.com/TrainingSoftware/Condition-Based- Maintenance.html
L T P C
15SEA02
MECHANICS OF LAMINATED COMPOSITES
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart the knowledge on fundamentals of composites.
 To study the behaviour of lamina.
 To provide knowledge on behaviour of laminate.
 To study the effect of Hygrothermal forces on mechanical
behaviour of composite.
 To get exposed to soft computing techniques.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course the students will be able to
 Use various laminated composites.
 Analyze the behaviour of lamina.
135
 Analyze the behaviour of laminates.
 Analyse the effect of Hydrothermal forces on mechanical
behaviour
 Familiarize with numerical and soft computing techniques
UNIT I
FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITES
9
Classification and characteristics of composite materials - basic
terminology - uses of laminated composites - comparison of properties
with traditional materials.
UNIT II
BEHAVIOUR OF LAMINA
9
Stress - strain relationship for anisotropic - orthotropic and isotropic
materials - transformation of elastic constants - failure criteria for an
orthotropic lamina - introduction to micromechanical behaviour - law of
mixture for E1, E2, G12, V12.
UNIT III
BEHAVIOUR OF LAMINATE
9
Classical lamination theory - stress - strain relationship for laminate extensional bending and coupling stiffness - different configurations and
corresponding stiffness - strength of laminates - inter-laminar stresses introduction to behaviour of thin walled laminated structures.
UNIT IV
HYGROTHERMAL EFFECTS
9
Effect of Hygrothermal forces on mechanical behaviour Micromechanics of Hygrothermal properties - Hygrothermal strains - free
thermal strains - stress strain relations - CTE and CME of laminates and
determination of stresses.
UNIT V
COMPUTER AIDED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
9
Introduction to numerical - soft computing techniques for the analysis Design of laminated composites.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
136
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Agarwal, B.D. and Broutman, L.J., “Analysis and Performance of
Fiber Composite”, John Wiley, 2006.
2. Johns, R.M., “Mechanics of Composite Materials”, Taylor &
Francis,1999
3. Madhujit Mukhopadhyay, “Mechanics of Composite materials and
structures”, Universities press (India) Pvt. Ltd., 2004.
L T P C
15SEA03
ADVANCED METAL STRUCTURES
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To outline the basic concepts in the design of industrial building
components.
 To get exposed to the design of structures subjected to wind and
seismic forces.
 To provide knowledge in the concept of plastic analysis.
 To introduce the basic concepts of cold formed thin walled
members.
 To gain knowledge on pre-engineered buildings.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, the students will be able to
 Design the members which are subjected to lateral and axial loads
 Analyze and design tall structures.
 Perform plastic analysis of frames.
 Design the cold formed thin walled members.
 Design the Purlins and girders subjected to different load
conditions.
137
UNIT I
GENERAL
9
Design of members subjected to lateral loads and axial loads - Analysis
and Design of industrial building bents - cranes Gantry Girders and
Crane columns - Bracing of Industrial Buildings and Bents
UNIT II
TALL STRUCTURES
9
Analysis & Design of Steel Towers - Trestles & Masts Subjected to wind
and earthquake forces.
UNIT III
PLASTIC ANALYSIS
9
Introduction - Shape factors - moment redistribution - static - Kinematic
and uniqueness theorems - combined mechanisms - Analysis of single
bay and two bay portal frames - Methods of plastic moment distribution Effect of Axial force and Shear force on plastic moment - connections moment resisting connection.
UNIT IV
COLD FORMED SECTIONS
9
Types of cross sections - Design of cold formed thin walled members local Buckling and post buckling strength - Beams - Columns -beam
columns - connections.
UNIT V
PRE ENGINEERED BUILDING
9
Introduction-Rigid frame End - Post and beam End - Design of Purlins and
girders subjected to different load conditions - Limitations of preengineered buildings -Advantages Comparison with Conventional Steel
Buildings.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Dayaratnam, “Design of Steel Structures”, A.H.Wheeler Publishing Co.,
7th Edition, 2008.
2. A.S.Arya, “Design of Steel Structures”, Nem Chand & Co, 2001
3. Lin.S.Beedlc, “Plastic Design of Steel Frames”, John Wiley & Sons,
138
1958.
4. Horne. M.R. and Morn’s L.J. “Plastic Design of Low-Rise Frames”,
Granada Publishing Ltd., New York, 1981.
5. Salmon. C.G and Johnson, J.E. , “Steel Structures Design and
Behaviour”, Harper and Row, 1982.
6. Wie-Wen Yu, “Cold-Formed Steel Structures”, McGraw Hill Book
Company, 1973.
L T P C
15SEA04
MANUFACTURING COST ESTIMATION
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the basics of cost estimation and different types of
cost estimating methods.
 To impart knowledge on cost and various factory expenses.
 To provide knowledge on budget and measures of cost economics.
 To study the cost estimation in different shops.
 To understand machining time and cost estimation for the different
process.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, the students will be able to
 Understand the different types of cost estimating methods.
 Calculate cost and expenses of various factory processes.
 Acquire knowledge on measures of cost economics.
 Calculate the process cost involved in different shops.
 Work out machining time and cost for the different process.
UNIT I
COST ESTIMATION
9
Objective of cost estimation - costing - cost accounting - classification of
cost - Elements of cost - Types of estimates - methods of estimates 139
data requirements and sources - collection of cost - allowances in
estimation.
UNIT II
COSTS AND EXPENSES
9
Aims of costing and estimation - Functions and procedure - Introduction
to costs - Computing material cost - Direct labour cost - Analysis of
overhead costs - Factory expenses - Administrative expenses - Selling
and distributing expenses - Cost ladder - Cost of product.
UNIT III
COST ECONOMICS
9
Budget - need - Types - Budgetary control - Objectives – Benefits,
Measures of cost economics - Make or buy decision and Analysis, Depreciation - Causes of depreciation - methods of Depreciation,
Allocation of overheads.
UNIT IV
ESTIMATION OF COSTS IN DIFFERENT SHOPS
9
Estimation in Forging shop - Losses in forging - Forging cost - Estimation
in welding shop - Gas cutting - Electric welding - Estimation in foundry
shop - Pattern cost - Casting cost - Illustrative examples.
UNIT V
ESTIMATION OF MACHINING TIMES AND COSTS
9
Estimation of machining time for lathe operations - drilling - boring shaping -planning - milling and grinding operations - Illustrative examples.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Adithan. M, “Process Planning and Cost Estimation”, New Age
International (P) Ltd., 2007.
2. Chitale.A.K and Gupta.R.C, “Product Design and manufacturing”,
Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2011.
3. Banga.T.R and Sharma.S.C, “Mechanical Estimating and Costing
including contracting”, Khanna publishers, New Delhi, 2001.
4. Joseph G. Monks, “Operations Management, Theory and Problems”,
140
McGraw Hill Book Company, New Delhi, 1987.
5. Narang.G.B.S and Kumar.V, “Production and Planning”, Khanna
Publishers, New Delhi, 1995.
6. Adithan.M. and Pabla.B.S, “Estimating and costing for the Metal
Manufacturing Industries”, CRC press, 1992.
L T P C
15SEA05
DAM SAFETY
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To enable the students to select the dams.
 To study the analysis and design gravity dams.
 To provide knowledge on design of spillways and energy
dissipaters.
 To study about various tests on the dam safety.
 To gain knowledge on computer analysis of dams.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, students will be able to
 Know dam types and functions.
 Analyze dams for stability.
 Design dams.
 Familiar with the safety aspects of dam.
 Perform static and dynamic analysis using software.
UNIT I
DAMS IN GENERAL
9
Definition uses and history of dam Construction - Modern dams - Various
kinds of dams - problems in dam construction - Classification of dams by
their uses and by hydraulic designs - rigid and non-rigid dams - factors
governing the selection of dams selecting of dam site.
141
UNIT II
ANALYSIS, DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF
GRAVITY DAMS
9
Introduction - Typical cross section - forces acting - Earth quake forces Weight of dam - Combination of forces for design - Modes of failures
and criteria for the structural stability of gravity dams - Gravity method or
two dimensional stability Analysis - Construction of gravity dams construction of galleries in gravity dams, shear keys - water stops foundation treatment for gravity dams.
UNIT III
SPILLWAYS, ENERGY DISSIPATERS
9
Definition - Location - Subsidiary or emergency spillway or beaching
section - Design Consideration for the main spillway - controlled and
Uncontrolled spillways - Design of crest of spillways Energy dissipation
below overflow spillways - Energy dissipation below other types of
spillways - stilling basin.
UNIT IV
REQUIREMENTS OF TESTS FOR DAM SAFETY
9
Introduction - Requirements for checking the safety of a dam - Earthen
dam evaluation - Dams with Heterogeneous construction materials Concrete dam evaluation - Non-destructive testing - Laboratory studies Requirement of repair materials - repair techniques of damages due to
cracks, cavitation.
UNIT V
COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF DAMS
9
Identification of computer program - Methods of Analysis - Finite element
method -Analysis of dam - Static Analysis - Dynamic Analysis - Results
Analysis and interpretation - Eligibility of the packages used in the dam
Analysis.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.William P. Creager, D Justin and Hinds, “Engineering for dams vol.1”,
Hesperides Press, 2006.
142
2.Notes on the training course on structural, Hydrological and foundation
Engineering aspects concerning Dam safety by
Prof.A.R.Santhakumar& Dr.S.Rajarathnam organized by the Dam Safety
Directorate, PWD, Chennai - 5 at the college of Engineering, Guindy,
Anna University, 2012.
15SEA06
BRIDGE MAINTENANCE AND
MANAGEMENT
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the philosophy behind bridge maintenance and
management.
 To provide exposure on reliability concepts.
 To provide training on various type of NDT.
 To know the causes of bridge deterioration.
 To familiarize the stress monitoring in bridge structures.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, students will be able to
 Understand the basics of bridge maintenance and management.
 Acquire knowledge on the assessment and evaluation procedure
of bridges.
 Perform nondestructive testing and monitoring of bridge structures.
 Identify the causes of bridge deterioration.
 Carryout stress measurements in bridge structures.
UNIT I
9
INTRODUCTION
Bridge maintenance management - The system - Inspection - Inspection
equipment - planning - condition rating.
143
UNIT II
9
ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION
Basic consideration - structural safety - analysis method - Reliability
concepts.
UNIT III
9
NON DESTRUCTIVE TESTING
Concrete Elements - Corrosion analysis equipment - Resistivity
measurements - Rebar locators - Ultrasonic testing - Rebound hammer carbonation test - permeability testing - internal fracture tester - impulse
radar - infrared thermography - Endoscopy - Impact echo - Radiography
- coring - steel elements - masonry elements.
UNIT IV
9
BRIDGE DETERIORATION
Basic Theory - Discount rate - Traffic disruption - Future development maintenance strategy - performance profiles - whole life assessment.
UNIT V
STRESS MEASUREMENTS AND BRIDGE
MONITORING
9
In - situ residual stresses - stress relief principle - Indirect stress
management - Live load stresses - Monitoring - scour sensing - load cells displacement transducers - Traffic monitoring.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.Ryall M J, "Bridge Management", Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford,
2009.
2.K. S. Rakshit, “Construction Maintenance Restoration & Rehabilitation of
Highway Bridges”, New central book agency (P) Ltd., 2003.
3.BojidarYanev, "Bridge Management", John Wiley & Sons INC., 2007.
4.Mohiuddin A. Khan, “Bridge and Highway structure Rehabilitation and
Repair”, McGraw Hill Pvt. Ltd., 2010.
144
15SEA07
L
T
P
C
3
0
0
3
EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn the basic principles of elasticity.
 To impart knowledge on 2D Photo elasticity.
 To understand the concepts of 3D Photo elasticity.
 To have exposure on electrical strain gauges.
 To understand the basics of Brittle coatings and Birefringence
coatings.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course, students will be able to
 Formulate solutions for problems on elasticity.
 Evaluate various technics on 2D photo elasticity.
 Work out stress formulations of 3D photo elasticity.
 Perform strain measurement.
 Detect cracks using various failure theories and coatings.
UNIT I
BASIC ELASTICITY
9
Laws of stress transformation - principal stresses and principal planes Cauchy's stress quadric strain analysis - strain equations of
transformation - Cauchy's strain quadric - stress - strain relationship
UNIT II
TWO DIMENSIONAL PHOTO ELASTICITY
9
Stress optics law - Optics of polarization plane and circular polariscope dark and light field arrangements - fringe multiplication - fringe sharp
ending - compensation techniques - commonly employed photo elastic
materials.
145
UNIT III
THREE DIMENSIONAL PHOTO ELASTICITY
9
Neuman's strain optic relationship - stress freezing in model materials for
three dimensional photo elasticity - shear difference method for stress
separation.
UNIT IV
ELECTRIC RESISTANCE STRAIN GAUGES
9
Gauge construction and installation - temperature compensation - gauge
sensitivities - gauge factor - corrections for transverse strain effects factors affective gauge relation - rosette analysis - potentiometer and
Wheatstone’s bridge circuits for strain measurements.
UNIT V
BRITTLE COATINGS AND BIREFRINGENCE
COATINGS
9
Introduction - coating stresses and failure theories- different types of crack
patterns - crack detection composition of brittle coatings - coating cure influence of atmospheric conditions - effects of biaxial stress field.
Sensitivity - reinforcing effects - thickness of birefringence coatings.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Dally and Riley, “ Experimental Stress Analysis”, McGraw Hill
Education 3rd Revised edition 2014
2. Dove and Adams, “Experimental stress analysis and motion
measurement”, Prentice Hall of India, Delhi 2014.
3. Durelly and Riley , “Introduction to Photo Mechanics”, Prentice Hall ,
2013
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://textofvideo.nptel.iitm.ac.in/112106068/lec1.pdf
2. http://courses.washington.edu/me354a/photoelas.pdf
3. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/112106068/
146
15SEA08
AUTOMOBILE POLLUTION AND CONTROL
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To create awareness about the various pollution sources.
 To provide exposure on pollutant formation in SI engines.
 To impart knowledge on pollutant formation in CI engines.
 To get trained in control emission procedures.
 To know about the measurement techniques emission standards
and test procedure.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course the students will be able to
 Identify the pollution sources and assess their impact.
 Gain knowledge on pollutant formation in SI engines.
 Assess the magnitude of pollutant formation in CI engines.
 Know how to control emissions from engines.
 Measure the pollution using the standard test procedures.
UNIT I
POLLUTION SOURCES
9
Vehicle population assessment in metropolitan cities and contribution to
pollution - effects on human health and environment - global warming types of emission - transient operational effects on pollution.
UNIT II
POLLUTANT FORMATION IN SI ENGINES
9
Pollutant formation in SI Engines - mechanism of HC and CO formation
in four stroke and two stroke SI engines - NOx formation in SI engines effects of design and operating variables on emission formation - control
of evaporative emission. Two stroke engine pollution.
147
UNIT III
POLLUTANT FORMATION IN CI ENGINES
9
Pollutant formation in CI engines, smoke and particulate emissions in CI
engines - effects of design and operating variables on CI engine
emissions - Nox formation and control - Noise pollution from automobiles
- measurement and standards.
UNIT IV
CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SI AND
CI ENGINES
9
Design of engine, optimum selection of operating variables for control of
emissions - EGR - Thermal reactors - secondary air injection - catalytic
converters, catalysts - fuel modifications - fuel cells, Two stroke engine
pollution controls.
UNIT V
MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES EMISSION
STANDARDS AND TEST PROCEDURE
9
Orsat Apparatus - NDIR, FID - Chemiluminescent analyzers - Gas
Chromatograph, smoke meters, emission standards, driving cycles USA, Japan, Euro and India. Test procedures - ECE, FTP Tests. SHED
Test - chassis dynamometers - dilution tunnels.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.Paul Degobert, “Automobiles and Pollution”, Editions Technip
ISBN-2-7108-0676- 2, 1995.
2.Ganesan, V- Internal Combustion Engines- Tata McGraw-Hill Co – 2003.
3.S.K.Agarwal, “Automobile Pollution” Ashish publishing house, 1997.
148
15SEA09
CONTINUUM MECHANICS - CLASSICAL
AND FE APPROACH
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To study the classical theory of linear elasticity for two and three
dimensional state of stress.
 To provide knowledge on 2D problems in rectangular coordinates.
 To impart knowledge on 2D problems in polar coordinates.
 To gain knowledge on analysis of stress and strain in 3Dimentional
problems.
 To get familiar with finite element approach.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course the students will be able to
 Understand the theory of linear elasticity for two and three
dimensional state of stress.
 Solve 2D problems in rectangular coordinates.
 Formulate and obtain solutions for 2D problems in polar
coordinates.
 Analyze and determine the stresses in 3D problems.
 Apply finite element approach to all structural elements.
UNIT I
BASIC CONCEPTS
9
Definition of stress and strain at a point - component of stress and strain
at a point - strain displacement relation in Cartesian co-ordinates constitutive relations -equilibrium equations - compatibility equations and
boundary conditions in 2-D and 3-D cases - plane stress - plane strain Definition.
149
UNIT II
TWO-DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS IN
RECTANGULAR COORDINATES
9
Airy’s stress function approach to 2-D problems of elasticity - Solution by
Polynominals - End Effects - Saint - Venant’s Principle - solution of some
simple beam problems - including working out of displacement
components.
UNIT III
TWO - DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS IN POLAR
COORDINATES
9
General equation in Polar coordinates - Strain and displacement
relations -equilibrium equations - Stress distribution symmetrical about
an axis - Pure bending of curved bars - Displacements for symmetrical
stress distributions - Bending of a curved bar by a force at the end - The
effect of a small circular hole on stress distribution in a large plate
subjected to uni-axial tension and pure shear.
UNIT IV
ANALYSIS OF STRESS AND STRAIN IN THREE
DIMENSIONS
9
Introduction - Principal stresses - Determination of the principal stresses
and principal planes - Stress invariants - Determination of the maximum
shearing stress - Octohedral stress components - Principal strains strain invariants.
UNIT V
FE APPROACH
9
2D and 3D Elements - CST-LST- Rectangular family - Tetrahedra and
Hexahedra - Shape functions - Element Stiffness matrix - Equivalent
Loads-Isoparametric formulation of Triangular and General quadrilateral
elements - Axisymmetric elements - Gauss Quadrature.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Timeshenko.S.P and Goodier.J.N, “Theory of Elasticity”, McGraw Hill
International Edition, 2010.
2. Reddy J.N, “An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics with Applications”,
Cambridge University press, 2013.
150
3. Robert D Cook et al, “Concepts and Applications of Finite Element
Analysis”, 4th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York 2001.
4. Srinath. L.S., “Advanced Mechanics of Solids”, Tata McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co ltd., New Delhi, 2009.
5. Sadhu Singh, “Applied stress analysis”, Khanna Publishers, 1983.
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY EEE DEPARTMENT
SL.
NO.
1.
2.
3.
COURSE
COURSE TITLE
CODE
15PEA01 Efficient Illumination Technologies
15PEA02 Controllers for Robotics
15PEA03 Analysis of Solar Energy Systems
Converters, Inverters and
Applications
4.
15PEA04
5.
15PEA05 Hybrid and Electric Vehicle
Technology
Renewable Power Generation
15PEA06
Technology
6.
15PEA01
L
T
P
C
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
3
0
0
3
EFFICIENT ILLUMINATION TECHNOLOGIES
LTPC
3 003
Pre-requisites:
Basic electrical engineering, physics in lighting principle and basics of
economics.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart in-depth knowledge on energy savings.
 To make the students learn the concepts of solid state lighting
technologies and their characteristics.
 To educate the students on the design aspects of light fitting.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
151
 Explain the significance of energy savings.
 Elucidate the solid state lighting technologies and their
characteristics.
 Design the parameters related to light fitting.
GREEN ENGINEERING: CHOICE OF LIGHTING 9
UNIT I
TECHNOLOGIES
Lighting upgrade- Green Benefits-Energy Savings-Green House Gas
Emission- Social ProspectiveDeferred from Mercury- Clean
disposal options-Discount-Rational Economic Factor- Pay Back
Formula. Cost of Light- Energy Cost –Usage hours- Replacement Cost.
Trade –off among alternative technology-Daily Lighting Load CurvesAnnual Cost of White LED’s-Better investment.
UNIT II TRANSITION TO SOLID STATE LIGHTING
9
Technical Prospective Lighting Upgrade- Comparative Study of LightsEdison’s bulb- Fluorescent Tubes- CFL- Solid State Lighting- Key
Characteristics- Efficiency- Life Time-Spot Replacement - Group
Replacement- Colour- Co-related Colour Temperature- Black Body
Radiator- RF Noise and Flicker.
UNIT III
RETROFIT ECONOMICS
9
Efficiency: Visible Spectrum- Luminous Flux- Human Eye- Photopia
Spectral Eye Sensitivity Curve- Device Efficacy, Source and Driving
Circuit Losses- System Efficacy with minimum Fixture Loss. Useful LifeLamp Lumen Depreciation- Junction Temperature-Heat Sink- Fixture
Reflectance
DepreciationOptics
CleaningMaintenance
Factor- Coefficient of Utilization-Causes of Failure.
9
UNIT IV
LUMINAIRE FIXTURE
Definition-Thermal-Electrical-Mechanical Design and Testing-Lamp
Holder- wiring- Control Gear- Driving Circuit-Housing. Optics-Light
control elements: Reflectors-Lenses and Refractors-Diffuser-FiltersScreening devices- Mirror Louver. Specula reflector- Plane-Optical
Gain-Uses-Parabolic-Curved-Circular-Faceted-Trough
versions.
Accurate beam Control- Control of spill light- practical uses-Combined
Spherical and Parabolic reflectors- Elliptical reflectors-Hyperbolic
reflector- Spread reflector- Moderate beam control- Diffuse reflectorMaterials- Lenses and refractors.
9
UNIT V
LIGHT FITTINGS
Focusing Lours for flood lighting-Shielding angle- Cut-off angleBarn doors- colour filters- Light Distribution- Symmetric- and
Asymmetric- Diffused and Focussed- Direct and Indirect Beam spread
classification- Batwing light distribution.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
152
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Craig Delouse-“The Lighting Management Hand Book”- The
FAIRMONT PRESS.
2.
Ines Lima Azededo, M. Granger Morgan and Fritz Morgan “The
Transition to Solid State Lighting” IEEE Proceedings, Vol.97,
No.3.March 2009.
3.
A.R. Bean and R. H. Simons-“Lighting Fittings Performance and
Design”, 1st Edition, International Series of Monographs in
Electrical Engineering, 1968.
L T P C
15PEA02
CONTROLLERS FOR ROBOTICS
3 0 0 3
Pre-requisites: Fundamentals of Microprocessor, Microcontroller and
Control System.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To give students a well rounded education in Robotic Technology.
 To impart knowledge on microcontroller programming for the
purpose of controlling robotics.
 To expose the students to the concepts and basic algorithms
needed to make a mobile robot function reliably and effectively.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
 Explain the techniques of Robotics Programming.
 Implement the microcontroller in the programming of the
autonomous robot.
 Describe and analyze control schemes frequently used at
industrial level.
153
UNIT I
ARM ARCHITECTURE AND
PROGRAMMING
9
RISC Machine – Architectural Inheritance – Core & Architectures Registers – Pipeline - Interrupts – ARM organization - ARM processor
family – Co-processors. Instruction set – Thumb instruction set –
Instruction cycle timings - The ARM Programmer’s model – Interrupts –
Interrupt handling schemes- Firmware and boot loader.
UNIT II
TRANSPORT AND APPLICATION LAYERS
9
TCP over Adhoc
Networks – WAP – Architecture – WWW
Programming Model – WDP – WTLS – WTP – WSP – WAE – WTA
Architecture – WML – WML scripts.
UNIT III
ONE DIMENSIONAL RANDOM
VARIABLES
9
Random variables - Probability
function
–
moments
–
moment generating functions and their properties
–
Binomial,
Poisson, Geometric, Uniform, Exponential, Gamma and Normal
distributions – Function of a Random Variable
UNIT IV
COMMUNICATION WITH BUSES FOR
DEVICES NETWORKS
9
I/O devices: timer and counting devices, serial communication using I2C,
CAN, USB, and Buses: communication using profi bus, field bus, arm
bus, interfacing with devices/ serial port and parallel ports, device
drivers.
UNIT V
ARM APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
9
ARM Development tools – ARM Assembly Language
Programming and ‘C’ compiler program; Introduction to DSP on ARM
–FIR Filter – IIR Filter – Discrete Fourier transform
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Steve Furber, ‘ARM system on chip architecture’, Addision Wesley
154
2. Andrew N. Sloss, Dominic Symes, Chris Wright, John Rayfield
‘ARM System Developer’s Guide Designing and Optimizing
System Software’, Elsevier 2007.
3. Dananjay V. Gadre ‘Programming and Customizing the AVR
microcontroller’, McGraw Hill 2001.
4. Charles E. Perkins, “ Adhoc Networking”, Addison-Wesley, 2001.
5. N.Mathivanan, ‘Microprocessors, PC Hardware and Interfacing ,
PHI, second Printing 2003.
15PEA03
ANALYSIS OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS
LTPC
3 003
Pre-requisites: Basics of solar energy conversion
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart knowledge on the fundamentals of solar energy
conversion systems.
 To make the students gain knowledge on photovoltaic energy
conversion, energy storage and grid connection processes.
 To make the students think on how to advance the current
technology of the solar energy systems for making the process
economical, environmentally safe and sustainable.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
 Explain semiconductor physics, optical systems, load matching,
storage and grid connections related to photovoltaic engineering.
 Elucidate the challenges in sustainable energy processes,
economic aspects, and future potentials of solar energy utilization.
 Perform cost analysis, design photovoltaic systems for different
applications meeting residential and industrial needs.
155
UNIT I
SOLAR RESOURCE
9
Introduction-Extra-terrestrial Solar Radiation-Solar Spectrum-Sun and
Earth Movement-Declination Angle-Angle of Sun rays on Solar CollectorOptimum angle for fixed collector surface-Optimal inclination of collector
in summer and winter-Sun Tracking: One axis tracking-Two axis
Tracking-Azimuth Tracking
UNIT II
SOLAR THERMAL SYSTEMS
9
Introduction-Classification-Performance indices: Collector EfficiencyConcentration ratio-Temperature Range-Liquid Flat Plate CollectorEvacuated Tube Collector-Cylindrical Parabolic Collector-Fixed mirror
solar concentrator-Central Tower Receiver-Solar Passive Heating and
Cooling System-Solar Industrial Heating Systems
UNIT III
SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC(PV) SYSTEMS
9
Generic Photovoltaic Cell: Simple Equivalent circuit- More Accurate
Equivalent Circuit-Cells-Modules-Array-PV Curve-IV Curve-Impact of
irradiance and Cell Temperature on IV curves-Effect of Shading Series
and Parallel connection-Mismatch in cell/module-Mismatch in series
connection-Mismatch in Parallel Connection-Blocking diode- Bypass
Diodes-Simple Problems
UNIT IV
BALANCE OF SOLAR PV SYSTEMS
9
Battery Parameters: Battery Capacity, Battery Voltage, Depth of
Discharge-Battery Life Cycle-C rating-Self Discharge- Factors Affecting
Battery Performance-Choice of a battery-Battery Charging and
Discharging Methods-Charge Controllers-Types of Charge ControllerMaximum Power Point Tracking(MPPT)-Algorithms for MPPT: Constant
Voltage Method-Hill Climbing Method-DC DC-to- Converters for MPPT
traction
UNIT V
PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM DESIGN AND
APPLICATIONS
9
Introduction to Solar PV Systems-Stand Alone PV System Configuration156
Case Study: PV System Design for specified daily water Requirement,
Design of Standalone System with battery and AC or DC Load-Hybrid
PV Systems-Grid Connected PV systems- Life Cycle Costing
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Sukhatme S P, Nayak J K, “Solar Energy: Principles of Solar
Thermal Collection and Storage”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2008.
2. Chetan Singh Solanki, “Solar Photovoltaics: Fundamentals,
Technologies and Applications”, PHI Learning Private Limited,2012
REFERENCE BOOK:
1. Gilbert M. Masters, “Renewable and Efficient Electric Power
Systems”, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
15PEA04
CONVERTERS, INVERTERS AND
APPLICATIONS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
Pre-requisites:
Basic knowledge on Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart knowledge on the basics of power semiconductor
devices and their characteristics.
 To impart knowledge on steady state operation of single phase
AC-DC converters and their applications.
 To make the students analyze the operation of various DC-DC
converters and their applications.
 To make the students analyze the operation of various DC-AC
converters and their applications.
 To make the students analyze the operation of AC voltage
controllers and their applications.
157
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
 Explain the basics of power semiconductor devices and its
characteristics.
 Explicate the basic concept of steady state operation of single
phase AC-DC converters.
 Design and analyze the various DC-DC converters.
 Analyze the operation of DC-AC converters.
 Design and analyze the operation of AC-AC converters.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO POWER
SEMICONDUCTOR SWITCHES
9
Introduction to Power Electronics - Study of switching devices: structure,
operation, static and switching characteristics of SCR, TRIAC, BJT,
MOSFET, IGBT.
SCR: Two Transistor model, turn on circuits and commutation circuits,
series and parallel operation.
UNIT II
AC-DC CONVERTER AND ITS
APPLICATIONS
9
1-pulse, 2-pulse converters - circuit, operation, waveforms - Estimation
of average load voltage and average load current for continuous current
operation - Input power factor estimation for ripple free load currentControl of DC Motor using fully and half controlled converters.
UNIT III
DC-DC CONVERTER AND ITS
APPLICATIONS
9
Step-down and step-up chopper - Time ratio control and current limit
control – Buck, boost, buck-boost converter –Isolated Converters: Fly
back and Forward converter- Battery charging using DC-DC Converters.
158
UNIT IV
DC-AC CONVERTER AND ITS
APPLICATIONS
9
Single phase and three phase inverters (both 120 mode and 180 mode) PWM techniques: single, multiple, sinusoidal PWM, modified sinusoidal
PWM – Voltage and harmonic control- UPS-Types: Online and Offline
UPS.
UNIT V
AC-AC CONVERTER AND ITS
APPLICATIONS
9
Single phase AC voltage controllers –Integral cycle control, phase angle
control - Estimation of RMS load voltage, RMS load current and input
power factor- Electronic Regulators for Fan.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ned Mohan, Undeland and Riobbins, “Power Electronics: converters,
Application and design”, John Wiley and sons. Inc, Newyork, 1995.
2. Rashid M.H., “Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and Applications ",
Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1995.
3. Cyril W.Lander, “power electronics”, Third Edition McGraw hill-1993
4. P.C Sen.," Modern Power Electronics ", Wheeler publishing Co, First
Edition, New Delhi-1998.
5. P.S.Bimbra, “Power Electronics”, Khanna Publishers, Eleventh
Edition, 2003. Bimal K Bose, “Modern Power Electronics and AC
Drives”, Pearson Education Asia 2002.
6. R W Erickson and D Maksimovic,”Fundamentals
Electronics”, Springer, 2nd Edition.
of
Power
7. Philip T.Krein, “Elements of Power Electronics” Oxford University
Press, 2004.
8. M.D. Singh and K.B Khanchandani, “Power Electronics”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 2001.
9. Vedam Subramanyam “Power Electronics”, by, New Age International
publishers, New Delhi 2nd Edition, 2006.
159
15PEA05
L T P C
HYBRID AND ELECTRIC VEHICLE
TECHNOLOGY
3 0 0 3
Pre-requisites:
Basic knowledge on batteries and electric motors.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart knowledge on the vehicle components and vehicle
movement.
 To make the students grasp the architecture of Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles.
 To make the students comprehend the need for Energy storage.
 To provide knowledge on the electrical components and control
system for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
 Explain the components and Configuration of Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles.
 Depict the types of batteries and their role in Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles.
 Describe the different control methods of Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
TO
HYBRID
ELECTRIC DRIVE TRAIN
AND
9
Introduction-Components of Gasoline, Hybrid and Electric VehicleGeneral description of vehicle movement- Aerodynamic drag-Motion and
Dynamic equation for Hybrid and Electrical Vehicle- Adhesion, Dynamic
wheel radius and slip.
160
UNIT II
ARCHITECTURE
OF
ELECTRIC VEHICLES
HYBRID
AND
9
Introduction-Energy Saving potential in Hybrid Vehicle-Different
configuration of Hybrid Vehicle: Series Hybrid System- Parallel Hybrid
System-Electric Vehicle (EV) Configurations- Electric Vehicle (EV) Drive
train Alternatives Based on Drive train Configuration- Electric Vehicle
(EV) Drive train Alternatives Based on Power Source
UNIT III
BATTERIES
9
Basics- Parameters-Capacity, Discharge rate, State of charge, state of
Discharge, Depth of Discharge, Types-Lead Acid Battery-Lithium ion
battery- Lead Acid Battery-Lithium ion Battery-Technical characteristicsModelling of battery capacity- Calculation of Peukert Coefficient
UNIT IV
ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
9
Motors for Hybrid and Electric Vehicle-Suitability of BLDC, PMSM and
Induction Motor for Traction-Generic Power Converter Topology of
Electric Vehicle- DC-DC Converter: Types-Buck Converter-Bidirectional
Converter-DC-AC Converter-Working of Single and Three Phase
Inverter- Sizing of the Electric Machine-Power Train and Drive Cycles:
New York City Cycle- New European Driving Cycle- Fundamentals of
Regenerative Braking
UNIT V
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ELECTRIC AND
HYBRID VEHICLE
9
Function of the Control System in HEVs and EVs-Different Operational
Modes- Overview of Control System-Control Variables-Principle of Rule
based Control Methods for ECU Design-State Machine based ECU
Design- Fuzzy Logic Based Control System- Case study of torque
control and battery recharging control based on fuzzy Logic
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
161
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Mehrdad Ehsani, Yimin Gao, Ali Emadi, “Modern Electric, Hybrid
Electric, and Fuel Cell Vehicles: Fundamentals”, CRC Press, 2010.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Iqbal Hussain, “Electric & Hybrid Vechicles
Fundamentals”, Second Edition, CRC Press, 2011.
–
Design
2. James Larminie, “Electric Vehicle Technology Explained”, John
Wiley & Sons, 2003.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.nptel.ac.in/courses/108103009/
15PEA06
RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION
TECHNOLOGY
LTPC
3 003
Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge on electrical power generation.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To impart knowledge on solar PV system, its design and MPPT.
 To impart knowledge on wind energy systems.
 To educate the students on other renewable sources of energy.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to
 Design stand alone and grid connected PV systems.
 Select suitable wind turbine generators for different applications.
 Explain the concept of Hybrid Energy Systems.
UNIT I
SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM
9
Sun and Earth-Basic Characteristics of solar radiation-angle of sunrays
on solar collector-Photovoltaic cell-characteristics-equivalent circuit162
Photovoltaic modules and arrays
UNIT II
SOLAR SYSTEMS DESIGN
9
PV Systems-Design of PV systems-Standalone system with DC and AC
loads with and without battery storage-Grid connected PV systemsMaximum Power Point Tracking
UNIT III
WIND ENERGY
9
Wind energy – energy in the wind – aerodynamics - rotor types – forces
developed by blades- Aerodynamic models – braking systems – tower control and monitoring system –design considerations-power curve power speed characteristics-choice of electrical generators
UNIT IV
WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION
9
Wind turbine generator systems-fixed speed induction generatorperformance analysis-semi variable speed induction generator-variable
speed induction generators with full and partial rated power converter
topologies -isolated systems
UNIT V
HYBRID AND OTHER SOURCES
9
Hybrid energy systems-wind-diesel system-wind-PV system-micro
hydro-PV system biomass- PV-diesel system-geothermal-tidal and
OTEC systems
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Sukhatme S P, Nayak J K, “Solar Energy: Principles of Solar
Thermal Collection and Storage”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2008.
2. Chetan Singh Solanki, “Solar Photovoltaics: Fundamentals,
Technologies and Applications”, PHI Learning Private Limited,2012
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Gilbert M. Masters, “Renewable and Efficient Electric Power
Systems”, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
163
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED TO BY ECE DEPARTMENT
I. Communication Systems
S.
No
COURSE
CODE
1.
COURSE TITLE
L
T
P
C
15CMA01 Bio MEMS
3
0
0
3
2.
15CMA02 High Speed Networks
3
0
0
3
3.
15CMA03 Telemetry Systems
3
0
0
3
4.
15CMA04 Light wave Communication
3
0
0
3
5.
15CMA05 Image Processing
3
0
0
3
II. VLSI Design
S.
No.
COURSE
CODE
1.
15VDA01
2.
COURSE TITLE
L
T
P
C
Sensors, Actuators and Interfaces
3
0
0
3
15VDA02
Energy harvesting with materials
and microsystems
3
0
0
3
3.
15VDA03
Embedded and networking systems
3
0
0
3
4.
15VDA04
Extreme environment electronics
3
0
0
3
5.
15VDA05
Transducers and Signal
conditioning circuits
3
0
0
3
164
15CMA01
BIO MEMS
LTPC
3 003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To be familiar of different sensors and actuators and fabrication
techniques used in MEMS
 To identify the applications of MEMS in medical field.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Select desired actuator for any application
 Develop MEMS based system to diagnose disease
 Implement the recently developed sensing technology used in BIO
MEMS
UNIT I
MEMS AND MICROSYSTEMS
9
Typical MEMs and Microsystems, materials for MEMS - active substrate
materials- Silicon and its compounds, Silicon piezoresistors, Gallium
Arsenide, quartz, polymers. Micromachining photolithography, thin film
deposition, doping, etching, bulk machining, wafer bonding, LIGA
UNIT II
MECHANICAL AND THERMAL SENSORS AND
ACTUATORS
9
Mechanics for MEMs design- static bending of thin plates, mechanical
vibration, thermo-mechanics, fracture and thin film mechanics.
Mechanical sensors and actuators – beam and cantilever –microplates,
strain, pressure and flow measurements, Thermal sensors and
actuators- actuator based on thermal expansion, thermal couples,
thermal resistor, Shape memory alloys- Inertia sensor, flow sensor
UNIT III
ELECTROSTATIC
AND
PIEZOELECTRIC
SENSORS AND ACTUATORS
9
Parallel plate capacitor, pull in effect, Electrostatic sensors and
165
actuators- Inertia sensor, Pressure sensor, flow sensor, tactile sensor,
comb drive. Properties of piezoelectric materials, Piezoelectric sensor
and actuator – inchworm motor, inertia sensor, flow sensor.
UNIT IV MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS
9
Fluid dynamics, continuity equation, momentum equation, equation of
motion, laminar flow in circular conduits, fluid flow in microconduits, in
submicrometer and nanoscale. Microscale fluid, expression for liquid
flow in a channel, fluid actuation methods, dielectrophoresis, microfluid
dispenser,
microneedle,
micropumps-continuous
flow
system,
micromixers
UNIT V
SENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIO-MEMS
APPLICATIONS
9
Culture-Based Biochip for Rapid Detection of Environmental
Mycobacteria, MEMS for Drug Delivery, Pharmaceutical Analysis Using
Bio-MEMS, Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis Systems for DNA
Analysis
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Steven S. Saliterman “Fundamentals of BioMEMS and Medical
Microdevices”, Wiley Interscience, SPIE press, First Edition, 2006
2. Tai Ran Hsu, “MEMS and Microsystems design and manufacture”,
Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company, New Delhi, First Edition, 2002
3. NitaigourPremchandMahalik, “ MEMS”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
Company, New Delhi,Second Reprint, 2008
4. Wanjun Wang, Steven A.Soper “ BioMEMS-Technologies and
applications”, CRC Press,BocaRaton,First Edition, 2007
5. Chang Liu,’ Foundations of MEMS’, Pearson Education International,
New Jersey, USA, Second Edition,2012
166
WEB REFERENCES:
1. https://www.mecheng.osu.edu/nlbb/files/nlbb/Nanotech_0.pdf
2. h
‎ ttp://www.tc.umn.edu/~drsteve/Lectures/Introduction%20to%20BioM
EMS.pdf‎
15CMA02
HIGH SPEED NETWORKS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To be aware of high speed architectures
 To know the features and limitations of high speed architectures
 To discuss the congestion control mechanisms required for high
speed architectures
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Employ the right type of high speed architecture according to the
requirement
 Administer congestion control and provide QoS
 Provide compatibility between different high speed architectures
UNIT I
ISDN AND FRAME RELAY
9
Introduction to High Speed networks - ISDN: Conceptual view –
Standards – Transmission structure – BISDN Frame Relay: Frame mode
protocol architecture – Call control – LAPF – Congestion – Traffic rate
management – Explicit congestion avoidance – Implicit congestion
control.
UNIT II
ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER MODE
8
Asynchronous transfer mode - ATM Protocol Architecture, ATM logical
Connection, ATM Cell - ATM Service Categories – AAL - Traffic and
Congestion control in ATM - Requirements - Attributes - Traffic
167
Management Frame work, Traffic Control – ABR traffic Management ABR rate control, RM cell formats, ABR Capacity allocations - GFR
traffic management.
UNIT III
CONGESTION CONTROL AND QOS IN IP
NETWORKS
9
Congestion Control in Packet Switching Networks: – The Need for Flow
and Error Control – Link Control Mechanisms – ARQ Performance –
TCP Flow Control – TCP Congestion Control – Performance of TCP
Over ATM Integrated Services Architecture – Queuing Discipline –
Random Early Detection – Differentiated Services – Resource
Reservation: RSVP – Multi protocol Label Switching – Real Time
Transport Protocol.
UNIT IV
WDM OPTICAL NETWORKS
9
Introduction to Optical Networks – Wavelength Division Multiplexing
(WDM) – Broadcast and select networks – switch architectures –
channel accessing – Wavelength routed networks – switch architectures
– Routing and wavelength assignment – Virtual topology design – IP
over ATM over WDM – IP over WDM.
UNIT V
SONET AND SDH
9
High Speed LANs: Fast Ethernet – Switched fast Ethernet - Gigabit
Ethernet - 10Gigabit Ethernet
FDDI: Network configuration – Physical Interface – Frame transmission
and reception SONET: Introduction – Layers – Frames – STS
multiplexing – SONET networks – Virtual tributaries - Payload mappings
– Packet over SONET – Generic Framing Procedure – Transport
services – SONET over WDM – Traffic Grooming.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. William Stallings, “ISDN and Broadband ISDN with Frame Relay and
ATM”, Prentice-Hall of India, Fourth edition, 2004.
2. William Stallings, “High Speed Networks and Internets: Performance
and Quality of Service”, Pearson Education, Second edition, 2002.
168
3. C. Siva Ram Murthy and Mohan Gurusamy, “WDM Optical Networks:
Concepts, Design and Algorithms”, Prentice-Hall of India, 2002.
4. Fred Halsall, “Multimedia Communications – Applications, Networks,
Protocols”, Pearson Edition, 2001.
5. Greg Bemstein, BalaRajagopalan and DebanjanSaha, “Optical
Network Control – Architecture, Protocols and Standards”, Pearson
Education, 2004.
6. Behrouz A Forouzan, “Data Communications and Networking”, Tata
McGraw-Hill, Fifth edition, 2013.
7. Behrouz A. Forouzan and Sophia Chung Fegan, “Local Area
Networks”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2003.
8. Rajiv Ramaswami and Kumar N. Sivarajan, “Optical Networks: A
Practical Perspective”, Morgan Kaufmann, Third edition, 2004
9. .Uyless Black, “Optical Networks - Third Generation Transport
Systems”, Pearson Education, 2002.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.williamstallings.com/HsNet2e.html
2. ftp://ftp.prenhall.com/pub/esm/computer_science.s041/stallings/Slides/HsNet2e_PPT-Slides/
3. pages.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/~carey/CPSC641/.../atm/CongestionControl.ppt
15CMA03
TELEMETRY SYSTEMS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:


To apply the transmitter and receiver techniques for different
telemetry systems.
To apply the telemetry principles for practical applications.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Develop and design components for telemetry applications.
169
 Design a reliable telemetry system for different emerging field
applications.
 Implement a system for different real time applications.
UNIT I
TELEMETRY PRINCIPLES
9
Basic systems, Classification, Non electrical telemetry systems, Voltage
and current telemetry systems, Local transmitters and converters,
Frequency Telemetering, Power line carrier communication, Signal and
transmission basics, Symbols and codes
UNIT II
MULTIPLEXED SYSTEMS
9
Frequency division multiplexing systems- FDM: An Introduction, IRIG
standards, FM circuits, Phase Modulation circuits, Receiving end, Phase
locked local loop, mixers. Time divison multiplexed systems- TDM/PAM
systems, PAM/PM SYSTEMS, TDM-PCM systems, digital multiplexer,
PCM reception, coding for varying levels, DPCM standards.
UNIT III
MODEMS AND FILTERS
9
MODEMS- Introduction, Modems, QAM, modem protocol. FILTERSIntroduction, Polynomial filter, active RC filter, universal filter circuits,
switched capacitor filters, digital filters.
UNIT IV
TRANSMITTER AND RECEIVER
9
Transmitters introduction, Transmitter techniques, Interstage coupling,
Receiver. Antennas- ideal structure, dipoles, arrays, current distribution
and design consideration, Microwave antennas.
UNIT V
APPLICATION OF TELEMETRY SYSTEMS
9
Satellite Telemetry: TT & C services, digital transmission systems in
satellite telemetry, TDM, The antenna, TT & C sub-systems, satellite
telemetry and communications: MA techniques. Fibre optical telemetry:
optical fibre cable, dispersion, losses, connectors and splices, sources
and detectors, transmitter and receiver circuits, coherent optical fibre
communication systems, wavelength division multiplexing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
170
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. D. Patranabis, ‘Telemetry Principles’, Tata McGraw-Hill Education,
2007.
2. Swoboda G, ‘Telecontrol Methods and Applications of Telemetry and
Remote Control’, Reinhold Publishing Corp., London, 1991.
3. OndrejKrejcar , ‘Modern Telemetry’, InTech, 2011.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://free179.glareebook.org/pdf/telemetry-principles_yemev.pdf
2. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/585928/telemetry
15CMA04
LIGHT WAVE COMMUNICATION
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To Analyze the basic elements of light sources, Wavelength and
frequencies of light
 To Analyze the different kind of fibers, losses, and fiber slicing and
connectors
 To apply different types of photo detectors for constructing the
optical receiver
 To evaluate the fiber optical receivers by measuring the
parameters

To apply the optical components for constructing the optical
networks.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Analyze different kinds of light sources and Detectors used in any
applications
 Design any optical communication systemfor different real time
applications.
 Evaluate any optical related parameters
 Design a reliable telemetry system for different emerging field
applications.
171
UNIT I
OPTICAL SOURCES
9
Light sources: Sunlight, Torch light, LED and Laser light Optical
frequencies and Wavelength: Spectrum of Light sources LED internal quantum efficiency, Relationship between speed of light, wavelength
and frequency, light as an Electromagnetic waves comparison of LED
and Laser. Comparison of RF, Microwave and Lightwave communication
: Advantages and disadvantages.
UNIT II
OPTICAL FIBER
9
Introduction, Refractive Index - Ray theory of transmission- Total internal
reflection-Acceptance angle – Numerical aperture –Structure of an
optical fiber Types of an optical fibers- Attenuation Fiber Bend losses
and Dispersion : Optical domain signal, electrical domain signal Optical
pulses for the digital data Optical fiber connectors, Fiber alignment and
Joint Losses – Fiber Splices – Fiber connectors-Fiber couplers
UNIT III
OPTICAL DETECTORS
9
Optical Detectors: PIN Photo detectors, Avalanche photo diodes,
construction, characteristics and properties, Comparison of performance,
Photo detector noise –Noise sources, Signal to Noise ratio, Detector
response time.
UNIT IV
FIBER OPTIC RECEIVER AND MEASUREMENTS
9
Fundamental receiver operation, Pre amplifiers, Error sources –
Receiver Configuration – Probability of Error – Quantum limit. Fiber
Attenuation measurements- Dispersion measurements –Optical
Spectrum Analyzer
UNIT V
OPTICAL NETWORKS
9
Basic Networks – Broadcast and select WDM Networks –Bus topology
– Star topology - Wavelength Routed Networks – Routing and
wavelength Assignment – Different types of wavelength assignmentNon linear effects on Network performance – Performance of WDM +
EDFA system – Solitons – Optical CDMA – Ultra High Capacity
Networks, OTDR.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
172
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Gerd Keiser, “Optical Fiber Communication”,Third Edition , McGraw
Hill, 2013
2. J.Gower, “Optical Communication System”, Prentice Hall of India,
2001
3. Rajiv Ramaswami, “Optical Networks “, Third Edition, Elsevier, 2009.
4. Govind P. Agrawal, “Fiber-optic communication systems”, Third
edition, John Wiley & sons, 2010.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.nptel.ac.in/courses/117101002/downloads/Lec19.pdf
2. www.ece466.groups.et.byu.net/notes/notes_source.ppt
15CMA05
IMAGE PROCESSING
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To analyze the mathematical transforms necessary for image
processing.
 To analyze image restoration procedures.
 To analyze the image segmentation techniques.
 To analyze the image compression procedures
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Simulate basic image processing algorithms
 Develop algorithms for image enhancement and compression
 Develop algorithms for image restoration and segmentation
 Implement the algorithms for image compression applications
UNIT I
IMAGEPROCESSING SYSTEM
9
Image Sampling – Quantization – Resolution, human Visual System,
173
Classification of Digital Images, Types, Elements of an Imageprocessing System, File Formats, Applications, Image Transforms,
various Image Transforms (qualitative study only) Comparison, ColourImage Processing, Colour Formation, Colour Model, The Chromaticity
Diagram.
UNIT II
IMAGE ENHANCEMENT
9
Image Enhancement in Spatial Domain, Point Operation, Histogram
Manipulation, Linear and Nonlinear Gray-level Transformation, Local or
Neighborhood Operation, Median Filter, Image Sharpening, Bit-plane
Slicing, Enhancement in the Frequency Domain, Homomorphic Filter,
Zooming Operation, image Arithmetic.
UNIT III
IMAGE RESTORATION AND DENOISING
9
Image Degradation, Image Blur, Classification of Image restoration
Techniques, restoration Model, Linear and Non-linear Image-restoration
Techniques, Blind-deconvolution Techniques, Image Denoising,
Classification of Noise in Image, Median Filtering, Trimmed Average
Filter, Performance Metrics in Image Restoration, Applications.
UNIT IV
IMAGE SEGMENTATION
9
Image-segmentation Techniques, Region Approach, Clustering,
Thresholding Edge-based Segmentation, Edge Detection, Edge Linking,
Hough Transform, Active Contour, Watershed Transformation, Shape
Representation.
UNIT V
IMAGE COMPRESSION
9
Image Compression, Image-compression Scheme, Fundamentals of
Information Theory, Run-length Coding, and Huffman coding, Dictionarybased Compression, Predictive Coding, JPEG compression standard,
Scalar and vector Quantization.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jayaraman. S, Essakkirajan.S, Veerakumar. T,
Processing, McGraw Hill Educations, 2013
174
Digital Image
2. Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods, “Digital Image Processing',
Pearson Education Inc, Third Edition, 2009
3. Anil K. Jain, “Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing”, Prentice
Hall of India, Fifth Edition, Sixth reprint 2007 .
4. Kenneth R. Castleman, “Digital Image Processing”, Pearson, 2006
5. Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods, Steven Eddins, “Digital
Image Processing using MATLAB”, Pearson Education Inc, Third
Edition, 2010.
6. William K. Pratt, , “Digital Image Processing”, John Wiley, Fourth
Edition, 2007
7. Milan Sonka, Vaclav Hlavac, Roger Boyle, “Image Processing,
Analysis, and Machine Vision”, Cengage Learning, Fourth Edition,
2014
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.imageprocessingplace.com/
2. http://in.mathworks.com/products/image/
3. http://in.mathworks.com/discovery/digital-image-processing.html
15VDA01
SENSORS, ACTUATORS AND THEIR
INTERFACES
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Recognize different types of sensors and actuators for different
environments.
 Converse the different measurements using sensors
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Analyze sensors for different type of measurements.
175
 Decide different Actuators at the output.
UNIT I
SENSORS AND ACTUATORS
9
Classification of Sensors and Actuators, General Requirements for
Interfacing, Units and Measures, Performance Characteristics of
Sensors and Actuators.
UNIT II
TEMPERATURE,
ACTUATORS
OPTICAL
SENSORS
AND
9
Thermoresistive Sensors, Thermoelectric Sensors, PN Junction
Temperature Sensors, Optical Units and materials, Effects of Optical
Radiation, Quantum-Based Optical Sensors, Photoelectric Sensors,
Coupled Charge (CCD) Sensors and Detectors, Thermal-Based Optical
Sensors, Active Far Infrared (AFIR) Sensors, Optical Actuators..
UNIT III
ELECTRIC, MAGNETIC, MECHANICAL SENSORS
AND ACTUATORS
9
The Electric Field: Capacitive Sensors and Actuators, Magnetic Fields:
Sensors and Actuators, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Sensors and
Actuators, Voltage and Current Sensors, Force Sensors,
Accelerometers, Pressure Sensors, Velocity Sensing, Inertial Sensors:
Gyroscopes.
UNIT IV ACOUSTIC,
ACTUATORS
CHEMICAL
SENSORS
AND
9
Elastic Waves, Microphones, The Piezoelectric Effect , Acoustic
Actuators, Ultrasonic Sensors and Actuators, Piezoelectric Actuators,
Piezoelectric Resonators and SAW Devices, Electrochemical Sensors,
Potentiometric Sensors, Thermochemical Sensors, Optical Chemical
Sensors, Mass Sensors, Humidity and Moisture Sensors, Chemical
Actuation.
176
UNIT V
RADIATION SENSORS AND ACTUATORS, MEMS
AND SMART SENSORS
9
Radiation Sensors, Microwave Radiation, Antennas as Sensors and
Actuators, MEMS Sensors and Actuators, Smart Sensors and Actuators,
Sensor Networks.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. NATHAN IDA, “Sensors, Actuators and their Interfaces”, Scitech
publishing. 2013.
2. Vijay K.Varadan, K.J.Vinoy, S.Gopalakrishnan, “Smart Material
Systems and MEMS”, Wiley edition, 2006.
3. Hartmut Janocha, “Actuator : Basics and its Applications”, Springer,
2004.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. catalog.weidmueller.com/catalog/Start.do?localeId=en&ObjectID
2. www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/Grove_System
15VDA02 ENERGY HARVESTING WITH MATERIALS AND
MICROSYSTEMS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Analyze energy extraction from non-conventional harvesting
sources.
 Design and model energy harvesting materials.
 Analyze the different sensor-level power supply architectures.
177
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Design different types of Energy Harvesting sources.
 Analyze the performance of energy sources.
UNIT I
POWER
ENERGY
MICROSYSTEMS
WITH
AMBIENT
9
Microsystems: Market Demand, Energy and Power requirements,
Technology Trends, Miniature Sources: Light Energy, Kinetic energy,
Thermal energy and Mechanical Energy, Conditioning Microelectronics:
Linear Switch, Switched Capacitors and Inductor, Energy Harvesting
Chargers and Power Supplies.
UNIT II
ENERGY HARVESTING APPLICATIONS
9
Energy Harvesting : Types of Energy Harvesting Sources and Power
Ranges, Medical Implants, Powering Solutions for Human Wearable
and Implantable Devices, Multisource Self-Powered, Device Conception.
Thermoelectric Design - Optimization and Constraints, Thermal System
Design and Considerations in Thermoelectric Systems, Structural
Design and Considerations in Thermoelectric Systems.
UNIT III ENERGY SOURCES
9
Theory of Thin Film-Based Thermo-power Wave Oscillations,
Characterization, Thermo-power Wave Systems, Bi2Te3- and Sb2Te3Based Thermo-power Wave Systems, Comparison of Sb2Te3- and
Bi2Te3-Based Thermo-power Devices, Thermo-power Devices Based
on Al2O3and Terracotta Substrate, ZnO-Based Thermo-power Wave
Sources.
UNIT IV SOLAR CELLS
9
Polymer Solar Cells: Theory Considerations and Survey on Existing and
New Polymers, Polymer Solar Cells: Nano- Optics for Enhancing
Efficiency, Manufacturing Techniques: From Small - Scale to Large178
Scale Production, Theory of the Organic Solar Cell, Normal Structure
Solar Cells, Inverted Structure Solar Cells, Comparison between
Inverted and Regular Structures, Different Cathode and Anode
Interfacial Layers Used in Inverted Solar cells.
UNIT V
PIEZO ELECTRIC MATERIALS AND MODELING
9
Piezoelectric MEMS, Preparation of Piezoelectric PZT Thin Films, LeadFree Piezoelectric Thin Films, Vibration Energy Harvesters, Energy
Transfer in PVEH Devices, Single Degree of Freedom Model of a PVEH,
Limit Based on Inertial Coupling, Stress – Based Limits,
Electromechanical
Conversion,
Electrical
Energy
Extraction,
Benchmarking.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Krzysztof Iniewski, Madhu Bahskaran “Energy Harvesting with
Functional Materials and Microsystems” CRC Press Edition. First
Edition, 2014. ISBN 978-1-4665-8725-0.
2. Yen Khang Tan “Energy Harvesting Autonomous Sensor Systems”
CRC Press Edition. First Edition, 2013. ISBN 978-1-4398-9273-2.
3. Niell Elvin : Advances in Energy Harvesting Methods”, Springer, 2013.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.holistic.ecs.soton.ac.uk/
2. www.energyharvesting.net/
179
15VDA03
EMBEDDED AND NETWORKING SYSTEMS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Analyze Co-Synthesis Of Real-Time Embedded Systems.
 Analyze Power Management Frame Work.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Analyze applications in Wireless Sensor Networks
 Analyze various network systems.
UNIT I
EVOLUTION OF DSP ARCHITECTURE AND COSYNTHESIS OF REAL-TIME EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
9
Fixed point DSP – DSP Array processing – VLIW devices –Multi
Processing – Co-Synthesis and real time constraints – Co-Synthesis
frame work –Target Embedded System specification and solution
representation – Optimization and proposed Co-Synthesis model – PE
initialization –Dead line assignment – Processes and communication
event scheduling- Evaluation of architectural Co-Synthesis
UNIT II
EMBEDDED SYSTEM CODE OPTIMIZATION AND
POWER CONSUMPTION
9
Methods For Non-Intrusive Dynamic Application Profiling And Soft Error
Detection: Dynamic Application Soft Error Detection – Area efficient
optimization for Dynamic Application – Power Aware optimization –
Software and Hardware Platforms – Methodology and Applications –
Code optimization impact on power consumption
UNIT III
POWER MANAGEMENT FRAME WORK FOR RTOS
BASED EMBEDDED SYSTEM
9
Proposed RTOS Power Management Frame Work – Implementation of
RTOS – ACPI Frame work– Power Management policies – Power
180
Saving and real Time Ability – Core Mark – Multi Core bench marking –
Multibench Benchmark Suite-Application specific Benchmarking and
Bench mark characterization.
UNIT IV NETWORKING EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
9
Global Innovation – Digital Storage – Processing – Sensors –Displays –
Statistical Data Analyses – Autonomic systems – New network
paradigms – Business Eco systems – Internet with Things.
UNIT V
OCTOPUS AND DELAY AWARE APPLICATIONS IN
WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS
9
Mathematical Preliminaries – Proposed Model –Clustering– Computing
Minimum Dominant Set – Selecting Gate ways – Cluster head and
External Gateway Link–Complexity – Proposed Network Structure–
Network Formation Algorithm – Numerical Analyses
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Gul N. Khan, Krzysztof Iniewski, “Embedded and Networking
Systems: Design, Software, and Implementation”, CRC Press 2013.
2. Glaf P.Feiffer, Andrew Ayre and Christian Keyold, “Embedded
Networking with CAN and CAN open”, Embedded System Academy
2005.
3. Frank Vahid, Givargis „Embedded Systems Design: A Unified
Hardware/Software Introduction, Wiley Publications.
4. James F Kurose, “Computer Networking: A Top – Down Approach
Featuring the Internet”, Addison Wesley, 2nd Edition 2002.
WEB REFERENCE:
1. https://www.cisco.com/web/solutions/trends/iot/embedded.html
2. http://web.mit.edu/eichin/www/embedded-kerberos.html
181
15VDA04
EXTREME ENVIRONMENT ELECTRONICS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Analyze different
environments
methods
for
simulation
for
extreme
 Analyze Semiconductor devices for extreme environments
 Determine the modeling for Applications at extreme environments
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Modeling of circuits for Extreme environments
 Analyze the circuits for reliability in Extreme environments
 Verify the models and Analyze the faults of the circuits
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
ELECTRONICS
TO
EXTREME
ENVIRONMENT
9
Physics of Temperature and Temperature's Role in Carrier Transport,
Overview of Radiation Transport Physics and Space Environments,
Interaction of Radiation with Semiconductor Devices, Orbital Radiation
Environments, Error Rate Prediction Methods, Monte Carlo Simulation of
Radiation Effects, Extreme Environments in Energy Production and
Utilization, Extreme Environments in Transportation.
UNIT II
SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE TECHNOLOGIES
9
Radiation Effects in Si CMOS Platforms, Wide Temperature Range
Operation of Si CMOS Platforms, Trade-Offs between Performance and
Reliability in Sub-100nm RF-CMOS on SOI Technologies, SiGe HBT
Platforms, Using Temperature to Explore the Scaling Limits of SiGe
HBTs, SiC Integrated Circuit Platforms for High-Temperature
Applications, Passive Elements in Silicon Technology, Power Device
182
Platforms, CMOS-Compatible
Extreme Environments.
UNIT III
Silicon-on-Insulator
MODELING
FOR
EXTREME
ELECTRONIC DESIGN
MESFETs
for
ENVIRONMENT
9
TCAD of Advanced Transistors, Mixed-Mode TCAD Tools, Mixed-Mode
TCAD for Modeling of Single-Event Effects, Compact Modeling of SiGe
HBTs, Compact Modeling of CMOS Devices, Compact Modeling of
LDMOS Transistors, Compact Modeling of Power Devices, Modeling
Radiation Effects in Mixed-Signal Circuits, Compact Model Toolkits.
UNIT IV
RELIABILITY AND CIRCUIT DESIGN FOR EXTREME
ENVIRONMENTS
9
Reliability Estimation of SiGe HBTs & Silicon CMOS, Radiation
Hardening by Design, RHBD Techniques for SiGe Devices and Circuits,
Wide Temperature Range Circuit Design, Invariability in Analog Circuits
Operating in Extreme Environments.
UNIT V
VERIFICATION, PACKAGING AND
ENVIRONMENT APPLICATIONS
EXTREME
9
Model-Based Verification, Event-Driven Mixed-Signal Modeling
Techniques for System-in-Package Functional Verification, Electronic
Packaging Approaches for Low & High -Temperature Environments,
Failure Analysis of Electronic Packaging, Silicon Carbide Power
Electronics Packaging, A SiGe Remote Sensor Interface and Remote
Electronics Unit, Distributed Motor Controller for Operation, RadiationHard Multichannel Digitizer ASIC.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. John D. Cressler, H. Alan Mantooth, “Extreme Environment
Electronics”, CRC press, 2013.
2. N. DasGupta and A. DasGupta, “Semiconductor Devices – Modeling
and Technology”, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, India,
183
2004.
3. A. B. Bhattacharyya, “Compact MOSFET Models for VLSI Design”,
John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2009.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.eng.auburn.edu/.../Extreme_Environment_Electronics_application
s
2. www.crcnetbase.com
15VDA05
TRANSDUCERS AND SIGNAL CONDITIONING
CIRCUITS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Analyze different physical measurements
 Analyze the different types of sensors
 Evaluate the signal arrangements for sensor communications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, the students will be able to
 Analyze the resistive and reactive variations for different physical
measurements
 Create interface the sensors with Processors
UNIT I
SENSOR-BASED MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS
9
General Concepts and Terminology, Sensor Classification, General
Input & Output Configuration, Static Characteristics of Measurement
Systems, Dynamic Characteristics, Other Sensor Characteristics,
Primary Sensors, Materials for Sensors, Microsensor Technology.
184
UNIT II
RESISTIVE SENSORS
9
Potentiometers, Strain Gauges, Resistive Temperature Detectors
(RTDs), Thermistors, Magneto resistors, LDRs, Resistive Hygrometers,
Resistive Gas Sensors, Liquid Conductivity Sensors, Measurement of
Resistance,
Voltage
Dividers,
Wheatstone
Bridge:
Balance
Measurements, Wheatstone Bridge: Detection Measurements,
Differential and Instrumentation Amplifiers.
UNIT III
REACTANCE VARIATION AND ELECTROMAGNETIC
SENSORS
9
Capacitive Sensors, Inductive Sensors, Electromagnetic Sensors,
Problems and Alternatives, AC Bridges, Carrier Amplifiers and Coherent
Detection, Specific Signal Conditioners for Capacitive Sensors,
Resolver-to-Digital and Digital-to-Resolver Converters, Synchro-toresolver converters, Digital-to-resolver converters, Resolver-to-digital
converters.
UNIT IV SELF-GENERATING SENSORS
9
Thermocouples,
Piezoelectric
Sensors,
Pyroelectric
Sensors,
Photovoltaic Sensors, Electrochemical Sensors, Chopper and Low-Drift
Amplifiers, Electrometer and Transimpedance Amplifiers, Charge
Amplifiers, Noise in Amplifiers, Noise and Drift in Resistors, Noise in
resistors
UNIT V
DIGITAL AND INTELLIGENT SENSORS
9
Position Encoders, Resonant Sensors, Variable Oscillators, Conversion
to Frequency, Period, or Time Duration, Direct Sensor - Microcontroller
Interfacing, Communication Systems for Sensors, Intelligent Sensors,
Sensors Based on Semiconductor Junctions and MOSFET Junctions,
Fiber-Optic Sensors, Ultrasonic-Based Sensors, Biosensors.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
185
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ramon Pallaas-Areny, John G. Webster “Sensors and Signal
Conditioning” John Wiley, Second Edition, 2007.
2. D.V.S Murty “Transducers and Instrumentation” Prentice Hall, First
Edition, 2004.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.engineersgarage.com/articles/sensors
2. www.sensorsmag.com
186
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY CSE DEPARTMENT
ALLIED ELECTIVE
SL.
COURSE
CODE
NO.
1
15MCA01
2
15MCA02
3
15MCA03
4
15MCA04
15MCA05
5
15MCA01
COURSE TITLE
L T P
C
Data Structures
Introduction to Data Mining
Software Engineering Principles
Information Security
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
Internet Security
3 0
0
3
DATA STRUCTURES
LTPC
3 003
Course Objectives:
 To study data structures such as list, stack, queue and set along with its
applications
 To learn nonlinear data structures such as Tree and Graph with
applications
 To learn advanced search structures and heap structures and its
applications
 To discuss sorting and searching techniques
 To introduce concurrency on the basic data structures such as list, stack
and queue.
Course Outcomes:
 Use linked lists, stacks, queues and sets for various applications
 Use tree and Graph for real time applications
 Design various types of search and heap structures
 Apply appropriate sorting and searching algorithms for real world
applications
 Design and implement concurrent linked lists, stacks, and queues
UNIT I
LINEAR AND NON-LINEAR DATA STRUCTURES
9
List ADT: Array and linked List – Applications: Polynomial Operations, Multi list.
Stack ADT: Implementation – Applications: Balancing symbols. Queue ADT:
Implementation – Applications: Job/Task scheduling. Set ADT: Operations Union and Find – Smart union algorithms – Path compression – Applications of
187
set- Maze problem.
UNIT II
TREE AND GRAPH STRUCTURES
9
Tree ADT– Binary trees – traversals – Expression Trees -– Applications of Tree
– Directory. Graph – Traversal – Shortest path algorithms: Single source
shortest path algorithm. Minimum spanning tree – Prim’s and Kruskal’s
algorithms – Finding Connected components - PERT graph
UNIT III SEARCH TREES AND HEAP STRUCTURES
Binary search trees - 2-D tree - Red Black tree– Splay trees - Multi-way Search
Trees – Tries. Priority queue – Min heap – Deaps - Applications of heap - Event
Simulation and selection.
UNIT IV
SORTING AND SEARCHING
9
Bubble sort - Selection sort - Insertion sort –Bucket Sorting- Merge sort -Quick
sort – Heap sort. Linear Search– Binary Search - Introduction to hashing Hash tables – Separate chaining – Open addressing - ISAM
UNIT V
DATA STRUCTURES AND CONCURRENCY
9
Data structures and concurrency – locking linked lists – coarse-grained
synchronization – fine-grained synchronization – lazy synchronization – nonblocking synchronization – concurrent queues – bounded partial queues –
unbounded lock-free queues – dual data structures – concurrent stacks –
elimination backoff stack
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”, 3rd
edition, Pearson Education Asia, 2007.
2. Jean-Paul Tremblay and Paul G. Sorenson, “An Introduction to Data
Structures with Applications”, Second Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, New
Delhi, 1991.
3. M. Herlihy and N. Shavit, “The Art of Multiprocessor Programming”,
Morgan Kaufmann, 2012.
4. Gregory L. Heilman, “Data Structures, Algorithms and Object Oriented
Programming”, Tata Mcgraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2002.
5. Alfred V. Aho, John E. Hopcroft and Jeffry D. Ullman, “Data Structures
and Algorithms”, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2006.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/pattern-searching-set-8-suffix-treeintroduction/
2. http://iamwww.unibe.ch/~wenger/DA/SkipList/
3. http://www.cs.au.dk/~gerth/slides/soda98.pdf
4. http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith/files/suffix-trees.shtml
188
5. http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~shuchi/courses/880-S07/scribenotes/lecture20.pdf
15MCA02
INTRODUCTION TO DATA MINING
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:




To study data mining, its applications and its issues
To learn to mine the data using Frequent Patterns
To discuss the various classification methods
To understand how to evaluate classification models and select the
appropriate one
 To study the role of clustering on large data
Course Outcomes:




Identify the data mining tasks and the issues in data mining applications
Generate rules using association rule mining
Develop solutions using classification algorithms
Select the right classification technique and algorithm for the given
problem
 Develop solutions using clustering techniques
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction to Data Mining – Types of Data Mining – Technologies for Data
Mining - Applications of Data Mining-Major Issues in Data Mining - Data sets –
Data Objects and Attributes- Measurement and Data- Data Pre-processingData Visualization
UNIT II
FREQUENT PATTERN MINING
9
Basic Concepts of frequent patterns - Frequent Itemset Mining Methods Evaluation of Interestingness - Pattern Mining in Multilevel, Multidimensional
Space - Mining High dimensional Data - Applications of Pattern Mining
UNIT III
CLASSIFICATION
9
Basic Concept of classification – Decision Tree induction – Bayes Classification
Methods – Rule Based Classification - Model Evaluation and Selection –
Techniques to improve Classification Accuracy
UNIT IV
ADVANCED CLASSIFICATION
9
Bayesian Belief Networks - Classification by Back Propagation – Support Vector
Machine – Classification using frequent patterns - k-Nearest -Neighbour
Classifiers - Genetic Algorithms - Rough Set Approach - Fuzzy Set Approach.
189
UNIT V
CLUSTER ANALYSIS
9
Basic concept of Cluster Analysis-Partitioning methods – Hierarchical methods
– Density Based Methods – Grid Based Methods – Evaluation of Clustering –
Advanced Cluster Analysis: Probabilistic model based clustering – Clustering
High Dimensional Data – Clustering Graph and Network Data
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, Jian Pei, “Data Mining: Concepts and
Techniques”, Third Edition, The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data
Management Systems, 2012.
2. David J. Hand, Heikki Mannila and Padhraic Smyth, “Principles of Data
Mining”, MIT Press, 2001.
3. Margaret H Dunham, “Data Mining: Introductory and Advanced Topics”,
Pearson Education, 2003.
4. Soman K.P, Diwakar Shyam and Ajay V. “Insight into Data Mining:
Theory and Practice”, PHI, 2009.
5. I. H. Witten and E. Frank, “Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning
Tools and Techniques”, Second Edition, Morgan Kaufmann, 2005
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.autonlab.org/tutorials
2. http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/sloan-school-of-management/15-062-datamining-spring-2003/index.htm
15MCA03
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:
 To explain the process and process models
 To bring out the requirements and prepare them into a model
 To know the design concepts and testing strategies
 To explain estimation and scheduling techniques
 To learn the project management and quality principles
Course Outcomes:
 Deploy an appropriate process model for the software
 Identify the different requirements of a software and create a model
 Convert the model into a deign and implement testing strategies
190
 Prepare the software project estimate and schedule
 Maintain the desired quality for the developed software
UNIT I
SOFTWARE PROCESSSES AND PROCESS
9
MODELS
The Nature of Software – Software Engineering - The Software Process –
Software myths – Generic Process Models - Prescriptive Process Models : The
Waterfall Model, Incremental Process Model, Evolutionary Process Models –
Overview of Agile Process models – Overview of CMMi
UNIT II
REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS
9
Requirements Engineering – Eliciting requirements – Developing use cases –
Building requirements model – Negotiating requirements – Validating
requirements – Requirements analysis – Scenario based modelling
UNIT III
DESIGN,CODING AND TESTING
9
Design Concepts – Design Model - Software Architecture: Architectural Styles,
Architectural Design, User Interface Design – Coding: Programming Principles
and Guidelines - Testing Strategies for conventional software– Validation testing
– System Testing – Debugging – White box tesing – Basis path testing – Control
structure testing – Black box testing
UNIT IV
PROJECT ESTIMATION AND SCHEDULING
9
Project management spectrum – Process and Project Metrics : Metrics ,
Software measurements, Software quality metrics – Estimation: Project
planning process, Resources, Decomposition techniques, Empirical Estimation
models– Scheduling: Project Schedling, Tracking, Scheduling and Earned
value analysis
UNIT V
SOFTWARE QUALITY
9
Risk management – Software Configuration Management – Quality
Management: Software quality, Achieving Software quality and Formal
Technical Reviews - Overview of Maintenance - Rengineering and reverse
engineering
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Roger S.Pressman, “Software Engineering – A practitioner’s Approach”,
McGraw Hill Publications, Seventh Edition, 2010.
2. Pankaj Jalote,”An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering”,
Springer, Third Edition, 2005.
3. Ian Sommerville, “Software engineering”, , Pearson Education Asia,
Seventh Edition , 2007.
4. Watts S.Humphrey, ”A Discipline for Software Engineering”, Pearson
Education, 2007.
191
5. James F.Peters and Witold Pedrycz, ”Software Engineering, An
Engineering Approach”, Wiley-India, 2007.
6. Stephen R.Schach, “Software Engineering”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2007.
7. S.A.Kelkar, ”Software Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India Pvt, 2007.
8. Pankaj Jalote- “A Concise Introduction to Software Engineering”, Springer
Verlag, 2008.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.mhhe.com/pressman
2. www.rspa.com/spi/
3. http://www.wiley.com/college/comp/peters189642/
15MCA04
INFORMATION SECURITY
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:
 To understand the role of access control in information systems
 To explain the cryptanalysis for various ciphers.
 To exemplify the attacks on software and its solutions
 To explore the operating system security mechanisms
 To learn the methods to prevent the system and network intrusions
Course Outcomes:
 Exercise the access control mechanism for better authentication and
authorization
 Perform cryptanalysis for various ciphers.
 Apply solutions to overcome the attacks on software
 Deploy the various techniques to secure the operating systems
 Develop solutions to guard against system and network intrusions
UNIT I
ACCESS CONTROL
9
Authentication - Passwords – Biometrics - Two-factor Authentication –
Authorization - Access Control Matrix - Multilevel Security Model - Covert
Channel - Authentication Protocols - Perfect Forward Secrecy-Confidentiality
Policies - Integrity Policies - Hybrid Policies
UNIT II
CRYPTANALYSIS OF CIPHERS
9
Classical Ciphers-Symmetric Key Ciphers-Stream Ciphers-Block Ciphers-Public
Key Ciphers-RSA-Diffie-Hellman-Linear and Differential Cryptanalysis-Tiny
DES-Linear and Differential Cryptanalysis of Tiny DES- Side Channel Attack on
RSA-Lattice Reduction and the Knapsack-Hellman's Time-Memory Tradeoff.
192
UNIT III
ATTACKS ON SOFTWARE
9
Software Flaws-Buffer Overflow-Incomplete Mediation-Race ConditionsMalware-Software Based Attacks-Salami-Linearization-Time Bombs-Trusting
Software-Insecurity in Software-Software Reverse Engineering-Software
Tamper Resistance-Digital Rights Management-Software Development Issues
UNIT IV
OPERATING SYSTEM SECURITY
9
Operating System Security Functions-Separation-Memory Protection-Access
Control-Trusted
Operating
System-MAC-DAC-Trusted
Path-Trusted
Computing Base-Next Generation Secure Computing Base-Feature GroupsCompelling Applications-Evaluating Systems: TCSEC,FIPS140,The common
Criteria, SSE- CMM
UNIT V
SYSTEM AND NETWORK SECURITY
9
Preventing System Intrusions-Guarding against Network Intrusions-Identity
Management-identity Theft-Penetration Testing-Vulnerability Assessment
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mark Stamp,"Information Security: Principles and Practice", John wiley &
Sons, 2006.
2. Matt Bishop,"Introduction to Computer Security", Pearson Education, First
Edition,2005.
3. John R.Vacca (Ed),"Computer and Information Security Handbook",
Morgan Kaufman, Second Edition, 2013.
4. Charles P.Pfleeger and Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, "Security in Computing
”, Prentice Hall, Fourth Edition, 2006
5. Michael Whitman,and Herbert Mattord “Principles of Information
Security”, Fourth Edition, Cengage Learning, 2012.
6. William Stallings, “Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and
Practices”, Pearson Education, Third Edition, 2011.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.itsecurity.com
2. http://security.harvard.edu
15MCA05
INTERNET SECURITY
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:
 To introduce the classical and modern block ciphers, the hash functions
and authentication protocols
 To explore public key cryptosystems and key management techniques
193
 To study various network security protocols.
 To understand public key infrastructure and IPSec protocols
 To exemplify E-commerce protocols
Course Outcomes:
 Apply the modern block ciphers like DES, AES, hash functions and
Authentication Protocols
 Use public key cryptosystems like RSA and ECC and key management
techniques
 Make use of the network Security protocols like Kerberos, PGP and SSL
 Formulate PKI and IPSec protocol
 Implement security in E-Commerce using Secure Electronic Transactions
(SET) protocols
UNIT I
CRYPTOSYSTEMS AND AUTHENTICATION
9
Classical Cryptography - Substitution Ciphers - permutation Ciphers - Block
Ciphers – DES - Modes of Operation – AES - Linear Cryptanalysis, Differential
Cryptanalysis - Hash Function – SHA-512 - Message authentication codes HMAC - Authentication protocols
UNIT II
PUBLIC KEY CRYPTOSYSTEMS
9
Introduction to Public key Cryptography - Number theory - The RSA
Cryptosystem and Factoring Integer - Attacks on RSA - The ELGamal
Cryptosystem - Digital Signature Algorithm - Finite Fields - Elliptic Curves
Cryptography - Key management – Session and Interchange keys, Key
exchange and generation
UNIT III
NETWORK SECURITY
9
Kerberos - Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) - S/MIME - Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
and TLSv3 - Intruders – HIDS - NIDS
UNIT IV
PUBLIC KEY INFRASTRUCTURE
9
Internet Publications for Standards-Digital Signing Techniques-Functional
Roles of PKI entities-Key Elements of PKI operations-X.509 Certificate
Formats-Certificate Revocation List-Certification Path Validation-IPSec-IPSec
Authentication Header-IP Encapsulating Security Payload-Key Management
protocol for IPSec
UNIT V
E-COMMERCE SECURITY
9
Secure Electronic Transactions (SET) - Cryptographic Operation principles Dual signature and signature verification - Payment Processing - Internet
Firewalls-Role of Firewalls-Types of Firewalls-Firewall Designs-Viruses
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
194
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. William Stallings, “Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and
Practices”, Third Edition, Pearson Education, 2006.
2. Wade Trappe and Lawrence C. Washington, “Introduction to
Cryptography with Coding Theory”, Second Edition, Pearson Education,
2007
3. Man Young Rhee, "Internet Security: Cryptographic Principles,
algorithms and Protocols", Wiley, 2003.
4. Douglas R. Stinson, “Cryptography Theory and Practice”, Third Edition,
Chapman & Hall/CRC, 2006.
5. Jeffery Hoffstein, Jill Pipher, Joseph H. Silverman, "An Introduction to
Mathematical Cryptography", Springer, 2008.
6. Bernard Menezes, "Network Security and Cryptography", Cengage
Learning, New Delhi, 2011
7. Jonathan Katz and Yehuda Lindell, "Introduction to Modern
Cryptography", CRC Press, 2007
WEB REFERENCES:
1. https://www.cryptool.org/
2. http://www.crypto-textbook.com/
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT
I. CAD / CAM
Sl.
Subject
No.
Code
1.
15CCA01
Work Design
2.
15CCA02
Course Title
L
T
P C
3
0
0
3
Mechatronics in Engineering Systems 3
0
0
3
II. Industrial Safety Engineering
1.
15ISA01
Industrial Noise Control
3
0
0
3
2
15ISA02
Handling of Nano powder
3
0
0
3
195
III. Nano Science and Technology
SL.
COURSE
NO.
CODE
1.
2.
15NTA01
15NTA02
COURSE TITLE
L
T P
C
Bottom up synthesis of
nanostructures
3
0
0
3
Nano toxicology
3
0
0
3
3.
15NTA03
Synthesis and application of
nanomaterials
3
0
0
3
4.
15NTA04
Top down manufacturing methods
3
0
0
3
L T P C
15CCA01
WORK DESIGN
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To acquire a sound knowledge on Productivity.
 To learn about method study.
 To know the work measurement and applied work measurement
techniques.
 To design displays and controls.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of this course, the students are able to,
 Demonstrate various productivity models.
 Explain the graphic tools used in method study.
 Calculate the standard time for different operations.
 Calculate wages by using different wage incentive plans.
 Design displays and controls by considering the ergonomics.
196
UNITI
PRODUCTIVITY
9
Productivity - definition – importance - types of productivity – productivity
and living standards – factors affecting productivity - work design and
Productivity – Productivity measurement-Productivity models – case
studies.
UNITII
METHOD STUDY
9
Definition of method study – significance - Total work content,
Developing methods – operation analysis, motion & micro motion study,
graphic tools – case studies.
UNITIII
WORK MEASUREMENT
9
Need for work measurement – steps in work measurement - Stop watch
time study - Performance rating – methods - allowances: definition, need
and types, standard data-machining times for basic operations, learning
effect.
UNITIV
APPLIED WORK MEASUREMENT
9
Methods time measurement (MTM) - Work sampling techniques organization and methods (O & M) - Wage incentive plans: need and
types – case studies.
UNITV
ERGONOMICS
9
Definition - Human factors Engineering - human performance in physical
work –anthropometry - design of workstation - design of displays and
controls – case studies.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Benjamin W.Niebel, “Motion and Time Study”, Richard, D. Irwin
Inc., Seventh Edition, 2002.
2. “Introduction to work study”, ILO, 3rd edition, Oxford & IBH
publishing, 2001.
3. Barnes, R.M. “Motion and Time Study”, John Wiley, 2002.
4. Bridger R.S. “Introduction to Ergonomics”, McGraw Hill, 1995.
197
15CCA02
MECHATRONICS IN ENGINEERING
SYSTEMS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the technologies behind modern mechatronic
systems.
 To provide methodological fundamentals for the development of
fully automated system.
 To develop a robotic or automated system project focusing on the
hardware and software integration.
 To apply the acquired knowledge for developing a mechatronic
system.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
On completion of the course on Mechatronics in Manufacturing
Systems, the students will have gained the following learning outcomes:
 To understand and proficiently apply the relevant sciences and
scientific methods to mechatronics engineering, to design
solutions to complex problems.
 Identify, interpret and critically appraise current developments and
advanced technologies and apply them to mechatronics
engineering.
 Analysis and synthesise the constraints posed by economic
factors, safety considerations, environment impacts and
professional standards on mechatronics engineering practice and
use them to inform professional judgements.
 To determine, analyse and proficiently apply theoretical and
numerical analysis of phenomena to predict, design, control and
optimise the performance of mechatronics engineering systems.
 To create the research, identify, conceptualise, investigate, and
interpret knowledge from modern engineering tools and
techniques to synthesise a coherent approach to the solution of a
problem and/or the design of a project.
198
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION AND SENSORS,
TRANSDUCERS
9
Introduction to Mechatronics - Systems - Mechatronics in Products Measurement Systems - Control Systems - Traditional design and
Mechatronics Design. Introduction to sensors - Performance
Terminology - Displacement, Position and Proximity - Velocity and
Motion - Fluid pressure - Temperature sensors - Light sensors Selection of sensors - Signal processing - Servo systems.
UNIT II
SIGNAL CONDITIONING AND REAL TIME
INTERFACING
9
Introduction – Elements of data acquisition and control system –
transducers and signal conditioning – devices for data conversion –
data conversion process – application software like lab view – data
acquisition case studies - Data acquisition and control case studies
UNIT III
MICROPROCESSORS IN MECHATRONICS
9
Introduction - Architecture - Pin configuration - Instruction set Programming of Microprocessors using 8085 instructions - Interfacing
input and output devices - Interfacing D/A converters and A/D
converters –Applications - Temperature control - Stepper motor control
- Traffic light controller.
UNIT IV
PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS
9
Introduction - Basic structure - Input / Output processing - Programming
-Mnemonics Timers, Internal relays and counters - Data handling Analog input / output - Selection of PLC.
UNIT V
DESIGN AND MECHATRONICS
9
Designing - Possible design solutions - Case studies of Mechatronics
systems- autonomous mobile robot – wireless surveillance balloon –
Firefighting robot – Piezo sensors and actuators in cantilever beam
vibration control.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
199
REFERENCES:
1. W.Bolton “ Mechatronics” Pearson 5th Edition , Pearson 2013.
2. R.K.Rajput “Introduction to “Mechatronics “4th Edition S.Chand
& Co.,2014.
3. Michael B.Histand and David G. Alciatore, “Introduction to
Mechatronics and Measurement Systems", McGraw-Hill
International Editions, 1999.
4. Bradley, D.A., Dawson, D, Buru, N.C. and Loader, AJ,
"Mechatronics", Chapman and Hall, 1993.
5. Ramesh.S,
Gaonkar,
"Microprocessor
Architecture,
Programming and Applications” Wiley Eastern, 1998.
6. Lawrence
J.Kamm,
“Understanding
Electro-Mechanical
Engineering, an Introduction to Mechatronics", Prentice-Hall,
2000.
7. Ghosh, P.K. and Sridhar, P.R., 0000 to 8085, “Introduction to
Microprocessors for Engineers and
Scientists ", Second
Edition, Prentice Hall, 1995.
8. DevdasShetty Richard A.Kolk “ Mechatronics – System Design”
Second Edition, Cengage learning, 2014.
WEB REFERENCE:
http://www.cs.Indiana.edu.
15ISA01 : INDUSTRIAL NOISE CONTROL
(Common to other PG Programmes)
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide in depth knowledge about industrial noise control.
 To get an exposure about the basic terms and terminologies about
the noise and its source.
 To analyse and to design the machineries and equipment in such a
200
way that noise may be controlled at source or path.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 To identify regulations related to noise measurement and control in
industries.
 To acquire the basic concepts and knowledge about Noise and its
types.
 To apply the knowledge on Industrial noise control by suitable
methods.
 To carry out noise assessment in workplace.
 To suggest and recommend suitable practical measures to reduce
noise at the workplace.
UNIT I
Fundamentals of noise and regulations
9
Introduction, Types of noise, frequency, wavelength, amplitude, speed,
Sound fields, sound pressure,
sound pressure level, addition,
subtraction and averaging decibel levels, noise dose level, Sound
intensity, sound power and sound power level, OSHA noise standards
permissible exposure level and action level, Health hazards and hearing
protection program, The noise pollution (Regulation and Control ) Rules,
2000, The control of noise at work regulations 2005, The Supply of
Machinery (Safety) Regulations.
UNIT II
Noise Measurement
9
Need for noise measurement, Concept of noise measurement,
Anechoic chambers, Reverberation chambers, Terminologies used in
noise measurement, Rules for noise measurement, Influence of
instrument and operator, Influence of environment, Filtering and
weighting scales, Frequency analysis, source identification, source
directivity, sound field characteristics, determining daily noise exposure,
sound power level estimation, survey approach, Contents of
measurement report.
201
UNIT III
Instrumentation for Noise measurement
9
Microphones–Piezoelectric, electric condenser, air condenser,
Integrators, Pre amplifiers, sound level meters, Noise dosimeter, serial
analysing instruments, Frequency analyser, real time analyser,
Recorder, sound pressure calibrator - Measuring noise exposure in the
workplace - field demonstration, Standards for the performance and
testing of noise measurement instruments.
UNIT IV
Noise control
9
Noise risk assessment, Noise control policy, Noise control checklist,
Hierarchy of noise control–organisational control, workplace design,
Low noise machines, machine design, Enclosures, screens and barriers,
Refuges, Damping, isolation, silencers, active noise control, Distance,
maintenance, Noise control material, Sound absorption coefficient,
Common absorbers, foam, fibrous material, Helmholtz resonators,
Insulating material and its rating, installation of sound insulating
materials – Hearing protection selection, use, care and maintenance,
special type of protectors, over protection.
UNIT V
Specific Noise Sources and Solutions
9
Jet and turbulence noise, jet noise reduction, Valve noise, Fluid flow
problems furnace and combustion noise, fan and compressor noise,
duct-borne noise, automotive noise control, Engine noise, transmission
and gear noise, Coal handling equipment, Boilers, cooling towers, noise
control in heating, Ventilating and air conditioning system, Case studies
– Gas turbine generator, process steam boiler fans, Printing and cutting
press, Concrete block making machine.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. “Controlling Noise at Work”, Health and Safety Executive, 2nd
edition, 2005.
2. “Industrial Noise Control Manual” NIOSH, Revised edition, 1978.
3. Graham Orr. W., “Handbook of Industrial Noise control”, The
Bionetics Corporation Hampton, Virginia.
202
4. Nicholas P. Cheremisinoff, “Noise Control in Industry: A Practical
Guide “, Standards media, 2003.
5. Arnold P.G. Peterson, “Handbook of Noise Measurement” GenRad,
Inc., Ninth edition, 1980.
6. Randall F. Barron, “Industrial Noise Control and Acoustics”, Marcel
Dekker, Inc., 2003.
7. Istvan .L.Ver and Leo Beranek, “Noise and Vibration control
engineering”, John Wiley & Sons, Second edition, 2006.
8. Michael Moser, “Engineering Acoustics: A Handbook”, 2009.
9. Lewis H.Bell & Doughlas H.Bell, “Industrial Noise Control” Marcel
Dewcker, inc., 2nd edition, 1993.
15ISA02 : HANDLING OF NANO POWDER
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To know nano powder properties and their handling.
 To know the processing and characterisation of metal powders.
 To gain the knowledge on various test and apparatus
applicable in dust explosion.
 To study the nano powder handling and material handling
equipment in industries.
 To understand housekeeping procedures and pollution control
methodology.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of this course, the students are able to
 Students can have the abilities to understand the classification
and to synthesis and characterise the nano powders.
 Can have the knowledge regarding the usage and
applications of equipment such as SEM, AFM etc., used to
characterise the metal powders.
203
 The students will be able to understand the various tests and
apparatus used in dust explosion evaluation.
 They can know how to handle the hazardous materials and
the usage of different kind of handling equipment.
 Students can have knowledge about g o o d housekeeping
and various safety procedures to control pollution.
UNIT I
PROPERTIES OF NANO POWDER AND
9
METHODS OF HANDLING
Properties of nano powders - Powder classification - physical, chemical,
thermal and other properties - Friction and Impact sensitivity – Toxicity –
Explosivity – Metallic powders – Manual, mechanical, automatic handling
methods.
UNIT II
NANO POWDER HAZARDS
9
Electrostatic charges - charge distribution - energy released-type of
discharge - spark-carona -insulating powders - propagating brush
discharge - discharge in bulk lightning hazards in powder coating –
electroplating. Dust explosion - explosibility characteristics
Recognition of chemical hazards - dust, fumes, mist, vapour, fog, gases,
types, concentration, Exposure vs. dose, TLV - Methods of Evaluation,
process or operation description - Field Survey - Sampling methodology
- Industrial Hygiene calculations - Comparison with OSHAS Standard.
UNIT III
IGNITION OF NANO POWDERS AND
9
DUST CONTROL
Ignition - minimum ignition energy - powder dispersion - spark,
generation –characteristics - pressure concentration - flammable gases solvent vapour -vapour clouds – decomposition - exothermic and
endothermic reaction.
Dust: Definition – type – concepts – exposure – dispersion – control monitoring and measure-control of dust at the source - control
approaches and strategies -occupational related diseases, lead-nickel,
chromium, coal and manganese toxicity, their effects and prevention local, systemic and chronic effects, temporary and cumulative effects,
204
carcinogens entry into human systems - Housekeeping and
environmental protection - technological options for collection, treatment
and disposal of hazardous waste - Pollution control in process
industries.
UNIT IV
HAZARD ASSESSMENT AND
9
MEASUREMENT
Volume reference – resistivity of solids-powders in bulk - surface
resistance -static charge, conductivity – electric field, minimum Ignition
energy - Hartmann vertical tube apparatus - particulate measurement air sampler - dust monitor.
Sampling instruments – types - Measurement procedures - Instruments
Procedures - dust sample collection devices - personal sampling Hazard identification and assessment in the process industries.
UNIT V
SAFETY IN NANO POWDER HANDLING
9
Safety measures in powder handling – loading and unloading –
pneumatic transfer – sieving - grinding and mixing – control measures –
PPE - earthing – elimination of incendiary discharge.
Dust Explosion prevention – handling of nano powders in the presence
of flammable gases and vapour – safety measures in industries.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Martin Glor, “Electro Static Hazard in Powder Handling” Research
studies Press Ltd., England, 1988.
2. Major Hazard Control-ILO Geneva, 1987.
3. Seminar on “Hazard Recognition and Prevention in the Work
Place- Airborne Dust” Vol.1 and 2, SRMC, Chennai, 4/5, Sept.,
2000.
4. Hand book of “Occupational Safety and Health”, National Safety
Council, Chicago, 1982.
205
15NTA01
BOTTOM UP SYNTHESIS OF
NANOSTRUCTURES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide synthetic approach about thin films.
 Knowledge about physical vapour deposition on sputtering.
 To know about epitaxial growth of semi-conductor films.
 To have an idea about the development of thin film by chemical
methods.
 To know about different printing technologies.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 To develop thin films using CVD and other methods.
 To obtain thin films using sputtering methods.
 To develop epitaxial growth of thin films.
 To grow thin films using various chemical methods.
 To differentiate different types of printing techniques.
UNIT I
THIN FILM TECHNOLOGIES – I
9
CVD chemical vapor deposition – atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD)
– low pressure CVD (LPCVD) - plasma enhanced chemical vapor
deposition (PECVD) - HiPCO method – photo-enhanced chemical vapor
deposition (PHCVD) - LCVD Laser – induced CVD.
UNIT II
THIN FILM TECHNOLOGIES – II
9
Physical vapor deposition - sputter technologies - diode sputtering magnetron sputtering - ion beam (sputter) deposition, ion implantation
and ion assisted deposition - cathodic arc deposition - pulsed laser
deposition.
206
UNIT III
EPITAXIAL FILM DEPOSITION METHODS
9
Epitaxy, different kinds of epitaxy - influence of substrate and substrate
orientation, mismatch, MOCVD metal organic chemical vapor deposition
- CCVD combustion chemical vapor deposition - ALD atomic layer
deposition - LPE Liquid phase epitaxy - MBE molecular beam epitaxy.
UNIT IV
CHEMICAL METHODS
9
Sol-gel synthesis – different types of coatings - spin coating - selfassembly - (periodic) starting points for self-assembly - directed selfassembly using conventional lithography - template self-assembly vapor liquid solid growth - langmuir-blodgett films – DNA self-assembly.
UNIT V
PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES
9
Screen printing - inkjet printing - gravure printing and flexographic
printing - flex graphic printing - gravure printing – roll to roll techniques.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. G. Cao, “Nanostructures & nano materials: Synthesis, properties
& applications” , Imperial college press, 2004.
2.W.T.S. Huck, “Nanoscale assembly: chemical techniques
(nanostructure science and technology)”, Springer, 2005.
3. E. Gdoutos and I. M. Daniel, “Handbook of nano science
engineering and technology”, Kluwer publishers, 2002.
15NTA02
NANOTOXICOLOGY
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand about fundamentals of toxicology.
 To learn about risk on nano toxicology.
207
 To gain knowledge about protocols in toxicology studies.
 To learn the animal studies on toxicology.
 To understand concepts on risk assessment and execution.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Learn the toxicological terminology.
 Gain knowledge about nano toxicity.
 Ability to assess toxicity of nano materials.
 Know about dosing profile for animal models.
 Exposure on the regulations of toxicity.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO TOXICOLOGY
8
Concept of toxicology - types of toxicity based on route of entry - nature
of the toxin – toxicodynamics – dose Vs. toxicity relationships toxicokinetics – ADME - LADMET hypothesis - genotoxicity and
carcinogenicity – mechanisms and tests - organ toxicity – respiratory dermal hepato - neuro and nephro.
UNIT II
NANO TOXICOLOGY
10
Characteristics of nanoparticles that determine potential toxicity - biodistribution of nanoparticles - interation of nanoparticles with
biomembrane and genes - evaluation of nanoparticle transfer using
placental models - nanomaterial toxicity – pulmonary – dermal – hepato
– neuro - ocular and nephron - estimation of nanoparticle dose in
humans - in vitro toxicity studies of ultrafine diesel exhaust particles;
toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes.
UNIT III
PROTOCOLS IN TOXICOLOGY STUDIES
9
Methods for toxicity assessment – cyto, geno, hepato, neuro,
nephrotoxicity - assessment of toxicokinetics - assessment of oxidative
stress and antioxidant status.
208
UNIT IV
ANIMAL MODELS
9
Types, species and strains of animals used in toxicity studies - dosing
profile for animal models - studies on toxicology - pathology and
metabolism in mouse and rat - laws and regulations - governing animal
care and use in research.
UNIT V
RISK ASSESSMENT AND EXECUTION
9
Risk assessment of nanoparticle exposure - prevention and control of
nano particles exposure - regulation and recommendations.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. John H. Duffus & Howard G. J. Worth, “Fundamental toxicology”,
The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2006.
2. Nancy A. Monteiro-Riviere & C. Lang Tran., “Nano toxicology:
characterization, dosing and health effect”, Informa healthcare
publishers, 2007.
3. Lucio G. Costa, Ernest Hodgson, David A. Lawrence, Donald J.
Reed & William F. Greenlee, “Current protocols in toxicology”, John
Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2005.
4. Shayne C. Gad, “Animal models in toxicology”, Taylor & Francis
Group, LLC 2007.
5. P. Houdy, M. Lahmani & F. Marano, “Nanoethics
Nanotoxicology”, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2011.
and
6. M.ZafarNyamadzi, “A Reference handbook of nanotoxicology”,
2008.
7. Andreas Luch, “Molecular, clinical and environmental toxicology
Volume 2: Clinical toxicology”, Birkhauser Verlag AG, 2010.
209
15NTA03
SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF
NANOMATERIALS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide the basic knowledge in nanomaterials.
 To obtain the knowledge about the fabrication of nanomaterials.
 To know about the CNT production.
 To have an idea about the bulk synthesis of nanomaterials.
 To know about different applications of nanomaterials.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 To know basic knowledge on nanomaterials.
 To synthesis nanomaterials using physio, chemical approaches.
 To fabricate CNT and its properties, applications.
 To gain knowledge on bulk synthesis of nano materials.
 To apply nanomaterials for various applications.
UNIT I
FUNDAMENTALS OF NANOMATERIALS
9
Scientific revolutions - Nano sized metals and alloys, semiconductors,
ceramics - comparison with respective bulk materials - Zero, one, two,
and three dimensional nanostructures - surface area and aspect ratio Size and shape dependent optical, emission, electronic, transport,
photonic, refractive index, dielectric, mechanical, magnetic, non-linear
optical properties - Catalytic and photo catalytic properties.
UNIT II
CHEMICAL & PHYSICAL APPROACHES
9
Sol gel process - Electro spraying and spin coating - SAMs - LB films micro emulsion polymerization - pulsed electrochemical deposition 210
epitaxial growth techniques (CVD, MOCVD, MBE) - pulsed laser
deposition - Magnetron sputtering – lithography.
UNIT III
CNT FABRICATION
9
Laser evaporation - carbon arc method - Chemical vapour deposition –
PECVD - Solid state formation of CNT - Flame synthesis - Mechanism of
growth - Purification - Fullerene and Graphene.
UNIT IV
BULK SYNTHESIS
9
High energy ball mill - types of balls - ball ratio - medium for grinding limitations - severe plastic deformation - melt quenching and annealing Mechano chemical process - Bulk and nano composite materials.
UNIT V
APPLICATIONS OF NANOMATERIALS
9
Field emission - Fuel Cells - Display devices - chemical & biological
sensors - Automobile - composite materials - space elevators - Electron
and Probe microscopy - Nanoporous Materials - AgX photography smart sunglasses - transparent conducting oxides - molecular sieves –
nanosponges.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. A. Roth, Vacuum technology, North – Holand Pub., II Edition,
1982.
2. S.P. Gaponenko, Optical Properties of semiconductor
nanocrystals, Cambridge University Press, 1980.
3. W.Gaddand, D.Brenner, S.Lysherski and G.J.Infrate(Eds.),
Handbook of NanoScience, Engg. and Technology, CRC Press,
2002.
4. K. Barriham, D.D. Vedensky, Low dimensional semiconductor
structures:fundamental and device applications, Cambridge
University Press, 2001.
5. G. Cao, Nanostructures & Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties
211
&Applications, Imperial College Press, 2004.
6. J.George, Preparation of Thin Films, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New
York. 2005.
15NTA04
TOP DOWN MANUFACTURING METHODS
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide the basic knowledge in lithographic techniques.
 To obtain the knowledge about advanced lithographic techniques.
 To know about etching process followed after lithography.
 To have an idea about the development of nano crystalline
ceramics using ball mill.
 To know about different micro milling processes.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course the students will be able
 To develop various lithography with etching techniques.
 To advance knowledge on E-beam and ion beam lithography.
 To develop ball milling processes to fabricate nano crystalline
materials.
 To gain knowledge on micro milling/machining techniques.
 To differentiate the types of micro milling processes.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
12
Introduction to micro fabrication and Moore’s law – importance of
lithographic techniques - different types of lithographic techniques optical projection lithography – photo mask - binary mask - phase shift
mask - optical immersion lithography - maskless optical projection
lithography - zone plate array lithography - extreme ultraviolet
lithography.
212
UNIT II
E-BEAM AND ION BEAM LITHOGRAPHY
15
Principle and instrumentation - scanning electron-beam lithography mask less EBL - parallel direct-write e-beam systems - E-beam
projection lithography - X-ray lithography - focused ion beam lithography
- ion projection lithography - masked ion beam direct structuring – nano
imprint lithography - soft lithography - dip-pen lithography.
UNIT III
5
ETCHING TECHNIQUES
Reactive ion etching - magnetically enhanced RIE - ion beam etching wet etching of silicon - isotropic etching - anisotropic etching electrochemical etching - vapor phase etching - dry etching - other
etching techniques.
UNIT IV
5
BALL MILLING TECHNIQUE
Nano powders produced using micro reactors – nano crystalline
ceramics by mechanical activation - formation of nanostructured
polymers.
UNIT V
8
MACHINING PROCESSES
Micro milling/micro drilling/micro grinding processes and the procedure
for selecting proper machining parameters with given specifications EDM micro machining, laser micro/nano machining - models to simulate
micro/nano machining processes using molecular dynamics techniques wet chemical etching - dry etching - thin film and sacrificial processes.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. M. J. Jackson, “Micro fabrication and nano manufacturing”, CRC
Press, 2005.
2. P.Rai-Choudhury, “Handbook of micro lithography, micro
machining, and micro fabrication”, Vol. 2, SPIE Press, 1997.
3. M. Madou, “Fundamentals of micro fabrication,” CRC Press,
1997.
4. G.Timp, “Nano technology”, AIP press, Springer-Verlag, New
York, 1999.
213
ALLIED ELECTIVE OFFERED BY IT DEPARTMENT
SL.
COURSE
NO
COURSE TITLE
L T
P
C
CODE
1.
15MIA01
Embedded Computing Systems
3
0
0
3
2.
15MIA02
Scilab Programming
3
0
0
3
3.
15MIA03
Network Simulation
3
0
0
3
4.
15MIA04
Geo Information Systems
3
0
0
3
5.
15MIA05
Fuzzy Logic
3
0
0
3
15MIA06
Statistical Analysis using R
Programming
3
0
0
3
7.
15MIA07
Sensor Networks
3
0
0
3
8.
15MIA08
Concurrent Programming
3
0
0
3
9.
15MIA09
Video Processing using OpenCV
3
0
0
3
15MIA10
Rural Technology and Community
Development
3
0
0
3
11. 15MIA11
Pedagogy
3
0
0
3
12. 15MIA12
IT Essentials
3
0
0
3
6.
10.
15MIA01
EMBEDDED COMPUTING SYSTEMS
LTPC
3 003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To gain knowledge about various processors, its architecture,
instruction set and its programming
 To learn about memory and I/O Devices, its interfacing and handling
of interrupts
214
 To learn more about multiple task and processes ,
 To develop embedded software both in assembly language and C
 To know about software development tools
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Develop 8051 and ARM Assembly Program
 Analyze the need of memory and I/O management and to illustrate
the mechanism for handling the interrupts
 Design the Processes suitable for embedded system.
 Develop Embedded Software by considering real time constraints and
multi state sequences.
 Design embedded systems for any application.
UNIT I
Embedded Computing
9
Introduction-Embedded System design process-Formalism for System
Design-Instruction
Sets-Preliminaries-ARM
Processor-8051
Micro
Controller: Architecture, Instruction Sets and Programming
UNIT II
MEMORY AND INPUT / OUTPUT MANAGEMENT
9
Programming Input and Output –Supervisor Modes, Exceptions, Trap, CoProcessors- Memory system mechanisms –CPU Performance-CPU Power
Consumption- Memory and I/O devices– Interrupts handling.
UNIT III
PROCESSES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS
9
Multiple tasks and processes –Preemptive Real Time Operating Systems–
Scheduling policies – Inter process communication mechanisms –
Performance issues-Power Management and Optimization for Processes
UNIT IV
EMBEDDED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
9
Programming embedded systems in assembly and C – Meeting real time
constraints – Multi-state systems and function sequences -Host and target
machines, linkers, locations for embedded software, getting embedded
software into target system, debugging technique
UNIT V
SYSTEM DESIGN DEVOLPMENT
9
Design methodologies-requirement analysis-specifications- system analysis
215
and architecture design –Design examples- Telephone Answering
Machine- ink jet printer- water tank monitoring system-GPRS, Intruder
Alarm System- A Prototype Integrated Monitoring System for Pavement and
Traffic Based on an Embedded Sensing Network
TOTAL: 45 Periods
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Wayne Wolf, “Computers as Components: Principles of Embedded
Computer System Design”, Elsevier, Third Edition,2008.
2. Michael J. Pont, “Embedded C”, Pearson Education, Second
Edition,2008.
3. Steve Heath, “Embedded System Design”, Elsevier, 2005.
4. Muhammed Ali Mazidi, Janice Gillispie Mazidi and Rolin D. McKinlay,
“The 8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems”, Pearson
Education, Second edition, 2007.
5. David E.Simon, “ An Embedded Software Primer” pearson education,
2009
6. Wenjing Xue, Linbing Wang, and Dong Wang ,”A Prototype Integrated
Monitoring System for Pavement and Traffic Based on an Embedded
Sensing Network”, IEEE Transactions On Intelligent Transportation
Systems,June 2015
WEB REFERENCES:

www.scribd.com/doc/52569374/55/Busy-Wait-I-O

www.ict.kth.se/courses/2B1445/Lectures/Lecture3/2B1445_L3_CPU.p
df

www.webster.cs.ucr.edu/AoA/.../MemoryArchitecturea2.html

www.dce.kar.nic.in/new%20files/Chapter4-9-07.pdf
216
15MIA02
SCILAB PROGRAMMING
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the fundamental structure and use of Scilab's
 To give a description of the Scilab's existing functions, including the
integrated graphics facilities
 To describes the main Scilab functions for system analysis and
control
 To discuss the signal-processing tools, which include discussions
on signal representation, FIR and IIR filter design and spectral
estimation
 To acquire the knowledge in simulation and optimization tools
 To introduce various models used for simulation and optimization
problems
 To describe Metanet, a toolbox for graphs and network flow
computations.
 Introduce the student to the topic and to aid the professional in
making effective use of Scilab in the application area
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Use SCILAB tool and write simple programs
 Create new functional Scilab primitives
 Apply Scilab tool for various scientific and engineering problems
 Apply Scilab's numerical solver for Ordinary Differential Equations
and Differential Algebraic Equations systems
 Identify the way graphs are represented in Metanet and the
corresponding data structures
 Solve several complex real-world problems
UNIT I
SCILAB LANGUAGE AND GRAPHICS
9
Constants, Data types, Scilab Syntax, Data-Type-Related –Functions,
Overloading, Graphics.
217
UNIT II
BASIC
FUNCTIONS
PROGRAMMING
AND
ADVANCED
9
Linear Algebra, Polynomial and Rational function Manipulation, Sparse
Matrices, Random Numbers, Cumulative Distribution Functions and their
Inverses.
Functions and Primitives- Call function- Building Interface ProgramsAccessing Global variables within a Wrapper- Intersci- Dynamic LinkingStatic Linking- GUI.
UNIT III
SYSTEMS,
CONTROL
SIGNAL PROCESSING
TOOLBOX
AND
9
Linear Systems- System Definition- Improper Systems- System
Operations- Control Tools- Classic Control- State-Space control- H 
Control- Model Reduction- Identification- Linear matrix Inequalities.
Signal Processing: Time and frequency representation of signalsFiltering and Filter design- Spectral Estimation.
UNIT IV
SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION TOOLS
9
Simulation and Optimization Tools: Models- Integrating Ordinary
Differential Equations- Integrating Differential Algebraic Equations Solving optimization Problems.
Graph and Network Toolbox (Metanet): Graph- Representation GraphsCreating and Loading Graphs- Generating Graphs and Networks- Graph
and Network Computations- Examples using Metanet.
UNIT V
APPLICATIONS
9
Modeling and Simulation of an N-Link pendulum -Modeling and
Simulation of a Car- Open-Loop Control to Swing Up a PendulumParameter Fitting and Implicit Models- Implementation of Genetic
Algorithm.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
218
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Claude Gomez “Engineering and Scientific Computing with Scilab”
Springer Science and Business Media Newyork 1999
2. Stephen L. Campbell, Jean-Philippe Chancelier and Ramine
Nikoukhah “Modeling and Simulation in Scilab/Scicos”, 2006
Springer Science Business Media,Inc
3. Rietsch E “An introduction to SciLab from a Matlab User's Point of
View”,2001, Eike Rietsch
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.blogdopapeleiro.com.br/biblioteca/AplicativosLivres/Scil
ab/tutorial-all.pdf
2. http://www.scilab.org/content/search?SearchText=introscilab
3. www.cmap.polytechnique.fr/~allaire/levelset/manual.pdf
ftp.tuwien.ac.at/comp/scilab/manual_scilab-5.1.1_en_US.pdf
15MIA03
NETWORK SIMULATION
LTPC
3 00 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To explain the principles of functioning of the computer simulators.
 To provide an understanding of the principles of computer
simulation as applied to computer networks.
 To ensure that students can apply obtained knowledge and
effectively use relevant tools.
 To Design computer network models for the simulator.
 To investigate dynamic behaviour of the computer networks using
network simulator.
 To process and critically analyse the data produced by network
simulator.
219
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Extrapolate the simulation of computer networks
 Infer the linkage between TCL and OTCL programming
 Paraphrase the basics of discrete event simulation
 Simulate nodes as routers using ns2 modules
 Construct ns2 scenarios that simulate various emerging types of
wired and wireless networks.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Simulation of computer networks - Layering concept- System modelingSimulation Definition- Elements of simulation-Time dependent
simulation –Protocols – Ns2: introduction - Architecture – installation –
directories – running ns2 simulation – including c++ module - Simulation
example – single channel queuing system
UNIT II
TCL/OTCL PROGRAMMING
9
Linkage between OTcl and C++ - class binding – variable binding –
Variables – List - Procedure - Array - Conditional statements - Looping
Structures - Classes and objects – Expressions - File handling Input/output Console
UNIT III
DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION
9
Ns2 simulation concept - events and handlers – overview – class –
NSobject – Packet – At event - scheduler – components – data
encapsulation – polymorphism – main and auxiliary functions –
dynamics – scheduling – dispatching events – simulator – components –
retrieving – instance – initialization – instprocs - network objectscreation, configuration and packet forwarding
UNIT IV
SIMULATION OF NODES AS ROUTERS
9
Nodes – overview – multi-target packet forwarders – components – port
classifiers – hash classifiers – creating own classifiers – routing
modules – overview – c++ class routing module – Otcl routing module –
built-in routing module – route logic – node construction and
220
configuration
UNIT V
SIMULATION EXAMPLES
9
WIRED SCENARIO - Simulator Class- Trace the events- Node creationLink between nodes- Communication Agent- Traffic agent - MAC
protocols – Ethernet - Simulation using NS2 - Wired-Cum-Wireless
Scenario - Creating Simple Wired-Cum-Wireless Scenario - Running
Mobile-Ip In Wired-Cum-Wireless Topology - Wireless Scenario - Node
Configuration- Routing Protocols- Energy Model- Topology GenerationGraphical Events On Node- Neighbour Discovery- Route DiscoveryEvent Scheduling Wireless Sensor Networks - Energy Model- Sense
Power-Transmission Power-Energy Efficient Routing ProtocolsClustering
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Teerawat Issariyakul, Ekram Hossain, “Introduction to Network
Simulator NS2”, Springer, Second Edition, 2012
2. Patel Rajankumar, Patel Nimisha, “A Case Study of Implementation
and Simulation of New Protocol in NS2: The PING Protocol for
MANET Environment”, International Conference on Computing for
Sustainable Global Development (INDIACom), 2014.
3. MIAO Quan-xing and XU Lei, “DYMO Routing Protocol Research
and Simulation Based on NS2”, 2010 International Conference on
Computer Application and System Modeling (ICCASM), 2010.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.isi.edu/nsnam/ns/
2. http://nile.wpi.edu/NS/
3. http://csis.bits-pilani.ac.in/faculty/murali/resources/tutorials/ns2.htm
4. http://www.winlab.rutgers.edu/~zhibinwu/html/network_simulator_2.ht
ml
5. http://wing.nitk.ac.in/tutorials/
221
15MIA04
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To provide exposure to data models and data structure used in
GIS
 To introduce various Raster and Vector Analysis capabilities of
GIS
 To expose the concept of quality and errors in GIS
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Explore the basics of GIS
 Interpret different data models in GIS
 Analyze the Raster data and vector data analysis
 Apply different models in GIS
 Apply data quality analysis in GIS
UNIT I
BASICS
9
Maps: Types – Characteristics – Coordinate systems – Map projections
– Definition of GIS – Evolution – Components of GIS – Data : Spatial
and Non-spatial – Spatial Data: Point, Line, Polygon/Area and Surface
– Non-Spatial Data: Levels of measurement – Database Structures
UNIT II
DATA MODEL AND INPUT
12
Raster Data Model – Grid – Tessellations – Geometry of Tessellations
–– Data Compression – Vector Data Model – Topology – Topological
consistency – Vector data input– Raster Vs. Vector comparison – File
Formats for Raster and Vector – Vector to Raster conversion- raster
formats
UNIT III
DATA ANALYSIS AND OUTPUT
6
Raster Data Analysis: Local, Neighbourhood and Regional Operations
– Map Algebra – Vector Data Analysis: Non-topological analysis,
Topological Analysis - Point-in-Polygon - Line-in-polygon - Polygon-inpolygon – Network Analysis – buffering – ODBC – Map Compilation.
222
UNIT IV
SPATIAL MODELING
9
Modeling in GIS – types – Digital Elevation Models: Generation Representation, Applications – ALTM.
UNIT V
DATA QUALITY AND MISCELLANEOUS
TOPICS
9
Data quality analysis – Sources of Error – Components of Data Quality
– Meta Data – Open GIS consortium – Customisation in GIS – Object
Oriented GIS – WebGIS-GIS system evaluation and bench marking
TOTAL: 45 Periods
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Lo. C P and Yeung, Albert K W, “Concepts and Techniques of
Geographic Information Systems”, Prentice Hall of India, 2012
2. Robert Laurini and Derek Thompson, “Fundamentals of Spatial
Information Systems”, Academic Press, 1996.
3. Peter A Burrough, Rachael A Mc.Donnell, “Principles of GIS”, Oxford
University Press, 2000.
4. Allan Brimicombe, GIS Environmental Modeling and Engineering,
Taylor & Francis, 2003.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. bgis.sanbi.org/gis-primer/page_15.htm
2. www.isprs.org/caravan/documents/Lao_GIS.pdf
3. planet.botany.uwc.ac.za/NISL/GIS/GIS_primer/page_25.htm
15MIA05
FUZZY LOGIC
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:

To understand the basic knowledge of crisp and fuzzy sets

To learn basic knowledge of fuzzy information representation and
processing

To choose basic fuzzy inference and approximate reasoning and the
223
basic notion of fuzzy rule base

To know the basics of fuzzy relations

To learn basic fuzzy system modelling methods
COURSE OUTCOMES:

Identify the difference between the crisp set and fuzzy set concepts

Perform mapping of fuzzy sets by a function

Apply fuzzy inference systems in the design of intelligent systems.

Perform classification and clustering using fuzzy relations

Design the fuzzy logic controllers for various applications
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction - The Case for Imprecision - A Historical Perspective - The
Utility of Fuzzy Systems - Limitations of Fuzzy Systems - The Illusion:
Ignoring Uncertainty and Accuracy - Uncertainty and Information - Fuzzy
Sets and Membership - Chance Versus Fuzziness - Sets as Points in
Hypercubes - Classical Sets - Fuzzy Sets.
UNIT II
CLASSICAL
RELATIONS
RELATIONS
AND
FUZZY
9
Cartesian Product - Crisp Relations – Fuzzy Relations - Tolerance and
Equivalence Relations - Fuzzy Tolerance and Equivalence RelationsValue Assignments-Other Forms of the Composition OperationFeatures of the Membership Function - Various Forms - Fuzzification Defuzzification to Crisp Sets - λ-Cuts for Fuzzy Relations- Defuzzification
to Scalars
UNIT III
LOGIC AND FUZZY SYSTEMS
9
Classical Logic – Proof - Fuzzy Logic - Approximate Reasoning - Other
Forms of the Implication Operation – Fuzzy System - Natural Language
- Linguistic Hedges - Fuzzy (Rule-Based) Systems - Graphical
Techniques of Inference
224
UNIT IV
FUZZY CLASSIFICATION
9
Classification by Equivalence Relations - Crisp Relations - Fuzzy
Relations - Cluster Analysis - Cluster Validity - c-Means Clustering Hard c-Means (HCM) - Fuzzy c-Means (FCM) - Classification Metric Hardening the Fuzzy c-Partition - Similarity Relations from Clustering
UNIT V
FUZZY LOGIC CONTROL
9
Fuzzy reasoning – Mechanism – Mamdani’s Direct Method - Designing
Fuzzy Logic Controllers – Application Examples of Fuzzy Reasoning Simple Fuzzy Logic Controllers - Aircraft Landing Control Problem Classical Feedback Control - Fuzzy Logic for Adaptive Instruction in an
E-learning Environment for Computer Programming
TOTAL: 45 Periods
REFERENCES
1. Timothy J.Ross , “Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications”, Third
Edition , Wiley Publication, 2012
2. S. N. Sivanandam & S. N. Deepa, Principles of Soft Computing, Wiley
- India, 2007.
3. S. Rajasekaran & G.A. Vijayalakshmi Pai, “Neural Networks, Fuzzy
Logic and Genetic Algorithm: Synthesis and Applications” Prentice Hall
of India ,2003
4. Jyh-Shing Roger Jang, Chuen-Tsai Sun, Eiji Mizutani, “Neuro-Fuzzy
and Soft Computing”, Prentice-Hall of India, 2003.
5. Kazuo Tanaka ,“An Introduction to Fuzzy Logic for Practical
Applications”, Springer 1997
6. George J. Klir and Bo Yuan, “Fuzzy Sets and Fuzzy Logic-Theory and
Applications”, Prentice Hall, 1995.
7. Chrysafiadi, K, Virvou, M, “Fuzzy Logic for Adaptive Instruction in an
E-learning Environment for Computer Programming”, IEEE
transactions on Fuzzy Systems, Vol.23 No.1, Pages 164 -171, 2015.
225
WEB REFERENCES:
1.
www.csie.ntnu.edu.tw/~violet/FT96/Ch1.ppt
2.
www.csee.wvu.edu/classes/cpe521/old/01%20%20Introduction.ppt
3.
www.pafkiet.edu.pk/Portals/0/.../Fuzzy_Systems_and_Applicati
ons.ppt
15MIA06
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USING R
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Explore the need of R tool
 Apply various Data Importing techniques in R
 Implement programs with R with objects, functions, analysis etc
 Work on applications, implementing R Analytics to create Business
Insights
 Apply graphics interface in R
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Apply the basics of R programming

Apply the package concepts in R
 Explore data analysis with objects and computation
 Use classes and functions in R
 Implement graphics with R
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO R
9
Starting R – Installation – Data objects in R – Data Import and Export –
Data Manipulation – Computing with data – Organizing an analysis –
Language – Functions and Packages
UNIT II
PROGRAMMING WITH R & PACKAGES
9
Commands to Functions – Functional Programming – Function objects –
Function calls – Language – Debugging – Errors and Warnings Package concept and tools – Why to write a package – Creating a
226
package – Documentation for Packages – Testing – Packaging
namespace – Including C in packages
UNIT III
OBJECTS & DATA COMPUTATION
9
Objects, Names, and REFERENCES – Replacement Expressions –
Environments – Non-local Assignments – Closures – Connections –
Reading and Writing Objects – Object Types – Vector and Structures –
Vectorizing Computations – Statistical Data: Data Frames –
Computations on Numeric Data – Matrix Computations – Fitting
Statistical models – Programming Random Simulations
UNIT IV
CLASSES & GENERIC FUNCTIONS
9
Why classes – Programming with classes – Inheritance and Inter-class
Relations – Virtual Classes – Creating and Validating Objects – Example
: Binary Trees – Data Frames – Why methods – method definitions –
methods for old functions – Programming techniques – Generic
functions – working of method selection
UNIT V
WORKING OF R & GRAPHICS
9
R Program - Calls to R functions – Primitive Functions – Data
Visualization and graphics – xy plot – Common graphics model –
graphics package – Computing with Text – Import – Data analysis &
Computations – examples
TOTAL: 45 Periods
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. John Chambers, “Software for Data Analysis: Programming with R
“, Springer; 1st ed. 2008. , 2nd printing 2009 edition
2. Torsten Hothorn, Brian S. Everitt, “ A Handbook of Statistical
Analyses Using R “,Chapman and Hall/CRC; 2 edition ,2009
3. Thomas Lumley,” Complex Surveys: A Guide to Analysis Using R”,
Wiley Series in survey methodology, 2010
4. Nicholas J. Horton, Ken Kleinman,” Using R and RStudio for Data
Management, Statistical Analysis, and Graphics” , CRC Press,
Second edition, 2015
5. Eric D. Kolaczyk, “Statistical Analysis of Network Data with R”,
227
Springer, 2014
6. John Maindonald, W. John Braun,”Data Analysis and Graphics
Using R: An Example-Based Approach”, University Press,
Cambridge, Third edition, 2010
7. John M. Quick,” Statistical Analysis with R”, Packt Publishing ,
2010
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://www.gardenersown.co.uk/Education/Lectures/R/
2. http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/r/
3. http://www.statistics.com/r-for-statistical-analysis/
4. http://www.r-project.org/about.html
5. http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/what-r
15MIA07
SENSOR NETWORKS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the fundamentals and Architecture of Wireless
Sensor Networks(WSN)
 To analyze the role of physical and data link layer and its
associated protocols
 To learn the impact of Time Synchronization, localization and
positioning in WSN
 To understand the role of routing protocols in WSN
 To apply concepts of WSN for real time applications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Explore the impact the WSN and its associated hardware
components
 Analyze the different protocols in MAC and Link layer
 Apply the concepts of localization, Time synchronization and
positioning in WSN
228
 Perform data routing and data aggregation
 Design simple applications using sensor nodes incorporating
security features
UNIT I
8
Challenges for Wireless Sensor Networks- Enabling Technologies For
Wireless Sensor Networks- Single-node architecture-Hardware
components-Energy consumption of sensor nodes-Some examples of
sensor nodes-Network architecture-Sensor network scenariosOptimization goals and figures of merit-Design principles for WSNs
UNIT II
9
Physical layer-Wireless channel and communication fundamentalsTransceiver design considerations in WSNs-MAC protocolsFundamentals-Low duty cycle protocols and wakeup conceptsContention-based protocols-Schedule-based protocols-The IEEE
802.15.4 MAC protocol-Link-layer protocols – Fundamentals - Error
control – Framing - Link management
UNIT III
10
Time Synchronization –Introduction- Protocols- Localization and
Positioning – Properties – mathematical basics – Single Hop localization
– Positioning in Multihop environment – Impact of anchor placementTopology Control – In Flat networks – In Hierarchical networks
UNIT IV
9
Routing protocols-Gossiping and agent-based unicast forwardingEnergy-efficient unicast-Broadcast and multicast-Geographic routingMobile nodes-Data-centric routing-Data aggregation-Data-centric
storage
UNIT V
9
Advanced in-network processing-Security-Denial of Service attacks Application-specific support
229
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Holger Karl & Andreas Willig, " Protocols And Architectures for
Wireless Sensor Networks" , John Wiley, 2005.
2. Feng Zhao & Leonidas J. Guibas, “Wireless Sensor Networks
3. Kazem Sohraby, Daniel Minoli, & Taieb Znati, “Wireless Sensor
Networks-Technology, Protocols, And Applications”, John Wiley,
2007
4. Anna Hac, “Wireless Sensor Network Designs”, John Wiley, 2003
WEB REFERENCES:
1. www.cs.uni-paderborn.de/index.php?id=1119&L=1
2. www.cpe.ku.ac.th/~cpj/204525/slides/02-Node.ppt
3. www.sensors-and-networks.blogspot.com/2011/08/physical-layerfor-wireless-sensor.html
4. www.isi.edu/div7/publication_files/Ye02a.pdf
5. www.cs.wustl.edu/~jain/cse574-06/yftp/time_sync/index.html
6. www.macrothink.org/journal/index.php/npa/article/viewFile/279/276
7. www.site.uottawa.ca/~ivan/rout-ruehrup.pdf
8. www.cs.wayne.edu/~weisong/papers/walters05-wsn-securitysurvey.pdf
9. www.ece.iastate.edu/~kamal/Docs/kk04.pdf
10.
ieeexplore.ieee.org/iel5/7384/32301/01507522.pdf
11.
2009.telfor.rs/files/radovi/03_12.pdf
12.
www.isi.edu/scadds/papers/timesync.pdf
15MIA08
CONCURRENT PROGRAMMING
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To learn about Concurrency and POSIX thread concepts
 To understand the various types of Synchronization
 To familiarize with Advanced Threaded Programming
230
 To study the usage of POSIX With Threads
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Apply POSIX threads for concurrency
 Demonstrate Synchronization for an Application
 Utilize advanced Threading concepts for various applications
 Implement POSIX with threads for different applications
 Make use of the hints to avoid debugging
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION AND THREADS
9
Definitions and terminology - Asynchronous - Concurrency - Uniprocessor
and multiprocessor – Parallelism - Thread safety and reentrancy Concurrency control functions - Asynchronous programming is intuitive Asynchronous programming - Benefits of threading - Costs of threading
POSIX thread concepts - Architectural overview - Types and interfaces Creating and using threads - The life of a thread – Creation - Startup Running and blocking - Termination – Recycling
UNIT II
SYNCHRONIZATION
9
Synchronization - Invariants, critical sections, and predicates – Mutexes Creating and destroying a mutex - Locking and unlocking a mutex Nonblocking mutex locks - Using mutexes for atomicity - Sizing a mutex
to fit the job - Using more than one mutex - Lock hierarchy - Lock
chaining- Condition variables - Creating and destroying a condition
variable - Waiting on a condition variable - Waking condition variable
waiters - One final alarm program - Memory visibility between threads - A
few ways to use threads Pipeline - Work Crew - Client/Server
UNIT III
ADVANCED THREADED PROGRAMMING
9
One-time initialization - Attributes objects - Mutex attributes - Condition
variable attributes - Thread attributes - Cancellation - Deferred
cancelability - Asynchronous cancelability - Thread-specific data - Real
time scheduling - Threads and kernel entities.
UNIT IV
POSIX WITH THREADS
9
Fork - exec - Process exit – Stdio - Thread-safe functions - User and
terminal identification - Directory searching - String token - Time
231
representation - Random number generation - Group and user database
– Signals - Signal actions - Signal masks - pthread_kill - sigwait and
sigwaitinfo - SIGEV_THREAD - Semaphores: synchronizing with a
signal-catching function
UNIT V
ERROR HANDLING TECHNIQUES
9
Hints to avoid debugging: Avoiding incorrect code - Avoid relying on
“thread inertia” - Never bet your mortgage on a thread race - Cooperate
to avoid deadlocks - Beware of priority - Never share condition variables
between predicates - Sharing stacks and related memory - Avoiding
performance problems - concurrent serialization - right number of
mutexes - Never fight over cache lines
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. David R. Butenhof, “Programming with POSIX Threads”, Addision
Wesley, 1997.
2. Dick Buttlar, Jacqueline Farrell, Bradford Nichols, “PThreads
Programming” , O'Reilly, 1996.
3. M. Herlihy and N. Shavit, “The Art of Multiprocessor
Programming”, Morgan Kaufmann, 2012.
4. Michel Raynal, “Concurrent Programming: Algorithms, Principles,
and Foundations”, Springer, 2003.
WEB REFERENCES:
1. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/
2. http://gee.cs.oswego.edu/dl/cpj/
15MIA09
VIDEO PROCESSING USING OPENCV
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To study the image processing fundamentals
 To understand the basics of video processing and video coding.
 To study the general methodologies of motion estimation
232
 To get introduced to OpenCV
 To learn to apply video processing in OpenCV
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Work with Images on simple operations
 Apply video processing to solve real world problems
 Analyze various methodologies for motion estimation
 Apply OpenCV functions for image processing
 Implement video processing functions using OpenCV
UNIT I
FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING
9
Introduction – Elements of visual perception – Steps in image processing
systems – Digital imaging system – Image acquisition – Sampling and
quantization – Pixel relationships – File formats – Color images and
models – Image operations – arithmetic, logical, statistical and spatial
operations.
UNIT II
VIDEO PROCESSING
9
Introduction – Basic steps of video processing - Analog video, Digital video
– Time – varying – Image formation models: Three-Dimensional motion
models – Geometric image formation – Photometric image formation –
Sampling of video signals – Filtering operations.
UNIT III
MOTION ESTIMATION
9
2-D motion estimation optical flow – General methodologies – Pixel based
motion estimation – Block – Matching algorithm – Mesh based motion
estimation – Global motion estimation – Region based motion estimation –
Multi resolution motion estimation – Waveform based coding – Block
based transform coding – Predictive coding – Application of motion
estimation in video coding.
UNIT IV
OPENCV
9
Introduction to OpenCV – OpenCV primitive data types – CVMat matrix
structure – Ipl image data structure – Matrix and image operators –
OpenCV functions for displaying images – OpenCV functions for image
processing – OpenCV functions for image transforms.
233
UNIT V
HANDLING IMAGE AND VIDEO FILES
9
Introduction – Downloading and installing OpenCV – Structure of OpenCV
– Creating user projects with OpenCV – Reading and writing image files –
Real-Time Computer Vision with OpenCV – Image processing for video –
Video stabilization – Super resolution – Stitching – Tracking and Motion –
The Basics of Tracking – Corner Finding – Mean-Shift and Camshift
Tracking – Motion Templates – User interaction tools
TOTAL: 45 Periods
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. R. C. Gonzalez, R. E. Woods, “Digital Image Processing”, Pearson
Education. Third Edition, 2014.
2. Yao wang, Joem Ostarmann and Yaquin Zhang, ”Video processing
and communication “,1st edition , PHI
3. Gary Bradski and Adrian Kaehler, “Learning OpenCV” ORIELLEY,
2003.
4. Gloria Bueno García, Oscar Deniz Suarez, Jose Luis Espinosa
Aranda, Jesus Salido Tercero, Ismael Serrano Gracia, Noelia Vállez
Enano,”Learning Image Processing with OpenCV”, Packt Publishing,
2015
5. A.K.Jain, “Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing”, Prentice-Hall,
1989.
6. A.Bovik, “Handbook of Image and Video Processing”, 2nd Edition,
Academic Press, 2005.
7. A. M. Tekalp, Digital Video Processing , Prentice-Hall, 1995
8. Kari Pulli, Anatoly Baksheev, Kirill Kornyakov, and Victor Eruhimov,
“Real-Time Computer Vision with OpenCV”, communications of the
ACM, no. 6, vol. 55, June 2012.
WEB REFERENCES
1. http://opencv-pythontutroals.readthedocs.org/en/latest/py_tutorials/py_gui/py_table_of_co
ntents_gui/py_table_of_contents_gui.html
2. http://opencv.org/
3. http://docs.opencv.org/opencv_tutorials.pdf
234
15MIA10
RURAL TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
L T PC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the Importance, scope and objectives of Rural
Development
 To describe the importance of Rural Delivery System
 To provide an introduction , overview as well as its underlying
Premises
 To understand the variety of ways in which communities organize,
assess and plan for community development
 To discuss the need for communities to effectively integrate skill
development into their activities
 To provide a broad perspective on the total community
assessment process.
 To discuss comprehensive assessments and the areas that should
be considered, including a community’s physical, social and
human infrastructure and capital.
 To provide information on techniques such as asset inventories,
identifying potential partners and collaborators
 To provides an overview of economic impact analysis and how it
may be used to allocate scarce community financial resources
 To discuss the issues impacting community development, focuses
on a few of the many and diverse issues
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Examine the objective of Rural Development scheme
 Attain the knowledge in Rural Delivery System
 Learn the introduction, overview of the discipline as well as its
underlying Premises
 Identify the ways in which communities organize, assess and plan
for community development
235
 Analyze the issues impacting community development, focuses
on a few of the many and diverse issues
UNIT I
RURAL DEVELOPMENT
9
Importance, scope and objectives of rural Development; Various
approaches to Rural Development – Gandhian approach for Community
development- I.A.D.P.- I.R.D.P.- N.R.E.G.A.- Neo Gandhian- (PURA)Need Based and demand based centers.
UNIT II
RURAL DELIVERY SYSTEM
9
Rural Development Administration and Panchayat Raj Institutions:
Panchayat Raj System- functions of Panchayat Raj System- Sources of
income for Panchayats- merits and demerits of Panchayat systemstrengthening of Panchayat Raj System- Rural Development
administration - People’s Participation in Rural Development: Importance
of people’s participation- some problems- and measures of strengthen
people’s participation.
UNIT III
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATIONS
9
A framework for community and economic development- Seven
theories for seven community developers- Asset based community
development- Social Capital and community building- community
development practice.
UNIT IV
PREPARATION AND PLANNING
9
Community visioning and strategic planning- Establishing community based organizations- Developing community leadership skillscommunity development assessments- community assets mapping and
surveys- Assessing your local economy.
UNIT V
ISSUES IMPACTING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
9
Community development finance- Securing grants for community
development projects- The global economy and community
development- Sustainability in community development- Conclusions
and observations on the future of community development
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
236
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Dr.Sundaram, I.SATYA, “Rural Development” ,Himalaya Publishing
House, Mumbai, 1999
2. Rhonda Phillips and Robert H. Pittman “An introduction to
Community
development”, Routledge 2009
3. Desai, Vasant. “Rural Development in India”, New Delhi: Himalaya,
2005.
4. Battacharya S.N. (1972),” Community Development in Developing
Countries”, Academic Publishers.
5. M.J.Campbell “New
Routledge 2009
Technology
And
Rural
Development”,
6. Joseph, M.K. ; Andrew, T.N.” Participatory approaches for
the development and
use
of
Information
and
Communication Technologies (ICTS) for rural farmers” Technology
and Society, 2008. ISTAS 2008
7. Meera K. Joseph Theo. N. Andrew” Information and
Communication Technology policy imperatives for rural women
empowerment: focus on South Africa”AFRICON, 2009. AFRICON
'09.
15MIA11
PEDAGOGY
LTPC
3 003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Instill pedagogical skill sets through an introduction to theoreticallybased teaching methods and strategies that can be incorporated into
your future teaching or collaborative opportunities.
 Identify the ways that the personal research can be transferred to
other educational contexts
 Explore the impacts of teaching and curricular innovations on
“student” to the learn the activities of K-12, collegiate, working
professional and research group member
237
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Analyze the differences between expert and novice learners
 Apply the key factors that influence knowledge transfer
 Explore the mind and brain of people to leverage the awareness on
the educational contexts
 Discover the four dimensions of the “How People Learn” (HPL)
framework to improve the learning efficiency of the society.
 Operationalize HPL elements in STEM learning environments.
 Identify the challenges of HPL elements using STEM learning
environments.
 Evaluate the importance of assessment in engineering education
 Apply Thematic Curriculum and Project-Based Learning best
practices to lesson planning
 Plan a STEM curriculum that brings together the above lessons and
best practices
UNIT I
TEACHING ENGINEERING
9
Introduction – Components of Good Teaching – Philosophical Approach –
Compendium of Learning Principles – Efficiency – Goal Setting –
Priorities and To-Do List – Interaction with People – Using a Computer –
Research Efficiency – Handling Stress – Limitation
UNIT II
DESIGNING THE CLASS ROOM
9
Types of Courses – Classroom Activities – New Faculty Member
Experiences – Goals and Objectives - Taxonomies or Domains of
Knowledge – Affective Domain - Psychomotor Domain - Interaction of
Teaching Styles and Objectives - Developing the Content of the Course Accreditation Constraints on Undergraduate Programs
UNIT III
PROBLEM SOLVING AND CREATIVITY
9
Problem Solving—An Overview - Novice And Expert Problem Solvers Problem-Solving Strategies - Getting Started Or Getting Unstuck Teaching Problem Solving – Creativity – Lectures - Content Selection and
238
Organization – Performance - Building Interpersonal Rapport in Lectures Special Lecture Methods - Handling Large Classes - Lectures As Part of A
Course Introduction
UNIT IV
TECHNOLOGICAL ALTERNATIVES TO LECTURE
9
Cooperative Group Learning - Group Methods for Involving Students Mastery and Self-Paced Instruction - Independent Study Classes:
Increasing Curriculum Flexibility - Field Trips and Visits - Teaching with
Technology - Computers in Engineering Education – Audio tutorial
Method
UNIT V
ONE-TO-ONE TEACHING AND ADVISING
9
Tutoring and Helping Students - Advising and Counseling - Research
Advisers - Testing, Homework and Grading – Scoring– Homework –
Projects – Grading - Student Cheating, Discipline and Ethics - Other
Discipline Problems - Teaching Ethics - Psychological Type and Learning
- Applications of the MBTI in Engineering Education - Difficulties with
Psychological Testing
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Phillip C Wankat, Frank S Oreovicz, “Teaching Engineering,” McGrawHill, 1993
2. Julie Dirksen, “Design For How People Learn (Voices That Matter),”
New Riders (A Division of Pearson Education), Berkeley, CA, 2012.
3. Wiggins G, McTighe, “Understanding by Design,” Upper Saddle, NJ:
Prentice Hall, 1998.
4. John D.Bransford, Ann L.Brown, and Rodney R.Cocking, “How People
Learn Brain, Mind, Experience, and School,” National Academy Press
Washington, D.C., 2000 (Expanded Edition).
5. Select Committee on Science and Technology, “Higher Education in
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects,”
House of Lord, UK, 2012-13.
239
WEB REFERENCES:
1. Golde CM, “The Challenges Of Conducting Interdisciplinary Research In
Traditional Doctoral Programs,” Ecosystems 1999; 2(4): 281-285.
2. Stephens R, Richey M, “Accelerating STEM Capacity : A Complex
Adaptive System Perspective. Journal Of Engineering Education,
100(3), 417-423.
3. Newstetter, W. C. (2011). UNPACKING THE INTERDISCIPLINARY
MIND: Implications For Teaching And Learning. American Society For
Engineering Education (Pp. AC 2011-2614).
15MIA12
IT ESSENTIALS
LTPC
3003
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To be familiar with the basic concepts of computer architecture
and operating systems
 To understand various methods of problem solving
 To acquire knowledge on database and query language
 To familiarize object oriented concepts
 To provide a background on networking and web development
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Explore the concepts of computer architecture and operating
systems
 Develop solutions using problem solving concepts
 Build data models for databases using query languages
 Implement object oriented concepts for applications
 Develop knowledge on networking and web applications
UNIT I
9
Fundamentals of Computer architecture-introduction-organization of a
small computer - Central Processing Unit - Execution cycle – Instruction
categories – measure of CPU performance Memory – Input/output
240
devices - BUS-addressing modes - System Software – Assemblers –
Loaders and linkers – Compilers and interpreters - Operating system –
introduction – memory management schemes Process management
Scheduling – threads.
UNIT II
9
Problem solving with algorithms- Programming styles – Coding
Standards and Best practices - Introduction to C Programming - Testing
and Debugging. Code reviews - System Development Methodologies –
Software development Models - User interface Design – introduction –
The process – Elements of UI design & reports.
UNIT III
9
RDBMS- data processing – the database technology – data models - ER
modeling concept –notations – Extended ER features - Logical database
design - normalization - SQL – DDL statements – DML statements –
DCL statements - Writing Simple queries – SQL Tuning techniques –
Embedded SQL - OLTP
UNIT IV
9
Objected oriented concepts – object oriented programming - UML Class
Diagrams– relationship – Inheritance – Abstract classes – polymorphism
- Object Oriented Design methodology - Common Base class - Alice
Tool – Application of OOC using Alice tool.
UNIT V
9
Client server computing - Internetworking – Computer Networks –
Working with TCP/IP – IP address – Sub netting – DNS – VPN – proxy
servers - World Wide Web – Components of web application - browsers
and Web Servers - URL – HTML – HTTP protocol – Web Applications Application servers – Web Security.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, PHI,
3rd ed., 1991
2. Silberschatz and Galvin, Operating System Concepts, 4th ed.,
Addision-Wesley, 1995
3. Dromey R.G., How to solve it by Computers, PHI, 1994
241
4. Kernighan, Ritchie, ANSI C language PHI,1992
5. Wilbert O. Galitz, Essential Guide to User Interface Design, John
Wiley, 1997
6. Alex Berson, Client server Architecture, Mc Grew Hill International,
1994
7. Rojer Pressman, Software Engineering-A Practitioners approach,
McGraw Hill, 5th ed., 2001
8. Alfred V Aho, John E Hopcroft, Jeffrey D Ullman, Design and
Analysis of Computer Algorithms, Addison Wesley Publishing Co.,
1998
9. Henry F Korth, Abraham Silberschatz, Database System Concept,
2nd ed. McGraw-Hill International editions, 1991
10. Brad J Cox, Andrew J.Novobilski, Object – Oriented Programming
– An evolutionary approach, Addison – Wesley, 1991
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY BIO-TECH DEPARTMENT
SL. COURSE
NO.
CODE
THEORY
1.
15MBA01
COURSE TITLE
L
T
P
C
Foundations of Computational and
systems Biology
3
0
0
3
2. 15MBA02
3. 15MBA03
Biohazardous waste management
3
0
0
3
Biotechnology and Environment
3
0
0
3
4. 15MBA04
5.
15MBA05
Basic Biological Sciences
3
0
0
3
Principles of Fermentation
Technology
3
0
0
3
6.
15MBA06
Advanced Nanobiotechnology
3
0
0
3
15MBA07
Nanoparticles micro organisms Bio
nano composites
3
0
0
3
8.
15MBA08
Molecular Electronics
3
0
0
3
9.
15MBA09
Biomolecular Machines
3
0
0
3
Biophotonics
3
0
0
3
7.
10. 15MBA10
242
FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTATIONAL AND
15MBA01
SYSTEMS BIOLOGY
L T P C
3 0
0
3
Course Objectives:
 To know the basic concepts of molecular biology
 To know about the biochemical reactions
 To understand the application of system biology tools
Course Outcomes:
 Able to understand the basic concepts in molecular biology
 Able to understand the biochemical reactions
 Able to understand the fundamentals system biology and
applications
 Able to use system biology tools
UNIT I
ESSENTIALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
9
Genes, Transcription, Translation, Proteins, Regulation of Gene
Expression; Interaction of DNA and Protein, Protein-Protein Interaction,
Signal Transduction.
UNIT II
BIOCHEMICAL REACTIONS
9
Characterization of Enzymes; Enzymatic Reaction; Kinetics; Metabolism,
Metabolic Control Analysis, Metabolic Databases and Simulation;
Biomacromolecule – Ligand Interactions, Receptor Biochemistry and
Signal Transduction, Fitting of Binding Data
UNIT III
FUNDAMENTALS OF SYSTEMS BIOLOGY
9
Systems Biology, Fundamental Concepts, Networks, Regulation, Kinetics,
Switches, Feed-back and Feed-Forward Loop, Model Analysis:
Robustness, Perturbations; Modeling of Processes: Transport, Diffusion.
UNIT IV
SYSTEMS BIOLOGY TOOLS
243
9
Introduction, Matrices, Differential Equations, Writing SciLab functions;
Open Source Tools (R and SciLab) for Systems Biology, Systems Biology
Toolbox; Systems biology markup language, SBMLTools; Cell Designer
UNIT V
APPLICATIONS IN SYSTEMS BIOLOGY
9
A minimalistic model for the cell cycle (Goldbeter); Bistable switch:
repressilator (Elowitz); EGF-pathway simulation; Computational Design of
Optimal Dynamic Experiments in Systems Biology: a Case Study in Cell
Signalling; Dynamic Model for the Optimization of L(-)-Carnitine
Production by Escherichia coli.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Berg, J M, Tymoczko, J L, Gregory G J., Stryer, L B. “Biochemistry”,
Freeman Macmillan Publishers, 8th Edition, 2015.
2. Manuel C., Jose L.I., Arturo M., “Understanding and Exploiting
Systems Biology
in Biomedicine and Bioprocesses”, Symposium
organizing committee, 1st Edition, 2006.
3. Stan C.T., “An Introduction to Computational Biochemistry” Wiley, 1st
edition, 2002
4. Brian P. Ingalls., “Mathematical Modeling in Systems Biology: An
Introduction” MIT Press, 2013
REFERENCE PAPERS
1. Goldbeter, A. (1991). “A minimal cascade model for the mitotic
oscillator involving cyclin and cdc2 kinase”,Vol. 88(20), 9107–9111,
PNAS,1991
2. Elowitz, M. B., & Leibler, S., “A synthetic oscillatory network of
transcriptional regulators”, Vol. 403(6767), Nature, 2000.
244
15MBA02
BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:
 To know the characteristics and risks of biohazardous waste.
 To understand the laws and regulatory policies of health care
waste.
 To know the techniques of biohazardous waste management.
Course Outcomes:
 Able to understand the characteristics and risks of biohazardous
waste.
 Able to understand the laws and regulatory policies of health care
waste.

Able to understand the techniques of biohazardous waste
management.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
8
Hazardous waste- Classifications of hazardous waste and its sources Effects on public health and environment
UNIT II
BIO HAZARDOUS WASTE
10
Biomedical and healthcare wastes - Sources - Bio hazardous waste
classification - Risks associated with bio hazardous waste - Need for
control
UNIT III
LEGISLATIVE, REGULATORY AND POLICY
ASPECTS OF HEALTH-CARE WASTE
10
National policies and its five guiding principles - Available guidance:
World health organization (WHO), The International Solid Waste
Association (ISWA) and its policy document
UNIT IV
BIO HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT
AND DISPOSAL
9
Segregation, storage and transport of healthcare waste - Treatment and
disposal method - Health and safety practices for health-care personnel
and waste workers
245
UNIT V
MANAGEMENT OF BIO HAZARDOUS
WASTES
8
Healthcare waste-management planning - Infectious waste management
plans - Healthcare waste minimization, reuse and recycling.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Cheremisinoff, N. p., Cheremisinoff P. N., “Hazardous Materials and
Waste Management: A Guide for the Professional Hazards
Manager”, Noyes Publications, 1995.
2. Blackman W. C., “Basic Hazardous Waste Management”, CRC
Press, 3rd Edition, 2001.
3. Henry J. G., Heinke G. W., “Environmental Science and
Engineering”, Pretice Hall of India, 2nd Edition, 2004.
4. “Safe Management of Wastes from Health-Care Activities”, WHO,
2nd Edition, 2014.
5. “Biomedical waste (Management and Handling) Rules”, Ministry of
Environment & Forests, 1998.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. http://biosafety.utk.edu/waste.
15MBA03
BIOTECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT
LTPC
3003
Course Objectives:
 To know about the applications of biotechnology in environmental
problems
Course Outcomes:
 Able to understand the environmental problems
 Able to understand the principles of biosensing, bioremediation
246

and phytoremediation
Able to understand the role of biotechnology in controlling pollution
UNIT I
8
ENVIRONMENT
Environment - basic concepts and issues- An overview of atmosphere:
hydrosphere, lithosphere and anthrosphere - biogeochemical cycling in
ecological systems - Concept of ecosystems and ecosystem
management - global environmental problems - ozone depletion greenhouse effect and acid rain due to anthropogenic activities
UNIT II
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION AND
BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING
10
Environmental pollution - types of pollution - sources of pollution bioconcentration - bio/geomagnification - biosensors for heavy metal
monitoring, nitrogen compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),
phenolic compounds and biological oxygen demand (BOD) biosensors
UNIT III
BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF WASTE
WATER AND BIODEGRADABLE WASTES
10
Role of microphyte and macrophytes in water treatment - Recent
approaches to biological waste water treatment - composting process and
techniques, use of composted materials.
UNIT IV
BIOSENSING, BIO AND
PHYTOREMEDIATION
9
Role of microphyte and macrophytes in water treatment - Recent
approaches to biological waste water treatment - composting process and
techniques, use of composted materials.
UNIT V
ROLE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN
CONTROLLING POLLUTION
8
Biopesticides - biomining – biofuels - biofuels - plant derived fuels 247
biogas - landfill gas - bioethanol - biohydrogen - role of immobilized
cells/enzymes in treatment of toxic compounds - biotechniques for air
pollution abatement and odour control - GEMs in environment.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Rittmann, B.E., and McCarty, P.L., “Environmental Biotechnology:
Principles and Applications”, McGraw Hill, 2nd Edition, 2000.
2. Jordening H. J., Josef Winter, J. “Environmental Biotechnology:
Concepts and Applications” Weinheim: Wiley-VCH, 1st Edition, 2nd
reprint 2006.
3. Baaker, K. H., Herson D.S., “Bioremidation”, Mc.GrawHill IncNewYork , 1st Edition, 1994.
4. Ahmed, N., Qureshi, F. M., Khan, O. Y., “Industrial and
Environmental Biotechnology”, Garland Science/Ane Book, 1st
Edition, 2001.
5. Metcalf, Eddy, “Wastewater Engineering, Treatment- Disposal and
Reuse”, Tata McGraw Hill - New Delhi, 3rd Edition, 1991.
6. Cunninghum, W. P., Saigo, B. W., “Environmental Science”, Mc
Graw Hill, 5th Edition, 1999.
7. Scragg, A., “Environmental Biotechnology”, OUP Oxford , 2nd
Edition, 2005.
8. Cheremisinoff. P. N., “Biotechnology for Wastewater Treatment”,
Prentice Hall of India. 2001.
9. Gray. N. F., “Biology of wastewater Treatment”, Mc Graw Hill, 2nd
Edition, 2004.
15MBA04
BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
L T
P
C
3
0
3
0
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the various organelles of the cell and their function.
 To learn the basic cellular processes like replication, transcription
and translation.
 To understand the importance of amino acids and proteins.
248
 To understand the structure and significance of carbohydrates and
lipids.
 To develop a knowledge about the cells energy production
pathways.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Able to differentiate cellular components.
 Understand how the central dogma of life works out.
 Describe the structure and function of various biomolecules.
 Able to understand the importance of biomolecules and their role in
various cellular metabolic activities.
 Able to understand the energetics of the cell.
UNIT I
CELL BIOLOGY
9
Introduction to Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic cells, Organelles: Structure,
functions, Principle of membrane organization: composition, models,
cytoskeletal proteins: Microfilaments, Microtubules, Intermediate filaments,
Cell division: Mitosis, Meiosis, Cell cycle checkpoints and control.
UNIT II
NUCLEIC ACIDS
12
Introduction to DNA structure: Composition - nucleotide structures, double
helix, genome structure and organization of Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes,
Central dogma of life, DNA is the genetic material: Griffith, avery and
hershey experiments, DNA replication: Semi-conservative mode of
replication,
experiment,
enzymology,
inhibitors,
Transcription:
Enzymology, Transcription factors, inhibitors, Translation: genetic code,
enzymology, translational factors and inhibitors.
UNIT III AMINO ACIDS AND PROTEINS
9
Amino acids: Introduction, structure, classification, physical, chemical and
optical properties, peptide bond, Proteins: Structure - Primary, secondary,
super secondary, Tertiary and quaternary structures, Covalent and noncovalent interactions in protein structure, Classification, Enzymes249
Introduction to structure, properties.
UNIT IV
CARBOHYDRATES AND LIPIDS
9
Structure, Nomenclature, Function and classification of carbohydrates,
mono, di and polysaccharides and Lipids- saturated and unsaturated fatty
acids.
UNIT V
METABOLISM AND ENERGY PRODUCTION
6
Energetics of Glycolysis, Kreb cycle, Electron transport chain, Pentose
phosphate pathway, β-oxidation of fatty acids.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. R. Cantor & P.R.Samuel, “Biophysical Chemistry”, W.H., Freeman &
Co., 1985.
2. Watson, James, T.Baker, S.Bell, A.Gann, M.Levine, & R.Losick.
“Molecular Biology of the Gene”, San Francisco: Addison-Wesley,
5th Edition, 2000.
3. Alberts, Bruce, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith
Roberts & Peter Walter, “Molecular Biology of the Cell”, New York:
Garland Science, 4th Edition. 2002.
4. Branden, Carl-Ivar & John Tooze “Introduction to Protein Structure”
New York, Garland Pub., 2nd Edition, 1991.
5. Creighton & E, Thomas, “Proteins: Structures and Molecular
Properties”, New York: W.H. Freeman, 2nd Edition. 1992.
6. B.Lewin, “Genes IX”, Sudbury: Jones & Bartlett, International
Edition. 2007.
250
15MBA05
PRINCIPLES OF FERMENTATION
TECHNOLOGY
L T
P
C
3 0
0
3
Course Objectives:
 To know the fundamentals of fermentation
 To know about the aeration and agitation system of bioreactor
 To understand the downstream processing of biological products
Course Outcomes:
 Able to understand the fermentation and their mode of operation
 Able to know about the microbial growth kinetics
 Able to know about the downstream processing operation
UNIT I
OVERVIEW OF FERMENTATION PROCESS
9
Introduction: historical review with reference to fermentation
technology. Fermentation equipment: batch, fed batch and
continuous systems; bioreactor design, development and scale up;
instrumentation for monitoring and controlling - inline and online
controls in bioreactors. Sterilization techniques: media sterilizationkinetics of batch and continuous systems; sterilization of air.
UNIT II
AERATION AND AGITATION
9
Aeration and agitation system for bioreactors and their designs;
oxygen requirement of Industrial fermentation; rheology;
determination and factors affecting KLa in bioreactors; concept of
aeration in shake flasks, roller tubes, static and submerged cultures;
factors affecting oxygen transfer rate in shake flasks.
UNIT III
MICROBIAL GROWTH
9
Microbial growth kinetics: batch, fed-batch and continuous systems
and their application. Raw materials: preparation of conventional and
non-conventional substrates for microbial & food fermentation;
251
chemicals and biological control of raw materials, storage transport
and homogenization.
UNIT IV
TYPES OF FERMENTATION AND
INOCULUM DEVELOPMENT
9
Techniques for the development of inocula for industrial
fermentation/procedures of aseptic inoculation of industrial
fermenters. Fermentation- submerged fermentation, surface
fermentation and solid substrate fermentation; factors affecting
fermentation.
UNIT V
DOWNSTREAM PROCESSING OF
PRODUCTS
9
Isolation-physical, chemical, enzymatic and mechanical techniques
for cell separation and cell disruption. Purification: chromatographic,
electrophoresis, distillation, membrane separation, evaporation,
drying and crystallization techniques.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Shuler, M.L., Kargi F., “Bioprocess Engineering “, Prentice Hall,
2nd Edition, 2002.
2. Pauline D., “Bioprocess Engineering Principles “. Elsevier, 2nd
Edition, 2012.
3. Stanbury, P.F., Stephen J.H., Whitaker A., “Principles of
Fermentation Technology”, Science & Technology Books, 2nd
Edition, 2009.
4. Rehm H J., Reed G ., “Biotechnology: Bioprocessing”, Vol. 3,
Wiley VCH, 2nd Edition,2008
252
15MBA06
ADVANCED NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY
L T P
C
3 0 0
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To gain knowledge about natural nanocomposites for agricultural
applications.
 To learn the principles of bio delivery systems.
 To gain knowledge about design strategies of protein and DNA
nanostructures.
 To learn the basics of nano bioelectronics.
 To understand applications of nanoparticles in therapeutic and
diagnostic applications.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Able to differentiate synthetic and natural nanocomposites and its
applications.
 Capable of synthesizing thermo responsive delivery systems.
 Ability to fabricate biomimetic nanostructures.
 Understand the bio recognition techniques of nanoparticles.
 Able to understand the role of nanoparticles in cancer therapy.
UNIT I
NATURAL NANOCOMPOSITES
9
Natural nano composite materials – biomineralisation – biologically
synthesized nano structures – metals, ceramic and silica deposition
vesicles –nanotechnology in agriculture - fertilizers and pesticides.
SMART NANO PARTICULATE
9
SYSTEMS
Thermo responsive delivery systems - pH responsive delivery systems external stimuli based delivery systems (magnetic, photosensitive and
ultra sound sensitive delivery systems) – stealth nanoparticles - multi
targeting systems.
UNIT II
253
UNIT III
PROTEIN AND DNA BASED
NANOSTRUCTURES
9
S-Layer proteins, biotemplating – engineered nano pores – protein
based nanostructure formation – nanoparticle, biomaterial hybrid
systems – De novo designed Structures – biomolecular motors – DNAprotein nanostructures - biomimetic fabrication of DNA based metallic
nanowires - conjugates and networks.
UNIT IV
NANO BIOELECTRONICS
9
DNA based nano mechanical devices – biology inspired concepts – DNA
as a biomolecular template - DNA branching for network formation –
bioelectronics – nanoparticle enzyme hybrids – biorecognition events of
nanoparticles – DNA analyzer as biochip – biomimetic ferritins.
UNIT V
THERAPEUTIC AND DIAGNOSTIC
APPLICATIONS OF NANOPARTICLES
9
Gene therapy using nanoparticles – nanofluids (aqueous dispersed
applications of nanoparticles) – nanoparticles in bioanalytical techniques
(quantum dots, SPR based and peptide based sensors) – advances in
cancer therapy.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Niemeyer C.M, & Mirkin C.A, “Nano biotechnology: Concepts,
applications, and perspectives”, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, 1st
Edition, 2004.
2. Robert A. F. Jr., “Nano medicine: Basic capabilities” Vol.1, Landes
Biosciences, 1st Edition, 2003.
3. Shoseyov, O. & Levy, I, “Nano biotechnology: bioinspired devices
and materials of the future”, Humana Press Inc., 1st Edition, 2008.
254
15MBA07 NANOPARTICLES AND MICRO ORGANISMS
BIO NANO COMPOSITES
L T
P
C
3 0
0
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the biosynthesis of nano materials and its toxicity.
 To learn about the biomimetic synthesis of nanocomposite materials.
 To learn the basic concepts of bioelectronic devices.
 To cultivate the idea about novel drug delivery routes.
 To know the concept of tissue engineering for biomedical applications.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Able to synthesis nanoparticles through microorganisms.
 Ability to develop synthetic nanocomposites by biomimetic route.
 Capable of designing
bioelectronic systems.
nanoparticle-enzyme
hybrids
based
 Able to target diseases using nano mediated drug delivery systems.
 Understand the fundamentals of tissue engineering.
UNIT I
MICROORGANISMS FOR SYNTHESIS OF
NANO MATERIALS
8
Natural and artificial synthesis of nanoparticles in microorganisms - use of
microorganisms for nanostructure formation - testing of environmental toxic
effect of nanoparticles using microorganisms.
UNIT II
NANOCOMPOSITE BIOMATERIALS
9
Natural nanocomposite systems as spider silk, bones, shells - organicinorganic nanocomposite formation through self-assembly - biomimetic
synthesis of nanocomposite material - use of synthetic nanocomposites for
bone, teeth replacement.
255
UNIT III
NANO BIO SYSTEMS
10
Nanoparticle - biomaterial hybrid systems for bioelectronic devices bioelectronic systems based on nanoparticle-enzyme hybrids - nanoparticle
based bioelectronic biorecognition events - biomaterial based metallic
nanowires - networks and circuitry - DNA as functional template for nano
circuitry. Protein based nano circuitry; Neurons for network formation - DNA
nanostructures for mechanics and computing and DNA based computation DNA based nano mechanical devices - biosensor and biochips.
UNIT IV
NANOPARTICLES AND NANO DEVICES
9
Targeted, non-targeted delivery - controlled drug release - exploiting novel
delivery routes using nanoparticles - gene therapy using nanoparticles nanostructures for use as antibiotics - diseased tissue destruction using
nanoparticles.
UNIT V
TISSUE ENGINEERING
9
Major physiologic systems of current interest to biomedical engineers –
cardiovascular – endocrine – nervous – visual – auditory - gastrointestinal
and respiratory - useful definitions - The status of tissue engineering of
specific organs - including bone marrow - skeletal muscle and cartilage cell biological fundamentals of tissue engineering.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. David S. Goodsell, “Bionanotechnology: Lessons from Nature,
Wiley, 1st Edition, 2004.
2. Robert A. Freitas, “Nano medicine, Vol. IIA: Biocompatibility”,
maimai_bn, 1st Edition, 2003.
3. Hari Singh Nalwa, “Handbook of nanostructured biomaterials and
256
their applications in nanobiotechnology”, Book News, Inc., 1st
Edition, 2005.
4. C.M.Niemeyer & C.A. Mirkin, “Nanobiotechnology”, Wiley, 1st Edition,
2006.
5. Ajayan, Schadler & Braun, “Nanocomposite science & technology”,
Wiley, 1st Edition, 2003.
15MBA08
MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS
L T
P
C
3 0
0
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the basic concepts of organic molecules for molecular
electronics applications.
 To acquire knowledge about unimolecular devices.
 To gain knowledge about the computer architecture of molecular
electronic devices.
 To understand the fabrication technologies of molecular electronic
devices.
 To gain knowledge about hybrid nano materials for biomolecular
optoelectronic device.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Gain knowledge about material properties used in molecular
electronics.
 Able to design advanced unimolecular electronic devices.
 Capable of interpreting the computing architectures of molecular
electronic devices.
 Able to fabricate optoelectronic and thin film transistors.
 Able to process hybrid structures for biomolecular optoelectronic
devices.
257
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Controlling surfaces and interfaces of semi-conductor sensing organic
molecules - types of molecule - manipulation experiments - measurements
in molecular electronics - soft and hard electronics - electronic structure of
absorbed organic molecule.
UNIT II
UNIMOLECULAR ELECTRONICS
9
Organic semiconductor for new electronic device - photo voltaic cells Schotkey diodes FET digital processing and communication with molecular
switches.
UNIT III
MOLECULAR
ELECTRONIC
ARCHITECTURES
COMPUTING
9
Molecular electronics overview – rectifiers - molecular wires – molecular
switches – data storage - photo switches - molecular magnets.
UNIT IV
MOLECULAR ELECTRONIC DEVICES
9
Molecular engineering of doped polymer for optoelectronics - fabrication for
molecular electronics organic FETs – organic thin film transistors.
UNIT V
BIO
MOLECULAR
PROCESSING
ELECTRONICS
AND
9
Bio electronics – molecular and biocomputing – prototypes for molecular
functional limits and actuators – molecular assembly – characterization of
hybrid nano materials - biomolecular optoelectronic device.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
258
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. G. Cumbertl & G. Fagas, “Introducing molecular electronics”,
Springer, 1st Edition, 2005.
2. S.C. Levshevski, “Nano and molecular electronics handbook”, CRC
Press, 1st Edition 2007.
3. Karl Goser & Jan Dienstuhl, “Nano electronics & nano systems:
Fromtransistor to molecular & quantum devices”, Springer, 1st Edition
2004.
15MBA09
BIO MOLECULAR MACHINES
L
T
P
C
3
0
0
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand about fundamentals of molecular scale machines.
 To gain knowledge about bio molecular machines.
 To learn about molecular nano reactors.
 To learn the basics of logic gate memories.
 To understand the basic concepts of nano scale devices.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Learn the types of molecular machines & switches.
 Gain knowledge about bio molecular machines.
 Ability to design molecular nano reactors.
 Know about logic gate memories.
 Understand the fabrication of nano scale devices.
259
UNIT I
MOLECULAR SCALE-MACHINE
9
Characterization of molecular machine - energy supply - chemical fuelsmolecular shuttle - electrochemical energy - molecular machines powered
by light energy: molecular switching - chemical switching and
electrochemical switching.
UNIT II
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF MOTOR DESIGN
9
Biomolecular machines: transcription, translation and replication processes
at single molecule level – initiation and force control of biological processes
- force generation and real-time dynamics – active transport by biological
motors – mechanism, dynamics and energetic of kinesin, myosin, dyneins
and ATP synthesis.
UNIT III NANO REACTORS
9
Self-assembled nano reactors - molecular nano reactors - covalent system
- nano covalent system - macro molecular nanoreactions micelles and
polymers – biomacro molecular nanoreactions - protein cages-viruses - rod
shaped and cage structured.
UNIT IV MEMORIES, LOGIC GATES AND RELATED
SYSTEMS
9
Memories logic gates – multistate – multifunctional systems.
UNIT V
NANO SCALE DEVICES
9
Fabrication and patterning of nano scale device.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
260
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. V. Balazani, “Molecular devices and machines: A Journey into the
nanoworld”, Wiley – VCH, 1st Edition, 2003.
2. M. Schilva, “Molecular motors”, Wiley - VCH. 1st Edition, 2005.
13MBA10
BIOPHOTONICS
L
T
P
C
3
0
0
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the interaction of light with biological systems.
 To learn the principles of various imaging techniques.
 To gain knowledge about single molecule spectroscopy.
 To learn the basics of optical trapping technologies.
 To understand basic bio detection techniques.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Learn the effects of light with body organelles.
 Capable of operating imaging tools.
 Ability to differentiate various spectroscopy techniques.
 Understand the optical confinement phenomena for trapping
applications.
 Able to detect cellular and molecular tags.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Interaction of light with cells, tissues - non-linear optical processes with
intense laser beams - photo-induced effects in biological systems.
261
UNIT II
IMAGING TECHNIQUES
9
Light microscopy – wide field - laser scanning – confocal – multi photon fluorescence lifetime imaging - FRET imaging – frequency domain lifetime
imaging - cellular imaging - imaging of soft and hard tissues and other
biological structures.
UNIT III
SINGLE MOLECULE SPECTROSCOPY
9
UV-Vis. spectroscopy of biological systems - single molecule spectra and
characteristics – IR and raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced raman
spectroscopy for single molecule applications.
UNIT IV ANALYTICAL BIOTECHNOLOGY
9
Optical force spectroscopy: generation optical forces – optical trapping and
manipulation of single molecules and cells in optical confinement - laser
trapping and dissection for biological systems - single molecule biophysics.
UNIT V
DETECTION TECHNIQUES
9
Biosensors - fluorescence immunoassay - flow cytometry - fluorescence
correlation spectroscopy - fluorophores as cellular and molecular tags
.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Michael P. Sheetz (Ed.), “Laser tweezers in cell biology and methods
in cell biology”, Vol.55, Academic Press, 1997.
2. P.N. Prasad, “Introduction to biophotonics”, John-Wiley, 2003.
3. G. Marriot & I. Parker, “Methods in enzymology”, Vol.360, 361,
Academic Press, 2003.
262
ALLIED ELECTIVES OFFERED BY MBA DEPARTMENT
SL. COURSE
COURSE TITLE
NO.
CODE
1. 15BAA01 Essentials of Finance
2. 15BAA02 Essentials of Marketing
3. 15BAA03 Essentials of Human Resources
Management
15BAA01
ESSENTIALS OF FINANCE
(Allied Elective)
L
T
P
C
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
L T P
3 0 0
C
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To develop an understanding of business related finance.
 To have an understanding of finance in order to contribute to the
organization’s success.
 To improve the financial skills in order to make critical business
decisions involving budgets, cost savings and growth strategies.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:
 understand financial terms
 interpret financial statements
 make decision on budgeting and investment
 communicate with financial experts
UNIT I
Introduction to Finance
9
Role for Finance for Individual and Organization – Goals and Functions of
Finance - Time Value of Money – Significance
UNIT II
Financial Planning and Decisions
9
Financial Planning – Decisions – Investment Decision – Financing
Decision - Dividend Decision - Evaluation of Investment Projects and
Financing – Working Capital
263
UNIT III
Funds Management
9
Funds Mobilization – Sources – Internal and external
UNIT IV
Financial Statements
9
Financial Statements - Balance Sheet – PL account - Cash/Fund Flow Analysis
UNIT V
Overview of Indian Financial Markets
9
Financial System – Bank and Financial Institutions – Capital Market Money Market
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXTBOOKS:
1. I. M. Pandey, “Financial Management”, (10th ed.), Vikas Publishing
House Pvt. Ltd., 2013.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Prasanna Chandra, “Financial Management”, (7th ed.), Tata
McGraw Hill, 2008.
2. Khan M Y and Jain P K, “Financial Management”, (6th ed.), McGraw
Hill, 2013.
ESSENTIALS OF MARKETING
(Allied Elective)
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
15BAA02
L T P C
3 0 0 3
 To understand the basics of Marketing Management as a
functional area of an organisation.
 To understand the basic elements that makes up the marketing
function.
 To understanding the functions of a marketing department.
 To understand the importance of marketing to an organisation.
264
COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of this course students will be able to:
 Describe a Marketing Department and the functions of a marketing
department.
 Choose and understand the needs of the customers.
 Combine the four Ps of marketing to design a marketing model
 Have a basic ideas on how a market segmented and customers
are targeted.
 Have a basic understanding on the elements of the marketing mix
UNIT I
Understanding Marketing Management –
an overview
9
Introduction, Marketing department functions, Selling vs Marketing,
Marketing concepts (Marketers and Prospects, Needs, Wants, and
Demands, Value and Satisfaction), Basics of Market segmentation,
Target markets and Positioning.
UNIT II
The Marketing mix element – Product
9
Introduction, Characteristics of the product life cycle and their marketing
implications, Facets of the PLC, New product development, The market
diffusion process, Organizing for new product development
UNIT III
The Marketing mix element – Price
9
Introduction, Price and the marketing mix, Pricing objectives, Factors
affecting pricing decisions, Setting a price, Pricing industrial goods,
Pricing and information technology
UNIT IV
The Marketing mix element – Promotion
9
Communications contact techniques (Promotion mix) - Advertising, Direct
marketing, Sales promotion, Personal selling, Sponsorship, Publicity
UNIT V
The Marketing mix element – Place:
channels of distribution
9
Introduction, Intermediaries in channels of distribution - Sales agents,
Distributors, Wholesalers, Retailers, Franchising, Internet marketing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
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TEXTBOOKS:
1. Marilyn A. Stone, John Desmond, “Fundamentals of Marketing”
(Special Indian Edition), Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2014.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
William J. Stanton, Michael J. Etzel, Bruce J.
“Fundamentals of Marketing”, (10th ed.), TMH, 1994.
Walter,
2. Philip Kotler, “Marketing Management: A South Asian Perspective”,
(14th ed.), Pearson India, 2012.
15BAA03
ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT (Allied Elective)
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To make the participant understand the role of HR Department in
an organization
 To know the various functional areas of HRM
 To understand the recent developments in HR
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Students will understand the basic concepts in HRM
 Students will be aware of human resource requirement for an
organization
 Students will be aware of the ways for developing the skills and
knowledge of the employees
 Students will be able to understand the motivation model in an
organization
 Students will be aware of present development in HR
UNIT I
Introduction
9
Introduction to HRM – Meaning, Importance and Objectives, History of
Managing Human Resources, Environment of HR. Functions and Roles
of HR Manager
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UNIT II
Procurement of Human Resources
9
Job Analysis – Meaning, Process and Methods, Human Resource
Planning – Importance, Process, HR Demand and Supply Forecasting
Techniques. Recruitment – Importance, Recruitment Sources, Selection
– Process Socialization / Induction – Importance and Types
UNIT III
Development / Training
9
Training – Purpose, Process – Need Identification, On-the-Job Methods
and Off-the-Job Methods. Executive Development Programmes –
Difference from training. Performance Appraisal – Process, Techniques
– MBO and 360 Degree Feedback. Job Changes - Promotion, Demotion
and Transfer
UNIT IV
Compensation and Motivation
9
Job Evaluation – Meaning, Process, Compensation Plan – Deciding
factors & Framing Process. Human Needs – Motivation Theories –
Maslow’s Need theory and Herzberg’s two factor theory, Applications –
Rewards and Reinforcement. Grievances – Causes and Redressal
methods. Disciplinary Action – Nature and Types
UNIT V
Maintenance and Separation
9
The Factories Act, 1948 – Health, Safety and Welfare Provisions. The
Industrial Employment (Standing Orders) Act, 1946 – Framing Standing
Order. Separation – Retirement, Layoff, Out-placement & Discharge.
Latest trends in HRM - HRIS – Meaning and Implementation Process. EHRM.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Arun Monappa, “Managing Human Resources”, (1st ed.), Trinity
Press Publications, 2014.
2. Dessler, “Human Resource Management”, (12th ed.), Pearson
Education Limited, 2011.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Aswathappa K., “Human Resource Management”, (7th ed.), 2013,
Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
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2. Decenzo and Robbins, “Human Resource Management”, (10th
ed.), Wiley, 2010.
3. Mamoria C.B & Mamoria S., “Personnel Management”, Himalaya
Publishing Co., 2010.
4. Eugence Mckenna & Nic Beach, “Human Resource Mgmt”, (2nd
ed.), Pearson Education Ltd, 2008.
5. Wayne Cascio, “Managing Human Resource”, (9th ed.), Tata
McGraw Hill, 2012.
6. Ivancevich, “Human Resource Management”, (12th ed.), Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2012.
15CAV01
WEB DESIGNING
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To define the basics in web design.
 To visualize the basic concept of HTML.
 To introduce basics concept of CSS.
 To write PHP oriented applications.
 To develop applications using JOOMLA Framework.
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Understand the principles of web page design.
 Design web pages using HTML and CSS
 Develop PHP oriented applications
 Develop applications using JOOMLA framework
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO WWW
9
Internet Standards – Introduction to WWW – WWW Architecture –
SMTP – POP3 – File Transfer Protocol - Overview of HTTP, HTTP
request – response –– Generation of dynamic web pages.
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UNIT II
UI DESIGN
9
Markup Language (HTML): Introduction to HTML and HTML5 Formatting and Fonts –Commenting Code – Anchors – Backgrounds –
Images – Hyperlinks – Lists – Tables – Frames – HTML Forms.
UNIT III
Cascading Style Sheet (CSS)
9
The need for CSS, Introduction to CSS – Basic syntax and structure Inline Styles – Embedding Style Sheets - Linking External Style Sheets
– Backgrounds – Manipulating text - Margins and Padding - Positioning
using CSS.
UNIT IV
PHP
9
Introduction - How web works - Setting up the environment (LAMP
server) - Programming basics - Print/echo - Variables and constants –
Strings and Arrays – Operators, Control structures and looping
structures – Functions – Reading Data in Web Pages - Embedding
PHP within HTML – Establishing connectivity with MySQL database.
UNIT V
JOOMLA Framework
9
Definition – CMS- Services-Development package –Template packages
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Harvey & Paul Deitel & Associates, Harvey Deitel and Abbey Deitel,
“Internet and World Wide Web - How To Program”, Pearson
Education, Fifth Edition, 2011.
2. Achyut S Godbole and Atul Kahate, “Web Technologies”, Tata
McGraw Hill, Second Edition, 2012.
3. Steven Holzner, “The Complete Reference - PHP”, Tata McGraw Hill,
2008.
4. Mike Mcgrath, “PHP & MySQL in Easy Steps”, Tata McGraw Hill,
2012.
5. http://php.net/manual/
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15CAV02
SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the need for software documentation
 To know about documentation planning
 To study about document testing and
 To know about documentation layout and guidelines to be followed
COURSE OUTCOMES:
 Understand the basic concepts, techniques and applications of
software documentation.
 Learn how to prepare the documentation.
 Understand various steps involved in document preparation.
 Learn about various layouts for documentation
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Need for Software Documentation - Understanding task orientation Analysing users - Writing user scenarios - User informational needs Document goals - User work motivations .
UNIT II
DOCUMENTATION PLANNING
9
Planning and writing documents - Task list and Schedule - Guidelines Documentation process - Documentation plan - Document review form
- Review plan - Schedule – Checklist.
UNIT III
DOCUMENTATION TESTING
9
Usability tests - Advantages of field testing - Editing and fine tuning Problems - Designing for task orientation - Page showing elements of
document design - Screen showing elements for online help design Solutions to the design problem for printed and online documentation.
UNIT IV
DOCUMENTATION LAYOUTS
9
Laying out pages and screens - Elements of page and screen design Designing type - Effective writing style - Using graphical that support
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decision making.
UNIT V
DOCUMENTATION GUIDELINES
9
Writing to guide - Procedures - Guidelines - Writing to support Reference - Structural - reference entry - Checklist - Designing index User oriented index - Case studies.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Thomas T. Barker, "Writing S/W Documentation - a Task Oriented
Approach", Allyn & Bacon Series of Technical Communication, 1998.
2. Dan Jones, Sam Dragga, “Technical Writing Style", Pearson
Education, 1997.
15CAV03
APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT FOR
ANDROID DEVICES
L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
 Build your own Android apps
 Explain the differences between Android and other mobile
development environments
 Understand how Android applications work, their life cycle,
manifest, Intents, and using external resources
 Design and develop useful Android applications with compelling
user interfaces by using, extending, and creating your own layouts
and Views and using Menus.
 Take advantage of Android's APIs for data storage, retrieval, user
preferences, files, databases, and content providers
 Tap into location-based services, geocoder, compass sensors, and
create rich map-based applications
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this Subject, the student shall be able to:
 Understand the basic technologies used by the Android platform.
Recognize the structure of an Android app project. Be able to use
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the tools for Android app development.
 Become familiar with creating graphical elements, handling
different screen resolutions, and how graphical elements in an
Android app are displayed.
 Create graphical user interfaces along with functionality for Android
apps.
 Create various graphical assets for Android apps and create
animations and transitions.
 Learn how the Android platform uses Intents. Write code to deal
with Content Providers.
 Gain experience in location-based apps, including GPS sensors,
and Maps API
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction to Android Architecture: Introduction, History, Features and
Android Architecture. Android Application Environment, SDK, Tools:
Application Environment and Tools, Android SDK. Programming
paradigms and Application Components - Part 1: Application
Components, Activity, Manifest File, Programming paradigms and
Application Components Part 2: Intents, Content providers, Broadcast
receivers, Services.
UNIT II
User Interface Design
9
User Interface Design part 1: Views &View Groups, Views : Button, Text
Field, Radio Button, Toggle Button, Checkbox, Spinner, Image View,
Image switcher, Event Handling, Listeners, Layouts : Linear,Relative,
List View, Grid View, Table View, Web View, Adapters. User Interface
Design part 2: Menus, Action Bars, Notifications : Status, Toasts and
Dialogs, Styles and Themes, Creating Custom` Widgets, Focus, Touch
Mode, Screen Orientation.
UNIT III
Resources, Assets, Localization
9
Resources, Assets, Localization: Resources and Assets, Creating
Resources, Managing application resources and assets, ResourceSwitching in Android. Localization, Localization Strategies, Testing
Localized Applications, Publishing Localized Applications.
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UNIT IV
Data Storage
9
Content Providers: Contents provider, Uri, CRUD access, Browser,
CallLog, Contacts, Media Store, and Setting. Data Access and Storage:
Shared Preferences, Storage External, Network Connection. SQLite SQLite Databases.
UNIT V
Native Capabilities
9
Camera, Audio, Sensors and Bluetooth: Android Media API: Playing
audio/video, Media recording. Sensors - how sensors work, listening to
sensor readings. Bluetooth. Maps & Location: Android Communications:
GPS, Working with Location Manager, Working with Google Maps
extensions, Maps via intent and Map Activity, Location based Services.
Location Updates, location-based services (LBS),Location Providers,
Selecting a Location Provider, Finding Your Location, Map - Based
Activities, How to load maps, To finding map API key.
TOTAL: 45 HOURS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Reto Meier, “Professional Android 4 Development”, John Wiley and
Sons, 2012.
2. W. Frank Ableson, RobiSen, Chris King, C. Enrique Ortiz, “Android in
Action”, Third Edition, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Wei-Meng Lee ,”Android Application Development Cookbook”, John
Wiley and Sons, 2013.
2. Grant Allen, “Beginning Android 4”, Apress, 2011.
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