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Transcript
Finding Opportunities to Fill the Fiber Gap:
Choose MyBowl!
Pat Felt, MS, RD, LD
Kellogg’s USA Nutrition Marketing
Today’s Agenda
• Review the benefits of breakfast and
smart solutions to start the day
• Share a new tool to help people build
better breakfasts: Kellogg’s MyBowl
• Explore how you can use new MyBowl
Resources, including interactive
components
• Learn how to find the fiber in the bowl
and on the plate
• Understand Fiber’s benefits beyond
the Gut
Benefits of Breakfast
& Smart Solutions
Breakfast Delivers Big Benefits
Experts Agree Breakfast is the Most
Important Meal of the Day
• Establishes healthy eating habits
– Increased whole fruit, total vegetables,
whole grain, and milk consumption
• Contributes to healthy weight and
BMI among children and adults
O’Neil CE, Zanovec M, Nicklas TA, Cho SS. Presweetened and non-presweetened ready-to-eat
cereals at breakfast are associated with improved nutrient intake but not with increased body
weight of children and adolescents. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 2012.
Albertson MA, Anderson GH, Crockett SJ, Geobel MT. Ready-to-eat cereal consumption: it’s
relationship with BMI and nutrient intake in children aged 4 to 12 years. Journal of the
American Dietetic Association. 2003.
But Life Gets in the Way and
Many People Skip Breakfast
54% of adults
would like to eat
breakfast daily
34% of adults
actually eat
breakfast daily
89% of moms
want their kids to
eat breakfast daily
40% of moms
report that their
child doesn’t eat
breakfast daily
Kellogg’s Breakfast in America Survey. 2011.
As Kids Grow Up,
Breakfast Consumption Goes Down
of kids attending
high school eat
breakfast daily.
of kids attending
middle school eat
breakfast daily.
of young children eat
breakfast every day.
Kellogg’s Breakfast in America Survey. 2011.
Families Face Barriers to Enjoying Breakfast
No time or
inconvenient
Not hungry
Trying to lose weight
(believe breakfastskipping helps)
Breakfast Solutions: Nutritionals
2010 DGA Nutrients of Concern
Calories
1 c Frosted Wheat Cereal,
1 c 1% milk, ½ c strawberries
1 scrambled egg with 1 tbsp
shredded cheddar cheese, 1
c orange juice, 1 slice whole
wheat toast with 2 tsp fruit
spread
1 whole grain bagel (2 oz.), 2
tbsp light cream cheese, 1
cup cantaloupe cubes, latte
made with ½ cup fat-free
milk
1 slice wheat toast, 1 tbsp
peanut butter, 1 med
banana, 1 c apple juice
Fat
(g)
320 3.5
Sat Fat
(g)
Sodium
(mg)
Protein Fiber (g)
(g)
1.5
110
14
Calcium
(mg)
Vitamin D
(IU)
Potassium
(mg)
8
300
130
680
350
11
4
360
14
3
150
20
650
270
6
3
370
13
5
410
50
790
390
10
2
220
8
5
70
0
870
USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Release 24. 2011.
Cereal Remains #1 Food Consumed at
Breakfast in Every Age Group
Of all breakfast occasions, Americans are
consuming:
32%
Ready-to-Eat Cereal
15%
Toasted/Non-Toasted Bread
13%
Eggs
13%
Fruit
10%
Pancakes/Waffles/French Toast
NPD Group, Total Individuals: National Eating Trends, February 2012. (percentages rounded)
Cereal is #1 consumed
breakfast food (40%)
for kids 6-17 years-old
Cereal + Milk is A Favorite
— and A Nutritional Powerhouse
A breakfast of cereal with skim milk delivers an
array of essential nutrients in about 150 calories
per serving, on average – for only 50 cents.
Cereal with milk & fruit helps get
more of the four nutrients of
concern identified by the 2010
Dietary Guidelines -- fiber,
calcium, vitamin D and potassium.
Scientific evidence shows
that cereal eaters have
healthier body weights.
In the US, cereal + milk
is a leading source of 10
nutrients in kids’ diets.
Breakfast and Dietary Guidance
2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
on Breakfast
“Eat a nutrient-dense breakfast”
• “Not eating breakfast has been
associated with excess body weight,
especially among children and
adolescents.”
• “Consuming breakfast also has been
associated with weight loss and
weight loss maintenance, as well as
improved nutrient intake.”
Do We Need a Tool to Help Translate Dietary
Guidance and Help People Build A Better Breakfast?
Kellogg’s MyBowl™ Makes It Easier to Build
Better Breakfasts
• Easy, simple way to translate dietary
guidance to bowl-based meals, like
cereal breakfast
• Interactive tool to help clients include
a variety of foods and food groups at
breakfast
• Visual resources to demonstrate how
nutrition at breakfast is key to start
the day
RD Feedback on MyBowl
• 89% of RDs believe a tool like
Kellogg’s MyBowl complements
USDA’s MyPlate extremely or very
well.
• 95% of RDs expect Kellogg’s
MyBowl to be used in addition to
USDA’s MyPlate.
Survey of 204 Registered Dietitians - Perceptions of Whole Grain Foods, Fiber, MyPlate and Reactions to MyBowl. March 2012.
Kellogg’s MyBowl™ Is Consumer-Relevant
• 83% of consumers thought Kellogg’s
MyBowl concepts conveyed
breakfast, and 39% said it depicted
food groups eaten in a bowl.
• 41% of consumers thought Kellogg’s
MyBowl concepts worked together
with USDA’s MyPlate.
Survey of 164 females, ages 21-44. February 24-March 2, 2012.
www.ChooseMyBowl.com
19
20
Coming Soon. . .
• Kellogg will add more MyBowl resources this year,
including
– Interactive Build A Better Breakfast online tool
– Healthcare professional toolkit
Build Better Breakfasts with Kellogg’s MyBowl
• Breakfast delivers BIG benefits – yet many families are
skipping breakfast, especially as kids gets older.
• 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recognizes the
importance of breakfast, and there’s an opportunity to
apply recommendations to bowl-based meals like
cereal breakfasts.
• Kellogg’s MyBowl is a new, interactive tool you can use
to help people build better breakfasts.
Visit ChooseMyBowl.com for more resources!
Helping Consumers Find the Fiber
in MyBowl and on MyPlate!
Fiber: Another National Deficit
Adequate Intake
is 14 grams per
1,000 calories—
25 grams per day
for women and
38 grams per day
for men
Institute of Medicine
Average intake of
dietary fiber is
very low—only
15 grams per day
on average
NHANES
Less than 10% of
Americans are
meeting their fiber
recommendation
2005 and 2010
US Dietary
Guidelines lists
fiber as a
“nutrient of
concern”
What We Eat in America,
2005, NHANES 2003-06
2010 Dietary Guidelines
For Americans
What Are American’s Sources
For Fiber Intake?
USDA
36 %
15 %
36%
11 %
Consumer Surveys
13 %
25%
United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and
Promotion, Home Economics Research Report Number 58: Nutrient Content of
the U.S. Food Supply, 2005, Washington DC; March 2008
NPD NET Panel 2008
Most Americans Say They Are Looking for WholeGrains and Fiber as They Make Purchase Decisions
IFIC Foundation 2012 Food and Health Survey
With Good Intent, Consumers ARE
Looking for More Fiber
• Consumers are looking to
specific nutrients and
ingredients as a health
“gauges” for their foods
– Protein and Fiber,
specifically are
among the nutrients
most important to
consumers
Hartman Group Compass Eating Database, 2012
But, consumers are
especially confused about
fiber and whole-grains1
•
85% expect a food labeled
“whole-grain” on-pack to be an
excellent or good source of fiber
•
73% of adults believe food
products made with whole-grain
ingredients provide at least a
good source of fiber
•
Consumers strongly prefer
simple, more actionable
language (such as an icon) when
presented with fiber and whole
grain messages2
1Kellogg
2 1,043
Company Whole Grains & Fiber Omnibus Survey, 2009
grocery shoppers surveyed online in Nov. 2010
Consumers Are Confused!
They Are Trying to Find the Fiber Needle in the Whole-Grain Haystack!
• They believe that while they are making more whole-grain
choices they are also getting more fiber from those
whole-grain food choices.
• Registered Dietitian Research also reveals that RD’s
consider that 90% of the 150 RD’s surveyed perceived a
whole-grain stamp as a “good source” fiber claim
2010 Online RD Survey - screened from a community of medical specialty groups and administered by Survey Sampling
International.
Marketplace Whole-Grain Food Choices
are Expanding
But: They’re Not Taking Fiber Along!
Ready-to-Eat Cereal
33% Increase
One-third of products 2009-2011
With less than 3g fiber
212 whole-grain labeled RTEC brands
282 whole-grain labeled RTEC brands
99 whole-grain labeled granola bars
124 whole-grain labeled granola bars
Granola/Cereal Bars
25% increase
Half of products 2009-2011
with less than 3g fiber
Based on 2012 audit of Mintel GNPD 2005-2007 and 2009-2011.
Looking to Whole- Grain Labeling is Not Enough
From Field to Box Fiber Content Varies Significantly Between Grains
Grain
Mean %
Fiber in
Kernel 1, 2, 3
Fiber in 16g
of WG2
Barley1
30
2.8g
Brown Rice
3.5
0.6g
Oats2
10.6
1.7g
Wheat3
13
2.0g
1. AACCI, 2006
2.All values from USDA National Nutrient Database SR 25
3. Fardet, 2010 Nutrition Research Reviews
This 100% Whole-Grain
Crispy Brown Rice Cereal
provides about 28g of
whole grain but < 1gram of
fiber per serving
This 100% Whole-Grain
Shredded Wheat Cereal
Provides about 45g of
Whole-grain and 6g of
fiber
The Reality of Misperception
Consumption Pattern Data Can Help Tell the Story!
Where are Consumers Getting Fiber?
Are they finding it in whole-grain foods?
•
•
•
Audit of NPD’s National
Eating Trends (NET) panel
(n=10,708) balanced to US
census
Average daily fiber intake
calculated from types and
frequency of food and
beverages consumed using a
14 day food frequency diary
over 3 years ending in 2008
T-tests were conducted on
fiber intake at breakfast to
identify differences between
adults consuming WG cereals
with either fiber level
Results
When the cereal consumed was made with
whole-grain, it became the number one
source for fiber in the diet. But when WG
cereal contained ≥3 g fiber , consumption
nearly doubled!
RTEC BKF
Consumers
Fiber
Consumed in
RTEC (g)
% Increase
Non-WG
RTEC
1.01g
WG RTEC
1.66g
78%
2.37g
144%
<3g fiber/svg)
WG RTEC
≥ 3g fiber/svg
Williams, Felt-Gunderson. AJLM 2013: Online ahead of print
The Outcome of This Confusion:
FIBER REMAINS A
“NUTRIENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH CONCERN”!
In order to find that elusive fiber needle – some food for thought
• Meet consumers where they are – but help them understand that wholegrain ≠ fiber!
• Educate and motivate consumers to look for at least 3 grams of fiber
per serving as that marker to deliver the fiber benefit that they expect to
get in their whole grain choices
– But also educate them to look for fiber in other grain foods that may also
provide at least a good source of fiber.
• Work together to raise a call-to-action to include fiber for on-pack wholegrain labeling claims
• Educate ourselves, our colleagues and consumers on the evidence and
importance for eating more fiber – from all sources
What is Fiber?
• Institute of Medicine Definition
– Dietary fiber – non-digestible carbohydrates and lignin that
are intrinsic and intact in plants
• Examples - Fibers found in fruits, vegetables, grains, bran, legumes
– Functional (added) fiber – isolated non-digestible
carbohydrates that have beneficial physiological effects in
human beings
• Examples - Fibers isolated from fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes
such as pectin, cellulose, b-glucans, psyllium, inulin
– Total fiber – sum of dietary and functional fiber
What is Fiber?
• Consumer Definition
– Dietary fiber = fiber
– Functional fiber = fiber
– Total fiber = fiber
Did you know?
Functional Fiber is the
only nutrient required by
IOM to show a
physiological benefit. All
other nutrients are
defined by their chemical
composition.
What are some of the potential
benefits of fiber?
We need a variety of fibers to
maximize benefit.
So many benefits!
A blessing and a curse
Because fiber has so many benefits it can create confusion for consumers
The Goal: VARIETY!
Building a More Fiber-ful Bowl/Plate
• First Flip for Fiber!
– Look to the Nutrition Facts Panel for at least 3g
fiber per serving
– Make sure that at least half those grain foods
are whole- grain foods with at least 3 g of fiber
– But also look to enriched grain foods with
added fiber
• Make Fiber Fun!
– Use MyBowl to teach clients about fiber
– Mix it Up! Use Fiber-ful products in different
ways
– Shake it up! Combine a high fiber cereal with
one that isn’t as high
– Add fruit to the bowl: You could get more than
half way to fiber goals at the breakfast table!
Circus Muffins: 3g Fiber
• Help Fiber Find its Moxy!
– Provide a “reason-to-believe” for eating more
fiber – and make it easy
Berry Bugs: 2g Fiber
Swap it Out for Fiber!
• Swap a candy bar for a more nutritious snack bar with at
least 3g fiber
• Swap out some flour in a recipe for finely crushed high
fiber cereal
• Use a crushed high fiber or bran flake cereal as crisp
topping for casseroles
• Use bran flake cereals to thicken soups and stews
• Swap out mashed banana for some of the fat in quick
bread recipes
• Sprinkle high fiber cereal such as Kellogg’s All-Bran® on a
salad instead of croutons or even on sorbet!
• Spread apple slices with peanut butter and sprinkle with
some crushed high fiber cereal
Like to Cook?
Alter Recipes to Include Fiber Cereals as Ingredients
Or, search our website for some great recipes made with these products
Curry Bran Chicken Salad
Serving Size
189g
Calories
190
Total Fat
5g
Sodium
260mg
Sugars
16g
Dietary Fiber
4g
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INGREDIENTS
2/3 cup plain, low-fat yogurt
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/8 teaspoon ginger
2 cups chopped, cooked chicken
3/4 cup chopped celery
3/4 cup chopped green or red bell pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 can (20 oz.) pineapple chunks, drained
3/4 cup Kellogg's® All-Bran® Original cereal
(divided)
Just One More Recipe!
Slow Cooker Pork
Serving Size
1 Cup Pork Mixture
& 1/2 Cup Rice
Calories
420
Total Fat
8g
Sodium
270mg
Sugars
24g
Dietary Fiber
8g
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INGREDIENTS
2 pounds lean pork stew meat
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
3 cups baby carrots
1 large onion, sliced
1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black
pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 clove garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups Kellogg's® All-Bran®
Complete® Wheat Flakes cereal
(crushed to 3/4 cup)
1 cup dried tart cherries
3/4 cup apple juice or apple cider
4 cups hot cooked brown rice
Some Thoughts to Leave You With…
• Help shrink the US fiber deficit by teaching your clients where to
look for fiber
– Make the breakfast meal a key occasion for consuming fiber
– Snacks can be another occasion for getting some fiber
– Make sure to look at the Nutrition Facts for fiber content
• Be open to all types of fiber!
– Science Supports that all fiber have benefits: and that a variety
of fibers provide a variety of benefits for holistic health
• Find the fun and flavor in fiber!
– Use high fiber cereals in recipes
– Swap out low fiber ingredients for higher fiber ingredients
Be a Fiber Maven!
Thank You!