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Transcript
COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION
Two weeks after Congress declared war on German,
President Wilson created the Committee on Public
Information (CPI) to increase public support for the war.
President Wilson knew that in order for the war to be
successful, that he would need Americans to “back it up.”
The CPI used rallies, parades, posters, and pamphlets
as forms of propaganda to persuade Americans to support the
war. The committee recruited movie stars to entertain
troops. Hollywood also produced movies like The Kaiser:
The Beast of Berlin, which showed enemy leaders (ex: Kaiser
of Germany) as evil people, and even monsters. The CPI
restricted what information Americans saw regarding the
war, so that they were only receiving the messages that the
government wanted them to see.
COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION
Two weeks after Congress declared war on German,
President Wilson created the Committee on Public
Information (CPI) to increase public support for the war.
President Wilson knew that in order for the war to be
successful, that he would need Americans to “back it up.”
The CPI used rallies, parades, posters, and pamphlets
as forms of propaganda to persuade Americans to support the
war. The committee recruited movie stars to entertain
troops. Hollywood also produced movies like The Kaiser:
The Beast of Berlin, which showed enemy leaders (ex: Kaiser
of Germany) as evil people, and even monsters. The CPI
restricted what information Americans saw regarding the
war, so that they were only receiving the messages that the
government wanted them to see.
ESPIONAGE & SEDITION ACTS
In order to make sure that Americans were supportive of
the war, and the U.S. government in general, the government
took steps to make sure that Americans were not actively
speaking out against the war. The government wanted to
make sure that the messages that Americans were hearing
were positive ones.
To accomplish this, the government passed the Espionage
Act in 1917 and the Sedition Act in 1918. These acts
(laws) provided severe penalties for aiding the enemy,
refusing military duty, or speaking “disloyally” about the
U.S. Government, Constitution, or flag. As a result, about
900 opponents of the war – including some labor leaders and
socialists – were put in jail for breaking these laws.
ESPIONAGE & SEDITION ACTS
In order to make sure that Americans were supportive of
the war, and the U.S. government in general, the government
took steps to make sure that Americans were not actively
speaking out against the war. The government wanted to
make sure that the messages that Americans were hearing
were positive ones.
To accomplish this, the government passed the Espionage
Act in 1917 and the Sedition Act in 1918. These acts
(laws) provided severe penalties for aiding the enemy,
refusing military duty, or speaking “disloyally” about the
U.S. Government, Constitution, or flag. As a result, about
900 opponents of the war – including some labor leaders and
socialists – were put in jail for breaking these laws.
SELECTIVE SERVICE ACT
The American government knew that in order to be
successful in the war, that one of the most important
things was to have enough soldiers. Our leaders also knew
that we would not have enough members of the military
unless something was done. To deal with this problem, the
Selective Service Act was passed, which helped our military
obtain more soldiers to fight in the war.
This act, which was passed in 1917, required men
between the ages of 21 and 30 to register to be drafted
into the armed forces. Almost 3 million men who serve
during the war were draftees. Some Americans saw the draft
as a violation of their civil liberties (freedoms). Others
claimed that they could not fight in the war as a result of
their religious beliefs. These people were often placed in
“non combat” positions.
SELECTIVE SERVICE ACT
The American government knew that in order to be
successful in the war, that one of the most important
things was to have enough soldiers. Our leaders also knew
that we would not have enough members of the military
unless something was done. To deal with this problem, the
Selective Service Act was passed, which helped our military
obtain more soldiers to fight in the war.
This act, which was passed in 1917, required men
between the ages of 21 and 30 to register to be drafted
into the armed forces. Almost 3 million men who serve
during the war were draftees. Some Americans saw the draft
as a violation of their civil liberties (freedoms). Others
claimed that they could not fight in the war as a result of
their religious beliefs.
“non combat” positions.
These people were often placed in
ANTI-GERMAN ATTITUDES
Since Germany was the main country that we were
fighting against during the war, Americans were
understandably fearful of Germans and also had strong
negative feelings towards them. Just like the American
government tried to get citizens to be in favor of the
United States, many people tried to portray Germany in a
negative way.
Many German Americans faced harassment and charges of
disloyalty because of strong anti-German feelings. Also,
in order to show their dislike for German things, people
renamed familiar items that were linked to Germany. For
example, hamburgers became “liberty sandwiches” and
dachshunds (a type of German dog) became “liberty pups.”
ANTI-GERMAN ATTITUDES
Since Germany was the main country that we were
fighting against during the war, Americans were
understandably fearful of Germans and also had strong
negative feelings towards them. Just like the American
government tried to get citizens to be in favor of the
United States, many people tried to portray Germany in a
negative way.
Many German Americans faced harassment and charges of
disloyalty because of strong anti-German feelings. Also,
in order to show their dislike for German things, people
renamed familiar items that were linked to Germany. For
example, hamburgers became “liberty sandwiches” and
dachshunds (a type of German dog) became “liberty pups.”