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Review for English I PreAP/World Studies Final Exam
The exam will consist of 50 objective questions that pertain to skills and concepts students attained in the Fall
semester: interview narrative, rhetorical appeals, cinematic techniques, literary analysis, vocabulary and grammar.
Students who study all of the following information and annotate the provided texts will be very well-prepared for this test.
1. Students should read and annotate the short interview narrative with author Laurie Halse Anderson.
Students MUST have this text with them on the day of the exam! Use the following ideas to
guide your annotations:



Note the purpose and target audience for the article
Read paragraph three. Note an open-ended question that was most likely asked to generate this section of
the interview
Note parts of the interview that best capture Anderson’s voice and experience
2. Students should read and annotate the short story “The Quilt” on the back of this review. Students
MUST have this text with them on the day of the exam! Use the following ideas to guide your
annotations:
 How does the mood in the first paragraph compare to the mood at the end of the passage?
 What is the symbolic significance of the linen napkins?
 What is a major theme of the story?
 What is the point of view and how does it affect the story?
 What is the relationship between mood, conflict and plot in the story?
3. Students should be able to identify which cinematic technique a director should use to achieve a specific
effect/purpose:
- Review all Cinematic Technique Terms on page 134 – 136 in your SpringBoard book. *Pay close
attention to the effect the technique achieves in a film.
- For example, you will be asked questions like the following:
o A student is creating a film version of “Short Story.” The student would like her opening
shot to reflect the story’s setting. Which establishing shot would BEST capture her
purpose?
4. Students should review the advertising techniques and rhetorical appeals on page 69 - 74 and be able to
identify examples of the appeals and techniques in a scenario or actual advertisement.
 ethos, pathos, logos  rhetorical appeals
 bandwagon, avant-garde, testimonials, facts and figures, transfer  advertising techniques
 For example, you will be given a scenario like the following and be asked to identify the rhetorical
appeal being used or the advertising technique:
o A car company boasts about their award-winning vehicle and discusses the impressive
number of miles per gallon of gas their car can travel.
5. Students should review the following grammar concepts:
 phrase v. clause
 independent v. dependent clause
 sentence types: simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
6. Students should review the vocabulary words from units 4 – 6 in the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop, Level E.
English 1- Pre-AP Semester Exam Review (1st Semester)
Roots/ Word Parts
bene
cardi
don; donat
ego
-ent; -ant
-ent; -ant
form
hypo; hyp
luc; lum
mega
neg
-ous; -ious; eous
phys
psych
sci
scope
terr
tract
ultra
vac
Sadlier Vocabulary Unit 4
Affiliated
Ascertain
Attainment
Bequeath
Cogent
Converge
Disperse
Esteem
Expunge
Finite
Invulnerable
Malevolent
Nonchalant
Omniscient
Panacea
Scrupulous
Skulk
Supercilious
Uncanny
Venial
Sadlier Vocabulary Unit 5
Altruistic
Assent
Benefactor
Chivalrous
Clemency
Dearth
Diffident
Discrepancy
Embark
Facile
Indomitable
Infallible
Plod
Pungent
Remiss
Repose
Temerity
Truculent
Unfeigned
Virulent
Sadlier Vocabulary Unit 6
Accede
Brandish
Comprise
Deft
Destitute
Explicit
Extirpate
Inopportune
Ironic
Musty
Officious
Ominous
Pinnacle
Premeditated
Rampant
Solace
Stately
Supple
Suppress
Venal
Springboard Unit 1 Vocabulary
Ad hominem
Advertising techniques
Avant-garde
Band wagon
Claim
Concessions
Diction
Ethos
Facts and figures
Hook
Hyperbole
Imagery
Logos
Pathos
Protagonist
Refutations
Rhetorical appeals
Simile
Summary/ call to action
Support
Syntax
Testimonials
Transfer
Tone
Voice
Springboard Unit 2 Vocabulary
Cinematic techniques
 Shots and Framing
Shot
Establishing shot
Long shot
Medium shot
Close up
Extreme close up
Two shot
 Camera Angles
Eye level
High angle
Low angle
 Camera movements
Pan
Tilt
Zoom
Dolly/tracking
Boom/crane
 Lighting
High key
Low key
Bottom or side lighting
Front or back lighting
 Editing techniques
Cut
Fade
Dissolve
Wipe
Flashback
Shot-reverse-shot
Cross cutting
Eye-line match
 Sound
Diegetic
Non-diegetic
The Quilt
The unpleasant sensations of feeling chilled from the weather and overheated and exhausted overtook Nettie. Although she
searched the recesses of her mind, there was nothing to contemplate that would take her mind off her immense weariness. She felt as
tattered as the worn clothes piled high in the mending basket. The laundry was backbreaking labor—all that water to carry and
humongous iron pots to hoist onto the fire. The quilt was immersed and soaking in the kettle, waiting until Nettie had scrubbed the linen
napkins. The napkins, which made Nettie smile momentarily, in spite of herself, were Mama's way of holding onto her family traditions
of formality, no matter how ridiculous it might seem on the rough prairie. She always insisted that their mealtimes be observed with
some decorum.
No one from their family would wipe their dinner drippings on their sleeve. This seemed a frivolous practice to Nettie, her prairie-born
child—Nettie, the one who invariably did the scrubbing. To her, Mama's tradition just meant more laundering—more water to carry,
more kettles and pots to hoist, more scrubbing to numb and damage her hands. She yearned for an idyllic location where she could
stretch out her back and melt away her aches in the sunshine. Daydreams of peaceful slumber clouded her mind.
Mama roused her from her musings to help heave the quilt from the ancient kettle. Nettie watched as the steam escaped into
the frosty October air, and her mother grabbed the two thick branches Papa had whittled and handed one to Nettie. "Now come on,
child, and help me with this quilt. We've practically boiled it to death."
Plunging the wooden branches into the kettle, Nettie and her mother maneuvered them under the quilt to haul the soaking
mass out of the pot. Nettie staggered under the cumbersome weight of the quilt before regaining her balance, but Mama's feet were
steady and sure; as always, this gave Nettie comfort. Mama may have been slight in stature, but she had the strength of a team of
horses. Mama always gave the appearance of being hard and uncompromising, but her interior was nothing but softness—nothing but
a loving and affectionate soul.
Together they hefted the quilt and hung it on the clothesline, which nearly collapsed to the ground under its heavy burden.
Why they needed that ancient quilt was a mystery. You would have thought Papa had discovered gold when he brought it home from
the trading post, bursting into the cabin and practically flinging it at Mama.
Mama's eyes were gleaming, and her smile transformed her face, removing all traces of hardship and leaving only radiance in
its place. "Now, Oliver, I hope that's not the only thing you brought back." He affectionately kissed her cheek. "There's more in the
wagon," he replied and then collapsed in the chair like the bucket dropping to the bottom of a well.
"That pitiful quilt looks like a collection of discarded rags," Nettie heard herself say.
"It's an heirloom, Nettie. After some mending and a thorough washing, this handsome quilt will be magnificent. You won't refer
to it as a collection of rags when its encompassing folds shield you from the harsh winter winds and bitter cold," added Mama in mild
reproach.
Papa just laughed, finding humor in life's experiences as he always did; his was the way of the optimist, and he faced every
day on the prairie as an adventure to be encountered gladly. Though the deep creases on his forehead told another story, Papa never
indicated that he felt anything but lighthearted.
"Nettie, quit fantasizing and grab an end so we can smooth this beauty out."
Nettie's hands were a brilliant crimson, and they stung fiercely, but she took heed and helped Mama straighten the quilt. Water
pooled into a murky puddle as it cascaded from the cloth. Nettie stepped away gingerly, not wanting to drench her shoes any further in
the all-encompassing puddle forming under the quilt. That menacing puddle reminded her of what it felt like when she had to do the
washing as if she were about to submerge herself into the deepest darkest depths, only to resurface when she had discovered some
way to escape from the tedious task. She looked up, and there was the quilt suspended from the clothesline. For the first time she saw
something other than a collection of patchwork
rags. Instead, she saw beautiful depictions delicately embroidered in the patchwork: a tree in summer, boughs laden with an
abundance of speckled apples; the dark silhouettes of horses at pasture against a sunset; a portrait of a young girl; waves of golden
wheat blanketing fields. Nettie reached out and traced these pictures with her fingertips. Who knew it was so beautiful? No wonder
Papa had borne it home in triumph; no wonder Mama had spent countless hours repairing and restoring it. When it was finally dry, that
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lovely old quilt would surround her in tenderness and warmth and protect her through all of the frigid prairie winter nights. No howling
wind, no piercing cold could ever touch her again.
Who Wrote That? Featuring Laurie Halse Anderson
Published in California Kids! (March 2005)
Laurie Halse Anderson says that no one who knew her as a child thought she would become a successful adult. “I was
an innocent child and wasn’t terribly bright. I stuttered and needed a reading tutor.” As a teen, she remembers feeling confused
and overwhelmed most of the time and withdrew into herself for protection. In college, Anderson avoided English and language
arts classes because she hated the way teachers made her analyze books. “This made the process of becoming an author A LOT
harder!” she says.
In spite of her lack of formal English training, Anderson possesses a well-developed sense of story. When she was a
kid, she used to sneak downstairs after bedtime to eavesdrop on the grown-ups telling stories. Their tales not only grounded
Anderson in her own history, but subliminally implanted literary devices like pacing, hooks, and dialogue.
Before Anderson is ready to write a novel, she thinks about her main characters until she can hear their voices in her
head. She calls this stage “eavesdropping” because she records what she hears—bits of dialogue, likes, dislikes, fears—all the
nuances that make her characters real. As the characters develop, conflict points become clearer. Once Anderson establishes
conflict, she begins writing.
When Anderson first started writing for children, she had a day job. “I was sneaking in my writing in the morning and
at night. Now that I’m a published author who’s had a lot of lucky breaks, I have a day job—designing my website, answering
fan mail, speaking at schools and conferences. So I still sneak in my writing in the morning and at night.” But Anderson isn’t
complaining. She feels fortunate to have had such an impact on children. If she had to predict how her life would have turned
out, she would never have predicted her current success.
ON THE DAY OF THE EXAM, YOU WILL NEED A PENCIL, ERASER AND YOUR ANNOTATED TEXTS!!! DON’T FORGET!!
THE TEXTS WILL NOT BE ON THE EXAM!!!
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