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Transcript
Section Four
Meeting Children's
Nutrition Requirements
in Care
What are children’s nutrition requirements?
Food and good nutrition is of utmost importance to young children. What they eat impacts
on their growth and development. Children’s eating habits are developed in the early years,
and many eating habits developed at this early age will be continued throughout life. It is
therefore important that, whilst in care, children consume foods that are consistent with the
Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents, promote the development of healthy
eating habits and meet children’s nutrition requirements for optimum growth.
The Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia
Children and adolescents should be encouraged to:
ƒ Eat plenty of vegetables, legumes and fruits
ƒ Eat plenty of cereals (including breads, rice, pasta and noodles), preferably
wholegrain
ƒ Include lean meat, fish, poultry and/or alternatives
ƒ Include milks, yoghurts, cheese and/or alternatives
Reduced-fat milks are not suitable for young children under 2 years, because of
their high energy needs, but reduced-fat varieties should be encouraged for older
children and adolescents
ƒ Choose water as a drink
Alcohol is not recommended for children
And care should be taken to:
ƒ Limit saturated fat and moderate total fat intake
Low-fat diets are not suitable for infants
ƒ Choose foods low in salt
ƒ Consume only moderate amounts of sugars and foods containing added sugars
ƒ Care for your child’s food: prepare and store it safely
Children need to consume a certain number of serves from each food group to ensure that
their nutrition requirements are being met. This will not only promote appropriate weight
gain and reduce the risk of diet related diseases, but also expose children to a variety of
foods (Table 1.). Children’s food group recommendations use ‘child size’ serves to allow for
their small stomachs. A ‘child size’ serve is equal to half an adult size serve based on the
Australian Guide to Health Eating.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.1
Table 1. Recommended number of serves of each food group consumed per day for children
Food group
Number of ‘child size’ serves
required each day
1- 3 years*
4- 7 years**
Vegetables
3-4
4-8
Fruit
2
2-4
Dairy foods
6
4-6
Meat & meat
1-2
1-2
At least 4
6-14
Limit to ½ - 2
Limit to 1-2
alternatives
Breads, cereals, rice and
pasta
Extras (foods high in
fat, salt and/or sugar)
*Children’s Hospital Westmead
**Australian Guide to Healthy Eating
See Resource 4.1 for more details of what types of food each food group includes
Extras are foods that do not fit into the other five food groups, as they are not essential to
provide the nutrients the body needs and many contain too much added fat, salt or sugar.
Examples of such foods include biscuits, chocolates, lollies, crumbed or battered meats,
potato chips, pies, pastries etc. It also includes sweetened drinks, such as soft drink and
cordial. Such foods should not be consumed by children on a daily basis. There are also
foods that could fit into one of the five food groups, because they provide some essential
nutrients, but that are also high in fat, sugar and/or salt (eg processed meats, cereal bars,
fruit juice). These foods should also not be consumed by children on a daily basis.
Therefore, extras and others foods high in fat, sugar and/or salt will be referred to as ‘food
and drinks high in fat, salt and/or sugar’ throughout the remainder of the package.
Criteria to define food and drinks that are high in fat, salt or sugar has been defined as:
ƒ
A food that is ‘high in fat’ contains greater than 20g of fat per 100g and/or greater than
5g of saturated fat per 100g. For drinks if there is greater than 10g of fat per 100g
and/or greater than 2.5g saturated fat per 100g it is high in fat.
ƒ
A food that is ‘high in sugars’ has greater than 15g of sugars per 100g. For drinks if
there is greater than 7.5g sugar per 100g it is high in sugars.
ƒ
A food that is ‘high in salt’ contains greater than 600mg of sodium per 100g. For drinks
if there is greater than 300mg per 100g it is high in salt.
These criteria are based on the“ www.choicefoodforkids.com.au” recommendations.
See Resource 4.2 for more details on how to identify food and drinks that are high in
fat, salt or sugar.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.2
What about infants?
There are no specific food group recommendations for children under 1 years of age.
However recommendations regarding appropriate introduction of foods and drinks do exist.
Children aged less than about 6 months need no solid foods and should receive breast milk
or infant formula. Australian and international health authorities recommend exclusive
breastfeeding with no other milks or drinks until around 6 months of age.
From 6 months children should start to be offered solid foods. At first babies should be
offered foods that are easily digestible and soft, and then progress to different textures.
Breast milk or infant formula should continue as the main food up until twelve months.
Breastfeeding can continue to provide health benefits in a child’s second year of life.
Water that has been boiled and cooled can be offered in small amounts. By 12 months of age
children should be able to eat most family foods and drink from a cup.
See Resource 4.3 for a list of useful resources about infant nutrition
What are children’s nutrition requirements when in care?
On the days that children attend care, they may spend a large proportion of their day in
care. Therefore children should receive an appropriate proportion of their food and drink
needs whilst in care. The number of serves of each food group that children are required to
eat is dependant on the number of hours they are in care. Some food groups (eg meat or
meat alternatives) require certain types of foods within the group to be consumed to ensure
children’s requirements for particular nutrients are met (eg red meat to obtain iron).
Recommendations for services open for 8 hours
If a service is open for 8 hours children should consume enough food to meet 50% of the
recommended dietary intake (RDI) for all nutrients. This is reinforced under the NSW
Children’s Service Regulations 2004 endorsement of the Dietary Guide for Children (Caring
for Children 2005). This equates to approximately half of the recommended number of
'child size' serves of each food group each day, that is:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
1 child size serve of meat or meat alternatives
2 child size serves of vegetables
1 child size serve of fruit
3 child size serves of dairy
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.3
ƒ
2 child size serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles
In addition:
ƒ
Water should be available for children to drink at all times, including meal and non-meal
times.
ƒ
Food and drinks that are high in fat, salt and/or sugar should not be consumed by
children whilst in care.
For children aged 1-2 years this is the number of serves from each food group they need to
consume to meet their energy and nutrient requirements whilst in care each day. Those
aged 3 years and over will require extra food to meet their energy requirements. Extra
serves of food from the bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles or vegetable groups should be
offered in such cases, but should be limited to one to two additional serves from both of the
food groups. The older a child is and the more active they are, the more likely it will be that
they require these additional serves.
To ensure that adequate serves of food from each food group can be consumed during care
it is recommended that children should receive one main meal (lunch or breakfast) and two
snacks (morning tea, afternoon tea or late afternoon tea).
Recommendations for services open for less than 8 hours
If a service is open for less than 8 hours children should consume enough food to meet
proportionally less than 50% of RDI for all nutrients. This equates to slightly less than half of
the number of recommended serves of each food group per day, that is:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
1 serve of meat or meat alternatives
1 serve of vegetables
1 serve of fruit
2 serves of dairy
2 serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles
In addition:
ƒ
Water should be available for children to drink at all times, including meal and non-meal
times.
ƒ
Food and drinks that are high in fat, salt or sugar should not be consumed by children
whilst in care.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.4
For children aged 1-2 years this is the number of serves from each food group they need to
consume to meet their energy and nutrient requirements whilst in care each day. Those
aged 3 years and over will require extra food to meet their energy requirements. Extra
serves of food from the bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles or vegetable groups should be
offered in such cases, but should be limited to one additional serve from both of the food
groups. The older a child is and the more active they are, the more likely it will be that they
require these additional serves.
To ensure that adequate serves of food from each food group can be consumed during care
it is recommended that children should receive one main meal (breakfast or lunch) and one
snack (morning tea, afternoon tea or late afternoon tea).
Recommendations for services open for greater than 8 hours
If a service is open for greater than 8 hours children should consume enough food to meet
proportionally more than 50% of RDI for all nutrients. This equates to slightly more than
half the number of recommended serves of each food group per day, that is;
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
1 serve of meat or meat alternatives
3 serves of vegetables
1 serve of fruit
3 serves of dairy
3 serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles
In addition:
ƒ
Water should be available for children to drink at all times, including meal and non-meal
times.
ƒ
Food and drinks that are high in fat, salt or sugar should not be consumed by children
whilst in care.
For children aged 1-2 years this is the number of serves of food from each food group they
need to consume to meet their energy and nutrient requirements whilst in care each day.
Extra serves of food from the bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles or vegetable groups
should be offered in such cases, but should be limited to two additional serves from both of
the food groups. The older a child is and the more active they are, the more likely it will be
that they require these additional serves.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.5
To ensure that adequate serves of each food group can be consumed during care it is
recommended that children should receive one main meal (breakfast or lunch) and two
snacks (morning tea, afternoon tea or late afternoon tea), and an additional main meal or
snack.
How do we ensure children are meeting their nutrition
requirements when in care?
The process to ensure children are meeting their nutrition requirements when in care is
described below.
Review current
practice and
identify needs
Plan
Reflect and
evaluate
Implement
See Bringing about change (Section 2) for more details about this model
Review current practice and identify needs
Form a team to revise your menu and/or lunchbox recommendations. This should include
your cook(s) (if applicable), staff as well as family members. The team should facilitate the
remaining steps.
a. Determine the nutrition requirements of children that attend your service
The nutrition requirements of children attending your service are dependant on your hours
of operation. Use Table 2. to determine how many meals, and how many serves from each
food group children must be provided with each day whilst in care.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.6
b. Determine whether children are currently receiving an appropriate number of
meals and snacks whilst in care
How many meals and snacks do children currently consume in care? This includes the meals
and snacks provided by the service and those provided by families that are consumed whilst
the child is in care.
If you determine that children are currently not receiving enough meals and snacks you will
need to ensure that either the service or families provides any appropriate additional meals
or snacks. If you determine that children are currently receiving too many meals or snacks,
it is recommended that either the service or families cease providing any extra meals or
snacks.
Table 2.
What meals should
children be provided
whilst in care?
One main meal
(breakfast or lunch)
+
One snack (morning
tea, afternoon tea or
late afternoon tea)
One main meal
(breakfast or lunch)
+
Two snacks (morning
tea, afternoon tea or
late afternoon tea)
How many serves of
vegetables must children
consume each day whilst
in care?
How many serves of fruit
must children consume
each day whilst in care?
How many serves of dairy
must children consume
each day whilst in care?
How many serves of meat
or meat alternatives must
children consume each
day whilst in care?
How many serves of
breads, cereals, rice and
pasta must children
consume each day whilst
in care?
1-2*
2-4*
One main meal
(breakfast or lunch)
+
2 snacks (morning tea,
afternoon tea or late
afternoon tea)
+
An additional main meal
(breakfast or lunch) or
an additional snack
(morning tea, afternoon
tea or late afternoon
tea)
3-5*
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
1
2-3*
2-4*
3-5*
* Children aged 2 years and younger should be provided with the number of serves at the lower end of the range. Children
aged 3 years and over should be provided with the number of serves at the upper end of the range.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.7
c. Determine whether children are currently receiving an appropriate number of
serves of each food group whilst in care
How you determine whether children are currently receiving an appropriate number of
serves of each food group whilst in care is dependant on whether your service provides all
the meals, families provide all the meals or both families and the service provide meals.
If your service provides all meals review your current or future menu to determine if an
appropriate number of serves of each food group is being provided.
Use the Good for Kids Menu Planning Checklist (see Resource
4.4) for the appropriate number of hours your service is open.
When families provide all meals it is more difficult to ensure children are meeting their
nutritional requirements. It is the service’s role, however, to develop lunchbox
recommendations and inform and educate families about these recommendations. Review
your lunchbox recommendations to determine if the service is advising an appropriate
number of serves from each food group be provided by families.
Use the Good for Kids Lunchbox Recommendations Checklist
(see Resource 4.5) for the appropriate number of hours your service is open.
If both the service and families provide meals you will need to follow a two step process to
determine whether children's nutrition requirements are being met. Review your current or
future menu and your lunchbox recommendations to determine how many serves from each
food group is being provided/recommended and therefore whether children's nutrition
requirements are being met from these combined sources.
Use the Good for Kids in Menu Planning Checklist for services
where families provide some meals (see Resource 4.6) for the appropriate
number of hours your service is open.
d. Determine any specific nutritional needs of your children.
This will include noting any allergies or intolerances, medical histories, cultures and
religious beliefs or developmental difficulties. These factors should be considered when
planning the menu and/or lunchbox recommendations.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.8
e. Make a list of changes
Using the information gathered through review of meal provision, and your menu or
lunchbox recommendations, make a list of changes that should be made to the number of
meals provided, your menu and/or your lunchbox recommendations.
Plan
Determine whether or not you need to make changes to your menu and/or lunchbox
recommendations.
To develop your new menu and/or lunchbox recommendations you
should use the appropriate checklist, along with other appropriate resources (e.g.
cookbooks).
Use some of the cookbooks and resources listed in Resource 4.7 to assist with
developing menus and lunchbox recommendations.
See Developing a Nutrition Policy that is Good for Kids (Section 3) as any changes
made to your menu or lunchbox recommendations should be reiterated in your
nutrition policy.
See Partnerships with Families (Section 6) for ideas for how to engage families in
planning.
Implement
To help the changes to your nutrition policy, menu and/or lunchbox recommendations run
smoothly, it is recommended that you:
ƒ
ensure all families and staff members see a copy of the new menu or lunchbox
recommendations
ƒ
provide any necessary education for families about the new menu and/or lunchbox
recommendations. This should be part of orientation for new families also.
See Partnerships with Families (Section 6) for more details about informing and
educating families.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.9
Reflect and evaluate
It is important that once changes have been made to ensure children’s nutrition
requirements are met that your service continues to reflect on and evaluate the
effectiveness of and satisfaction with the changes.
If changes to your menu or lunchbox recommendations have been effective children will
continue to be provided with food and drinks that meets their nutrition requirements. You
may evaluate this through:
ƒ
ƒ
checking that your menu is always planned using an appropriate checklist
ensuring that the food actually being provided to children is what is recorded on the
menu and that it is being served in appropriate portion sizes
ƒ
ensuring that food being provided by families is consistent with the service’s lunchbox
recommendations
Use Resource 4.8 How to conduct a ‘Menu Audit’ to assist
Use Resource 4.9 How to conduct lunchbox audits to assist
It is also important that staff, children and families are satisfied with the changes.
Information regarding satisfaction may be collected formally or informally from these
parties.
Use Resource 6.12 to evaluation parent’s satisfaction with your
menu and/or lunchbox recommendations.
See Bringing about change (Section 2) for more details about determining staff,
children and families satisfaction and Partnerships with Families (Section 6) for
more details on how to overcome family dissatisfaction.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.10
Resource 4.1:
Identifying which food
group foods and drinks
belong to
a. Australian Guide to Healthy Eating: Summary Information Brochure*
b. Food for Health- Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents: Pamphlet *
* The serving sizes recorded in these documents are ‘adult size’ serves not ‘child size’ serves.
One child size serve= ½ an adult size serve
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.11
Resource 4.2:
Identifying foods and
drinks high in fat, salt
and/or sugar
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.12
Nutrition information panels (NIP)
Is it high in salt?
made simple!
Looking at the quantity per 100g column for
Current food standard codes require all
sodium check if there is >600mg of sodium.
manufactured foods to have a nutrition
If there is the food is high in salt! For drinks
information panel. They can help you
if there is >300mg it is high in salt!
identify what foods are high in fat, salt or
Source: www.choicefoodforkids.com.au
sugar.
Is it high in sugars?
Nutrition
information
panels
provide
Looking at the quantity per 100g column for
information on the levels of: saturated fats
sugar check if there is >15g sugars. If there
and total fat; protein; energy (kilojoules);
is, the food is high in sugars. For drinks if
sugars (includes added sugar and sugar that
there is >7.5g sugar it is high in sugars!
is naturally present); total carbohydrate;
Source: www.choicefoodforkids.com.au
and sodium.
Nutrition claims
Nutrition Information
Servings per package: 3
Serving Size: 150g
Energy
Protein
Fat, total
- saturated
Carbohydrate
- sugars
Sodium
Quantity per
serving
608kJ
4.2g
7.5g
4.6g
18.6g
18.6g
90mg
For products to make some nutrition claims
on their products they must meet certain
Quantity per
100g
405kJ
2.8g
4.9g
3.0g
12.4g
12.4g
60mg
criteria
ƒ
No added sugar- Contain no added sugar but
can contain natural sugars (eg from fruit or
milk)
ƒ
Reduced fat, salt - should be at least a 25 per
cent reduction from the original product.
What to look for…….
ƒ
Low fat - must contain less than 3 per cent
Quantity per 100g: 100g is a useful
fat for solid foods (1.5 per cent for liquid
standard to help you compare different
foods).
products. It can be found on every nutrition
panel. This is most helpful as different
products record different serving sizes (and
ƒ
Fat free - must be less than 0.15 per cent fat.
Nutrition labelling tricks!
ƒ
therefore servings per package).
‘Lite’ or ‘Light’ doesn’t always mean that a
product is low in fat or kilojoules. It often
refers to texture, colour or taste (e.g. oil).
Is it high in fat?
The label should include a statement of what
Looking at the quantity per 100g column
makes the food ‘light’
for fat (total and saturated) check if there is
ƒ
‘93% fat free’ Many products are now
> 20g of total fat OR > 5g of saturated
claiming that they are 93% or even 90% fat
fat. If so, the food is high in fat! For drinks if
free- but remember this means that the
there is >10g of fat OR >2.5g saturated fat
it is high in fat.
product is still 7 or 10 per cent fat!
ƒ
‘Baked not fried’ although this sounds
healthier, the product can still contain too
much fat. Make sure you check the nutrition
Source: www.choicefoodforkids.com.au
information panel when such a claim is
made.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.13
Resource 4.3: List of
infant nutrition
resources
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.14
Caring for Infants. NSW Health.
A concise, spiral bound book covering nutrition and food hygiene for 0-1 year olds
Copies can be obtained from:
The Community Nutritionist
Central Sydney Community Health Services
Level 4, Queen Mary Building
Grose Street
Camperdown NSW 2050
Ph: (02) 9515 3270
Fax: (02) 9515 3282
$15.00
Breastfeeding, Women And Work. The Australian Breastfeeding Association
Practical suggestions and ideas to assist mothers continue to breastfeed after returning to
the paid workforce, study or any other pursuits involving long periods separating mother
and baby.
Available to order from http://www.mothersdirect.com.au
$5.00
Introducing solids. The Australian Breastfeeding Association
A sensible approach to starting your breastfed baby on solids and foods eaten by the rest of
the family.
Available to order from http://www.mothersdirect.com.au
$5.00
Starting family foods. NSW Health
A short brochure providing information for families on introducing solids.
Available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/pubs/2006/pdf/baby_foods.pdf
Feeding from 6 months Queensland Health
A fact sheet outlining food and nutrition needs from 6 months
Available at: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/phs/documents/cyhu/28108.pdf
Feeding from 8 months. Queensland Health
A fact sheet outlining food and nutrition needs from 8 months
Available at: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/phs/documents/cyhu/28109.pdf
Feeding from 9 months. Queensland Health
A fact sheet outlining food and nutrition needs from 9 months
Available at: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/phs/documents/cyhu/28110.pdf
Solids table. Queensland Health
A fact sheet including a table that summaries the introduction of solids process (by age and
food group.
Available at:http://www.health.qld.gov.au/phs/documents/cyhu/28115.pdf
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.15
Resource 4.4 Good for
Kids Menu Planning
Checklists
a. Menu Planning Checklist for services open for 8 hours
b. Menu Planning Checklist for services open for less than 8 hours
c. Menu Planning Checklist for services open for greater than 8 hours
d. Menu Planning Checklist Instructions
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.16
Menu Planning
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan each two-week cycle of your menu if you are open for 8
hours and provide all meals. The number of serves recommended is required to meet
the nutritional needs of children whilst in care. You must get a tick in every box to be
meeting children’s nutrition requirements whilst in care. You only get a tick in the box
if you are providing the exact number of serves.
. Number of meals provided
The menu includes:
…
…
One main meal
Two snacks
Dairy Foods
…
…
The menu includes 3 'child size' serves of
dairy foods per day
The menu includes reduced fat milk for
children aged 2 years and over
Main meals
Beef/Lamb
…
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
Lean red meat is included on the menu at
least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu
at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
…
…
A vegetarian meal is included on the menu
at least 2 times per fortnight
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is
served with the vegetarian meal
(excluding fruit juice).
Iron
…
On each day that a white meat or
vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other
iron containing food is included on the
menu
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
High fibre varieties are included at least 4
times per fortnight
Snacks are planned on the menu as part of
the total day's intake
High fat, sugar or salt foods
Drinks
The menu allows for 1-2 additional ‘child
size’ serves of vegetables for children aged
3 years and over
The menu allows for 1-2 additional ‘child
size’ serves of bread, cereal, rice or pasta
foods per day for children aged 3 years and
over
Snacks
Vegetables and Fruit
The menu includes at least 2 'child size'
serves of vegetables daily
The menu includes at least 2 'child size'
serves of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods
per day for
The menu does not include foods that are
high in fat, sugar or salt
The menu includes water as a drink
The menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
The menu includes 1 'child size' serve of
fruit daily
Checklist based on ‘Nutrition Checklist for Long Day
Care Menu Planning from NSW Health’s Caring for
Children Food, Nutrition and Fun Activities, June 2005
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.17
Menu Planning
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan each two-week cycle of your menu if you are open for less
than 8 hours and provide all meals. The number of serves recommended is required to
meet the nutritional needs of children whilst in care. You must get a tick in every box
to be meeting children’s nutrition requirements whilst in care. You only get a tick in
the box if you are providing the exact number of serves.
Number of meals provided
The menu includes:
…
…
One main meal
One snack
Main meals
Beef/Lamb
…
Lean red meat is included on the menu at
least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu
at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
…
…
A vegetarian meal is included on the menu
at least 2 times per fortnight
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is
served with the vegetarian meal
(excluding fruit juice).
On each day that a white meat or
vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other
iron containing food is included on the
menu
Vegetables and Fruit
…
…
…
…
…
The menu includes 2 'child size' serves of
dairy foods per day
The menu includes reduced fat milk for
children aged 2 years and over
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
…
…
…
The menu includes at least 2 'child size'
serves of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods
per day
The menu allows for 1 additional ‘child size’
serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods
per day for children aged 3 years and over
High fibre varieties are included at least 4
times per fortnight
Snacks
…
Snacks are planned on the menu as part of
the total day's intake
High fat, sugar or salt foods
Iron
…
Dairy Foods
The menu includes at least 1 'child size'
serves of vegetables daily
…
The menu does not include foods that are
high in fat, sugar or salt
Drinks
…
…
The menu includes water as a drink
The menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
The menu makes available 1 additional
‘child size’ serves of vegetables for
children aged 3 years and over
The menu includes 1 'child size' serve of
fruit daily
Checklist based on ‘Nutrition Checklist for Long Day Care
Menu Planning from NSW Health’s Caring for Children
Food, Nutrition and Fun Activities, June 2005
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.18
Menu Planning
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan each two-week cycle of your menu if you are open for greater
than 8 hours and provide all meals. The number of serves recommended is required to
meet the nutritional needs of children whilst in care. You must get a tick in every box
to be meeting children’s nutrition requirements whilst in care. You only get a tick in
the box if you are providing the exact number of serves.
Number of meals provided
The menu includes:
…
…
…
One main meal
Two snacks
Lean red meat is included on the menu at
least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
…
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu
at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
…
…
… The
menu includes at least 3 'child size'
serves of dairy foods per day
… The
menu includes reduced fat milk for
children aged 2 years and over
An additional main meal or snack
Main meals
Beef/Lamb
…
Dairy Foods
…
A vegetarian meal is included on the menu
at least 2 times per fortnight
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is
served with the vegetarian meal
(excluding fruit juice).
The menu includes at least 3 'child size'
serves of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods
per day
The menu allows for 2 additional ‘child
size’ serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta
foods per day for children aged 3 years
and over
High fibre varieties are included at least 4
times per fortnight
Snacks
…
Snacks are planned on the menu as part of
the total day's intake
Iron
…
High fat, sugar or salt foods
On each day that a white meat or
vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other
iron containing food is included on the
menu
…
The menu does not include foods that are
high in fat, sugar or salt
Drinks
Vegetables and Fruit
…
…
…
The menu includes at least 3 'child size'
serves of vegetables daily
…
…
The menu includes water as a drink
The menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
The menu makes available 2 additional
‘child size’ serves of vegetables for
children aged 3 years and over
The menu includes 1 'child size' serve of
fruit daily
Checklist based on ‘Nutrition Checklist for Long Day
Care Menu Planning from NSW Health’s Caring for
Children Food, Nutrition and Fun Activities, June 2005
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.19
Menu planning checklist instructions
Use Table 1 below and the appropriate menu planning checklist for your service to
determine whether your menu meets children's nutrition requirements. To be meeting
children's nutrition requirements you should get a tick in every box on the appropriate Good
for Kids Menu Planning Checklist. You should only get a tick if your menu provides exactly
that number of serves, you are not meeting children's nutrition requirements if you are
providing less serves and you are exceeding their nutrition requirements if you are providing
more.
Table 1 provides examples of foods within the groups to help complete the relevant Good
for Kids Menu Planning Checklist. Pay special attention to the 'includes' and 'does not
include' column as there are particular foods within each food group that should not be
included on your menu as they are high in fat, sugar or salt. You should not count the foods
in the 'does not include' column as a serve for that food group, but instead as a food high in
fat, salt or sugars. Also note that when the checklist asks for number of serves it may be
referring to the number of serves of the food group over each day, or the total over the
fortnight.
If you are not sure whether a food or drink is high in fat, salt or sugar refer to Resource 4.2
Identifying foods and drinks high in fat, salt and/or sugar.
Table 1: Examples of foods from each group
Group
Includes
Does not include
Beef/Lamb
Premium/’heart smart’
mince
Lean roast beef/lamb
Lean and trimmed
fillet/rump/sirloin steaks
Lean and trimmed lamb
chops
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
Lean cuts of chicken, fish,
pork, veal
Chicken, pork or veal mince
Lean and trimmed pork
midloin or forequarter chop
Pork butterfly steak
Lean veal, loin chop or leg
shoulder steak
Roast pork
Grilled baked fish fingers
Grilled/baked fish cakes
Tofu
Egg
Cheese**
Baked beans
Chickpeas
Kidney beans
Lentils
Four bean Mix
Nuts**
Citrus fruit, rockmelon,
melon, kiwifruit,
passionfruit, pineapple,
mango, raspberry,
strawberry, blackberry,
cherry, guava and lychee
Artichoke, asparagus, broad
beans, butter beans, green
beans, brussel sprouts,
cabbage, capsicum,
cauliflower, onion, snow
peas, sweet corn, tomato
and zucchini
Crumbed or battered beef
or lamb
Commercial hamburger
patties
Processed meats such as:
sausage, Devon, cabanossi,
pastrami, salami, bacon,
frankfurters
Pies or sausage rolls
Processed meats eg chicken
roll
Fish burgers
Crumbed or battered
chicken, fish, pork or veal
Chicken nuggets, chicken
patty and chicken fillet
wedges
Vegetarian meals
Vegetarian meals
(Vitamin C rich fruit
or vegetable)
Edition 3 June 2008
Serving size (per
child)
30-50g cooked meat
(match box size)
¼ cup lean mince
1 slice roast meat
40-60g fish
30-50g chicken, pork or
veal
¼ cup cooked dried
beans, lentils,
chickpeas, split peas or
canned beans
1 small egg
1 slice processed
cheese or 20g block
cheese
¼ cup nuts
Dependant on food
group
Page 4.20
Group
Includes
Does not include
Iron containing foods
Wholemeal bread
Wholemeal pasta
Wholemeal crackers
Some breakfast cereals (eg
weetbix, bran flakes)
Dried fruit**
Dark green vegetables (eg
spinach)
Orange vegetables (eg
pumpkin, sweet potato)
Cruciferous vegetables (eg
broccoli, cauliflower)
Starchy vegetables (eg
potato)
Salad vegetables (eg
lettuce, tomato)
Includes fresh, frozen and
canned
Citrus fruits (eg oranges,
mandarins)
Tropical fruits (eg bananas,
pineapples)
Stone fruits (eg apricots,
peaches)
Melons, berries, grapes,
apples and pears
Includes fresh, canned (in
juice) and dried**
Plain milk
Cheese**
Custard
Reduced fat cream
Reduced fat sour cream
Yoghurt
Milo
Vegetables
Fruit
Dairy foods
Breads, cereals, rice
and pasta
Edition 3 June 2008
Reduced fat dairy
products should be
provided for children 2
years and over
Reduced fat cream or sour
cream do not contain
calcium so they are not a
substitute for cheese,
yoghurt, custard or milk
Breads eg white,
wholemeal, multigrain
Turkish, pita, Lebanese,
rye, fruit loaf
Rice
Pasta
Noodles
Some breakfast cereals (eg
Weetbix, Special K, All
bran, Mini Wheats,
Guardian, All Bran, Rolled
Oats)
Cous Cous
Crumpets
Low fat savoury biscuits (eg
paradise lites, rice crackers,
rice cake thins, corn thins,
vita-wheats)
Pastry
Pancakes/Pikelets
High fibre varieties of
breads, cereals, rice and
pasta are preferable
Serving size (per
child)
Dependant on food
group
All varieties of potato or
other vegetables cooked in
oil (e.g. potato chips, fries,
gems, wedges, hash
browns)
¼ cup of cooked
vegetables (~35g)
½ cup salad vegetables
¼ cup of legumes
(dried beans, peas or
lentils)
½ medium potato
Canned varieties in syrup
Fruit Straps
Fruit bars and sticks
1 small piece of fruit
(eg apricot, kiwi fruit,
plums)
1 small piece of fruit
(eg apple, orange, pear)
½ cup diced pieces or
canned fruit
2 dried apricot halves
¾ tablespoon of
sultanas
½ cup of milk
(125ml)
½ cup yoghurt (~100g)
1 slice processed
cheese or 20g block
cheese
½ cup custard (~100g)
Frozen yoghurt
Dairy Desserts (eg Yogo)
Ice cream (including low
fat)
Cream
Sour cream
Flavoured milk
Fried noodles
Some breakfast cereals (eg
Nutrigrain, Cornflakes,
Coco Pops, Fruit Loops.
Frosties, Cheerios,)
Savoury biscuits (eg Sao)
Croissants
Processed or high fat/sugar
cakes, biscuits and slices
1 slice of bread
½ medium bread roll
½ cup cooked rice,
pasta or noodles
100g spaghetti
½ cup breakfast cereal
¼ cup muesli
10 rice crackers
1 thick rice cake
2 thin rice/corn cakes
Small packet popcorn
1 small pikelet
2 medium crispbread
Page 4.21
Group
Includes
Does not include
Drinks
Water
Plain milk
(N.B Plain milk provided
as a drink should still be
counted within the dairy
serves)
Fruit juice
Cordial
Soft Drink
Flavoured Milk
Foods high in fat, salt
or sugar’
For your service to 'not include foods that are high in fat,
sugar or salt’, your menu cannot contain any foods in the
'does not include’ columns above
Serving size (per
child)
125ml of milk
N/A
** Although this food or drink does meet the criteria specified for foods high in fat, sugar or
salt it provides vital nutrients that are available from few other foods
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.22
Resource 4.5:
Good for Kids Lunchbox
Recommendations
Checklist
a. Good for Kids Lunchbox Recommendations Checklist for Children's Services Open for 8
hours
b. Good for Kids Lunchbox Recommendations Checklist for Children's Services Open for
less than 8 hours
c. Good for Kids Lunchbox Recommendations Checklist for Children's Services Open for
greater than 8 hours
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.23
Lunchbox
Recommendation
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan or review your lunchbox recommendations if you are open
for 8 hours and families provide all meals. The number of serves recommended is
required to meet the nutritional needs of children in care. You must get a tick in every
box for your lunchbox recommendations to be meeting children’s nutrition
requirements when in care. You should only get a tick in the box if you are
recommending the exact number of serves for that food group.
Please tick the box if your lunchbox recommendations for families encourage
them to pack:
…
…
…
…
1 main meal
2 snacks
1 child size serve of lean meat or meat alternatives
2 child size serves of vegetables for children less than 3 years & up to 3-4 child
size serves of vegetables for children 3 years and over
…
…
1 child size serve of fruit
3 child size serves of dairy (reduced fat milk suggested for children over 2 years
of age)
…
2 child size serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles for children less than
3 years and 3-4 child size serves of breads, cereals, rice pasta or noodles for
children 3 years and over
…
…
Water as a drink
No foods or drinks that are high in fat, sugar or salt
If all boxes are ticked your lunchbox recommendations meet children's nutrition
requirements.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.24
Lunchbox
Recommendation
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan or review your lunchbox recommendations if you are open
for less than 8 hours and families provide all meals. The number of serves
recommended is required to meet the nutritional needs of children in care. You must
get a tick in every box for your lunchbox recommendations to be meeting children’s
nutrition requirements when in care. You should only get a tick in the box if you are
recommending the exact number of serves for that food group.
Please tick the box if your lunchbox recommendations for families encourage
them to pack:
…
…
…
…
1 main meal
1 snack
1 child size serve of lean meat or meat alternatives
1 child size serve of vegetables for children less than 3 years & up to 2 child size
serves of vegetables for children 3 years and over
…
…
1 child size serve of fruit
2 child size serves of dairy (reduced fat milk suggested for children over 2 years
of age)
…
2 child size serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles for children less than
3 years and 3 child size serves of breads, cereals, rice pasta or noodles for
children 3 years and over
…
…
Water as a drink
No foods or drinks that are high in fat, sugar or salt
If all boxes are ticked your lunchbox recommendations meet children's nutrition
requirements.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.25
Lunchbox
Recommendation
Checklist
Use this checklist to plan or review your lunchbox recommendations if you are open
for greater than 8 hours and families provide all meals. The number of serves
recommended is required to meet the nutritional needs of children in care. You must
get a tick in every box for your lunchbox recommendations to be meeting children’s
nutrition requirements when in care. You should only get a tick in the box if you are
recommending the exact number of serves for that food group.
Please tick the box if your lunchbox recommendations for families encourage
them to pack:
…
…
…
…
…
1 main meal
2 snacks
An additional main meal or snack
1 child size serve of lean meat or meat alternatives
3 child size serve of vegetables for children less than 3 years & up to 5 child size
serves of vegetables for children 3 years and over
…
…
1 child size serve of fruit
3 child size serves of dairy (reduced fat milk suggested for children over 2 years of
age)
…
3 child size serves of bread, cereals, rice, pasta or noodles for children less than 3
years and up to 5 child size serves of breads, cereals, rice pasta or noodles for
children 3 years and over
…
…
Water as a drink
No foods or drinks that are high in fat, sugar or salt
If all boxes are ticked your lunchbox recommendations meet children's nutrition
requirements.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.26
Resource 4.6:
Good for Kids Menu
Planning Checklist for
services where families
provide some meals
a. Good for Kids Menu Planning Checklist for services where families provide some meals
and are open for 8 hours
b. Good for Kids Menu Planning Checklist for services where families provide some meals
and are open for less than 8 hours
c. Good for Kids Menu Planning Checklist for services where families provide some meals
and are open for greater than 8 hours
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.27
Menu Planning
Checklist
For services where parents also provide some meals
Use this checklist to plan or review each two-week cycle of your menu and your
lunchbox recommendations for families if you are open for less than 8 hours. The
number of serves recommended is required to meet the nutritional needs of children in
care. You must get a tick in every box to be meeting children’s nutrition requirements
when in care. You should only get a tick in the box if in total you are recommending
and providing the exact number of serves for that food group.
Number of meals provided
…
Children are provided with one main meal and one snack either by the service or the family.
The service provides_______________
The parents provide _______________
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by the service)
Beef/Lamb
…
Lean red meat is included on the menu at least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
… A vegetarian meal is included on the menu at least 2 times per fortnight
…
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is served with the vegetarian meal (excluding fruit juice).
Iron
… On
each day that a white meat or vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other iron containing food
is included on the menu
Vegetables
…
The main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of vegetables
Breads, cereals, rice or pasta
… The
main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods per
day
Dairy
…
The main meal should include 1 'child size' serve of dairy
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by parents)
…
Our lunchbox recommendations state that families must pack 1 child size serve of meat or meat
alternatives each day.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.28
Dairy Foods
A child should consume 2 'child size' serves of
dairy foods whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
is provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
… The
total number of serves is equal to 2
child size serves of dairy per day
… The
service provides reduced fat dairy
products for children aged 2 years and over
… Our
lunchbox recommendations state that
parents must pack reduced fat dairy
Vegetables and Fruit
A child should consume at least 2 child size
serves of vegetables each day in care. 1
additional serve of vegetables should be
made available to children 3 years and
over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables are
families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
… The
total number of serves is equal to at
least 2 'child size' serves of vegetables
daily
products for children aged 2 years and over
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
A child should consume 2 child size serves of
bread, cereal, rice or pasta per day. 1
additional serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta
should be made available to children 3 years
and over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
breads etc is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of bread
etc are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
…
…
The total number of serves is equal to at
least 2 child size serves of bread, cereal,
rice or pasta
High fibre varieties are included on the
menu at least 4 times per fortnight
Our lunchbox recommendations state
that parents should try and pack high
fibre varieties
A child should consume 1 child size serve
of fruit whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables are
families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
… The
total number of serves is equal to 1
'child size' serve of fruit daily
High fat, sugar or salt foods
… The
menu does not include foods that
are high in fat, sugar or salt
… Our
lunchbox recommendations state
that families should provide no foods or
drinks that are high in fat, sugar or salt.
Drinks
… The menu includes water as a drink
… The
menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
… Our
lunchbox recommendations state
that families should provide water as a
drink
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.29
Menu Planning
Checklist
For services where parents also provide some meals
Use this checklist to plan or review each two-week cycle of your menu and your
lunchbox recommendations for families if you are open for 8 hours. The number of
serves recommended is required to meet the nutritional needs of children in care. You
must get a tick in every box to be meeting children’s nutrition requirements when in
care. You should only get a tick in the box if in total you are recommending and
providing the exact number of serves for that food group.
Number of meals provided
…
Children are provided with one main meal and two snacks either by the service or the family.
The service provides_______________
The parents provide _______________
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by the service)
Beef/Lamb
…
Lean red meat is included on the menu at least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
… A vegetarian meal is included on the menu at least 2 times per fortnight
…
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is served with the vegetarian meal (excluding fruit juice).
Iron
… On
each day that a white meat or vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other iron containing food
is included on the menu
Vegetables
…
The main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of vegetables
Breads, cereals, rice or pasta
… The
main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods per
day
Dairy
…
The main meal should include 1 'child size' serve of dairy
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by parents)
…
Our lunchbox recommendations state that families must pack 1 child size serve of meat or meat
alternatives each day.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.30
Dairy Foods
A child should consume 3 'child size' serves
of dairy foods whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
is provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
… The
total number of serves is equal to 3
child size serves of dairy per day
… The
service provides reduced fat dairy
products for children aged 2 years and
Vegetables and Fruit
A child should consume at least 2 child size
serves of vegetables each day in care. 1-2
additional serves of vegetables should be
made available to children 3 years and over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables are
families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
over
… Our
lunchbox recommendations state
that parents must pack reduced fat dairy
products for children aged 2 years and
over
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
A child should consume 2 child size serves
of bread, cereal, rice or pasta per day. 1-2
additional serves of bread, cereal, rice or
pasta should be made available to children
3 years and over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
breads etc is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of bread
etc are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
…
…
The total number of serves is equal to
at least 2 child size serves of bread,
cereal, rice or pasta
The total number of serves is equal to at
least 2 'child size' serves of vegetables
daily
A child should consume 1 child size serve of
fruit whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of fruit is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of fruit
are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
The total number of serves above is
equal to 1 'child size' serve of fruit daily
High fat, sugar or salt foods
…
…
High fibre varieties are included on the
menu at least 4 times per fortnight
The menu does not include foods that
are high in fat, sugar or salt
Our lunchbox recommendations state
that families should provide no foods or
drinks that are high in fat, sugar or salt.
Drinks
Our lunchbox recommendations state
that parents should try and pack high
fibre varieties
Edition 3 June 2008
…
…
…
The menu includes water as a drink
The menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
Our lunchbox recommendations state
that families should provide water as a
drink
Page 4.31
Menu Planning
Checklist
For services where parents also provide some meals
Use this checklist to plan or review each two-week cycle of your menu and your
lunchbox recommendations for families if you are open for greater than 8 hours. The
number of serves recommended is required to meet the nutritional needs of children in
care. You must get a tick in every box to be meeting children’s nutrition requirements
when in care. You should only get a tick in the box if in total you are recommending
and providing the exact number of serves for that food group.
Number of meals provided
…
Children are provided with one main meal and two snacks, and an additional main meal or snack
either by the service or the family
The service provides_______________
The parents provide _______________
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by the service)
Beef/Lamb
…
Lean red meat is included on the menu at least 4 times per fortnight
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
…
Lean white meat is included on the menu at least 3 times per fortnight
Vegetarian meals
… A vegetarian meal is included on the menu at least 2 times per fortnight
…
A vegetable or fruit high in Vitamin C is served with the vegetarian meal (excluding fruit juice).
Iron
… On
each day that a white meat or vegetarian meal is served, at least 1 other iron containing food
is included on the menu
Vegetables
…
The main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of vegetables
Breads, cereals, rice or pasta
… The
main meal should include at least 1 'child size' serve of bread, cereal, rice or pasta foods per
day
Dairy
…
The main meal should include 1 'child size' serve of dairy
Main meal (complete this section if lunch is provided by parents)
…
Our lunchbox recommendations state that families must pack one child size serve of meat or
meat alternatives each day.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.32
Dairy Foods
A child should consume 3 'child size' serves of
dairy foods whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
is provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of dairy
are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
…
…
The total number of serves is equal to 3
child size serves of dairy per day
The service provides reduced fat dairy
products for children aged 2 years and
over
Our lunchbox recommendations state that
parents must pack reduced fat dairy
products for children aged 2 years and
over
Breads, cereals, rice & pasta
A child should consume 3 child size serves of
bread, cereal, rice or pasta per day. 2
additional serves of bread, cereal, rice or
pasta should be made available to children 3
years and over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
breads etc is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of bread
etc are families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
…
…
Vegetables and Fruit
A child should consume at least 3 child size
serves of vegetables each day in care. 2
additional serves of vegetables should be made
available to children 3 years and over.
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables are
families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
The total number of serves is equal to at
least 3 'child size' serves of vegetables
daily
A child should consume 1 child size serve of
fruit whilst in care
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables is
provided on your
menu each day?
How many ‘child
size’ serves of
vegetables are
families
recommended to
pack each day?
Total
…
The total number of serves is equal to 1
'child size' serve of fruit daily
High fat, sugar or salt foods
The total number of serves is equal to at
least 3 child size serves of bread, cereal,
rice or pasta
High fibre varieties are included on the
menu at least 4 times per fortnight
Our lunchbox recommendations state that
parents should try and pack high fibre
varieties
Edition 3 June 2008
…
…
The menu does not include foods that are
high in fat, sugar or salt
Our lunchbox recommendations state that
families should provide no foods or drinks
that are high in fat, sugar or salt.
Drinks
…
…
…
The menu includes water as a drink
The menu does not include sweetened
drinks (including fruit juice)
Our lunchbox recommendations state that
families should provide water as a drink
Page 4.33
How to use the menu planning checklist(s) for services
where both families and the service provide food
Use Table 1 below and the appropriate Good for Kids Menu and Lunchbox Planning
Checklist for your service to determine whether your menu and lunchbox recommendations
combined meet children’s nutrition requirements. You should only get a tick if your menu
provides exactly that number of serves, you are not meeting children's nutrition
requirements if you are providing less serves and you are exceeding their nutrition
requirements if you are providing more. In Table 1, pay special attention to the 'includes'
and 'does not include' column as there are particular foods within each food group that
should not be included on your menu as they are high in fat, sugar or salt. You should not
count the foods in the 'does not include' column as a serve for that food group, but instead
as a food high in fat, salt or sugars
If you are not sure whether a food or drink is high in fat, salt or sugar refer to Resource 4.2
Identifying foods and drinks high in fat, salt and/or sugar.
N.B It is important to be reasonable when determining the number of serves of each food
group provided by the families and the service. For example, if the service provides lunch
with no vegetables, it is not practical to expect the families to supply the remaining 2 serves
of vegetables in the 2 snacks they are providing. In this case the menu may need to be
revised. Also, take into consideration what types of foods families normally pack in their
allocated meals when planning your menu. For example, if most families pack fruit every
day, it is probably best for the families to continue to pack the one serve of fruit required
and for the service not to provide any fruit.
Table 1: Examples of foods from each group
Group
Includes
Does not include
Beef/Lamb
Premium/’heart smart’
mince
Lean roast beef/lamb
Lean and trimmed
fillet/rump/sirloin steaks
Lean and trimmed lamb
chops
Chicken/fish/pork/veal
Lean cuts of chicken, fish,
pork, veal
Chicken, pork or veal mince
Lean and trimmed pork
midloin or forequarter chop
Pork butterfly steak
Lean veal, loin chop or leg
shoulder steak
Roast pork
Grilled/baked fish fingers
Grilled/baked fish cakes
Tofu
Egg
Cheese**
Baked beans
Chickpeas
Kidney beans
Lentils
Four bean Mix
Nuts**
Citrus fruit, rockmelon,
melon, kiwifruit,
passionfruit, pineapple,
mango, raspberry,
strawberry, blackberry,
cherry, guava and lychee
Crumbed or battered beef
or lamb
Commercial hamburger
patties
Processed meats such as:
sausage, Devon, cabanossi,
pastrami, salami, bacon,
frankfurters
Pies or sausage rolls
Processed meats eg chicken
roll
Fish burgers
Crumbed or battered
chicken, fish, pork or veal
Chicken nuggets, chicken
patty and chicken fillet
wedges
Vegetarian meals
Vegetarian meals
(Vitamin C rich fruit
or vegetable)
Edition 3 June 2008
Serving size (per
child)
30-50g cooked meat
(match box size)
¼ cup lean mince
1 slice roast meat
40-60g fish
30-50g chicken, pork or
veal
¼ cup cooked dried
beans, lentils,
chickpeas, split peas or
canned beans
1 small egg
1 slice processed
cheese or 20g block
cheese
¼ cup nuts
Dependant on food
group
Page 4.34
Group
Iron containing foods
Vegetables
Fruit
Dairy foods
Breads, cereals, rice
and pasta
Edition 3 June 2008
Includes
Artichoke, asparagus, broad
beans, butter beans, green
beans, brussel sprouts,
cabbage, capsicum,
cauliflower, onion, snow
peas, sweet corn, tomato
and zucchini
Wholemeal bread
Wholemeal pasta
Wholemeal crackers
Some breakfast cereals (eg
weetbix, bran flakes)
Dried fruit**
Dark green vegetables (eg
spinach)
Orange vegetables (eg
pumpkin, sweet potato)
Cruciferous vegetables (eg
broccoli, cauliflower)
Starchy vegetables (eg
potato)
Salad vegetables (eg
lettuce, tomato)
Includes fresh, frozen and
canned
Citrus fruits (eg oranges,
mandarins)
Tropical fruits (eg bananas,
pineapples)
Stone fruits (eg apricots,
peaches)
Melons, berries, grapes,
apples and pears
Includes fresh, canned (in
juice) and dried**
Plain milk
Cheese**
Custard
Reduced fat cream
Reduced fat sour cream
Yoghurt
Reduced fat dairy
products should be
provided for children 2
years and over
Reduced fat cream or sour
cream do not contain
calcium so they are not a
substitute for cheese,
yoghurt, custard or milk
Breads eg white,
wholemeal, multigrain
Turkish, pita, Lebanese,
rye, fruit loaf
Rice
Pasta
Noodles
Some breakfast cereals (eg
Weetbix, Special K, All
bran, Mini Wheats,
Guardian, All Bran, Rolled
Oats)
Cous Cous
Crumpets
Low fat savoury biscuits (eg
paradise lites, rice crackers,
rice cake thins, corn thins,
vita-wheats)
Does not include
Serving size (per
child)
Milo
Dependant on food
group
All varieties of potato or
other vegetables cooked in
oil (e.g. potato chips, fries,
gems, wedges, hash
browns)
¼ cup of cooked
vegetables (~35g)
½ cup salad vegetables
¼ cup of legumes
(dried beans, peas or
lentils)
½ medium potato
Canned varieties in syrup
Fruit Straps
Fruit bars and sticks
1 small piece of fruit
(eg apricot, kiwi fruit,
plums)
1 small piece of fruit
(eg apple, orange, pear)
½ cup diced pieces or
canned fruit
2 dried apricot halves
¾ tablespoon of
sultanas
½ cup of milk
(125ml)
½ cup yoghurt (~100g)
1 slice processed
cheese or 20g block
cheese
½ cup custard (~100g)
Frozen yoghurt
Dairy Desserts (eg Yogo)
Ice cream (including low
fat)
Cream
Sour cream
Flavoured milk
Fried noodles
Some breakfast cereals (eg
Nutrigrain, Cornflakes,
Coco Pops, Fruit Loops.
Frosties, Cheerios,)
Savoury biscuits (eg Sao)
Croissants
Processed or high fat/sugar
cakes, biscuits and slices
1 slice of bread
½ medium bread roll
½ cup cooked rice,
pasta or noodles
100g spaghetti
½ cup breakfast cereal
¼ cup muesli
10 rice crackers
1 thick rice cake
2 thin rice/corn cakes
Small packet popcorn
1 small pikelet
2 medium crispbread
Page 4.35
Group
Drinks
Foods high in fat, salt
or sugar’
Includes
Pastry
Pancakes/Pikelets
High fibre varieties of
breads, cereals, rice and
pasta are preferable
Water
Plain milk
(N.B Plain milk provided
as a drink should still be
counted within the dairy
serves)
Does not include
Serving size (per
child)
Fruit juice
Cordial
Soft Drink
Flavoured Milk
125ml of milk
For your service to 'not include foods that are high in fat,
sugar or salt’, your menu cannot contain any foods in the
'does not include’ columns above
N/A
** Although this food or drink does meet the criteria specified for foods high in fat, sugar or
salt it provides vital nutrients that are available from few other foods
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.36
Resource 4.7:
List of recommended
resources for menu
planning & lunchboxes
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.37
Caring for Children. Food, Nutrition and Fun Activities. NSW Health
The latest (4th) edition of the well-known ‘Yellow Book’ from Lady Gowrie Child Centre.
Looks at nutrition for childcare and fun activities to get children involved in eating well. You
can order a copy by printing the order form from the website.
Available from: www.gowrie-sydney.com.au
What is Better Food? Queensland Health
Available at: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/phs/Documents/shpu/6656.pdf
Planning nutritious childcare centre menus: Nutrition checklist and support
materials. 2nd Edition. South Australian Childcare Nutrition Partnership
A resource for child care centres to help them provide nutritious food for children
Available at: http://www.chdf.org.au/i-cms_file?page=110/PlanningNutritionCCCmenu.pdf
Start them Right. Tasmanian Health
A booklet for families and carers giving practical information about common food and
nutrition issues
Available at:
http://www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/healthyliving/nutrition/documents/Start_them_right_booklet.pdf
Menu planning for childcare centres Nutrition Australia
A comprehensive guide to planning nutritious menus for childcare environments. It covers
general healthy eating information that needs to be considered when planning a menu and
provides great menu suggestions which incorporate all of the children’s nutritional
requirements whilst in care. The book also covers feeding infants, introduction of solids and
what to feed children on special diets such as lactose free, diabetes, gluten free or
vegetarian. Taking into account cultural diversity of foods, seasonal availability of foods and
budgeting, this book is a must have for centres which provide food.
Available at:
http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/On_the_Book_Shelf/Publications/publications.asp
Culture, cuisines and child care: more than just nutrition.
A multicultural
resource for childcare centres.
A multicultural resource to learn about foods from different cultures and include
them in menus.
Available from:
Community Nutrition
Liverpool Health Service
PO Box 3084, LIVERPOOL NSW 2170
Cost: $11.00 (including GST) plus postage and handling
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.38
Tummy Tempters. A cookbook for long day care centres Northern Sydney Cooks
Network (2000)
A recipe book for cooks developed by cooks
Available from Dietitian in Charge, Dietetics Department, Manly Hospital. PO Box 465,
Manly NSW 1655 Ph (02) 99769611
NEAT Recipes for Kids. Cookbook for Long Day Care Centres Penrith City Council
A recipe book for cooks that includes nutritious, economical and tasty recipes for 40
children.
Available from Lady Gowrie South Australia
www.gowrie-adelaide.com.au/cms/index.php?q=system/files/Catalogue05Web.pdf
N.B. There may be slight differences in the recommendations being made in these
resources to those of Good for Kids. To meet Good for Kids. Good for Life Best Practice
Nutrition Guidelines you should follow the recommendations listed in this package.
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.39
Resource 4.8:
How to conduct a
Menu Audit
a. Instructions
b. Menu audit form
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.40
Menu Audit Instructions
1. Serve up an extra plate of each main meal and snack on one day
2. Complete the menu audit form, taking into consideration:
-
Is the meal or snack provided what was recorded on the menu?
-
How many serves of each food group does each meal and snack provide?
3. Determine whether you have met children’s nutrition requirements for that day, if
not identify the issues (eg too small/large serving sizes, different ingredient used
than listed on the menu)
4. Work with your cook and menu planning group to overcome the issues
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.41
Menu Audit Evaluation Form
For services that provide all meals
Date_______________________
Are all meals provided as listed on the menu?
…
Yes
…
No ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Does this meet children's nutrition
requirements whilst in care?
Determine whether this meets your
services required number of serves
dependant on opening hours- see
notes)
Notes
30-50g cooked meat
¼ cup lean mince
1 slice roast meat
40-60g fish
30-50g chicken, pork or veal
¼ cup legumes
1 small egg
1 slice processed cheese or
20g block cheese
…
…
…
1 serve per day in care
¼ cup of cooked vegetables
(~35g)
½ cup salad vegetables
¼ cup of legumes (dried
beans, peas or lentils)
½ medium potato
…
…
…
Food group
Serving size
Instructions
Use the serving sizes to
calculate how many serves
of each food group a child
receives from the menu
Red meat
White meat
or
vegetarian
meal
Vegetables
Edition 3 June 2008
Food(s) provided from this
group
List foods within the food
group provided on the
menu. Remember to divide
up mixed menu items (eg
spaghetti bolognaise to
meat, vegetable and
breads)
Number
of serves
Calculate
total
number
of serves
Yes
No- not enough
No- too many serves
Comments:
Yes
No- not enough
No- too many serves
Comments:
1 serve per day if open
less than 8 hours
At least 2 serves per
day if open for 8 hours
At least 3 serves per
day if open greater
Page 4.42
than 8 hours
Fruit
Bread,
cereal, rice,
pasta or
noodles
Dairy
1 small piece of fruit (eg
apricot, kiwi fruit, plums)
1 small piece of fruit (eg
apple, orange, pear)
½ cup diced pieces or
canned fruit
2 dried apricot halves
¾ tablespoon of sultanas
1 slice of bread
½ medium bread roll
½ cup cooked rice, pasta or
noodles
½ cup breakfast cereal
½ cup of milk
(125ml)
1
/3 cup yoghurt
1 slice processed cheese or
20g block cheese
½ cup custard
Edition 3 June 2008
…
…
…
Yes
1 serve per day in care
No- not enough
No- too many serves
Comments:
…
…
…
Yes
No- not enough
No- too many serves
Comments:
…
…
…
Yes
No- not enough
No- too many serves
Comments:
At least 2 serves per
day if open less than 8
hours
At least 2 serves per
day if open for 8 hours
At least 3 serves per
day if open greater
than 8 hours
2 serves per day if open
for less than 8 hours
3 serves per day if open
for greater than or
equal to 8 hours
Page 4.43
Resource 4.9:
Lunchbox Audits
a. Good for Kids Lunchbox Audit tool for services open for 8 hours
b. Good for Kids Lunchbox Audit tool for services open for less than 8 hours
c. Good for Kids Lunchbox Audit tool for services open for greater than 8 hours
d. Instructions for Lunchbox Audits
Edition 3 June 2008
Page 4.44
Lunchbox
Audit Tool
Food Group
Number of serves in
child's lunchbox
Meat or meat
alternatives
Vegetables
Number of serves
required to meet
nutrient
requirements
1
Fruit
At least 2
Up to 3-4 serves if 3
years or over
1
Dairy
3
Breads, cereals, rice,
pasta or noodles
At least 2
Up to 3-4 serves if 3
years or over
0
Foods or drinks high
in fat, sugar or salt
Water
Meeting children's
nutrition
requirements
(please circle)
Edition 3 June 2008
YES
Must be packed in
lunchbox
NO
- Not enough serves
- Too many serves
- Combination of not
enough and too
many serves
Page 4.45
Lunchbox
Audit Tool
Food Group
Number of serves in
child's lunchbox
Meat or meat
alternatives
Vegetables
Number of serves
required to meet
nutrient
requirements
1
Fruit
At least 1
Up to 2 serves if 3
years or over
1
Dairy
2
Breads, cereals, rice,
pasta or noodles
At least 2
Up to 3 serves if 3
years or over
0
Foods or drinks high
in fat, sugar or salt
Water
Meeting children's
nutrition
requirements
(please circle)
Edition 3 June 2008
YES
Must be packed in
lunchbox
NO
- Not enough serves
- Too many serves
- Combination of not
enough and too
many serves
Page 4.46
Lunchbox
Audit Tool
Food Group
Number of serves in
child's lunchbox
Meat or meat
alternatives
Vegetables
Number of serves
required to meet
nutrient
requirements
1
Fruit
At least 3
Up to 5 serves if 3
years or over
1
Dairy
3
Breads, cereals, rice,
pasta or noodles
At least 3
Up to 5 serves if 3
years or over
0
Food or drinks high
in fat, sugar or salt
Water
Meeting children's
nutrition
requirements
(please circle)
Edition 3 June 2008
YES
Must be packed in
lunchbox
NO
- Not enough serves
- Too many serves
- Combination of not
enough and too
many serves
Page 4.47
Instructions for Lunchbox Audit
a)
Use the checklist either at meal times or outside meals, whatever suits your service
b)
On one day, complete for each child (or a selection of children) an audit tool by
checking what is packed in their lunchboxes.
c)
Calculate how many serves from each food group each child has packed (using the
table below). If you are having trouble determining whether a food is high in fat, salt or
sugar you can also refer to Resource 2.1
d)
Determine whether the lunchbox meets children's nutrition requirements.
The food meets children's nutrition requirements if:
The number of serves in child’s lunchbox = number of serves required to meet
children's nutrition requirements column
A child’s lunchbox may not meet requirements because there are:
- Not enough serves of some food groups
- Too many serves of some food groups
- Both not enough serves of some food groups AND too many serves of other food
groups
e) Calculate overall how many children's lunchboxes met nutrition requirements (ie total
number of 'yes')
f) Your service should aim for 100%.
g) Take any appropriate action, for example:
-
if most people are packing a healthy lunchbox that meets children's nutrition
requirements (eg 90%) this should be celebrated (eg congratulations to families in the
newsletter)
-
if there a still some 'unhealthy' lunchboxes not meeting children's nutrition
requirements then further communication and education for families regarding the
service lunchbox recommendations may be required
-
if there are a lot of unhealthy lunchboxes not meeting children's nutrition
requirements you may need to revisit your lunchbox recommendations or nutrition
policy.
Note: Conducting a lunchbox audit should be at the discretion of each service. Results
should be used to determine how effective your nutrition policy and lunchbox
recommendations are. Do not single out or deny children of foods packed.
Food Group
Meat or meat alternatives
Edition 3 June 2008
Example
Lean cuts of beef or lamb
Lean cuts of chicken, fish,
pork, veal
Serving Size
30-50g cooked meat
¼ cup lean mince
1 slice roast meat
40-60g fish
30-50g chicken, pork or
veal
Page 4.48
Food Group
Vegetables
Fruit
Dairy
Breads, cereals, rice,
pasta or noodles
Example
Vegetables include all dark
green vegetables (e.g.
spinach), orange vegetables
(e.g. pumpkin, sweet potato),
cruciferous vegetables (e.g.
broccoli, cauliflower), starchy
vegetables (e.g. potatoes)
and salad vegetables (e.g.
lettuce, tomato)
Includes all citrus fruits (e.g.
oranges, mandarins), tropical
fruits (bananas and
pineapple) stone fruits (e.g.
apricots, peaches), melons,
berries, grapes, apples and
pears
Includes fresh, canned and
dried fruits
Plain milk
Yoghurt
Cheese
Custard
Reduced fat dairy products
should be provided for
children 2 years and over
Breads: loaf, pita, Lebanese,
fruit loaf
Rice
Pasta
Noodles
Breakfast cereals
Cous Cous
Filo pastry
Crumpets
Pikelets/Pancakes
Low fat savoury biscuits
Serving Size
¼ cup of cooked
vegetables (~35g)
½ cup salad vegetables
¼ cup of legumes (dried
beans, peas or lentils)
½ medium potato
1 small piece of fruit (eg
apricot, kiwi fruit, plums)
1 small piece of fruit (eg
apple, orange, pear)
½ cup diced pieces or
canned fruit
2 dried apricot halves
¾ tablespoon of sultanas
½ cup of milk
(125ml)
1
/3 cup yoghurt
1 slice processed cheese
or 20g block cheese
½ cup custard
1 slice of bread
½ medium bread roll
½ cup cooked rice, pasta
or noodles
½ cup breakfast cereal
High fibre varieties of
breads, cereals, rice and
pasta are preferable
Foods high in fat, sugar or
salt
Edition 3 June 2008
Crumbed or battered beef or
lamb
Commercial hamburger
patties
Processed meats such as:
sausage, devon, cabanossi,
chicken roll, pastrami, salami,
bacon, frankfurters
Pies or sausage rolls
Fish fingers, fish cakes or fish
burgers
Crumbed or battered chicken,
fish, pork or veal
Chicken nuggets, chicken
Page 4.49
Food Group
Sweetened drinks
Edition 3 June 2008
Example
Serving Size
patty, chicken fillet wedges
All varieties of potato or other
vegetables cooked in oil (e.g
potato chips, fries, gems,
wedges, hash browns)
Coloured, buttered or salted
popcorn
Fruit juice, fruit straps
Flavoured milk
Flavoured custard
Ice cream
Sour cream or cream
Dairy desserts or puddings
Low fibre, high sugar or high
salt breakfast cereals (e.g.
Nutrigrain, cornflakes,
Special K, Coco Pops, Fruit
Loops, Frosties)
Flaky pastry
2 minute noodles
Croissants
Processed or high fat/sugar
cakes or biscuits
Muesli or cereal bars
Fruit Juice
Cordial
Soft drinks
Flavoured mineral waters
Sports Drinks
Flavoured milk
Page 4.50