Download Programme - IPNA - Universität Basel

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Cultural anthropology wikipedia, lookup

Archaeology wikipedia, lookup

Social mobility wikipedia, lookup

Culture-historical archaeology wikipedia, lookup

Pseudoarchaeology wikipedia, lookup

Economic mobility wikipedia, lookup

History of archaeology wikipedia, lookup

Post-processual archaeology wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Institut für Prähistorische und Naturwissenschaftliche Archäologie Universität Basel
Institut de préhistoire et des sciences de l'antiquité Université de Neuchâtel
Seminar für Ur- und Frühgeschichte Universität Basel
Graduiertenprogramm „Integrative Archäologie“
Module 4
Migration and Mobility
11. February to 13. February 2009
Organization:
Dr. Angela Schlumbaum
Dr. Sandra Pichler
Dr. Gerhard Hotz
Humans are migratory; their movements have been shaping landscapes, social and cultural life
and economy until today. However, defining and collecting evidence for migration/mobility
events in the past is a challenging task in archaeology. The discussions on either demic or
cultural diffusion of agriculture or whether cultural transitions can be explained with migration are
just two prominent examples. Others concern transhumance or trade of animals, or import of
plants. Furthermore the interpretation of social and economic consequences of migration is
difficult for past times in particular without written sources.
Migration events are studied by different scientific communities. In archaeology and
anthropology spatial and temporal changes of material culture, building designs or burial
customs are studied. Geophysicists use stable isotopes as signatures for movements relative to
the local geological environment during the life span of an individual, in case of archaeological
remains e.g. bones or teeth. Modern genetics analyse the long term history of females and
males or groups of individuals with molecular markers. Archaeogenetics uses archaeological
remains to test hypotheses from modern genetics/archaeology and provides insight into a
precise time span in the past. Archaeobiologists observe animal and plant movements and
indirectly measure human migrations by intentionally spread crops or domestic animals.
In an interdisciplinary approach graduates are to learn about and discuss the potentials of the
different methodical approaches, and develop how best to use the information to gain a deeper
insight into their own projects.
In this module we will explore human, animal and plant migrations by key lectures about state of
the art methods in archaeology, anthropology, archaeobiology, stable isotope analysis,
archaeogenetics and modern genetics.
1
Wednesday, 11. February 2009: Position Papers
13.30h–13.45h
Chair; welcoming address, introduction
Thomas Doppler, Basel
13.45h–14.15h
Introduction of the graduates
Dr. Angela Schlumbaum, Dr. Gerhard Hotz, Dr. Sandra Pichler, Basel
14.15h–15.00h
Dr. Roland Prien, Heidelberg: Migration and archaeology: a theoretical
perspective
15.00h–15.15h
Commentary: Dr. Mike Schweissing, München, discussion
15.15h–16.00h
Dr. Julia Koch, Leipzig: Mobility and gender. Ancient written sources as
interpretation help for gender differentiation in mobility studies
16.00h–16.30h
Commentary: Prof. Dr. Brigitte Röder, Basel, discussion
16.30h–17.00
Coffee break
17.00h–17.45h
Prof. Dr. Terry Brown and Dr. Keri Brown, Manchester: Tracing the
migrations of humans by studying the spread of agriculture in Italy
17.45h–18.15h
Commentary: Dr. Sandra Pichler, Basel, discussion
18.15h–18.30h
Conclusion, plenary discussion
from 18.30h
Apéro and Dinner at Castelen
2
Thursday 12. February, morning session: Genetic evidence of Migration and
Mobility
8.30h–8.45h
Chair; introduction of session topics, speakers and research issues
Francesca Ginella, Basel
8.45h–9.15h
Dr. Angela Schlumbaum, Basel: An introduction to archaeogenetics:
What ancient genes tell about migration
9.15h–9.45h
Commentary: Britta Pollmann, Basel, discussion
9.45h–10.15h
Coffee break
10.15h–10.45h
Dr. Thomas Cucchi, Durham: Human migration and mobility in
zooarchaeology: human dispersal of commensal and domestic species
10.45h–11.15h
Commentary: Miki Bopp-Ito, Basel, discussion
11.15h–11.45h
Ben Krause-Kyora, Kiel: Man, landscape and what do the pigs say
11.45h–12.15h
Commentary: Julia Elsner, Basel, discussion
12.15h–12.30h
Conclusions, plenary discussion
12.30h–14.00h
Lunch Castelen
Thursday 12. February, afternoon session: Geochemical evidence of Migration
and Mobility
14.00h–14.15h
Chair; introduction of session topics, speakers and research issues
Felix Engel, Freiburg
14.15h–14.45h
Dr. Mike Schweissing, München: Strontium isotopes as a proxy for
migration-events in historical and prehistorical times
14.45h–15.15h
Commentar: Aixa Andreetta, Basel, discussion
15.15h–15.45h
Corina Knipper M.A., Mainz: Animal husbandry detected by isotopic
signatures
15.45h–16.15h
Commentary: Marguerita Schäfer, Basel, discussion
16.15h–16.45h
Coffee break
16.45h–17.15h
17.15h–17.45h
Victoria Oelze, Leipzig: Isotope Evidence of Mobility and Diet in the Early
Bronze and Early Iron Ages in Southern Germany
Commentary: Dr. Marion Benz, Freiburg, discussion
17.45h–18.00h
Conclusion, plenary discussion
18.00h
Dinner at Römerhof, Giebenacherstrasse 31, Augst
3
Friday 13. February, morning session: Archaeobotany, Migration and Mobility
8.30h–8.45h
Chair; introduction of session topics, speakers and research issues
Dorota Wojtczak, Basel
8.45h–9.15h
Dr. Sue Colledge, London: Archaeobotanical evidence for the spread of
Neolithic farming
9.15h–9.45h
Commentary: Renata Perego, Basel, discussion
9.45h–10.15h
Coffee break
10.15h–10.45h
Daniel Schuhmann, Basel: Combining GIS and archaeozoology: An
attempt to prove migration with the help of archaeozoological finds
10.45h–11.15h
Commentary: Barbara Stopp, Basel, discussion
11.15h–11.45h
Dr. Elke Kaiser, Berlin: Mobility and migration of prehistoric populations
in the northern Pontic steppe
11.45h–12.15h
Discussion
12.15h–12.30h
Conclusion, plenary discussion
12.30h–14.00h
Lunch at Castelen
Friday, 13. February, afternoon session: Anthropological and archaeological
studies
14.00h–14.15h
Chair; introduction of session topics, speakers and research issues
Thomas Hauck, Basel
14.15h–14.45h
Dr. Gerhard Hotz, Basel: Migration and Mobility: Anthropological
approach to an interdisciplinary task
14.45h–15.15h
Commentary: Hannele Rissannen, Basel, discussion
15.15h–15.45h
Richard Frosdick, Basel: Filling in the gaps: Size and body shape of the
livestock through time in NW Switzerland.
15.45h–16.15h
Commentary: Dominique Hecker, Basel, discussion
16.15h–16.45h
Coffee break
16.45h–17.15h
Johanna Kranzbühler, Mainz: Social change at the Near Eastern
Neolithic transition from foraging to farming - dental and isotopic evidence
17.15h–17.40h
Commentary: Simon Kramis, Basel, discussion
17.40h–18.10h
Fabio Wegmüller, Basel: Early Human Migration - The Oldest Human
Expansion into Eurasia from an Archaeological View
18.10h–18.35h
Commentary: Janina Duerr, Basel and Dr. Keri Brown, Manchester,
discussion
18.35h–19.00h
Concluding discussion and module summary: Apéro and END
4
5