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JUNE | JULY | AUGUST 2016
PRICELESS!
Vol 21 No 9
LISTINGS | FEATURES
RECORD REVIEWS
YOUR ANNUAL GREEN PAGES
SUMMER MUSIC GUIDE
Lemon Bucket
Orkestra
IN JUNE
TAFELMUSIK @
Sun, June 19, 2016 @7:20pm
visit website for more details
Don’t miss Tafelmusik’s debut at the Hearn
Generating Station, as part of Luminato’s 10th
anniversary celebrations! Led by Jeanne Lamon,
this informal, 45 minute-long performance will make
for an exciting and thought-provoking contrast of
baroque repertoire in a raw, industrial setting.
Photo: G. Pimentel
FRE E CONCERT S IN JUNE!
Baroque
Summer
Festival
SUPPORTED BY
Delightfully Baroque
Tafelmusik Baroque
Orchestra and
Chamber Choir
June 6 at 8pm
Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,
Jeanne Lamon Hall
Musical Interlude
June 11 at 12:30pm
TBSI Orchestras and Choirs
June 15 at 1pm
Walter Hall, U of T
The Grand Finale
June 18 at 7:30pm
Grace Church on-the-hill—
TICKETS REQUIRED,
visit website for more details
SEASON PRESENTING SPONSOR
Walter Hall, U of T
BLISS
16/17 Season
Save up to 30% and subscribe
today to our upcoming season
Call 416.964.6337
tafelmusik.org
24 performances
6 intimate venues
1 world-class festival!
TICKETS ON
SALE NOW!
DISCOUNTED LOCAL DINING AND
ACCOMMODATIONS AVAILABLE FOR
FESTIVAL TICKET HOLDERS
CHARTERED BUS SERVICE BETWEEN TORONTO AND ELORA
with Valérie Milot
July 15
Jan Lisiecki
www.musicandbeyond.ca
Photo: Hiep Vu
July 10
Measha
Brueggergosman
July 9
Les Violons
du Roy
© CamirandPhoto
July 8 & 9
SHAKESPEARE AND MUSIC
with Christopher Plummer
Photo: Bo Huang
Photo: Richard Bain
MUSIC AND BEYOND | 75 CONCERTS & EVENTS | JULY 4-17, 2016
Volume 21 No 9 | Summer 2016
Highlights of
the season
FEATURES
6. OPENER | On Music Making In Particular Places | DAVID PERLMAN
8. ON OUR COVER | Lemon Bucket Orkestra | MJ BUELL
8. How I’ll Spend My Summer Vocation | SARA CONSTANT
10. SSM At Sweet Sixteen | DAVID PERLMAN
12. Summer Of Our Discontent? | LYDIA PEROVIC
15. Jazz Stories | Balancing the Books, and Real Jazz Hooks | ORI DAGAN
18. Meet Music Mondays’ Ian Grundy | ALLAN PULKER
70. WE ARE ALL MUSIC’S CHILDREN | Alex Pangman | MJ BUELL
92. CBC RADIO TWO: This Isn’t Silence | DAVID JAEGER
BEAT BY BEAT
18. Classical & Beyond | PAUL ENNIS
22. In with the New | WENDALYN BARTLEY
24 World View | ANDREW TIMAR
26. On Opera | CHRISTOPHER HOILE
28. Early Music | DAVID PODGORSKI
29. Art of Song | HANS DE GROOT
30. Choral Scene | BRIAN CHANG
32. Bandstand | JACK MacQUARRIE
62. Mainly Clubs, Mostly Jazz! | BOB BEN
SPECIAL FEATURE
G1 - G10. GREEN PAGES: SUMMER FESTIVAL GUIDE
LISTINGS
35. S | Summer Festival Listings
46. A | Concerts in the GTA
57. B | Concerts Beyond the GTA
60. C | Music Theatre
62. D | In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
65. E | The ETCeteras
DISCOVERIES: RECORDINGS REVIEWED
71. Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS
73. Strings Attached | TERRY ROBBINS
76. Keyed In | ALEX BARAN
78. Vocal
81. Early Music And Period Performance
81. Classical & Beyond
82. Modern & Contemporary
83 Jazz & Improvised
86. Pot Pourri
87. Something in the Air | KEN WAXMAN
88. Old Wine, New Bottles | BRUCE SURTEES
MORE
6. Contact Information & Deadlines
7. Index of Advertisers
68. Classified Ads
GRIGORIAN.COM
Cover Photograph Ananas Hostel
F O R O P E N E R S | DAV I D P E R L M A N
On Music Making In Particular Places
I
W
Perspectives by incongruity 2
hen Luminato first burst onto the Toronto scene a little over
a decade ago, (as, among other things, a civic vaccine for
SARS), their mission statement/slogan was “Bringing the
World to Toronto,” and I remember feeling a grudging admiration for
the sneakily clever ambiguity of it all.
“Way to hedge your bets,” I thought at the time. If the global public
does come to see how wonderfully cultural we are, mission accomplished. If, on the other hand, those of us who can’t afford plane and
concert tickets get to take in some of the great art and culture of our
time right here in our own backyard, then mission still accomplished!
(That being said, I will forever remain grateful for the opportunity
to take in the Ex Machina/Robert Lepage production of Lip Sync at
the Bluma Appel Theatre in 2009. It was worth every penny, at a time
when pennies were still worth something.)
I’m quite sure, though, that this ambiguity of mission has not
served Luminato very well over the years. “And if they still don’t get
that it doesn’t serve them well, then it serves them right,” is what I
would have said, right up until a few months ago. But methinks, as
Andrew Timar intimates in his World View column this issue, there
may be some hope on the eastern horizon.
The decision to tie Luminato’s fortunes to a single location – the
decommissioned Hearn Generating Station in the eastern portlands represents for me, the recognition, finally, that the stated goal
of attempting to turn the whole of downtown Toronto into a ten-day
cultural wonder of the world has been as much of an exercise in
futility as it would have been be to try to turn the outfield at the
Rogers Centre into a world-class rose garden.
Perspectives by incongruity 1
n this particular version of an ancient allegory, the Editor-In-Chief
summons two scribes to his lofty perch and says, “Go forth and
ascertain the health of the operatic art form in our realm during
the months when shorts are shortest and the sun is at its highest in
the sky.”
So off they go, and in due course they return and the one scribe
steps forward and says:
“A peculiar thing happens each year around mid-May in this, the
largest, busiest city of Canada: Toronto opera life all but shuts down,
give or take an intrepid indie daring a short, early-June run. And the
season stays shut until the latter half of September.”
“Aha!” says the Editor-In-Chief. “Thank you!”
Then the other scribe steps forward and says:
“It used to be that, come June, Ontarians had to leave the province to seek opera performances elsewhere. That’s not the case this
summer, which is surprisingly filled with opera, especially with
new ones.”
“Aha!” says the Editor-In-Chief. “Thank you!”
At this point, the Managing Editor, who has been observing all
this with an almost imperceptible frown, steps forward: “They can’t
both of them be ‘Aha!’” the Managing Editor says. (And the Senior
Proofreader, who has also been observing all this, nods in almost
imperceptible agreement.)
“Aha!!” says the Editor-In-Chief. “Thank you!”
The WholeNote™
VOLUME 21 NO 9| JUNE 1 -SEPTEMBER 7, 2016
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Recordings Editor | David Olds
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6 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
THANKS TO THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS
Beat Columnists
Paul Ennis, Wendalyn Bartley, Brian Chang,
Christopher Hoile, David Podgorski, Hans de
Groot, Andrew Timar, Jack MacQuarrie, Bob Ben,
mJ buell
Features
David Perlman, Ori Dagan, David Jaeger, Sara
Constant, Lydia Perovic
CD Reviewers
Alex Baran, John Beckwith, Stuart Broomer, Max
Christie, Raul da Gama, Hans De Groot, Daniel
Foley, Janos Gardonyi, Tiina Kiik, Roger Knox,
Alison Melville, Lesley Mitchell-Clarke, David Olds,
Ivana Popovic, Ted Quinlan, Cathy Riches, Cathy
Riches, Terry Robbins, Sharna Searle, Bruce
Surtees, Robert Tomas, Ken Waxman, Dianne
Wells, Vanessa Wells, Elliot Wright
Proofreading
Vanessa Wells, Jennifer Liu, John Sharpe, Paul
Ennis, Sara Constant
Listings
John Sharpe, Bob Ben,Tilly Kooyman, Ruth
Atwood, Simone Desilets, Jennifer Liu, Katie White
Circulation Team
Abram Bergen, Beth Bartley / Mark Clifford, Bob
Jerome, Dagmar Sullivan, Dave Taylor, Garry
Page, Gero Hajek, Jack Buell, James Harris, John
Dodington, Jeff Hogben, Jonathan Spencer, Lorna
Nevison, Manuel Couto, Micah Herzog, Patrick
Slimmon, Paul Ennis, Robert Faulkner, Sharon
Clark, Tiffany Johnson, Tom Sepp, Vanita
Butrsingkorn, Wende Bartley
Layout & Design
Bryson Winchester, Susan Sinclair
an Ontario government agency
un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario
Upcoming Dates & Deadlines
Free Event Listings Deadline
6pm Monday August 8
Display Ad Reservations Deadline
6pm Monday August 15
Classifieds Deadline
6pm Thursday August 25
Advertising Materials Due
6pm Thursday August 18
Publication Date
Tuesday August 30 (Online)
Thursday September 1 (Print)
Volume 22 No 1 covers
September 1 - October 7, 2016
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thewholenote.com
thewholenote.com
Ask LUDWIG!
I don't know enough about the inner workings at Luminato to
know whether this decision is a final virtuosic flourish from outgoing
artistic director Jörn Weisbrodt. But bravo to someone for what is
simultaneously an act of humility and outrageous grandiosity. “Hey
guys, we’ve decided to think global and act local. So let’s go score us
the biggest honking locale we can!”
How they go about getting us locals to go there in droves (so we’re
eventually worth some global gawking at, while we play) is another
question. But, I say this year, give them the benefit of the doubt. Go
experience the potential of the place – imagine, for example, what a
remount of Apocalypsis would have been like at the Hearn instead of
the Sony Centre!
Lessons learned:
Here’s to Brian Barlow’s Jazz Van during the PEC JazzFest careening
around the county, stopping to unload sounds of brass into the Quinte
roadside air!
Here’s to the visionary individuals in places like Elora, Parry Sound,
Clear Lake, Indian Springs, Stratford, the Beaches, and yes, even
downtown Toronto, who looked at some particular place, thought of
some particular time, imagined the music that belonged there, and
did something about it.
Here’s to all our future musical places yet to discover!
Here’s to open air music in all our downtowns, little and large.
Here’s to getting to recharge our musical batteries over the summer
so we come back in the fall with fresh ears!
LUDWIG enables you, the reader, to better search our
live concert listings. On our website you can search for
specific text (like a performer’s or composer’s name).
You can also refine your search to geographic zones or
genres or date range.
LUDWIG online! is brand new and still in what we call a
"Beta" trial. This means there may be some bugs or
errors that we are not yet aware of. We thank you for
helping us "kick the tires" on this new service and
apologize in advance for any problems you may
encounter.
Last print issue till September
We are done in print now until the beginning of September. So
now’s the time to register, on the front page of our website, for our
e-letter, HalfTones, which will publish June 15, July 4 and August 10,
bringing you news, updated listings, contests and links to newly
posted videos, audios, concert reports and more!
[email protected]
Find what you like online at
TheWholeNote.com/Ask-Ludwig
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
Adelphi Vocal Ensemble 52
Aga Khan Museum 25
All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church 30
Amadeus Choir 48, 66
Analekta73, 79
Artists’ Garden Cooperative35
ArtsMediaProjects 69
ATMA 5, 75, 76, 77
Bach Children's Chorus 66
Barrie Concert Band58
Beaches International Jazz Festival G10
Blue Griffin Recording Inc75
Canadian Children’s Opera Company49
Cantemus Singers50
Cathedral Bluffs34
Christ Church Deer Park - Jazz Vespers 61
Classical Unbound Festival 9
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival35
CONTACT Contemporary Music 23, 51, 67
Elmer Iseler Singers31
Elora Festival 3, 36
Estonian National Opera Boys’ Choir52
Festival of the Sound37
Florian Hoefner79
Flute Street 47
Follk Camp 66
Grace Church on-the-Hill 65
Highlands Opera Studio 38, 39
Horizon Tax Services 68
I Furiosi52
thewholenote.com
Inga Filippova 52
Kindred Spirits Orchestra 21, 53
Lark Ensemble50
Living Music71
LizPR 68
Long & McQuade67
Master Performing69
Mississauga Symphony 21
Moonaura48
Mooredale Concerts 20
MOSAIC Canadian Vocal Ensemble66
Music and Beyond 4, 40
Music at Metropolitan 31, 55
Music at Metropolitan / Noon at Met47
Music Mondays 48, 53, 55, 56
Music Picnic55
Music Toronto 11
National Youth Orchestra of Canada 41, 56, 58, 91
Naxos 73, 75
New Horizons Bands 33
New Music Concerts 51
No Strings Theatre 55
Off Centre Music Salon17
Off Centre/Deranger 49
Opera Atelier65
Orpheus Choir 68
Pasquale Bros. Downtown 66
Prince Edward County Classical Music Festival41
Remenyi House of Music 15
Rhodes Electric Piano69
Royal Conservatory School68
Ryan Choi71
Sam Broverman 77
Sari Kessler77
Schubert Now49
St Philip’s - Jazz Vespers64
St. Olave’s Church50
St. Stephen in-the-Fields Anglican Church 48
Steinway Piano Gallery, Toronto 13
Stratford Summer Music 41, 90
Summer Opera Lyric Theatre 61
Tafelmusik 2
Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute 48, 49, 51
TD Sunfest ‘16 (London) 42
TD Toronto Jazz Festival 43, 63
Toronto Children’s Chorus67
Toronto Operetta Theatre 14, 27
Toronto Summer Music Festival 44, 94, G10
Toronto Symphony 93
Universal Music Canada 73, 79
VegasNorth Entertainment69
Viva! Youth Singers of Toronto 46
Voicebox: Opera in Concert 29
Walden Chamber Players 77
Westben Arts Festival Theatre 45
Women’s Musical Club of Toronto 19
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church 34, 48
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 7
On Our Cover
T
How I’ll Spend
My Summer
Vocation
LEMON BUCKET ORKESTRA
hese boys of summer are
members of Toronto’s
Lemon Bucket Orkestra.
They have lots of exciting
reasons to blow their own
horns, and no difficulty
getting audiences to dance to
their beat.
LBO began in 2010 as a
four-person street busking
band consisting of Mark
Marczyk, violin and vocals,
Oskar Lambarri, drum and
vocals, Tangi Ropars, button
accordion, and Alex Nahirny,
guitar. In 2016, it’s now a band
of 16-plus, rolling merrily into
its sixth summer and gathering members as it goes, the
way a rolling ball of burdock
gathers more burdock: vocals,
strings, winds, brass, percusPlaying trombone on the left is Leli
Camilo; trombone on the right – Nate
sion, including a range of
Dell-Vandenberg; on the sousaphone
world/folk instruments. The
– Ian Tulloch. Mark Marczyk – violin &
music is every bit as vigorous
vocals, who is a founding member of
as “Balkan-klezmer-gypsythe band, has his back to the camera.
party-punk-super band”
Photographed at the Ananas Hostel
suggests, and so is their
in Pécs, Hungary, by a member
schedule.
of the hostel staff, during Lemon
Counting Sheep: A Guerrilla
Bucket’s 2015 Moorka release tour.
Folk Opera is LBO’s current
performance project. It’s an interactive video-music-dinner-theatre
play about the Maidan Revolution, which will be performed August 5
to 29 at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival following its May 26 to June 5
Toronto run at Broadview Place. The Ukrainian polyphonic choral
music, exuberant performances and powerful visuals offer a visceral
experience of living with present-day revolution. Based on the 2014
Kyiv experiences of band-members Mark Marczyk and Marichka
Kudriavtseva, the show includes the audience alongside the ensemble
members in stylized white sheep masks – there is food and music and
dancing for everyone, blurring the line between what is theatre and
real life.
But before Lemon Bucket Orkestra takes off for Edinburgh they’ll
be shaking things up here in Canada. They have Toronto concerts
at Roy Thomson Hall (“Live on the Patio” series, June 23) and at the
Opera House, with Romanian band Fanfare Ciocarlia (TD Toronto
Jazz Festival, June 29) followed by appearances at eight Canadian
festivals including the Hillside Festival (July 24, in Guelph), Ottawa
Chamberfest (July 28), and then another concert at Toronto’s Mel
Lastman Square (July 29).
Lemon Bucket’s newest recording Moorka, nominated for a 2016
JUNO Award, has just won a Canadian Folk Music Award – “World
Group of the Year.” It includes folk songs the band learned on their
last European tour from local musicians in Romania, Ukraine, Serbia,
and Macedonia, but these are spiked and shaken up into the stirring
musical mix LBO audiences now hunger for in Canada and around
the world. By all accounts, no matter where the band is playing,
people find themselves irresistibly drawn in – weirdly at home with
and involved in music that is simultaneously exotic and familiar. This
includes the passengers on a delayed Air Canada flight from Toronto
to Frankfurt in 2012 who were treated to an impromptu concert
while Lemon Bucket waited to take off for their “Balkan Station
Romania Tour.”
mj Buell
8 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
I
S A R A C O N S TA N T
t’s no secret that summer, as far as the classical music scene goes, is
Toronto’s off-season. As Lydia Perovic points out in her take on this
year’s summer opera scene, though (see page 12), Toronto’s musical
off-season tends to be a lot longer than most. If they haven’t already,
most of our local music presenters are now wrapping up the last of their
2015/16 shows—which leaves a good three months of limbo until the
beginning of 2016/17 in the fall.
Of course, that implies that the city falls silent for most of June,
July and August—which is far from the case. Summer music festivals
abound, including local giants like Luminato, TD Toronto Jazz Festival
and Toronto Summer Music. International artists often schedule
Toronto into their summer tours and festival circuits, and local musicmakers, who jump from gig to gig all year long, finally have the gift
of much-needed time—to relax, or to plan projects of their own. And
while the length of Toronto’s musical break might attest to the relative youth of our music scene, it makes these long summer months
the perfect moment to look beyond business as usual, towards something new.
TCML: “Something new”
pretty much sums up the
motivation behind at least
one of the musical projects
in town this month. New
this year, the Toronto
Creative Music Lab (TCML)
is a one-week workshop
for early-career musicmakers (June 19 to 24),
where performers and
composers are formed into
small groups to collaborate
on new works. Designed
with the spirit of peer-topeer collaboration in mind,
the workshop focuses on
building a community for
early-career artists that is
rich in opportunities for
Jason Doell
professional development.
Full disclosure: I’m one of the participants this year. But – biased
though I may be – during a time when the usual music scene is taking
a breather, this program is just the thing .to fill in some of the gaps,
and build potentially fruitful musical relationships.
Composer Jason Doell and saxophonist Olivia Shortt, who alongside William Callaghan of Musica Reflecta, form the organizing
team for the workshop, are hopeful about what this project will do
for emerging artists. “For me, peer-mentoring is essential for earlycareer artists and there is an opportunity in the Toronto contemporary
music scene to facilitate these relationships,” says Doell. “While technical development in any discipline may be aided by the guidance of
recognized experts, most professional relationships and opportunities arise within a peer group. Also…who knows more about being an
early-career artist than those directly involved in being early-career
artists? Peer-mentoring is a fantastic way to access the knowledge of
people who are facing similar issues and obstacles to the ones you are
facing today.”
“Toronto is abundant in programs for composers and performers
thewholenote.com
Olivia Shortt
seeking out more traditional styles of music and art practices but there
isn’t as much for those seeking workshops that offer an approach
to more current music,” adds Shortt. “Especially as a saxophonist,
Toronto doesn’t offer much in the way of workshops and opportunities to network as a classical/new music performer. I’ve often had to
seek these opportunities in other cities.”
A project like TCML couldn’t come at a better time of year for people
like me. Taking place at the end of June means that TCML can create
these opportunities in Toronto, for participants, who at any other time
would be busy at work, schools or conservatories all over the world.
And for both organizers, June offers a moment to reflect on the rest of
the year, and put their observations into action.
“[TCML] fits in well with my day-to-day life,” explains Doell. “I’m
a full-time composer and I also create music educator programs, so a
lot of what we are trying to accomplish at TCML is in the front of my
mind regularly.” And for Shortt, an incoming masters student at the
University of Toronto, being on the giving rather than the receiving
end of a summer workshop has so far been a valuable experience.
“This is one of the first projects for me that hasn’t been something I’m
organizing for myself, like a recital or a tour,” she says. “And there’s a
lot that school couldn’t teach me, so this has been the most practical
educational opportunity that I’ve been a part of.”
For my part, the workshop will be a refreshing break from my restof-the-year schoolwork, and a welcome challenge after some time
away from my instrument. It will be, in other words, the perfect
summer vocation.
The final concert of TCML, featuring all of the premieres workshopped during the week’s rehearsals, takes place on June 24 at the
918 Bathurst Centre; details at tcml.ca.
Of course, Shortt and Doell aren’t the only ones with exciting
musical plans in the works for the next three months. After speaking
with them, we were inspired to get in touch with other local musicians to ask them this one thing:
How do you make use of Toronto’s long musical summer to
recharge your musical batteries for the season ahead?
Here are some of their responses.
Name: Gordon Mansell
Instrument: Organ
Summer Vocations continues on page 89
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 9
SSM At Sweet Sixteen
“
DAV I D P E R L M A N
our choral programming this year, and
they are bringing two programs of music
they’ve been building up and singing
to people visiting the church in their
community. Their vicar is coming, and
we’re going to team up with the local
Anglican church here, plant trees in both
churchyards...and on our lecture series
music critic Robert Harris is doing a presentation on Shakespeare and music...and
that’s a lot more than the Theatre is doing.
So we are in fact carrying the ball on the
salute to the 400th anniversary. Mind you,
I could have done a whole festival based
on that.”
“You could have,” I agree. “And it’s
fantastic that you haven’t.”
One distinctive feature of Miller’s
abilities as a curator is how deftly he
spins multiple themes that weave
through the course of a Stratford
Summer Music season. For example,
the choral strand this year, will also
feature Daniel Taylor’s Theatre of Early
Music (in a program of great anthems
by Handel and Bach titled ‘Let The
People Hear’), The Canadian Spotlight (a chorus of professional and
semi-professional singers put together for SSM by conductor Mark
Vuorinen) which does a full program of Canadian choral works, and
the Harlem Gospel Choir, with, as Miller reveals, a significant guest.
“What you probably don’t know yet is that Measha
[Brueggergosman] will come and sing with them. Last year we had
The Blind Boys of Alabama – a huge success, hundreds of people, we
were turning people away – and Ben [Heppner] came and sang with
them, and I thought wouldn’t it be fun to carry that sort of spirit on.
But who could sing with the Harlem choir? Measha was the natural
and she agreed to come.”
"Tell about the other strands this year," I ask, and he obliges with
gusto: there’s the always stellar piano series (“I’m really proud of
the piano series. I just love piano. That’s part of it”; there’s 7am
music on the banks of the Avon; a cabaret series ranging from "Trish
O'Callaghan covering Cohen to Alex Samaras doing Sondheim, to
Michael Occhipinti and friends doing John Lennon.” There will also
be 30 hours of barge music in a wide range of genres; three “Bach
walks” in “The Grove” with music supplied by the Charm of Finches
flute ensemble and commentary by the local society of field naturalists
society “on the double-breasted whatevers and the purple trillium”;
Whiskey Jack (who backed up Stompin’ Tom for decades) will play at
the local Legion “because I thought, well, where would Stompin’ Tom
have played”; one of their trademark restaurant concert series will
feature the world of harp music “from classical to celtic to baroque to
Paraguyan to Senegalese to contemporary”; …the list, and his delight at
all of it, seem boundless.
One element of Miller’s ability to bring about programming coups,
like Heppner singing with The Blind Boys of Alabama last year or
this year's Brueggergosman/Harlem Gospel Choir collaboration,
relates to the formidable and diverse rolodex of musical contacts and
musical acquaintanceships he has built up over a decade and a half
here at Stratford Summer Music. (“The one part of my job I don’t
like,” he says, “is how often I have to say no to people, now.”) Part of
it doubtless also stems from previous sojourns with the Glenn Gould
Foundation and before that the Canadian Music Centre.
But part of it also stems from a very savvy sense of what one might
call the art of the necessary. Which arises from an acutely realistic
So you’re sweet sixteen?” I say
to my guest. We’re sitting in The
WholeNote office, mid-May –
one of those “just-happenedto-be-in-town,” semi-spontaneous
conversations that goes better for not
having over-planned it. He chuckles.
“I hadn’t quite thought of it that way”
he says. “I’ve just been telling people we
are in our teens. But if someone wants
to come along and kiss us with a big fat
donation, I wouldn’t say no.”
“Anyone particular in mind?” I ask.
He fires right back. “If there was, I
wouldn’t tell you!”
My guest this day is John Miller,
artistic producer from the outset,
16 years ago, of Stratford Summer
Music (SSM), that, for six weeks of
(Above) BargeMusic at
the summer anyway, grabs a share of the
Stratford Summer Music.
spotlight from the Stratford Festival, the
(Right) John Miller
April-to-November theatrical juggernaut
that has, over the course of its 60-year existence, completely reshaped
the history of one small Ontario town.
“Is the elephant co-operative these days?” I tease. “Or are you guys
two solitudes?”
Perhaps it’s the presence of the tape recorder, but he pauses for
longer than usual, given his normal free-flowing conversational style.
And then: “...I’m only choosing my words carefully” he says “because
I don’t want any wrong impression to come out. By saying that we’re
in our own spheres it doesn’t mean there aren’t occasions when we
cross, or cooperate. But what we realize is they are a $60 million dollar
big business, and we’re a $1 million small business, and it’s so easy
to get crushed, or overwhelmed. So we tend to want to keep our own
separate tracks, so that we can keep our own identity. Because I think
it will always be the case that if you say ‘Stratford’ and ‘Festival’ in
one breath, people think theatre. Because we started more than four
decades behind them, that’s the thing. I often dream of what music
would be like if the original concept of music at the Stratford Festival
had been allowed to grow instead of being cut off as it was.”
“You mean the days of Louis Applebaum?” I ask. (Applebaum,
the Stratford Festival’s resident composer for 43 years, had begun a
separate Stratford Music Festival in 1955, two years after the establishment of the Theatre Festival.) Miller lights up. “Absolutely! When
Glenn Gould was in charge of the music programming, Peter Pears
and Benjamin Britten used to come. Elisabeth Schwarzkopf used to
come. Duke Ellington would come. Those were great days.”
Part of the problem, he explains, is that music was deemed by the
festival board to be too expensive, and so was cut out. “It is expensive,”
he continues. “And it’s a psychological thing. You mount a (theatrical) production. It costs a lot, but it can run for six months. We don’t
do that in music. You bring in a great orchestra or singer or somebody and it costs a lot of money, and what do they do? One concert, or
maybe two if you’re lucky, and then away they go...But it’s not a case
of ‘Oh we’re trying to bring music back.’ We’re not trying any more.
We have succeeded in bringing music back, with its head held high.”
“If I’d had to guess, before looking at your website, I’d have thought
you’d be making a meal of the ‘Shakespeare at 400’ thing this year,”
I say, “But it looks like you’re being quite laid back about it, not
whacking it over the head – you have a very diverse program.”
“Well, we’re probably doing the biggest thing in the city in
regard to it,” he responds, “because we are bringing the choir from
Shakespeare’s own church, the Holy Trinity Church, as the core of
10 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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chamber music
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STRINGS
Oct. 13 Juilliard Quartet
Nov. 10 Quatuor Arthur-LeBlanc
Dec. 1 Suzie LeBlanc,
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Jan. 26
Feb. 16
Mar. 2
Mar. 16
Gryphon Trio
St. Lawrence Quartet
Eybler Quartet
Prazak Quartet
Philharmonia Quartett Berlin
PIANO
Oct. 25 Janina Fialkowska
Nov. 15 Danny Driver
Jan. 10 Sean Chen
Feb. 7 Ilya Poletaev
Full season of 12 concerts $479, $434
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A
understanding of the context in which he and SSM must operate. If he
does his job right, around 65,000 people every season, who make it to
Stratford for something else, will “happen across” SSM, and remember
the fact that they did.
“How do you plan for people to stumble across you and how do you
ensure that, no matter how long they stick around for, they go away
appreciating the scope of the whole thing and the deftness of the
weave?” I ask.
“It’s very interesting,” he says. “I am always running into people
who say ‘I didn’t know there was a music festival here’ and then I’ll
say ‘Well, did you hear the Andrew Collins Trio; did you hear the bluegrass?’ and they’ll say ‘Oh yeah I heard the bluegrass music down
on that wonderful floating stage, downtown,’ but they just sort of
thought it happened somehow.”
“But that’s the big challenge, isn’t it?” I ask. “Because your passers
through, your Stratford Festival attendees, even your SSM regulars,
are only going to get a tiny taste of it all, unless they are coming back
every weekend or staying the week, which I would think isn’t easy to
do given how busy the town is in theatre high-season.”
He pushes back a bit at that: “Well I suppose. But if you went to
the Edinburgh Festival, or Ravinia, or any of these places, even if you
come for the Stratford Theatre, you know, you don’t get it all at one
time. You have to come back, or you take your chance on what has
been programmed by some artistic director for the dates when you’re
going to be there. That’s the way it is, and as the artistic director you
have to understand that. My responsibility is to present you with a
cultural smorgasbord at any given moment, so that you can pick and
choose from it.”
The trick, he says, is to make sure that there is always a representative mix of ingredients so you come away with a sense of the whole.
Beyond Concertizing: Stratford Summer Music is also becoming
an increasingly interesting educational destination, for public and
students alike, most notably its TorQ Percussion Quartet residency,
now in its fifth year, and a robust Vocal Academy which offers a jawdroppingly fine ten-day residency to career-edge artists.
“The Vocal Academy is expanded this year,” Miller says, “with new
faculty – Krisztina Szabó, Nathalie Poulin and Alison Pybus.” Pybus,
he says, is a particularly significant addition. “We felt it was important
that these edge-of-career singers have guidance in areas additional to
voice. And management is something they need to understand and
have insight into. Alison Pybus used to be the director of the vocal
division at IMG. So she’s at the top of her field and will join [Michael]
Schade and Phillip Addis and Emily Hamper, and Howard Dyck who
lectures on oratorio, and Geraint Wynn-Davies who speaks to them
about acting.”
Getting in is via a rigorous application process involving submission of recordings and CVs so they can be shipped to Schade, Hamper
and Addis wherever they may be; at this point applicants come in
from all over Canada, and elsewhere – “The furthest this year was New
Zealand” he says. “And we sent posters to every music faculty in the
country back in January.” It’s not a full scholarship opportunity but
the ten days end up costing around $500, with billeting opportunities
and/or housing in the nurses’ residence in town as options. “And of
course while they are with us they get tickets to the theatre and everything else that’s going on in the Stratford environment.” The great
thing, he adds, is that most of those vocal master classes are open to
the public – “Alison Pybus will, for example conduct mock auditions,
and then spend private time afterwards, giving feedback and going
over each student’s promotional materials.”
Tellingly, the subsidizing of student participation in the Vocal
Academy comes from the community itself – a grass roots initiative.
“What is extraordinary to me,” Miller says, “is how the community
buys in. After all this time, living in Stratford, you understand how
important the arts are, not just for the pocket book but for your own
soul. Artists love to come here - 35,000 population, extraordinary
restaurants and neighbours. I’m having fun. One heck of a good place,
it really is. I am just happy to be lucky enough to do what I do.”
LY D I A P E R O V I C
peculiar thing happens each year around mid-May in the
largest, busiest city of Canada, the fifth largest North American
city: mainstream Toronto opera life all but shuts down, give or
take an intrepid indie daring a short early June run. And the season
stays shut until the latter half of September. This year there’s an exception, a chamber opera at the Winter Garden in July thanks to the
Toronto Summer Music Festival, but it’s likelier to be a one-off than
a harbinger. Classical music lovers are somewhat luckier, with the
TSO working full steam until the end of June, though it too starts the
season late in September. Berlin, on the other hand, goes to the opera
until early August and happily returns to it first week of September.
Opera in Paris runs parallel with ballet until mid-July. London goes
strong until mid-July and effectively has no respite with the Proms
taking over from then on till mid-September.
Even regional European houses in small cities beat us in quantity and length. The opera house in Liège (population 200,000)
has an eight-production season that runs until the end of June.
Dutch National Opera in Amsterdam (population 780,000) starts its
12-production season early September and dovetails with Holland
Festival on the other end to finish in early July.
What do the artists who make opera do in those four months that
Toronto doesn’t do opera? And how do they explain our long break?
Soprano Ambur Braid recently returned home to Toronto after a
Magic Flute run at the English National Opera in London, where she
sang a wheelchair-bound Queen of the Night, and subsequently a
very different, glammed-up Maleficent-like version of the same role
at the Calgary Opera. “Evil royalty,” as she puts it, dramatic coloratura roles are becoming her calling card and one of her great historical
research interests: those who attended the Canadian Art Song Project
recital “The Living Spectacle” last winter were treated to a standup quality introduction to the wives of Henry VIII before her exceptional rendering of Try Me, Good King by Libby Larsen. She could not
confirm or deny if she will return to the ENO in the near future, but
I would bet on Yes, and on Verdi, the composer she’s starting to sing
more, including the recital with Toronto Concert Orchestra at Casa
Loma this May.
The voracious intellect whose interests range from Anne Boleyn to
painter Stephen Appleby-Barr to Wes Anderson to caftans (if anybody
will make them glamourous, it’ll be this statuesque soprano), Braid
will combine work, study and travel this summer. “I’ll be singing the
bitchy maid Dalinda in Richard Jones’ new Ariodante at the COC in
September, so my June will be all Ariodante prep, all the time,” she
says. She’ll also travel to Puglia to brush up her Italian, and try out
agriturismo (“And eat and gain my preparatory weight,” she adds).
“On August 6 I’m singing a recital of Rachmaninoff and Sibelius in
Niagara-on-the-Lake, two new singing languages for me, and will be
coaching all of that in July.” The COC rehearsals start on September 9.
We mull over possible reasons for the shortness of Toronto opera
season, and wonder if it’s still presumed that since a lot of people of a
certain class are out of town every weekend from May long weekend
until Labour Day that everybody else is—or that they’re the only
ones going to the opera. Opera tickets as a luxury item, opera audiences upper middle class? Sad state of affairs, if true, we agree. “Even
in real estate,” she muses, “and in sales of clothes and jewellery, not
a lot of people with buying power are in town in the summer, so that
activity slows down.” The massive influx of tourists helps refill the
audiences of London, Paris and Berlin during summer, she says after
I bring up the European seasons. Is it about our habits, do we only do
culture October to May? “It could be because we’re so young. Unlike
Europeans, we are not brought up with it…And here, because it’s less
subsidized and more expensive to go to the opera, you don’t go as
David Perlman can be reached at [email protected]
12 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 13
JENNIFER TOOLE
Smith’s degrees from Laurier and UofT are in
voice and opera, but by the third year she knew
she wanted to direct rather than sing. She’s
since assisted a number of directors, including
Michael Cavanagh for the world premiere of the
now much-travelled Svadba by Ana Sokolović
and Tim Albery for the landmark Grimes on
the Beach at Aldeburgh Music Festival. Her
summers so far have been about development.
Last year she spent it in Quebec City observing
the rehearsals for the new Robert Lepage
production of L’Amour de loin and talking with
the director (her theatre role model) about
structuring rehearsals and getting the most out
of people. This June she is travelling to Chicago
to attend the Chicago Summer Opera program
for two months. “I’ll be working with the
director George Cederquist there. He does some
exciting work, I’m really looking forward. I’m
going to be mentored by him and have one-onone seminars.” The two will work on Britten’s
Albert Herring.
For the director Ashlie Corcoran there will
be no summer vacation this year: the season
at Thousand Islands Playhouse in Gananoque
where she is artistic director actually runs May
to October, and her recently completed run of the play Das Ding at
Canadian Stage was her 12th production in as many months. Three of
the ten productions at the Playhouse she’ll direct herself: Sondheim’s
Into the Woods, Coward’s Blythe Spirit and Das Ding by Philipp Löhle,
a German play about globalization that she enthusiastically describes
as “wild.” She’ll also be preparing for the pieces she’s directing in
the fall, Blythe Spirit in Kamloops, the school tour at the COC and
in December, Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah. Then off to direct the
often – it’s a special occasion thing. We
Ambur Braid
say it shouldn’t be, but it is. And the relative rarity of performances also makes
going to the opera a special event. You
cannot show up at the opera house any
day of the week and see something.”
But she’s optimistic we’ll get there.
“Hopefully we’ll get to the next step.
Things are happening, it’s an exciting
time to be in Canada.”
Christopher Mokrzewski has a similar
take. “I get the feeling that Toronto is still
a bit old-fashioned in that so much of
the population takes significant time off
in the summer. People are always travelling, are out of town, attending weddings
and going to cottages, which makes it a
little more difficult to maintain an active
performance schedule with a diminished audience base,” writes the resident conductor at the Calgary Opera
and music director of Against the Grain
Theatre in an email. So musicians adapt
and leave the city to work at festivals or
train, like he’s about to do after wrapping
up A Little Too Cozy, the AtG adaptation of Mozart/Da Ponte’s Così fan tutte. He’s taking a few days off in
Toronto – “I’m desperate to get to a Jays game and see more concerts!”
– before heading to St. Louis for a week on a professional development
stipend from Calgary Opera. He’ll be working on bel canto repertoire
with conductor Stephen Lord. The brilliant young musician is best
known for the mashup of Schubert and Messiaen played with great
conviction and drama in AtG’s “Death and Desire” last year, but his
conducting interests are growing and it’s bel canto’s turn now.
He’s then off to Banff for six weeks, where he is music director for
the Open Space Opera young artist program to conduct his first The
Rape of Lucretia: his second one is the TSMF semi-staged performance at Winter Garden Theatre, Toronto’s one mainstream operatic
exception of the summer. “I just love Banff to death. And I cannot wait
for the real highlight of the summer, the Banff Centre Theatre Arts
staff softball game. Big league!” Late July the AtG will perform at the
Ottawa Chamber Fest, after which Mokrzewski returns to Calgary for
a week of rehearsals and two weeks of performances at the Calgary
Opera summer festival. “In late August and September I’ll likely be in
Toronto and NYC for some professional development opportunities
that are currently still in the works. Maybe I’ll take a few days off, if
the mood strikes, and go on a road trip.”
Not a lot of leisure in Amanda Smith’s summer either. The emerging stage director and founding artistic director of FAWN Chamber
Creative is already leaving her mark as one of the few movers within
the Toronto Indie Opera network who embrace electronic music as
essential for operatic creation and dance as essential to its performance. This approach was very much in evidence in Synaesthesia,
FAWN’s recent six-composer workshop performance in the postindustrial area around Sterling Avenue that featured a dancer in
pieces that alternate acoustic and electronic, live and tape. “I grew up
listening to metal and noise music, it’s a big part of my life,” she says.
The audience at Synaesthesia that night was mostly twentysomethings, and this was in part due to this bridging between the electronic music audience and the performing arts audience that those
pieces proposed. “I also don’t want to charge people more than $20
per show. People are less willing to go to something unfamiliar if
the tickets are more expensive. And us millennials are probably the
most underemployed generation in a long while, with little disposable income.” One of the three audience-chosen pieces from the show
will be commissioned into an opera. “We’re hoping to create a ballet
lyrique and I want it to be sort of like devised theatre – only, devised
opera. We have a workshop period, we’ll have a story, but the music
will get devised.”
fun, and I hope to do it again in
revival of The Magic Flute at
the future.”
the COC, the show she already
Over at the COC, the
assisted under the direction
costume department staff are
of Diane Paulus, and directed
already working on the two
herself for the Ensemble Studio
September productions. Sandra
performance, and later revived
Corazza, COC’s costume superat Opera Philadephia.
visor tells me how her summer
What guides her programwill unfold while giving me a
ming at the Playhouse? “It’s
tour of the third floor worka year-long occupation, I’m
rooms and storage spaces.
always reading plays, seeing
The costumes for Ariodante
musicals, thinking about it
and Norma are already there,
constantly, and any time I
shipped from their most
see something that I’m interrecent dwelling places, the
ested in, I put it on a list or
opera houses of Amsterdam
add it to the pile. And once
and Barcelona respectively.
I start programming, I see
The Handel was designed by
how all the pieces would fit
Ultz with a mid-20th century
together. It all needs to be high
Scottish village aesthetic, and
quality, intelligent, entertaining
Sandra Corazza
there are a lot of old coats, wool
work, but I’m also looking for
sweaters and plain dresses on the rows of hangers before us. Corazza
work that’s different and that sort of bounces up against each other,
already saw the production in Amsterdam. “It’s good to be able to go
rubs against each other in interesting ways.” The audience is more
backstage and ask the makers – dressers, makeup artists – what probof a regional theatre audience than summer audience, very diverse
lems they had. Some of that stuff can’t be written precisely enough,
with very diverse expectations, and Corcoran aims to meet those but
even though we get the bible.” (The thick binder containing all the
also to propose new and unexpected experiences. She says she can
fabric samples, purchase information, sketches and photos is known
certainly imagine doing a chamber opera in the smaller Fire Hall in
as “the bible” among costume professionals.)
the future. “Last year we did an operetta, The Pirates of Penzance. I
The forthcoming COC run will have an entirely new set of princiadapted it with Andrew Kushnir and we set it in 1927 in the prohibipals, some of whom are as physically different from their peers cast in
tion times in the Thousand Islands. We re-wrote the libretto—Gilbert
& Sullivan are in the public domain - so the pirates were rum runners, the same roles in Aix-en-Provence and Amsterdam as imaginable. The
petite green ensemble now on a mannequin will have to be adjusted
the police were the American coast guard, the sisters were a federfor the taller Ginevra by Jane Archibald. Dalinda too – the “bitchy
ation of teetotallers. We kept a lot of the original music, but we also
included some other music from the 1920s. It was successful and great maid” to be revived by Ambur Braid – will probably have her clothes
resized. “This wedding dress,” Sandra pulls out a long sturdy white
gown with modest ornaments. “It never gets worn properly, she sort
of slaps it on over her slip, then sees the puppet show and takes it off,
Sunday, November 6, 2016
and Dalinda puts it on at one point…It’s handled more than actually
worn.” The trouser role baddie will be sung by Verduhi Abrahamyan,
a mezzo taller than Sonia Prina, whose name is still attached to her
A Tribute to Kálmán and Lehár
biker style costumes. Alice Coote’s Ariodante will be the same height
as his love interest, and it remains to be decided whether she’ll be
December 27, 30, 31, 2016 and January 6, 7, 8, 2017
slightly raised with the right pair of shoes. For costume resizing, the
seam allowance and long hem come to the rescue.
Ultz is expected to arrive in Toronto by the end of June, but meanwhile the fittings for the smaller roles are already starting. “We still
by Jacques Offenbach
don’t have the casting of the chorus, six male and six female, and
April 26, 28, 29, 30, 2017
24 and 24 in Norma. Once we know that, we will know now many
costumes we have to build. In Aix and Amsterdam, they had these
sweaters custom knit. If these are too small, we may have to find a
knitter to knit us a sweater, or go with a different costume. If Ultz
by Oscar Straus
decides to redesign the chorus and the extras, we’ll have to make these
costumes happen.”
Sunday, June 4, 2017
The gold sequin-encrusted dress by the costume designer Jessica
Jahn is already fitted and waiting for Sondra Radvanovsky’s Norma.
“When we get the Barcelona bible, we can find out where all these
A Tribute to Gilbert & Sullivan
fabrics came from and start contacting these companies. We may
add more red to Russell Thomas’s costume. Details often get changed
when productions move from stage to stage.” The fitting of the principals and chorus starts in earnest on the third week of August.
There are also the understudies to clothe, and in Norma, the children. Corazza will take a vacation too, but July is the only possibility.
The 2016/17 season is already underway on the third floor of the COC’s
Front Street East building.
WALTZ RIVALS
2016 | 2017
ORPHEUS IN THE UNDERWORLD
THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER
THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE
For a subscription brochure and ticket information
please call our office at 416-922-2912 or email
[email protected]
14 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Lydia Perovic’s novella All That Sang is out now wherever you buy
books. As for her June, she’s off to Amsterdam for some Herheimdirected opera, Jacobs-conducted Haydn and Joël Pommerat’s
theatrical take on the French Revolution. After a few additional days
in Antwerp and Brussels, she’s back in Toronto for the summer.
Guillermo Silva-Marin
General Director
thewholenote.com
Beat by Beat | Jazz Stories
Balancing the
Books, and Real
Jazz Hooks
From TD Toronto Jazz to PEC
STEFAN MYLES
P
ORI DAGAN
at Taylor, co-founder, with the late Jim Galloway, of Toronto
Downtown Jazz, producers of the the TD Toronto Jazz Festival
has stepped down this year, after 30 years on the job. Stepping
in as CEO is Howard Kerbel, who has for nine years been a member
of the eight-person TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival) leadership team, with a special focus on branding and marketing strategy.
Taylor remains as a member of the programming team and an advisor
to Kerbel.
“This transition will allow me more time to focus on strategic initiatives and allow Howard to develop one of the country’s favourite
brands,” states Taylor in the official release announcing Kerbel’s
appointment. “After 30 years at the helm, I have confidence that
Howard has the passion to build upon this foundation and take it to
the next level.”
What that “next level” will be is anyone’s guess. (After all, when
TD Toronto Jazz started out 30 years ago, who would have thought it
would end up with such places as the Second Cup at King and John,
or the posh department store Holt Renfrew for that matter being
listed as “official festival venues”? And how does a pop star headliner
Sarah McLachlan at the Sony Centre or film star Kiefer Sutherland
playing country at the Horseshoe fit into a jazz festival lineup? Taylor
is refreshingly blunt. “Balancing the books,” he says. “Thirty years ago
we were the only game in town. Now there are 21 jazz festivals in the
GTA. Every concert hall has a jazz series. That’s what we wanted to
see happen. In our mind, jazz is doing well in town. I’m not making a
living as a musician but I’m sure it’s better than 30 years ago…”
As a musician trying to make a living now, particularly since the
Internet took over the world, I’m not so sure about the “better” bit. As
in many industries, the value of music has so drastically changed that
as of the time of this writing, each play on Spotify equates to small
fractions of a penny, and even the penny has been discontinued as
physical currency due to its worthlessness.
Speaking of balance, the free outdoor shows of any music festival
are crucial to the creation of new musical connections, for audiences
and musicians alike. As unexpected as venues like Holt Renfrew and
Second Cup are, it sure would be nice to see live music in these places
all of the time, if only for the element of surprise that is so essential
to jazz music. It’s fun to watch passerby reaction, especially when it’s
with a smile and a head bop.
And if you’d like to get to know a budding musician, on Saturday
June 25 between 2 and 4pm the Regent Park School of Music will
help animate Nathan Phillips Square with musical demonstrations
and interactive opportunities. Following the performances, the audience is invited to try out the instruments, or as it has become known,
an “instrument petting zoo.” Perhaps best of all, Dave Clark and his
Woodshed Orchestra will lead you on “a raucous, romping march”
through Nathan Phillips Square. Not to be missed!
Nathan Phillips Square is once again the hub of TD Toronto Jazz,
balancing paid and free performances throughout the festival. The
lunchtime concerts at 12:30pm will introduce ears to a diverse
offering, including the Toronto Mass Choir, Brian Barlow Big Band’s
salute to Ellington at Newport with special guests Guido Basso, Dione
Taylor and the Backsliderz and Jim Galloway’s Wee Big Band, directed
by Martin Loomer. And an additional outdoor stage at Nathan Phillips
thewholenote.com
Raoul and The Big Time
Square will include jazz and blues performances during the afternoon
and early evening, from the sizzling soul of Tanika Charles (Sunday
June 26 at 2:30pm) to the disco-flavoured spun vocal sugar that is The
Spandettes (Monday June 27 at 6:30pm) to charismatic blues brother
Raoul and The Big Time (Saturday July 2 at 6:30pm), and…to a visiting
artist worth highlighting: Welsh singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist Gwyneth Herbert (Thursday June 30 at 6:30pm) who will be
making her Toronto debut.
I met Herbert unexpectedly, sharing a cab in Bremen, Germany, en
route to the Canadian Blast concert at jazzahead, just weeks before
writing this article and was blown away, both by her story and how
she told it. (You’ll get some sense of this unique individual in the
sidebar to this piece!)
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 15
Fanfare Ciocarlia
In this crazy age of streaming music for fractions of pennies, my
hope is that when Gwyneth Herbert performs her free June 30 concert
(right before a Molly Johnson-Jane Bunnett double bill!), that all
will sell out of CDs and merchandise. To support this music, all you
have to do is show up! Look for ticket contests on the festival’s social
media outlets.
Sometimes these ticketed shows can be priceless. Jazz piano fans
should not miss Oliver Jones (June 28 at Jane Mallett Theatre), now 81
years old and still swinging his behind off. Beyond this, one concert
Gwyneth Herbert's Toronto Honeymoon
H
But you left the label to pursue life as an indie artist. Why? Having
a major deal gave me lots of great things. The ability to work with
exceptional musicians, a press profile, a new haircut…I’m so pleased
that I had that opportunity as for so many artists it – even in the
current climate – remains the holy grail. But it just didn’t work for
me. I got signed so young and I soon found that it was my own stories
that I wanted to tell, that didn’t fit in with the label’s marketing strategies and formulas. Much of the discussions had nothing to do with
creativity and everything to do with finance – naturally, because a big
label’s purpose is to make money. I’m also really grateful because it
gave me something to kick against – I got signed so young before I had
a clear idea of what I wanted to say and make, and it made me find
answers through the questioning.
As an artist who frequently records your own compositions, what
degree you fit within the term “jazz.” I grew up listening to jazz and
blues. I’d sit and learn all of Billie Holiday’s phrasing and mimic Big
Maybelle’s tone and try to feel Anita O’Day’s timing deep in my bones.
As a tiny teen in an ever-so-English village in a totally different era, I’d
hear and hold the heartbreak and the joy and feel it as if it was all my
own. I still love those old songs – they speak of huge human experience in simple poetic language and they’re true and vast. And I love
diving back into them now, from time to time, to see what they help
me discover.
But now I live the miraculous life of a discoverer, a story hunter –
finding and animating hidden stories, finding new ways to give them
breath. There are melodies and rhythms everywhere, and the flavour
of my work’s always informed by the music and language of the
particular world it inhabits...There are seagull cries and pub chatter,
there’s the rattle of a ship mast and the hum of an escalator. There
are shanties and funerals and newspaper headlines. I do work with
amazing jazz musicians in my band, and one of the wondrous things
about playing with people with that sensibility is the improvisatory
language they bring – there’s a push and a pull and then we navigate the journey together. It’s fresh and it’s a different kind of magic,
every time.
And the British music scene in London and beyond? After 13 years
in London, I’ve run away to the sea – I live on the beautiful south coast
in Hastings. There’s a real buzz about this little town, people making
things everywhere, skiffle and poetry and metal in the pubs, parades
through the streets. I love coming back to London – my favourite club
ow did you end up on a label so quickly? When I was supposedly studying English Literature at university, I actually spent
the majority of my time singing jazz with fellow student Will
Rutter, a guitarist and kindred spirit with whom I’d roam the cobblestones of the North of England – along with Edinburgh, Paris and
Amsterdam in our holidays – busking and hustling for gigs in pavement cafes. When we graduated we moved down to London together,
a couple of wet-eared country kids with no concerts, no money and
no contacts, and picked an area of the city a day…armed with an A-Z
map, Will’s guitar and a fistful of demos recorded in a bedroom,
we went into every pub, wine bar, cafe and restaurant and asked if
they’d give us a gig.
You kind of got used to asking the tattooed, muscle-necked landlord if he’d mind turning down the racing while you played Fly Me
to the Moon to the corner clientele who’d just tried to sell you a
VCR on the way in, and invariably if the bar-owner didn’t offer us
a gig they’d give us a drink on the house. At the end of one of these
long, street-peddling days, I’d sipped enough Dutch courage to go
into the legendary Pizza Express Jazz Club in Soho. The visionary
manager there at the time, Peter Wallis, was famed for championing
new talent – he gave Norah Jones and Diana Krall their first breaks
in the UK. Fired up by my day’s refreshment, I asked to speak to the
manager, and when asked if I had an appointment, I ordered a large
brandy (which I’d never drunk before, but it seemed like it sounded
sophisticated) and said, “Just tell him it’s Gwyneth Herbert.” When
Peter arrived, I came clean and said that of course he had no reason
to know who I was, but that I loved music more than anything and
that I wasn’t looking for a gig, but any advice would be so gratefully
received, and with shaky fingers thrust our little demo into his hand.
He gently but firmly explained that he received over 300 such
demos a week, but, admitting that no one had quite approached
him like that before, said he’d try to give it a listen. Within two
weeks, Will and I were signed to his indie label Dean Street records,
had the amazing vocalist Ian Shaw as a mentor and producer, and
were recording our debut album First Songs and touring with Jamie
Cullum and Amy Winehouse soon after. Jamie Cullum sang a duet
on that record, it started getting some airplay and - riding high on
their recent success with Jamie – it wasn’t long before Universal
came sniffing and snaffled me up.
16 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
EMILE HOLBA
that I would guarantee a good time or your money back
will take place at the Opera House on Wednesday, June 29.
Romanian super band Fanfare Ciocarlia opens for local band of
heroes Lemon Bucket Orkestra. Do YouTube searches of both
brilliant bands! Instant fanhood is guaranteed.
Finally, an exciting development at the Toronto Jazz Festival
this year is the returning commitment to a nightly late night
jam session at the Rex Hotel Jazz & Blues Bar, hosted by local
saxophone great Chris Gale nightly at 1am. Seen frequently
around town as a sideman who sensitively adds just the thing
to any musical situation, Gale has been hosting the weekly
Tuesday night jam beautifully and inclusively. Please come out
and support the jam session!
Botos and Barlow at PEC Jazz fest: Speaking of jazz jams
that are worth the drive to Picton, reading up on various festivals that will take place in July and August, I stumbled upon
the programming of the 16th Annual Prince Edward County
Jazz Festival, which features a jazz jam hosted by the Robi Botos
Trio, no less. I contacted PEC creative director, drummer/bandleader
Brian Barlow to discuss PEC Jazz, starting with the success of these
jam sessions.
“The After Hours Jam Sessions have been very popular” he told
me. “One of the things that make our festival unique is that we
encourage musicians to spend time in the county by providing them
with multiple gigs over a number of days. It’s not unusual for a musician to have six or seven gigs in the five or six days they spend with us.
This not only works out well for them financially, it also give them the
opportunity to relax and get to know the county. Since they’re staying
overnight, and there’s not a great deal to do in Picton after 10pm,
they tend to come out to the jam sessions. Robi has done these often
but not every year. Many of the mainstage Regent Theatre artists have
come to the jam sessions, including Ellis Marsalis, Vincent Herring,
Louis Hayes, Guido Basso, Ranee Lee and Chet Doxas.”
Prince Edward County is a magnet for people in the arts and they
are all very supportive of each other, so the local audience tends
to be quite hip and informed where jazz is concerned, Barlow tells
me. “There are many fine jazz musicians living in the county and
surrounding area. Guido Basso has lived here for over 35 years, and
Belleville is home to the Commodores’ Orchestra, a big band that
holds the record for being the longest continuously performing big
band in the world, having been formed in 1928.” And the festival
builds its audience from very early spring (as early as February in
some years) with our Jazz Dinners and then in April “our TD Jazz
Education Program that finishes up with a concert at the Regent
Theatre. So the festival itself has an almost six-month presence in the
county.”
A unique feature of this festival is that Prince Edward County is
an island, forming a natural boundary to work within. “We usually
have about 40 events at venues from the soft-seat Regent Theatre,
to wineries, restaurants, pubs, community centres, churches (and
church steps), a farmers’ market and a cemetery. We also have a Jazz
Van that drives around the county putting on concerts.
2016/2017
Boris Zarankin & Inna Perkis
FOUNDERS & ARTISTIC DIRECTORS
continues to page 61
all concerts take place at TRINITY-ST. PAUL’s CENTRE, 427 Bloor St. West
season preview
september 18, 2016 3 PM
schubertiad:
4 MEMORIES
november 13, 2016
russian salon:
4 SEASONS OF MOTHER RUSSIA
Gwyneth Herbert
is the 606 in Chelsea which feels like an extension of my living room,
an underground secret dive bar vibe with the most amazing international musicians both on the stage and hanging at the bar and
some delicious nachos. Performing for me is like coming home, but I
spend most of my time these days working on wonky art/music/film/
theatre commissions in collaboration with sculptors and directors
and clowns and communities all over the country and beyond…Today
I was exploring the process of contraception through the medium of
dance for a music theatre piece I’m writing with playwright Diane
Samuels called The Rhythm Method. I have so many hats that are
interchangeable on a daily, sometimes hourly basis – it’s exhausting
and challenging but somehow each hat feeds the others and I’m
constantly learning - as a performer, as a writer, and as a general
human being stumbling through the world.
You’ve been to Montreal before but this is your Toronto debut,
yes? This is indeed my Toronto debut, and I am so excited to be
exploring so much more of Canada for the first time. I’m joined
by the incredible percussionist and multi-instrumentalist Dave
Price, and also my very newly wedded husband Ned Cartwright on
piano – I have a feeling this is going to be a musical honeymoon
to remember!
thewholenote.com
3 PM
Maeve PALMER
Inna PERKIS
Giles TOMKINS
Boris ZARANKIN
Igor GEFTER
Joni HENSON
Inna PERKIS
Ernesto RAMIREZ
Mark SKAZINETZKY
Boris ZARANKIN
april 2, 2017 3 PM
Michèle BOGDANOWICZ
Lucia CESARONI
Adrian KRAMER
Peter McGILLIVRAY
Inna PERKIS
Boris ZARANKIN
june 4, 2017 3 PM
Isabel BAYRAKDARIAN
Russell BRAUN
Inna PERKIS
Ernesto RAMIREZ
Boris ZARANKIN
Ilana ZARANKIN
a musical invasion of
Paris: THE MIGHTY 4
tour de 4...ce!
BRAHMS Liebeslieder Waltzer
SCHUMANN Spanische Liebeslieder
offcentremusic.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 17
ORI DAGAN
I
Beat by Beat | Classical & Beyond
Meet Music Mondays’
Ian Grundy
Summer Music
Cornucopia
A
ALLAN PULKER
n early April I happened
to attend a concert by two
distinguished Canadian
musicians, pianist, William
Aide and flutist, Robert Aitken.
Friends since their student
days in the late 1950s at the
University of Toronto’s Faculty
of Music, where they used
to play together frequently,
each has had his own individual, successful career. But
they had not played together
since those distant days until
getting together to prepare for
this concert, a benefit to help pay off Church of the Holy Trinity’s new
piano, showcased in this concert.
Arising from this experience, in May I sat down with Ian Grundy,
artistic director of the May-to-September Music Mondays noon-hour
concert series, as well as music director at Holy Trinity, to talk about
the piano, Music Mondays and his new role as its artistic director in
this, its 25th season.
Knowing of the fabulous reputation of Bechstein pianos, I asked
why Holy Trinity had decided to seek out a new instrument rather
than rebuild their old Bechstein. The trouble with rebuilding, he told
me, is that you really do not know how the rebuilt piano is going to
sound; there are no guarantees. With a new piano, on the other hand,
you can hear it before you buy it.
On behalf of the church, Aide evaluated dozens of pianos. When
he tried a seven-foot Steinway, to which Alex Thomson, the general
manager of Steinway Piano Gallery had directed them, he knew at
once that he had found their instrument. Only 12 years old and little
played, its action was good enough to play a double glissando; its
tone, strong but not overpowering. “It’s the perfect instrument for
chamber music,” Ian told me. Its sound is big enough to fill Holy
Trinity’s live acoustic environment but controllable enough to balance
other instruments, even with the lid on full stick. An added benefit is
that the case is made of Indian rosewood, which makes it extremely
beautiful. Piano technician, Leela Khurana, one of only two Steinwaytrained technicians in Toronto, who tuned the instrument for this
concert, described it to me as “fabulous...young, flexible, resilient and
powerful.”
The acquisition of the Steinway is a major step towards the realization of Grundy’s vision for Music Mondays as a first-class venue
with first class instruments. One is the Steinway, of course; the other,
the Casavant tracker organ acquired seven years ago from Deer Park
United Church. A guiding principle for upcoming seasons, he says, is
for the series to be a worthy platform for emerging young artists and
to continue to feature a variety of musical genres.
“First-class publicity” is another part of the picture - to attract
a more diverse audience and build audience size. He is interested
in “taking music out of its compartment and reaching out to the
community.” To this end he has joined the Yonge-Dundas B.I.A., a
partnership which, he told me, is proving as welcome to the B.I.A. as
it is to Holy Trinity.
With this kind of dynamic leadership, we can expect Music
Mondays to grow into an even stronger cultural force than it already
is and a major contributor to live music in the city in the summer.
Stay tuned!
(And meanwhile enjoy the rest of this summer's series. Deails are in
our GTA and festival listings.)
PA U L E N N I S
quick glance at the Union Jack-based brochure of Toronto
Summer Music’s 11th season, “London Calling: Music in Great
Britain,” might lead you to expect a bounty of English music,
but the more you delve into TSM’s 25 concerts it’s apparent that what
the festival is offering is a cornucopia of music that would have been
heard in London over the course of three centuries. As artistic director
Douglas McNabney told The WholeNote publisher David Perlman in
a recent podcast (video coming soon to TheWholeNote.com), “We’re
celebrating musical life in London…[which] has always been the centre
– a Mecca for musicians.” No wonder, since the city was the centre of
the immense British Empire.
And this year’s festival, more so than ever, is also a celebration of
chamber music; 14 programs fall into that category. But TSM, with its
mentors and fellows program, is more than a showcase for top-notch
instrumentalists and ensembles like the Parker or Dover Quartets. It
offers full scholarships to musicians on the brink of a musical career
the opportunity to be mentored by established professionals, and
equally important, to participate in concerts with them (the so-called
“Chamber Music reGENERATION” series of eight Saturday afternoon
recitals and the two Art of Song reGENERATION Friday afternoon
concerts).
McNabney has very cleverly taken a handful of 19th-century
London concert series and used the conceit to create diverse and satisfying chamber music programs. The Beethoven Quartet Society of
1845, for example, marked the first instance of a complete Beethoven
string quartet performance cycle. The acclaimed young American
ensemble, the Dover Quartet, who will be launching their own
traversal of the Beethoven cycle this fall, will follow the lead of those
19th-century Londoners by including an early, a middle and a late
quartet in their program. On July 29 in Walter Hall, they will play
Op.18 No.6, Op.59 No.3 and Op. 132, making for an unusually rich and
sure-to-be illuminating musical evening. Another American quartet,
the Parker, whose Naxos recording of the complete Ligeti quartets won
them a Grammy, pay tribute to the Musical Union of 1865, a famous
concert series of its day, with a program of late Haydn, early Beethoven
and late Schubert quartets, July 15.
Of course, there will be English music, beginning with the opening
concert July 14, featuring two 20th-century masterpieces, Britten’s
sublime Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings and Elgar’s exhilarating Introduction and Allegro for string quartet and orchestra.
A second, centred on TSM’s
artistic-director-designate, TSO
concertmaster and New Orford
Jeremy Denk
String Quartet violinist, Jonathan
Crow, includes Elgar’s mournfully beautiful Violin Sonata,
Bax’s Piano Quartet and Bridge’s
Piano Quintet. A third, a homage
to the People’s Concert Society
(another 19th-century London
concert series), showcases TSO
principal oboist Sarah Jeffrey,
one of TSM’s mentors, in a lively
program comprised of Britten’s
Phantasy Quartet for Oboe
and Strings, Op.2, Bliss’ Oboe
Quartet and Vaughan Williams’
Piano Quintet, August 3.
Two compelling pianists, Pedja
Muzijevic and Jeremy Denk,
Flutist Allan Pulker is chairman of the board of The WholeNote.
18 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
16
17
MUSIC IN THE
AFT E R NOON
119 TH SEASON
Dover Quartet
WOMEN’S MUSICAL CLUB OF TORONTO
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: SIMON FRYER
Walter Hall, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto (Museum Subway Station)
OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 1.30 PM
I S S AC H A H
SAVAGE
tenor
piano TBA
will each give what are certain to be fascinating recitals. Muzijevic is
back as a mentor this year after a fulfilling session in 2015. As well as
being a pianist of impeccable flair, he proved to be an engaging man
with a mic in last year’s American Avant-Garde concert, introducing the music and reading from John Cage’s 32 Questions. Both qualities will no doubt be evident in July 19’s Haydn Dialogues, the Walter
Hall event in which Muzijevic will discuss Haydn’s London experience
(where he wrote two of the three sonatas on the program) and relate
Haydn’s work to Cage’s seminal In a Landscape, Knussen’s Sonya’s
Lullaby and Berger’s Intermezzo.
Winner of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, Denk brings his keen
intellect to everything he does. A gifted writer in addition to being
a supreme musician, his New Yorker account of his years as a music
student, "Every Good Boy Does Fine," is revealing, moving and a
must-read.
The program for his July 21 recital has not yet been announced but it
promises to be imaginative, insightful and engaging, one I won’t miss.
NOVEMBER 24, 2016 | 1.30 PM
JAMES
SOMMERVILLE
Concert Sponsor:
WMCT Foundation
French horn
with: Scott St. John, violin; Peter Longworth, piano
MARCH 9, 2017 | 1.30 PM
TRIO
TORONTO
DEBUT
SHAHAM EREZ
WALLFISCH
Hagai Shaham, violin; Arnon Erez, piano; Raphael Wallfisch, cello
Festival of the Sound
Festival of the Sound’s 37th summer offers an abundance of musical
treats to snack on. Each week features several chamber music combinations; the Gryphon Trio, playing Dvořák’s popular Dumky Trio and
Schubert’s delightful Trio No.1 D898, shares the stage with the New
Zealand String Quartet at 7:30 on July 19 and Moshe Hammer and
Peter Longworth at 3:30 the same day; Hammer appears in “Our
Favourite Sonatas I” the next day while Longworth accompanies cellist
Rolf Gjelsten in a late Beethoven sonata in “Our Favourite Sonatas II”
later that day.
Stewart Goodyear brings his penchant for Beethoven to the
“Pathétique,” “Moonlight,” “Tempest,” and “Appassionata” sonatas
in “My Favourite Beethoven” on July 22. On July 21, he puts on his
chamber music hat teaming up with the Penderecki String Quartet
and New Zealand String Quartet
for Schumann’s Piano Quintet
Op.44 and Brahms’ Piano
Quintet Op.34.
Recent Chopin International
Competition second-prizewinner, the gifted Charles
Richard-Hamelin, highlights
week two, July 28, with two
concerts that show off his sensitivity as soloist and collaborator. After playing a Chopin
nocturne, ballade and polonaise
before intermission, he returns
as pianist with the Hochelaga
Trio to perform Tchaikovsky’s
Piano Trio in A Minor Op.50.
Earlier that day, Trio Hochelaga
plays Ravel’s gem, Piano Trio in
thewholenote.com
TORONTO
RECITAL
DEBUT
APRIL 6, 2017 | 1.30 PM
AIZURI
TORONTO
DEBUT
QUARTET
Miho Saegusa, violin; Ariana Kim, violin;
Ayane Kozasa, viola; Karen Ouzounian, cello
MAY 4, 2017 | 1.30 PM
CHARLES
RICHARD-HAMELIN
piano
Five Concerts for $165
For information and to subscribe call 416-923-7052
All artists, dates, and programmes are subject to change without notice.
Support of the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and
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PRESENTED BY
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 19
Charles
Richard-Hamelin
promising young pianists in what
could turn out to be an unforgettable experience for student and
audience alike. Each student is
well-known in the piano competition world: Anastasia Rizikov,
now 16, is a veteran of the concert
stage; Toronto-based, Russianborn Vladimir Soloviev is the
most-decorated student in the
history of the Don Wright Faculty
of Music at the University of Western Ontario; Charissa Vandikas, 18,
is a top student at the Glenn Gould School. Dinnerstein begins her
visit to Stratford, July 21, with a program devoted to a selection of
Glass’ Metamorphoses and Etudes paired with Schubert Impromptus
Op.90 and his immortal Sonata in B-Flat D960.
Two other young veterans of international piano competitions, Tony
Yike Yang and Luca Buratto, make their Stratford debuts. Yang, at 16
the youngest prizewinner in the history of the Chopin International
Piano Competition, will bring his immense technique and precocious
interpretative sensibility to a demanding program of Mozart, Chopin,
the formidable Liszt Sonata in B Minor and Prokofiev’s dramatic
Sonata No.7, August 3. Two weeks later, Buratto, the most recent
Honens Prize-winner, brings his “fiery imagination and finesse” to
works by Schumann and Beethoven.
Now 21, the redoubtable Jan Lisiecki continues on his path to the
upper reaches of the pianistic universe. His recital on August 26
includes works by Bach, Rachmaninov and Chopin. The following
afternoon, he will play Schubert’s final Four Impromptus,
Schumann’s Klavierstücke Op.32 and Chopin’s Nocturnes Op. 48 and
Scherzo No.1 in B Minor Op. 20. These will be Lisiecki’s only local
recital appearances this season. Don’t miss this chance.
A Minor, in a program that also features
the festival’s artistic director, clarinetist James Campbell, oboist James
Mason, violinist Martin Beaver, violist
Graham Oppenheimer and bassist
Joel Quarrington in Prokofiev’s radical
nugget, Quintet Op.39. My favourite
jazz pianist, Robi Botos, is joined by
drummer Terry Clarke and legendary
bassist, Dave Young, for “My Favourite
Jazz” on July 29.
Week three is dominated by the piano, culminating August 6 in
a “Piano Spectacular” celebrating ten years of the ensemble Orford
Six Pianos, and concluding with Janina Fialkowska, Bergmann Duo,
Anagnoson & Kinton and Glen Montgomery joining the Orford six
in Bizet/Wilbert’s Carmen Fantasy for 12 pianists. Duo pianists
Anagnoson & Kinton, celebrating 40 years of concertizing together,
perform Bartók’s incisive Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion
as well as other works, August 2. The notes continue flowing with
Fialkowska’s “My Favourite Chopin” on August 5. The festival
concludes with Fialkowska joining the National Academy Orchestra
for Beethoven’s rhapsodic Piano Concerto No.4 and Anagnoson &
Kinton playing Mozart’s Concerto No.10 for Two Pianos. Earlier in
the week, August 3, the Lafayette String Quartet, the only all-female
quartet still comprised of its original members, celebrates 30 years of
togetherness by performing Ravel and Dvořák.
Stratford Summer Music
The piano is consistently a major focus of Stratford Summer Music,
and 2016 is no exception. Simone Dinnerstein, who famously selfproduced her refreshing take on Bach’s Goldberg Variations and then
saw it become immensely popular, will perform the piece July 23 at
11am. The prior afternoon she will give a Bach master class to three
Sept. 25 - Cecilia String Quartet, Celebrated Canadian Ensemble
Sublime and eloquent: Mendelssohn Quartet in D Major Op. 44,
No. 1 and Haydn B minor Op. 33, No. 1
Nov. 6 - Noël Coward: A Talent to Amuse
Featuring Monica Whicher, soprano, Norine Burgess, mezzo,
Benjamin Butterfield, tenor, Alexander Dobson, baritone
Dec. 4 - Stephen Prutsman, piano – Bach and Forth
Inventive program based on J.S. Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier,
Book 2, plus other great piano movements
Jan. 22 - The Heath Quartet – Britain’s Rising Stars
Canadian debut of award winning young artists perform string
quartets by Bartók and Dvorák
Mar. 5 - In Mo Yang – New Violin Virtuoso
Canadian debut – Schumann Violin Sonata No. 3, Beethoven
Sonata No. 9 (Kreutzer) “An arresting performer…” - The Boston Globe
Apr. 23 - New Orford String Quartet with Adrian Fung, cello
Elite orchestral leaders perform Brahms, Schubert Quintet in
C Major, D. 956, Op. 163 “Nothing short of electrifying.” - The Star
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20 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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Festival de Lanaudière
The 39th season of the Festival de Lanaudière is a tribute to
its founder, Father Fernand Lindsay who was especially fond of
Beethoven, Bach, Brahms, Berlioz and Tchaikovsky, so the festival has
taken special care to invite music lovers to discover the many works
of those composers to be featured this summer. About an hour’s drive
northeast of Montreal, the festival is well-suited for a holiday excursion. Since many of the festival’s artists don’t normally make the trip
to Toronto, it’s all the more reason to travel to Joliette, Quebec.
JUNO Award-winner, pianist Alain Lefèvre opens the festival
with Tchaikovsky’s uber-romantic Piano Concerto No.1 on July 9.
The Jupiter String Quartet, quartet-in-residence at the University
of Illinois and a tightly knit family unit (the cellist is married to the
second violinist who is the sister of the violist), are undertaking a
cycle of the complete Beethoven string quartets at the festival, beginning this summer with concerts July 11 (Nos.6, 11, 15), 12 (Nos.4, 5, 13)
and 14 (3, 16, 8). Angèle Dubeau leads her all-female string ensemble,
La Pietà, in “The Mark of Minimalism,” a July 10 concert comprised of
music by Glass, Einaudi, Mozetich, Nyman, Goulet and Pärt.
The eminent English violinist, Anthony Marwood, is the soloist
in Beethoven’s ageless Violin Concerto Op.61, with Les Violons du
Roy conducted by Bernard Labadie, July 15. “Child Prodigy” Tony
Yike Yang gets a chance to perfect the program he will be playing
in Stratford, August 3, when he performs it in Lanaudière on
July 19. Silver medal winner in the 2015 Tchaikovsky International
Competition, American George Li’s recital includes sonatas by Haydn
and Chopin (No.2), Rachmaninov’s Variations on a Theme by Corelli
and two crowdpleasers by Liszt. Armenian-born pianist Nareh
Arghamanyan, the winner of the 2008 Montreal International Musical
Competition, performs an unusual program on July 26 – Bach’s
Goldberg Variations, Saint-Saëns’ Danse Macabre, Liszt’s Totentanz
and three of his transcriptions of songs by Schubert and Mozart. The
innovative ensemble, collectif9, plays Golijov, Brahms, Piazzolla and
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 21
Beat by Beat | In with the New
Summertime and
the Sounds of
Extinction
A
others on July 29.
The Orchestre symphonique de Montréal led by Kent Nagano begin
the festival’s final weekend August 5 accompanying Charles RichardHamelin in Brahms’ fiery Piano Concerto No.1 and unlocking the
many strains of Schumann’s Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish.” August 6,
the orchestra performs two of the most famous unfinished works
in the musical canon, Schubert’s Symphony No.8 “Unfinished”
and Mozart’s Requiem, an ideal pairing for an outdoor concert.
The 39th season concludes with local hero Yannick Nézet-Séguin
and his Orchestre Métropolitain in a program that pays homage to
the conductor’s Philadelphia Orchestra post. All four pieces were
commissioned by that orchestra: Bach/Stokowski’s Passacaglia and
Fugue in C minor BWV582; Rachmaninoff’s magical Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini Op. 43 and Symphonic Dances Op. 45; and Nico
Muhly’s Mixed Messages. There are no mixed messages in the Festival
de Lanaudière, simply a love of music that exists to be shared in the
warmth of a summer day or evening.
W E N D A LY N B A R T L E Y
s I sit to write this column, I’m still feeling the after-effects
of the May 25 concert with the Kronos Quartet and guest
performer Tanya Tagaq at the Royal Conservatory’s 21C Music
Festival – an event that was featured in last month’s WholeNote. It
was a truly sublime moment in time, making it difficult to find words
that encapsulate the experience of being transported into a kaleidoscope of global musical styles and then beyond into uncharted territory – and all within the scope of the two violins, viola and cello,
plus voice. The anticipated commission from Tagaq for the quartet
was, as first violinist David Harrington said during his introduction, “unlike anything you’ve ever heard for the string quartet.” With
a string quartet score created from transcriptions of recorded improvised vocalizations made by Tagaq in a studio a few months ago, and
Tagaq adding a live vocal layer, it was as if the earth itself was opening
up to reveal new layers and aspects of what’s possible. It began with
creaking string tones and subterranean vocal tones which started
out so low in range that I couldn’t help be reminded of another vocal
pioneer, Roy Hart, whose principle of the eight-octave voice was at the
heart of his company’s research throughout the 1960s and 70s. It was
this push into stretching vocal boundaries that opened up possibilities
for composers to write for the extended voice. The performance of
Nunuvut, the second work performed by Tagaq and the quartet in the
concert, was more improvisational in nature, with a series of intense,
intimate and sensual duets that Tagaq engaged in with each individual
performer before turning to the capacity audience to deliver a sonic
portrait of our collective presence. It was a spectacular beginning to
the upcoming summer season.
Launching into the summer season usually means it’s festival time,
which often translates into opportunities to experience music that
pushes at the far outer edges. Certainly with the Luminato Festival this
year, this will be the case, and not just with its music programming
since this year’s primary venue, the Hearn Generating Station, will
be making its own artistic statement. Situated on the waterfront, it’s
the site of a de-commissioned power station that will be turned into
a temporary cultural venue for the next ten years of Luminato. With
a series of interlocking areas designed for performances and exhibitions, along with restaurant and club spaces, the building will take
on the air of an architectural installation. Another in-house feature
of this environment will be a state-of-the-art surround sound system
and projection space with multiple screens. Which, as it turns out,
is the perfect venue for the fully immersive music and visual concert
piece created by composer Rose Bolton and filmmaker Marc de Guerre
being performed on June 22.
The piece, Song of Extinction, is just as its title suggests – a work
that raises the critical issue of species extinction through the combination of melody, word and image. And although songform is at the
heart of Bolton’s compositional language for this piece, the musical
scale of the project is extensive, combining youth and adult choirs, an
instrumental chamber ensemble, percussion, two keyboard players,
and electronics. The work was originally initiated by Music in the
Barns under the direction of Carol Gimbel whose specialty is in
creating multimedia and site-specific installation concerts.
Despite the focus on the difficult and critical theme of what is
happening to the mass disappearance of species on our planet, the
work is not activist in nature. As de Guerre explained in a recent
conversation both he and Bolton had with me about the piece, “I
believe in the power and beauty of images. In the same way that music
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival
Under the direction of pianist Alexander Tselyakov, the 11th annual
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival makes for a lovely Manitoba
weekend July 21 to 24. The concerts are filled with quality (Tselyakov
playing Ravel’s devilish Gaspard de la Nuit and participating in
Dvořák’s great Piano Quintet in A No.2 Op.81 in the opener) and
diversity (Tselyakov collaborating with Kerry DuWors and Joyce Lai, 
violins and Simon Fryer, cello, in sonatas by Handel, Saint-Saëns and
Prokofiev and Three Madrigals by Martinů). An appealing Saturday
morning concert July 23 precedes the finale July 24 in which Schubert,
Dvořák and Schumann are the featured composers.
Music and Beyond
There’s an unmistakable European flavour to this year’s Music and
Beyond festival (which runs from July 4 to 17 in Ottawa) with the
dynamic Utrecht String Quartet performing Beethoven, Tchaikovsky
and Piazzolla on July 7 and the joyous Vienna Piano Trio in for three
concerts July 7, 8 and 9. It’s worth a drive to the nation’s capital to
hear these remarkably adept musicians perform all three of Brahms’
piano trios as well as works by Shostakovich, Haydn, Ravel and Cerha.
QUICK PICKS
TSO: June 4, 5. Emanuel Ax-protege Orion Weiss performs
Gershwin’s immortal Rhapsody in Blue. Andrew Grams conducts.
June 9, 10, 11: James Ehnes performs Elgar’s beloved Violin Concerto;
Peter Oundjian offers orchestral support and leads the TSO in
Stravinsky’s revolutionary The Rite of Spring. June 11: The TSO
Chamber Soloists led by Jonathan Crow give a pre-concert performance of Stravinsky’s bedevilling suite from L’Histoire du soldat. A full
version of the piece takes place at the Hearn Generating Station as part
of Luminato, June 18.
A significant serving of Beethoven is on order June 15 and 16 with
Oundjian leading the orchestra in the composer’s Eroica Symphony
and accompanying the thoughtful Yefim Bronfman in Piano
Concerto No.3. June 18 Oundjian takes his forces to the Hearn for
Beethoven’s rousing Symphony No.5 and Gershwin’s danceable An
American in Paris.
June 21: Nine Sparrows presents a free concert with flutist (and
WholeNote chairman of the board) Allan Pulker.
June 30: Summer Music in the Garden presents the Cecilia String
Quartet playing Mozart’s String Quartet K.590 and Kati Agócs’ Tantric
Variations.
July 16: Alexander Tselyakov and friends warm up for Clear
Lake with a concert presented by Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society.
Aug 15: Music Mondays presents “Surrealism at Midday” with
pianist Anastasia Rizikov performing works by Liszt, Ravel
and Scriabin.
Paul Ennis is the managing editor of The WholeNote.
22 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 23
KAREN ABEL
performances with Mridangam
master drummer Trichy Sankaran,
Tenderness (aka Chrissy Reichert)
alongside dancer Allison
Peacock, and turntable artist
SlowPitchSound (Cheldon Paterson)
who will mine the Gallery’s sound
archives to create new visions
out of past performances. And
while on the topic of summertime wild and untamed sound
events, I must mention the Electric
Eclectics festival that takes place
from July 29 to 31 in the countryside
near Meaford. Directed by Gordon
Monahan and Chris Worden, the
festival combines experimental music, sound art, DJ artists and sound
installations in a relaxed camping environment. Check out their
website for the extensive lineup, which includes two noteworthy duos:
Not the Wind, Not the Flag, and the duo of Jennifer Castle and Mary
Margaret O’Hara.
The Rest of the Summer: Here are my listings of what else to look
out for during the hazy and hot months ahead.
JUNE
One highlight early in the month is Spectrum Music’s Tower of
Babel concert on June 4 with new compositions evoking various interpretations of this iconic story which appears in Christian, Islamic and
Jewish religious texts. The pieces will explore the question of whether
this ancient story can shed any light on contemporary divisons
amongst nations and religious groups. Globally acclaimed oud player,
Amos Hoffman, will be one of the performers. For improvised music
lovers, there is DroneDoctor, a drone music meditation concert on
June 5; the CCMC performing at Gallery 345 on June 11; and Audio
Pollination on June 25.
gets under your skin and moves
you, and you don’t really know why
or what it means or what it’s doing
to you, the images are functioning
in very much the same way.” He
continued to reflect on this topic
by saying “I find it odd given what’s
happening on the planet that
there hasn’t been a body of work
with this theme from a more art
perspective rather than it just being
about political activism.”
And that’s why using song is
so important for both of these
Rose Bolton
creators. They think of the piece as
“a heartbreak song in the same way
that songs are about heartbreak. This is about our heartbreak because
of what we do to the earth, to the planet.” Their ultimate priority is
to make a work that is emotionally powerful, to lead people into an
experience of “feeling what we are doing to the earth.” In fact, de
Guerre says, “If I don’t feel anything when I experience a work of art,
then I don’t consider it to be successful.” Thus the nature of the piece
is a poetic, impressionistic and non-literal approach to the theme,
with the film images conceived around the music.
Bolton’s approach to song was to create melodies that people would
love to sing and love to hear – melodies that would “stick in people’s
heads after the performance.” For inspiration, she first turned to the
songs of Robert Burns and his way of writing that asks universal questions. The next step was to ask the Order of Canada-appointed poet
Don McKay to become involved. She asked him if he could write in a
similar way, creating texts that addressed her questions related to the
theme of extinction. The Newfoundland-based McKay is a poet whose
strong personal connection to the land infuses his work, creating
poetry that both Bolton and de Guerre described as “grounding.” His
way of using precise language to create images that are sweeping and
allegorical in nature was a perfect fit, and with these texts, Bolton was
able to take their essence and turn them into lyrics for the songs. The
texts will also be published as a book of poems that will be available at
the concert.
The songs will be performed by both the VIVA! Youth Singers of
Toronto and Tafelmusik Chamber Choir, with the adults representing
the current generation and the children the generation of the future.
Both choirs will be engaged in conversations between the present
and the future. The keyboard players will also perform on the harpsichord as well as electronic keyboards, with the composer performing
the electronics on her laptop as well as triggering the spatial movement of the sound amongst the multiple speaker sound system. The
electronics are more ambient in nature, like a wash, and will include
live processing of the instrumental sounds with simple delay effects.
The overall arc of the piece begins with an air of innocence in the first
half, with almost a feeling of reverence towards nature and nonhuman
species. Then at a pivotal point, things take a turn for a more solemn
and desperate view towards our world and the reality of extinction.
Song of Extinction promises to be a powerful and evocative meditation on those realities that are often difficult to cope with. No doubt
however, we as audience members respond, we will be left with more
stirring questions than solid answers.
One of the other boundary-pushing musical events of Luminato
is the return of Unsound Toronto, a two-night sonic playground on
June 10 and 11 combining ambient, drone, noise and other forms of
experimental soundmaking. As well, a giant listening party is being
planned on June 16 for all those who want to experience the recording
of last year’s Apocalypsis performance composed by R. Murray
Schafer and performed by a cast of 1000 or more.
Parallel to these events at the festival is the concert celebrating 40
years at the Music Gallery on June 11. Combining new music, video,
performance and site-specific installation works, the evening promises to be a sonic portrayal of past, present and future. Starting
the evening off will be a performative walking tour of St. George
the Martyr’s courtyard highlighting oral histories, followed by
Beat by Beat | World View
TorQ
A Sonic Traveller's
Summer Sampler
S
ANDREW TIMAR
ummer in the city for me also means music in the city. No longer
constrained by indoor concert halls and clubs, audiences can
now enjoy an expanded range of venues and even performance genres, taking a cue from the rising temperatures, shirtsleeve
and sandals weather (at last!). That means outdoor venues like those
at North York’s Cultura Festival, Harbourfront Centre’s weekend festivals and Toronto Music Garden, plus those at Roy Thomson Hall’s
Live on the Patio are animated with relaxed crowds. These and many
other outdoor Toronto spaces resound for the summer with globally
conscious music.
And that’s just a partial urban list. It doesn’t begin to touch on the
wealth of outside summer folk festivals across Ontario or the curated
concerts at city parks. Moreover, music presentations in the summertime include a huge range of genres, presenting an ideal opportunity
to sample music you have been meaning to try, or never even knew
existed – the latter’s always a treat for sonic explorer types like me.
This is a sneak peek at just a few.
Luminato at the Hearn: Every year for the last decade, Toronto’s
warm weather music season seems to begin with Luminato. The
festival that set out to animate the city with music in June is ten years
old this year. It also happens to be artistic director Jörn Weisbrodt’s
swansong year, a golden period in the tenure of any CEO. As it is for
the present President south of the border, it’s a tempting opportunity
for Weisbrodt to affix his personal visionary seal on the organization
he is about to pass on to other hands. And this year’s festival is indeed
a radical revisioning.
As opposed to the multiple outdoor venues of past years, music at
Luminato will resonate from six sites all located within the caverns
of the decommissioned Hearn Generating Station, as well as in one
outside site, the Biergarten. Weisbrodt has chosen to program almost
all Luminato events at the Hearn, dubbed by one wag “Toronto’s
concrete cathedral.” It’s an immense edifice of interconnected industrial buildings most notable today for its imposing mid-century industrial brick and concrete presence on Toronto’s waterfront.
At one time the largest enclosed space in the country, the Hearn is
three times larger than the Tate Modern art gallery in London. How
big is that? The festival promo puts it into perspective: the “Statue of
Liberty fits in it upright (or on its side).”
With 17 days of programming under one roof, “creating an exceptionally rich and uniquely integrated global cultural experience”
becomes a more achievable lofty aim than past efforts to try to
animate the whole downtown core. That being said, finding a world
music through-line in their programming this year has proven to be
a more difficult task than in some past years. One site however where
it does appear is at the Bavarian-style Biergarten, where senior music
curator Derek Andrews has programmed a lively mix of daily evening
performances at the New Canadian Music Stage. Sponsored by Slaight
Music, some of the themes Andrews explores this year in his roster
of 14 acts include music from Francophone, Persian, Aboriginal and
“roots” artists.
Andrews, in a late May phone interview, drew my attention to a
Biergarten performance by the exciting Toronto female vocal quartet
Nazar-i Turkwaz (My Turquoise Gaze), Saturday, June 11. The quartet is
comprised of Brenna MacCrimmon, Maryem Tollar, Sophia Grigoriadis
and Jayne Brown, four remarkable musicians who have, over their
careers, immeasurably enhanced Toronto’s world music scene, as well
as individually performing on numerous video and film soundtracks
and theatrical productions. For over three decades they have collected
and performed traditional repertoire from the Middle East and Turkey,
Greece and the Balkans. In Nazar-i Turkwaz, they collectively explore
Sounds of the Next Generation (SONG) will be performing Spirit
Garden: Spring Planting by R. Murray Schafer, an outdoor music
drama, running June 11 and 12 on a farm in Cold Springs, near
Cobourg. The piece involves planting a garden, and will be followed
up by a harvesting concert on September 25. On June 25 the Canadian
Music Centre presents new works by Chris Paul Harman including
his Five Japanese Children’s Songs and the world premiere of his
Five Pieces for Clarinet and Piano. Other new and traditional works
inspired by Japan will also be included.
JULY
On July 17, Soundstreams Salon presents the premiere of Emilie
Lebel’s collaboration with Jumblies Theatre and community participants. Over at the Stratford Summer Music Festival, TorQ Percussion
will perform Strange and Sacred Noise by John Luther Adams, on
July 26. The work is a visual and aural exploration of the sonic geography of Alaska, answering the composers question “What would it
sound like if the wilderness could sing, and I could hear it singing?”
One of the largest summer festivals to include an extensive amount
of new concert music is the Ottawa International Chamber Music
Festival. I’ve compiled a summarized overview, but I also recommend
checking the listings for more details. On July 22, there is a concert of
seven Canadian works for oboe and piano. Two events for new music
lovers take place on July 26: a performance of Reciprocity, a multidisciplinary work by UK composer Patrick Cohen is followed later
in the evening by a series of boundary-crossing works performed by
Jesse Stewart, David Mott and Ernst Reijseger. On July 29 the Cecilia
String Quartet performs works by four Canadian women composers,
while on July 31 Morton Feldman’s masterwork, Clarinet and String
Quartet, will be played by James Campbell and the Quatuor Bozzini.
AUGUST
Continuing with the Ottawa Chamberfest, their special New Music
Miniseries comprised of three concerts spread throughout the day on
August 1. The first includes works by Canadians Palmer, Di Castri and
Murphy, followed by a second concert of seven works by Canadian
composers for violin and piano. The miniseries ends up with a more
international concert, with two works by Pierre Boulez among others.
The final new music work of the festival is a performance of Christos
Hatzis’ landmark multidisciplinary spectacle, Constantinople,
on August 2.
Mr. Shi and His Lover, a contemporary Chinese language music
theatre work composed by Torontonian Njo Kong Kie will be
presented as part of this year’s SummerWorks Performance Festival,
running from August 5 to 8 and 11 to 13. The Classical Unbound
Festival which occurs in Prince Edward County has a Living Canadian
Composer Stream of concerts, with pieces by Morlock Buczynski and
Mozetich spread throughout their concerts on August 19, 24 and 26.
And finally, Summer Music in the Garden’s September 1 concert will
feature works by Ann Southam.
Have an enjoyable and relaxing music-filled summer and keep
your eyes posted for details of Contact Contemporary Music’s annual
extravaganza on Labour Day weekend at Dundas Square.
Wendalyn Bartley is a Toronto-based composer and electrovocal sound artist. [email protected]
24 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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Nazar i Turkwaz
enactment of sama (sufi ritual of
dance music and poetry) for iftar,
thereby celebrating the peaceful
spirit of Ramadan and setting the
mood for the communal supper to
come. It sounds lovely.
Harbourfront Centre: Perhaps
the granddaddy of all current
Toronto summer music festivals
happens down at Harbourfront
Centre. For more than 40 years
it has striven to present a crosssection of the “mosaic of cultures
from within our country and around
the world.” I was among its earlyadopter audiences and a frequent visitor, along with my children
when they were young, enjoying its eclectic, though typically high
quality music programming. Along the way I learned a great deal
about diverse musics. It served me well in my various future careers –
including this one!
One of Harbourfront’s charms is the intimacy of most of its venues.
It’s where I saw and met many international musicians over the years,
some of whom, like the Malian singer and guitarist Ali Ibrahim Farka
Touré, subsequently went on to grand international careers. I saw him
perform a laid-back but nevertheless memorably musical concert
at the 150 to 250 seat Lakeside Terrace within sight of the sunlight
glinting off the lake.
This summer’s family-oriented themed weekend festivals in July
include too many to discuss in detail here. I will however give my
picks. Starting with “Ritmo y Color: The Streets of Mexico,” July 15
to 17; we move to the Caribbean in “Island Soul” July 29 to August 1.
The following month “Habari Africa” co-produced by Batuki Music
Society, highlighting the “cultural diversity of global Africa,” will
take over the Centre’s venues August 12 to14. The next weekend
“TAIWANfest: A Cultural Tango with Hong Kong” is in the house
August 26 to 28.
September 3 to 5 Harbourfront’s festival season comes to a close
with the “Ashkenaz Festival,” produced by the Ashkenaz Foundation
in partnership with Harbourfront Centre. It is North America’s largest
celebration of Jewish music, art and culture and its musical breadth
and depth warrants a story of its own, perhaps in the next issue of The
WholeNote.
Summer Music in the Garden: Another summertime music success
story has been the annual Summer Music in the Garden concert
series. It is produced by Harbourfront Centre in partnership with
City of Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation, with the support of
this repertoire, creating their own
arrangements, cultivating in their
vocal alchemy a very satisfying
sonic union.
Sunday June 26, at the other end
of this year’s Luminato Festival,
Biergarten-goers will find the
Toronto-based band Zuze. As far
as I could find out, it is comprised
of Iranian and Azerbaijani musicians. Relatively new on the Toronto
scene, Zuze presents a self-described
signature mix of “popular & folk
melodies of Iran and Azerbaijan set to
Afrobeat rhythms.”
The most unusual and perhaps the most inclusive event at this
year’s Luminato is scheduled for June 22. “Iftar at the Hearn” is
billed as a “free, inclusive event welcoming newcomers from Syria.”
Iftar is the meal served to break the daily fast during the month of
Ramadan. A social event involving family and friends, iftar provides
an opportunity to share food as an act of kindness and generosity with
members of the community. Toronto has recently welcomed thousands of Syrian refugees and Luminato brings together performers
from across the city, as well as food and refreshments, to welcome and
celebrate the presence of the newest arrivals to our famously multicultural city.
The free event opens with a greeting by the Ojibwe elder Duke
Redbird, a journalist, activist, businessman, actor and administrator,
followed by music by the Nai Children’s Choir, a Toronto community
group singing in Arabic, English and French. JUNO nominee Cris
Derksen then performs on cello in an artistically edgy set with her
trio which includes Aboriginal hoop dancer Nimkii Osawamick and
drummer Jesse Baird. Derksen aims to blur genre expectations with
her “electro-aboriginally influenced” cello compositions.
Capping the Iftar at the Hearn evening, just prior to the communal
meal with traditional Syrian and Middle Eastern food, is a performance by Toronto dancer-choreographer Sashar Zarif. His set features
collaboration with two leading young Azerbaijani musicians, the
kamancha virtuoso Elnur Mikayilov and award-winning mugham
singer Mirelem Mirelemov. Zarif is a multi-disciplinary performing
artist, educator and researcher whose “artistic practice…is steeped in
the artistry and history of traditional, ritualistic, and contemporary
dance and music of the Near East and Central Asia.” He has toured
widely “promoting cultural dialogue through intensive fieldwork,
residencies, performances and creative collaborations.” Integrating
dance, music and poetry the trio take themes from Sufi poetry in an
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 25
Beat by Beat | On Opera
Filling the
Operatic Vacuum
I
corporate and individual supporters. Located in a pleasant garden
setting along the lakeshore, it’s free, though donations are welcome.
The 17th edition of Summer Music in the Garden runs most Thursdays
at 7pm and Sundays at 4pm, weather permitting, from June 30 to
September 18 in the Toronto Music Garden.
With Tamara Bernstein returning to her artistic director duties, the
18-concert program this year looks as eclectic and exciting as usual.
I won’t pretend to be all-inclusive; but here are my picks from the
Garden’s crop.
July 21: Persian percussion specialist Naghmeh Farahmand and
young setar soloist Pejman Zahedian present “Becoming One with
Universal Love: Ancient Persian Music for a New Age.”
July 24: Toronto-based Subhadra Vijaykumar, violin, Vasudevan
Govindarajan, mrdangam, and Ramana Indrakumar, ghatam, present
“From the Banyan to the Willow Tree,” featuring the melodies and
rhythms of Carnatic classical music of South India.
July 28: Tamara Ilana and Ventanas have been making waves in the
city’s world music scene for a number of years. The six-member group
presents a “trans-Mediterranean” program of North African, Balkan,
Turkish and Spanish music.
August 7: Multiple JUNO-winning banjoist extraordinaire Jayme
Stone, and his friends (Kristin Andreassen, voice; Sumaia Jackson,
fiddle; and Joe Phillips, bass) return to the Summer Music in the
Garden with “Deep River of Song.” They will perform from their
impressive album Tabula Rasa, featuring songs collected by American
song collector Alan Lomax.
August 11: Sadie Buck and the He hi ye Girls present traditional and
contemporary Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) music in their concert, “The
Sweet Sound of Our Nature.” It’s rare to hear these songs cherished by
the people who made their homes here before most of us, performed
in public in the city. This is one opportunity I’ll be sure not to miss.
August 18: Nagata Shachu, Toronto’s leading taiko ensemble, returns
to the lakeside garden with roaring rhythms and soaring melodies
performed on Japanese instruments made of wood, metal and skin.
August 21: The Bachands, consisting of Qristina Bachand, violin/
voice, and Quinn Bachand, guitar/banjo, perform “All in the (Celtic)
Family.” Expect Celtic roots music by the award-winning brothersister duo.
CHRISTOPHER HOILE
t used to be that come June Ontarians had to leave the province to seek opera performances elsewhere. That’s not the case
this summer which is surprisingly filled with opera, especially
with new ones.
The season begins with a brand new opera festival – the Toronto
Festival of Children’s Opera – running May 29 to June 12. The festival
includes lectures and symposia and performances of four operas.
There is the Adventures of the Magic Tree Fort created by the After
School Opera Program; the world premiere of Dean Burry’s latest
work, The Sword in the Schoolyard by VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto;
a version of Hansel and Gretel by Shoestring Opera and a remount
of Dean Burry’s successful 2004 opera, The Hobbit, presented by the
Canadian Children’s Opera Company June 9 to 12 with Giles Tomkins
as both Gandalf and Smaug.
The same month Opera 5 concludes its 2015/16 season with an
immersive performance of Die Fledermaus (1874) by Johann Strauss,
Jr. The operetta is set in the midst of a party going on at 918 Bathurst
Street with card playing and alcohol available. Michael Barrett sings
Eisenstein, Rachel Krehm is Rosalinde, Julie Ludwig is Adele and Keith
Lam is Falke. Patrick Hansen conducts an 11-member ensemble and a
13-member chorus and Aria Umezawa is the stage director. The party
featuring dancers and surprise cabaret acts is set for June 8 to 11.
Also in June are three performances by Opera by Request, the
company where the singers choose the repertory. First up on June 10
is the rarity La Wally (1892) by Alfredo Catalani. The opera is best
known for the aria “Ebben? Ne andrò lontana,” made popular as the
stolen recording in the 1981 movie Diva. Sarah Hood sings Wally (a
nickname for Walburga), Paul Williamson sings Hagenbach whom
Wally loves and Michael Robert-Broder sings Gellner who also loves
Wally. One reason the opera is seldom produced is that it ends in an
avalanche, but that will be no problem for Opera by Request since the
work is presented in concert.
Also on OBR’s schedule is Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress (1951),
an opera not seen in Toronto since 1985. Will Ford sings the role of the
aptly named Tom Rakewell, Sharon Tikiryan sings Tom’s betrothed,
Anne Trulove, and
Michael York sings
Nick Shadow, the Devil
in disguise who leads
Tom astray. The single
performance takes
place June 17.
OBR’s final offering
on June 25 is Verdi’s
Aida (1871). Carrie Gray
will sing the title role,
Paul Williamson will
sing Aida’s beloved
Radames and Ramona
Carmelly will sing
the jealous Amneris.
For all three operas
in concert, the tireless William Shookhoff
will provide the piano
accompaniment.
June 26 will see the
first production of the
mysterious Confidential
Opera Project. In a
Alexander Dobson
QUICK PICKS
Lulaworld 2016, presented by Lula Music and Arts Centre, continues
its festival into the second week of June with concerts every evening
until June 10. Check the listings for details.
Aga Khan Museum: June 12 World Music Series: “Dusk to Dawn”
features the renowned dancer Pandit Birju Maharaj in a program of
kathak dance and Hindustani music. August 4 the Fanna-Fi-Allah Sufi
Qawwali Party perform Sufi devotional music. August 11 The World
Music Series presents the Mehmet Polat Trio in a program of Ottoman,
Anatolian, Balkan and West African musical traditions played on the
ngoni, oud and ney.
Cultura Festival, North York: Mel Lastman Square is home July 8,
15, 22 and 29 to an un-ticketed outdoor community-centric familyoriented arts festival. Each Friday night in July different musicians,
buskers, art activities, international street food and films are featured.
As of press time the programming hadn’t yet been released, so check
the festival website or print media closer to the festival dates.
Roy Thomson Hall: Live on the Patio: The concerts, which take place
throughout the months of June, July and August, transform the Roy
Thomson Hall patio into an outdoor downtown music venue. Groups
such as Lemon Bucket Orkestra, Hampaté and Sahel Blues, Salsa y
Fusion, Samba e Forró with Flavia Nascimento and World Fusion with
the Villalobos Brothers and Alberto de la Rosa help enliven the large
space a level down from King Street. Again, the listings hold the keys
to the dates.
If you see me relaxing at one of these concerts, please say hello. And
may you have a pleasant music-filled summer.
Andrew Timar is a Toronto musician and music writer. He
can be contacted at [email protected]
26 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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WALTZ RIVALS
2016 | 2017
ORPHEUS IN THE UNDERWORLD
THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER
THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 27
-MÉLISSA TREMBLAY
the operetta Earnest, The Importance
unique arrangement, COP co-creators
of Being that Toronto Operetta Theatre
Marion Abbott and Gregory Finney
premiered in 2008. They returned to
choose and cast an opera and distribute
the work and reshaped it as a grand
the scores to the cast with the proviso
opera with a large-scale scenes at a ball
that they keep the opera a secret. With
and in the courtroom. As Davies says,
no rehearsals, the cast and music director
“The stuff of opera was always there,
meet for the first time on the night of
with the vocal requirements, high lyrithe performance and start the opera. The
cism and large dramatic gesture.”
audience shows up without knowing
Though the SOLT production will use
what opera they’re going to see. The chalonly piano accompaniment, Davies
lenge for the performers is to create
says that an audience will easily be
an ensemble on their feet in front of
able to imagine the orchestral sound
an audience. In his COP blog, Finney
he intends. Michael Rose is the music
revealed this much: “Our first show, like
director and Guillermo Silva-Marin the
all the ones we have planned after, is a
stage director.
beloved part of the Opera canon and let
In August the SummerWorks festival
me tell you this: each and every one will
will include the opera Mr. Shi and
leave you thrilled, awed and amazed!”
His Lover by Njo Kong Kie, his fourth
Farther afield the Westben Arts Festival
opera to appear at the festival. The
in Campbellford is presenting the world
most recent was the well-received
premiere of The Pencil Salesman with
Señorita Mundo in 2009. Mr. Shi and
both music and libretto by Brian Finley.
His Lover, commissioned by the Macau
The fully staged opera concerns Boris
Guillermo Silva-Marin directing a SOLT rehearsal
in 2010 on the Robert Gill Theatre stage
Experimental Theatre in 2013, is based
Ball, the patriarch of a family of inventors.
on the same real-life story that inspired
While he lives in his glory days when he
the play M. Butterfly (1988) about a Chinese opera performer and
invented the Personal Touch Typewriter, it takes a pencil salesman
his French Diplomat lover who believed him to be a woman. Jordan
to bring him into the present to get to know his own granddaughter.
Cheng from Macau and Po Jen Chen from Taiwan sing the two roles.
Among the eight-member cast, John Fanning plays Boris, Donna
The composer conducts an ensemble of piano, marimba and Chinese
Bennett his wife Rose and Alexander Dobson the Pencil Salesman.
percussion and Johnny Tam from Macau will direct. The work running
Daniel Warren conducts a chamber orchestra; stage direction is by
from August 5 to 13 is sung in Mandarin with English surtitles.
Michael Mori, artistic director of Tapestry Opera. The opera runs
June 25, 26 and July 1, 2 and 3. There are also a series of workshops
Christopher Hoile is a Toronto-based writer on opera and
and vocal intensives connected with the opera.
theatre. He can be contacted at [email protected]
Moving on to July, opera returns to Toronto Summer Music in the
form of The Rape of Lucretia (1946) by Benjamin Britten on July 22.
This, the first of Britten’s chamber operas, is based on a French play
by André Obey, which gave the librettist Ronald Duncan the idea of
Sunday, November 6, 2016
having the story narrated by a Male and a Female Chorus who interpret the action from a Christian point of view. Set in Rome circa
500 BC the opera focuses on Lucretia, wife of Junius Brutus, who,
after being raped by Tarquinius, chooses suicide rather than a life of
A Tribute to Kálmán and Lehár
dishonour.
The production, co-produced by Against the Grain Theatre
December 27, 30, 31, 2016 and January 6, 7, 8, 2017
and the Canadian Opera Company at the Winter Garden Theatre,
features Emma Char as Lucretia, Iain MacNeil as Tarquinius, Owen
McCausland as the Male Chorus and Chelsea Rus as
by Jacques Offenbach
the Female Chorus. Topher Mokrzewski conducts a
13-member ensemble and Anna Theodosakis directs.
April 26, 28, 29, 30, 2017
The end of July and beginning of August is the
time of the productions of the Summer Opera Lyric
Theatre, founded and directed by Guillermo Silvaby Oscar Straus
Marin and this year celebrating its 30th anniversary.
SOLT presents fully staged operas with piano accomSunday, June 4, 2017
paniment at the intimate Robert Gill Theatre at the
University of Toronto. On July 30 and August 2, 4 and
7, it presents The Tales of Hoffmann (1881) by Jacques
Offenbach. On July 30 and August 3 and 5, it presents
A Tribute to Gilbert & Sullivan
Handel’s Giulio Cesare (1724).
On July 29 and 31 and on August 6, as part of its anniversary celebrations, SOLT presents its first-ever world
premiere, A Tale of Two Cities with music by Victor
Davies to a libretto by Eugene Benson. Based on Charles
Dickens’ 1859 novel of the same name, the opera
concerns Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat,
and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English
lawyer, who become enmeshed through their love for
Lucie Manette and drawn against their will to Paris at
the height of the Reign of Terror.
For a subscription brochure and ticket information
Davies and Benson informed me that they began the
please call our office at 416-922-2912 or email
Guillermo Silva-Marin
piece as a musical before they became occupied with
[email protected]
General Director
Beat by Beat | Early Music
Cappella Intima: One lesser-known group that’s been putting on
some great concerts for a while now is also worth a listen this month.
Tenor Bud Roach’s ensemble Cappella Intima has been getting quite
a reputation for its exciting, well-researched concerts of late-Renaissance Italian vocal music, and their next show promises to be more
of what the group does very well. “The Paradise of Travellers” will be
DAV I D P O D G O R S K I
an evening devoted to the Venetian stop on the grand tour, featuring
ith the arrival of summer weather – and the attendant
canzonettas, arias, and sacred motets written by the composers
cottage weekends – it’s a safe bet that it’ll be a few months at
(Monteverdi, Croce, Banchieri, and, somewhat later, Rolla) with
least before next season starts up again for most major early
accounts of the city of Venice by tourists from the early 17th-century
music ensembles around town. Most of their concert seasons wound
(spoiler: not all of them thought the city lived up to its reputation).
down the year by the end of May, but there are a few concerts to catch
You can catch this show at Trinity St.-Paul’s Centre on June 22 at 8pm.
around Toronto, most of them free. But if you can make it out of town,
Have cello, will travel: I’ve always liked the idea of casual clasor you’re willing to take a chance on some music festivals, you can
sical concerts; so, if you’re not in the mood for a formal evening at
actually hear quite a wide variety of good music this summer.
the concert hall, consider giving this show a try. Steuart Pincombe
Montreal Baroque: It’s completely impossible to talk about early
is an American baroque cellist who has recently come back to North
music festivals over the summerAmerica after living for four years
time without mentioning
in The Hague. Not content to
Montreal Baroque, which
tough it out on a more convencompletely dominates the
tional, and in all probability,
musical landscape every year.
slower, path to a musical career,
Its four-day, long-weekend-inhe has taken the artistic lifestyle
Quebec extravaganza is packed
to new extremes. He has bought
with nearly 30 concerts, lectures,
a used trailer, in which he now
free public events, and just outlives, and is putting on a series of
and-out weird ideas, and features
concerts all over North America in
top-tier Canadian talent salted
whatever venue will put him up.
with a few international artists
His current solo project, “Bach
who fetch top dollar anywhere in
and Beer” is a pay-what-you-can
the world.
concert of three of the Bach cello
And the festival isn’t just about
suites, which he’ll be performing
spectacle alone – this year’s is
at the Rainhard Brewery in the
actually delivering a sizeable
Junction on June 16 at 7 pm.
chunk of the Bach catalogue,
Each suite is paired with a brew
including some rarely performed
Lina Tur Bonet
from Rainhard’s own selection. As
works. A casual glance at their
a concert idea, Pincombe’s approach is fun. But as a beer aficionado,
program shows there’s about a half dozen must-see concerts packed
don’t get me started! (Did you know people have been brewing beer
into one weekend. The festival will feature Bach’s complete sonatas
using recipes that are hundreds of years old and changing them gradand partitas for solo violin, played by rising star Lina Tur Bonet. Then,
ually over time? Sort of the same way music has evolved? Surely I’m
in the weird ideas category, there’s a concert devoted to The Art of
not the the first person to suspect the craft beer movement as being
Fugue featuring Les Voix Humaines and the electric guitar collective,
a thinly applied intellectual veneer meant to rebrand alcoholism as a
Instruments of Happiness, which as a concert idea is likely the perfect
fun hobby...oh dear, there I go.)
way to get people interested in what’s probably the most academic
Anyway, as I said, you can’t deny it sounds like a fun idea. I am all
composition of the classical canon. But if you need further motivation
in favour of getting classical music out of the concert hall and into
to pack your bags for Montreal, here are two other concerts make the
as many different venues as possible. Bach, in particular, is rarely
road trip worth it: the near-legendary Italian gambist Paolo Pandolfo
if ever performed on the bar scene; letting the audience relax with
will be joining the festival for a concert of Bach cello suites (which
some food and drink while listening is a great idea for winning over a
he’s decided, somewhat mercurially, to transcribe and play on viola
new audience.
da gamba); and harpsichordist Eric Milnes will direct the Montreal
Summer Music in the Garden: Speaking of the cello suites, the
Baroque Festival band, which includes the festival's best soloists, for an
Music Garden at the foot of Spadina, landscaped to follow the strucall-star concert of Bach cantatas.
ture of the Bach suites, is a good reason to take a trip down to
And there’s plenty more good music to see: a concert of instruHarbourfront and find an oasis in the middle of downtown. Among
mental music composed by Purcell and his contemporaries; soprano
the twice-weekly concerts that will take place there till well into
Jacinthe Thibault singing late 18th-century French cantatas; and a
September, this summer some younger Montreal-based musifantastical concert dedicated to the music of Jean-Féry Rebel, to name
cians will be giving a spirited performance of some composers who
a few. If the idea of taking a weekend off to hear non-stop Baroque
don’t get much attention at all. Soprano Andréanne Brisson Paquin
concerts appeals to you, consider giving this festival a look. It takes
joins Pallade Musica chamber ensemble – harpsichordist Mélisande
place on and around the McGill University campus in downtown
McNabney, violinist Tanya LaPerrière, lutenist Esteban La Rotta, and
Montreal from June 23 to 26.
JUNO-nominated cellist Elinor Frey – to perform two female baroque
Tafelmusik Summer Baroque: To some, getting outside the city for
composers (Elizabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre and Rosa Giacinta
a weekend of concerts might be a bit ambitious. Fortunately, Toronto’s
Badalla) together with the English composer, John Eccle, and the
top baroque band has a little festival of its own. The Tafelmusik
Polish composer, Adam Jarzębski, in a free concert on July 14 at
Summer Baroque Festival features a series of free concerts running
7pm. This is definitely a group that can take risks with their concert
from June 6 to 18, and while the group isn’t forthcoming on details,
programming, and you can be sure they will play everything on the
they’re solid enough to take a chance on, particularly when they’re
program with dedication and verve.
free. A couple stand out: Tafelmusik soloists will be playing a mixed
program of chamber music on June 11 at 12:30 in somewhat baroqueDavid Podgorski is a Toronto-based harpsichordist, music
unfriendly Walter Hall in the Edward Johnson building; if you prefer a
teacher and a founding member of Rezonance. He can
full, woody orchestral sound, consider checking out their concert for
be contacted at [email protected]
choir and orchestra at Grace Church on-the-Hill on June 18 at 7:30.
An Early Summer
W
28 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
Beat by Beat | Art of Song
B
The Songs of
Summer
HANS DE GROOT
thewholenote.com
www.operainconcert.com
y the beginning of June most
regular concert series have
ended and will not resume until
September, their place taken by a
number of summer festivals. First and
foremost, there is Toronto Summer
Music (TSM). This year’s theme is
London Calling: Music in Great Britain
and the programs include not only
music composed in Britain but also
recreations of musical events that
have taken place in Britain in the past.
There is one vocal recital: the mezzo
Jamie Barton, winner of the Cardiff
Singer of the World Competition,
will give a recital on July 25. The
program will include songs by Turina,
Chausson, Schubert and Dvořák and
will conclude with three spirituals. The
pianist is Bradley Moore.
Also of interest is the opening
concert on July 14 which features
Jamie Barton
Nicholas Phan, tenor, and Neil Deland,
French horn, who will perform Britten’s Serenade for Tenor, Horn and
Strings. On August 4, TSM is presenting a homage to The Last Night of
the Proms. The vocal soloist is the mezzo Allyson McHardy (all three
concerts are in Koerner Hall). An important part of TSM has always
been to present and to help develop newly emerging talent. The fruits
of this can be sampled in “Art of Song reGENERATION,” two separate
concerts on July 22 in Walter Hall. The coaches are the soprano Anne
Schwanewilms and the collaborative pianist Malcolm Martineau.
Since 2010 the administrator of Toronto Summer Music has been
Douglas McNabney. TSM has now announced that 2016 will be
McNabney’s last season. He is a violist as well as an administrator and,
while he never stopped playing the viola, the move may mean that
he will have more playing time. That is good news, for him and for
his audiences. He will be succeeded by Jonathan Crow, well-known
to Toronto audiences as the concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra and the co-leader of the New Orford String Quartet.
Luminato, now in its tenth year, will present a performance of
Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du soldat, directed by Jonathan Crow, in which
Derek Boyes will be the narrator at the Side Room of the Hearn
Generating Station, June 18; there will be another performance of
the Stravinsky at the AGO Walker Court, June 12 at 2pm. Rufus does
Judy is a recreation of Judy Garland’s 1961 concert at Carnegie Hall,
performed by Rufus Wainwright at the Hearn Generating Station,
June 23 and 24.
Tafelmusik presents several free concerts as part of their Baroque
Summer Festival. Among these is one featuring the Tafelmusik
Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir directed by Jeanne Lamon and
Ivars Taurins, with soloits Ann Monoyios, soprano, and Peter Harvey,
baritone, on June 6 at Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre.
Other Festivals
The Kincardine Summer Music Festival presents a concert which
aims at bringing together the sounds of Broadway, the improvisations of jazz and the sensibility of pop. The performers are Heather
Bambrick, Diane Leah and Julie Michels at Knox Presbyterian
Church, June 17.
Among the offerings at this year’s Westben Arts Festival is a concert
of Schubert’s music, both songs and instrumental chamber music.
2016
2017
SEASON
V O I C E B OX
For a Subscription Brochure
and ticket information please
call (416) 922-2147 or e-mail
[email protected]
OPERA IN CONCERT
Guillermo Silva-Marin
General Director
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2016
Shakespeare
400
A Tribute Benefit Concert
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2016
I Capuleti
e i Montecchi
The Capulets and the Montagues
by Vincenzo Bellini
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2017
L’isola disabitata
The Deserted Island
by Joseph Haydn
with Kevin Mallon and the Aradia Ensemble
SUNDAY, MARCH 26, 2017
Khovanshchina
Хованщина
The Khovansky Affair
by Modest Mussorgsky
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 29
REBECCA FAY
The singers are the sopranos Donna Bennett and Kathryn Shuman at
Westben Concert Barn, Campbellford, July 17.
The Leith Summer Music Festival presents a concert of songs taken
from The American Songbook with special emphasis on the work
of Leonard Cohen. The singer is the soprano Patricia O’Callaghan,
accompanied by Robert Kortgaard, piano, and Andrew Downing, bass,
at Leith Church, August 27. O’Callaghan performs “Hallelujah,” songs
of Leonard Cohen and others at Stratford Summer Music, July 23 at
Revival House.
The Elora Festival will be presenting four concerts of
interest, all in St. John’s Church, Elora. Tenor Russell
Braun teams up with his wife and accompanist, Carolyn
Maule, and the Elora Festival Singers for an afternoon
concert of works by Vaughan Williams and others,
July 9. Soprano Marie-Josée Lord joins the Elora Festival
Singers in a performance of selections from her JUNO
Award-winning CD, Amazing Grace, as well as music by
Gounod, Gershwin and others, July 14. Acclaimed early
music specialist, soprano Suzie LeBlanc, joins with harpsichordist Alexander Weimann, July 16, in a celebration
of Shakespeare on the 400th anniversary of his death.
Star countertenor, Daniel Taylor, Elora Festival Singers
soprano, Rebecca Genge, and pianist, Steven Philcox
perform “Songs of Love,” July 23.
Elsewhere, Leslie Fagan, soprano, and Peter Longworth,
piano. perform Schumann’s Frauenliebe und leben,
Op. 42 as part of the Festival of the Sound, July 21. And
I am looking forward to the return of Capella Intima,
who will present a concert of canzonettas, arias and
motets from 17th century Northern Italy. The music will
be complemented by contemporary travellers’ accounts.
The performers are Bud Roach, tenor and director, Sheila
Dietrich, soprano, Jennifer Enns Modolo, alto, and David Roth, baritone, at Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, June 22; donation requested. The
Beat by Beat | Choral Scene
Reflections on the
Sacred and the
Secular
A
program will be repeated at St. John the Evangelist in Hamilton
on June 26.
QUICK PICKS
June 1: Bach’s cantata, Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes
BWV76 will be performed by soloists from St. James Cathedral and the
organist Ian Sadler.
June 2: Christina Stelmacovich, mezzo, will sing a free concert at
Metropolitan United Church.
June 3: Show One Productions presents Tamara Gverdtsiteli
singing Yiddish songs, with the Moscow Male Jewish Cappella at Roy
Thomson Hall.
June 4: Ermanno Mauro, tenor, will sing popular opera arias along
with emerging singers coached by him at Columbus Centre.
June 4: The Aradia Baroque Ensemble presents arias by Handel to be
followed by Peter Maxwell Davies’ Eight Songs for a Mad King at The
Music Gallery.
June 4: The Etobicoke Centennial Choir presents opera arias and
choruses by Mozart, Verdi and Offenbach. The soloists are Andrea
Naccarato, soprano, Erin Ronniger, alto, Lance Kaizer, tenor, and
Lawrence Shirkie, baritone, at Humber Valley United Church.
June 5: Maeve Palmer, soprano, sings Five Poems by Tyler Versluis at
Gallery 345.
June 6: Melanie Conly, soprano, and Kathryn Tremills, piano,
perform Mozart’s Exsultate Jubilate as well as songs by Case, Holby,
Gershwin, Gounod, Porter and Purcell at the Church of the Redeemer.
June 7: The Toronto Concert Orchestra presents highlights from
Rigoletto, La traviata, La bohème and other operas. The singers are
Sara Papini, soprano, Eugenia Dermentzis, mezzo, Romulo Delgado
and Riccardo Iannello, tenor, and Bradley Christensen, baritone at
Casa Loma.
June 8 and 9: Michael Donovan, baritone, will sing his own new
songs at Gallery 345.
June 12: Schubert’s Mass in G will be sung in a free concert with
soloists Jennifer Krabbe, soprano, and Dennis Zimmer, bass at
Humbercrest United Church.
June 16: Charlotte Knight, soprano, is the singer in “It Shoulda
Been Me: A Cabaret,” a program of songs by Sondheim, Billy Joel, Joe
Iconis and others at Gallery 345. The show is also being performed in
St. Catharines, June 10 and Guelph, June 18.
June 17: Rachel Fenlon sings and plays the piano in a Schubert
concert at Gallery 345.
June 24: Inga Filippova, soprano, Stanislav Vitort, tenor, and
Andrey Andreychik, baritone, sing opera at Lawrence Park
Community Church.
And beyond the GTA, June 1: Maryem Tollar, Brenna MacCrimmon,
Jayne Brown and Sophia Grigoriadis, who comprise the group
Turkwaz, perform “Sounds of the Eastern Mediterranean” at the
Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music Society Music Room.
BRIAN CHANG
s we voyage into the beauty of summer and the winding down
of the regular 2015/2016 choral season, it has been my pleasure
to write this column over the last year. One fascinating theme
for me, as an active singer and performer, and as a regular attendee
of concerts in the region, has been how often choral music finds itself
at the crossroads of the secular and the sacred. From a Eurocentric
perspective this comes as no surprise: much of what we revere
as choral singers is deeply rooted in biblical and church liturgy Handel’s Messiah, Mendelssohn’s Elijah, countless requiems, oratorios
based on stories and teachings from scripture. Less evident, from that
perspective, is the extent to which choral music is inseparable from
global spirituality. We are lucky to be in Toronto, a truly global village
where we can interact with, learn from, and be humbled by the
myriad diversity of the human voice, human spirituality and music.
One great case in point is the Aga Khan Museum which has hosted
a variety of fabulous musicians from across the world. Qawwali is
a devotional, passionate music inspired by Sufi tradition and the
California-based Fanna-Fi-Allah Sufi Qawwali Party will perform it at
the museum, August 4. This youthful group will bring us sounds and
words that have been part of South Asian culture for over 700 years,
showing us the harmony of the sacred and secular at play. I hope their
programming goes from strength to strength, and that more institutions like this emerge as our city’s cultural landscape continues
to change.
Reflecting on the past season, the year has been an extraordinary
choral soundscape: 1000 performers in Luminato’s staging of Murray
Schafer’s Apocalypsis; several opportunities to experience contemporary throat singing with Tanya Tagaq; fans coming together to sing
choral tributes to David Bowie and Prince; a diverse series of Ismaili
and other South Asian works by the Aga Khan Museum; an unusual
Messiah under Sir Andrew Davis with the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir
and the TSO; and the voices of so many children, in the region’s children’s choirs and guests from around the world. Choral City isn’t just
humming, it is belting a message of hope across the region!
Gospel Music – Community in Action: Karen Burke, a York
University professor specializing in music education and gospel
music, is also the director of the Toronto Mass Choir. She’s incredibly
in demand as a clinician and teacher. She talks about the music, but
it is clear that people are the key to her approach and to her appeal as
an educator and expert. The community that is built, the stories, the
Hans de Groot is a concertgoer and active listener
who also sings and plays the recorder. He can be
contacted at [email protected]
30 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
performances are taken directly from gospel
music. So it’s an easier sell to people we want to
reach as we try to keep choral music alive.”
She’s absolutely right. So much popular
music has been directly influenced by gospel
music. It is a musical vernacular that everyone is
familiar with, even if they don’t know what it is.
Examples include: Lisa Fischer and the backing
vocals in Gimme Shelter with the Rolling Stones;
NSync’s bridge in This I Promise You; Beyoncé’s
chorus in Halo; the end of Lady Gaga’s Born this
Way; the Book of Mormon’s Hasa Diga Eebowai;
and pretty much anything ever done by Motown.
We know the sounds, the harmonies, the bridges
into a full-step key change, the call and response,
the dominant harmonies – gospel has been part
of music for a very long time. This is indeed
our music. Is it any wonder that Burke can get
youth engaged in choral music and singing at the top of their lungs?
This is accessible music and it is also youthful music with a deep
local history.
She also talks about how the rote nature of most gospel music
requires musicians to use their skills in a different way instead of
relying too heavily on sheet music: “What’s on paper is only three
quarters of what you need…there’s this phenomenal thing called
listening. It’s an incredible tool.” She finds herself constantly
surprised by the hesitancy of choristers who don’t think they can sing
without music, and then “their eyes come up out of the folders, out of
the music, and the sound is just there.” It’s transformative not only for
choristers but their directors as well.
Every time one performs gospel, she says, the energy, the feeling,
the personality will be different (in contrast to much Eurocentric
choral music where we seek to evoke the original intention of the
composers as exactly as possible. Gospel music often demands of us to
personalities, and the love of them
all coming together – this is the
core of gospel music. An opportunity to talk to Burke immersed
me in all the things I like about
choral music – love, sharing music
in ensemble and being part of
something much greater than
ourselves.
One of the key abilities of a
great conductor is to be able to
build an ensemble of people,
not just singers. As a professor,
Burke takes a unique approach.
“Our first class is about making
memories. How do you intentionally learn the names of your chilKaren Burke
dren so they feel like people and not
just voices?” She tells a story that shows how deeply she cares about
the singers she works with, and how she is changed by those experiences. In this way, grief becomes joy, and fear can become wonder –
for everyone involved – and it all comes out in the music.
I reveal to her my own ignorance of the place of gospel music
in Canadian history, and it prompts our conversation. Burke situates gospel music in its Toronto context citing the work of colleagues
who have studied the growth and experience of gospel music, in the
region and in how it has shaped the very fabric of choral history. “It
is part and parcel of our history here; our choral history, our musical
culture,” she says. “And then it’s only a few steps away from remembering how much gospel music is part of our mainstream and what
it has done in terms of making our ears more familiar to the different
harmonies we hear. And especially how it is has influenced popular
music. That is why, working with young people, it is so readily accessible and why they love it. So many [mainstream] harmonies and
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 31
Beat by Beat | Bandstand
Chanticleer
What's In a Name?
P
JACK MACQUARRIE
eople’s given names saddle them with epithets that tend to
remain with them throughout their lives. The name Jack, for
example, endows or burdens me with more than my share. A
few of the more obvious: Jack be nimble, Jack Sprat could eat no fat,
Jack was every inch a sailor, Jackass, and Jack of all trades, but master
of none. The last of these, “Jack of all trades,” particularly rankles
when I hear it applied to musicians willing (and able) to switch from
their usual instrument to another to fill in for some other missing
instrument in a band. (The disdainful critics are, generally, those who
would not be able to do so.)
A more complimentary term than “Jack of all trades” might be “A
man of many hats.” I can’t think of anyone in the music world more
deserving of that title, sometimes quite literally, than Henry Meredith
of Western University (Doctor Hank as he is affectionately known)
who displays his amazing array of talents with the aid of his Plumbing
Factory Brass Band (PFBB). I had the pleasure of attending their most
recent concert in London where, demonstrating several of the many
period instruments from his vast collection, he donned the style of
hats that might have been worn by musicians of the period.
This concert was a perfect example of what I have often described,
and encouraged, as “Music Education as Entertainment.” The title of
the concert was “Meet the Plumbers,” but would have more accurately
described the scope of the concert if the title had been expanded to
include “and Meet Their Instruments.” After the opening number,
performed by the entire band, the audience was introduced to all of
the members of the family of modern brass instruments and many
of their predecessors including parforce horns, valveless trumpets,
saxhorns, and the ancient cornett. In many of these smaller ensemble
numbers all the musicians wore hats of many eras from Doctor
Hank’s colourful hat collection.
The concert’s grand finale began with the introduction of the
vuvuzela which could be described as a type of primitive klaxon.
Its modern offspring, the plastic vuvuzela, came into prominence
(notoriety is perhaps a better word) a few years ago when thousands of them were sounded during football matches at the FIFA
World Cup in South Africa. In 1930 composer Henry Fillmore wrote
The Klaxon March where he introduced the sound of early car horns
into the work. At this concert, a few members of the audience were
given vuvuzelas to produce the appropriate sound and then cued by
Meredith whenever the music called for the klaxon. I can proudly
report that this Jack of all trades added to my repertoire by displaying
my musical skills on a bright green plastic vuvuzela.
Doctor Hank is truly “a man of many hats,” and he displayed
his many talents as conductor, instrumentalist, curator and entertainer, simultaneously educating and entertaining his audience. After enjoying works of four centuries spanning the era from
Samuel Scheidt in the early 17th century to Henry Mancini and Paul
McCartney, we all had learned as we listened. We went home with
memories of a great concert and some newly gained knowledge of
some of the many aspects of music.
Wychwood Clarinet Choir: The next major event on our musical
calendar was the “Sounds of Spring” concert of the Wychwood
Clarinet Choir. This was a very special concert dedicated to the
memory of Howard Cable, who had been their composer and
conductor laureate in recent years until his passing in March. In addition to the performance of two of Cable’s works from the 1960s there
was a special tribute section in the printed program with photographs with choir members in recent years. During the intermission
Bobby Herriot, trumpeter, conductor, composer and long-time friend
of Cable spoke about their friendship and working relationship over
the years. Cable’s two daughters and one son were in attendance and,
after the concert, spoke of a few initiatives under discussion to recognize their father in one of Toronto’s parks. (We were also treated to a
fine arrangement of Tchaikovsky’s Andante Cantabile from the String
be different and new, every single time. “It’s about what you do for the
music personally. When you’re given that permission to be personal,
and the choir relates to it, it provides a whole different take on things.
People can give more,” she says.
The Toronto Mass Choir is a prolific performing and recording
group. I highly encourage you to check them out; their full gamut of
experience is available on Google Play. Karen Burke and the Toronto
Mass Choir will present a concert as part of the TD Toronto Jazz
Festival on Sunday June 26 at 12:30pm, Nathan Phillips Square.
Summer Festivals: As the regular musical season winds down, there
are still many opportunities to catch fantastic music across the region.
I hope to see you at some of the performances I have highlighted here,
and please look at the listings of the other summer festivals in the
region. There is choral music happening everywhere!
The Elora Festival: The Elora Festival continues to provide worldclass musical performances in an adorable rural Ontario setting.
There is a lot of choral programming over its 16 days. On Friday
July 8 at 7:30pm the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir joins the Elora
Festival Singers and the Festival Orchestra in an opening night gala
featuring a brand new commission, River of Life by Timothy Corlis,
as well as Mozart’s Requiem. July 10 at 4pm is “The Glory of Bach”
featuring Bach’s Mass in G Minor and more. The incredibly popular
all-male chorus Chanticleer performs on Friday July 15 at 7:30pm.
Don’t miss a chance to hear Haydn and Mozart on Friday July 17 at
4pm featuring the Elora Festival Singers and the Festival Orchestra in
Mozart’s Vesperae solennes de confessore and Haydn’s Lord Nelson
Mass, a fantastic double bill. The Elora Festival Singers present “Choral
Mystics II” including two new premieres by British composer Patrick
Hawes. Hawes will be present as the singers record these premieres
on Thursday July 21 at 7:30pm. In the year of Queen Elizabeth’s
90th birthday, the festival presents “Coronation Anthems,” music
by Handel on July 23 at 4pm. The festival closes on July 24 at 2pm
with the Montreal Jubilation Gospel Choir. See elorafestival.ca for
all the listings and locations. Most performances are in a variety of
intimate venues.
Toronto Summer Music presents the Theatre of Early Music with
Daniel Taylor in a reconstruction of the music that accompanied King
George II’s ascension to the throne in 1727. Music by Handel, Purcell,
Gibbons and Tallis is featured, Tuesday July 26 at 7:30pm, Walter Hall.
The Brott Music Festival presents its 29th season, featuring a
variety of fantastic music across the Hamilton area. The first choral
performance is Beethoven’s Ninth on Thursday June 30 at 7:30pm at
St. Thomas the Apostle Church, Waterdown. Brott presents Classic
Blend in“Songs of the Seasons in Ladies Barbershop Style,” a rare
chance to hear a female barbershop ensemble, Saturday July 23 at
7:30pm, Zoetic Theatre. The season closes with Verdi’s Requiem
on Thursday August 18, 7:30pm at the Mohawk College McIntyre
Performing Arts Centre.
Follow Brian on Twitter @bfchang Send info/media/
tips to [email protected]
32 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
JOAN ANDREWS
A Special High School: It isn’t often that I report on high school
band concerts, but I must make an exception this month. For a
number of reasons the music department of Dr. Norman Bethune C.
I. deserves special mention. Among many other selections in their
“Spring Music Night” were a new composition and a fine transcription. In honour of the school’s founding principal, Robert Thomson,
whose school nickname (presumably affectionately) is “Thor,” the
school commissioned J. Scott Irvine to write a suitable composition.
So it was that the school’s wind ensemble gave the world premiere
performance of Irvine’s stirring Mjolnir, The Hammer of Thor.
Another outstanding number by the Wind Ensemble was a transcription of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 “The Titan.” This arrangement by the school’s director of music, Paul Sylvester, was part of his
master’s thesis.
A New Band: For my third concert in four days I was thrust into
a different role. I was not in the audience this time but playing
in the first formal concert of the fledgling York Region Brass. Yes,
we did have to have a couple of ringers to fill in, but all went well.
One of these ringers brought a very special surprise for me. Jonas
Feldman reminded me that I had been his teacher many years ago.
As is customary, teachers and students usually lose contact after the
students move on. However, every once in a while our paths have
crossed, and in this instance we were sitting beside each other for the
band’s end-of-concert photograph. In the interim since we first met,
Jonas just happened to have earned bachelor and master’s degrees
in music. Another surprise: although I had been rehearsing with the
group for several weeks, I had no idea that there was a composer in
our midst. Then we played the new Lavender March by euphonium
player Eugene Belianski. If you play a brass instrument and live within
driving distance of Newmarket, the York Region Brass would love to
hear from you. Their email is [email protected]
Elsewhere: As mentioned last month, the Uxbridge Community
Concert Band has just started another season. They would love to hear
from potential members. If you would like to try a new band for the
summer months, contact the band at [email protected] or visit their
website at uccb2016.webs.com.
By the time that this issue is published the Toronto New Horizons
Bands will have wound up their sixth season with a concert by
195-plus members in six bands plus a jazz orchestra. Rather than
take time off, NHB Director Dan Kapp has announced that he will be
offering what he calls “a jump-start camp” for people returning to
playing after not having played for a while. There will be experienced
staff for daily workshops, band classes, interest sessions and ensembles. This will all take place at the Miles Nadal Jewish Community
Centre at Bloor and Spadina from July 18 to 22. Their website is mnjcc.
org/camps. And a reminder: as mentioned in last month’s issue the
Dr. Hank plays the parforce horn.
Quartet Opus 11 by Cable’s friend, distinguished arranger and musical
director Fen Watkin who was also in attendance.)
As for the repertoire, there were two standouts for me. The first of
these was a novelty number, with a very catchy melody, named Immer
Kleiner by 19th-century composer Adolf Schreiner and transcribed by
George S. Howard. For those not proficient in German, the title means
“Always Smaller” and that is exactly what happened to Michele Jacot’s
clarinet. After a brief interlude, she stopped, removed the bell of her
clarinet and then continued playing. After another melodic interlude,
she stopped again and removed the lower joint which is the bottom
half of the keys of the instrument.Then on with the next section of the
music with only the upper joint keys, then without the barrel until
she was left with only the mouthpiece. It was all very melodic, well
performed and hilarious to witness.
The second standout was a transcription of Gustav Holst’s First Suite
in E-Flat for band. Many years ago I read, in a scholarly publication,
that this composition and Holst’s Second Suite in F had been written
as commissions from the Royal Military School Music, Kneller Hall. It
was reported that directors of the school lamented the fact that almost
all serious concert works played by British military bands were transcriptions of orchestral music. In a recent check of possible sources, I
have not been able to verify that. However, I was able to confirm that
this suite was premiered at the Royal Military School Music in 1920.
This acceptance that the military band was a serious form of ensemble
prompted other composers, including Ralph Vaughan Williams and
Gordon Jacob, to write serious band music.
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 33
JOAN ANDREWS
documentary film about these New Horizons Toronto bands will be
aired on TVO, June 8 at 9pm. After that it will be streamed on the
TVO website.
Coming events
Getting June off to a flying start, on Sunday, June 5 we have no fewer
than four concerts by community instrumental groups, two of which
will be performing with choral groups:
At 3pm the Newmarket Citizens’ Band will be performing in their
“Spring Fling Concert” with the Upper Canada Chordsmen Chorus at
Trinity United Church, Newmarket.
At 7pm the Strings Attached Orchestra, with music director Ricardo
Giorgi will present their “2016 Friends & Family Year End Concert”
at Tribute Communities Recital Hall, York University. This will be
another concert with an interesting adaptation. The Vivaldi Concerto
for Two Trumpets will be performed but with two violins playing the
solo trumpet parts. As mentioned earlier, this seems to be the season
for original compositions and this concert will be featuring two. The
first, with the whimsical title, Overture for a Puppet Show, is by Ric
Giorgi himself. The other, Cassiopeia by 16-year-old Adam Adle, is the
winner of the orchestra’s Young Composers Initiative 2016.
Also at 7pm the Northdale Concert Band will be joined by the choirs
of Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, Grace Church on-the-Hill and
Christ Church Deer Park for “Last Night of the Proms,” an evening full
of British pageantry fit for royalty at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church.
At 8pm Resa’s String Ensemble will hold their spring concert at
Crescent School.
Finally, on Tuesday June 7 at 8pm, Resa’s Pieces Concert Band will
perform their spring concert at the Toronto Centre for the Arts.
Cornet or cornett: In past columns I have occasionally commented on
how frequently people mispronounce the word cornet by misplacing
the syllabic emphasis. I have often pointed out that there is a significant
difference between the brass instrument called CORnet and the corNETT
(sometimes called cornetto). The ancient cornett has a wooden tubular
body similar to that of a recorder and the pitch of notes is varied by
covering holes in the tube. The tone is produced by vibration of the lips
in a cup-shaped mouthpiece as in members of the brass family. Here,
ladies and gentlemen, is a cornett in the hands of Doctor Hank.
Jack (of all trades) MacQuarrie plays several brass instruments
and has performed in many community ensembles. He
can be contacted at [email protected]
Cathedral
Bluffs
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Norman Reintamm
Artistic Director/Principal Conductor
2016-2017 Season
1. saturday november 12 8 pm Bruckner Symphony no. 4 in E flat major
sEasOn OPEnER Tchaikovsky Suite from Swan Lake
2. saturday december 17 8 pm Beethoven Leonore Overture no. 3
acclaimed pianist VaLERIE TRYOn Mozart Piano Concerto in C, K.467
TRYPTYCH COnCERT & OPERa Menotti Amahl and the Night Visitors
3. saturday February 11 8 pm Puccini Capriccio Sinfonico
featuring the critically-acclaimed Tchaikovsky Elegy for Strings
TRYPTYCH COnCERT & OPERa Puccini Suor Angelica
OLA GJEILO
LUMINOUS NIGHT F estival
4. saturday March 11 8 pm Fauré Requiem in D minor, op. 48
Mozart Requiem in D minor
UnIVERsITY OF TOROnTO sCaRbOROUGH CaMPUs COnCERT CHOIR
saInT JOsEPH’s R.C. CHURCH PaRIsH CHOIR (Hamilton)
and GRand RIVER CHORUs (Brantford)
5. saturday May 27 8 pm sEasOn FInaLE
featuring Canada’s baLLET JÖRGEn presenting favourites from ballets such as
Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty and other well-known masterpieces.
SATURDAY OCTOBER 15, 2016 7:30 pm
Subscribe Today & Save!
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church | LuminousNightFestival.com
cathedralbluffs.com | 416.879.5566
34 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
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GREEN PAGES
12th Annual Summer Music Guide
GREEN PAGES
ALL-CANADIAN JAZZ, PORT HOPE
➤ September 9 to 11
SUMMER MUSIC GUIDE
Port Hope, ON
Google “Canadian Jazz” and you’ll find this three-day outdoor tented festival
near the top of the list. The All-Canadian Jazz Festival was born 15 years ago
to celebrate and support the burgeoning Canadian jazz scene and every year
Welcome to The WholeNote’s 12th annual
easy links to participants’ own websites.
this is accomplished with a uniquely Canadian performance lineup. There’s
Green Pages, a pot pourri of summer
And visit The WholeNote’s own online
a free Friday night concert starring Brass Transit. Don’t miss Saturday even-
festivals and events across the musical
listings at www.thewholenote.com/
ing’s farewell performance by an “All-Canadian Jazz Legend” with Chelsey
map – offering classical, jazz, opera, folk,
ask-ludwig where listings will be added
Bennett opening. Stellar afternoon lineups include Dione Taylor, Amanda
world music and much more in a range of
through the summer, and you will be able
Martinez, Tia Brazda, Red Hot Ramble, the Marianne Trudel Quartet, the
unique and beautiful locations.
to search by date, geographic location,
Jive Bombers, “Coltrane!” featuring Kirk MacDonald & Pat Labarbera and
genre, keyword and more.
John MacLeod & the Rex Hotel Orchestra.
Here you will find brief profiles of
1-855-713-9310
40 widely diverse summer festivals
THE 2016 GREEN PAGES TEAM
and/or concert series, provided by
PROJECT COORDINATOR: Karen Ages
the presenters themselves. Detailed
PROJECT EDITOR: Kevin King
listings for many of them can be found
LAYOUT & DESIGN: Susan Sinclair
in our special summer listings section
PROOFREADING: Sara Constant/
Toronto, ON
immediately following these listings
Karen Ages
A massive four-week celebration of music with over 12 stages, a StreetFest
and/or in our regular listings sections.
WEBSITE: Bryson Winchester
and approximately one million in attendance. Features include a dynamic
Visit the online version of this directory at
For more information on our Green Pages,
trucks. The festival will showcase the sensational musical talents of both estab-
www.thewholenote.com/green where
contact [email protected] or
lished and emerging artists, with jazz, blues, Latin, swing, global, world beat,
you will find additional photographs and
phone Karen at 416-323-2232 x26
big band, Dixieland, Afro-Cuban, funk, R&B, ska, soul and more. Featured
www.allcanadianjazz.ca
BEACHES INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ July 2 to 24
musical roster, exciting activities and an enticing lineup of gourmet food
events include musical performances at Woodbine Park, StreetFest, Taste of
Jazz, Salsa Celebration, Beaches Tune Up Jazz Run and the Farmers Market
Jazz Series. All of this is taking place at the 28th International Beaches Jazz
Festival, July 2 to 24. Free for all ages. For a full schedule please visit www.
beachesjazz.com/complete-concert-schedule.
416-698-2152
www.beachesjazz.com
BEATLES 50 T.O.
➤ June 18 to November 12
Toronto, ON
It was 50 years ago that the Beatles last played Toronto. To mark the anniversary, Museums & Heritage Services is collaborating with curators, collectors,
musicians, community partners and sponsors to create 60s-themed events. Take
in walks, talks, exciting concerts and the exhibit “When the Beatles Rocked
Toronto,” which looks at life in Toronto in the 60s, opening June 18 at the
Market Gallery on the second floor of the St. Lawrence Market. Toronto was
Canada’s Beatlemania epicentre – the only city where they performed all three
years, 1964, 1965 and 1966 – and their impact was electrifying. Experience
that unique era again or for the first time! Visit www.toronto.ca/beatles50
for all the details. Don’t miss any of the other musical events at the City of
Toronto’s Historic Sites – go to www.toronto.ca/museum-events.
Call 311
www.toronto.ca/beatles50
Westben Arts Festival Theatre
Campbellford, ON
G2 | Summer 2016
thewholenote.com
BROOKSIDE MUSIC ASSOCIATION FESTIVAL OF THE BAY
➤ July 7 to August 18
Midland, ON
Now in its sixth year, Brookside Music Association presents “Festival of the
Bay” in Midland between July 7 and August 18, bringing world-class music
– from classical to jazz, from piano to brass – to the shores of Georgian Bay
in the heart of Ontario’s cottage country. This year features: July 7: Weston
Silver Band; July 14: Tien Hsieh, piano; July 21: Sonic Escape Flute & Violin;
August 4: Lafayette String Quartet; August 11: Anagnoson & Kinton piano
duo; August 18: Hogtown Brass Quintet. All concerts will take place in our
beautiful Midland Cultural Centre.
705-527-4420
www.brooksidemusic.com
BROTT MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ June 22 to August 18
Hamilton, Brantford, Waterdown and Ancaster, ON
Now entering its 29th season, the Brott Music Festival (est. 1988) is the largest
Brott Music Festival
Hamilton, Brantford, Waterdown and Ancaster, ON
non-profit orchestral music festival in Canada, and the only festival with a fulltime, professional orchestra-in-residence. The Brott Music Festival is renowned
CLEAR LAKE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
for its extremely high artistic standard, world-class soloists, exuberant young
➤ July 21 to 24
orchestra and eclectic mix of orchestral, chamber, jazz, pops and education
Riding Mountain National Park, MB
concerts at various venues across Southern Ontario. A stunning array of great
The 11th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival, under the artistic direction of
music in all its forms: classical, contemporary, chamber, opera, jazz, blues
one of Canada’s leading concert pianists, Alexander Tselyakov, has become
and rock. A fully-staged production of Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro, a
an important part of Canada’s cultural calendar. The first of its kind and most
PopOpera of great vocal arias and ensembles, Verdi’s magnificent Requiem,
exciting that Manitoba has to offer, this festival is a celebration of summer
music you know and love by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Elgar, Rimsky-Korsakov,
with classical music, jazz and outstanding musicians in the natural beauty of
Ravel – and what more could you want!
Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba. The festival will take place in the
905-525-7664
third week of July, from the 21st to the 24th. For tickets or more information
www.brottmusic.com
contact us by phone or email. See directions on our website.
204-571-6547 or 204-727-9631
CLASSICAL UNBOUND FESTIVAL
www.clearlakefestival.ca
➤ August 13 to 26
Prince Edward County, ON
ELORA FESTIVAL
World-calibre classical music and musicians, barns, wineries, beaches: concerts
➤ July 8 to 24
in unconventional contexts. The barn and winery venues are set among natural
Elora, ON
elements, and the vitality of the County’s gastronomic and viticulture scenes
Experience world-class music in intimate settings this July at the Elora Festival!
underlays the concerts’ intimacy and casualness – stripping away barriers to
From choral and classical to world music and jazz – the Elora Festival has
the music for you, the audience, and us, the musicians. Jessica Linnebach,
something for everyone! Featuring NYO Canada, Fubuki Daiko, the Elora
violin; Joanna G’froerer, flute; Michelle Gott, harp; Rachel Mercer, cello;
Festival Singers, Molly Johnson, the Barra MacNeils, Russell Braun and
Sean Rice, clarinet; Yehonatan Berick, viola; Yosuke Kawasaki, violin; Jona-
more! 24 performances, six intimate venues, one world-class festival. Come
than Krehm, clarinet. Performing: Alwyn, Andriessen, Beaser, Debussy,
celebrate with us July 8 to 24. Find out more on our website.
Haber, Hindemith, Hoover, Morlock, Mozart, Mozetich, Muczynski, Poenitz,
519-846-0331
Ravel, Staniland, Stravinsky, Sung, Tansman, Villa-Lobos. A new, unique
www.elorafestival.ca
not-for-profit festival by musicians, taking classical music out of the concert
hall and giving it to YOU.
613-567-1925
www.classicalunbound.com
thewholenote.com
Summer 2016 | G3
GREEN PAGES
Canadian stage director/violist Valerie Kuinka, the Highlands Opera Studio
is an advanced intensive training and professional networking program for
emerging opera professionals. Chosen from approximately 150 applicants from
across Canada through competitive auditions, the 2016 vocal participants can
be heard throughout the month of August and into September, in masterclasses
with Richard Margison, four concerts and three fully staged operas: The Brothers
Grimm and The Bremen Town Musicians by Dean Burry, and Faust by Charles
Gounod. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit our website.
1-855-457-9933
www.highlandsoperastudio.com
HUNTSVILLE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS
➤ July 2 to August 26
Huntsville, ON
An eclectic mix of national- and international-calibre artists presented at the
intimate 400-seat Algonquin Theatre in downtown Huntsville. In addition to main-
Highlands Opera Studio Haliburton, ON
stage presentations, there are free concerts at venues throughout the community,
including Back Street, an afternoon of interactive art installations, activities and
music happening on July 23. This summer’s lineup includes Bruce Cockburn,
FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND
Sarah Harmer, Downchild Blues Band, The Nylons, Hawksley Workman and
➤ July 15 to August 7
so much more! Over the long weekend in August, the Huntsville Jazz Festival
Parry Sound, ON
returns for its sixth season, featuring Oliver Jones, a tribute to John Coltrane, and
In its 37-year history, the Festival of the Sound has become a go-to destination for
Adi Braun singing the music of Rosemary Clooney, Judy Garland and Peggy Lee.
musicians and music lovers alike. It is Canada’s premier classical and jazz music
705-789-4975
festival, internationally recognized by various organizations including the CBC
www.huntsvillefestival.on.ca
as one of Canada’s Top Summer Festivals and by Festivals & Events Ontario as
one of the Top 100 Festivals or Events in Ontario. From July 15 to August 7, the
INDIAN RIVER FESTIVAL
Festival of the Sound hosts over 60 events, consisting of 50 unique musicians and
➤ June 19 to September 18
20 ensembles from Canada and around the world. And it all takes place on the
Indian River, PE
beautiful shores of Georgian Bay. It’s where the world’s great musicians come to play.
The Indian River Festival offers a summer-long series of concerts in a magnifi-
1-866-364-0061
cent heritage church, set within sight of beautiful Malpeque Bay, Prince
www.festivalofthesound.ca
Edward Island. Discover excellence in classical, jazz, Maritime, world and
contemporary music by the finest artists from across Canada, all in the world-
GUELPH JAZZ FESTIVAL & COLLOQUIUM
class acoustical setting of St. Mary’s Church.
➤ September 14 to 18
1-866-856-3733 or 902-836-3733
Guelph, ON
www.indianriverfestival.com
Join us for five days of innovative world-class music in one of Ontario’s loveliest cities. Heralded as one of the most visionary musical events in Canada,
KINCARDINE SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL
our intimate community-powered festival celebrates the best in cutting-edge
➤ July 31 to August 13; concert series April 16 to December 17
jazz and creative improvised music, and plays host to unique workshops,
Kincardine, ON
panels and lectures in a free education colloquium. Also free is the Friday
Celebrating its 25th anniversary, KSMF presents an expanded concert series
evening and Saturday full-day Jazz at Market Square, the most popular event
April 16 to December 17.
that puts music in an open-air venue on one of Guelph’s funkiest downtown
Live concerts starring brilliant vocalists and wonderful instrumentalists include
streets. Check the website for updates on the artistic lineup.
Broadsway with Heather Bambrick, Diane Leah and Julie Michels; Kati Gleiser,
519-763-4952
concert pianist; Andrea Tyniec, concert violinist with her Stradivarius violin; Duo
www.guelphjazzfestival.com
Novus – Kristin Toczko and Emily Belvedere, harpists; Marc Djokic, violin with
Beverley Johnston, percussion; and Christina Haldane, soprano. All this plus
HIGHLANDS OPERA STUDIO
the popular free 4 O’Clock in the Park concerts July 31 to August 12, and daily
➤ August 4 to September 1
music classes August 8 to 12 for everyone from beginners to experienced players,
Haliburton, ON
age 7 to Adult. Guitar, Strings and Bands – a fun time and great for families!
Love great singing? Need to escape the city? Celebrate our tenth anniversary
Kincardine Summer Music Festival – creating fabulous musical experiences
and hear the best young professional voices Canada has to offer in the beauty
for 25 years!
of the Haliburton Highlands, only 2 ½ hours northeast of the GTA. Established
519-396-9716
in 2007 by internationally-acclaimed Canadian tenor Richard Margison and
www.ksmf.ca
G4 | Summer 2016
thewholenote.com
KWCMS JULYMUSIC
➤ July 5 to 28
Waterloo, ON
Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music Society July: Chamber Music by the Park
– our busy July packs nine concerts into four weeks. The variety is impressive:
two by ensembles from the National Youth Orchestra of Canada (5th and
15th); arguably the world’s leading guitar duo (Eden-Stell, 7th); one worldfamed string quartet (New Zealand, 10th); one great Baroque quartet (Pallade
Musica de Montreal with soprano, 13th); Russian-Canadian pianist Alexander
Tselyakov with members of Toronto’s Canadian Sinfonietta (16th); ensembles from the University of Waterloo’s amazing orchestra (19th); a trio of
fine Ukrainian pianists (24th); and the brilliant and entertaining Syrène Saxophone Quartet (Netherlands, 28th). All are in our diminutive air-conditioned
concert hall, seating 85, with one of the best pianos around… All classical,
with a touch of jazz. And all for $180 (students $120), or buy individually.
519-886-1673
www.k-wcms.com
Music and Beyond Ottawa, ON
LEITH SUMMER FESTIVAL
➤ July 2 to August 27
MUSIC AND BEYOND
Leith, ON
➤ July 4 to 17
The Leith Summer Festival and artistic director Robert Kortgaard present
Ottawa, ON
five concerts in July and August in the Historic Leith Church. Leith Church,
Running from July 4 to 17, Music and Beyond is a classical music and multi-
12 km from Owen Sound, is an intimate venue with excellent acoustics and
disciplinary arts festival that blends classical music with different art forms,
is enjoyed by musicians and audiences alike. The season begins Saturday,
including visual art, drama, poetry, dance, architecture, circus, magic, science,
July 2 with Cheng2 Duo. On Saturday, July 16, Robert Kortgaard and Peter
comedy, law, food and wine and even yoga. Concerts are held at the most
Tiefenbach perform Piano à Quatre Mains. July 23 features Chris Donnelly,
unique venues in Ottawa, including the Canadian Museum of Nature, the
piano and Kornel Wolak, clarinet. The Penderecki String Quartet plays on
Diefenbunker, and the National Gallery of Canada. Festival highlights for
August 13, and Patricia O’Callaghan, with Robert Kortgaard and Andrew
2016 include Shakespeare and Music with Christopher Plummer, Music and
Downing, sings on August 27. All concerts are on Saturdays, starting at
Circus with the Hebei Acrobatic Troupe, Jan Lisiecki, Oliver Jones, Measha
7:30pm. Tickets available at the Roxy Theatre.
Brueggergosman, Ola Gjeilo, and many more.
519-371-2833
www.roxytheatre.ca
Music and Beyond was the winner of Ottawa Tourism’s “Partnership of
the Year” Award for their National Gallery Soirée with the National Gallery
of Canada.
MONTREAL BAROQUE FESTIVAL
613-241-0777
➤ June 23 to 26
www.musicandbeyond.ca
Montreal, QC
Theatre of tumultuous weather, Quebecers have courageously endured nature’s
MUSIC AT PORT MILFORD
anger with courage and bravura! For four days as turbulent as the Quebec
➤ July 16 to August 7
barometer, the 14th Montreal Baroque Festival will present a torrent of
Milford, ON
colourful musical passions, flooding the metropolis with cataclysmic musical
2016 marks Music at Port Milford’s 30th year of bringing promising 12- to
tempests and a storm of ideas, both mundane and magical. Come lightning or
18-year olds with a passion for chamber music together with an internation-
thunder, a Tempest in a Teapot will inundate the McGill Campus, Old Mont-
ally-renowned faculty to create an inspiring summer music experience. This
real and Phillips Square with the music of Purcell, Bach, Boismortier, etc.,
experience is proudly shared with Prince Edward County, ON, as the students
interspersed with a few rays of sunshine to blush the horizon before the hurri-
and faculty prepare vigorously for their multiple performances throughout
cane hits! Button up and hold on to your umbrella! Large and intimate concerts.
July and August, bringing the highest-calibre chamber music to Ontario. This
Discovery series. Free outdoor concerts, conferences and family activities.
summer’s festival includes performances by the Afiara Quartet (July 16),
514-845-7171
Ensemble Made in Canada (July 23), the Tokai String Quartet (July 30),
www.montrealbaroque.com
and the Music at Port Milford Faculty Ensemble (August 6), which includes
the concertmaster of the Canadian Opera Company, Marie Berard, and the
principal violist of the Canadian National Ballet Company, Angela Rudden.
613-476-7735
www.mpmcamp.org
thewholenote.com
Summer 2016 | G5
GREEN PAGES
NATIONAL YOUTH ORCHESTRA OF CANADA
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ June 22 to July 2
Waterloo, ON
Alongside NYO Canada’s rigorous Summer Training Institute, students and
faculty will come together to bring our second annual NYO Canada Chamber
Music Festival to the Kitchener-Waterloo community. From June 22 to July 2,
NYO Canada will present a series of chamber concerts at the Maureen
Forrester Recital Hall on the WLU campus. Hear our world-class faculty
and prestigious students perform a variety of small- and large-scale ensemble
works, modern and classical repertoire, and more. You can also catch exclusive performances by our resident professional chamber groups, including
the esteemed Formosa Quartet. We proudly offer these musical experiences
to the community for free or by donation. We encourage you to check out a
concert if you are in the area!
1-888-532-4470
National Youth Orchestra of Canada
Chamber Music Festival Waterloo, ON
www.nyoc.org
➤ May 2 to Aug 29
NO STRINGS THEATRE: THE GREAT CANADIAN
SHOWTUNE – AN HOMAGE TO OUR GREAT CANADIAN
MUSIC THEATRE MAKERS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE
Toronto, ON
➤ August 27 to 29
A lunchtime concert series at the Church of the Holy Trinity – Welcome to
Toronto, ON
our 25th Anniversary Season! Music Mondays has served as a launching pad
Our Emerging Professional Artist production was performed to sold-out
for emerging talent since its inception in 1992. Our concerts take place in
crowds in its inaugural year. Now in its second season, we present a musical
the warm acoustics of Holy Trinity Church, just steps away from the Eaton
revue showcasing material from some of Canada’s top theatre-makers,
Centre. Our goal is to provide the highest possible musical experience to a
including Leslie Arden, David Warrack, Jim Betts, Gary Williams, Mike
pay-what-you-can downtown Toronto audience. Please join us for this, our
Ross, our legendary Anne of Green Gables creators Norman Campbell and
25th Anniversary Season. Bring your lunch – and a friend – every Monday
Donald Harron, and the team that brought the world The Drowsy Chaperone,
at 12:15pm from May through the end of August.
Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison, as well as writers of tomorrow, creating a
MUSIC MONDAYS
416-598-4521 x223
showcase platform that will herald our Canadian Heritage 2016/17 season.
www.musicmondays.ca
We welcome submissions of Canadian works. Auditions for this production
will continue until July and are open to young artists (ages 21 to 30 approxi-
NATIONAL YOUTH ORCHESTRA OF CANADA
mately!). Check out our website for more details.
➤ July 22 to August 13
416-551-2093
Toronto, ON; Montreal, QC; Lisbon, Portugal
www.nostringstheatre.com
NYO Canada is excited to announce the 2016 TD Tour which will take the
orchestra, under the baton of maestro Ward Stare, to perform at the Lisbon
NO STRINGS THEATRE: LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS
Music Festival in Lisbon, Portugal from July 29 to August 5. The 2016 NYO
➤ August 5 to 7
Canada orchestra will also perform at the Elora Music Festival (July 22),
Toronto, ON
Toronto’s Koerner Hall (August 11) and Montreal’s Maison Symphonique
Join No Strings Theatre in their 11th Summer Music Theatre Intensive as
(August 13). For over 50 years, NYO Canada has enjoyed a reputation as
they present the most beloved cult classic musical of all time – Ashman &
Canada’s orchestral finishing school, providing a comprehensive training
Menken’s Little Shop of Horrors. When loveable flower shop assistant Seymore
program for young musicians. Come out and enjoy an evening of amazing
stumbles upon a mysteriously strange and unusual plant, he hasn’t a clue that
performances of works such as Bernstein’s West Side Story Symphonic Dances
it will grow to develop a soulful R&B voice, a potty mouth, and an unquench-
and Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5. Visit our website for more info.
able thirst for human blood! With a company of Toronto’s most dynamic
1-888-532-4470
young theatre artists, this motown inspired, laugh-a-minute musical classic
www.nyoc.org
will surely be the hit of the summer season. There is still time to register for
the Summer Music Theatre Intensive (ages 12 to 21). Check out our website
for more details.
416-551-2093
www.nostringstheatre.com
G6 | Summer 2016
thewholenote.com
OPERAMUSKOKA 2016
➤ August 23 to 25, October 30
Bracebridge, ON
2016 marks the 7th Annual OperaMuskoka Festival, once again presented
by Muskoka Chautauqua. August 23, 7:30pm: Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin,
in Russian with English surtitles. August 24, 1pm: Vocal masterclass with
Jennifer Tung of the Glenn Gould Studio. August 24, 7:30pm: Jennifer Tung
in concert with successful participants of her masterclass.
August 25, 1pm: Moshe Hammer violin masterclass. August 25, 7:30pm:
“Stars of Tomorrow” concert. October 30, 2pm: Opera Week celebration
with soprano Sasha Djihanian.
1-705-645-8400
www.muskokachautauqua.ca
OTTAWA INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ July 21 to August 3
Ottawa, ON
How do contrasts shape our lives, our culture and ourselves? How do they
Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
Toronto, ON
impact the music we make and enjoy? This summer, the Ottawa International
Chamber Music Festival explores Counterpoints – contrasts in complement
Brian Barlow, among others. Performers include rising young talents such
– through the valuable contributions to music made by women and cultural
as bassist Jodi Proznick, tenor saxophonist Alison Young, vocalist Alex
inspirations from around the world.
Samaras, and a week’s worth of TD Young Jazz Series artists who will one
613-234-6306
day make their mark as headliners. Since 2001, the Prince Edward County
www.chamberfest.com
Jazz Festival has been presenting the very best in live Canadian and international jazz for a week in August.
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY CLASSICAL MUSIC FESTIVAL
613-476-8416
➤ September 17 to 18 and 24 to 25
www.pecjazz.org
Picton, ON
Young, edgy, furious and innovative may not be what you expect at classical
STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC
music concerts, but the 13th season of the Prince Edward County Classical
➤ July 18 to August 28
Music Festival has them all. While continuing to present internationally-known
Stratford, ON
classical musicians in the intimate and acoustically superb St. Mary Magdalene
Stratford Summer Music celebrates 16 seasons. From Stratford-upon-Avon,
Church, artistic director Stephane Lemelin has created a bill that includes
the Choir of Holy Trinity Church, where Shakespeare is buried, marks the
young talent, edgy performers and unusual instrument combinations. Friday,
400th anniversary of the Bard’s death. New York’s hallelujah chorus, the
September 17 features Opera McGill presenting an evening of operatic greatest
Harlem Gospel Choir (with Measha Brueggergosman), add to the season’s
hits as sung by inspiring young musicians. Saturday, September 18 features
choral catalogue, while Canada’s Theatre of Early Music and Daniel Taylor
I FURIOSI, a baroque ensemble with surprising performance approaches.
celebrate great anthems by Bach and Handel. Simone Dinnerstein plays Bach,
On Saturday, September 24 and Sunday, September 25, the Lafayette String
Schubert and Glass; Jan Lisiecki presents Chopin, Schumann and Rachman-
Quartet, Canada’s much-revered all-female string quartet, will be joined by
inov; Joey Alexander does Jazz. Bach Walks with flutes and finches animate
clarinetist James Campbell and our own artistic director, pianist Stephane
nature trails. Morning percussion refreshes the Avon River. Weekend brunches
Lemelin. The unusual instrument combination will allow for some rarely-
feature harps from Africa, Europe and the Americas. Evening cabarets, illus-
performed repertoire.
trated musical lectures, outdoor sound experiences, vocal and percussion
613-393-3798
academies for emerging artists, The Barber of Seville as dinner opera…music
www.pecmusicfestival.com
is a Stratford experience!
519-271-2101 or 1-866-288-4313
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY JAZZ FESTIVAL
www.stratfordsummermusic.ca
➤ Picton, ON
August 16 to 21
SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE
Direct from wins at the 2016 JUNO Awards – the Prince Edward County Jazz
➤ July 29 to August 7
Festival will present vocalist Emilie-Claire Barlow and pianist Robi Botos at
Toronto, ON
this year’s festival. The two stars captured two of three available jazz JUNOs
Toronto’s Mini Opera Summer Festival at Robert Gill Theatre – conven-
this year. In fact, the entire 2016 Prince Edward County Festival lineup is
iently located in the heart of the city. This is the 30th anniversary season and
steeped in JUNO, Gemini and even Grammy winners and nominees: Joe
Summer Opera Lyric Theatre features the stars of tomorrow as our young
Sealy, Jackie Richardson, Mike Murley, Guido Basso, Bernie Senensky and
artists advance towards careers at the national and international level. SOLT
thewholenote.com
Summer 2016 | G7
GREEN PAGES
TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER FESTIVAL
➤ June 6 to 18
Toronto, ON
Musicians from around the world gather in Toronto for the annual Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival with four free concerts open to the public,
featuring the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and participants of the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute. “Delightfully Baroque” on June 6 at TrinitySt. Paul’s Centre; “Musical Interlude” on June 11 at Walter Hall, University
of Toronto; “TBSI Orchestras and Choirs” on June 15, also at Walter Hall,
University of Toronto; and the Grand Finale on June 18 at Grace Church
on-the-Hill. All concerts are general admission. Free tickets for the Grand
Finale must be obtained in advance and will be made available to the public
Tuesday, June 14 at 10am at the Tafelmusik Box Office (427 Bloor St. W.).
416-964-6337
www.tafelmusik.org/tbsf
TD Sunfest ’16: “Canada’s Premier Celebration
of World Cultures” London, ON
TD MARKHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ August 18 to 21
Markham, ON
2016 Opera Workshop presents three great works for the stage: The Tales of Hoff-
The TD Markham Jazz Festival is an exciting and vibrant four-day event,
mann by Offenbach, Julius Caesar by Handel and A Tale of Two Cities by Victor
featuring well-known professional jazz musicians performing on three stages
Davies and Eugene Benson – SOLT’s first world premiere in celebration of its
on beautiful Main Street Unionville in Markham. The festival launches on
30th anniversary. These productions provide a diversity of roles and an amazing
Thursday, August 18 with a ticketed event, followed by a reception and silent
variety of style, both vocal and dramatic. Check our website for more details.
auction at the intimate Varley Art Gallery. From August 19 to 21, Main Street
416-366-7723
comes alive with 30+ free performances during the day and under the stars
www.solt.ca
on outdoor stages, and on the street and in bars and restaurants. Come and
listen to acclaimed Canadian and international artists along with up-and-
SUN LIFE FINANCIAL UPTOWN
WATERLOO JAZZ FESTIVAL
coming artists performing all styles of jazz and blues. Early confirmed artists
➤ July 15 to 17
Dione Taylor, and Peripheral Vision.
include Dr. Lonnie Smith from New York, JUNO nominee Rich Brown,
Waterloo, ON
905-471-5299
The Sun Life Financial UpTown Waterloo Jazz Festival is an annual three-
www.markhamjazzfestival.com
day free music festival held in Waterloo, Ontario, encouraging all genres of
jazz. This year, in our 24th season, we proudly present Michael Kaeshammer,
TD NEWMARKET JAZZ+ FESTIVAL
the Heavyweights Brass Band, Gabriel Palatchi, Ariel Pocock, Snaggle and
➤ July 29 to August 1
more! We invite you to UpTown Waterloo for one of the country’s most
Newmarket, ON
anticipated jazz festivals. Visit our website for a full lineup and more details.
TD Newmarket jazz+ Festival is proud to announce that Canadian superstar
519-885-1921
Colin James headlines this year, performing Saturday night on July 30 inside
www.uptownwaterloojazz.ca
RTC’s Arena One, opening with George St. Kitts. Saturday noon to 10pm:
mixed music with Lorne Lofsky, from jazz, pop and big band to blackboard
SWEETWATER MUSIC FESTIVAL
blues! Friday night: Mardi Gras/Caribana Dance Music Party from 6pm to
➤ September 16 to 18
1am. Sunday: mixed music experience from noon, finishing off with “Chicago”
Owen Sound and Meaford, ON
tribute band Brass Transit and the fabulous George Olliver. Monday: Family
Artistic director Mark Fewer has assembled a stellar lineup for the 13th edition
Day – mixed music plus Mad Hatter Tea Party & Wonderland; costumes/
of SweetWater. The Festival will once again offer up an entirely new take on clas-
dress-up closing with the amazing George St. Kitts Sounds of Motown Show.
sical and jazz music performed by some of the world’s best musicians. Featured
Location Change: Festival now at Ray Twinney Complex with indoor and
performers this year include the Gryphon Trio, James Campbell, Aiyun Huang,
outdoor areas, each including vendors, beer/wine, children’s creative zone
Matthias Maute, Nicholas Michael Smith, David Braid, Steven Dann, Meredith
and more! Safe and accessible! Full festival lineup and hours on our website.
Hall and Joseph Phillips. Plus, lots of other weekend events including Mozart for
905-841-6893
Munchkins, Classical Jam playalong, Luthiers display and more. Friday Night
www.newmarketjazzfestival.com
Gala at the Historic Leith Church is $45 and all concerts on Saturday and Sunday
are $30. Festival Weekend Pass $120 ($105 before July 31). Student tickets $10.
519-371-2833
www.sweetwatermusicfestival.ca
G8 | Summer 2016
thewholenote.com
TD SUNFEST ’16: “CANADA’S PREMIER
CELEBRATION OF WORLD CULTURES”
➤ July 7 to 10
London, ON
Celebrate the enchantment of summer with Canada’s premier free-admission
festival of the global arts – a Songlines Magazine (UK) 2016 pick as one of the
key Overseas World Music festivals. Now in its 22nd year, TD Sunfest transfigures downtown London’s Victoria Park into a culturally diverse jewel, where
over 30 outstanding groups, representing almost every region of the planet,
entertain on five stages. This summer’s headliners range from legendary Chilean
jazz band Congreso to luminaries Budiño (Galicia/Spain), Elida Almeida (Cape
Verde), and the Helsinki-Cotonou Ensemble (Benin/Finland). New this year is
the Government of Ontario-supported “Afrikalia: African Heart Beats.” And
with almost 300 Park exhibitors, TD Sunfest ’16 will whet festival-goers’ appetites for scrumptious international cuisine and unique crafts and visual art.
519-672-1522
www.sunfest.on.ca
Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival
Rochester, NY
TD TORONTO JAZZ FESTIVAL
➤ June 24 to July 3
WESTBEN ARTS FESTIVAL THEATRE
Toronto, ON
➤ June 25 to July 31
Whatever flavour of jazz you enjoy, find it at the TD Toronto Jazz Festival
Campbellford, ON
as we celebrate our 30th anniversary this summer, running from June 24 to
Westben is located in the rolling countryside near Campbellford, Ontario, two
July 3, 2016. More than 1,500 musicians will perform in over 350 concerts.
hours east of Toronto. Now in its 17th season, Westben presents over 25 perform-
Discover a new artist, explore different genres and attend a live concert
ances of classical, Broadway, jazz, world, folk and blues music and improv
surrounded by thousands, as the city’s largest music festival takes over for 10
comedy with artists such as Linda Kash, Charles Richard-Hamelin, Buzz Brass,
incredible days of non-stop activity. Experience music the way you want it!
Ashley Condon, Heather Bambrick, Ken Whiteley, Cadence, Còig and more.
Featured performers include Wynton Marsalis, Chick Corea, Oliver Jones,
The world premiere of Brian Finley’s opera The Pencil Salesman opens June 25,
Sarah McLachlan, Gregory Porter, Molly Johnson, Sharon Jones, Joe Jackson,
followed with “Connecting in Song,” a nine-day exploration of the themes of
Joey Alexander, Ramsey Lewis, Robi Botos, Bill Charlap, Heather Bambrick,
human connection as inspired by The Pencil Salesman with seminars, chats, work-
Alfredo Rodriguez, Robert Glasper and more!
shops and studio tours. The Jazz Fringe Festival wraps up the summer season
1-888-655-9090
www.torontojazz.com
on July 31. Come join us! Westben will change the way you experience music.
1-877-883-5777
www.westben.ca
TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL
➤ July 14 to August 7
XEROX ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL
Toronto, ON
➤ June 24 to July 2
Toronto Summer Music Festival 2016 celebrates the musical traditions of
Rochester, NY
Great Britain – from the baroque to the 20th-century pop British Invasion!
Enjoy nine days of amazing music at the 15th anniversary of the Xerox
Join us in exploring the great British composers Elgar, Vaughan Williams,
Rochester International Jazz Festival. More than 1500 artists will perform
Britten and Walton among many others, as well as composers who made
from around the world. From legendary performers and familiar favorites to
prolonged and frequent stays in England such as Haydn, Mozart, Mendels-
rising stars and new discoveries – this is a festival that navigates all genres
sohn, Liszt and Grieg. You won’t want to miss incredible superstar guest artists
of creative improvised music. See more than 320 shows in three series, the
such as pianists Jeremy Denk and Christopher O’Riley, opera superstar and
Club Pass Series with 225 shows including three international series – Oh
2015 Richard Tucker Prize winner Jamie Barton, the Parker & Dover Quar-
Canada!, Made in the UK and Nordic Jazz Now – Headliner Series, and 99
tets or the semi-staged production of Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia, presented
free shows and events. Park once and walk to all venues. Young musicians
in collaboration with Against the Grain Theatre, the Banff Centre, and the
can also attend free workshops led by world-renowned musicians performing
Canadian Opera Company.
at the festival. See our website for the complete lineup.
416-408-0208
585-454-2060
www.torontosummermusic.com
www.rochesterjazz.com
Thank you for taking a look at this year’s Green Pages! If you are looking for a
specific form of summer festivities, visit us online at thewholenote.com/green,
where you can do more browsing or conduct a more focused search.
thewholenote.com
Summer 2016 | G9
Summer
Festival Listings
Welcome to the Summer Festival listings.
The following pages contain listings for these festivals:
Artists’ Garden Cooperative ....................... July 6 to Aug 31
Beaches International Jazz Festival .................... July 2 to 24
Brott Music Festival ..................................June 22 to Aug 18
Classical Unbound Festival ..............................Aug 13 to 26
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival ............ July 21 to Aug 3
Elora Festival ....................................................July 8 to 24
Festival de Lanaudière .................................July 9 to Aug 7
Festival of the Sound .................................. July 15 to Aug 7
Highlands Opera Studio ............................... Aug 4 to Sep 1
Indian River Festival ................................ June 25 to Sep 18
Leith Summer Festival ............................... July 2 to Aug 27
Luminato Festival .............................................June 10 to 26
Montreal Baroque Festival ................................ Jun 23 to 26
Music and Beyond Festival ................................ July 4 to 17
Music at Port Milford ................................. July 16 to Aug 7
Music Mondays .........................................June 6 to Aug 20
National Youth Orchestra ........................ June 22 to July 15
Ottawa International Chamber Fest. .......... July 21 to Aug 3
Stratford Summer Music .......................... July 18 to Aug 28
TD Sunfest ’16 .................................................. July 7 to 10
TD Toronto Jazz Festival ............................June 24 to July 3
Toronto Summer Music Festival ................. July 14 to Aug 7
Westben Arts Festival Theatre ................. June 25 to July 31
CHAMBER MUSIC reGENERATION
A TSM Audience Favourite! Artist Mentors share the stage with
TSM Chamber Music Institute Fellows, a collaborative performance
of established musicians and tomorrow’s stars.
Saturday, July 16 at 4:00pm and 7:30pm
Parker Quartet, Pedja Muzijevic
Saturday, July 23 at 4:00pm and 7:30pm
Martin Beaver, Andrew Wan, Steven Dann, Johannes Moser,
Stéphane Lemelin
Saturday July 30 at 4:00pm and 7:30pm
Dover String Quartet, Jonathan Crow
Saturday, August 6 at 4:00pm and 7:30pm
Jonathan Crow, Shane Kim, Eric Nowlin, David Hetherington,
Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, David Jalbert, Sarah Jeffrey
ART SONG reGENERATION
Friday July 22 at 12:00pm and 4:00pm
Performances by Art of Song Fellows. Mentored by Anne
Schwanewilms Malcolm Martineau and Steven Philcox
TORONTOSUMMERMUSIC.COM 416-408-0208
Artists subject to change (Mentors will perform on either the 4pm or 7:30pm performance.
Art of Song mentors do not perform in the Art of Song recitals.
G10 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
Summer Festivals
Artists’ Garden Cooperative
Plein Air Garden Concerts
July 6 to Aug 31
Toronto, ON
Wednesdays only at 7:30pm.
345 Balliol St.
416-487-0705. $10
See Section A. for details.
Beaches International Jazz Festival
July 2 to 24
Toronto, ON
J – Jimmie Simpson Park
T – TD Main Stage, Woodbine Park
O – OLG Main Stage, Woodbine Park
416-698-2152
●●Jul 08 6:00: Sounds of Leslieville and River-
side. Exodus; The Digs (J; Free).
●●Jul 09 12:00_noon: Sounds of Leslieville and
Riverside. Toronto All-Star Big Band; Turbo
Street Funk; Kim and Company; Johannes Linstead; Eddie Bullen and Friends. J; Free.
●●Jul 10 12:00_noon: Sounds of Leslieville and
Riverside. Toronto All-Star Big Band; Jerome
Tucker Band; Paul James. J: Free.
●●Jul 15 5:00: Woodbine Park Main Stage
Concerts. Youth Series; Yani Borrell Orchestra; 7Sould. T; Free.
●●Jul 16 12:00_noon: Woodbine Park Main
Stage Concerts. Youth Series; Rich Brown
Band; Samantha Martin and The Sugar Devils;
De Bruces a Mi. T; Free.
●●Jul 17 11:00am: Woodbine Park Main Stage
Concerts. Youth Series; David Vest; Paul
James; Johnny Rawls. T; Free.
●●Jul 22 5:00: Woodbine Park Main Stage
Concerts. Youth Series; House of David Gang;
Tortured Soul. O, Free.
●●Jul 23 12:00_noon: Woodbine Park Main
Stage Concerts. Youth Series; Mark Kelso;
Dione Taylor; Yani Borrell; Dwayne Dopsie.
O, Free.
●●Jul 24 11:00am: Woodbine Park Main Stage
Concerts. Youth Series; Gary Slaight Jr. and
Avery Raquel; Rhythm Express; Melanie Durrant; Ghost Town Blues Band. O, Free.
Brott Music Festival
June 22 to Aug 18
Hamilton, Brantford, Waterdown and
Ancaster, ON
FM - Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum,
64 Sulphur Springs, Ancaster.
LS - Liuna Station, 360 James St. N.,
Hamilton
July 21
ALEXANDER
TSELYAKOV
piano
Classical Unbound Festival
Aug 13 to 26
Prince Edward County, ON
●●Jun 22 7:30: Great Romantics: Tchaikov-
sky and Scheherezade. Jonathan Crow,
violin; National Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott, conductor SC; $35; $31(sr);
$25(Brott35); $15(st).
●●Jun 30 7:30: Ode to Joy. Leslie Fagan, soprano; Mia Lennox, mezzo; Michael Colvin,
tenor; James Westman, baritone; National
Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott,
conductor. STA; $35; $31(sr); $25(Brott35);
$15(st).
●●Jul 07 7:30: PopOpera. National Academy
Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott, conductor.
MPAC; $38; $34(sr); $25(Brott35); $15(st).
●●Jul 10 7:00: Viva La Diva. Natalie Choquette.
FM; Free or by donation.
●●Jul 14 7:30: Marriage of Figaro. National
Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott,
conductor. MPAC; $43; $39(sr); $25(Brott35);
$15(st).
●●Jul 17 3:00: Valerie and Friends High Tea.
Valerie Tryon and the Festival Brass Quintet.
SJA; $43; $39(sr); $25(st).
●●Jul 20 7:30: World’s Best Chamber Music.
SJE; $30; $27(sr); $25(Brott35); $15(st).
●●Jul 21 2:00: World’s Best Chamber Music.
SJE; $30; $27(sr); $25(Brott35); $15(st).
●●Jul 21 7:30: World’s Best Chamber Music.
SJE; $30; $27(sr); $25(Brott35); $15(st).
●●Jul 23 7:30: Songs of the Seasons in Ladies
Barbershop Style. Classic Blend. ZT; $25.
●●Jul 28 7:30: An Evening with John Williams:
The Music of Star Wars and More. National
Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott,
conductor. MPAC; $32; $27(sr); $25(Brott35);
$15(st).
●●Aug 05 7:30: The Music of Led Zeppelin; The
Song Remains the Same. Jeans ‘n’ Classics.
National Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris
Brott, conductor. MPAC; $40.
●●Aug 11 7:30: From Tchaikovsky to Ravel.
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.5; Ravel: Concerto
in G; Sokolović: Ringelspiel (Merry Go Round).
Sarah Davis Buechner, piano; National Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott, conductor. MPAC;. $32; $27(sr); $25(Brott35);
BCC - By Chadsey’s Cairns Winery and
Vineyard, 17432 Loyalist Pky, Wellington.
GPE - Grange of Prince Edward Vineyards
and Estate Winery, 990 Closson Rd, Hillier.
OHH - Osterhout Henry Hall, Fields on West
Lake, 15786 Loyalist Pky, Bloomfield
613-567-1925
●●Aug 13 7:30: Musicians of Classical
Unbound at Large. Works by Alwyn,
Andriessen, Beaser, Debussy, Hoover, and
others. Joanna G’froerer, flute; Michelle Gott,
harp; Sean Rice, clarinet. BCC; $49.50.
●●Aug 19 7:30: Eloquent Pairings. Living Canadian Composer Stream. Works by Debussy,
Haber, Hindemith, Morlock, Ravel and others.
Joanna G’froerer, flute; Michelle Gott, harp;
Rachel Mercer, cello; Sean Rice, clarinet;
Yosuke Kawasaki, violin. GPE; $49.50
●●Aug 24 7:30: Clarinets Unleashed. Living Canadian Composer Stream. Works by
Mozart, Mozetich, Ravel and Tansman. Joanna G’froerer, flute; Jonathan Krehm, clarinet; Michelle Gott, harp; Rachel Mercer, cello;
Sean Rice, clarinet; Yehonatan Berick, viola;
Yosuke Kawasaki, violin. OHH; $49.50.
●●Aug 26 7:30: Mozart and S’more. Living
Canadian Composer Stream. Works by Morlock, Mozart and Mozetich. Joanna G’froerer,
flute; Rachel Mercer, cello; Yehonatan Berick,
viola; Yosuke Kawasaki, violin. GPE; $49.50.
clearlakefestival.ca
Saint-Saëns: Sonata for violin and piano No.2
in d Op.75; Martinů: Duo No.2 H313; Prokofiev:
Sonata for cello and piano Op.119. Alexander
Tselyakov, artistic director/piano; Daniel Tselyakov, piano; Kerry DuWors, violin; Joyce Lai,
violin; Simon Fryer, cello. EL; $15-$25.
●●Jul 23 10:30am: Coffee Concert - Serious
Fun! Works by Vivaldi, Mozart, Leo Weiner,
Piazzolla, Kye Marshall and others. Alexander Tselyakov, artistic director/piano; Catherine Wood, clarinet; Kerry DuWors, violin;
Joyce Lai, violin; Ian Clark, viola; Simon Fryer,
cello; David Playfair, baritone; Alla Turbanova,
piano. EL; $15-$25.
●●Jul 23 7:30: Jazz Concert. EL; $15-$25.
●●Jul 24 8:30: Jazz Cruise Concert. Pieces
TBA. Greg Gatien, saxophone; Eric Platz, percussion; Shannon Kristjanson, saxophone/
flute/vocals; Jordan Panko, double bass. MM;
$30 and $35.
●●Aug 03 3:00: Festival Grand Finale. Weber:
Clarinet Quintet Op.34; Dvořák: Terzetto in
C Op.74 for two violins and viola; Schumann:
Piano Quartet in E-flat Op.47. Alexander Tselyakov, piano; Kerry DuWors, violin; Joyce
Lai, violin; Ian Clark, viola; Simon Fryer, cello;
Catherine Wood, clarinet. EL; $15-$25.
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival
July 21 to Aug 3
Riding Mountain National Park, MB
EL - Erickson Lutheran Church, 30 Third St.
SW, Erickson
LW - Lorne Watson Recital Hall, Brandon
University, School of Music, 270-18th St.,
Brandon
MM - The Martise at the Marina, Main
Beach, Clear Lake, Riding Mountain National
Park.
204-571-6547 or 204-727-9631
Plein
Air
Garden Concerts
●●Jul 21 7:30: Alexander Tselyakov and
Friends. Kenneth Nichols: Letters Home
(world premiere); Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit;
Dvořák: Piano Quintet in A No.2 Op.81. Alexander Tselyakov, piano; Alla Turbanova, piano;
Kerry DuWors, violin, Joyce Lai, violin; Ian
Clark, viola; Simon Fryer, cello; David Playfair, baritone; Sarah Hall, soprano; Catherine
Wood, clarinet; Crystal Tait, double bass; Kenneth Nichols, host. LW; $25; $15(sr/st).
●●Jul 22 7:30: Inimitable Duos. Handel: Sonata
for two violins and piano in g Op.2 No.6;
Join us Wednesday evenings
July and August, in the Garden.
345 Balliol St. Toronto
Seat fee $10 at the door
info. & reservations:
416 487 0705
www.artistsgardencoop.com
thewholenote.com
OPENING
NIGHT
$15(st).
●●Aug 12 7:30: 100 Years of Frank Sinatra:
Come Fly with Me. Chris Jason; National
Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott,
conductor. LS; $40; $37(sr); $25(Brott35);
$15(st).
●●Aug 18 7:30: Verdi: Requiem. Leslie Ann
Bradley, soprano; Michèle Bogdanowicz,
mezzo; Ernesto Ramirez, tenor; James Westman, baritone; National Academy Orchestra
of Canada; Boris Brott, conductor. MPAC; $35;
$31(sr); $25(Brott35); $15(st).
MPAC - McIntyre Performing Arts Centre,
Mohawk College, 135 Fennell Ave. W.,
Hamilton
SC – Sanderson Centre for the Performing
Arts, 88 Dalhousie St., Brantford
SJA - St. John’s Anglican Church, 272 Wilson
St. E., Ancaster.
SJE - St. John the Evangelist Church
(Hamilton), 320 Charlton Ave. W., Hamilton
STA - St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 715
Centre Rd., Waterdown
ZT - Zoetic Theatre, 526 Concession St.,
Hamilton
905-525-7664
Elora Festival
July 8 to 24
Elora, ON
EPS - Elora Public School, 288 Mill St. E.,
Elora
GB - Gambrel Barn, Corner of Country Rd. 7
and 21, Elora.
GR -Grand River Raceway, 7445 Wellington
County Rd. 21, Elora
KP -. Knox Presbyterian Church (Elora), 51
Church St., Elora
SJA - St. John’s Anglican Church (Elora), 33
Henderson St., Elora
SJC - St. Joseph’s Catholic Church (Fergus),
760 St. David St. N., Fergus
519-846-0331 or 1-888-747-7550
●●Jul 08 7:30: Opening Night Gala. Mozart:
Requiem Mass in d; Corlis: River of Life (premiere). Elora Festival Singers; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir; full orchestra. GB;$65 and up;
$15(youth); 6:45: pre-concert talk. Reception
and fireworks to follow.
●●Jul 09 1:30: Anagnoson & Kinton: 40th
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 35
Summer Festivals
Anniversary Concert. Works for piano duo
and voice. Elora Festival Singers. SJA; $40;
$15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 09 4:00: Russell Braun and Carolyn Maule. Husband and wife team perform music for baritone and piano. Works by
Vaughan Williams and others. Elora Festival
Singers. SJA; $40; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 09 7:30: The Barra MacNeils. Cape Breton-based Celtic family group perform songs
in English and Gaelic with step dancing and
numerous instruments. GB; $45; $15(st);
$5(child).
●●Jul 09 9:30: Starlight Jazz Series: Elizabeth
Shepherd and Kevin Breit. Mixtape Session.
Elizabeth Shepherd, vocals and piano; Kevin
Breit, guitar. GR; $30; $15(st). Special menu
and drinks available.
●●Jul 10 2:00: Annex String Quartet: The
Roaring Twenties. 1920s Garden Party. Sarah
Jane Pelzer, soprano. SJA; $40; $15(st);
$5(child). Picnic lunch from the Desert Rose
Café available for $15.
●●Jul 10 4:00: Glory of Bach. J.S. Bach: Concerto in c for oboe and violin; Singet dem
Hern; Mass in g. Elora Festival Singers; chamber orchestra. KP; $45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 14 4:00: Guy Few and Stephanie Mara.
Works for trumpet and piano. SJA; $35;
$15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 14 7:30: Marie-Josée Lord, soprano.
Music from her Amazing Grace recording
and works by Gounod, Gershwin and others.
Elora Festival Singers. St John’s Anglican
Church (Elora), 33 Henderson St., Elora. 519846-0331 or 1-888-747-7550. $40; $15(st);
$5(child).
●●Jul 15 4:00: Elora Festival Kids Camp: Annie
KIDS. Children in grades 2 to 8 perform
Annie following a week-long camp. Based on
the comic strip and adapted from the Tony
award-winning musical. EPS; $5(child/early
drop-off); $10(child/late pick-up).
●●Jul 15 7:30: Chanticleer. Male chorus from
San Francisco. GB; $45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 16 1:30: Duo Percussion: More Than
Drums. Traditional and non-traditional percussion. Duo Percussion; Elora Festival Singers. KP; $35; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 16 4:00: Suzie LeBlanc, soprano. Featuring early arias set to Shakespearean texts to
mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s
GUY FEW &
STEPHANIE MARA
JULY 14, 4PM
ST. JOHN’S CHURCH,
ELORA
ELORAFESTIVAL.CA
36 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Choir. GB; $45 and up; $15(st); $5(child).
death. Alexander Weimann, harpsichord.
SJA; $40; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 16 7:30: Fubuki Daiko. Japanese taiko
drummers. GB; $40; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 16 9:30: Starlight Jazz Series: Tim Louis
and The Ambassadors. Tim Louis, vocals and
piano. GR; $15(st). Special menu and drinks
available.
●●Jul 17 2:00: André Laplante. Piano sonatas
by Liszt, Mozart and Beethoven, and other
works. SJA; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 17 4:00: Haydn and Mozart. Mozart: Vesperae solennes de confessore; Haydn: Missa
in Angustiis (Nelson Mass). Elora Festival
Singers. KP; $45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 21 4:00: Thomas Chartré, cello. Pärt:
Spiegel im Spiegel; Fratres; works by Fauré,
Mendelssohn and others. Leslie De’Ath, piano.
SJA; $35; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 21 7:30: Choral Mystics II. Patrick
Hawes: premiere of two new works. Elora
Festival Singers. SJC; $40; $15(st); $5(child).
Pre-concert discussion with Patrick Hawes.
●●Jul 22 7:30: Molly Johnson Songbook. Original compositions, music by Billie Holiday
and other jazz classics. Mike Downes, bass;
Robi Botos, piano; Terry Clark, drums. GB;
$45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 23 1:30: Daniel Taylor and Benjamin
Butterfield: Songs of Love. Works for countertenor and tenor. Rebecca Genge, soprano;
Steven Philcox, piano. SJA; $40; $15(st);
$5(child).
●●Jul 23 4:00: Coronation Anthems. In honour of the Queen’s 90th birthday. Handel:
Zadok the Priest; Let Thy Hand Be Strengthened: King Shall Rejoice; My Heart Is Inditing;
Water Music. Elora Festival Singers. KP; $45;
$15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 23 7:30: National Youth Orchestra of Canada: 2016 TD Tour. Berlioz: Benvenuto Cellini Overture; Barber: School for
Scandal Overture; Adams: Short Ride on
a Fast Machine; newly commisioned Canadian work; Bernstein: West Side Story Symphonic Dances; Bloch: Schelomo for cello and
orchestra. GB; $45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Jul 23 9:30: Starlight Jazz Series: Stretch
Orchestra. Kevin Breit, guitar; Matt Brubeck,
cello; Jesse Stewart, drums. GR; $30; $15(st).
Special menu and drinks available.
●●Jul 24 2:00: Montreal Jubilation Gospel
Festival de Lanaudière
July 9 to Aug 7
Joliette, PQ
450-759-4343
CCR - Christ Church, 3537 Metcalfe St.,
Rawdon
FLA - Fernand-Lindsay Amphitheatre, 1655
Boulevard Base-de-Roc, Joliette
LPC - La Purification Church, 445 NotreDame St., Repentigny
MAJ - Musée d’art de Joliette, 145 PèreWilfrid-Corbeil St., Joliette.
PSA - Presbytère St-Alphonse, 960 NotreDame St., Saint-Alphonse-Rodriguez
PSM - Presbytère Sainte-Mélanie, 910
Principale St., Sainte-Mélanie
PSP - Presbytère St-Paul, 8 Brassard St.,
St-Paul
PSS - Presbytère Saint-Sulpice, 1095 NotreDame Street, Saint-Sulpice
SAC - St-Antoine Catholic Church, 1341
Notre-Dame St., Lavaltrie.
SAK – Saint-Ambroise-de-Kildare Church,
850 Principale St., Saint-Ambroise-deKildare.
●●Jul 09 8:00: Alain Lefèvre Plays Tchaikov-
sky: Romantic Drama and Passion. Tchaikovsky: The Tempest, Symphonic Fantasia, Op.18;
Piano Concerto No.1 in b-flat Op.23; Romeo
and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture; Respighi: Feste
romane (Roman Festivals). Orchestre du Festival; Alain Lefèvre, piano; Gregory Vajda, conductor. FLA; $21.91-$70.00.
●●Jul 10 2:00: The Mark of Minimalism: Glass,
Pärt, Mozetich, Nyman, Einaudi. Glass: Overture from La Belle et la Bête; Einaudi (arr. F.
Vallières, A. Dubeau): Divenire; Giorni dispari;
Run; Mozetich: Unfolding Sky (from Postcards
from the Sky); and other works. La Pietà;
Angèle Dubeau, violin. FLA; $17.56-$40.00.
●●Jul 11 8:00: Beethoven: The Complete
String Quartet Cycle. Beethoven: String Quartet No.6 in B-flat Op.18 No.6; String Quartet No.11 in f Op.95; String Quartet No.15 in a
Op.132. Jupiter Quartet. LPC; $30.
●●Jul 12 8:00: Beethoven: The Complete
String Quartet Cycle. Beethoven: String Quartet No.4 in c Op.18 No.4; String Quartet No.5
in A Op.18 No.5; String Quartet No.13 in B-flat
Op.130. Jupiter Quartet. PSP; $30.
●●Jul 14 8:00: Beethoven: The Complete
String Quartet Cycle. Beethoven: String
Quartet No.3 in D Op.18 No.3; String Quartet No.16 in F Op.135; String Quartet No.8 in e
Op.59 No.2. Jupiter Quartet. PSM; $30.
●●Jul 15 8:00: The Conductor Serves Haydn
and Beethoven. Haydn: Overture to L’isola disabitata; Symphony No.95 in c; Beethoven:
Violin Concerto Op.61. Les Violons du Roy;
Anthony Marwood, violin; Bernard Labadie,
conductor. FLA; $17.56-$60.00.
●●Jul 16 8:00: Beethoven: From Shadow to
Light. Mendelssohn: Overture to The Fair
Melusina Op.32; Saint-Saëns: Cello Concerto No.1 in a Op.33; Romance for Cello,
Op.36; Dvořák: Silent Woods (Klid) Op.68;
Beethoven: Symphony No.5 in c Op.67.
Orchestre de Chambre I Musici; Emmanuelle
Bertrand, cello; Jean-Marie Zeitouni, conductor. FLA; $17.56-$60.00.
●●Jul 17 2:00: Tribute to Ella Fitzgerald.
Embraceable You, Fascinating Rhythm,
DUO
PERCUSSION
JULY 16, 1:30PM
KNOX PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, ELORA
ELORAFESTIVAL.CA
Someone to Watch over Me, Laura, You Do
Something to Me, and other works. Montréal
National Jazz Orchestra; Jessica Vigneault,
vocalist; Christine Jensen, conductor. FLA;
$17.56-$40.00.
●●Jul 18 8:00: As You Like It, Mr. Shakespeare! Music set to texts from Romeo and
Juliet, Henry VIII, Othello, The Tempest,
As You Like It, and Twelfth Night. Johnson:
Where the bee sucks; Tomkins: Barafostus’ Dream; Weldon: Take, O take those lips
away; Edwards: When griping grief; Byrd: Willow song; and other works. Suzie LeBlanc,
soprano; Alexander Weimann, harpsichord.
CCR; $30.
●●Jul 19 8:00: Tony Yike Yang: Child Prodigy. Liszt: Sonata in b S161; Mozart: Sonata in
F K332; Chopin: Polonaise-Fantaisie in A-flat
Op.61; Prokofiev: Sonata No.7 in B-flat Op.83.
Tony Yike Yang, piano. PSA; $30.
●●Jul 22 8:00: The Colours of French Romanticism. Lalo: Overture to Le Roy d’Ys; Massenet: Méditation from Thaïs; Chausson:
Poème de l’amour et de la mer; Berlioz: Overture to Le Corsaire; Bizet: Three songs for
soprano and orchestra; Franck: Le chasseur
maudit. Orchestre Métropolitain; Karina Gauvin, soprano; Mathieu Lussier, conductor. FLA;
$17.56-$60.00.
●●Jul 24 2:00: Alexandre Da Costa and The
Royal 22nd Regiment. Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen; Fantaisie on Airs from Carmen;
Monti: Czardas; Queen: The Show Must Go
On. Music of The Royal 22nd Regiment; Alexandre Da Costa, violin; Captain Christian
Richer, conductor. FLA; $17.56-$40.00.
●●Jul 25 8:00: Virtuoso George Li. Haydn:
Piano Sonata in b HobXVI:32; Chopin: Piano
Sonata No.2 in b-flat; Rachmaninoff: Variations on a Theme by Corelli Op.42; Liszt: Consolation No.3 in D-flat; Hungarian Rhapsody
No.2. George Li, piano. SAC; $30.
●●Jul 26 8:00: Nareh Arghamanyan: Poetess of the Piano. Bach: Goldberg Variations; Saint-Saëns: Danse macabre Op.40;
Schubert/Liszt: Der Müller und der Bach;
Gretchen am Spinnrade; Mozart/Liszt: Confutatis and Lacrimosa (from Mozart’s Requiem);
Liszt: Totentanz. Nareh Arghamanyan, piano.
PSS; $30.
●●Jul 28 8:00: [email protected]ère.
Akousma. Guests: Pipo Pierre-Louis; Line
Katcho; Myriam Bleau. MAJ; $23.50.
●●Jul 29 8:00: Live the Collectif9 Experience!
Works by Brahms, Golijov, Holbrook, Márquez, Piazzolla and others. Collectif9: Thibault
Bertin-Maghit, double bass/arrangements;
Roland Arnassalon, violin; Yubin Kim, violin;
Frédéric Moisan, violin; Grégor Monlun, violin;
Scott Chancey, viola; Xavier Lepage-Brault,
viola; Jérémie Cloutier, cello; Andrea Stewart,
cello. FLA; $17.56-$50.00.
●●Jul 30 8:00: Learning While Listening with
Christopher Hall. Brahms: Hungarian Dance
No.5 (orch. Parlow); Bizet: Carmen Suite No.1;
J. Strauss II: Tritsch-Tratsch Polka Op.124;
Kodály: Dances of Galánta; J. Strauss II: The
Blue Danube Waltz; Rozankovic: Guide comique pour orchestre; Márquez: Danzón No.2.
Orchestre symphonique de Laval; Christopher Hall, clarinet and narrator; Alain Trudel,
conductor. FLA; $17.56-$60.00.
●●Jul 31 2:00: Major Anniversaries: Tribute to Father Lindsay. Orchestral and choral
music by Beethoven, Mozart, Dvořák, Orff,
Verdi and others. Orchestre du Camp Musical
Père Lindsay; Chœur Fernand-Lindsay; Julien
thewholenote.com
Proulx, chorusmaster. FLA; $17.56-$40.00.
●●Aug 02 8:00: Jocelyne Roy: The Art of the
Flute. J.S. Bach: Concerto for Flute, Violin, and
Keyboard BWV1044; C.P.E. Bach: Concerto for
Flute and Strings in A; Concerto for Flute and
Strings in d. Orchestre de Chambre du Festival; Jocelyne Roy, flute; Mélisande McNabney,
harpsichord; Antoine Bareil, violin. SAK; $30.
●●Aug 04 8:00: Jocelyne Roy: The Art of the
Flute. Bach: Partita in a BWV1013; Debussy:
Syrinx; Varèse: Density 21.5; Ibert: Pièce pour
flûte seule; Tremblay: Envol; Takemitsu: Voice;
Karg-Elert: Chaconne. Jocelyne Roy, flute.
MAJ; $30.
●●Aug 05 8:00: Charles-Richard Hamelin
and Kent Nagano: The Audience Chooses!
Schumann: Symphony No.3 in E-flat “Rhenish”; Brahms: Piano Concerto No.1 in d Op.15.
Orchestre symphonique de Montréal; Charles
Richard-Hamelin, piano; Kent Nagano, conductor. FLA; $21.91-$70.00.
●●Aug 06 8:00: Kent Nagano and the Mozart Requiem: A Great Classic in the Great
Outdoors. Schubert: Symphony in b D759
“Unfinished”; Mozart: Requiem in d K626.
Orchestre symnphonique de Montréal (Kent
Nagano, conductor); Festival Chorus (Andrew
Megill, conductor); Sarah Wegener, soprano; Michèle Losier, mezzo; Michael Schade,
tenor; Alexander Tsymbaluk, bass. FLA;
$21.91-$70.00.
●●Aug 07 2:00: Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the
Orchestre Métropolitain: From Philadelphia
With Love. Bach/Stokowski: Passacaglia and
Fugue in c BWV582; Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody
on a Theme of Paganini Op.43; Muhly: Mixed
Messages; Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances
Op.45. Orchestre Métropolitain; Nicholas
Angelich, piano; Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor. FLA; $21.91-$70.00.
Festival of the Sound
July 15 to Aug 7
Parry Sound, ON
C3 - Chippewa III, Seguin River Parkette,
Parry Sound
CC - Canadore College Deck, 1 College Dr.,
Parry Sound
CS - Charles W. Stockey Centre for the
Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound
FO - Festival Office, 1 Avenue Rd., Parry
Sound
IQ - Island Queen Cruise Ship, 9 Bay St.,
Parry Sound
SV - Seguin Valley Golf Club, 133 Badger Rd.,
Seguin
705-746-2410 / 1-866-364-0061
●●Jul 15 5:30: Classics by Candlelight. Haydn:
String Quartet in D Op.20 No.4 Hob.III:34;
other works. Leslie Fagan, soprano; Guy Few,
trumpet/piano; Moshe Hammer, violin; James
Campbell, clarinet; Penderecki String Quartet. CS; $150. Fundraising dinner.
●●Jul 16 1:30: Strings Across the Sky. CS; free.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Gala Opening Concert. Trad.:
Just a Closer Walk with Thee for clarinet, jazz
bass, piano and choir; Trad.: Lo, How a Rose
E’er Blooming; Kulesha: Shaman Songs; Glick:
Northern Sketches; Daley: Salutation of the
Dawn; and works by Mozart, Vivaldi, Handel
and Bach. Elmer Iseler Singers; Lydia Adams,
conductor; James Campbell, clarinet; Guy
Few, trumpet; Penderecki String Quartet; Bob
Mills, double bass. CS; $42-$52.
thewholenote.com
●●Jul 17 7:30: Opera Gala. Anvil Chorus from
Il Trovatore; Aria (Drinking Chorus) from The
Daughter of the Regiment; Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves from Nabucco; Brindisi from La
Traviata; The Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin;
and other works. Mark DuBois, tenor/host;
Leslie Fagan, soprano; Gabrielle Prata, mezzo;
Colin Ainsworth, tenor; Bruce Kelly, baritone;
Guy Few, piano; Elmer Iseler Singers; Lydia
Adams, conductor. CS; $37-$47.
●●Jul 18 6:00: Swing Cruise. Hogtown Syncopators. IQ; $35. Musical cruise.
●●Jul 19 11:00am: Office Hour. New Zealand
String Quartet. FO; free.
●●Jul 19 3:30: Schubert and Dvořák I. Schubert: Sonatina in D Op.137 D384; Schubert/
Wilhelmi: Ave Maria D839; Dvořák: Piano
Trio No.4 in e “Dumky”. Moshe Hammer, violin; Peter Longworth, piano; Gryphon Trio.
CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 19 7:30: Schubert and Dvořák II. Schubert: Piano Trio in B-flat D898; Dvořák:
String Quartet No.12 in F Op.96 “American”.
Gryphon Trio; New Zealand String Quartet.
CS; $34-$42.
●●Jul 20 1:30: Our Favourite Sonatas I.
Brahms: Sonata in d Op.108; Rodrigo: Sonata
giocosa for guitar; Prokofiev: Piano Sonata
No.7 Op.83. Moshe Hammer, violin; Leopoldo
Erice, piano; Rolf Gjelsten, cello; Daniel Bolshoy, guitar; Peter Longworth, piano. CS;
$19-$27.
●●Jul 20 3:30: Our Favourite Sonatas II.
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in C Op.102 No.1;
Brahms: String Sextet No.2 in G Op.36. Peter
Longworth, piano; Penderecki String Quartet; Gillian Ansell, viola; Rolf Gjelsten, cello.
CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 20 7:30: Sir Wilfred Laurier at 175. Copland: Quiet City; Mendelssohn: String Quartet
No.2 in a; Bach: Chromatic Fantasy BWV903;
Glick: Images at Nightfall, Georgian Bay; Boyd
McDonald: Timelines for piano, four hands;
Mozart: Ch’io mi scordi di te?...Non temer,
amato bene K505. Leslie Fagan, soprano;
James Mason, English horn; Guy Few, trumpet/piano; Penderecki String Quartet; Leopoldo Erice, piano; James Campbell, clarinet;
Jeffrey Stokes, double bass. CS; $34-$42.
●●Jul 21 1:30: Fantasies and Fairy Tales. R.
Schumann: Romances for oboe and piano
Op.94; C. Schumann: Romances for violin and
piano Op.22; R. Schumann: Fantasy Pieces
for clarinet and piano Op.73; R. Schumann:
Fairy Tales for viola and piano Op.113. James
Mason, oboe; James Campbell, clarinet;
Helene Pohl, violin; Gillian Ansell, viola; Peter
Longworth, piano; Leopoldo Erice, piano. CS;
$19-$27.
●●Jul 21 3:30: Love and Inspiration. Schumann: Frauenliebe und -leben Op.42; Schumann: Piano Quartet in E-flat Op.47. Leslie
Fagan, soprano; Penderecki String Quartet; Peter Longworth, piano; Leopoldo Erice,
piano. CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 21 7:30: Mentor and Master. Schumann:
Piano Quintet in E-flat Op.44; Brahms: Piano
Quintet in f Op.34. Stewart Goodyear, piano;
Leopoldo Erice, piano; Penderecki String
Quartet; New Zealand String Quartet. CS;
$34-$42.
●●Jul 22 11:00am: Office Hour. Daniel Bolshoy,
guitar. FO; free.
●●Jul 22 1:30: Music for Guitar and Friends.
De Falla: Siete canciones populares españolas
for guitar and voice; Boccherini: Introduction
and Fandango for guitar and strings; Barrios:
Canada’s premier summer classical music festival
at the Charles W. Stockey Centre in
Parry Sound — on beautiful Georgian Bay
j u ly 15 t h – a u g u s t 7 t h , 2 016
ClassiCal
music
jazz weekend
cruises • films • talks
60 EvEnts
50 MusiCians
20 EnsEMblEs
www.festivalofthesound.ca
1.866.364.0061
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 37
Summer Festivals
Un sueño en la floresta for solo guitar; Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Quintet for guitar and string
quartet Op.143. Daniel Bolshoy, guitar; Leslie Fagan, soprano; Penderecki String Quartet. CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 22 7:30: My Favourite Beethoven.
Beethoven: Sonata No.17 “Tempest”; Sonata
No.8 “Pathétique”; Sonata No.14 “Moonlight”;
Sonata No.23 “Appassionata”. Stewart Goodyear, piano. CS; $37-$47.
●●Jul 23 7:30: Classically Ellington. Gene
DiNovi, piano/host; James Campbell, clarinet;
Drew Jurecka, violin/saxophone; Dave Young,
bass; Glenn Anderson, drums. CS; $62.
●●Jul 25 6:00: Celtic Sounds Cruise. Còig. IQ;
$35. Musical cruise.
●●Jul 26 7:30: Haydn, Mozart and the Human
Voice. Haydn: Lord Nelson Mass in d Hob.
XXII:11; Mozart: Vespers K321 and K339. Elora
Festival Singers; Festival of the Sound Ensemble; Noel Edison, conductor. CS; $37-$47.
●●Jul 27 11:00am: A Musical Offering. Bach:
Ricercar a 6 and Trio Sonata in c from The
Musical Offering BWV1079; Telemann: Trio in
g from Essercizii musici; Hertel: Double Concerto in E-flat. Festival Baroque: Suzanne
Shulman, flute; James Mason, oboe; James
McKay, bassoon; Guy Few, trumpet; Julie
Baumgartel, violin; Chloé Dominguez, cello;
Joel Quarrington, double bass; Cynthia Hiebert, harpsichord. SV; $32.
●●Jul 27 3:30: Afternoon Concert. Weber:
Trio in g Op.63; Mozart: String Quintet in C
K515. Suzanne Shulman, flute; Paul Marleyn, cello; Stéphan Sylvestre, piano; Graham
Oppenheimer, viola; Cecilia String Quartet.
CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 27 7:30: Evening Concert. Beethoven:
Violin Sonata No.3 in E-flat; Mendelssohn:
String Quartet No.1 in E-flat; Schubert: Piano
Quintet in A “Trout”. Martin Beaver, violin;
Graham Oppenheimer, viola; Paul Marleyn,
cello; Joel Quarrington, double bass; Cecilia String Quartet; Stéphan Sylvestre, piano.
CS; $34-$42.
●●Jul 28 11:00am: Office Hour. Cecilia String
Quartet. FO; free.
●●Jul 28 1:30: Colour and Motion. Prokofiev:
Quintet Op.39 “Trapèze Ballet”; Ravel: Piano
Trio in a. James Mason, oboe; James Campbell, clarinet; Martin Beaver, violin; Graham
Oppenheimer, viola; Joel Quarrington, double
bass; Trio Hochelaga. CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 28 3:30: Scandinavia: Northern Neighbours. Nielsen: Serenata in vano FS68; Sibelius: Suite for string trio in A JS186; Berwald:
Grand Septet in B-flat. James Campbell, clarinet; James McKay, bassoon; Ken MacDonald, horn; Martin Beaver, violin; Anne Robert,
violin; Graham Oppenheimer, viola; Chloé
Dominguez, cello; Paul Marleyn, cello; Joel
Quarrington, double bass. CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 28 7:30: Chopin and Tchaikovsky. Chopin: Nocturne in E-flat Op.55 No.2; Ballade
No.3 in A-flat Op.47; Polonaise in A-flat Op.53
“Heroic”; Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in a Op.50.
Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano; Trio Hochelaga. CS; $34-$42.
●●Jul 29 1:30: Summer Serenade. Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik K525; Duff:
Summer Serenade; Onslow: String Quintet No.15 Op.38. Martin Beaver, violin; Julie
Baumgartel, violin; Graham Oppenheimer,
viola; Paul Marleyn, cello; Joel Quarrington,
double bass. CS; $19-$27.
●●Jul 29 3:30: Canadian Songbook. Words
38 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Jeux d’eau; Rachmaninoff: Three Symphonic
Dances Op.45. Linda Ruan, piano; Bergmann
Duo; Glen Montgomery, piano. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 05 7:30: My Favourite Chopin. Janina
Fialkowska, piano. CS; $37-$47.
●●Aug 06 11:00am: Office Hour. Glen Montgomery, piano. FO; free.
●●Aug 06 7:30: Piano Spectacular. Orford Six
Pianos; Janina Fialkowska, piano; Bergmann
Duo; Anagnoson and Kinton, piano duo; Glen
Montgomery, piano. CS; $37-$47.
●●Aug 07 12:30: Office Hour. Creativity + Science = Magic. Beethoven: Piano Concerto
No.4. Glenn Montgomery, piano. FO; free.
●●Aug 07 2:30: Piano Finale. Mozart: Concerto No.10 in E-flat for two pianos K365;
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.4 in G Op.58;
Elgar: Enigma Variations Op.36. Janina Fialkowska, piano; Anagnoson and Kinton, piano
duo; National Academy Orchestra of Canada;
Boris Brott, conductor. CS; $37-$47.
Around the Waist. CD; $25.
●●Jul 29 7:30: My Favourite Jazz. Robi Botos,
piano; Dave Young, bass; Terry Clarke, drums.
CS;. $34-$42.
●●Jul 30 7:30: Jazz Canada. Dave Young, bass;
Kevin Turcotte, trumpet; Perry White, tenor
sax; Terry Promane, trombone; Gary Williamson, piano; Terry Clarke, drums. CS; $34-$42.
●●Jul 30 10:00: After Office Hours. Words
Around the Waist. FO; $10.
●●Jul 31 10:30am: Songbook on the Chippewa. Words Around the Waist. C3; $62.
●●Jul 31 7:30: Toronto All-star Big Band. CS;
$37-$47.
●●Aug 01 6:00: Jazz Cruise. Bob DeAngelis
Band. IQ; $35. Musical cruise.
●●Aug 02 3:30: Children’s Corner. SaintSaëns: Carnival of the Animals (excerpts);
Beethoven: Für Elise WoO59; Schumann: The
Happy Farmer Op.68 No.10. Glen Montgomery, piano; Duo Turgeon; Charissa Vandikas,
piano; Linda Ruan, piano. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 02 7:30: Anagnoson and Kinton at 40.
Bartók: Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion. Anagnoson and Kinton, piano duo; Dave
Burns, percussion; Chung Ling Lo, percussion. CS; $37-$47.
●●Aug 03 1:30: Trans-Atlantic Journeys: Into
the 20th Century I. Brahms: Intermezzo in b
Op.119, No.1; Dvořák: Slavonic Dances; Ravel:
Sonata in G for violin and piano; MacDowell: To a Wild Rose Op.51 No.1; works by Joplin and Stravinsky. Elissa Lee, violin; Sharon
Wei, viola; Angela Park, piano; Magdalena von
Eccher, piano; Duo Turgeon. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 03 3:30: Trans-Atlantic Journeys: Into
the 20th Century II. Milhaud: Scaramouche
Op.165b; Rachmaninoff: Cello Sonata in g
Op.19; Bernstein: Clarinet Sonata; Gershwin:
Songbook including I’ve Got Rhythm. James
Campbell, clarinet; Rachel Mercer, cello; Magdalena von Eccher, piano; Glen Montgomery, piano; Charissa Vandikas and Linda Ruan,
piano. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 03 7:30: The Lafayette at 30 Years.
Dvořák: Humoresque Op.101 No.7; Gershwin:
Three Preludes; Ravel: String Quartet in F;
Dvořák: Piano Quintet No.2 in A Op.81. Lafayette String Quartet; Glen Montgomery, piano;
Magdalena von Eccher, piano. CS; $34-$42.
●●Aug 04 1:30: Office Hour. Coulthard: String
Quartet No. 2; Threnody; Archer: Sonata for
clarinet and piano. Lafayette String Quartet;
James Campbell, clarinet; Glen Montgomery,
piano. FO; free.
●●Aug 04 3:30: The Magic of Cello. Bach:
Cello Suite No.1 in G BWV1007; Brahms: Cello
Sonata No.2 in F Op.99; Kelly-Marie Murphy:
Four Degrees of Separation. Ensemble Made
In Canada. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 04 7:30: Mozart and Musical Magic.
Mozart: Sonata No.16 in C K545; Sonata for
piano four-hands in C K521; Clarinet Trio in
E-flat K498; Piano Quartet in E-flat K493.
Ensemble Made In Canada; Duo Turgeon;
James Campbell, clarinet; Charissa Vandikas,
piano. CS; $34-$42.
●●Aug 05 1:30: Piano in the Afternoon I. Rachmaninoff: Prelude in G Op.32 No.5; Gershwin/
Bergmann: Porgy and Bess (excerpts); Rachmaninoff: Suite No.2 for two pianos Op.17.
Charissa Vandikas, piano; Bergmann Duo;
Magdalena von Eccher, piano; Glen Montgomery, piano. CS; $19-$27.
●●Aug 05 3:30: Piano in the Afternoon II.
Rachmaninoff: Étude-tableau in e-flat; Ravel:
Highlands Opera Studio
Aug 4 to Sep 1
Haliburton, ON
MU - Minden United Church, 21 Newcastle
St., Minden. 1-855-457-9933
NL - Northern Lights Performing Arts
Pavilion, 5358 County Rd. 21, Haliburton.
1-855-457-9933
SG - St. George’s Anglican Church
(Haliburton), 617 Mountain St., Haliburton.
1-855-457-9933
1-855-457-9933
●●Aug 09 8:00: From Opera to Broadway.
Selections from the popular opera and
musical theatre repertoire. SG; $32.50.
●●Aug 11 8:00: More Opera to Broadway.
Selections from the popular opera and
musical theatre repertoire. MU; $32.50.
●●Aug 16 8:00: For the Love of Shakespeare.
Commemorating the 400th anniversary of
Shakespeare’s death, featuring opera and
song repertoire inspired by the Bard. SG;
$32.50.
●●Aug 18 7:30: The Brothers Grimm and The
Bremen Town Musicians. Two operas by Dean
Burry. NL; $37.50. Also Aug 20(2:00)
●●Aug 23 8:00: Celebrations! Highlands
Opera Studio alumni in concert for a
FAUST
AUG 28, 30, 31 & SEP 1
Haliburton
Box Office 1-855-457-9933
HighlandsOperaStudio.com
retrospective of our last 10 years. SG; $32.50.
●●Aug 28 2:00: Gounod’s Faust. NL; $37.50.
Also Aug 30, 31, Sep 1 (eves).
Indian River Festival
June 25 to Sep 18
Indian River, PEI
All performances at St. Mary’s Church, 1374
Hamilton Rd., Route 104, Indian River, Prince
Edward Island. 902-836-3733
●●Jun 19 7:30: Centre Stage: The Once
and Strings. The Once; The Atlantic String
Machine and Friends. $42; $40(sr).
●●Jun 25 3:00: Classical: Youth Legacy Celebration. Featuring the top prize winners of
the PEI Provincial Music Festival and Debut
Atlantic’s Award for Excellence recipient.
$15; $13(sr).
●●Jul 02 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: Rose Cousins. $36; $34(sr).
●●Jul 03 3:00: The Voice: Exaltation. Sirens;
The Atlantic String Machine. $32; $30(sr).
●●Jul 08 7:30: The Voice: If I Loved You.
Danika Lorèn, vocalist; Jonathan MacArthur,
vocalist; Adam Harris, vocalist; Peter Tiefenbach and Robert Kortgaard, piano duo. $32;
$30(sr).
●●Jul 10 7:30: The Voice: Carmina Burana.
Massed Maritime chorus and instrumental
ensemble with vocal soloists. $32; $30(sr).
●●Jul 15 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: EmilieClaire Barlow. $36; $34(sr).
●●Jul 17 7:30: The Voice: In Perfect Harmony. Helios Vocal Ensemble; Daniel Cabena,
countertenor; Stephen Runge, piano. $32;
$30(sr).
●●Jul 21 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: The Door
You Came In. Songs and stories from The
Danger Tree by David MacFarlane, with original music performed by Douglas Cameron.
$32; $30(sr).
●●Jul 23 7:30: Centre Stage: Joel Plaskett.
$42; $40(sr).
●●Jul 29 7:30: The Voice: It Ain’t Necessarily So. Works by Gershwin and others. Cast
members of Indian River Festival’s The Barber of Seville; Christina Bouey; Peter Tiefenbach and Robert Kortgaard, piano. $32;
$30(sr).
●●Jul 30 7:30: The Voice: The Barber of
Seville. Rossini: The Barber of Seville. Brent
Krysa, stage director; Peter Tiefenbach,
music director. $32; $30(sr); free(children
12 and under with paying adult). Also July
31(3:00).
●●Aug 05 7:30: Centre Stage: Matthew Barber and Jill Barber. Songs from The Family
Album. $42; $40(sr).
●●Aug 07 7:30: Classical: Lafayette String
Quartet. Works by Haydn, Dvořák and Coulthard. $32; $30(sr).
●●Aug 13 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: The East
Pointers. $32; $30(sr).
●●Aug 14 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: Fêtons
L’Acadie! Suzie Leblanc, vocalist; Robert Kortgaard, piano; DesRoches Ouellette and Chaisson Trio. $32; $30(sr).
●●Aug 16 7:30: Classical: Charles and Chopin. Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano. $32;
$30(sr).
●●Aug 19 7:30: Songwriters’ Circle: The Good
Lovelies. Songs from the album Burn the Plan.
$32; $30(sr).
●●Aug 21 3:00: The Voice: Seasons of Life and
thewholenote.com
Landscape. Choral concert. Julia Davids, conductor. $32; $30(sr).
●●Aug 27 3:00: Centre Stage: Fred Penner.
$42; $40(sr); $20(child).
●●Aug 28 7:30: Classical: Trio Canoë. JeanFrançois Normand, clarinet; Marina Thibeault, viola; Philip Chiu, piano. $32; $30(sr).
●●Sep 03 3:00: Songwriters’ Circle: Kensington Ceilidh. By donation.
●●Sep 18 3:00: Classical: Ensemble Made in
Canada. $32; $30(sr).
Leith Summer Festival
July 2 to Aug 27
Leith, ON
All performances at Leith Church, 419134
Tom Thomson Ln., Leith. 519-371-2833
●●Jul 02 7:30: Cheng2 Duo. Silvie Cheng,
piano; Bryan Cheng, cello. $30.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Piano à Quatre Mains. Robert
Kortgaard, piano; Peter Tiefenbach, piano.
$30.
●●Jul 23 7:30: Common Ground: Jazz Meets
the Classics. Chris Donnelly, piano; Kornel
Wolak, clarinet. $30.
●●Aug 13 7:30: Penderecki String Quartet.
Jeremy Bell and Jerzy Kaplanek, violin; Christine Vlajk, viola; Katie Schlaikjer, cello. $30.
●●Aug 27 7:30: Sweet Songs of Sin and Sorrow. Patricia O’Callaghan, soprano; Robert
Kortgaard, piano; Andrew Downing, bass.
$30.
Luminato Festival
June 10 to 26
Toronto, ON
The following concerts take place at the
Hearn Generating Station, 440 Unwin Ave.
416-368-4849
●●Jun 19 7:20: Tafelmusik/Luminato. In Con-
cert. Works by Telemann, Handel, Torelli,
Marais and Bach. $25.
●●Jun 22 6:30: Luminato Festival. Music in the
Barns: Song of Extinction. Music by Rose Bolton. Film by Marc de Guerre. Libretto by Don
McKay. Featuring members of the Tafelmusik
Chamber Choir. $30; $60(VIP).
●●Jun 21 6:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra/
Luminato Festival. Beethoven: Symphony No.5
and Gershwin: An American in Paris. Peter
Oundjian, conductor. $32.77-$44.07.
Montreal Baroque Festival
Jun 23 to 26
Montreal, PQ
CND - Crypt of the Chapelle Notre-Damede-Bon-Secours, 400 rue Saint Paul Est,
Montreal
MU - Lobby of the Arts Building, McGill
University, 853 rue Sherbrooke Ouest,
Montreal
OL - Osler Library of the History of Medicine,
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, 3rd
Floor, Montreal.
RH - Redpath Hall, 3461 rue McTavish,
Montreal
RM - Redpath Museum, 859 rue Sherbrooke
Ouest, Montreal
SC - Salle de la Commune, Marché
thewholenote.com
Bonsecours, 325 rue de la Commune Est,
Montreal
514-845-7171
VALERIE KUINKA
General Director
●●Jun 23 7:00: Prospero’s Tempest. Works
RICHARD MARGISON
Artistic Director
by Purcell and others. Bande Montréal Baroque, Lina Tur Bonet, Passiflore, Flûte Alors!,
Pallade Musica, and others. RH; $30; $25(sr);
$20(st).
●●Jun 23 9:00: Fugal Tornado. Bach: Art of
Fugue. Les Voix Humaines; Instruments of
Happiness. RH; $30; $25(sr); $20(st).
●●Jun 24 11:00am: Impetuous Lover, Turbulent Love. Odéi Bilodeau, soprano; Martin
Robidoux, harpsichord. SC; $20.
●●Jun 24 2:00: Tumultuous Bach 1. Bach:
Sonata in g BWV1001; Partita in b BWV1002.
Lina Tur Bonet, baroque violin; Jesse
Blumberg, baritone; Eric Milnes, harpsichord.
SC; $30; $25(sr); $20(st).
●●Jun 24 5:00: Torrent of Tears. Works by
Clérambault, Montéclair and Rebel. Ensemble
Sonate 1704; Jacinthe Thibault, soprano. SC;
$30; $25(sr); $20(st).
●●Jun 24 7:00: Hail! the Gigantic Gique! Baroque, Métis and contemporary music. Ensemble Caprice; Métis Fiddler Quartet. CND; $35;
$30(sr); $25(st).
●●Jun 24 9:00: Breeze or Hurricane? Boismortier: Five Flute Concertos. Ensemble La
Chamaille; Autour de la Flûte. CND; SOLD OUT.
●●Jun 25 11:00am: Scandinavian Gust. JeanFrançois Bélanger, nyckelharpa. RM; $20.
●●Jun 25 2:00: Weather Alert. New works for
recorder by young Quebec composers. Vincent Lauzer, recorder. OL; $20.
●●Jun 25 4:00: Los Rafales de vento! Music
inspired by Spain, the Mediterranean, African and Native-American influences. David
Jacques, guitar; Ziya Tabassian, percussion.
OL; $20.
●●Jun 25 7:00: The Widow Rebel. Le Nouvel
Opéra. RH; $35; $30(sr); $25(st).
●●Jun 25 9:00: Tumultuous Bach 2. Bach:
Sonata in a BWV1003; Partita in d BWV1004.
Lina Tur Bonet, baroque violin; Jesse
Blumberg, baritone; Eric Milnes, harpsichord.
RH; $30; $25(sr); $20(st).
●●Jun 26 11:00am: Heavenly Bach: Thunder and Lightning. Bach: Cello Suites. Paolo
Pandolfo, viola da gamba. MU; $30; $25(sr);
$20(st).
●●Jun 26 4:00: Tumultuous Bach 3. Bach:
Sonata in C BWV1005; Partita in E BWV1006;
Notebook for Anna Magdalene Bach
(excerpts). Lina Tur Bonet, baroque violin;
Jesse Blumberg, baritone; Eric Milnes, harpsichord. MU; $30; $25(sr); $20(st).
●●Jun 26 7:00: Tempest of Ideas: The Reformation According to J.S. Bach: Cantatas
BWV76, BWV79 and BWV80. Hélène Brunet,
Michael Taylor, Philippe Gagné and Jesse
Blumberg, soloists; La Bande Montréal Baroque; Eric Milnes, conductor. RH; $35(sr);
$30(st).
OUR 10TH SEASON!
MASTERCLASSES
RICHARD MARGISON
AUGUST 4, 5 & 6 | Haliburton
CONCERTS
FROM OPERA TO BROADWAY
AUGUST 9 & 11 | Haliburton & Minden
FOR THE LOVE
OF SHAKESPEARE
AUGUST 16 | Haliburton
CELEBRATIONS!
AUGUST 23 | Haliburton
OPERAS
THE BROTHERS GRIMM &
THE BREMEN TOWN MUSICIANS
AUGUST 18 & 20 | Haliburton
FAUST
AUG 28, 30, 31 & SEP 1 | Haliburton
TRAVEL PACKAGES AVAILABLE!
Box Office 1-855-457-9933
HighlandsOperaStudio.com
Music and Beyond Festival
July 4 to 17
Ottawa, ON
CC - Christ Church Cathedral (Ottawa), 439
Queen St., Ottawa
CM - Canadian Museum of Nature, 240
McLeod St., Ottawa. 613-566-4700
DC - Dominion-Chalmers United Church,
355 Cooper St., Ottawa
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 39
Summer Festivals
DF - Diefenbunker, 3929 Carp Rd., Ottawa
FB - First Baptist Church (Ottawa), 140
Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa
IG- Irving Greenberg Theatre Centre, 1233
Wellington St W., Ottawa. 613-232-2075
KP - Knox Presbyterian Church (Ottawa),
120 Lisgar St., Ottawa
MT - Mayfair Theatre, 1074 Bank St., Ottawa,
613-730-6552
ND - Notre Dame Cathedral Basilica, 385
Sussex Dr., Ottawa
NGC - National Gallery of Canada, 380
Sussex Drive, Ottawa RC – Rideau Canal,
Ottawa
SAC - St. Andrew’s Church (Ottawa), 82
Kent St., Ottawa
SBA - St. Barnabas Anglican Church
(Ottawa), 70 James St., Ottawa
SBC - Saint Brigid’s Centre for the Arts, 310
St. Patrick St., Ottawa 613-288-1079
SJC - St. Joseph’s Church, 151 Laurier Ave.
E., Ottawa
SMA - St. Matthew’s Anglican Church
(Ottawa), 217 First Ave., Ottawa
SUC - Southminster United Church, 15
Aylmer Ave., Ottawa
TH - Tabaret Hall, University of Ottawa, 550
Cumberland St., Ottawa
UO - University of Ottawa, 50 University,
Ottawa
613-241-0777
●●Jul 04 5:30: Music on the Canal. RC;
$10-$50.
●●Jul 04 7:30: Opening Gala, Music and Cir-
cus. DC; $10-$50.
●●Jul 05 12:00_noon: Utrecht String Quartet.
FB; $10-$50.
●●Jul 05 2:00: Theremin in Concert: Thor-
wald Jørgensen. FBC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 05 7:00: An Evening at the Diefen-
bunker. Thorwald Jørgensen, thermin; Ruth
Anna Lindemeir, zither; Utrecht String Quartet and Film. DF; $10-$70.
●●Jul 05 8:30: In Concert. Jens Lindemann,
Tommy Banks; National Arts Centre Orchestra. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 06 12:00_noon: Leopold Godowsky: A
Life in Music. Carl Petersson; Hélène Brunet;
Julian Armour. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 06 2:00: Music of Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Piazzolla. Utrecht String Quartet. FB;
JULY
8&9
Léonardelli, harp; Robin Best, harp; Matthew
Larkin, piano. CC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 11 7:30: Luc Beauséjour. SBA; $10-$70.
●●Jul 11 7:30: Oliver Jones: Farewell Tour. DC;
$25-$150.
●●Jul 11 7:30: Celebrating Vienna! Marco Di
Sapia. SUC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 12 12:00_noon: Made in Canada. DC;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 12 7:30: London Handel Players I: Music
of J.S. Bach. SBA; $10-$70.
●●Jul 12 7:30: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.Also July 13.
●●Jul 13 12:00_noon: Matthew Larkin in
Recital. CC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 13 7:00: Music in the Lives of Louise
Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun and Marie Antoinette.
NG; included with gallery admission.
●●Jul 13 7:30: Czech Masterpieces. Sláva
Pechokova, piano. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 14 12:00_noon: Hélène Brunet, soprano.
DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 14 2:00: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG;. $10-$70.Also 7:30.
●●Jul 14 5:00: Ottawa Wind Ensemble. TH;
free.
●●Jul 14 7:30: London Handel Players II: Music
of France. SBA; $10-$70.
●●Jul 15 2:00: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 15 2:00: London Handel Players III:
Music of Handel. SBA; $10-$70.
●●Jul 15 7:30: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 15 7:30: The Music of Ola Gjeilo. SMA;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 15 7:30: Music of Bach, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, and Schubert. Jan Lisiecki, piano.
DC; $10-$90.
●●Jul 16 2:00: Ukrainian Music and Dance.
DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 16 2:00: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 16 2:00: In Recital. Felix Hell, organ.
SAC; $10-$70. Also July 17.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Orchestre de la Francophonie.
Stéphane Tétreault, cello; Jean-Philippe
Tremblay, conductor. SBC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 16 8:30: Chanticleer. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 17 2:00: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 17 7:30: Closing Gala: The Seven Deadly
Sins. Thirteen Strings; Kevin Mallon, conductor; Jennifer Taverner, soprano; Felix Hell,
organ; Marc Djokic, violin; Jasper Wood, violin; Catherine Ferreira; Julian Armour, cello.
DC; $10-$70 .
$10-$70.
●●Jul 06 6:30: The Third Man. Ruth Anna Lindemeir, zither. MT. $10-$70.
●●Jul 06 7:00: Music and Nature. CM.
Included in admission price.
●●Jul 06 7:30: Martin Chalifour. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 07 2:00: Utrecht String Trio. FB;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 07 7:30: Vienna Piano Trio I. C.P.E. Bach:
Trio Sonata in e Wq89:5; Brahms: Piano
Trio in C Op.87; Shostakovich: Piano Trio
No.2 Op.67. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 07 7:30: The Colours of Orlando.
Selected works by Orlando Di Lasso. Le Studio de musique ancienne de Montréal. SJC;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 07 7:30: Music and Circus. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 07 9:15: Coffee Concert: Fritz Kreisler
Celebration. DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 07 10:00: Percussion Plus! SBC;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 08 10:00am: Les Boréades de Montréal.
SBA; $10-$70.
●●Jul 08 2:00: Music and Circus. IG; $10-$70.
Also at 7:30.
●●Jul 08 2:00: Music for Life: A Celebration!
DC; $25-$150
●●Jul 08 7:30: Christopher Plummer: Shakespeare and Music. Excerpts from favourite
Shakespeare plays, joined by some of Canada’s top musicians. DC; $25-$150. Also July 9
●●Jul 08 7:30: Vienna Piano Trio II. Haydn:
Piano Trio in E Hob.XV:28; Ravel: Piano Trio; F.
Bridge: Phantasie-Piano Trio H.79; Brahms:
Piano Trio in c Op.101. SUC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 09 2:00: Vienna Piano Trio III. F. Cerha
(on occasion of his 90th birthday): 5 Sätze
für Klaviertrio; Brahms: Piano Trio in B Op.8.
DC; $10-$70.
●●Jul 09 2:00: Music and Circus. Hebei Acrobatic Troupe. IG; $10-$70.Also at 7:30.
●●Jul 09 8:00: Les Violons du Roy. ND;
$10-$70.
●●Jul 09 11:00: Tapestry Presents: Starry
Night. KP; $10-$70.
●●Jul 10 10:00am: Ottawa Family Music Expo.
Mini-concerts and interactive arts programming for families. UO; free.
●●Jul 10 7:30: Music and Circus. IG; $10-$70.
●●Jul 10 7:30: Measha Brueggergosman. DC;
613-241-0777. $10-$70.
●●Jul 11 2:00: Angels and Demons. Caroline
July 16 @ 8:30 pm
Music at Port Milford
July 16 to Aug 7
Milford, ON
SHAKESPEARE AND MUSIC
with Christopher Plummer
musicandbeyond.ca
40 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
C - MPM Camp, 89 Colliers Rd., Milford
R – Regent Theatre, 224 Main St., Picton.
613-476-8416
M - St. Mary Magdalene Anglican Church,
335 Main St., Picton
613-476-7735
Back by popular demand
●●Jul 16 10:00am: MPM Takes to the Streets.
Chanticleer
Students aged 12 to 18 perform chamber
music. Streets throughout Picton and Wellington; Free. Until 12:00pm.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Spin Cycle. Haydn: String
musicandbeyond.ca
Quartet in f Op.20 No.5; Teehan: Infinite
Streams II; Lau: String Quartet No.3; Silberberg: Transcendence; Wijeratne: Two Pop
Songs on Antique Poems; Wijeratne/Skratch
Bastid: Through the Invisible. Afiara String
Quartet: Valerie Li and Catherine Cosbey, violins; Eric Wong, viola; Adrian Fung, cello. M;
$30; $10(st).
●●Jul 17 2:00: Sunday MPM Student Matinee.
Chamber, orchestral and choral works. Students aged 12 to 18. C; free.
●●Jul 23 7:30: Ensemble Made in Canada.
Mozart: Piano Quartet No.2 in E-flat K493;
Murphy: Four Degrees of Freedom; Fauré:
Piano Quartet No.2 in g Op.45. Elissa Lee, violin; Sharon Wei, viola; Rachel Mercer, cello;
Angela Park, piano. M; $30; $10(st).
●●Jul 24 2:00: Sunday MPM Student Matinee. Chamber, orchestral and choral works.
Students aged 12 to 18 and Community Singers. M; free.
●●Jul 29 7:30: Classic Rock. Music from David
Bowie, Journey, Kiss, Queen, Pat Benatar,
Stevie Nicks and others. Naomi Garreet and
Kevin Pierson, vocals; Gary Backstrom, guitar; Chris Eastburn, bass; Andy Pesz, drums;
MPM Student Orchestra. R; $30.
●●Jul 30 7:30: Tokai String Quartet. Haydn:
String Quartet in D Op.71 No.2; Burge: String
Quartet No.1; Debussy: String Quartet in g
Op.10. Amanda Goodburn and Csaba Koczo,
violins; Yosef Tamir-Smirnoff, viola; Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello. M; $30;
$10(st).
●●Jul 31 2:00: Sunday Student Matinee.
Chamber, orchestral and choral works. Students aged 12 to 18. C; free.
●●Aug 06 7:30: Faculty Ensemble. Beethoven:
String Quintet “Storm” in C Op.29; Ravira:
Wapango; Brahms: String Quintet No.2 in G
Op.111. Marie Bérard and Rohan Gregory, violins; Keith Hamm and Angela Rudden, violas;
Paul Widner, cello. M; $30; $10(st).
●●Aug 07 2:00: Sunday Student Matinee.
Chamber, orchestral and choral works. Students aged 12 to 18. M; free.
Music Mondays
Every Monday during the summer from
June 6 to Aug 20
Toronto, ON
All performances are at 12:15pm at The
Church of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Sq., 416598-4521. PWYC
●●Jun 06 12:15: Echoes of Bach. Bach: The Art
of the Fugue (excerpts); Smallman: Baroquial
Suite; Hindemith: Ludus Tonalis (excerpts).
Reverb Brass.
●●Jun 13 12:15: Old-School Love. When I Fall
in Love; I Could Write a Book; It Ain’t Necessarily So; Old Cape Cod; A Nightingale Sang
in Berkeley Square; and other works. Russell Drago Trio.
●●Jun 20 12:15: Duo Primo. Ronée Boyce,
piano; Helen Yang, cello.
●●Jun 27 12:15: Dévah Unplugged. Dévah
Quartet.
●●Jul 04 12:15: Albéniz: Iberia Book III - El
Albaicín, El Polo, and Lavapiés. Koichi Inoue,
piano.
●●Jul 11 12:15: Bach and Beyond. Welmers:
Laudate Dominum; Cowell: Hymn and Fuguing
Tune No.14; and works by Bach and Böhm.
Aaron James, organ.
thewholenote.com
●●Jul 18 12:15: Transcriptions and Works for
the Spanish Guitar. Works by Bach, Albéniz,
Tarrega and Barrios. Cary Savage, guitar.
●●Jul 25 12:15: Organ Music from Québec.
Bédard: Suite du deuxième ton; works by Daveluy, LeBuis and Warren. Denis Gagné, organ.
●●Aug 01 12:15: Allison Au Quartet.
●●Aug 08 12:15: True North - Canadian Duos
for Violin and Piano. Willan: Sonata No.1
in e; works by Champagne, Archer and H.
Schmidt. Stephanie Chua, piano; Véronique
Mathieu, violin.
●●Aug 15 12:15: Surrealism at Midday. Liszt:
Ballade No.2 in b, S171; Ravel: Gaspard de la
nuit; Scriabin: Sonata No.4 in F-sharp Op.30.
Anastasia Rizikov, piano.
●●Aug 22 12:15: Dueling Cellos. VC² (Amahl
Arulanandam and Bryan Holt, cellos).
●●Aug 29 12:15: Gala 25th Anniversary Concert. David Braid, piano. Post-concert
reception.
National Youth Orchestra of Canada
Chamber Music Festival
June 22 to July 15
Waterloo, ON
MF - Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75
University Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470
KW - KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 519-886-1673
All chamber music concerts are free except
for July 5 and 15.
●●Jun 22 8:00: Faculty Concert. Peter Hatch:
Cooking with Alice; Simon Steen/Andersen: Next to Beside Besides, #0 and #4
(2003/2006) for Percussion and Cello; Daron
Hagen: Duo for Violin and Cello. David Hetherington; Aiyun Huang; Steve S. MF.
●●Jun 24 8:00: Student Concert. Reich: Music
for pieces of wood; Schiffelholz: Trio Sonata
for Two Bassoons and Piano. MF.
●●Jun 25 8:00: Student Concert. Cole: Postludes; Reich: Drumming part 1; Mozart: Flute
Quartet in D; Jolivet: Pastorales de Noël;
Tomasi: Être ou ne Pas Être. MF.
●●Jun 28 8:00: Faculty Concert. Featuring the
Formosa String Quartet. MF.
●●Jun 29 8:00: Faculty Concert. Böhme:
Trumpet Sextet; Oesterle: Carrousel; Gripp:
String Quartet. MF.
●●Jun 30 2:00: Student Concert. Pasculli:
2016 TD Tour
Omaggio a Bellini - Duetto; Mendelssohn:
Octet; Smetana: String Quartet. MF.
●●Jun 30 8:00: Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert. Debussy: Sonate; Mozart:
String Quartet in F, K.590; Bliss: Oboe Quintet;
Barber; Summer Music; Shostakovich: String
Quartet No.14. MF.
●●Jul 01 2:00: Student Concert. Mendelssohn: String Quartet in f, Op.80; Poulenc:
Sonata for Clarinet and Bassoon; Ibert: Deux
Interludes; Beethoven: String Quartet in D
major, Op.18 No.3. MF.
●●Jul 01 8:00: Student Concert. Engelman:
Remembrance; Nielsen; Quintet for Winds
Op.43; Poulenc: Trio for Trumpet, Horn and
Trombone; Verdi: String Quartet; Tomasi:
Cinq danses profanes et sacrées pour quintette á vent; Dvorak: String Quintet. MF.
●●Jul 02 8:00: Student Concert. Malcolm
Arnold: Brass Quintet No.1; Górecki: Sonata
for Two Violins Op.10; Raff: Double Wind Quintet; Britten: String Quartet No.2 in C. MF.
●●Jul 02 8:00: Student Concert. Ravel: Introduction et Allegro; Ewald: Brass Quintet No.1;
Schumann: Piano Quintet; Oesterle: Look on
Glass; Goepfart: Wind Quartet Op.93; Bartók:
String Quartet No.4. MF.
●●Jul 05 8:00: In Concert. Ensembles of the
National Youth Orchestra of Canada. KW;
$25; $15(st).
●●Jul 08 8:00: Faculty Concert. MF.
●●Jul 15 8:00: Ensembles of the National
Youth Orchestra of Canada. KW; $25; $15(st).
Prince Edward County Jazz Festival
Aug 16 to 21
Picton, ON
●●Aug 20 2:00: Robi Botos and Jodi Proznick.
M; $25.
●●Aug 20 8:00: Joe Sealy and Jackie Richard-
son: Africville Stories. R; $38.
B – Baxter Centre, 3 Stanley St., Bloomfield
GC – Glenwood Chapel, 47 Ferguson St.,
Picton
HEW – Huff Estates Winery, 2284 County Rd.
1, Bloomfield
M - Church of St. Mary Magdalene, 339 Main
St., Picton
R - Regent Theatre, 224 Main St., Picton
SOM – Stache on Main, 287 Main St.,
Wellington. 613-399-2498
TB&C – The Beck and Call, 252 Main St.,
Picton
W - Waring House, 395 County Rd 1, Picton
613-476-8416 x28 or 1-877-411-4761
●●Aug 20 10:00am: Mike Murley and Jodi
Proznick. GC; free
●●Aug 21 10:30am: Jazz Mass. Brian Barlow
Quartet. M.
●●Aug 21 8:00: The Brian Barlow Big Band
with Alex Samaras. R;. $38.
Stratford Summer Music
●●Aug 16 7:00: Backstage: Brian Barlow in
conversation with Guido Basso, B; free
●●Aug 17 5:30: Jazz Overture. Mark Eisenman
Trio. Guest: Phil Dwyer. WH; $75. 5:30: wine
tasting; 6:30: dinner; 8:00: concert.
●●Aug 17 7:30 : Fade Kings. W.
●●Aug 18 1:00: Hannah Barstow Trio. HEW.
●●Aug 18 8:00: Ben Vandergaast. SOM
●●Aug 18 8:00: Emilie-Claire Barlow. R; $38.
●●Aug 18 10:00: Robi Botos Trio. TB&C.
●●Aug 19 7:30: Hannah Barstow Trio. Young
Jazz Series. W.
●●Aug 19 8:00: Bill King and Michael Dunstan. SOM.
●●Aug 19 8:00: Guido Basso and Friends. With
Jodi Proznick, Mike Murley, Bernie Senensky
and Dave Laing. R; $38.
●●Aug 19 10:00: Robi Botos Trio. TB&C. Cover.
2016 TD Tour
June 22 to Aug 13
●●Jul 23 7:30: Elora Festival/National Youth
Orchestra of Canada. 2016 TD Tour. Berlioz:
Benvenuto Cellini Overture; Barber: School
for Scandal Overture; Adams: Short Ride on
a Fast Machine; newly commisioned Canadian work; Bernstein: West Side Story Symphonic Dances; Bloch: Schelomo for cello and
orchestra. Gambrel Barn, Corner of Country Rd. 7 and 21, Elora. 519-846-0331 or 1-888747-7550. $45; $15(st); $5(child).
●●Aug 11 7:30: National Youth Orchestra of
Canada. 2016 TD Tour. Wagner: Overture to
Tannhauser; Bloch: Schelomo for cello and
orchestra; Prokofiev: Symphony No.5; new
commissioned works by C. Goddard and C.
Meyer. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor
St. W. 416-408-0208. $25-$45.
●●Aug 13 6:00: National Youth Orchestra of
Canada. 2016 TD Tour. Berlioz: Benvenuto
Cellini Overture; Debussy: Syrinx; Bernstein:
West Side Story Symphonic Dances. Maison Symphonique de Montreal, 1600 SaintUrbain, Montreal. 514-842-2112. TBA.
Classical
Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival
July 21 to Aug 3
Ottawa, ON
• LISBOA •
Maestro Ward Stare
The Elora Festival
July 23, 7;30 pm
613-214-6306
Explore how contrasts shape our lives
through the valuable contributions to music
made by women and cultural inspirations
from around the world. The festival takes
place in more than ten different venues
around the City of Ottawa. Details were
unavailable at time of going to press. Please
visit the festival’s website at
www.chamberfest.com
pecmusicfestival.com
nyoc.org
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 41
Summer Festivals
July 18 to Aug 28
Stratford, ON
AP - Arden Park Hotel, 552 Ontario St.,
Stratford
K - Knox Presbyterian Church, 142 Ontario
St., Stratford
LQ - Lower Queen’s Park, Queen St.,
Stratford
P - Prune, 151 Albert St., Stratford
RH - Revival House, 70 Brunswick St.,
Stratford
SAC - St. Andrew’s Church (Stratford), 25
St. Andrew’s St., Stratford. 519-271-2101
RC - Royal Canadian Legion, 207 St. Patrick
St., Stratford
SC - Stratford Central Secondary School, 60
St. Andrew St., Stratford
SJA - St. James Anglican Church, 41
Mornington St., Stratford.
519-271-2101
●●Jul 18 8:00: Opening Night. LQ; free.
●●Jul 18 9:30: Grand Illumination to Music for
a Midsummer’s Night. LQ; free.
●●Jul 19 7:00: Basia Bulat and Sunparlour
Players. K; $30.
●●Jul 20 7:00: Harlem Gospel Choir. Guest:
Measha Brueggergosman, soprano. K; $40.
●●Jul 21 7:00: International Piano Series 1.
Simone Dinnerstein, piano. SAC; $40.
●●Jul 23 11:00am: International Piano Series
2. Bach: Goldberg Variations. Simone Dinnerstein, piano. SAC; $40.
●●Jul 23 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Baroque
Harp (Brunch Program 1). Julia Seager-Scott,
harp. P; $49.50 (includes brunch). Also on
July 24.
●●Jul 23 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret:
Hallelujah. Songs of sin and sorrow by Leonard Cohen. Patricia Callaghan, vocals; Robert
Kortgaard, piano. RH; $40.
●●Jul 29 9:00: Strange and Sacred Noise.
A visual and aural exploration of composer
John Luther Adams “sonic geography” of
Alaska. TorQ Percussion Quartet. SJA; $30.
●●Jul 30 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Paraguayan Harp (Brunch Program 2). Martha
Mazzoleni, harp. P; $49.50 (includes brunch).
Also on July 31.
●●Jul 30 7:00: Whiskey Jack Salutes Canadian
42 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Jan Lisiecki Programme 1. Jan Lisiecki, piano.
SAC; $40.
●●Aug 27 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Two Celtic
Harps (Brunch Program 6). Julia SeagerScott, harp; Sharlene Wallace, harp. P; $49.50
(includes brunch). Also on Aug 28.
●●Aug 27 2:00: International Piano Series 6:
Jan Lisiecki Programme 2. Jan Lisiecki, piano.
SAC; $40.
●●Aug 27 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret: Shine On - The Universe of John Lennon.
Michael Occhipinti Jazz Ensemble. RH; $40.
●●Aug 28 2:00: Season Finale: The Stratford
Six, Version 2.0. SAC; $40.
Country Legends: Don Messer. Guest: Dan
Stacey. RC; $30.
●●Aug 01 8:00: The Artie Shaw Orchestra.
AP; $45. 7:00pm: Brush Up Your Foxtrot.
Also Aug 2.
●●Aug 03 7:00: International Piano Series 3.
Tony Yike Yang, piano. SAC; $30.
●●Aug 04 7:00: Choral Concert. Choir of Holy
Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon. SJA;
PWYC.
●●Aug 06 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Contemporary Harp (Brunch Program 3). Sharlene
Wallace, harp. P; $49.50 (includes brunch).
Also on Aug 7.
●●Aug 06 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret:
The Sondheim Jazz Project. RH; $40.
●●Aug 07 5:00: Choral Vespers Service. Choir
of Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon.
SJA; TBA.
●●Aug 07 7:00: TorQ Percussion Seminar
Finale Concert. SC; PWYC.
●●Aug 11 7:00: The People Shall Hear: Great
Choruses by Bach and Handel. Theatre of
Early Music Choir; Daniel Taylor, director.
SJA; $40.
●●Aug 12 7:00: Canadian Choral Spotlight:
Massed Choir. Tallis: Spem in alium; R. Murray
Schafer: Credo. Theatre of Early Music Choir;
Daniel Taylor, director. SJA; $40.
●●Aug 13 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Gaelic
Harp - The Clarsach (Brunch Program 4).
Julia Seager-Scott, harp. P; $49.50 (includes
brunch). Also on Aug 14.
●●Aug 13 9:00: Live at Revival House Cabaret:
Carole Pope. RH; $40.
●●Aug 14 2:00: International Piano Series 4.
Joey Alexander Jazz Trio. SAC; $40.
●●Aug 16 7:00: Vocal Academy Faculty Quartet Recital. SAC; $40.
●●Aug 17 7:00: International Piano Series 5.
Luca Buratto, piano. SAC; $30.
●●Aug 19 6:30: The Barber of Seville (dinner
performance). RH; $99. Also Aug 20(6:30)
and 21(12noon).
●●Aug 20 11:00am: Musical Brunch: Senegalese Harp - The Kora (Brunch Program
5). Robert Simms, harp. P; $49.50 (includes
brunch). Also on Aug 21.
●●Aug 21 2:00: Vocal Academy Participants’
Finale Recital. SAC; PWYC.
●●Aug 26 7:00: International Piano Series 6:
TD SUNFEST ’16:
“CANADA’S PREMIER CELEBRATION OF
WORLD CULTURES.”
July 7 to 10
London, ON
519-672-1522
More than 30 groups representing diverse
world cultures entertain visitors on five
stages in downtown London’s historic
Victoria Park. Further details were not
available at the time of going to press. Please
visit www.sunfest.on.ca for details.
TD Toronto Jazz Festival
June 24 to July 3
Toronto, ON
D - Distillery Historic District, 55 Mill St.
416-346-1177
HR - Holt Renfrew, 50 Bloor St. W. 416-9222333
HS - Home Smith Bar at The Old Mill Toronto,
21 Old Mill Rd. 1-888-655-9090
HT - Horseshoe Tavern, 370 Queen St. W.
1-888-655-9090.
HTD - Hilton Toronto Downtown, Pool Deck,
145 Richmond St. W. 416-869-3456
JB - Jazz Bistro, 251 Victoria St. 1-888-6559090
JM - Jane Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence
Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E. 416-3667723
KH - Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor
St. W. 416-408-0208
MS - Mill St. Brew Pub, Distillery Historic
District, 55 Mill St. 416-681-0338
NPS - Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St.
W. 1-888-655-9090
OH - Opera House, 735 Queen St. E. 1-888655-9090
R - The Rex, 194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475
SC - Second Cup, 287 King St. W. 416-3409888
SCPA - Sony Centre for the Performing Arts,
1 Front St. E. 1-888-655-9090
●●Jun 24 12:30: Jane Bunnett and Hilario
Duran. HR; free.
●●Jun 24 5:00: Tia Brazda Quartet. MS; free.
●●Jun 24 7:30: Heather Bambrick and
Friends. Featuring Alex Pangman with Russ
Little Quartet. HS; $35.50.
●●Jun 24 8:00: An Evening with Sarah
McLachlan. SCPA; $59.50-$125.
●●Jun 24 8:00: Bill Charlap Trio. JB;
$45/$40(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 24 10:00: Bill Charlap Trio. JB;
$45/$40(adv). Also 8pm.
●●Jun 25 12:30: Bill King’s Rhythm Express.
NPS; free.
●●Jun 25 12:30: Jarrod Lawson. HR; free.
●●Jun 25 3:00: Slocan Ramblers. D; free.
●●Jun 25 5:00: Bob Brough Trio. MS; free.
●●Jun 25 6:30: Jarrod Lawson. NPS; free.
●●Jun 25 7:30: Heather Bambrick and
Friends. Featuring Broadsway with Russ Little
Quartet. HS; $35.50.
●●Jun 25 8:00: Bill Charlap Trio. JB; $45;
$40(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 25 8:30: Sharon Jones and the DapKings. NPS; $62.50 to $73.50.
●●Jun 26 12:30: Toronto Mass Choir. NPS;
free.
●●Jun 26 3:00: Sam Dickinson Trio. HTD; free.
●●Jun 26 5:00: Blue Moon Marquee. MS; free.
●●Jun 26 6:30: Jamison Ross. NPS; free.
●●Jun 26 8:00: Laila Biali Trio and Phil Dwyer.
JB; $30; $25(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 26 8:30: Lee Fields and The Expressions/Allen Stone Double Bill. NPS;
$45(reserved); $40(lounge); $35(main floor).
●●Jun 27 12:30: Brian Barlow Big Band: Ellington at Newport with guest Guido Basso. NPS;
free.
●●Jun 27 6:30: The Spandettes. NPS; free.
●●Jun 27 8:30: Grace Potter. NPS;
$50(reserved); $45(lounge); $40(main floor).
●●Jun 27 10:00: Kiefer Sutherland Band. HT;
$30; $25(adv).
thewholenote.com
●●Jun 28 12:30: Michael Occhipinti’s Sicilian
Jazz Project. NPS; free.
●●Jun 28 6:30 Mark McLean’s Playground.
NPS; free.
●●Jun 28 8:00: Oliver Jones Trio. JM; $40.
●●Jun 28 8:00: Robi Botos and Paul Novotny
Duo. JB; $30; $25(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 28 8:00: Oliver Jones Trio. JM; $40.
●●Jun 28 8:00: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. KH; $79.50-$99.50.
●●Jun 28 8:30: Gregory Porter. NPS;
$56.50(reserved); $50(lounge); $45(main
floor).
●●Jun 29 12:30: Dione Taylor and The Backsliderz. NPS; free.
●●Jun 29 1:00: Bill McBirnie’s Find Your Place
Band. SC; free.
●●Jun 29 4:00: Richard Whiteman Quartet.
HTD; free.
●●Jun 29 6:30: Gray Matter. NPS; free.
●●Jun 29 7:00: Pram Trio. SC; free.
●●Jun 29 8:00: Chick Corea Trio: Chick
Corea, Christian McBride, Brian Blade. KH;
$69.50-$99.50.
●●Jun 29 8:00: Robi Botos and Hilario Duran
Duo. JB; $30; $25(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 29 8:30: Robert Glasper Experiment.
NPS; $45(reserved); $40(lounge); $35(main
floor).
●●Jun 29 9:00: Fanfare Ciocarlia/Lemon
Bucket Orkestra. OH; $35; $30(adv).
●●Jun 29 10:00: Eagle Rock Gospel Singers.
HT; $20; $15(adv).
●●Jun 29 10:00: Robi Botos and Hilario Duran
Duo. JB; $30; $25(adv). Also 8pm.
●●Jun 30 12:30: Lula All-Stars. NPS; free.
●●Jun 30 1:00: Jorge Miguel Trio. SC; free.
●●Jun 30 4:00: Shannon Butcher and Ross
Maclntyre. HTD; free.
●●Jun 30 5:00: Herriott-Harkness (H2). MS;
free.
●●Jun 30 6:30: Gwyneth Herbert Trio. NPS;
free.
●●Jun 30 8:00: Robi Botos Quartet. Featuring
Seamus Blake. JB; $35; $30(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jun 30 8:00: Ramsey Lewis Quartet/Joey
Alexander Trio. KH; $59.50-$69.50.
●●Jun 30 8:00: Avishai Cohen Trio. JM; $35.
●●Jun 30 8:30: Molly Johnson/Jane Bunnett
and Spirits of Havana 25th Anniversary. NPS;
$35(reserved); $30(lounge); $25(main floor).
●●Jun 30 10:00: Robi Botos Quartet. Featuring Seamus Blake. JB; $35; $30(adv). Also
8pm.
thewholenote.com
●●Jul 01 12:30: Jim Galloway’s Wee Big Band.
Under the direction of Martin Loomer. NPS;
free.
●●Jul 01 1:00: Les Petits Nouveaux. SC; free.
●●Jul 01 2:00: JAZZ.FM91 Youth Big Band.
NPS; free.
●●Jul 01 3:00: Julian Fauth and Ken Yoshioka
Duo. HTD; free.
●●Jul 01 3:00: Climax Jazz Band. D; free.
●●Jul 01 5:00: Justin Bacchus Collective. R;
TBA.
●●Jul 01 5:00: George Grosman and Bohemian Swing. MS; free.
●●Jul 01 6:30: Kalabash. NPS; free.
●●Jul 01 7:00: Brownman Akoustic Trio. SC;
free.
●●Jul 01 7:30: Heather Bambrick and Friends.
Featuring Melissa Stylianou with Russ Little
Quartet. HS; $35.50.
●●Jul 01 8:00: Alfredo Rodriguez: Solo Piano.
JB; $25; $20(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jul 01 8:00: Music From Born To Be Blue
with Braid, Turcotte, Wallace and Clarke. JB;
$30; $25(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jul 01 8:30: Michael Franti. NPS;
$55(reserved); $50(lounge); $45(main floor).
●●Jul 01 10:00: Music From Born To Be Blue
with Braid, Turcotte, Wallace and Clarke. JB;
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 43
Summer Festivals
$30; $25(adv). Also 8pm.
●●Jul 01 10:00: Alfredo Rodriguez: Solo Piano.
JB; $25; $20(adv). Also 8pm.
●●Jul 02 3:00: Jesse Barksdale Quartet.
HTD; free.
●●Jul 02 5:00: Eric St-Laurent Quartet. MS;
free.
●●Jul 02 6:30: Joe Jackson. NPS;
$62.50-$73.50.
●●Jul 02 6:30: Raoul And The Big Time. NPS;
free.
●●Jul 02 7:30: Heather Bambrick and Friends.
Featuring John Alcorn with Russ Little Quartet. HSB; $35.50.
●●Jul 02 8:00: Alfredo Rodriguez: Solo Piano.
JB; $25; $20(adv). Also 10pm.
●●Jul 02 8:30: Joe Jackson. NPS:
$73.50(reserved); $68(lounge); $62.50(main
floor).
●●Jul 02 10:00: The Hot Sardines. HT; $30;
$25(adv).
●●Jul 02 10:00: Alfredo Rodriguez: Solo Piano.
JB; $25; $20(adv). Also 8pm.
Toronto Summer Music Festival
July 14 to Aug 7
Toronto, ON
KH - Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor
St. W. 416-408-0208
WG - Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge St.
1-855-622-2787
WH - Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,
University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416408-0208
●●Jul 14 7:30: Opening Night: English Music
for Strings. Britten: Serenade for Tenor,
Horn and Strings Op.31; Bridge: Suite; Elgar:
Introduction and Allegro Op.47. Nicholas
Phan, tenor; Neil Deland, horn; Parker String
Quartet; Toronto Summer Music Festival
Ensemble; Joseph Swensen, conductor. KH;
$20-$79.
●●Jul 15 7:30: Musical Union of 1865. Haydn:
String Quartet in D Op.71 No.2; Schubert:
String Quartet No.15 in G D887; Beethoven:
String Quartet in G Op.18 No.2. Parker String
Quartet. WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 16 4:00: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
44 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
TSM Academy Fellows; Parker Quartet. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Jul 16 7:30: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
TSM Academy Fellows; Parker Quartet. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Jul 19 7:30: Haydn Dialogues. A comparison
of Classical-period sonatas with works from
the 20th and 21st centuries. Haydn: Sonatas
in D, G, g, and C; works by Knussen, Cage and
Berger. Pedja Muzijevic, piano. WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 20 7:30: The St. James’s Hall Popular
Concerts. Haydn: String Quartet in g “Rider”;
Mendelssohn: Piano Trio No.1 in d Op.49;
Walton: Piano Quartet. Martin Beaver, violin; Andrew Wan, violin; Steven Dann, viola;
Johannes Moser, cello; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano. WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 21 7:30: Jeremy Denk, piano. KH;
$20-$79.
●●Jul 22 12:00_noon: Art Song reGENERATION. Singers and pianists from the Toronto
Summer Music’s 2016 Academy of Art Song
Program. WH; $10-$20.
●●Jul 22 4:00: Art Song reGENERATION. Singers and pianists from the Toronto Summer
Music’s 2016 Academy of Art Song Program.
WH; $10-$20.
●●Jul 22 7:30: The Rape of Lucretia. Emma
Char, mezzo (Lucretia); Peter Rolfe Dauz,
baritone (Junius); Beste Kalender, mezzo
(Bianca); Jasper Leever, bass (Collatinus);
Iain MacNeil, baritone; (Tarquinius); Ellen
McAteer, soprano (Lucia); Owen McAusland,
tenor (Male Chorus); Chelsea Rus, soprano
(Female Chorus); Topher Mokrzewski, music
director; Anna Theodosakis, stage director;
Joel Ivany, artistic director. WG; $35-$95.
●●Jul 23 4:00: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Andrew Wan, violin; Steven Dann, viola;
Johannes Moser, cello; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano; and TSM Academy Fellows. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Jul 23 7:30: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
Andrew Wan, violin; Steven Dann, viola;
Johannes Moser, cello; Stéphane Lemelin,
piano; and TSM Academy Fellows. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Jul 25 7:30: Jamie Barton in Recital. Jamie
Barton, mezzo. KH; $20-$79.
●●Jul 26 7:30: The Coronation of King George
II. Daniel Taylor and the Theatre of Early
Music. WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 27 7:30: Sonnets, Scenes and Songs: A
Shakespeare Serenade. Works by Tippett,
Finzi, Gounod, Barber, Verdi and Britten. Patrick Hansen, music director/stage director.
WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 28 7:30: Jonathan Crow and Co. Elgar:
Violin Sonata; Bridge: Piano Quintet in d; and
other works. Jonathan Crow, violin; Angela
Park, piano; Eric Nowlin, viola; and others.
WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 29 7:30: Beethoven Quartet Society of
1845. Beethoven: String Quartet Op.18 No.6,
String Quartet Op.59 No.3, String Quartet,
Op.132. Dover Quartet. WH; $20-$55.
●●Jul 30 4:00: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
TSM Academy Fellows; Dover Quartet. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Jul 30 7:30: Chamber Music reGENERA-
TION. Chamber music masterpieces and
rarities from Great Britain and the continent from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
TSM Academy Fellows; Dover Quartet. WH;
$10-$20.
●●Aug 02 7:30: Christopher O’Riley, piano.
KH; $20-$79.
●●Aug 03 7:30: The People’s Concert Society. Britten: Phantasy Quartet for Oboe and
Strings Op.2; and other works. David Jalbert,
piano; Sara Jeffrey, oboe; Shane Kim, violin;
Eric Nowlin, viola; Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello. WH; $20-$55.
●●Aug 04 7:30: (Almost) Last Night of the
Proms. Elgar: Pomp and Circumstance
March; Parry: Jerusalem; Arne: Rule, Britannia!; Vaughan Williams: Lark Ascending.
Jonathan Crow, violin; Allyson McHardy,
mezzo; National Academy Orchestra of Canada; Boris Brott, conductor. KH; $20-$79.
●●Aug 05 7:30: Hanover Square in 1801.
Haydn: Symphony No.102 for chamber
ensemble; Beethoven: Septet in E-flat Op.20.
Sara Jeffrey, oboe; Jonathan Crow, violin;
Eric Nowlin, viola; David Hetherington, cello;
Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello; David
Jalbert, piano. WH; $20-$55.
●●Aug 06 4:00: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and
thewholenote.com
rarities from Great Britain and the continent
from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. TSM
Academy Fellows; Sara Jeffrey, oboe; Jonathan Crow, violin; Eric Nowlin, viola; Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello; and others.
WH; $10-$20.
●●Aug 06 7:30: Chamber Music reGENERATION. Chamber music masterpieces and rarities from Great Britain and the continent
from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. TSM
Academy Fellows; Sara Jeffrey, oboe; Jonathan Crow, violin; Eric Nowlin, viola; Emmanuelle Beaulieu-Bergeron, cello; and others.
WH; $10-$20.
●●Aug 07 11:00am: Community Academy Final
Concert. Participants from Toronto Summer Music’s Community Academy programs
in Chamber Music, Piano Master class and
Chamber Choir. WH; free.
Westben Arts Festival Theatre
June 25 to July 31
Campbellford. ON
All performances are at Westben Concert
Barn, 6698 County Rd. 30, Campbellford,
unless noted otherwise.
705-653-5508 or 1-877-883-5777
www.westben.ca
●●Jun 25 2:00: The Pencil Salesman. World
premiere gala performance. Finley, based on
an idea by A. M. Herzberg. John Fanning and
Alexander Dobson, baritones; Donna Bennett
and Virginia Hatfield, sopranos; Keith Klassen, tenor; and others. $75; $73(sr); $30(st/
under 30); $5(youth). 1:00: pre-performance
chat; 4:30: post-performance reception. Also
Jun 26, Jul 1(eve), 2, 3.
●●Jul 07 7:00: Piano Mania: New Now –Young
Pianists Leonid Nediak and Luke Bell. Rachmaninoff: selected preludes; Chopin: Nocturne Op.48 No.1 in c; Etude Op.10 No.12 in
c “Revolutionary;” Liszt: Second Hungarian Rhapsody; Bach: Prelude and Fugue in C
(Well-Tempered Clavier Book 2); Beethoven
Sonata in A-flat Op.110; Medtner: Sonata in g
Op.22. $26(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/
under 19).
●●Jul 08 7:00: Piano Mania: TGIJazz Lorraine Desmarais and Friends. Works from
recent recording “Couleurs de lune”. Frédéric
Alarie, double bass; Camil Bélisle, drums.
$42; $40(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/
under 19).
●●Jul 09 2:00: Piano Mania: Buzz Salutes
Gershwin. Buzz Brass Quintet with pianist Matt Herskowitz. Gershwin: An American in Paris; Three Preludes for solo piano;
Summertime; I’ve Got Rhythm; Rhapsody in
Blue. Sylvain Lapointe and Frédéric Gagnon,
trumpets; Pascal Lafrenière, horn; Jason De
Carufel and Sylvain Arseneau, trombones.
$42; $40(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/
under 19).
●●Jul 10 2:00: Piano Mania: Great Pianists: Charles Richard-Hamelin. $45; $43(sr);
$15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under 19). 1:00:
pre-performance chat on Chopin with Barb
Hobart.
●●Jul 14 7:00: Voices of Summer: New Now
– New Voices: Ben and Kat. Explorations
into electronic, acoustic and improvised
music. Kathryn Shuman, soprano; Ben Finley,
double bass. $28; $26(sr); $15(st/under 30);
$5(youth/under 19).
thewholenote.com
$37(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under
19).
●●Jul 29 8:00: Jazz – Out of This World: Westben Jazz Fringe. Jazz musicians at local eateries. Campbellford: Apollos Pizzeria, Be My
Guest, Capers Tap Grill, Stinking Rose Pub;
Hastings: Banjos, McGillicafey’s; Warkworth:
Garden of Eatin’, Our Lucky Stars Café. Visit
website for times, artists and locations.
●●Jul 30 2:00: Jazz – Out of This World: Heather Bambrick and Friends. $42; $40(sr);
$15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under 19).
●●Jul 30 5:00: Jazz – Out of This World: Jazz
Main. Jazz musicians at various locations
throughout the Trent Hills. Visit website for
times, artists and locations.
●●Jul 15 7:00: Voices of Summer: TGIFolk!
Ashley Condon. Old-time country to folk,
blues and soul. $39; $37(sr); $15(st/under
30); $5(youth/under 19).
●●Jul 16 2:00: Voices of Summer: Pallade
Musica presents ELLES. Celebration of baroque women. Works by de la Guerre, Clérambault, Badalla, Duphly and others.
Andréanne Brisson Paquin, soprano; Pallade Musica: Tanya LaPerrière, baroque violin;
Elinor Frey, baroque cello; Esteban La Rotta,
theorbo; Mélisande McNabney, harpsichord.
$42; $40(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/
under 19).
●●Jul 17 2:00: Voices of Summer: Follow the
Lieder – A Summer Schubertiad. Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Op.120; Du bist die Ruh; Die
Forelle; Trout Quintet. Donna Bennett and
Kathryn Shuman, sopranos; Marie Bérard,
violin; Keith Hamm, viola; Elinor Frey, cello;
Ben Finley, bass; Brian Finley, piano. $45;
$43(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under
19). Viennese treats at intermission.
●●Jul 20 2:00: Broadway to Cape Breton:
Kisses on Broadway. Excerpts from West Side
Story, Kiss Me Kate, King & I and Fiddler on
the Roof. Caitlin Wood, soprano; Kim Dafoe,
mezzo; Adam Fisher, tenor; Frank Moore,
tenor; Brian Finley, piano. $42; $40(sr);
$15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under 19). Also
Jul 21, 22, 23.
●●Jul 22 7:00: Comedy: TGIFun! All-Star
Improv: Linda Kash and Friends. Evening of
improvisation. $39; $37(sr); $15(st/under 30);
$5(youth/under 19).
●●Jul 24 2:00: Comedy: Còig. Folk/roots band
from Cape Breton. Còig: Chrissy Crowley, fiddle, viola; Jason Roach, piano; Rachel Davis,
fiddle, viola, vocals; Darren McMullen, guitar,
mandolin, mandola, banjo, bouzouki, whistles,
flute, vocals. $45; $43(sr); $15(st/under 30);
$5(youth/under 19).
●●Jul 28 7:00: Jazz – Out of This World: New
Now: I Double You. Blend of acoustic and
electronic instruments. Ian Wright, drums;
Emily Rockarts, voice; Jeff LaRochelle, clarinet/bass clarinet; Tara Kannangara, trumpet/flugelhorn; PJ Andersson, trombone;
Dylan Moore, guitar/electronics; Chris Pruden, keys/synthesizers; Andrew Wright, bass.
$28; $26(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/
under 19).
●●Jul 29 7:00: Jazz – Out of This World: TGIF!
Ken Whiteley and The Beulah Band. $39;
●●Jul 30 9:00: Jazz – Out of This World: Jazz
Jam. Chelsey Bennett and the Rob Phillips Quartet; other Jazz Fringe artists. Clock
Tower Hall, 36 Front St. S., Campbellford.
Free.
●●Jul 31 11:00am: Jazz – Out of This World:
Jazz Brunch. Jazz musicians at various locations throughout the Trent Hills. Visit website
for times, artists and locations.
●●Jul 31 2:00: Jazz – Out of This World:
Cadence. A cappella jazz quartet. $45;
$43(sr); $15(st/under 30); $5(youth/under
19).
WESTBEN
Arts Festival Theatre
New this year!
Search our Summer
Music Festival
Listings by genre or
by location online at
thewholenote.com/
ask-ludwig
Charles
Richard-Hamelin,
piano
Sunday, July 10,
2pm
The Barn
westben.ca
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 45
A. Concerts in the GTA
LISTINGS
IN THIS ISSUE: Brampton, Centre Island, Etobicoke, Leaskdale,
Markham, North York, Oakville, Scarborough, Unionville, Ward’s
Island, Whitby.
The WholeNote listings are arranged in four sections:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Wednesday June 1
GTA (GREATER TORONTO AREA) covers all of Toronto
plus Halton, Peel, York and Durham regions.
●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
John Palmer, Organ. 1585 Yonge St. 416-9221167. Free.
●●6:00: St. James Cathedral. Cantatas in the
Cathedral. Bach: Die Himmel erzählen die
Ehre Gottes BWV76. Soloists from the Cathedral Choir of St. James; Ian Sadler, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. By donation.
●●7:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre/Toronto
Blues Society. Lulaworld Opening Night
Party: Yoser Rodriguez, bass. CD launch. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
Free(before 8pm); $20/$15(adv)(after 8pm).
Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
●●8:00: Mezzetta Restaurant. Wednesday
Concert Series. Flamenco Show. Dino Toledo,
guitar; Makeda Benitez, flamenco dancer.
681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687. No cover.
●●8:00: Miles Nadal JCC. Community Choir
20th Annual Spring Concert. Jazz, pop, classical, world, folk and Canadian music. Al
Green Theatre, 750 Spadina Ave. 416-9246211 x0. $10. Also Jun 2.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Ravel:
Daphnis et Chloé. Granados: Intermezzo
(from Goyescas); Nielsen: Violin Concerto;
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé. Pekka Kuusisto, violin; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir; Juanjo Mena,
conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-598-3375. $33.75-$148. Also June 2.
●●9:00: Lula Music and Arts Centre/
Toronto Blues Society. Lulaworld Opening Night Party: Laura Cole, vocals. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$20/$15(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs June
1 to 11.
●●10:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre/
Toronto Blues Society. Lulaworld Opening
Night Party: Cécile Doo-Kingué, guitar/vocals.
Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-5880307. $20/$15(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs
June 1 to 11.
BEYOND THE GTA covers many areas of Southern
Ontario outside Toronto and the GTA. Starts on page 57.
MUSIC THEATRE covers a wide range of music types:
from opera, operetta and musicals, to non-traditional
performance types where words and music are in some
fashion equal partners in the drama. Starts on page 60.
IN THE CLUBS (MOSTLY JAZZ)
is organized alphabetically by club.
Starts on page 62.
THE ETCETERAS is for galas, fundraisers, competitions,
screenings, lectures, symposia, masterclasses, workshops,
singalongs and other music-related events (except
performances) which may be of interest to our readers.
Starts on page 65.
A GENERAL WORD OF CAUTION. A phone number is provided
with every listing in The WholeNote — in fact, we won’t publish
a listing without one. Concerts are sometimes cancelled or postponed; artists or venues may change after listings are published.
Please check before you go out to a concert.
HOW TO LIST. Listings in The WholeNote in the four sections above
are a free service available, at our discretion, to eligible presenters.
If you have an event, send us your information no later than the
8th of the month prior to the issue or issues in which your listing is
eligible to appear.
LISTINGS DEADLINE. The next issue covers the period from
September 1 to October 7, 2016. All listings must be received by
Midnight Monday August 8.
LISTINGS can be sent by e-mail to [email protected] or
by fax to 416-603-4791 or by regular mail to the address on page 6.
We do not receive listings by phone, but you can call 416-323-2232
x27 for further information.
Thursday June 2
●●12:00 noon: Encore Symphonic Concert
Band. In Concert: Classics and Jazz. John
Edward Liddle, conductor. Wilmar Heights
Centre, 963 Pharmacy Ave., Scarborough.
416-346-3910. $10. Includes coffee and
snack.
●●12:15: Music at Metropolitan. Noon at Met.
Christina Stelmacovich, mezzo; Andrew Ager,
piano. Metropolitan United Church (Toronto),
56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Free.
●●7:00: Espresso Manifesto/Istituto Italiano
di Cultura. Gabriele Mirabassi and Espresso
Manifesto. Columbus Centre, 901 Lawrence
Ave. W. 416-789-7011. $70. Includes food and
wine.
●●7:00: Swedish Women’s Educational Association Toronto. Jenny Lind Concert. Nordic songs and a variety of opera pieces. Karin
Osbeck; mezzo; Matilda Lindholm, piano. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. 905-727-9837.
Donations accepted.
●●7:30: Home Smith Bar at the Old Mill
Toronto. Angela Turone. Original music and
arrangements of jazz standards. Angela Turone, vocals and piano; Connor Walsh, bass;
Robin Claxton, drums; Chris Platt, guitar.
LISTINGS ZONE MAP. Visit our website to see a detailed version
of this map: thewholenote.com.
Georgian
Bay
Lake
Huron
8
7
6
3 4
2
1 City of Toronto
Lake Ontario
5
Lake Erie
46 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Home Smith Bar at The Old Mill Toronto,
21 Old Mill Rd. 416-236-2641. No cover ($20
minimum purchase).
●●8:00: Array Music. Array Session #39. An
evening of improvisation by some of Toronto’s finest musicians along with their friends
and guests. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416532-3019. Free/PWYC.
●●8:00: Miles Nadal JCC. Community Choir
20th Annual Spring Concert. See Jun 1.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Ravel:
Daphnis et Chloé. Granados: Intermezzo
(from Goyescas); Nielsen: Violin Concerto;
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé. Pekka Kuusisto, violin; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir; Juanjo Mena,
conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-598-3375. $33.75-$148. Also June 1.
●●10:00: Lula Music and Arts Centre/Baila
Boogaloo. Lulaworld: Los Poetas and Fito
Blanko. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416588-0307. $15. Lulaworld Festival runs June
1 to 11.
Friday June 3
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals,
ragtime, pop, international and other genres.
Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-631-4300. PWYC.
Concert in chapel; lunch and snack friendly.
●●1:30: VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto. The
Sword in the Schoolyard. Burry (world premiere). Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E.
416-238-2453. $20; $15(sr/st). School group
matinee. Public performances: 7:00; Jun 4,
5(mat).
●●3:00: St. Paul’s Bloor Street. Organ Recital.
Sarah Svendson, organ. 227 Bloor St. E. 416961-8116. Free, retiring collection.
●●7:00: 3-in-the-6ix. 5tet. Shostakovich:
Piano Quintet Op.57; Schumann: Piano Quintet Op.44. Rebecca MacLeod, violin; Tanya
Charles, violin; Ivan Ivanovich, viola; Sarah
Steeves, cello; Talisa Blackman, piano. Runnymede United Church, 432 Runnymede Rd.
416-578-6993. $25/$20(adv); $15(st/arts
workers); $5(under 18).
●●7:00: VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto.
The Sword in the Schoolyard. Burry (world
The World Premiere of
dean Burry’s oPera
The sword in the
schoolyard
June 3 at 1:30 and 7 pm
June 4 at 7 pm & June 5 at 2:30 pm
daniels spectrum 585 Dundas St. E.
Tickets - www.vivayouthsingers.com
thewholenote.com
premiere). Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St.
E. 416-238-2453. $20; $15(sr/st). 1:30: School
group matinee. Public performances also
Jun 4, 5(mat).
●●7:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre.
Lulaworld: Gabriel Palatchi Trio. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-5880307. Free(before 8pm); $15(after 8pm);
Free(ladies before 10pm). Includes admission to 10:30 set. Lulaworld Festival runs
June 1 to 11.
●●8:00: Show One Productions. Mamele,
Mother’s Eyes: Tamara Gverdtsiteli. Yiddish
songs with new orchestral arrangements;
other international favourites in Georgian,
Russian, French and Italian. Moscow Male
Jewish Cappella; Alexander Tsaliuk, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416872-4255. $55-$150.
●●10:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre/Havana
Club. Lulaworld: Charangón Del Norte. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$15/$10(adv); Free(ladies before 10pm). Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
Saturday June 4
●●2:30: Bel Canto Singers. A 90th Birthday
Celebration. Music in honour of our Queen’s
birthday. Linda Meyer, conductor; Jacqueline
Mokrzewski, piano. St. Mark’s United Church,
201 Centre St. S., Whitby. 416-286-8260. $20.
Also 7:30.
●●3:00: Singing Out. Seize the Day. Broadway hits, Canadian classics and other works.
Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W. 647-3820502. $25; $20(st); $15(child). Also 7:30.
●●6:30: Ermanno Mauro Annual Master
Class Gala and Concert. Stelle Nascenti.
Popular operatic arias. Ermanno Mauro,
tenor; Canadian opera singers mentored
by Mauro; Nicole Bellamy, piano. Columbus Centre, 901 Lawrence Ave. W. 647-2679040. $125.
●●7:00: VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto. The
Sword in the Schoolyard. Burry (world premiere). Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E.
416-238-2453. $20; $15(sr/st). Jun 3: School
group matinee. Public performances also
Jun 3, 5(mat).
●●7:30: Aradia Baroque Ensemble. Concert
for a Mad King. Handel: opera arias; Davies:
Eight Songs for a Mad King. Stacie Dunlop,
soprano; Vincent Ranallo, baritone; Guest:
Ensemble Paramirabo. The Music Gallery,
thewholenote.com
197 John St. 647-960-6650. $35; $20(sr/
under 30). CANCELLED.
●●7:30: Bel Canto Singers. A 90th Birthday
Celebration. See 2:30.
●●7:30: Cantores Celestes Women’s Choir.
Hymn to Freedom. A benefit concert for a
Syrian refugee family. Music from classical
to gospel. Tony Quarrington, guitar; Malcolm Gould, percussion; Kelly Galbraith, conductor; Ellen Meyer, piano. Parkwoods United
Church, 85 Parkwoods Village Dr. 416-4475519. $25.
●●7:30: Counterpoint Community Orchestra. A Prom for Pride: Somewhere Over the
Rainbow. Brahms: Academic Festival Overture; Elgar: Pomp and Circumstance; Love
Theme from The Godfather; music from
Star Wars and Lord of the Rings. Guest
conductor: Keith Reid. St. Luke’s United
Church, 353 Sherbourne St. 647-977-6058.
$20/$18(adv); $15(st).
●●7:30: Etobicoke Centennial Choir. Cherished Opera: Favourite Arias and Choruses.
Verdi: Va, pensiero from Nabucco; Coro di
zingari (Anvil chorus) from Il Trovatore; Brindisi Libiamo ne’ lieti calici from La Traviata;
Offenbach: Belle nuit, ô nuit d’amour from
Tales of Hoffmann; Mozart: Voyagers’ Chorus
from Idomeneo. Andrea Naccarato, soprano;
Erin Ronningen, alto; Lance Keizer, tenor;
Lawrence Shirkie, baritone. Humber Valley
United Church, 76 Anglesey Blvd., Etobicoke.
416-769-9271. $25.
●●7:30: Jubilate Singers. Birds. Nina Soyfer:
Birds and Waterflows (world premiere); and
works by Mendelssohn, Vaughan Williams,
Irving Berlin and Chatman. St. Simon-theApostle Anglican Church, 525 Bloor St. E. 416223-7690. $25; $20(sr/st); free(under 13).
●●7:30: Opera by Request/Annex Singers.
Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas and Mascagni’s
Cavalleria Rusticana. Catharin Carew, mezzo
(Dido); Jami-Lynn Gubbe, soprano (Belinda);
Austin Larusson, baritone (Aeneas); Jennifer Routhier, mezzo (Sorceress); Nicole
Hulme, soprano and Amanda Ironside, mezzo
(witches); and others; William Shookhoff, conductor/piano; Maria Case, conductor (Annex
Singers). St. Andrew’s United Church (Bloor
St.), 117 Bloor St E. 416-455-2365. $20.
●●7:30: Singing Out. Seize the Day. See 3:00.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. An
American in Paris. Copland: Fanfare for
the Common Man; Four Dance Episodes
(from Rodeo); John Adams: Short Ride in a
Fast Machine; Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue;
An American in Paris. Orion Weiss, piano;
Andrew Grams, conductor. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $33.75$107. Also June 5(3:00).
●●8:00: Acoustic Harvest. The Bombadils.
St. Nicholas Anglican Church, 1512 Kingston
Rd. 416-264-2235. $25/$22(adv). Wheelchair
accessible; free parking.
●●8:00: Gallery 345. Know the Now.
Christopher Simmons, piano/composer.
345 Sorauren Ave. 416-822-9781. $20; $10(st).
●●8:00: Heliconian Hall. Stephen Satory:
In Recital. Works by Debussy, Chopin and
Beethoven. 35 Hazelton Ave. 416-922-3618.
$25; $15(sr/st).
●●8:00: Nagata Shachu with Jiro Murayama.
In Concert. Featuring new works and traditional festival pieces. Jiro Murayama, shinobue (bamboo flute); Kiyoshi Nagata, music
director. Brigantine Room, Harbourfront
Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000.
$27-$37; $20(sr/st).
●●8:00: North York Concert Orchestra.
Scary Night. Herrmann: Psycho Suite; Mussorgsky: Night on Bald Mountain; Gounod:
Funeral March of a Marionette; Saint-Saëns:
Danse macabre; Berlioz: March to the Scaffold from Symphonie fantastique; and works
by Dukas and Mozart. Rafael Luz, conductor.
Yorkminster Citadel, 1 Lord Seaton Rd., North
York. 416-628-9195. $25; $20(sr); $10(st).
●●8:00: Oriana Women’s Choir. East
Meet West. Mitchell Pady, artistic director; Guests: Autorickshaw (Suba Sankaran,
vocals; Ed Hanley, tabla; Dylan Bell, multiple instruments). Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-978-8849. $25; $20(sr/
under 35); $10(st).
●●8:00: Spectrum Music. Tower of Babel.
New music by the Spectrum composers evoking interpretations on the story of the Tower
of Babel. Amos Hoffman, oud/guitar; Noam
Lemish, piano; Peter Lutek, clarinet; Justin
Gray, bass; Derek Gray, drums. Alliance Française de Toronto, 24 Spadina Rd. $15; $10 sr/
st/arts worker. A pre-concert chat.
●●10:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld: José Conda y Ola Fresca. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$15/$12(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs June
1 to 11.
Sunday June 5
●●2:00: Scarborough Sunday Concert Ser-
ies. Mary Lou Malicdem and the Juan Tomas
Band. A tribute to light jazz, classic rock and
solo flamenco guitar. Wave; Oh Lady Be Good;
Hotel California; Farruca; Cabaret. Marylou Malicdem, vocals; Juan Tomas, guitar;
Abbey Leon Scholzberg, bass; Steve Farrugia, drums; Lorne Hendel and Alex Mertens,
rhythm guitar. Scarborough Civic Centre,
150 Borough Dr., Scarborough. 416-396-7766
or 647-609-8291. Free.
●●2:30: VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto. The
Sword in the Schoolyard. Burry (world premiere). Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E.
416-238-2453. $20; $15(sr/st). Jun 3: School
group matinee. Public performances also
Jun 3, 4.
●●3:00: Penthelia Singers. In the Kitchen
with Penthelia Singers. Traditional sea shanties, Acadian reels and modern Canadian
classics. Alice Malach, conductor. Rosedale Presbyterian Church, 129 Mt. Pleasant
Rd. 647-248-5079. $20; pay your age(12 and
under). Pre-concert for Kids: Meet the Fiddler (2:30).
●●3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. An
American in Paris. Copland: Fanfare for
the Common Man; Four Dance Episodes
(from Rodeo); John Adams: Short Ride in a
Fast Machine; Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue;
An American in Paris. Orion Weiss, piano;
Andrew Grams, conductor. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29.50$83.75. Also June 4(7:30).
●●3:00: Tudor Consort. Song of Solomon.
Works by Byrd, Lassus, Guerrero, Ceballos
and Monteverdi. Tudor Consort and soloists.
Leaskdale Historic Church, 11850 Regional
Rd. 1, Leaskdale. 705-357-2459. Admission by
donation. In support of the Lucy Maud Montgomery Society of Ontario.
●●3:30: Young Voices Toronto. Colour Me
Spring. ZARI Georgian Folk Ensemble;
Andy Morris, percussion, Tracy Wong and
Brenda O’Connor, conductors; Sheldon Rose,
accompaniment. Trinity-St. Paul’s United
Church, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-762-0657. $25;
$15(sr/st).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Choral Recital. Phoenix Boys Choir. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Church of St. Mary Magdalene
(Toronto). Organ Transcriptions. Andrew
Adair, organ. 477 Manning Ave. 416-5317955. Free.
Flute Street
Toronto’s Professional Flute Choir
presents
A FAMILY
VISIT
All the members
of the Modern
Flute Family
in Concert!
Sunday,
June 5, 4pm
●●4:00: Flute Street. In Concert. Bach: Toc-
cata and Fugue in d; Matthew King: Sinfonia for Nine Piccolos; duet for contrabass
and sub contrabass flutes; and other works.
Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. 416462-9498. $30; $25(sr/arts workers); $15(st).
●●7:00: Amadeus Choir. Serenade to Music.
Vaughan Williams: Serenade to Music; Schubert: To Music; Britten: Hymn to St. Cecilia;
Howells: Hymn for St. Cecilia; three English
madrigals (Morley: All ye who music love;
Gibbons: The Silver Swan; Bennett: All creatures now). Lydia Adams, conductor; Shawn
Grenke, organist. Eglinton St. George’s United
Church, 35 Lytton Blvd. 416-446-0188. $40;
$30(sr); $25(under 30); $20(st).
●●7:00: Canadian Croatian Choral Society. Preko Polja i Planina / From Fields and
Highlands. Sacred, folk and contemporary
repertoire in English, French, Croatian, Italian, German and Japanese. Edward J. Mavrinac, artistic director. Holy Trinity Croatian
Catholic Church, 2110 Trafalgar Rd., Oakville. 905-337-8646. $25; $15(under 14). Also
May 29(Etobicoke).
●●7:00: Timothy Eaton Memorial Church.
Last Night at the Proms. Rule Brittania; Zadok
the Priest; O Canada; audience sing-along
and other works. Timothy Eaton Memorial Church Choir; Northdale Concert Band;
Christ Church Deer Park Choir; Grace Church
on-the-Hill Choir; Stephen Boda, organ;
Giles Bryant, master of ceremonies. 230 St.
Clair Ave. W. 416-925-5977. $20; $15(sr/st);
free(under 6); $40(family).
●●8:00: Gallery 345. foretelling (for telling):
new sounds and visions. New art song and
chamber music. Tyler Versluis: Five Poems
(by Lindsay Mason) with artwork by Timothy
Goertzen; Tze Yeung Ho: shulammite (a); Klaverkvintett. Maeve Palmer, soprano; Wesley Shen, piano; Angela Schwarzkopf, harp;
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 47
A. Concerts in the GTA
Carolina Herrera, violin; Katherine Peter, violin; Clara NguyenTran, viola; Amina Holloway,
cello. 345 Sorauren Ave. 416-822-9781. $15;
$10(sr/st/arts worker).
●●8:00: Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld: Elsten Torres with Amanda Martinez.
Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-5880307. $30/$25(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs
June 1 to 11.
●●8:00: Resa’s Pieces String Ensemble. Sixth
Gala Concert. Lennon and McCartney: Eleanor Rigby; Kyriakou: Dancing with the Tzars;
Mozart: Overture to the Magic Flute; and
other works. Ian Medley, conductor. Guest:
Resa’s Pieces Symphony Orchestra. Crescent
School, 2365 Bayview Ave. 416-765-1818. $20.
Jabberwocky; The Serpent; and other works
by Gershwin, Gounod, Porter and Purcell.
Melanie Conly, soprano; Kathryn Tremills,
piano. Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St.
W. 416-712-5863. $20; $15(st).
Monday June 6
oncert
C
E
E
FR
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Sym-
phony in the Gardens: Che Belle Voci. Highlights from Rigoletto, La traviata, La bohème
and other works. Sara Papini, soprano;
Eugenia Dermentzis, mezzo; Romulo Delgado, tenor; Riccardo Iannello, tenor; Bradley Christensen, baritone. Casa Loma, 1 Austin
Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(413); free(under 4).
●●8:00: Columbus Performing Arts Council.
La Grande Guerra. Michele Mangani: Fruilan
arrangements (Canadian premiere); Va, pensiero; and other works. Columbus Concert
Band; Columbus Belle Voci; Livio Leonardelli
and Paolo Busato, conductors; Annamaria
Mazzaferro, assistant conductor. Villa
Colombo, Sala Caboto, 40 Playfair Ave. 647267-9040. $20.
●●8:00: Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld: Kafinal and Elaine Lil’ Bit Shepherd.
Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-5880307. $10/$8(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs
June 1 to 11.
●●8:00: Resa’s Pieces Concert Band. 17th
Gala Concert. Holst: Jupiter (from The Planets); Higgins: Broadway Spectacular!; Bernstein: West Side Story; Kennedy: Chandler
Point Suite. Resa’s Pieces Singers; Resa’s
Pieces String Ensemble; Resa Kochberg,
conductor. George Weston Recital Hall,
5040 Yonge St. 416-765-1818. $25. Audience
participation.
Baroque
Summer
Festival
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Echoes of Bach. Bach: The Art of
the Fugue (excerpts); Smallman: Baroquial
Suite; Hindemith: Ludus Tonalis (excerpts).
Reverb Brass. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521.
PWYC.
●●7:30: Moonaura. Joy for June! Mozart:
Exsultate Jubilate; Case: Into Flight; Hoiby:
June 6 at 8pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
●●8:00: Tafelmusik. Delightfully Baroque. Ann
Monoyios, soprano; Peter Harvey, baritone;
Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir; Jeanne Lamon, director; Ivars
Taurins, director. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,
Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-9646337. Free. First-come, first-served. Part of
the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival running June 6 to 18.
Wednesday June 8
●●12:15: Music at Main and Danforth. Music
Meditation. Music for violin and organ. Carmen Lasceski, violin; Brian Stevens, organ.
Hope United Church, 2550 Danforth Ave. 416691-9682. Free.
●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway. Kingsway Organ Concert Series.
Simon Walker, organ. All Saints Kingsway
Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-7695224. Freewill offering.
●●12:30: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church. Concerts at Midday: Sarah Forestieri, soprano; Braden Young, piano. St.
Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890. Free.
●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
Eric Robertson, organ. 1585 Yonge St.
Tuesday June 7
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Ellen Meyer Duo (piano
& oboe). Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,
1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298. Free. Donations
welcome.
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Imre Oláh, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
Concerts
at Midday
48 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Bowkun
Works by Bach, Chopin,
Schumann & Mozart
June 8, 2016 - 7:30pm
Yorkminster Park.com
●●7:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.
Heléna Bowkun, Piano. Bach: Partita No.1;
Mozart: Sonata in C K330; Schumann:
Kinderszenen; Chopin: Andante Spianato and
Grande Polonaise Brillante Op.22. 1585 Yonge
St. 416-922-1167. $20. Benefit recital for the
Yorkminster Park Benevolent Fund.
●●8:00: Gallery 345. Schubert Now: The
Journey Outward. Works by Michael Donovan. Michael Donovan, baritone; Monique De
Margerie, piano; Paul Pulford, cello; Nicholas Donovan, drums; Lukas Pearse, projection
design; Ian Graham, sound. 345 Sorauren
Ave. 416-822-9781. $20; $10(st). Also June 9.
●●8:00: Opera 5. Die Fledermaus. Strauss
(script updated by Umezawa). Second act with
audience participation. Michael Barrett, tenor
(Eisenstein); Julie Ludwig, soprano (Adele);
Erin Lawson, mezzo (Orlofsky); Rachel Krehm,
TICKETS: $40,
$30/under 30, $25/sr, $20/st
416-446-0188
amadeuschoir.com
A pay-what-you-can
lunchtime concert series at
Church of the Holy Trinity
103 Bellevue Avenue
on College St. between
Bathurst & Spadina
437-344-3890
416-921-6350
saintstephens.ca
416.598.4521 ext. 223
www.musicmondays.ca
Wednesdays at 12:35
June 8th - August 31th
16th century English madrigals, Schubert, Vaughan Williams,
Howells, Britten, Freedman, and charming English folk song
arrangements by Willcocks — featuring Shawn Grenke, organist.
35 LYTTON BLVD., TORONTO
Heléna
JUNE 6 Reverb Brass, Echoes of Bach
JUNE 13 Russell Drago Trio
Old-School Love
JUNE 20 Ronée Boyce,
piano Duo Primo
JUNE 27 Dévah Quartet
Dévah Unplugged
All concerts start at 12:15pm
~ admission free ~
EGLINTON ST. GEORGES UNITED CHURCH,
p i a n o R e c i ta l
CHURCH OF
ST. STEPHEN
IN-THE-FIELDS
— MUSIC FOR A SUMMER EVENING —
SUNDAY, JUNE 5 TH AT 7:00PM
416-922-1167. Free.
●●7:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre/Latinos
Magazine. Lulaworld: Wagner Petrilli, Eliana
Cuevas and Aquiles Baez. Introduction by
Roberto Occhipinti. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas
St. W. 416-588-0307. $20/$15(adv). Lulaworld
Festival runs June 1 to 11.
thewholenote.com
abroad; Luke Housner, music director and
piano. St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican Church,
525 Bloor St. E. 416-923-8714. Freewill donation. English surtitles. Also June 11, 12.
●●7:30: Gallery 345. Not Another Soprano
Recital. Works by Purcell, Bellini, Fauré, Brahms,
Schoenberg and Bernstein. Melanie Taverna,
soprano; Sydney Clarke, soprano. 345 Sorauren
Ave. 416-822-9781. $15; PWYC(st).
●●7:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld: Toto Berriel with Mario Allende Group
and Dailyn Martinez. Toto Berriel, percussion/
vocals; Pablo Cardenas, piano; Mario Allende,
drums; Roberto Riverón, bass; Reimundo
Sosa, batá; Dailyn Martínez, dancer. Lula
Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$15/$12(adv). Includes admission to 10:30
set. Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
●●7:30: Opera by Request. Catalani’s La
Wally. In concert with piano accompaniment. Sarah Hood (Wally); Paul Williamson
(Giuseppe Hagenbach); Michael Robert-Broder (Vincenzo Gellner); Brigitte Bogar (Walter); and others; William Shookhoff, piano and
music director. College Street United Church,
452 College St. 416-455-2365. $20.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. James
Ehnes Plays Elgar. Webern: Five Pieces for
Orchestra (June 9 and 10 only); Elgar: Violin
Concerto; Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. James
Ehnes, violin; Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.
$33.75-$148. Also June 9(2:00) and 11(7:30).
●●8:00: Opera 5. Die Fledermaus. See Jun 8.
Also Jun 11.
●●10:30: Lula Music and Arts Centre/Okokan Productions. Lulaworld: Roberto
Linares Brown With Special Guest Roicel
Riveron. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W.
soprano (Rosalinde); Pearle Harbour (Ivan
and emcee); Patrick Hansen, conductor; and
others. 918 Bathurst Centre, 918 Bathurst St.
647-248-4048. $40; $25(st); $50(VIP). VIP incl.
invitation to cast party with complimentary
beverages. Runs June 8-11.
●●9:00: Alliance Française Toronto. Maxence
Cyrin, piano. Crossover music from pop to
classical. Alliance Française de Toronto,
24 Spadina Rd. 416-922-2014 x37. $22.50;
$15(members).
Thursday June 9
●●12:15: Music at Metropolitan. Noon at Met.
Daniil Protsyuk, organ. Metropolitan United
Church (Toronto), 56 Queen St. E. 416-3630331 x26. Free.
●●2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. James
Ehnes Plays Elgar. Webern: Five Pieces for
Orchestra (June 9 and 10 only); Elgar: Violin
Concerto; Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. James
Ehnes, violin; Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.
$29.50-$83.75. Also June 10(7:30) and 11(7:30).
●●6:00: Harbourfront Centre. World Stage:
Every Song I’ve Ever Written: Solo Performance. Jacob Wren performs entire catalogue
of his 58 songs in chronological order. Power
Plant, 231 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4949. Free.
Audience free to come and go. Jun 11: band
night.
●●7:00: Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld: D’bi and The 333. Lula Lounge,
1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307.
$15/$12(adv). Includes admission to 10pm set.
Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
●●7:30: St. John’s Catholic Church. Choral
Concert: From Bach to Spirituals, Opera
and Broadway. Choir of St. John’s Catholic
Church. 794 Kingston Rd. 416-699-2518. Freewill donation. Post-concert complimentary
light refreshments.
●●8:00: Off Centre Music Salon Dérangé/
Music Gallery. In Harmony. Music Gallery,
197 John St. 416-204-1080. $25/$20(adv);
$12(members); $15(st, arts).
●●8:00: Opera 5. Die Fledermaus. See Jun 8.
Also Jun 10, 11.
●●8:00: Gallery 345. Schubert Now: The
Journey Outward. Works by Michael Donovan. Michael Donovan, baritone; Monique De
Margerie, piano; Paul Pulford, cello; Nicholas
Donovan, drums; Lukas Pearse, projection
design; Ian Graham, sound. 345 Sorauren
Ave. 416-822-9781. $20; $10(st). Also June 8.
●●10:00: Rap N’ Roll/Dalton Higgins/SUPAFRIK/Lula Music and Arts Centre. Lulaworld:
Abakos. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St. W. 416588-0307. $15(adv); $15-plus(door). Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
Friday June 10
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. TrinitySt. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●7:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company. The Hobbit. Burry. Giles Tomkins, baritone (Gandalf and Smaug); CCOC choruses; and
others; Allison Grant, stage director; Julia Tribe,
costumes/sets; Teri Dunn, conductor. Harbourfront Centre Theatre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416366-0467. $35; $20(sr); $15(st); $10(school
group per student). Jun 10, 11, 12. Start times
vary. Recommended for Grade 1 and up.
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Don Giovanni. Mozart. Concert performance
after 12-day workshop for young singers. Local
artists with young professional singers from
416-588-0307. $15/$12(adv). Lulaworld Festival runs June 1 to 11.
Saturday June 11
Baroque
Summer
Festival
oncert
C
E
E
FR
June 11 at 12:30pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
●●12:30: Tafelmusik. Musical Interlude. A cas-
ual noon-hour concert of baroque chamber music by members of the Tafelmusik
Baroque Summer Institute Faculty. Walter
Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University of
Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337. Free.
First-come, first-served. Part of the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival running June
6 to 18.
Hobbit
The
by
Dean Burry
based
on the
book by
J.R.R.
Tolkien
THE HOBBIT TM SZC LIC. TO CCOC.
June 10 - 12, 2016
Harbourfront Centre Theatre
Box Office: 416-973-4000
canadianchildrensopera.com
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 49
A. Concerts in the GTA
●●2:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Com-
pany. The Hobbit. See Jun 10. Also 7:00 and
Jun 12(2:00). Recommended for Grade 1
and up.
●●6:15: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. TSO
Chamber Soloists. Stravinsky: Suite from
L’Histoire du soldat. Yao Guang Zhai, clarinet;
Michael Sweeney, bassoon; Gordon Wolfe,
trombone; David Kent, percussion; Jonathan
Crow, violin; Jeffrey Beecher, double bass;
Andrew McCandless, cornet. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. Included
with admission to TSO concert.
●●7:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.
The Hobbit. See Jun 10. Also Jun 12(2:00).
Recommended for Grade 1 and up.
●●7:00: St. Elizabeth Scola Cantorum Hungarian Choir. Spring Concert. Works by Mozart, Rossini, Bardos, Kodály and others. Imre
Olah, conductor. St. Elizabeth of Hungary
Roman Catholic Church, 432 Sheppard Ave.
E. 416-300-9305. $20; $10(st). Post-concert
reception.
●●7:00: Toronto Mandolin Orchestra. In
Concert. Favourite songs and arias from
opera, operetta and popular musicals. Lorna
D’Silva, soprano; Ira Erokhina, domra; Alexander Veprinskiy, artistic director. Trinity-St.
Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-533-2725.
$35; $20(st). In support of Free the Children
Adopt-A-Village program.
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Don Giovanni. See Jun 10
●●7:30: Brampton Chamber Music. Concert
Series. Jennifer Tran, saxophone; Gina Lee
and Harvard Tran, piano; young/community
artists selected by audition. St. Paul’s United
235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4949. $20;
$15(st/under 30). Jun 9: solo show.
●●8:00: Henderson Kolk Duo. In Concert.
Mozart: Symphony No.40, Marcello/Bach:
Oboe Concerto; other works by Schubert
and de Falla. Drew Henderson and Michael
Kolk, guitars. Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-294-6787. $20; $15(st).
●●8:00: Music Gallery. MG Remixed: Allatonceness. A recall and remix of the Music
Gallery’s past and present. Tenderness,
Trichy Sankaran, SlowPitchSound, artists;
Allison Peacock, dancer; Undervolt & co.
and Diana Lynn VanderMeulen, video; Rea
McNamara, curator. 197 John St. 416-2041080. $20/$15(adv); $10(members).
●●8:00: Opera 5. Die Fledermaus. See Jun 8.
●●8:00: Voices Chamber Choir. 20/20: A
Retrospective. Works by Palestrina, Byrd,
Bach, Willan, Raminsh and others. Ron Ka
Ming Cheung, conductor; John Stephenson,
accompaniment. Church of St. Martin-in-theFields, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-0528. $20;
$15(sr/st). Cash only at the door.
Church (Brampton), 30 Main St. S., Brampton. 905-450-9220. PWYC.
●●7:30: Cantemus Singers. Fair is the Rose.
Madrigals and lute songs by Gibbons, Pilkington, Wilbye and Dowland. Benjamin Stein,
lute. Church of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity
Sq. 416-578-6602. $20; free(under 12). Also
Jun 12(mat).
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Band. Stomp on
Front! Sweeney: Quad City Stomp; Gillespie: A
Night in Tunisia; Queen: Bohemian Rhapsody;
Orff: Carmina Burana (excerpts); Dello Joio:
Scenes from The Louvre; and other works.
Les Dobbin, conductor; Ken Hazlett, conductor. Guests: Troy Sexton and Sheldon De
Souza. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W.
647-479-2941. $15.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
James Ehnes Plays Elgar. Elgar: Violin Concerto; Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring. James
Ehnes, violin; Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.
$33.75-$107. 6:15pm: Free pre-concert performance by The TSO Chamber Soloists. Postconcert party in the lobby. Also June 9(2:00)
and 10(7:30).
●●8:00: Gallery 345. CCMC at Gallery 345.
Featuring original and newer members of
CCMC. 345 Sorauren Ave. 416-822-9781. $20.
Cash only at the door.
●●8:00: Harbourfront Centre. World Stage:
Every Song I’ve Ever Written: Band Night.
Five Toronto bands perform Jacob Wren’s
music, along with discussion about songs and
the internet. Above Top Secret; Maylee Todd;
Phèdre; Regina (from Light Fires); Snowblink. Brigantine Room, Harbourfront Centre,
Sunday June 12
●●10:30am: Humbercrest United Church.
Choral Concert. Schubert: Mass in G for
strings, trumpet and organ. Jennifer Krabbe,
soprano; Dennis Zimmer, bass; Melvin Hurst,
director of music. 16 Baby Point Rd. 416-7676122. Free.
●●2:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.
The Hobbit. See Jun 10. Recommended for
Grade 1 and up.
●●2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. TSO
Chamber Soloists. Stravinsky: L’Histoire du
soldat (complete). Derek Boyes, narrator; Yao
Guang Zhai, clarinet; Michael Sweeney, bassoon; Gordon Wolfe, trombone; David Kent,
percussion; Jonathan Crow, violin; Jeffrey
Beecher, double bass; Andrew McCandless,
cornet. Art Gallery of Ontario, Walker Court,
317 Dundas St. W. 416-598-3375. Included
with admission to AGO. Also June 18 (7:30) at
Hearn Generating Station.
●●3:00: Blythwood Winds. Hogtown
Roundup: Toronto Graffiti. Music inspired
by graffiti street art. Freedman: Tikki Tikki
Tembo; other works by J. Doell, B. Simms, E.
Denburg and A. Eddington. Tim Crouch, flute;
Elizabeth Eccleston, oboe; Anthony Thompson, clarinet; Michael Macaulay, bassoon;
Curtis Vander Hyden, horn. Heliconian Hall,
35 Hazelton Ave. 647-567-7906. $20/$15(adv);
$10(sr/st).
●●3:00: Cantemus Singers. Fair is the Rose.
See Jun 11(eve).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: St. Olave’s Anglican Church. Royal
Best. Choral Evensong followed by celebration of the 90th birthday of Her Majesty
Queen Elizabeth II featuring drama, poetry,
music and songs, from the first Elizabethan
Age to the present. St. Olave’s Arts Guild
and Consort. 360 Windermere Ave. 416769-5686. Free; contributions appreciated.
Strawberry tea following choral evensong.
●●4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church. Jazz
Vespers. Hilario Durán Trio (Hilario Durán;
Roberto Occhipinti, bass; Mark Kelso, drums);
Guest: Jane Bunnett. All Saints Kingsway
Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-233-1125. Freewill offering. NB: Temporary venue change.
●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz Vespers. Chameleon Jazz Band. 1570 Yonge St.
416-920-5211. Free. Donations welcome.
●●6:00: Aga Khan Museum/Kabir Cultural
Centre. World Music Series: Dusk to Dawn
featuring Pandit Birju Maharaj. Kathak dance.
Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford Dr. 416-6464677. From $55.
●●7:00: Toronto Summer Opera Workshop.
Don Giovanni. See Jun 10. Also Jun 11.
●●8:30: Hugh’s Room. Johnny A. 2261 Dundas
St. W. 416-531-6604. $30/$25(adv).
Monday June 13
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Old-School Love. When I Fall in Love;
I Could Write a Book; It Ain’t Necessarily So;
Old Cape Cod; A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley
Square; and other works. Russell Drago Trio.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
SKYLIGHT SERIES
CORKIN GALLERY
Sun. 12th June at 4 p.m.
Evensong
for the Queen’s
Official 90th Birthday
with memorable music from
Royal Weddings and Jubilees
plus Strawberry Tea and at 5:
ROYAL
BEST
St. Olave’s Arts Guild
and guests mark the occasion
with a glorious celebration
featuring drama, poetry, music
and songs from the first
Elizabethan Age to the present.
SPECTRUM
Monday, June 13th
7:30 PM
Tickets at the door, or
brownpapertickets.com
●●7:30: LARK Ensemble. Spectrum. Works
by Mozart, Kodály, Van Gilse, Piazzolla, and
Occhipinti. LARK Ensemble. Guest: Roberto
Occhipinti, bass. Corkin Gallery, 7 Tank House
Ln. 647-869-2559. $35; $20(st).
St. Olave’s Church
Bloor and Windermere
416-769-5686
stolaves.ca
50 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
Tuesday June 14
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Jialiang Zhu, piano.
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge
St. 416-241-1298. Free. Donations welcome.
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Eric Osborne, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Ol’ Blue Eyes. My Way,
New York New York, It Was a Very Good Year,
The Way You Look Tonight, Summer Wind,
and other works by Sinatra. Dan Lauzon, Sinatra tribute artist. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13);
free(under 4).
●●8:00: Lula Lounge. June Garber: CD
release - This I Know. 1585 Dundas St. W. 416588-0307. $20/$15(adv).
Thursday June 16
Friday June 17
●●7:00: Music in Familiar Spaces. Bach and
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
Beer. Three Bach Cello Suites. Steuart Pincombe, cello. Rainhard Brewing Company,
100 Symes Rd. 781-366-1328. Name your own
ticket price (plus cost of beer).
●●7:30: Charlotte Knight and Jon Corkal. It
Shoulda Been Me: A Cabaret. Works by Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sondheim, Billy Joel,
J. Iconis and others. Charlotte Knight, soprano; Jon Corkal, music director and piano.
Gallery 345, 345 Sorauren Ave. 647-637-9252.
$25; $20(sr/st). Cash only at the door. Also
Jun 10(St. Catharines), 18(Guelph).
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. TrinitySt. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St. W. 416631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack friendly.
●●7:00: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. End of Term Student Concert.
St. George the Martyr Church, 197 John St.
416-598-3444 x243 or x244. Free. Donations
gladly accepted. Also Jun 18(12:00 and 2:00).
●●7:30: Opera by Request. The Rake’s Progress. Stravinsky. Will Ford, tenor (Tom Rakewell); Sharon Tikiryan, soprano (Anne Trulove);
Michael York, baritone (Nick Shadow); Shilpa
Sharma, mezzo (Baba the Turk); Oliver Dawson, tenor (Sellem); and others; William Shookhoff, conductor/piano. College Street United
Church, 452 College St. 416-455-2365. $20.
●●8:00: Gallery 345. Liebesbotschaft: Love’s
Message. Lieder by Schubert. Rachel Fenlon, vocals/piano. 345 Sorauren Ave. 416-8229781. $20. Cash only at the door.
●●8:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Live on the Patio: The Massey Hall Band Plays R.E.M. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
●●8:00: Thin Edge New Music Collective.
Are You Ready Brother? Works by Nikolai Sergeevich Korndorf and Gregory Lee
Newsome. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
647-456-7597. $20/$13(adv); $15(sr/st/arts
workers)/$13(sr/st/arts workers - adv).
●●8:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Soirée:
Gutters and Skies; Eros to Death. A multicourse evening of Rachmaninoff and verse – poems
original and represented. Selections by Rachmaninoff. Marc B. Young, voice; Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel),
427 Bloor St. W. 416-631-4300. PWYC.
●●10:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Late
Night: Beethoven Symphony 3. Beethoven:
Symphony No.3 “Eroica”; Michael Mills (arr.
and additional music by David Mallamud):
Concerto for Violin, Rock Band, and String
Orchestra (world premiere/TSO co-commission). Robert McDuffie, violin; Mike Mills, electric bass/piano; Rock Band; Peter Oundjian,
conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-598-3375. $25.50-$46.
Wednesday June 15
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Richard Herriott, piano. Works by Bach. St. Stephen-inthe-Fields Anglican Church, 103 Bellevue Ave.
437-344-3890 or 416-921-6350. Free.
Baroque
Summer
Festival
oncert
C
E
E
R
F
June 15 at 1pm
See listing for details
tafelmusik.org
Jeanne Lamon, Director
Ivars Taurins, Director Vocal/Chamber Programme
C o n t a c t
2016 Summer Tour
06/12: New York, NY
Le Poisson Rouge
06/16: Toronto, ON
Music Gallery
06/25: Vancouver, BC
Celebration Hall
06/26: Victoria, BC
Open Space
06/27: Vancouver, BC
Queer Arts Festival
contactcontemporarymusic.org
●●8:00: Contact/Music Gallery. A Gossamer
Bit: Contact plays the music of Allison Cameron and more. 197 John St. 416-204-1080.
$10; Free(under 18).
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Beethoven Eroica Symphony. Jordan Pal:
City in Colour (world premiere/TSO commission); Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.3 “Eroica”. Yefim Bronfman, piano;
Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $33.75-$148.
Also June 15.
●●1:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Sum-
mer Institute Orchestra and Choirs. Jeanne
Lamon, Ivars Taurins, and Peter Harvey, directors. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,
University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416964-6337. Free. First-come, first-served. Part
of the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
running June 6 to 18.
●●8:00: New Music Concerts. Coffee House
Cabaret. Works by David Olds, Sy Potma, Willie P. Bennett, James Taylor, Fred Neil, Tim
Buckley and others. David Olds and others.
Gallery 345, 345 Sorauren Ave. 416-9619594. $50. Includes complimentary coffee,
pastries, wine and cheese with proceeds to
benefit New Music Concerts.
●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Beethoven Eroica Symphony. Jordan Pal:
City in Colour (world premiere/TSO commission); Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.3 “Eroica”. Yefim Bronfman, piano;
Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $33.75-$148.
Also June 16.
thewholenote.com
Saturday June 18
Coffee House 345
organ; Johan van’t Hof, organ. 525 Bloor St. E.
416-923-8714. $25; $20(sr/st/unwaged).
●●7:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. TSO
Chamber Soloists. Stravinsky: L’Histoire du
soldat (complete). Derek Boyes, narrator; Yao
Guang Zhai, clarinet; Michael Sweeney, bassoon; Gordon Wolfe, trombone; David Kent,
percussion; Jonathan Crow, violin; Jeffrey
Beecher, double bass; Andrew McCandless,
cornet. Hearn Generating Station, 440 Unwin
Ave. 416-598-3375. $39. Also June 12 (2:00) at
AGO Walker Court.
●●7:30: Tafelmusik. The Grand Finale. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute Orchestra
and Choir; Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra
and Chamber Choir; Jeanne Lamon and Ivars
Taurins, directors. Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-964-6337. Free. Tickets
must be obtained in advance at the Tafelmusik Box Office, 427 Bloor St. W. beginning
June 14. Maximum 2 tickets per person. Part
of the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
running June 6 to 18.
●●9:00: Music Gallery/Invocation. Departure
Series: The Out Louds, Mette Rasmussen/
Tashi Dorji/Tyler Damon and Michael Keith/
Saab Narayan. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
416-204-1080. $15/$12(adv); $10(members).
Sunday June 19
●●3:00: Orchestra Toronto. Music of the
Czechs. Jánaček: Suite for String Orchestra; Dvořák: Serenade for Wind Instruments;
Symphony No.6 in D Op.60; Walter: Concerto for Orchestra. George Weston Recital
Hall, 5040 Yonge St. 1-855-985-2787. $43;
$37(sr); $15(child/OTopus 14-29). 2:15: preconcert chat.
●●3:00: Toronto Operetta Theatre. Paris
on Broadway. Works by Offenbach, Lehár,
Gershwin, Porter, Herbert and others. Elizabeth Beeler, Curtis Sullivan, Jennifer Taverner, Vania Chan, Michael Nyby, Dion
Mazerolle, Guillermo Silva-Marin; Michael
Rose, music director/piano. Jane Mallett
Theatre, St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts,
27 Front St. E. 416-366-7723. $25, $45.
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:20: Tafelmusik/Luminato. In Concert. Works by Telemann, Handel, Torelli,
Marais and Bach. Hearn Generating Station,
440 Unwin Ave. 416-368-4849. $25.
●●12:00 noon: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. End of Term Student Concert. St.
George the Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416598-3444 x243 or x244. Free. Donations gladly
accepted. Also Jun 17(7:00) and 18(2:00).
●●2:00: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. End of Term Student Concert. St.
George the Martyr Church, 197 John St. 416598-3444 x243 or x244. Free. Donations gladly
accepted. Also Jun 17(7:00) and 18(12:00).
●●3:00: Neapolitan Connection. Musical
Matinées at Montgomery’s Inn: Children’s
Concert Classics. Acclarion Duo. Montgomery’s Inn, 4709 Dundas St. W. 647-262-4316.
$30; $12.50(child). Tea, historical tour (2:00),
cookies included.
●●4:00: St. Simon-the-Apostle Anglican
Church. A Concert of Sacred Choral Music.
Fundraiser for England tour this July. Works
by Howells, Murrill, Bryant, Parsons, Holman and others. Choir of St. Simon-the-Apostle; Robin Davis, conductor; Maurice White,
JUNE 15 @ 7:30
Gallery 345
www.NewMusicConcerts.com
TAFELMUSIK @
June 19 @7:20pm
Hearn Generating Station
tafelmusik.org
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 51
A. Concerts in the GTA
Latin tunes to traditional band pieces. Mel
Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge St., North York.
416-802-6819. Free. Also July 14, 28.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The
Second City Guide to the Symphony. Colin
Mochrie, host; The Second City, actors; Peter
Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29.50-$101.
Also June 24 and 25.
●●8:00: Royal Conservatory. Quiet Please,
There’s a Lady on Stage Series: Meow Meow.
Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.
416-408-0208. $40–$85.
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Angli-
Monday June 20
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Duo Primo. Ronée Boyce, piano;
Helen Yang, cello. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521.
PWYC.
Tuesday June 21
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Allan Pulker, flute. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St.
416-241-1298. Free. Donations welcome.
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Estonian Studies Centre. Estonian
National Opera Boys’ Choir. Works by Pärt,
Tormis, Sisask and contemporary Estonian
composers plus classical masterworks. Hirvo
Surva, conductor; Andres Lemba, piano.
Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.
416-408-0208. $45-$55; $25(st).
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Haydn Classics Par
Excellence. Haydn: Concerto for Trumpet;
Symphony No.88; other music by Boyce. Bob
Venables, trumpet. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13);
free(under 4).
Wednesday June 22
●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints King-
sway. Kingsway Organ Concert Series. Mark
Himmelman, organ. All Saints Kingsway
Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-7695224. Freewill offering.
can Church. Concerts at Midday: J.S. Bach’s
Leipzig Chorales (part 1). Performed by Matthew Whitfield on historic 1888 Ryder organ.
St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.
Summer Concerts in the Park. Guests: DOCA
Brass. Applewood/Shaver House, 450 The
West Mall, Etobicoke. 416-245-1983. Free.
●●8:00: Capella Intima. The Paradise of Travellers: Recollections of Venice and the Grand
Tour. Canzonettas, arias and motets from
17th-century northern Italy, with readings
from the original travel writers of the period including Coryat and George Sandys.
Bud Roach, director and tenor; Sheila Dietrich, soprano; Jennifer Enns Modolo, alto;
David Roth, baritone. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,
Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 905-5173594. Suggested donation of $15. Also June
26(Hamilton).
VOCAL
ENSEMBLE
Faire is
the Heaven
Friday June 24
●●12:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Free
Concert: Thank You, Toronto! Earl Lee, RBC
Resident Conductor; Peter Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-598-3375. Free. Seating is first-come,
first-served.
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Potpourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Ashkenaz Festival. Live on the Patio: Street Brass. Nomadica.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-5934822. Free. Food and drinks available.
Thursday June 23
●●1:30: Miles Nadal JCC. Volunteer Apprecia-
tion Afternoon Tea with the Satin Dolls. Vocal
jazz quartet performs selections from the
1930s and 1940s. 750 Spadina Ave. 416-9246211 x0. $4. Dessert reception.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Ashkenaz Festival. Live on the Patio: Street Brass.
Lemon Bucket Orkestra. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Band Concert Under the Stars. Music from swing to
SUMMER
NIGHT
OPERA
CONCERT
Inga
FILIPPOVA
Andrey
ANDREYCHICK
Stanislas
VITORT
JUNE 24,
7:30pm
eventbrite.ca
●●7:30: Inga Filippova. Summer Night Opera
Concert. Inga Filippova, soprano; Stanislas Vitort, tenor; Andrey Andreychik, baritone; Evgenia Yesmanovich, piano. Lawrence
Park Community Church, 2180 Bayview Ave.
647-885-6459. $30; $20(sr/st/under 30);
$10(youth).
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The
Second City Guide to the Symphony. Colin
Mochrie, host; The Second City, actors; Peter
Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29.50-$101.
Also June 23 and 25.
●●8:00: Adelphi Vocal Ensemble. Faire Is the
Heaven. Palestrina: Ut queant laxis; Missa
Ut, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La; Stanford: Benedictus in
C; Charles Wood: Hail, Gladdening Light; and
works by Byrd and William H. Harris. Peter
Bishop, director; Andrew Adair, organ. St.
Vincent de Paul Church, 263 Roncesvalles
Program features Estonian Composers
and classical masterworks
Program features Estonian Composers
and classical masterworks
52 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
ADELPHI
Friday June 24,
8pm
Ave. 416-535-5119. Free. $20 donation
suggested.
I FURIOSI
BAROQUE ENSEMBLE
FISH OUT
OF WATER
Friday, June 24th • 8pm
Calvin Presbyterian Church
www.ifuriosi.com
●●8:00: I Furiosi Baroque Ensemble. Fish
Out of Water. Works by Rosenmüller, Mattheson, Couperin, and others. Guests: Jed Wentz,
flauto traverso; James Johnstone, harpsichord. Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle
Ave. 416-536-2943. $20/$10(adv).
Saturday June 25
●●6:00: Canadian Music Centre. Clarinet
and Piano Duo Recital. Chris Paul Harman:
Five Japanese Children’s Songs; Five Pieces
for Clarinet and Piano (world premiere); and
other new and traditional works inspired
by Japan. Chris Paul Harman, composer;
Kimihiro Yasaka, piano; Shiori Kobayashi,
clarinet. 20 St. Joseph St. 416-961-6601 x202.
$20; $10(st/members).
●●6:00: Toronto Blues Society. TBS 31st
Birthday Party with Harrison Kennedy. Harrison Kennedy, vocals/guitar. Ward’s Island
Cafe, 20 Withrow Street, Ward’s Island. 416538-3885. Free.
●●7:30: Opera by Request. Aida. Verdi. Carrie Gray, soprano (Aida); Paul Williamson,
tenor (Radames); Ramona Carmelly, mezzo
(Amneris); Michael Robert-Broder, baritone (Amonasro); Domenico Sanfilippo,
thewholenote.com
bass-baritone (Ramfis); and others; William
Shookhoff, conductor/piano. College Street
United Church, 452 College St. 416-4552365. $20.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The
Second City Guide to the Symphony. Colin
Mochrie, host; The Second City, actors; Peter
Oundjian, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $29.50-$101.
Also June 23 and 24.
●●8:00: Arraymusic/Audiopollination.
Solonation. Heidi Chan, Asian flutes/percussion/electronics; Aki Takahashi, shamisen/vocals; Nicole Rampersaud, trumpet/
composer; Xuan Ye, various; Kayla Grant,
electronics. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.
416-532-3019. $10.
●●8:00: St. Barnabas Anglican Church.
Imagine: Blue. Jazz, blues and rock, and their
influence and relationships with classical
music. Works by Ravel, Prokofiev, Peterson,
M. O’Connor, and Radiohead. Raffi Altounian,
guitar. 361 Danforth Ave. 416-528-5349. $20;
$10(sr/st).
●●8:00: Vocem Resurgentis. Mystic Light.
Medieval reflections on light and hope
through the words and music of Hildegard
von Bingen. Linda Falvy, Mary Enid Haines and
Paola Di Santo, sopranos. Church of St. Mary
Magdalene (Toronto), 477 Manning Ave. 416890-1710. Entry by donation.
●●8:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano
Soirée. Rachmaninoff (arr. G. Murray):
Concerto No.2, Op.18 (mvt.1); Vocalise
Op.34 No.14; Daisies Op.38 No.3; Rhapsody
on a Theme Of Paganini Op.43 Variation 18;
and other works. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St. W.
416-631-4300. PWYC.
Sunday June 26
●●2:00: Confidential Opera Project. In Con-
cert. Performers will take the stage and perform an opera in its entirety, having met each
other only an hour before and having had
no group rehearsal. Ernest Balmer Studio
(315), Distillery District, 9 Trinity St. 416-5376066. $25.
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Columbus Concert Band. CCB At The
thewholenote.com
Movies: 2nd Annual Benefit Concert. Music
from Star Wars; 2001: A Space Odessey; The
Jungle Book; The Lion King; La Strada; and
others. Guest: Kira Braun, soprano. Crescent School, 2365 Bayview Ave. 647-2679040. $20.
●●4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church. Jazz
Vespers. Colleen Allen, sax; Mike Hurley, sax;
Adrean Farrugia, piano; Steve Wallace, bass;
Terry Clarke, drums. All Saints Kingsway
Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-247-5181. Freewill offering. NB: Temporary venue change.
●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz Vespers. Brian Barlow Big Band. 1570 Yonge St.
416-920-5211. Free. Donations welcome.
●●9:00: Music Gallery. Departure Series:
Endangered Blood, Mike Smith Company and
Body Help. Burdock, 1184 Bloor St. W. 416204-1080. $15/$12(adv); $10(members).
Wednesday June 29
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Angli-
can Church. Concerts at Midday: J.S. Bach’s
Leipzig Chorales (part 2). Performed by Matthew Whitfield on historic 1888 Ryder organ.
St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
Thursday June 30
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Lula Music and
Monday June 27
Arts Centre. Live on the Patio: Salsa y Fusion.
Picadillo. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food and drinks available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. From
Prussia to Tantra. Mozart: String Quartet in
F K590; Kati Agócs: Tantric Variations. Cecilia String Quartet. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. In
Concert: Buffy Sainte-Marie. Where the Spirit
Lives: Suite in Three Movements; My Country ’Tis of Thy People; It’s My Way; Moonshot;
Power in the Blood; and other works. Buffy
Sainte-Marie, vocalist; Toronto Symphony
Orchestra; full band; Lucas Waldin, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416598-3375. $27-$70.
●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Majesty,
Brilliance, Power. Shostakovich: Symphony
No.9; Dvořák: Violin Concerto in a Op.53; Nielsen: Helios Overture. Andrew Sords, violin;
Alexa Petrenko, host; Kristian Alexander, conductor. Flato Markham Theatre, 171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham. 905-305-7469. $15-$35.
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Dévah Unplugged. Dévah Quartet.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
●●7:00: Toronto Chamber Players/Pirate Life Toronto. Water Music Concert 2.
Brahms: Clarinet Quintet; Kodály: Duo for
violin and cello; Mozart: Duo for violin and
viola. Anthony Thompson, clarinet; Marcus Scholtes, violin; Sharon Lee, violin; Brandon Chui, viola; Sybil Shanahan, cello. Pirate
Life, Avenue of the Island, Centre Island. 416828-5647. PWYC. Outdoor venue, weather
permitting.
●●7:30: Robert Bruce. The Sound Spa. Robert Bruce, composer/piano. Heliconian Hall,
35 Hazelton Ave. 416-922-3618. Price TBA.
Tuesday June 28
●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime Chamber Music. Christopher Miranda,
piano. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,
1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298. Free. Donations
welcome.
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Viennese Garden
Party. J. Strauss: The Blue Danube, Radetzky
March; highlights from Die Fledermaus and
The Merry Widow; other Viennese works.
Julie Ludwig, soprano; Jeremy Ludwig, baritone. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-9231171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13); free(under 4).
Friday July 1
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Lula Music and
Arts Centre. Live on the Patio: Salsa y Fusion.
Lula All Stars. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.
416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks available.
●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Unionville Canada Day Celebration. Light classics and favourite pieces by Tchaikovsky, J.
Strauss, Brahms, Dvořák and others. Andrew
Sords, violin; Rodney Gray, flute; Michael
Berec, host; Kristian Alexander, conductor.
Unionville Millennium Bandstand, 143 Main
St., Unionville. 905-604-8339. Free.
Saturday July 2
●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. KSO
at the CBC. Shostakovich: Symphony No.9;
Dvorak: Violin Concerto in a Op.53; Nielsen: Helios Overture. Andrew Sords, violin;
Michael Berec, host; Miran Vaupotić, conductor. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W.
1-888-655-9090. $15-$30.
Sunday July 3
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden.
Yech’hed Mat! Tangi Ropars, vocals/accordion; Emilyn Stam, violin; John Williams, clarinet. Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay
W. 416-973-4000. Free.
Monday July 4
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays. Albéniz: Iberia Book III - El Albaicín, El Polo, and Lavapiés. Koichi Inoue, piano.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
A pay-what-you-can
lunchtime concert series at
Church of the Holy Trinity
JULY 4 Koichi Inoue, piano
Albeniz’s Iberia Book III
JULY 11 Aaron James, organ
Bach and Beyond
JULY 18 Cary Savage, guitar
The Spanish Guitar
JULY 25 Denis Gagné, organ
Organ Music from Québec
All concerts
start at 12:15pm
416.598.4521 ext. 223
www.musicmondays.ca
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 53
A. Concerts in the GTA
●●8:00: Goldenvoice. Brian Wilson Celebrates
Pet Sounds 50th Anniversary. Brian Wilson, Al Jardine, Blondie Chaplin and others.
Massey Hall, 178 Victoria St. 416-872-4255.
$39.50-$125.
Tuesday July 5
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Duelling Divas. Verdi:
Sempre libera, Dvořák: Song to the Moon;
Bizet: Habanera; J. Strauss: Orlovsky’s
Song; Puccini: Musetta’s Waltz; and other
works. Adria McCulloch, soprano; Cassandra Warner, mezzo. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13);
free(under 4).
●●8:30: Hugh’s Room. In Concert: Lyy. Emma
Björling, vocals; Anna Lindblad, fiddle; David
Eriksson, nyckelharpa (keyed fiddle); Petrus
Johansson, guitar; Martin Norberg, percussion. 2261 Dundas St. W. 416-531-6604.
$25/$22.50(adv).
Wednesday July 6
●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints King-
sway. Kingsway Organ Concert Series.
Andrew Adair, organ. All Saints Kingsway
Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-7695224. Freewill offering.
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church. Concerts at Midday: Trio Abelia.
Music for flute, French horn and piano. St.
Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.
Summer Concerts in the Park. Guests: Etobicoke Swing Orchestra. Applewood/Shaver
House, 450 The West Mall, Etobicoke. 416245-1983. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Jeffery Straker, folk and
pop music. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
Thursday July 7
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Sunfest. Live on
the Patio: World Fusion. Elida Almeida. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food and drinks available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. From
Sweden with Love (and a dragon or two).
Performance by Lyy. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
54 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Toronto Art Blast. Community arts showcase. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. Free. Until
6:00pm. Also Jul 16.
●●2:00: St. Andrew’s Church/Marabella
Presbyterian Church, Trinidad. The Marabella Steel Orchestra. An outdoor concert
of calypso and sacred music. St. Andrew’s
Church (Toronto), 73 Simcoe St. 416-5935600 x231. Free. Donations welcome. On the
patio. Also July 29(2:00 and 5:00).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. TBA, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:00: North York Concert Band. Music
Under the Stars. Music from swing to Latin
tunes to concert band pieces. Unionville Millennium Bandstand, 143 Main St., Unionville.
416-802-6819. Free.
●●7:00: Soundstreams Salon 21. Soundweavers. Premiere of Emilie Lebel’s collaboration with Jumblies Theatre and community
participants. Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s
Park. 416-504-1282. Free; PWYC for preferred
seating.
Tuesday July 12
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Thomas Fitches, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
Wednesday July 13
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Kat Hammer,
baroque guitar. French, Spanish and Italian music from the 17th and 18th centuries.
St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Larry Bond Band, jazz
quartet. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
Monday July 18
Thursday July 14
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Transcriptions and Works for the
Spanish Guitar. Works by Bach, Albéniz,
Tarrega and Barrios. Cary Savage, guitar.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Batuki Music
Society. Live on the Patio: Grooves and Sahel
Blues. Daniel Nebiat. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Elles.
Works by Badalla, de la Guerre, Clérambault,
Eccles and Jarzębski. Andréanne BrissonPaquin, soprano; Pallade Musica Baroque
Ensemble. Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens
Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Band Concert Under the Stars. Music from swing to
Latin tunes to traditional band pieces. Mel
Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge St., North York.
416-802-6819. Free. Also June 23, July 28.
Tuesday July 19
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Alastair Williams, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Piaf Encore. La vie en
rose, Milord, Hymn à l’amour, Mon Dieu, and
other songs. Pandora Topp, Piaf tribute artist. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171.
$25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13); free(under 4).
Wednesday July 20
Friday July 15
●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints King-
sway. Kingsway Organ Concert Series. Gordon Mansell, organ. All Saints Kingsway
Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-7695224. Freewill offering.
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Vladimir Soloviev, piano. St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church, 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or
416-921-6350. Free.
●●7:00: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.
Summer Concerts in the Park. Applewood/
Shaver House, 450 The West Mall, Etobicoke.
416-245-1983. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Nic ’n Norm: Nicole
Songbird Coward and Harpin’Norm Lucien.
345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
●●7:30: Grace Church on-the-Hill. Joint Sendoff Concert for UK Tours. Pax Christi Chorale and Choir of Grace Church on-the-Hill.
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-488-7884. Free.
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
Saturday July 16
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden.
●●11:00am: Artists’ Garden Cooperative.
Mondays: Bach and Beyond. Welmers: Laudate Dominum; Cowell: Hymn and Fuguing
Tune No.14; and works by Bach and Böhm.
Aaron James, organ. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-5984521. PWYC.
Sunday July 10
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Sunday July 17
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Sunfest. Live on
the Patio: World Fusion. Villalobos Brothers
with Alberto de la Rosa. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
Friday July 8
Evensong. Choirs of Grace Church and Downing College, Cambridge, UK. 300 Lonsdale Rd.
416-488-7884. Freewill offering.
Monday July 11
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Batuki Music
Society. Live on the Patio: Grooves and Sahel
Blues. Hampaté and Sahel Blues. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free.
Food and drinks available.
●●7:30: Hart House Singers. The Greatest
Duets in the World. Works by Bach, Schumann, Offenbach, Delibes and others. David
Arnot-Johnston, conductor; Jeff Vidov, piano.
Hart House, Great Hall, 7 Hart House Circle.
416-978-2452. Free; food donations to U of T
Foodbank welcomed.
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
●●6:00: Grace Church on-the-Hill. Choral
Forbidden Fruit: Music “Stolen” for Cello.
Bach: French Suite No.5 for solo cello; works
by Gabrielli, Purcell, Pasquini and others. Kate
Bennett Wadsworth, cello; Lucas Harris, lute.
Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W.
416-973-4000. Free.
●●11:00am: Artists’ Garden Cooperative.
Thursday July 21
Toronto Art Blast. Community arts showcase. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. Free. Until
6:00pm. Also Jul 17.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Hillside Festival/
Canadian Reggae World. Live on the Patio:
Reggae. The Human Rights. Roy Thomson
Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food
and drinks available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden.
“Becoming One with Universal Love”:
Ancient Persian Music for a New Age. Naghmeh Farahmand, percussion; Pejman Zahedian, Persian setar. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
Friday July 22
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Hillside Festival/
Canadian Reggae World. Live on the Patio:
Reggae. Mo’ Kalamity and the Wizards. Roy
Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food and drinks available.
Sunday July 24
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. TBA, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. From
the Banyan to the Willow Tree. Carnatic classical music from South India. Subhadra
Vijaykumar, violin; Vasudevan Govindarajan,
mrdangam/double headed drum; Ramana
Indrakumar, ghatam/clay pot. Toronto Music
Garden, 475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000.
Free.
Monday July 25
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Organ Music from Quebec. Bédard:
Suite du deuxième ton; works by Daveluy,
LeBuis and Warren. Denis Gagné, organ.
10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
●●7:00: Toronto Chamber Players/Pirate
Life Toronto. Water Music Concert 3. Mendelssohn: Octet; and pirate-themed music.
Ton Beau String Quartet; Odin String Quartet. Pirate Life, Avenue of the Island, Centre
Island. 416-828-5647. PWYC. Outdoor venue,
weather permitting.
Tuesday July 26
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Choral Recital. Southend Boys and Girls
Choir, Essex, UK. 65 Church St. 416-3647865. Free.
●●7:00: North York Concert Band. Band
Concert Under the Stars. Music from big
band to swing to concert band pieces. Earl
Bales Park - Barry Zukerman Amphitheatre,
4169 Bathurst St. 416-802-6819. Free. In case
of rain, event will take place at the Earl Bales
Community Centre.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Vivaldi - Four Seasons.
Sunny Choi, Marcus Scholtes, Alex Toskov and
Sharon Lee, violins. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13);
free(under 4).
Wednesday July 27
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Janice Kerkkamp, flute. St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church, 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890
or 416-921-6350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
thewholenote.com
Air Garden Concert. Joel Sheridan, jazz and
classic pop. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
●●7:30: Summer Singers. Choral Concert.
Light classical, folk, gospel and popular standards. Linda Eyman, director. Bloor Street
United Church, 300 Bloor St. W. 416-9247439. $5 suggested.
●●8:00: Toronto Blues Society. Sue Foley @
Jazz Bistro. Jazz Bistro, 251 Victoria St. 416363-5299. $20.
Thursday July 28
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Vintage Rock. Classic Albums Live: Creedence Clearwater Revival. 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food and drinks available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden.
Tamara Ilana and Ventanas. Melodic traditions of North Africa, the Balkans, Turkey and
Spain. Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens
Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:30: North York Concert Band. Band Concert Under the Stars. Music from swing to
Latin tunes to traditional band pieces. Mel
Lastman Square, 5100 Yonge St., North York.
416-802-6819. Free. Also June 23, July 14.
Friday July 29
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●2:00: St. Andrew’s Church/Marabella
Presbyterian Church, Trinidad. The Marabella Steel Orchestra. An outdoor concert
of calypso and sacred music. St. Andrew’s
Church (Toronto), 73 Simcoe St. 416-5935600 x231. Free. Donations welcome. On the
patio. Also July 17(2:00) and July 29(5:00).
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Vintage Rock. Classic Albums Live: Creedence Clearwater Revival. 60 Simcoe St. 416593-4822. Free. Food and drinks available.
●●5:00: St. Andrew’s Church/Marabella
Presbyterian Church, Trinidad. The Marabella Steel Orchestra. An outdoor concert
of calypso and sacred music. St. Andrew’s
Church (Toronto), 73 Simcoe St. 416-5935600 x231. Free. Donations welcome. On the
patio. Also July 17(2:00) and July 29(2:00).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. A Tale
of Two Cities. By Victor Davies and Eugene
Benson. Michael Rose, music director. Robert
Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College
St. 416-366-7723. $28; $22(sr/st). Also
Jul 31(mat), Aug 6(mat and eve).
Saturday July 30
●●3:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. The
Tales of Hoffmann. By Offenbach. Raisa Nakhmanovich, music director. Robert Gill Theatre,
University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-3667723. $28; $22(sr/st). Also Aug 2, 4, 7(mat).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Julius Caesar. By Handel. Maria H. Y. Jung, music
director. Robert Gill Theatre, University of
Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723. $28;
$22(sr/st). Also Aug 3(mat and eve), 5.
●●8:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano
Soirée. Works arranged by G. Murray. Chopin: Nocturne in E-flat Op.9 No.2; Kálmán:
Dream Once Again from Gypsy Princess;
Grieg: I Love Thee; Sarasate: Gypsy Airs
- Allegro molto vivace); and other works.
thewholenote.com
Carillon Concerts. Lisa Lonie and Janet Tebbel, carillon. Metropolitan United Church
(Toronto), 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331. Free.
Donations welcome.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. An
Evening with Calum Graham. Music from
the album Tabula Rasa. Calum Graham,
vocals and guitar. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●8:00: Aga Khan Museum/Kabir Cultural
Centre. Fanna-Fi-Allah Sufi Qawwali Party.
Sufi devotional music. Tahir Hussain Faridi
and guests. Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford
Dr. 416-646-4677. From $45.
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. The
Tales of Hoffmann. See Jul 30(mat). Also
Aug 7(mat).
Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St. W. 416-631-4300.
PWYC.
Sunday July 31
●●3:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. A Tale
of Two Cities. See Jul 29(eve). Also Aug 6(mat
and eve).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
Monday August 1
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Allison Au Quartet. 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521. PWYC.
Tuesday August 2
Friday August 5
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. TBA, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Never Mind the Why
and Wherefore. Gilbert and Sullivan: excerpts
from Pirates of Penzance, The Mikado, and
HMS Pinafore. Allison Arends, soprano; Deborah Overes, contralto; Geoffrey Butler, tenor;
Andrew Tees, baritone; Michael York, baritone. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-9231171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13); free(under 4).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. The
Tales of Hoffmann. See Jul 30(mat). Also
Aug 4, 7(mat).
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Swing. Tia Brazda. 60 Simcoe St. 416-5934822. Free. Food and drinks available.
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre. Little Shop of
Horrors. Music by Howard Ashman and Alan
Menken. Toronto Centre for the Arts, Studio
Theatre, 5040 Yonge St. 1-855-985-2787. $30;
$22.50(sr/st); $15(under 12). Also Aug 6(2:00
and 7:30); 7(2:00).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Julius
Caesar. See Jul 30.
Wednesday August 3
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Duo Sonora.
Music for flute and guitar. St. Stephen-in-theFields Anglican Church, 103 Bellevue Ave. 437344-3890 or 416-921-6350. Free.
●●3:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Julius
Caesar. See Jul 30. Also 8:00, Aug 5.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. L’Amero Ensemble.
345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Julius
Caesar. See Jul 30. Also Aug 5.
●●3:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. A Tale
of Two Cities. See Jul 29(eve). Also 8:00.
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre. Little Shop of
Horrors. See Aug 5; Also Aug 7(2:00).
●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. A Tale
of Two Cities. See Jul 29(eve)/
●●9:15: SummerWorks Performance Fes-
tival/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover.
See Aug 5(8:00) Also Aug 7(6:30); 8(9:00);
11(5:15); 12(10:15); 13(1:15).
Sunday August 7
●●2:00: No Strings Theatre. Little Shop of
Horrors. See Aug 5(7:30).
●●3:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. The
Tales of Hoffmann. See Jul 30(mat).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. David Briggs, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Deep
River of Song: Jayme Stone and Friends. Songs
by Alan Lomax. Jayme Stone, banjo; Kristin
Andreassen, voice; Sumaia Jackson, fiddle; and
Joe Phillips, bass. Toronto Music Garden,
475 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
●●6:30: SummerWorks Performance Festival/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover.
See Aug 5(8:00) Also Aug 8(9:00); 11(5:15);
12(10:15); 13(1:15).
Thursday August 4
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on the Patio:
Swing. Ginkoa. 60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822.
Free. Food and drinks available.
●●7:00: Music at Metropolitan. Summer
PRESENTS
MENKEN
A pay-what-you-can
lunchtime concert series at
Church of the Holy Trinity
AND
ASHMAN ’ S
●●8:00: SummerWorks Performance Festi-
val/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover. Text
by Wong Teng Chi. Music by Njo Kong Kie.
In Mandarin with English Surtitles. Jordan
Cheng, tenor; Po Jen Chen, baritone; Carol
Wang, percussionist; Njo Kong Kie, pianist/music director; Johnny Tam, stage director. Theatre Centre Mainspace, 1115 Queen
St. W. 647-636-1401. $15. Also on Aug 6(9:15),
7(6:30); 8(9:00); 11(5:15); 12(10:15); 13(1:15).
AUG 1 Allison Au Quartet (jazz)
Forest Grove
AUG 8 Stephanie Chua, &
Véronique Mathieu, True North Canadian Duos for Violin & Piano
AUG 15 Anastasia Rizikov, piano
Surrealism at Midday
AUG 22 Bryan Holt & Amahl Arulanandam
Dueling Cellos - VC²
Saturday August 6
All concerts
start at 12:15pm
●●2:00: No Strings Theatre. Little Shop of
Horrors. See Aug 5(7:30); Also Aug 6(7:30);
7(2:00).
416.598.4521 ext. 223
www.musicmondays.ca
AUGUST 5 – 7
THE GREAT
CANADIAN SHOWTUNE
AUGUST 27 – 29
NOSTRINGSTHEATRE.COM
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 55
A. Concerts in the GTA
Monday August 8
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: True North - Canadian Duos for Violin and Piano. Willan: Sonata No.1 in e; works
by Champagne, Archer and H. Schmidt.
Stephanie Chua, piano; Véronique Mathieu,
violin. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521. PWYC.
●●9:00: SummerWorks Performance Festival/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover.
See Aug 5(8:00) Also Aug 11(5:15); 12(10:15);
13(1:15).
Mozart Serenade. Trillium Brass. Toronto
Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000. Free.
the He hi ye Girls. Traditional and contemporary Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) music.
Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W.
416-973-4000. Free.
●●7:00: University Settlement Music and
Arts School. End of Term Student Concert.
University Settlement Auditorium, 23 Grange
Rd. 416-598-3444 x243 or x244. Free. Donations gladly accepted.
Monday August 15
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Surrealism at Midday. Liszt: Ballade No.2 in b, S171; Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit;
Scriabin: Sonata No.4 in F-sharp Op.30. Anastasia Rizikov, piano. 10 Trinity Sq. 416-5984521. PWYC.
Tuesday August 16
2016 TD Tour
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Tuesday August 9
• Toronto •
Organ Recital. TBA, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: String Serenade.
Glass: Arioso; Riho Maimets: Let the Cradle
Swing; Saint-Saëns: Sarabande; Jenkins: Palladio. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-9231171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13); free(under 4).
●●8:00: Goldenvoice. The Go-Gos’ Farewell Tour. Charlotte Caffey, Belinda Carlisle, Gina Schock and Jane Wiedlin. Guests:
Kaya Stewart, singer/songwriter; Best Coast.
Massey Hall, 178 Victoria St. 416-872-4255.
$69.50-$99.50.
Maestro Ward Stare
Wednesday August 17
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Thomas Gonder, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Mozart - Eternal Summer. Mozart: Double Concerto for Flute and
Harp; Symphony No.29 in A. Kaili Maimets,
flute; Andrew Chan, harp. Casa Loma, 1 Austin
Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(413); free(under 4).
Wednesday August 10
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Eric Osborne
performing on historic 1888 Ryder organ.
St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Melanie Peterson, folk
and pop music. 345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705.
$10.
Thursday August 11
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Toronto Blues
Society. Live on the Patio: Blues. Raoul and
The Big Time. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks
available.
●●5:15: SummerWorks Performance Festival/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover. See
Aug 5(8:00) Also Aug 12(10:15); 13(1:15).
●●7:00: Music at Metropolitan. Summer Carillon Concerts. Brian Tang, carillon. Metropolitan United Church (Toronto), 56 Queen St. E.
416-363-0331. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. The
Sweet Sound of Our Nature: Sadie Buck and
A pay-what-you-can lunchtime concert
series at Church of the Holy Trinity
AUGUST 29, 12:15PM
GALA 25TH
ANNIVERSARY CONCERT
David Braid,
Steinway Piano Artist
for the Arts’ “JazzID Award.”
Join us to hear David perform
on our new Steinway “B”
piano, in a Gala Music
Mondays 25th Anniversary Concert, presented
by Steinway Piano Gallery Toronto.
There will be a reception
following the concert.
416.598.4521 ext. 223
www.musicmondays.ca
56 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Koerner Hall
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Edmee Nataprawira, piano. St. Stephen-in-the-Fields
Anglican Church, 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-3443890 or 416-921-6350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Maneli Jamal, progressive fingerstyle guitar. 345 Balliol St. 416-4870705. $10.
August 11, 7;30 pm
nyoc.org
●●7:30: National Youth Orchestra of Can-
ada. 2016 TD Tour. Wagner: Overture to
Tannhauser; Bloch: Schelomo for cello and
orchestra; Prokofiev: Symphony No.5; new
commissioned works by C. Goddard and C.
Meyer. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor
St. W. 416-408-0208. $25-$45.
●●8:00: Aga Khan Museum. World Music Series: Mehmet Polat Trio. Ottoman, Anatolian,
Balkan and West African musical traditions
played on the ngoni, oud and ney. 77 Wynford
Dr. 416-646-4677. $40.
Thursday August 18
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Celtic Colours
International Festival/East Coast Music
Week. Live on the Patio: East Coast. The
East Pointers. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks
available.
●●7:00: Music at Metropolitan. Summer Carillon Concerts. Roy Lee, carillon. Metropolitan
United Church (Toronto), 56 Queen St. E. 416363-0331. Free. Donations welcome.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Wood,
Metal, Skin. Nagata Shachu, taiko drumming
ensemble. Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens
Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
Friday August 12
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Toronto Blues
Society. Live on the Patio: Blues. Irene Torres and The Sugar Devils. Roy Thomson Hall,
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
●●10:15: SummerWorks Performance Festival/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover. See
Aug 5(8:00) Also Aug 13(1:15).
Friday August 19
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Celtic Colours
International Festival/East Coast Music
Week. Live on the Patio: East Coast. North
Atlantic Drift. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks
available.
Saturday August 13
●●1:15: SummerWorks Performance Festi-
val/Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover. See
Aug 5(8:00).
Sunday August 14
Sunday August 21
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Choral Recital. Diocesan Girls Choir.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Brass
by the Lake. Guaraldi: Linus and Lucy; Elizabethan dance tunes; and excerpts from a
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. All in
the (Celtic) Family: The Bachands. Qristina
Bachand, violin/voice; Quinn Bachand, guitar/banjo. Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens
Quay W. 416-973-4000. Free.
Monday August 22
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity. Music
Mondays: Dueling Cellos. VC² (Amahl Arulanandam and Bryan Holt, cellos). 10 Trinity Sq.
416-598-4521. PWYC.
Tuesday August 23
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. Angus Sinclair, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: God Bless the Child.
Lover Man, Good Morning Heartache, Summertime, All of Me, In My Solitude, and other
songs. Khadija Mbowe, Billie Holiday tribute
artist. Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace. 416-9231171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(4-13); free(under 4).
Wednesday August 24
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Angli-
can Church. Concerts at Midday. Performing
on the historic 1888 Ryder organ. Thomas
Gonder, organ. St. Stephen-in-the-Fields
Anglican Church, 103 Bellevue Ave. 437-3443890 or 416-921-6350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Felix Gannon, folk music.
345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
Thursday August 25
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
Music. Live on the Patio: Samba e Forró. Flavia Nascimento. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks
available.
●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Passagi. Early Italian Baroque music. Vincent Lauzer, recorder; Mark Edwards, harpsichord.
Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W.
416-973-4000. Free.
Friday August 26
●●1:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano Pot-
pourri for all ages. Classics, opera, operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and
other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St.
W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch and snack
friendly.
●●5:00: Roy Thomson Hall/Small World
Music. Live on the Patio: Samba e Forró.
Aline Morales. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe
St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and drinks
available.
Saturday August 27
●●2:00 and 7:30: No Strings Theatre. The
Great Canadian Showtune. A tribute to Canadian music theatre composers. Wychwood
Theatre, 601 Christie St. 416-551-2093. $25;
$20(sr/st); $12(under 12). Also Aug 28(2:00);
29(7:30).
●●8:10: Gordon Murray Presents. Piano
Soirée. Works by Chopin, Liszt, Scriabin and
Rachmaninoff. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel), 427 Bloor St. W.
416-631-4300. PWYC.
Sunday August 28
●●2:00: No Strings Theatre. The Great
Canadian Showtune. See Aug 27. Also
Aug 29(7:30).
●●4:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
thewholenote.com
Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ. 65 Church
St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden.
Amor mi fa cantar a la Francesca. Works
by Machaut, Walther von der Vogelweide
and others. Duo Musica Fantasia: Julie Ryning, soprano; Katelyn Clark, clavisimbalum.
Toronto Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W.
416-973-4000. Free.
Monday August 29
●●12:15: Church of the Holy Trinity/Stein-
way Piano Gallery. Music Mondays: Gala
25th Anniversary Concert. David Braid, piano.
Church of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Sq. 416598-4521. PWYC. Post-concert reception.
●●7:00: Toronto Chamber Players/Pirate
Life Toronto. Water Music Concert 4. Works
by Bartók, Gershwin, Piazzolla, and Guns N’
Roses. Toronto Chamber Players Ensemble:
Catherine Cosbey, violin; Sharon Lee, violin;
Woosol Cho, viola; Rachel Pomedli, cello; Mike
Cox, bass; and others. Pirate Life, Avenue
of the Island, Centre Island. 416-828-5647.
PWYC. Outdoor venue, weather permitting.
●●7:30: No Strings Theatre. The Great Canadian Showtune. See Aug 27(2:00).
Tuesday August 30
●●1:00: Cathedral Church of St. James.
Organ Recital. TBA, organ. 65 Church St. 416364-7865. Free.
●●7:30: Toronto Concert Orchestra. Symphony in the Gardens: Some Enchanted Evening. Selections from Brigadoon, Kismet,
South Pacific, Showboat, Carousel, and other
Broadway classics. Lucia Cesaroni, soprano;
Adrian Kramer, tenor. Casa Loma, 1 Austin
Terrace. 416-923-1171. $25; $20(sr/st); $15(413); free(under 4).
B. Concerts Beyond the GTA
Wednesday August 31
IN THIS ISSUE: Ancaster, Barrie, Bracebridge, Brantford, Brighton,
Cavan, Cobourg, Cookstown, Gravenhurst, Guelph, Hamilton,
Innisfil, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Orangeville,
Ottawa, St. Catharines, Stratford, Waterloo, Waupoos.
●●12:35: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican
Church. Concerts at Midday: Peichen Chen
and Charles Lin. Works for piano four hands.
St. Stephen-in-the-Fields Anglican Church,
103 Bellevue Ave. 437-344-3890 or 416-9216350. Free.
●●7:30: Artists’ Garden Cooperative. Plein
Air Garden Concert. Odin String Quartet.
345 Balliol St. 416-487-0705. $10.
Wednesday June 1
●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru.
Julie Choi, piano. Works by Brahms, Debussy
and Choi. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church,
50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5;
free(st).
●●8:00: Open Ears Festival. Nazar-I Turkwaz.
Maryem Tollar, Brenna MacCrimmon, Jayne
Brown and Sophia Grigoriadis. KWCMS Music
Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-8861673. $30; $20(st). Festival runs to June 4.
Thursday September 1
●●Sep 01 5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on
the Patio: Downtown Funk. The St. Royals.
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available. Also Sept 2.
●●Sep 01 7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Glass Houses. Works by Ann Southam
and others. Taktus, percussion duo. Toronto
Music Garden, 475 Queens Quay W. 416-9734000. Free.
Thursday June 2
●●7:00: Orangeville Blues and Jazz Festi-
val. Opening Night Gala. Aura; Big Rude Jake;
Jerome Godboo Band featuring Shawn Kellerman. Best Western, 7 Buena Vista Dr.,
Orangeville. 519-941-9014. $45/$40(adv).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest No.3: Pushing the Perimeter: Omar Daniel Conducting the Ether.
Daniel: Quintet for theremin and string quartet; Martinu: Fantasia for theremin and string
quartet. Penderecki Quartet. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N.,
Waterloo. 519-883-4480. $35; $20(sr/arts
worker/PI); $15(st); $5(EyeGO). QuartetFest
runs to June 12.
●●10:00: Open Ears Festival. Dodecaphunk:
Serial works arranged for Funk Band. Kyle
Brenders Big Band. Jazz Room, Huether
Hotel, 59 King St N., Waterloo. 519-579-8564.
$20; $15(sr/st/arts workers); $5(eyeGo). Festival runs to June 4.
Friday September 2
●●Sep 02 1:10: Gordon Murray Presents.
Piano Potpourri for all ages. Classics, opera,
operetta, musicals, ragtime, pop, international and other genres. Gordon Murray, piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre (Chapel),
427 Bloor St. W. 416-631-4300. PWYC. Lunch
and snack friendly.
●●Sep 02 5:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Live on
the Patio: Downtown Funk. The St. Royals.
60 Simcoe St. 416-593-4822. Free. Food and
drinks available.
Sunday September 4
●●Sep 04 4:00: Cathedral Church of St.
James. Organ Recital. Ian Sadler, organ.
65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
Tuesday September 6
●●Sep 06 1:00: Cathedral Church of St.
Friday June 3
James. Organ Recital. Thomas Gonder,
organ. 65 Church St. 416-364-7865. Free.
●●8:00: Open Ears Festival. Mixtape Love:
Tenderness, Bernice, Katherine Young. Tenderness (Chrissy Reichert); Bernice (Robin
Dann); Katherine Young, bassoon. Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick St., Kitchener.
519-579-8564. $20; $15(sr/st/arts workers);
$5(eyeGo). Festival runs to June 4.
The following summer
festivals are not in the
daily concerts listings. Please refer to the
Summer Festivals beginning
on page 35.
Beaches International
Jazz Festival
Brott Music Festival
Classical Unbound Festival
Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival
Elora Festival
Festival de Lanaudière
Festival of the Sound
Highlands Opera Studio
Indian River Festival
Leith Summer Festival
Luminato Festival
thewholenote.com
Saturday June 4
●●2:00: Open Ears Festival. Anthropolo-
gies Imaginaires. Gabriel Dharmoo, vocals;
Andrew Reed Miller, double bass and media.
Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick St., Kitchener. 519-579-8564. $25; $15(sr/st); $20(arts
workers); $5(eyeGo). Festival runs to June 4.
●●7:00: Open Ears Festival. Sarah Neufeld
with Leanne Zacharias. Sarah Neufeld, violin; Stefan Schneider, drums; Leanne Zacharias, cello. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church
(Kitchener), 54 Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519579-8564. $25; $15(sr/st); $20(arts workers);
$5(eyeGo). Festival runs to June 4.
●●7:30: Grand River Chorus. Celebrating
Tekahionwake: The Genius of E. Pauline Johnson. Guests: Aaron Bell, storyteller; White
Pine Dancers. W. Ross MacDonald School,
350 Brant Ave., Brantford. 519-841-9708.
$25; $15(25 and under).
●●7:30: Hamilton Children’s Choir. Sentima.
A musical performance created by youth.
Guests: Countermeasure. Theatre Aquarius,
190 King William St., Hamilton. 905-522-7529.
$30; $25(sr); $20(HCC alumni); $15(st).
●●7:30: Oriana Singers of Northumberland.
Montreal Baroque Festival
Music and Beyond Festival
Music at Port Milford
National Youth
Orchestra of Canada
Ottawa International Chamber
Music Festival
Stratford Summer Music
TD Sunfest ’16
TD Toronto Jazz Festival
Toronto Summer Music Festival
Westben Arts Festival Theatre
From the Roots Up. Arrangements of music
by Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Pete Seeger
and others. St. Peter’s Anglican Church
(Cobourg), 20 College St., Cobourg. 905-3722210. $25; $22(sr); $10(st). Also on June 5
(Brighton).
●●9:30: Open Ears Festival. Mixtape Love:
Pursuit Grooves and Unbuttoned. Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick St., Kitchener.
519-579-8564. $20; $15(sr/st/arts workers);
$5(eyeGo). Festival runs to June 4.
Sunday June 5
●●3:00: Kokoro Singers. Remember...Love.
Brenda Uchimaru, conductor. Duff’s Presbyterian Church, 319 Brock Rd. S., Guelph. 289439-9447. $20; $15(sr/st). Also Jun 11(eve,
Ancaster).
●●3:00: Oriana Singers of Northumberland. From the Roots Up. Arrangements of
music by Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Pete Seeger and others. Trinity-St. Andrew’s United
Church, 56 Prince Edward St., Brighton. 613392-7423. $25; $22(sr); $10(st). Also on June
4 (Cobourg).
Tuesday June 7
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest No.4: Jose White Quartet. Revueltas: Quartet No.2; Shostakovich:
Quartet No.7; Mendelssohn: Quartet in E-flat
Op.12. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 886-1673. $35; $20(st). QuartetFest runs to June 12.
Wednesday June 8
●●2:30: Seniors Serenade. In Recital. Works
by Bach, Beethoven and Chopin. Tabitha
Johnson, piano. Grace United Church (Barrie), 350 Grove St. E., Barrie. 705-726-1181.
Free. 3:30: tea and cookies, $5.
●●7:30: Plumbing Factory Brass Band. A
Summer Serenade. For the Semiannual
Plumbers Musical Convention. Offenbach:
Orpheus in the Underworld; Major-Marothy:
March of the Plumbers; Simon: Willow
Echoes; Gabrieli: Sonata pian’ e forte; Lavallée: Bridal Rose; and other works. Henry
Meredith, conductor. Byron United Covenant
Church, 420 Boler Rd., London. 519-471-1250
or 519-659-3600. $15/$13(adv); $10/$8(st/
adv). Refreshments to follow.
●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department
of Music. Conrad Grebel Concerts: University
of Waterloo Balinese Gamelan Ensemble. Students play by ear on various gamelan instruments, consisting of gongs, metallophones,
drums and flutes. Theatre of the Arts, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24226. Free.
Thursday June 9
●●7:30: Conrad Grebel University College.
Voices for Peace Concerts: University of Waterloo Balinese Gamelan Ensemble. Weaver:
new work. Gamelan Ensemble instrumentalists, soloists and narrators. Theatre of the
Arts, University of Waterloo, 200 University
Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24226.
$10. Collaborative concert for Conrad Grebel’s International Peace Conference.
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 57
B. Concerts Beyond the GTA
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest No.5. Mozart: Viola
Quintet in C K515; Mendelssohn: Quartet in
a Op.13; Chausson: Concerto for violin, piano
and string quartet. David Gillham, violin/viola;
Chiharu Iinuma, piano; Penderecki Quartet.
KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $40; $25(st). QuartetFest
runs to June 12.
Friday June 10
●●7:30: Arcady. Voices of Summer. Beck-
ett: new works. Ronald Beckett, conductor.
Central Presbyterian Church (Brantford),
97 Wellington St., Brantford. 519-428-3185.
$10-$25.
●●7:30: Charlotte Knight and Jon Corkal. It
Shoulda Been Me: A Cabaret. Works by Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sondheim, B. Joel, J.
Iconis and others. Charlotte Knight, soprano;
Jon Corkal, music director and piano. Mahtay
Café, 241 St. Paul St., St. Catharines. 647-6379252. $20. Also Jun 16(Toronto), 18(Guelph).
●●8:00: Orangeville Music Theatre. Shrek
The Musical Jr. Music by Jeanine Tesori. Book
and Lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire. Town Hall
Opera House, 87 Broadway Ave., Orangeville.
519-942-3423. $20; $15(child 6-12); $10(5
and under). Also June 11(2:00 and 7:00) and
12(2:00).
●●8:00: Robert Bruce. Songs of Light and
Shadow. Presented with specially produced
short films and video art. Robert Bruce, composer/piano; Janet Obermeyer, soprano;
Nicole Katerberg, soprano. Theatre Aquarius, 190 King William St., Hamilton. 905-5227529. $20.
Saturday June 11
●●11:30am: Barrie Jazz Festival. Jazz at
Innisfil Public Library. Floyd Hall Trio. Featuring Andy Harasymchuk, guitar; Bruce Rumble, acoustic bass. Innisfil Public Library,
Cookstown Branch, 20 Church St., Cookstown. 705-458-1273. Free.
●●2:00: Orangeville Music Theatre. Shrek
The Musical Jr. See Jun 10(8:00). Also
Jun 11(7:00) and 12(2:00).
●●3:00: Sounds of the Next Generation
(SONG). The Spirit Garden: Spring Planting. An outdoor music drama by R. Murray
Schafer that involves audience participation
Friday June 17
in preparing, planting and harvesting the garden. Western University Choir; Wilfrid Laurier
University Percussion Ensemble; SONG Children’s Choir; St. Mary’s Treblemakers Choir;
Gary Diggins, vocal improvisation. Fifth Wind
Farm, 3987 Timlin Rd., Cobourg. 855-3722210. $50. Also 6:00, Jun 12(mat/eve); Sep 25:
Fall Harvest (tickets only available with Spring
Planting tickets).
●●6:00: Sounds of the Next Generation
(SONG). The Spirit Garden: Spring Planting.
See 3:00. Also Jun 12(mat/eve); Sep 25: Fall
Harvest (tickets only available with Spring
Planting tickets).
●●7:00: Orangeville Music Theatre. Shrek
The Musical Jr. See Jun 10(8:00). Also
Jun 12(2:00).
●●7:30: Barrie Concert Band. Gershwin!
Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris, Summertime, Porgy and Bess selections, Strike up
the Band and other songs. Guests: Amanda
MacLeod, piano; Scott Boyer/Maria Branje,
vocals. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne
St. N., Barrie. 705-481-1607. $20; $15(sr/st);
free(under 5).
●●7:30: Kokoro Singers. Remember...Love.
Brenda Uchimaru, conductor. Ryerson United
Church, 265 Wilson St. E., Ancaster. 289439-9447. $20; $15(sr/st). Also Jun 5(mat,
Guelph).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest No.6. Young Artists of
QuartetFest. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $15; $10(st).
QuartetFest runs to June 12.
●●6:00: Barrie Jazz Festival. Jazz at Innisfil
Public Library. Jmondew. Featuring Ted Quinlan, guitar; Max Senitt, drums; Andrew Stewart, bass. Innisfil Public Library, Lakeshore
Branch, 967 Innisfil Beach Rd, Innisfil. 705431-7410. Free.
●●8:00: Orangeville Music Theatre. Mary
Poppins. Original Music and Lyrics by Richard
M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. Book
by Julian Fellowes. Town Hall Opera House,
87 Broadway Ave., Orangeville. 519-9423423. $20; $15(child 6-12); $10(5 and under).
Until June 25; dates and times vary.
Saturday June 18
●●7:00: St John’s Church, Waupoos. In Praise
of Holier Women. Gregorian chant, Medieval polyphony, works by Hildegard of Bingen,
and new Canadian music. Schola Magdalena, Toronto; Stephanie Martin, conductor.
St. John’s Anglican Church (Waupoos),
3287 County Road 8, Waupoos. 613-929-2757.
$25. Proceeds to Alternatives for Living.
●●7:30: Charlotte Knight and Jon Corkal. It
Shoulda Been Me: A Cabaret. Works by Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sondheim, B. Joel, J.
Iconis and others. Charlotte Knight, soprano;
Jon Corkal, music director and piano. TBD
Theatre Co. Studio Space, 123 Woolwich St.,
Guelph. 647-637-9252. $15. Also Jun 10(St.
Catharines), 16(Toronto).
●●8:00: Baby Gumm Productions. Liberty
Silver in Concert. R&B, soul, smooth jazz,
funk. Liberty Silver, vocals. Staircase Theatre, 27 Dundurn St. N., Hamilton. 905-5250609. $30.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Marko Pejanovic, piano. Bach: Prelude and Fugue No.5 in D BWV874; Smetana:
On the Seashore; Mozart: Sonata K310; Liszt:
Ballade No.2 in b; Debussy: Préludes Book 1
“Les collines d’Anacapri”; Chopin: Berceuse;
Scherzo No.1. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $20; $10(st).
Sunday June 12
●●2:00: Orangeville Music Theatre. Shrek
The Musical Jr. See Jun 10(8:00).
●●2:30: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Con-
certs. Daniil Protsyuk, Organ. St. George’s
Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Free; voluntary offering
collected.
●●3:00 and 6:00: Sounds of the Next Generation (SONG). The Spirit Garden: Spring Planting. See Jun 11. Also 6:00. Sep 25: Fall Harvest
(tickets only available with Spring Planting
tickets).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. QuartetFest No.7. Young Artists of
QuartetFest. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $15; $10(st).
QuartetFest runs to June 12.
Wednesday June 22
Free Entry
Tuesday June 14
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. In Concert. Ensembles of the K-W
Community Orchestra. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$20; $10(st).
2016 Chamber
Music Festival
Wednesday June 15
●●12:00 noon: Music at St. Andrews.
Noontime Recital. Manuel Piazza, organ.
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (Barrie), 47 Owen St., Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5,
free(st).
June 22 - July 02
Wilfrid Laurier University
Thursday June 16
nyoc.org
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer
Concerts. Julia Brook and Valerie Dueck
Piano Duo. St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston),
270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Free;
voluntary offering collected. Concerts run
every Thurs. Jun 16 to Aug 25.
58 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Can-
ada. Chamber Music Festival: Faculty Concert. Peter Hatch: Cooking with Alice; Simon
Steen/Andersen: Next to Beside Besides,
#0 and #4 (2003/2006) for Percussion and
Cello; Daron Hagen: Duo for Violin and Cello.
David Hetherington; Aiyun Huang; Steve S.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free. Donations welcome.
Thursday June 23
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer
Concerts. In Concert. Elizabeth McDonald, vocals; Emily Martin, vocals. St. George’s
Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Free; voluntary offering
collected. Concerts run every Thurs. Runs
to Aug 25.
Friday June 24
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
Reich: Music for pieces of wood; Schiffelholz: Trio Sonata for Two Bassoons and Piano.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
Saturday June 25
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Can-
ada. Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert. Cole: Postludes; Reich:Drumming part 1;
Mozart: Flute Quartet in D; Jolivet: Pastorales
de Noël; Tomasi: Être ou ne Pas Être. Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University Ave.,
Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
Sunday June 26
●●3:30: Capella Intima/Hammer Baroque.
The Paradise of Travellers: Recollections of
Venice and the Grand Tour. Canzonettas,
arias and motets from 17th-century northern Italy, with readings from the original
travel writers of the period including Coryat
and George Sandys. Bud Roach, director and
tenor; Sheila Dietrich, soprano; Jennifer Enns
Modolo, alto; David Roth, baritone. Church of
St. John the Evangelist, 320 Charlton Ave. W.,
Hamilton. 905-517-3594. Suggested donation
of $15. Also June 22(Toronto).
Tuesday June 28
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Can-
ada. Chamber Music Festival: Faculty Concert. Featuring the Formosa String Quartet.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free. Donations welcome.
●●Wednesday June 29
●●Jun 29 8:00: National Youth Orchestra of
Canada. Chamber Music Festival: Faculty
Concert. Böhme: Trumpet Sextet; Oesterle:
Carrousel; Gripp: String Quartet. Maureen
Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University Ave.,
Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free. Donations
welcome.
Thursday June 30
●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Con-
certs. Min Key Park, Piano. St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.
613-548-4617. Free; voluntary offering collected. Concerts run every Thurs. Runs to
Aug 25.
●●2:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
Pasculli: Omaggio a Bellini - Duetto; Mendelssohn: Octet; Smetana: String Quartet. Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University Ave.,
Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
thewholenote.com
Debussy: Sonate; Mozart: String Quartet in
F, K.90; Bliss: Oboe Quintet; Barber; Summer
Music; Shostakovich: String Quartet No.14.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
Friday July 1
●●2:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
Mendelssohn: String Quartet in f, Op.80; Poulenc: Sonata for Clarinet and Bassoon; Ibert:
Deux Interludes; Beethoven: String Quartet
in D, Op.18 No.3. Maureen Forrester Recital
Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo. 416-5324470. Free.
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
Engelman: Remembrance; Nielsen; Quintet
for Winds Op.43; Poulenc: Trio for Trumpet,
Horn and Trombone; Verdi: String Quartet; Tomasi: Cinq danses profanes et sacrées
pour quintette á vent; Dvorak: String Quintet.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
Saturday July 2
●●8:00: Gravenhurst Opera House. Séan
McCann Live in Concert. Singer-songwriter.
295 Muskoka Rd. S., Gravenhurst. 888-4958888. $35/$30(adv).
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada. Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert. Malcolm Arnold: Brass Quintet No.1;
Górecki: Sonata for Two Violins Op.10; Raff:
Double Wind Quintet; Britten: String Quartet No.2 in C. Maureen Forrester Recital
Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo. 416-5324470. Free.
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Student Concert.
Ravel: Introduction et Allegro; Ewald: Brass
Quintet No.1; Schumann: Piano Quintet; Oesterle: Look on Glass; Goepfart: Wind Quartet
Op.93; Bartok: String Quartet No.4. Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University Ave.,
Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free.
Tuesday July 5
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. In Concert. Ensembles of the
National Youth Orchestra of Canada. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $25; $15(st).
Wednesday July 6
●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru.
Angie Nussey, Piano. Works by Silvestri,
Schönberg, Yiruma, Kern and Hammerstein.
Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N.,
Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5; free(st).
Thursday July 7
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Weston Silver
Band. Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King St.,
Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. Eden Stell Guitar Duo. Sor:
L’Encouragement Op.34; Couperin (arr.
Assad): Le carillon de Cithère; Rameau (arr.
Abreu/Assad): Pièces de Clavecin (excerpts);
Sarajyan (arr. Stell): Armenian Folk Songs;
other works by Poulenc, Mompou and
Brahms. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St.
W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $35; $20(st).
thewholenote.com
●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Harlem
Friday July 8
Gospel Choir. Guest: Measha Brueggergosman, soprano. Knox Presbyterian Church
(Stratford), 142 Ontario St., Stratford. 519271-2101. $40.
●●8:00: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Chamber Music Festival: Faculty Concert.
Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University
Ave., Waterloo. 416-532-4470. Free. Donations welcome.
Thursday July 21
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Sonic Escape.
Sunday July 10
Flute and violin. Midland Cultural Centre,
333 King St., Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
●●7:00: Barrie Concert Band. Midland Sum-
mer Concert. Little Lake Park, 545 Little Lake
Park Rd., Midland. 705-526-4275. Free.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. New Zealand String Quartet. Haydn:
Quartet Op.71 No.2; G. Farr: Quartet “Te Tai-ORehua;” Dvorak: “American” Quartet Op.96.
KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $35; $20(st).
Saturday July 23
●●8:00: Muskoka Pride. Irish Mythen. Con-
temporary folk with a tinge of traditional
Celtic influence. Gravenhurst Opera House,
295 Muskoka Rd. S., Gravenhurst. 888-4958888. $35. In support of Elder Abuse Prevention Muskoka.
Wednesday July 13
Sunday July 24
●●2:30: Seniors Serenade. A Summer Rhap-
●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department
sody. Piano students of Cheryl Graham.
Grace United Church (Barrie), 350 Grove St.
E., Barrie. 705-726-1181. Free. 3:30: tea and
cookies, $5.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Pallade Musica. Early music ensemble. Badalla: Motet “Non piangete;” Jarzębski:
Susanna videns; de la Guerre: Susanne, Cinquième cantate à voix seule; Sonata in G for
violin; Eccles: Oh, take him gently from the
pile; and other works. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$35; $20(st).
of Music. Instrumental Chamber Ensembles.
Three student chamber ensembles. Conrad
Grebel University College, 140 Westmount Rd.
N., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24226. Free.
Reception follows.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Three Ukrainian Pianists in Recital.
Olena Klyucharova, piano; Andiy Tykhonov,
piano; Vyacheslav Zubkov, piano. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $30; $20(st).
Thursday July 28
●●2:00: Ottawa International Chamber
Thursday July 14
Music Festival. Lemon Bucket Orkestra.
Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa.
613-234-8008. Free.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber
Music Society. Syrene Saxophone Quartet of the Netherlands: Fresh and Sweet
with a Bite. Handel: Music for the Royal Fireworks; Pierné: Introduction et variations sur
une ronde populaire; Haydn: String Quartet
Op.33 No.3 “Bird”; Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody
on a Theme of Paganini; Glazunov: Saxophone
Quartet Op.109; Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue.
KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $35; $20(st).
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Tien Hsieh, Piano.
Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King St., Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
Friday July 15
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Ensembles of the National Youth
Orchestra of Canada. KWCMS Music Room,
57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673.
$25; $15(st).
Saturday July 16
●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department
of Music. Music of Peace, Music of Joy: University Choir. Demonstration of various African songs and dance, Celtic dance and song,
swing, and Hawaiian song and hula. The
Cedars, 543 Beechwood Dr., Waterloo. 519885-0220 x24226. $10; $5(sr/st).
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Alexander Tselyakov, piano. SaintSaëns: Sonata for violin and piano Op.75;
Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit; Dvorak: Quintet for
piano and strings in A Op.81. Canadian Sinfonietta String Quartet; Joyce Lai, violin; Ian
Clark, viola; Andras Weber, cello. KWCMS
Music Room, 57 Young St. W., Waterloo. 519886-1673. $35; $20(st).
Saturday July 30
●●7:30: Muskoka Concert Association. Dan
Hill. Sometimes When We Touch, Daddy’s
Song, Can’t We Try, and others. Gravenhurst
Opera House, 295 Muskoka Rd. S., Gravenhurst. 888-495-8888. $35. Fundraiser for
Muskoka Concert Association.
Wednesday August 3
●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru.
Moellman Family on Piano, Violin and
Recorder. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church,
50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5;
free(st).
●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. International Piano Series 3. Tony Yike Yang,
piano. St. Andrew’s Church (Stratford), 25 St.
Andrew’s St., Stratford. 519-271-2101. $30.
Tuesday July 19
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Ensembles of [email protected] KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young St. W.,
Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $20; $10(st).
Thursday August 4
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Lafayette String
Wednesday July 20
Quartet. Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King
St., Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
●●12:00 noon: Music at St. Andrews. Noon-
time Recital. Works by Bach, Scarlatti, Gershwin, Elgar, Poulenc and Bedard. Simon Irving,
organ; Janice Beninger, piano. St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Church (Barrie), 47 Owen St.,
Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5, free(st).
Saturday August 6
●●2:00: Stratford Summer Music. Choral
Concert. Choir of Holy Trinity Church,
Stratford-upon-Avon. St. James Anglican
Church (Stratford), 41 Mornington St., Stratford. 519-271-2101. PWYC.
●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music
Society. Lucy Zhang, violin and Victor Chen,
piano. Ravel: Tzigane; Paganini: Caprice No.17;
Enescu: Violin Sonata No.3; Beethoven:
Sonata No.5. KWCMS Music Room, 57 Young
St. W., Waterloo. 519-886-1673. $25; $15(st).
Wednesday August 10
●●2:30: Seniors Serenade. Véronique
Mathieu, Violin and Stephanie Chua, Piano.
Works by Champagne, Willan, Schmidt and
Molinari. Grace United Church (Barrie),
350 Grove St. E., Barrie. 705-726-1181. Free.
3:30: tea and cookies, $5.
Thursday August 11
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Anagnoson and
Kinton, Piano Duo. Midland Cultural Centre,
333 King St., Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
Wednesday August 17
●●12:00 noon: Music at St. Andrews. Noon-
time Recital. Norman Reintamm, organ.
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (Barrie), 47 Owen St., Barrie. 705-726-1181. $5,
free(st).
Thursday August 18
●●7:30: Festival of the Bay. Hog Town Brass
Quintet. Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King St.,
Midland. 705-527-4420. $30.
Tuesday August 23
●●7:30: OperaMuskoka. Opera-in-Concert.
Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin. Daevyd Pepper,
tenor; University of Toronto Faculty of Music
Group. Rene M. Caisse Memorial Theatre,
100 Clearbrook Trail, Bracebridge. 705-6458400. $25. Performed in Russian with English surtitles.
Wednesday August 24
●●7:30: OperaMuskoka. Jennifer Tung in
Concert. Jennifer Tung and selected Vocal
Master class participants. Rene M. Caisse
Memorial Theatre, 100 Clearbrook Trail,
Bracebridge. 705-645-8400. $25.
Thursday August 25
●●7:30: OperaMuskoka. Stars of Tomorrow
Concert. Janelle Laarakker and others. Rene
M. Caisse Memorial Theatre, 100 Clearbrook
Trail, Bracebridge. 705-645-8400. $20.
Friday August 26
●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Inter-
national Piano Series 6: Jan Lisiecki Programme 1. Jan Lisiecki, piano. St. Andrew’s
Church (Stratford), 25 St. Andrew’s St.,
Stratford. 519-271-2101. $40.
Sunday August 28
●●7:00: Beaux Strings. Beaux in the Barn.
From Bach to Gaga on traditional string
instruments. Brooke Stewart, violin; Sybil
Shanahan, cello; Guests TBA. Century Barn
Cavan, 400 Stewart Line, Cavan. 416-8035498. $25.
Wednesday September 7
●●Sep 07 12:00 noon: Midday Music with
Shigeru. Pamela Cioroch, Piano. Works by
Bach, Beethoven and Chopin. Hi-Way Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705726-1181. $5; free(st).
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 59
C. Music Theatre
●●Mirvish. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love &
Murder. Music and lyrics by Steven Lutvak,
book and lyrics by Robert L. Freedman. Royal
Alexandra Theatre, 284 King St. W. 416-8721212. $35-$150. Opens May 18, 7:30pm. Runs
to June 26. Tues-Sat(7:30pm), Wed/Sat/
Sun(1:30pm).
●●Mirvish. Roald Dahl’s Matilda: the Musical.
Music and lyrics by Tim Minchin, book by Dennis Kelly, based on novel by Roald Dahl. Ed
Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria Street. 416872-1212. $38-$175. Opens July 5, 7:30pm.
Ongoing. Tues-Sat(7:30pm), Wed/Sat/
Sun(1:30pm).
●●National Ballet of Canada. Le Petit Prince.
Music by Kevin Lau. Based on the book by
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Guillaume Côté,
choreographer. Four Seasons Centre for the
Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-3459595. $37-$265. Opens June 4, 7:30pm. Runs
to June 12. Times vary. Visit national.ballet.
ca for details.
●●National Ballet of Canada. Giselle. Music
by Adolphe Adam, revised by Joseph Horovitz. Sir Peter Wright, choreographer, after
the choreography of Jean Coralli and Marius Petipa. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-345-9595.
$37-$265. Opens June 15, 7:30pm. Runs to
June 19. Times vary. Visit national.ballet.ca
for details.
●●National Ballet of Canada and Art Gallery of Ontario. The Dreamers Ever Leave
You. Music by Lubomyr Melnyk. Robert
Binet, choreographer. Art Gallery of Ontario,
317 Dundas St. W. 416-979-6648. $55;
$45(NBC/AGO members). Opens August 31,
6:00pm. Runs to September 10. Days and
Times vary. Visit ago.net for details.
●●Orangeville Music Theatre. Shrek The
Musical Jr. Music by Jeanine Tesori, lyrics and
book by David Lindsay-Abaire. Based on the
DreamWorks Animation Motion Picture and
the book by William Steig. Town Hall Opera
House, 87 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-9423423. $20; $15(ch). Opens June 10, 8:00pm.
Runs to June 12. Times vary. Visit orangevillemusictheatre.com for details.
●●Orangeville Music Theatre. Mary Poppins. Music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman,
Robert B. Sherman, George Stiles & Anthony
Drewe; book by Julian Fellowes. Town Hall
Opera House, 87 Broadway, Orangeville.
519-942-3423. $20; $15(ch). Opens June 17,
8:00pm. Runs to June 25. Days and times
vary. Visit orangevillemusictheatre.com for
details.
●●Port Hope Festival Theatre. Crazy for
You. Music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira
Gershwin, book by Ken Ludwig. Cameco Capitol Arts Centre, 20 Queen St., Port Hope.
1-800-434-5092. $24-35. Opens July 2,
2:00pm. Runs to July 23. Tues/Wed/Fri/Sat/
Sun(2:00pm), Thurs-Sat(8:00pm).
●●Port Hope Festival Theatre. Mamma Mia!
Music and lyrics by Benny Andersson, Björn
Ulvaeus, and some songs with Stig Anderson.
Book by Catherine Johnson. Cameco Capitol
Arts Centre, 20 Queen St., Port Hope. 1-800434-5092. $24-35. Opens August 9, 2:00pm.
Runs to September 18. Tues/Wed/Fri/Sat/
Sun(2:00pm), Thurs-Sat(8:00pm).
●●Randolph Academy for the Performing
Arts. Footloose. Music by Tom Snow with
Eric Carmen, Sammy Hagar, Kenny Loggins,
and Jim Steinman, lyrics by Dean Pitchford,
book by Dean Pitchford and Walter Bobbie.
MUSIC THEATRE covers a wide range of music types
including opera, operetta and musicals as well as nontraditional performance genres where words and music are
in some fashion equal partners in the drama. These listings
have been sorted alphabetically BY PRESENTER. Some
information here is also included in our GTA and Beyond The
GTA listings sections. Readers whose primary interest is
MUSIC THEATRE should start their search with this section.
Should your show be here? We welcome all submissions of
MUSIC THEATRE at [email protected]
●●Capitol Kids. Beauty and the Beast Jr.
Music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice. Book by Linda Woolverton.
Sculthorpe Theatre, 20 Queen St., Port Hope.
1-800-434-5092. $26; $13(st). Opens August
19, 7:00pm. Days and times vary. Until August
28. Visit capitoltheatre.com for details.
●●Civic Light Opera Company. You’re a Good
Man, Charlie Brown. Music and lyrics by
Clark Gesner, based on characters created
by Charles M. Schulz. Joe Cascone, director/
designer. Zion Cultural Centre, 1650 Finch
Ave. E. 416-755-1717. $28. Opens June 1,
7:00pm. Runs to June 12. Days and times vary.
Visit civiclightoperacompany.com for details.
●●Drayton Entertainment. Sister Act. Music
by Alan Menken, lyrics by Glenn Slater, book
by Cheri Steinkellner and Bill Steinkellner,
based on the screenplay by Joseph Howard. Huron County Playhouse, RR1, 70689 B
Line, South Huron. 1-855-372-9866. $26-$44.
Opens June 8, 2:00pm. Runs to June 25. Days
and times vary. Visit draytonentertainment.
com for details.
●●Drayton Entertainment. All Shook Up.
Book by Joe DiPietro. Join us for a fun-filled,
feel-good ‘50s musical comedy inspired by
the music of Elvis Presley. Dunfield Theatre
Cambridge, 46 Grand Ave. S., Cambridge.
1-855-372-9866. $26-$44. Opens June 22,
2:00pm. Runs to July 10. Wed-Sat(7:30pm),
Tues/Wed/Thurs/Sat/Sun(2:00pm).
●●Drayton Entertainment. Canadian
Legends: A Celebration of Our Musical
Heritage. Conceived and directed by Alex
Mustakas, orchestrations and vocal arrangements by Robert Foster, with music by various. Huron County Playhouse, RR1, 70689 B
Line, South Huron. 1-855-372-9866. $26-$44.
Opens June 30, 2:00pm. Runs to July 16. Days
and times vary. Visit draytonentertainment.
com for details.
●●Drayton Entertainment. Mamma Mia!
Music and lyrics by Benny Andersson, Björn
Ulvaeus, and some songs with Stig Anderson. Book by Catherine Johnson. King’s Wharf
Theatre, 97 Jury Dr., Penetanguishene. 1-855372-9866. $26-$44. Opens July 14, 2:00pm.
Runs to August 6. Tues/Wed/Thurs/Sat/
Sun(2:00pm), Thurs-Sat(7:30pm).
●●Drayton Entertainment. Anything Goes.
Music and lyrics by Cole Porter.
●●Original book by P.G. Wodehouse, Guy Bolton, Howard Lindsay, and Russel Crouse, with
new book by Timothy Crouse and John Weidman. Huron County Playhouse, RR1, 70689
B Line, South Huron. 1-855-372-9866. $26$44. Opens July 21, 2:00pm. Runs to Aug 6.
60 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Tues-Sat(2:00pm), Tues/Thurs/Sat(7:30pm).
●●Drayton Entertainment. Mamma Mia!
Music and lyrics by Benny Andersson, Björn
Ulvaeus, and some songs with Stig Anderson. Book by Catherine Johnson. Huron
County Playhouse, RR1, 70689 B Line, South
Huron. 1-855-372-9866. $26-$44. Opens
Aug 11, 2:00pm. Runs to September 3. Tues/
Wed/Thurs/Sat(2:00pm), Tues/Thurs/Fri/
Sat(7:30pm).
●●Drayton Entertainment. Smoky Joe’s Café.
Music and lyrics by Jerry Leiber and Mike
Stoller. This record-breaking musical revue
features 39 iconic tunes from the 1950s
through 1960s – all penned by the legendary
song-writing duo Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Drayton Festival Theatre, 33 Wellington
St. S., Drayton. 1-855-372-9866. $26-$44.
Opens August 17, 2:00pm. Runs to September 3. Tues/Wed/Thurs/Sat(2:00pm),
Wed-Sat(7:30pm).
●●Gravenhurst Opera House. The Marvelous
Wonderettes. Conceived by Roger Bean.
Gravenhurst Opera House, 295 Muskoka
Rd. S., Gravenhurst. 1-888-495-8888.
$38; $28(st). Opens August 2, 2:30pm.
Runs to August 26. Tues-Thurs(2:30pm),
Wed-Sat(8:00pm)
●●Highlands Summer Festival. Oliver! Music,
lyrics and book by Lionel Bart. Based on the
novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. Northern Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, Haliburton. 1-855-457-9933. $34. Opens July
4, 8:00pm. Runs to July 14. Days and times
vary. Visit highlandsummerfestival.on.ca for
details.
●●Lower Ossington Theatre. Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat. Music
by Andrew Lloyd Webber, lyrics by Tim Rice.
The Lower Ossington Theatre, 100A Ossington Ave. 416-915-6747. $49.99-$59.99.
Opens June 2, 7:30pm. Runs to June 26. Days
and times vary. Visit gogogojoseph.com for
details.
●●Lower Ossington Theatre. Peter and the
Starcatcher. Music by Wayne Barker, book
by Rick Elice. The Lower Ossington Theatre,
100A Ossington Ave. 416-915-6747. $49.99$59.99. Opens July 7, 7:30pm. Runs to August
28. Days and times vary. Visit lowerossingtontheatre.com for details.
●●Lower Ossington Theatre. West Side
Story. Music by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics by
Stephen Sondheim, book by Arthur Laurents.
The Lower Ossington Theatre, 100A Ossington Ave. 416-915-6747. $54.99-$64.99. Opens
August 11, 7:30pm. Runs to September 18.
Thurs-Sat(7:30pm), Sat/Sun(3:30pm).
Randolph Theatre, 736 Bathurst St. 416-9242243. $25. Opens July 28, 8:00pm. Runs to
August 6. Days and times vary. Visit randolphacademy.com for details.
●●Shaw Festival. Alice in Wonderland. Music
and lyrics by Allen Cole, book by Peter Hinton,
based on the book by Lewis Carroll. Festival
Theatre, 10 Queen’s Parade, Niagara-on-thelake. 1-800-511-7429. $35 and up. Previews
begin April 27, 2:00pm. Runs to October 16.
Days and times vary. Visit shawfest.com for
details.
●●Shaw Festival. Sweeney Todd. Music and
lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, book by Hugh
Wheeler. Jackie Maxwell, director. Festival
Theatre, 10 Queen’s Parade, Niagara-on-thelake. 1-800-511-7429. $35 and up. Previews
begin July 17, 2:00pm. Runs to October 19.
Days and times vary. Visit shawfest.com for
details.
●●Showboat Festival Theatre. Fitz Happens!
Music, lyrics and book by Mark Weatherley. Showboat Festival Theatre, 296 Fielden
Ave., Port Colbourne. 905-834-0833. $25$32. Opens June 8, 2:00pm. Runs to June
12. Times vary. Visit showboattheatre.ca for
details.
●●Soulpepper Concert Series. The Voyager
Golden Records. Music Director Mike Ross
leads an extra-terrestrial journey inspired by
the original Voyager Golden Records. Young
Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank
House Lane. 416-866-8666. $25-$60. Opens
June 9, 7:30pm. Runs to June 15. Days vary.
Visit soulpepper.ca for details.
●●Soulpepper Concert Series. The Canadian
Pacific Railway. Host and narrator Tom Allen
and Music Director Mike Ross lead a company of stellar artists through a historical and
musical ride along the ribbon of steel that
tied Canada together. Young Centre for the
Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Lane. 416866-8666. $25-$60. Opens June 16, 7:30pm.
Runs to June 25. Days vary. Visit soulpepper.
ca for details.
●●Soulpepper Concert Series. Taking the A
Train Uptown Manhattan -- Harlem. Albert
Schultz, writer and host. Mike Ross, music
director. This concert is a tour of the music,
words and ideas that have made Harlem
great. Young Centre for the Performing Arts,
50 Tank House Lane. 416-866-8666. $25-$60.
Opens August 26, 7:30pm. Runs to September 3. Days and times vary. Visit soulpepper.
ca for details.
●●Starvox Entertainment. Forever Plaid.
Book by Stuart Ross, music supervision and
arrangements by James Raitt, based on
1950s male pop quartets. Panasonic Theatre,
651 Yonge Street. 1-800-461-3333. $39.95$99.95. Opens May 17, 8:00pm. Runs to June
12. Tues-Sat(8pm), Wed/Sat/Sun(2pm).
●●Stratford Festival. A Chorus Line. Music
by Marvin Hamlisch, lyrics by Edward Kleban, book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas
Dante. Conceived and originally directed and
choreographed by Michael Bennett. Donna
Feore, director and choreographer. Festival Theatre, 55 Queen St, Stratford. 1-800567-1600. $25-$175. Previews begin April 19,
2:00pm. Runs to October 30. Days and times
vary. Visit stratfordfestival.ca for details.
●●Stratford Festival. A Little Night Music.
Music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, book
by Hugh Wheeler. Avon Theatre, 99 Downie
St, Stratford. 1-800-567-1600. $25-$175. Previews begin May 21, 2:00pm. Runs to October
thewholenote.com
23. Days and times vary. Visit stratfordfestival.ca for details.
●●Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. A Tale of
Two Cities. By Victor Davies and Eugene Benson. Michael Rose, music director. Robert Gill
Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St.
416-366-7723. $28; $22(sr/st).Opens Jul 29,
8:00. Also Jul 31(mat), Aug 6(mat and eve).
●●Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. The Tales
of Hoffmann. By Offenbach. Raisa Nakhmanovich, music director. Robert Gill Theatre,
University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-3667723. $28; $22(sr/st). Opens Jul 30, 3:00. Also
Aug 2, 4, 7(mat).
●●Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Julius Caesar. By Handel. Maria H. Y. Jung,
music director. Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-366-7723.
$28; $22(sr/st). Opens Jul 30, 8:00. Also
Aug 3(mat and eve), 5.
●●SummerWorks Performance Festival/
Music Picnic. Mr. Shi and His Lover. Text
by Wong Teng Chi. Music by Njo Kong Kie.
In Mandarin with English Surtitles. Jordan
Cheng, tenor; Po Jen Chen, baritone; Carol
Wang, percussionist; Njo Kong Kie, pianist/
music director; Johnny Tam, stage director.
Theatre Centre Mainspace, 1115 Queen St. W.
647-636-1401. $15. Opens Aug 5 at 8:00pm.
Also 7, 8, 11, 12 and 13. Various times.
●●Toronto Catholic District School Board
Staff Arts. Mary Poppins. Music and lyrics
by Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman,
George Stiles & Anthony Drewe. Book by Julian Fellowes. Cardinal Carter Academy for
the Arts Theatre, 36 Greenfield Ave. 416-2228282 x2787. $25. Opens June 11, 7:30pm. Runs
to June 18. Days and times vary. Visit tcdsb.
Beat by Beat | Jazz Stories
org/staffarts for details.
●●Toronto Operetta Theatre. Paris on Broadway. Works by Offenbach, Lehár, Gershwin,
Porter, Herbert and others. Elizabeth Beeler,
Curtis Sullivan, Jennifer Taverner, Vania Chan,
Michael Nyby, Dion Mazerolle, Guillermo SilvaMarin; Michael Rose, music director/piano.
Jane Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence Centre
for the Arts, 27 Front St. E. 416-366-7723. $25,
$45. Jun 19 3:00.
●●Toronto Summer Music Festival. The Rape
of Lucretia. Emma Char, mezzo (Lucretia);
Peter Rolfe Dauz, baritone (Junius); Beste
Kalender, mezzo (Bianca); Jasper Leever,
bass (Collatinus); Iain MacNeil, baritone; (Tarquinius); Ellen McAteer, soprano (Lucia);
Owen McAusland, tenor (Male Chorus); Chelsea Rus, soprano (Female Chorus); Topher
Mokrzewski, music director; Anna Theodosakis, stage director; Joel Ivany, artistic director. Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge St.
1-855-622-2787. $35-$95. July 22, 7:30pm.
●●Westben Arts Festival Theatre. The Pencil Salesman. World première gala performance. Finley, based on an idea by A. M.
Herzberg. John Fanning and Alexander Dobson, baritones; Donna Bennett and Virginia
Hatfield, sopranos; Keith Klassen, tenor;
and others; Westben Festival Orchestra and
Chorus; Daniel Warren conductor; Michael
Mori, director. Westben Concert Barn,
6698 County Rd. 30,Campbellford. 705-6535508 or 1-877-883-5777. $75; $73(sr); $30(st/
under 30); $5(youth). 1:00: pre-performance chat; 4:30: post-performance reception. Opens. June 25, 2:00pm. Also on Jun 26,
Jul 1(eve), 2, 3.
Prince Edward County
Jazz, continued from
Brian Barlow
page 17
“The band is
all acoustic with
nothing to set up
so they simply
arrive, jump out
and play a 45
minute set. Then
they jump back
in the van and
drive to the next
location. It’s very
popular and some
people spend the
day following
them from place to
place. This festival is all about Prince Edward County and all it has to
offer, from art galleries, to beaches, to wineries."
It’s also all about cultivating the future of the music. “Our programs
for young musicians have been a main focus for us for many years
now and will probably be the most important legacy of the festival”
Barlow says. It begins with their TD Jazz Education Program in the
spring, with four high school jazz ensembles chosen out of the many
who ask to come each year. “This year we hosted 90 students. We tend
to look for schools from the smaller communities where funding for
music programs is not as readily available, but we do have schools
from the GTA from time to time. We also like to have schools come
two years in a row when possible. We find that the second year the
students know what to expect and get in the groove a lot quicker.”
And then there’s the “Rising Young Star” that is a feature of every
August’s festival. “We receive applications from all across Canada
and the chosen candidate receives a cash award plus the opportunity to perform each evening at the Regent Theatre with our mainstage artists. The RYS is also featured at our evening Jam Sessions and
performs a concert of their own on the Friday of the festival week.”
Many of these musicians have gone on to be professional players and
several have come back to the festival as main-stage artists (Marika
Galea, Ian Wright and Eli Bennett).
And then there’s their Young Jazz Series, providing paid concert
performances for students in the post-secondary school system (UofT,
Humber, York). Among several other excellent young artists, vocalist/
pianist Hannah Barstow will appear, as well as versatile singer Kalya
Ramu who can be heard around Toronto regularly singing not only
jazz standards but also blues and rock with Angora, and winning folk
in the duo Mermaid and the Bear.
From jazz as big brand to keeping the real thing alive, here’s hoping
you, dear WholeNote reader, will come around the jazz clubs this patio
season, get out and about, and spread the word. Without an audience,
live music cannot live. And live music can’t be Spotified!
SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE
AND RESEARCH CENTRE
Guillermo Silva-Marin, General Director
Toronto’s own mini summer opera festival!
THE TALES OF HOFFMANN
by Jacques Offenbach ~ Raisa Nakhmanovich, Music Director
Sat Jul 30, Sun Aug 7 at 3pm & Tue Aug 2, Thu Aug 4 at 8pm
JULIUS CAESAR
by George Frideric Handel ~ Maria H. Y. Jung, Music Director
Sat Jul 30, Wed Aug 3, Fri Aug 5 at 8pm & Wed Aug 3 at 3pm
Ori Dagan is a Toronto-based jazz musician, writer and
educator who can be reached at oridagan.com.
A WORLD PREMIERE
A TALE OF TWO CITIES
by Victor Davies and Eugene Benson ~ Michael Rose, Music Director
Fri Jul 29, Sat Aug 6 at 8pm & Sun Jul 31, Sat Aug 6 at 3pm
ROBERT GILL THEATRE
University of Toronto, 214 College Street (at St. George)
Subscription: 3 operas for the price of 2!! $60 (including HST)
Reg. $28, Seniors/Students $22. Call now to reserve the best seats.
For tickets and subscriptions call the St. Lawrence Centre Box Office:
416-366-7723
or visit:
www.stlc.com
For more information visit www.solt.ca or call 416-922-2912.
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 61
Beat by Beat | Mainly Clubs, Mostly Jazz!
I
Even Richer
Than Usual
Avishai Cohen
I also must reluctantly mention that Rich
Brown’s rinsethealgorithm, about whom I’ve
written in the past, will
be playing a reunion show
at The Rex on Canada Day
after four years apart. I
say “reluctantly” because
I hate crowds; my rates
of happiness are generally inversely proportional
to my proximity to strangers’ bodies. Yet I will,
and must, bear it for the
music: rinsethealgorithm
is back, and everyone
who wants to know must
know. Downbeat at 8pm.
Enjoy the festival, friends. Plan your routes carefully and buy your
tickets early. May your ears be well-fed, and may your lines of vision
be unobstructed.
BOB BEN
t’s Toronto Jazz Festival time again! Time for a few great players
from out of town to play with and among the vast pool of equally
great Toronto players. It really is eye-opening to look at the listings
for the Jazz Festival (torontojazz.com ) and realize just how many of
the gigs listed are gigs that happen year round, and would continue
happening, festival or no. When it comes to the jazz scene in this city,
we truly have an embarrassment of riches. It’s just that around the
end of June we get a little richer.
And I will talk about all of that in just a minute, but first, it’s
anecdote time.
When I was in high school, I was a big progressive rock geek,
which, I know, is utterly unsurprising because a lot of young jazz
nerds started off that way. I don’t know why – maybe it was just the
challenge – but I loved working out the time signatures of songs in
which it wasn’t immediately obvious, or in which the number of
beats changed from bar to bar. Of course, this is neither a ubiquitous nor an essential feature of progressive rock, nor is it one exclusive
to the genre, but it attracted me nonetheless. And to be frank, while
counting odd time signatures fascinated me in high school, I can think
of few things more tedious now.
My cousin, also a music geek, offered me a challenge one day. He
played me a 20-second sample of bassist (not to be confused with
the jazz trumpeter of the same name) Avishai Cohen’s Ever-Evolving
Etude from his 2008 album Gently Disturbed, although I didn’t know
the title at the time, nor would I have remembered the name. I wasn’t
into jazz back then, much less what I was hearing here. It was unlike
anything I’d ever heard before. It was unconventional, complex,
difficult to parse. The bass and piano threw forth a fury of notes
that seemed, to my untrained ear, to have the rhythmic logic and
constancy of a person trying to kill a particularly evasive mosquito.
It was chaotic, furious and wonderful.
What kept it grounded for me were the pitches, satisfyingly tonal,
and the timbre, new to my ear at the time, of bass and piano playing
in unison, to which I am now much more accustomed.
He asked what the time signature was. When I couldn’t figure it out,
he said he’d be better off not knowing anyway; how can you enjoy it if
you’re counting?
Flash forward six or seven years. I’m in the final year of my music
degree and the great New York drummer John Riley is making an
appearance at our school. During a large portion of his lecture, Riley
deconstructs the very excerpt my cousin had showed me years earlier.
And so, I learned the answer.
I gained a lot from that lecture, but to this day I cannot count the
pulse of the Ever-Evolving Etude and certainly couldn’t notate it. Not
on my life. And it really is better like that.
As my ears grew (both figuratively and literally), I started to hear
Cohen’s music differently. Although I always heard, and still hear, the
progressive and fusion elements in it, I started to hear elements of
Latin American music; when I hear a heavily syncopated vamp and
complex, adventurous percussion, what else comes to mind but salsa?
This is especially true on the album Unity, on which Antonio Sanchez,
compared by some to an octopus for his remarkable limb independence, is responsible for the drumming.
You can explore Cohen’s music for yourself, in preparation for his
Toronto appearance on June 30 at the St. Lawrence Centre.
There’s no shortage of out-of-towners I’m excited to see listed for
the festival – among them Laila Biali, Phil Dwyer, Mark McLean’s
Playground and Robert Glasper, the latter two of whom I’ve been
lucky to see perform in person on more than one delightful occasion –
but if I wrote about every single one, I would be here all night.
62 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Bob Ben is The WholeNote’s jazz listings editor. He
can be reached at [email protected]
D. In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
120 Diner
120 Church St. 416-792-7725
120diner.com (full schedule)
June 1 6pm Genevieve Marantette & Robert Scott; 8pm Lisa Particelli’s Girls’ Night
Out Jazz Jam. June 2 6pm Ross MacIntyre & Kelly Jefferson; 9pm Nerissa Kay &
Friends. June 3 6pm Sinners Choir. June 4
6pm Cohen, Cohen & Willett; 8:30pm Stevey
Ross and the Blue Mambo Swing. June 5
5pm Peter Donato; 8:30pm Marilyn Lightstone. June 7 6pm Joey O’Neil; 8pm Arlene
Paculan. June 8 6pm Genevieve Marantette
& Robert Scott; 8pm Lisa Particelli’s Girls’
Night Out Jazz Jam. June 9 6pm Ross MacIntyre & Stu Harrison; 9pm Wonderfest. June
10 6pm Music Can Heal presents. June 11
6pm Heidi Lange. June 12 6pm Bella Canto;
8:30pm Carolyn Credico. June 14 6pm Megan
Worthy; 8pm Marshall Jacklin. June 15 6pm
Genevieve Marantette & Robert Scott; 8pm
Lisa Particelli’s Girls’ Night Out Jazz Jam.
June 16 6pm Ross MacIntyre & Mark Keiswetter. June 17 6pm Elvira Hopper Trio. June
18 6pm “Sistah’s Telling” with Sistah Louis and
Friends. June 19 6pm Fathers’ Day with The
Owls; 9pm Bless Your Purple Heart: Prince
Tribute. June 21 6pm Christine Gaidies; 8pm
Emilie Mover; 10pm Klezfactor. June 22 6pm
Genevieve Marantette & Robert Scott; 8pm
Lisa Particelli’s Girls’ Night Out Jazz Jam.
June 23 6pm Ross MacIntyre & Sophia Perlman. June 24 6pm Gabi Epstein $20. June 25
12pm Debbie Fleming $20; 5pm Kate Unger
$20; 8pm Ori Dagan $20; 11pm Ryley Murray
$20. June 26 12pm Shannon Butcher & Ross
MacIntyre $20; 5pm LJ Folk $20; 8pm Lady
Be Good $20. June 27 8pm Stu MacDonald
$20; 11pm Brownman Akoustic Trio $20. June
28 6pm Mel Côté $20; 8pm Stacey MacIntyre
$20. June 29 6pm Judith Lander $20; 8pm
Lisa Particelli’s Girls’ Night Out Jazz Jam.
June 30 5pm The Ault Sisters $20; 8pm Jacelyn Holmes $20; 11pm Janet Whiteway $20.
July 1 6pm Lisa Particelli $20; 9pm Mandy
Goodhandy’s Musical Cabaret $20. July 2
12pm Aucoin, Davidson, & Samaras $20. July
3 5pm Julie Michels & David Restivo $20; 8pm
Genevieve “Gigi” Marantette $20.
Alleycatz
2409 Yonge St. 416-481-6865
alleycatz.ca
All shows: 9pm unless otherwise indicated.
Call for cover charge info.
June 2, 4, 23, July 7 Wendy Robins The Quiet
Storm. June 3, 11, 18, 24 Lady Kane. June
9 Solo & Duets Concert Series. June 10, July
2 Jamesking. June 16 John Nicholson Jazz
Quartet. June 17 Taxi. June 25 Parkside Drive.
June 30 Carlos Morgan & The Flow. July
1 Pussy Cats.
Artword Artbar
15 Colbourne St., Hamilton. 905-543-8512
artword.net (full schedule)
June 2 8pm Big Fat Greek Jewish Music
Night feat. The Horables, and The Friends
of Markos $15(general)/$10(students).
June 3, 4 8pm Micah Barnes “New York
Stories” $15(adv)/$20(door). June 9 8pm
Doug Murphy (guitar) with Nicola Moore
(voice), Mike Ricci (sax, flute), Oscar Galbraith (drums), Alana Gunn (bass), and more
$10(general)/$5(students). June 10 8pm
Chris Wallaces’ (drums) Many Names with
Adrean Farrugia (piano), Artie Roth (bass).
June 11 8pm Elizabeth Herrera Rodriguez.
Bloom
2315 Bloor St. W. 416-767-1315
bloomrestaurant.com
All shows: 19+. Call for reservations.
June 30 7pm Fredy Suares (voice) with Jorge
Maza (flute), Johan Urbizo (percussion),
Roberto Riveron (bass) $45 (includes dinner).
Blue Goose Tavern, The
1 Blue Goose St. 416-255-2442
thewholenote.com
thebluegoosetavern.com
June 5 4pm Blues At the Goose with the Big
Groove Rhythm Section feat. Adam Beer-Colacino & Joel Visentin. June 12 4pm Blues At
the Goose with the Big Groove Rhythm Section feat. Morgan Davis & Al Lerman.
Burdock
1184 Bloor St. W. 416-546-4033
burdockto.com (Full schedule)
All shows: 9pm
June 4 Young Guns Quartet w/ The Ault Sisters $10(adv)/$15(door). June 25 Matt
Barker and the Trio (NYC) Album Release
$12(adv)/$15(door). June 26 Adrian Underhill & Charlotte Cornfield $8(adv)/$10(door).
June 28 Endangered Blood $15.
June 30 Lazersuzan & The Starfires
$8(adv)/$10(door).
Castro’s Lounge
2116e Queen St. E. 416-699-8272
castroslounge.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover/PWYC
C’est What
67 Front St. E. (416) 867-9499
cestwhat.com (full schedule)
June 4, 25 3pm The Hot Five Jazzmakers.
June 11 3pm The Boxcar Boys.
De Sotos
1079 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-651-2109
desotos.ca (full schedule)
Every Sun 11am Sunday Live Jazz Brunch
No cover.
Emmet Ray, The
924 College St. 416-792-4497
theemmetray.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover/PWYC
June 2 9pm Bossa Tres: Victor Monsiváis
(guitar), Abbey Sholzberg (bass). June 5
8:30pm Snaggle.
Fat City Blues
890 College St. 647-345-8282
Gate 403
403 Roncesvalles Ave. 416-588-2930
gate403.com
All shows: PWYC.
June 1 5pm Donghwan Moon Jazz Band; 9pm
Julian Fauth Blues Night. June 2 5pm Bruce
Chapman Blues Duo with feature guests; 9pm
Darcy Windover Band. June 3 5pm Denise
Leslie Jazz Band; 9pm The Pearl Motel. June
4 5pm Bill Heffernan and His Friends; 9pm
“Keiko” Jazz Band. June 5 5pm Grateful Sunday feat. Trevor Cape and The Field; 9pm The
Ault Sisters. June 6 5pm Mike and Jill Daley
Jazz Duo; 9pm Noah Franche-Nolan Jazz
Trio. June 7 5pm Vivia Kay and Kavin Barrett
Jazz Duo; 9pm Tim Shia: The Victoria Bridge
Preservation Society. June 8 5pm Michelle
Rumball with friend; 9pm Julian Fauth Blues
Night. June 9 5pm Amber Leigh Jazz Trio;
9pm Kevin Laliberté Jazz & Flamenco Trio.
June 10 5pm Vienna D’Amato Hall Jazz Trio;
9pm Jerry Quintyne Jazz Band. June 11 5pm
Bill Heffernan and His Friends; 9pm Julian
Fauth Blues Quartet. June 12 5pm Hello Darlings; 9pm Peter Kauffman Jazz Trio. June 13
5pm Byung-Gul Jung Jazz Band; 9pm Chris
Staig Trio. June 14 5pm Grant Lyle Blues
Music; 9pm Jacob Damelin Jazz Quartet.
June 15 5pm Rick Maltese: Rick’s Three in
One; 9pm Julian Fauth Blues Night. June 16
thewholenote.com
5pm Concord Jazz Quintet; 9pm Kristin Lindell Jazz Band. June 17 5pm Ken Taylor: Fixin’s
Jazz Trio; 9pm John Wayne Swingtet. June
18 5pm Bill Heffernan and His Friends; 9pm
Sweet Derrick Blues Band. June 19 5pm Jeff
Taylor and The SLT; 9pm “Wishing on Star”
from New York. June 20 5pm “Wishing on
Star” from New York; 9pm Linda Carone Vintage Jazz ‘n’ Blues. June 21 5pm Sarah Kennedy and Matt Pines Jazz Duo; 9pm Jimmy
Byron Band. June 22 5pm Malcolm Levin Jazz
Trio; 9pm Julian Fauth Blues Night. June 23
5pm G street Jazz Trio; 9pm Tiffany Hanus
Jazz Band. June 24 5pm Whitney Ross-Barris Jazz Band; 9pm Fraser Melvin Blues Band.
June 25 5pm Bill Heffernan and His Friends;
9pm Donné Roberts Band. June 26 5pm Six
Points Jazz Orchestra; 9pm Root Down Trio.
June 27 5pm Mark Rainey Jazz Band; 9pm G
street Jazz Trio. June 28 5pm Carter Brodkorb Jazz Quintet; 9pm Kalya Ramu Jazz
Band. June 29 5pm Sam Broverman Jazz
Duo; 9pm Julian Fauth Blues Night. June
30 5pm L.A. Turcotte: Sultans of Soul; 9pm
Amber Leigh Jazz Trio. July 1 5pm Joanne
Morra & The France St. Jazz Ensemble; 9pm
The Spirit of Jazz feat. Nina Richmond. July
2 5pm Bill Heffernan and His Friends; 9pm
Melissa Boyce Jazz & Blues Band. July 3
5pm Grateful Sunday feat. Trevor Cape and
The Field; 9pm The Ault Sisters. July 4 5pm
Mike and Jill Daley Jazz Duo; 9pm Drew Austin Jazz Band. July 6 9pm Julian Fauth Blues
Night. July 7 5pm Bruce Chapman Blues
Duo with feature guests; 9pm Darcy Windover Band.
Grossman’s Tavern
379 Spadina Ave. 416-977-7000
grossmanstavern.com (full schedule)
All shows: No cover (unless otherwise noted).
Every Sat The Happy Pals Dixieland jazz jam.
Every Sun 10pm The National Blues Jam
with Brian Cober. Every Wed 10pm Bruce
Domoney.
Harlem Restaurant
67 Richmond St. E. 416-368-1920
harlemrestaurant.com (full schedule)
All shows: 7:30-11pm (unless otherwise
noted). Call for cover charge info.
June 24 The Beetet with Neil Brathwaite
(sax), Don Pham (drums), Eric Boucher (keyboard), Clark Johnston (bass) $5. June
25 Gyles $5. June 27 Neil Brathwaite. July
1 The Simone Morris (voice) Trio with Mike
Freedman (guitar), Mike Pelletier (bass) $5.
July 2 Avani: Neil Brathwaite (sax), Anwar
Khurshid (sitar), Waleed Abdulhamid (bass),
Rich Greenspoon (drums), Eric Boucher
(keys) $5.
Hirut Cafe and Restaurant
2050 Danforth Ave. 416-551-7560
Every Sun 3pm Open Mic with Nicola
Vaughan: folk/country/jazz/world/r&b PWYC.
June 7, 21 8pm Finger Style Guitar Association PWYC. June 10 8pm Don Naduriak (keys)
Quintet with Bob Rice (drums), John “JJ”
Johnson (sax), George Koller (bass), Joaquin
Hidalgo (drums) PWYC. June 24 9pm Hirut
Hoot Cabaret $5.
Home Smith Bar – See Old Mill, The
Hugh’s Room
2261 Dundas St. W. 416-531-6604
hughsroom.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 63
D. In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)
All shows: 8:30pm (unless otherwise noted).
June 7 10pm Toronto Ravel $15; 8:30pm The
Dustbowl Revival $25(adv)/$30(door). June
9 Valdy $28(adv)/$30(door). June 10 Smooth
Sweet Sounds of the 70s $28(adv)/$30(door).
June 11 Things are Swinging – The Songs
of Peggy Lee $30(adv)/$35(door). June
12 Johnny A. $25(adv)/$30(door). June
15 Richard Shindell $25(adv)/$30(door).
June 16 James Gordon and Sons – CD Release
$22.50(adv)/$25(door). June 17 A Man called
Wrycraft presents Into the Great Wide Open:
The Music of Tom Petty $25(adv)/$30(door).
June 18 Stephen Fearing $25(adv)/$30(door).
June 19 The Small Glories – Cara Luft & JD
Edwards $22.50(adv)/$25(door). June 22 Al
Lerman – CD Release $17.50(adv)/$20(door).
June 23 China Crisis $27.50(adv)/$30(door).
June 24 A Trip Down the Yellow Brick Road
with Elton Rohn $35(adv)/$40(door). July
2 Patricia Barber $40(adv)/$45(door). July
3 Harpeth Rising $22.50(adv)/$25(door). July
4 8pm JAZZ.FM91 presents Jazz in July – The
Andrew Scott Trio: A Tribute to Henry Mancini $25. July 5 Lyy $22.50(adv)/$25(door).
July 6 Grainne Duffy $22.50(adv)/$25(door).
July 7 Ten Strings and a Goat Skin
$22.50(adv)/$25(door).
Jazz Bistro, The
251 Victoria St. 416-363-5299
jazzbistro.ca
June 1 8pm Stu Macdonald (voice) Quartet
with Stu Harrison (piano), Ross MacIntyre
(bass), Mark Micklethwaite (drums) $15. June
3, 4 9pm Coldjack: John Fraser (voice), Marcus Davis (bass), Carl Harvey (guitar), Aaron
Spink (drums), Bela Haymen (keys), Dianne
Rivard (percussion), Kolette Easy (voice), Igor
Babich (sax) $15(Fri)/$20(Sat). June 5 7pm
Steven Taetz (voice): “Porter for Pride: Tribute
to Cole Porter” with Ewen Farncombe (piano),
Mike Meusel (bass), Andrew Miller (drums)
$12. June 7, 8 8pm Denise Reis (voice, guitar) with the Heillig Manouevre: Alison Young
(sax), Stacie McGregor (piano), Charlie Cooley
(drums), Henry Heillig (bass) $15. June 9,
10, 11 9pm Bernie Senensky Quintet: “A Tribute to Moe Koffman” feat. Jake Koffman (sax),
Bill McBirnie (flute) $15(Thurs, Fri)/$20(Sat).
Martel (guitar) feat. Robi Botos (piano) $20.
June 23 8pm Jerzy Kaplanek Quartet $20.
June 24 8:30pm Matt Baker $20.
June 12 7pm Pat Murray $15. June 17, 18 9pm
Kirk MacDonald (sax) Quintet with Mark Eisenman (piano), Dave Young (bass), Terry Clarke
(drums) feat. Doug Lawrence (sax) $20. June
19 7pm Wendy Lands (voice) with Steve Hunter
(piano), Marc Rogers (bass), Jim Gillard
(drums) $15. June 21 8pm Dave Restivo Trio
$10. June 23 8pm The Carlos Morgan Quartet
$12. June 24, 25 8pm The Bill Charlap (piano)
Trio with Peter Washington (bass), Kenny
Washington (drums) $40. June 26 8pm Laila
Biali (piano, voice) with Ben Wittman (drums),
Ross MacIntyre (bass), Phil Dwyer (sax). June
28 8pm Robi Botos (piano) and Paul Novotny (bass) $25. June 29 8pm Robi Botos and
Hilario Duran (pianos) $25. June 30 8pm
Robi Botos (piano) Quartet with Paul Novotny (bass), Seamus Blake (sax), Mark McLean
(drums) $30. July 1 8pm The Music of Born to
Be Blue: David Braid (piano), Kevin Turcotte
(trumpet), Steve Wallace (bass), Terry Clarke
(drums) $25. July 2 8pm Alfredo Rodriguez
$20. July 3 7pm Stephanie Martin $15.
Joe Mama’s
317 King St. W. 416-340-6469
joemamas.ca
Every Tue 6pm Jeff Eager. Every Wed 6pm
Thomas Reynolds. Every Thurs 9pm Blackburn. Every Fri 10pm The Grind. Every
Sat 10pm Shugga.
KAMA
214 King St. W. 416-599-5262
kamaindia.com (full schedule)
Every Wed 5:30pm Jazz with the Kama
House Band.
La Revolucion
2848 Dundas St. W 416-766-0746
Every Tue 9pm Duets with Peter Hill and featured guests (Shawn Nykwist on June 7, 28;
Chris Gale on June 21; TBA on June 14). Every
Fri 7pm Les Petits Nouveaux.
Leaside Pub
Jazz Room, The
190 Laird Dr. 416-487-8682
leasidepub.com
June 25, July 2 4pm Climax Jazz Band.
Located in the Huether Hotel, 59 King St. N.,
Waterloo. 226-476-1565
kwjazzroom.com (full schedule)
All shows: 8:30pm-11:30pm unless otherwise
indicated. Attendees must be 19+.
June 2 10pm Dodecaphunk (Kyle Brenders
Septet) with opener Alison Au $20. June
3 8:30pm Ryan Cassidy Band with Special
Guest Brownman $15. June 4 8:30pm Laila
Biali $20. June 10 8:30pm Lydia Persaud $15.
June 11 8:30pm Rich Brown (bass) and The
Abeng: Luis Deniz (sax), Kevin Turcotte (trumpet), Stan Fomin (keys), Larnell Lewis (drums)
$20. June 17 8:30pm Tana Kannangara Group
$20. June 18 8:30 Mandy Lagan (voice) Quartet with Dave Restivo (piano), Ted Quinlan (guitar), Jim Vivian (bass), Nick Fraser
(drums) $18. June 19 4pm Dave Young (bass)/
Doug Lawrence (sax) Quintet with Kirk MacDonald (sax), Mark Eisenman (piano), Terry
Clarke (drums) $25. June 20 8pm Francois
Jalbert and Jerome Beaulieu $12. June 21
8pm Genevieve Marentette Trio $15. June 22
8pm Mark Kelso’s (drums) Jazz Exiles with
Rich Brown (bass), Luis Deniz (sax), Joey
Local Gest, The
424 Parliament St. 416-961-9425
Lula Lounge
1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307
lula.ca (full schedule)
June 2 10pm Los Poetas + Fito Blanko $15.
June 3 8pm Gabriel Palatchi + Changarón
Del Norte $15. June 4 10:30pm Ola Fresca
$12(adv)/$15(door). June 5 8pm Elsten Torres + Amanda Martinez $25(adv)/$30(door).
June 7 8pm Kafinal + Elaine Lil’Bit Shepherd
$8(adv)/$10(door). June 8 7:30pm Wagner
Petrilli + Aquiles Baez Trio + Eliana Cuevas +
Jeremy Ledbetter $15(adv)/$20(door). June
9 7pm D’BI. & THE 333 $15; 10pm Abakos
$15. June 10 7:30pm Berriel + Mario Allende
Group + Dailyn Martinez + Roberto Linares
Brown + Roicel Riveron $12(adv)/$15(door).
June 11 10:30pm Montreal Toronto Salsa
Meetup $12(adv)/$15(door). June 29 7pm
Monica Chapman (voice) with Dave Restivo
(piano), Alex Coleman (bass), Nathan Hiltz
(guitar), Chris Wallace (drums), Rebecca
Hennessy (trumpet) $12(adv)/$15(door).
St. Philip’s Anglican Church
Manhattans Pizza Bistro & Music Club
●
951 Gordon St., Guelph 519-767-2440
manhattans.ca (full schedule)
All shows: PWYC.
June 1, 15, 29 Jokela & Vogan (15, 29 with
Charlie Cooley). June 2 Dan Austin Quartet.
June 3 Ken Foster Trio. June 4 Cara Matthew
Trio. June 5 Brad Halls. June 7 Adrean Farrugia & Rob McBride. June 8, 12, 22 John Zadro.
June 9, 23 Joe Lucchetta & Friends. June
10 Jordan Snider Trio. June 11 Karyn Kirkwood
Trio. June 12 John Zadro. June 14, 21, 28 Paul
Taylor. June 16 Alex Pangman & Her Alleycats.
June 17 Gary Beck & Sideways. June 18 Steve
Koven Trio. June 19 Joni Nehrita. June 24 Lara
Solnicki Trio. June 25 Andrea LaBlanc. June
26, 30 Stan Chang + Erick Bruck.
Sunday, June 12, 4:00 PM | Jazz Vespers
Hilario Duran Trio with Roberto Occhipinti
(bass) and Mark Kelso (drums). With special
guest Jane Bunnett.
| Etobicoke
St. Philip’s
Anglican
Sunday, June
26, 4:00 Church
PM | Jazz Vespers
25 St.
Phillips
RoadMike
(near
Royal(saxophones),
York + Dixon)
Colleen
Allen,
Murley
416-247-5181
• stphilips.net
free will
offering
Steve Wallace
(bass), Terry• Clarke
(drums)
and Adrean Farrugia (piano)
Please note our change
ST. PHILIP’S JAZZ VESPERS
@ ALL SAINTS KINGSWAY
of venue – St Philip’s is
renovating for accessibility!
ANGLICAN CHURCH
2850 Bloor St. West, at Prince Edward, steps from the
Royal York subway, with Green P parking across the street.
FOR ST PHILIPS: 416-247-5181
FOR ALL SAINTS KINGSWAY: 416-233-1125
64 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Mezzetta Restaurant
681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687
mezzettarestaurant.com (full schedule)
All shows: 9pm, $8 (unless otherwise noted).
June 1 8pm Dino Toledo (guitar), Makeda
Benitez (flamenco dance) No cover.
Monarch Tavern
12 Clinton St. 416-531-5833
themonarchtavern.com (full schedule)
June 13 7:30pm Martin Loomer & His Orange
Devils Orchestra $10.
Morgans on the Danforth
1282 Danforth Ave. 416-461-3020
morgansonthedanforth.com (full schedule)
All shows: 2pm-5pm. No cover.
June 26 2pm Lisa Particelli’s Girls Night Out
Jazz Jam.
N'awlins Jazz Bar & Dining
299 King St. W. 416-595-1958
nawlins.ca
All shows: No cover/PWYC.
Every Tue 6:30pm Stacie McGregor. Every
Wed 7pm Jim Heineman Trio. Every Thu 8pm
Nothin’ But the Blues w/ Joe Bowden (drums)
and featured vocalists. Every Fri, Sat 8:30pm
N’awlins All Star Band. Every Sun 7pm
Brooke Blackburn.
Nice Bistro, The
117 Brock St. N., Whitby. 905-668-8839
nicebistro.com (full schedule)
June 22 Larry Bond Duo $39.99 (dinner
included).
Old Mill, The
21 Old Mill Rd. 416-236-2641
oldmilltoronto.com
The Home Smith Bar: No reservations. No
cover. $20 food/drink minimum. All shows:
7:30pm-10:30pm
June 2 Angela Turone (piano, voice) Quartet
with Chris Platt (guitar), Connor Walsh (bass),
Robin Claxton (drums). June 3 Canadian Jazz
Quartet & Friends: Frank Wright (vibes), Reg
Schwager (guitar), Pat Collins (bass), Don
Vickery (drums) feat. Phil Dwyer (sax). June
4 Nathalie Kraemer (voice) Trio with Adrean
Farrugia (piano), Ross MacIntyre (bass). June
7 Gene DiNovi (piano, voice): “In Concert and
Conversation”. June 9 Arlene Smith (voice)
Quartet with Mark Eisenman (piano), Steve
Wallace (bass), Mike Murley (sax). June 10 Pat
Collins (bass) Trio with Tom Szczesniak (accordion), Reg Schwager (guitar). June 11 Michael
Dunston (voice) Trio with Gord Sheard
(piano), Roberto Occhipinti (bass). June
16 Christopher Simmons (piano) Trio with
Artie Roth (bass), Kevin Dempsey (drums).
June 17 Carol McCartney (voice) Quartet with
Brian Dickinson (piano), Kieran Overs (bass),
Chris Robinson (sax). June 18 Pat LaBarbera
(sax) Trio with Brian Dickinson (piano), Kieran
Overs (bass). June 23 Barry Elmes (drums)
Quartet with Mike Murley (sax), Reg Schwager
(guitar), Steve Wallace (bass). June 24 Russ
Little (trombone) Quartet with Tom Szczesniak
(piano), Scott Alexander (bass), Brian Barlow (drums) feat. Alex Pangman (voice). June
25 Russ Little (trombone) Quartet with Tom
Szczesniak (piano), Scott Alexander (bass),
Brian Barlow (drums) feat. Broadsway: Julie
Michels, Diane Leah, Heather Bambrick
(voices). July 1 Russ Little (trombone) Quartet with Tom Szczesniak (piano), Scott Alexander (bass), Brian Barlow (drums) feat. Melissa
Stylianou (voice). July 2 Russ Little (trombone)
Quartet with Tom Szczesniak (piano), Scott
thewholenote.com
Alexander (bass), Brian Barlow (drums) feat.
John Alcorn (voice).
Only Café, The
972 Danforth Ave. 416-463-7843
theonlycafe.com (full schedule)
All shows: 8pm unless otherwise indicated.
June 8, 22 Lzrszn.
Paintbox Bistro
555 Dundas St. E. 647-748-0555
paintboxbistro.ca (Full schedule)
Pilot Tavern, The
22 Cumberland Ave. 416-923-5716
thepilot.ca
All shows: 3:30pm. No cover.
June 4 Sugar Daddies. June 11 Ted Quinlan
(guitar)/Phil Dwyer (sax) Quartet with Neil
Swainson (bass), Ethan Ardelli (drums). June
18 Adrean Farrugia (piano) Quartet with Kevin
Turcotte (trumpet), Jon Maharaj (bass), Ernesto
Cervini (drums). June 25 Pat Labarbera Quartet. July 2 Mike Murley Quartet.
Poetry Jazz Café
224 Augusta Ave. 416-599-5299
poetryjazzcafe.com (full schedule)
Reposado Bar & Lounge
136 Ossington Ave. 416-532-6474
reposadobar.com (full schedule)
Every Wed Spy vs. Sly vs. Spy. Every Thurs,
Fri 10pm Reposadists Quartet: Tim Hamel
(trumpet), Jon Meyer (bass), Jeff Halischuck
(drums), Roberto Rosenman (guitar).
Reservoir Lounge, The
52 Wellington St. E. 416-955-0887
reservoirlounge.com (full schedule).
All shows: 9:45
Every Tue, Sat Tyler Yarema and his Rhythm.
Every Wed The Digs. Every Thu Stacey
Kaniuk. Every Fri Dee Dee and the Dirty
Martinis.
Rex Hotel Jazz & Blues Bar, The
194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475
therex.ca (full schedule)
Call for cover charge info.
June 1 2pm Yiddish Journey; 6:30pm Jim Gelcer
Group; 9:30pm Terry Promane & Dave Young
Octet. June 2 6:30pm Laura Hubert Group;
9:45pm NYC’S Jeremy Pelt w/ Johnny Griffith Quartet. June 3 4pm Hogtown Syncopators; 6:30pm The Jive Bombers; 9:45pm NYC’S
Jeremy Pelt w/ Johnny Griffith Quartet. June
4 12pm The Sinners Choir; 3:30pm Matt Lagan
Big Band Ensemble; 7:30pm Eric St. Laurent
Group; 9:45pm Ted Warren Commission. June 5
12pm Humber College Community Music School
Recitals; 7pm “Austin John” CD Release; 9:30pm
Ilios Steryannis Quartet. June 6 6:30pm Ken
McDonald Quartet; 9:30pm Brampton’s Jazz
Mechanics Big Band. June 7 6:30pm Peter Hill
Quintet; 9:30pm Classic Rex Jazz Jam hosted by
Chris Gale. June 8 6:30pm Jim Gelcer Group;
9:30pm NYC’s Ava Granite Six. June 9 6:30pm
Laura Hubert Group; 9:30pm Nathan Hiltz Trio.
June 10 4pm Hogtown Syncopators; 6:30pm
The Jive Bombers; 9:45pm Jeff King’s Catalyst. June 11 12pm The Sinners Choir; 3:30pm
Paul Reddick; 7pm Ryley Murray; 9:45pm NYC’s
Rob Garcia. June 12 12pm Excelsior Dixieland
Jazz Band; 3:30pm Red Hot Ramble; 7pm James
Brown Guitar Trio; 9:30pm Zimzum. June 13
6:30pm Ken McDonald Quartet; 9:30pm China’s
Lawrence Ku feat. David Braid. June 14 6:30pm
thewholenote.com
E. The ETCeteras
Peter Hill Quintet; 9:30pm Classic Rex Jazz Jam
hosted by Chris Gale. June 15 6:30pm Jim Gelcer Group; 9:30pm Montréal’s Jazzamboka.
June 16 6:30pm Laura Hubert Group; 9:30pm
Brad Cheeseman Group. June 17 4pm Hogtown Syncopators; 6:30pm The Jive Bombers; 9:45pm Steve Amirault Trio. June 18
12pm The Sinners Choir; 3:30pm Jerome Godboo; 7pm Ryley Murray; 9:45pm Justin Bacchus. June 19 12pm Excelsior Dixieland Jazz
Band; 3:30pm Dr. Nick & The Rollercoasters;
7pm James Brown Guitar Trio; 9:30pm Hannah Barstow. June 20 6:30pm Ken McDonald Quartet; 9:30pm Kandinsky Effect (France/
Brooklyn). June 21 6:30pm Peter Hill Quintet; 9:30pm Kandinsky Effect (France/Brooklyn). June 22 6:30pm Jim Gelcer Group. June 23
5pm Bugaloo Squad; 8pm Pat LaBarbera; 10pm
NYC’s Tim Ries w/ Hungary’s East Gypsy Band.
June 24 3pm Hogtown Syncopators; 5pm The
Jive Bombers; 8pm Tara Davidson Group; 10pm
Dave Young. June 25 12pm The Sinners Choir;
3:30pm Swing Shift Big Band; 8pm Alex Pangman & her Alleycats; 10pm Mike Murley. June
26 12pm Excelsior Dixieland Jazz Band; 3:30pm
Freeway Dixieland Band; 7pm NYC’s Tim Christensen Spin Cycle; 9:30pm Metalwood. June 27
8:30pm John MacLeod’s Rex Hotel Orchestra.
June 28 1:30pm Big Band Slam; 5pm Peripheral
Vision; 8pm Mark Kelso’s Jazz Exiles; 11pm LA’s
Knower. June 29 5pm Allison Young; 8pm Allison Au Quartet; 11pm LA’s Knower. June 30 5pm
Fog Brass Band; 8pm Mike Downes Quartet;
10pm Nashville/NYC’s Progger w/ Special Guest
Melissa McMillan. July 1 12pm Berklee Students; 5pm Justin Bacchus; 8pm Rich Brown’s
rinsethealgorithm; 10pm Nashville/NYC’s Progger w/ Special Guest Melissa McMillan. July 2
12pm The Sinners Choir; 3:30pm Laura Hubert;
8pm Rich Brown’s The Abeng; 10pm Tara Kannangara Group. July 3 12pm Excelsior Dixieland
Jazz Band; 3:30pm Freeway Dixieland Band;
8pm Radiohead Jazz Project - T.J.O. Toronto
Jazz Orchestra.
Galas and Fundraisers
●●June 05 3:00-5:30: Toronto Early Music
Players Organization. Annual Fundraising Tea and Silent Auction. Live music, free
food and beverages; CDs, books and sheet
music for sale. Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-927-8699. Admission
by tax-deductible donation.
taste-tempting finger foods and strawberry
shortcake; enjoy some bubbly and listen to
delectable musical selections performed by
the choir under its director, Laurie Evan Fraser. Parish Hall, Grace Church on-the-Hill,
300 Lonsdale Rd. $30 (door) or reserved by
calling 416-256-0510. Cash bar.
●●June 18 5:00: Niagara Symphony Orchestra. 4th Annual Black & White Gala.
Superb
music by the Niagara Symphony Orchestra; sumptuous cuisine and wine; auction.
Ridley College, 2 Ridley Rd. St. Catharines.
905-687-4993 x221. $195 (individual); $1,560
(table of 8).
Festivals, Fairs, Festivities
●●June 26 10:00am-4:00: Royal Conserv-
atory of Music. 3rd Annual Wide Open House.
Fun for the entire family: drop-in music lessons, Smart StartTM class for babies and toddlers; summer camp activity room; courtyard
party. Free Koerner Hall concerts and activities throughout the day! 273 Bloor St. W. For
more information: rcmusic.ca/woh
1,
June 1
2016pm
Lectures, Salons, Symposia
●●June 09 7:00: Canadian Institute for
5
Noon- rive
D
d
r
i
a
L
1
●●June 11 12:00 noon-5:00: Opera Atelier.
Costume Sale: Burgers, Burgundy and Baroque. Fundraising event offering members of
the public the rare opportunity to buy their
very own Opera Atelier costumes; includes
wine and food. All Canadian Self-Storage,
1 Laird Drive. Tickets purchased at the door
or through Eventbrite.com $15 (suggested
donation).
●●June 12 2:00-5:00: Dundas Valley Orchestra. Strawberry Social Fundraiser. Includes
music, food, silent auction. St. Paul’s United
Church, 29 Park Street W. Dundas. www.dundasvalleyorchestra Entry by donation.
●●June 12 3:00-5:00: Upper Canada Choristers. Strawberry Social. Nibble on
Salty Dog Bar & Grill, The
1980 Queen St. E. 416-849-5064
(full schedule)
thesaltydog.ca
Sauce on the Danforth
1376 Danforth Ave. 647-748-1376
sauceondanforth.com
All shows: No cover.
Every Mon 9pm The Out Of Towners: Dirty
Organ Jazz. Every Tue 6pm Julian Fauth.
June 11 4pm The Lesters.
Advanced Research. Our Musical Brain. Join
the Gryphon Trio and CIFAR fellows Robert
Zatorre and Laurel Trainor for an evening of
performances and scientific insights revealing music’s connection to consciousness.
Hosted by CBC’s Julie Nesrallah. Koerner Hall,
TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning,
273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208; www.cifar.ca/
events/our-musical-brain $30; $15 (st).
●●June 09 7:30: Darchei Noam Synagogue.
Jews’ Muse: Leonard Bernstein. A mix of lecture, music and discussion with lecturer Rick
Phillips as he explores the music of Bernstein - the influences that shaped his music,
the impact he left on his times, and his lasting
legacy. 864 Sheppard Ave. W. 416-638-4783;
http://www.darcheinoam.ca/event/JewishComposers $20.
●●June 13 12:00 noon-1:00: The Study at St.
Barnabas Church. Lecture by composer
and music theorist Dr. Konrad Harley on the
music of Sergei Prokofiev. 361 Danforth Ave.
416-463-1344. Free.
Summer
Choir Camp
Seven44
Aug. 29 - Sept. 2,
9am-5pm
(Formerly Chick n’ Deli/The People’s Chicken)
744 Mount Pleasant Rd. 416-489-7931
seven44.com (full schedule)
All shows: 7:30pm
June 6 Advocats Big Band. June 13 Metro
Big Band. June 20 George Lake Swing Band.
June 27 Mega City Swing Band.
for Girls and Boys,
ages 6-16
“Singing, Music Theory,
Games, Sports, and Excursions“
Tranzac
292 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137
tranzac.org
3-4 shows daily, various styles. Mostly PWYC.
Every Mon 10pm Open Mic Mondays. Every
Fri 5pm The Friends of Hugh Oliver (folk).
This month’s shows include: June 7 7:30pm
Ali Berkok. June 8 10pm Ken Aldcroft. June
14 10pm Michael Davidson. June 19 7:30pm
Diane Roblin. June 24 10pm The Ryan Driver
Sextet.
Nominal Registration Fee • For details and registration,
please visit www.gracechurchonthehill.ca/our-music
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 65
E. The ETCeteras
Love to sing?
●●June 26 12:00 noon: Westben Arts Festival
Theatre. Hello? Tech-Connect. Experts meet
under the tent for discussion on technology
and the story behind The Pencil Salesman.
Westben Concert Barn, 6698 County Rd. 30,
Campbellford. 705-653-5508 or 1-877-8835777. Free to all June 26 ticket holders.
●●June 26 2:30-6:00: Royal Conservatory of
Music. Wide Open House: After Hours. Free
activities for adults, including music appreciation lectures; orchestra percussion, cello,
and harp demonstrations; Koerner Hall concerts, reception. 273 Bloor St. W. For more
information: rcmusic.ca/woh
●●July 17 7:00: Soundstreams Salon 21.
Soundweavers. Join Soundstreams for the
premiere of composer Emilie Lebel’s collaboration with Jumblies Theatre and the community participants involved with the new
work. Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park.
416-504-1282. Free, PWYC preferred seating available.
●●July 19 & 26 1:00-300: Royal Conservatory of Music. Elgar: Musical Voice of the
Edwardian Era. Join Rick Phillips for two
engaging lectures on the life and music of
the great English composer, Sir Edward
Elgar. 273 Bloor St. W. For more information:
ecmusic.ca/MusicAppreciation
Rehearse, learn, perform, travel
and expand your musical horizons with
BACH CHILDREN’S CHORUS
BACH CHAMBER YOUTH CHOIR
Linda Beaupré, Artistic Director
Age 6 through university age
Book an audition: 416.431.0790
[email protected]
facebook.com/BCCandBCYC bachchildrenschorus.ca
●●July 20 3:00: Festival of the Sound. What
is a Sonata Anyway? Find out more about
this legendary musical form. Jeffrey Stokes,
lecturer. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the
Performing Arts, 2 Bay St. Parry Sound.
1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca Free.
●●July 21 12:45: Festival of the Sound. Journey into the Heart and Mind of Robert Schumann. Jeffrey Stokes, lecturer. Charles W.
Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay
St. Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca Free.
Master♦ Classes
●●June 27 10:00am: Westben Arts Festival
Theatre. Connecting Through Song: SongConnect: Voice Intensive with Michael Warren. A three-day immersion experience
designed for all levels and genres of singers, age 16 and higher. Participants receive
30 min. lesson observed by other participants. Clock Tower Hall, 36 Front St. S.,
Campbellford. 705-653-5508 or 1-877-8835777. $135(one session with lesson); $25(one
session without lesson). Until 9:00pm. Program runs June 27-29. Private lessons also
available.
●●June 28 10:00am: Westben Arts Festival
Theatre. Connecting Through Song: SongConnect: Voice Intensive with Michael Warren. See June 27.
●●June 29 10:00am: Westben Arts Festival
Theatre. Connecting Through Song: SongConnect: Voice Intensive with Michael Warren. See June 27.
●●Aug 02 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Stockey
Master Class. Sit in with master teacher
LYDIA ADAMS
Canadian Vocal Ensemble
Conductor & Artistic Director
AUDITIONS for
the 2016/17 season
Represent Canada
and celebrate our
150th birthday
abroad!
Sing with us as we
tour Spain and
Portugal in 2017
will be held in May and June
for experienced singers in all
voice categories. The choir will
perform as guests of the Elmer
Iseler Singers and the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra in addition
to our regular 4 concert season.
FOR DETAILS OR TO SET UP AN
AUDITION PLEASE CONTACT US
AT 416-446-0188
[email protected]
Join us now as we prepare for our
second European tour. It will be a
musical celebration showcasing
Canadian choral composers.
PASQUALE B
PASQUALE
BROTHERS
ROTHERS
A musical experience
unlike any other!
PURVEYORS OF FINE FOOD
416-571-3680 • mosaic-vocalensemble.ca
(416) 364-7397
66 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
CATERING
WWW.PASQUALEBROS.COM
thewholenote.com
Glen Montgomery as he works with amateur pianists. Charles W. Stockey Centre for
the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St. Parry Sound.
1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca Free.
●●Aug 03 11:00am: Festival of the Sound.
Stockey Master Class. Pianists James Anagnoson and Leslie Kinton work on piano duo
repertoire with two 2016 Stockey Young
Artists. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the
Performing Arts, 2 Bay St. Parry Sound.
1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca Free.
●●Aug 04 11:00am: Festival of the Sound.
Stockey Master Class. Pianist Janina Fialkowska works on solo piano repertoire with
Stockey Young Artists. Charles W. Stockey
Centre for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St.
Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca Free.
●●Aug 04 7:00: Highlands Opera Studio. Master class with tenor Richard Margison. Meet
the singers of HOS 2016 and hear them work
with internationally acclaimed Canadian
tenor, Richard Margison. A great opportunity for those interested in singing to learn
more about what makes a great performance
even better. St. George’s Anglican Church,
122 Highland, Haliburton.
highlandsoperastudio.com $15.
●●Aug 05 7:00: Highlands Opera Studio. Master class with tenor Richard Margison. See
Aug 04.
●●Aug 06 7:00: Highlands Opera Studio. Master class with tenor Richard Margison. See
Aug 04.
●●Aug 24 1:00-4:00: Muskoka Chautauqua.
7th Annual OperaMuskoka Festival: Vocal
Master Class with soprano and RCM teacher
Jennifer Tung. Rene M. Caisse Memorial Theatre, Bracebridge. 705-645-8400; thecaisse.
com $100 (participants); $20 (audience).
●●Aug 25 1:00-4:00: Muskoka Chautauqua.
7th Annual OperaMuskoka Festival: Violin
Master Class with Moshe Hammer. Showcasing his “from violence to violins” approach
with five young participants. Rene M. Caisse
Memorial Theatre, Bracebridge. 705-6458400; thecaisse.com $100 (participants);
$20 (audience).
Salieri. With film critic William DiNovi. Charles
W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts,
2 Bay St. Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca $12.
●●Aug 01 1:00: Festival of the Sound. Keep
on Keepin’ On (2014). A touching documentary about jazz trumpeter Clark Terry and his
mentorship of a blind piano prodigy named
Justin Kauflin as the young man prepares for
an international competition. With film critic
William DiNovi. Charles W. Stockey Centre for
the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St. Parry Sound.
1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca $12.
Workshops
●●June 03 7:30: CAMMAC Recorder Play-
Screenings
ers’ Society. Amateur recorder players are invited to join in the playing of early
music. Mount Pleasant Road Baptist Church,
527 Mount Pleasant Rd. 416-597-0485; cammac.ca $15 (non-members). Refreshments
included. AGM held the second half.
●●June 30 11:00am: Westben Arts Festival
Theatre. Connecting Through Song: SoundConnect: Do You Hear What I Hear? Participants visit a recording studio to see what
technology can do for their voice. Four participants will record one brief song each
and receive a CD, while observers watch
●●July 18 1:00: Festival of the Sound. Around
the World in 50 Concerts (2014). This documentary follows the Royal Concertgebouw
Orchestra on a world tour and offers a wonderful portrait of the personalities behind this
great orchestra, as well as the lives of some
of the international music lovers who have
been touched by their music. With film critic
William DiNovi. Charles W. Stockey Centre for
the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St. Parry Sound.
1-866-364-0061; festivalofthesound.ca $12.
●●July 26 10:00am: Festival of the Sound.
Amadeus. This 1984 period drama, winner of
8 Academy Awards, tells the story of the life
of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the
envious eyes of a court composer, Antonio
or experiment with speech. Andy Thompson, sound engineer. Studio 29, Highway 30,
Warkworth. 705-653-5508 or 1-877-8835777. $50(singer); $20(observer/speaker).
Pre-registration required (space limited).
Also 2:00pm.
●●June 30 2:00 and 7:00: Westben Arts Festival Theatre. Connecting Through Song:
Sound-Connect: Do You Hear What I Hear?.
Participants visit a recording studio to see
what technology can do for their voice. Four
participants will record one brief song each
and receive a CD, while observers watch
or experiment with speech. Andy Thompson, sound engineer. Studio 29, Highway 30,
Warkworth. 705-653-5508 or 1-877-8835777. $50(singer); $20(observer/speaker).
Pre-registration required (space limited).
Also 11:00am.
●●July 01 3:00: Westben Arts Festival Theatre. Connecting Through Song: Choral-Connect. Marie Anderson leads an impromptu
“Quick Choir.” Previous choral experience
helpful but not necessary. Open to all. Westben Concert Barn, 6698 County Rd. 30,
Campbellford. 705-653-5508 or 1-877-8835777. $20. Pre-registration required.
Come Sing with the
Toronto Children’s Chorus!
Canada’s Premier Treble Choir
Audition: Saturday, September 10, 2016
Limited spaces. Register online to audition today!
www.torontochildrenschorus.com/join-us
MUSIC FROM SCRATCH
C O N TA C T C O N T E M P O R A RY M U S I C
FREE WORKSHOP FOR YOUTH 18-25yrs
MONDAY, JULY 11 TO FRIDAY, JULY 15, 2016
with visiting composer Giorgio Magnanensi
NO MUSICAL EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
Just a willingness to explore your own inner creativity
The Canadian Music Centre
20 St. Joseph Street, Toronto
Information/registration
Matthew Fava
416-961-6601 ext.207
[email protected]
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 67
Classified Advertising | [email protected]
WholeNote CLASSIFIEDS can help you
recruit new members for your choir or
band / orchestra or find a new music
director! Advertise your help wanted needs
or promote your services starting at only
$24/issue. Inquire by AUGUST 25 for the
SEPTEMBER issue.
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Sing With
AUDITIONS & OPPORTUNITIES
Orpheus!
Seeking a vibrant
and welcoming choral
community?
Want to sing with
an outstanding choral
conductor?
Looking for a choral
experience with a
difference?
Rehearsals: 7 p.m. Tuesdays
at Yorkminster Park Baptist Church
1585 Yonge Street
Interested? To book an audition,
contact Helen Coxon at
[email protected]
or 416-530-4428
AUDITIONS FOR PENTHELIA SINGERS - a
vibrant women’s chamber choir. 4 spots are
available. Strong sight singing skills, previous
choral experience required. Tuesday, August
30th, Wednesday, August 31st, 7:00 pm.
Contact Alice Malach: [email protected]
com Phone: 416-579-7464.
Robert Cooper, Artistic Director
2016-2017
Sing with renowned
composer Ola Gjeilo
AUDITIONS FOR SOLOISTS The Kindred
Spirits Orchestra invites soloists to affirm
their interest in performing one of the
following concerti with the orchestra during
its 2017.2018, 2018.2019 or 2019.2020
concert seasons: VIOLIN CONCERTI by
Schumann, Elgar, Bartok, Shostakovich, or
Britten; CELLO CONCERTI by Shostakovich,
Prokofiev, Saint-Saëns, or Dvořák; PIANO
CONCERTI by Rachmaninoff (Nos. 1 or 4;
Rhapsody), Tchaikovsky (No. 2), Prokofiev,
Stravinsky, Shostakovich (No. 2), Strauss
(Burlesque), Chopin, Liszt (No. 2; Totentanz),
Saint-Saëns, or Ravel (in G); SOLI SATB for
Beethoven’s Ninth. For more information,
e-mail [email protected]
Appear with the TSO in
the music of Tim Burton films
Celebrate Christmas with jazz
legend Jackie Richardson
Premiere
adventurous new works
Perform a Gala Concert
at Koerner Hall
Available positions with the KINDRED
SPIRITS ORCHESTRA: 1st/2nd Oboe,
1st Bassoon, 1st Horn, 1st/2nd and Bass
Trombone, Pianist, sectional Violins,
Violas, Cellos and Contrabasses. The KSO
is an auditioned-based civic orchestra
in residence at Flato Markham Theatre.
Weekly rehearsals are held on Tuesday
evening at the state-of-the-art Cornell
Recital Hall (HWY 407 ETR and 9th Ln). For
more information visit
www.KSOchestra.ca or e-mail Jobert
Sevilleno at [email protected]
www.orpheuschoirtoronto.com
WIDE
OPEN
HOUSE
COUNTERPOINT COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA
(www.ccorchestra.org) welcomes volunteer
musicians for Monday evening rehearsals
at the 519 Church Street Community Centre
in downtown Toronto. No audition. We’re
especially looking for harp, trombone and
strings players. Email [email protected]
DRUMMER WHO CAN SIGHT-READ and
bring drum kit to rehearsals needed for
Barrie Concert Band in Simcoe County.
[email protected]
THE PETERBOROUGH SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA is seeking a Concertmaster
on a permanent basis. This is a paid position
commensurate with experience and a
minimum 42 services per season. For more
information:
www.thepso.org/concertmaster
ORGANIST/MUSIC DIRECTOR sought
for Mimico Presbyterian Church in south
Etobicoke. We seek someone who will
relish the chance to help shape our future
as we grow. A 2-manual Casavant pipe
organ circa 1948 with midi interface and
a piano are used for worship. Musical
collaborations with vocalists and
instrumentalists from the congregation
will be part of the role. Experience with
coaching singers in vocal technique would
be invaluable. The ideal candidate will
enjoy using music from a variety of genres
in worship and will be willing to take risks
in a warm, supportive environment. The
position is for approximately 8 hours per
week. Remuneration is commensurate with
qualifications and experience, based on the
RCCO guidelines. Please submit your resume
to Mimico Presbyterian Church, 119 Mimico
Ave., Toronto, ON M8V 1R6 or by e-mail to
[email protected]
NEED HELP WITH
YOUR TAXES?
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including prior years
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Sunday, June 26
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For CRA stress relief call:
Press kits,
image consulting,
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www.lizpr.com
1-866-268-1319
[email protected]
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FREE EVENT
Instruments | Lessons & Classes | Concerts
New students receive 15% OFF
registration fees on June 26.
Introducing
BUSINESS
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to the WholeNote’s musically
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Book by August 25 for our September edition!
rcmusic.ca/WOH
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68 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
CALLING ALL PITCH PERFECT FANS! You
could be a part of Toronto’s brand new
a cappella sensation! Audition details:
soundcrowd.ca
DO YOU DRIVE?
Do you love
The WholeNote?
Share the love and earn a little
money! Join The WholeNote’s
circulation team: 9 times a year,
GTA and well beyond. Interested?
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Classified Advertising | [email protected]
VEGASNORTH’S 2016 FALL BIG BAND
WORKSHOPS These big band workshops
focus on teaching intermediate/advanced
musicians how to rehearse/perform in a
big band ensemble while having a ton of
fun rehearsing great charts.12 sessions
- Sundays Noon - 2 pm & Tuesdays 7 - 9
pm from Sept - Nov 2016. Location - The
Rehearsal Factory 330 Geary Ave Toronto.
Registration for the Fall is now open. [email protected]
vegasnorth.ca
THE WYCHWOOD CLARINET CHOIR is
looking for enthusiastic clarinet players
to join our group. Contact us through our
website at www.wychwoodclarinetchoir.ca to
arrange an audition. All ages welcome.
YORK REGION BRASS WELCOMES BRASS
PLAYERS for rehearsals in Newmarket,
Wednesdays 7:30-9:30 pm. contact
[email protected]
INSTRUCTION & COURSES
DR. STEPHEN SATORY is accepting private
piano and theory students. Near St. George
Subway. “A very patient, knowledgeable
teacher”; “A consummate professional”.
416-566-4411. [email protected]
FLUTE, PIANO, THEORY LESSONS. RCM
exam preparation. RCM certified advanced
specialist. Samantha Chang, FTCL,
FLCM, Royal Academy of Music PGDip,
LRAM, ARCT. Toronto, Scarborough 416-2931302, [email protected] com
www.samanthaflute.com.
RESTORE & PRESERVE
YOUR MEMORIES
Recital and gig tapes | 78’s
& LPs | VHS and Hi8 | 35mm
Slides |News clippings | Photos
& more, transferred to
digital files: CD’s, DVD’s,
or Video slideshow
ArtsMediaProjects
416.910.1091
LESSONS FOR ALL! Friendly and firm I’m an experienced musician and mom
teaching piano and singing to children (and
young at heart) in my Toronto home (East
Leslieville). To discuss your child’s need for
music-making please contact [email protected]
gmail.com.
PRIVATE VOICE/PIANO/THEORY
LESSONS: Experienced, BFA Certified
Teacher located at Christ Church Deer
Park (Yonge & St. Clair). Prepares you or
your child for RCM exams, competitions &
auditions. Contact Jessika: [email protected]
gmail.com (647) 214-2827.
PIANO, HARPSICHORD LESSONS with
former RCM examiner Mary Lim in North
York. Students won first prize 30+ times.
416-502-1315. torontopianolesson.ca
FOR SALE / WANTED
CLASSICAL RECORD AND CD COLLECTIONS
WANTED. Minimum 350 units. Call, text or
e-mail Aaron 416-471-8169 or [email protected]
PIANO LESSONS FOR ADVANCED
STUDENTS Prepare for RCM exams,
competitions. Play musically with freedom
and ease. Professional instruction with
Dr. Réa Beaumont (DMA, MMus, MusBacEd,
ArtDipMus, ARCT). Midtown Toronto studio,
near subway, parking.
[email protected]
FRENCH HORN in excellent condition. Selmer
prototype built by Reynolds. [email protected]
com
TRUMPET Bach Stradivarius model 37
(never used; SAXOPHONE Bundy Selmer
alto; BASSOON Linton; EUPHONIUM Besson
four valve compensating with laquer finish;).
Phone 416-964-3642.
PIANO LESSONS WITH CONCERT PIANIST
EVE EGOYAN eveegoyan.com All ages,
all levels welcome, at Earwitness Studio,
Artscape Youngplace (downtown Toronto).
Eve’s own exposure to exceptional teachers
during her developmental years makes her a
communicative, intuitive and creative teacher
with over 25 years teaching experience
(private lessons, masterclasses, adjudication)
Each student is an individual. Email Eve to set
up a free introductory meeting at
[email protected]
WHAT’S IN YOUR BASEMENT? Is that
accordion gathering dust? Are your band
days just a hazy memory? Someone out there
would love to give your nice old clarinet /
tuba / drum kit a new life. Advertise your
unused instruments or find one for sale with
a WholeNote classified ad! Contact [email protected]
thewholenote.com.
MUSICIANS AVAILABLE
SWEETHEART PARTY BAND? Do you provide
live music for weddings? Maybe also for
wakes, roasts & retirements, and all kinds of
Ace Your Auditions
Rhodes
Electric Piano
Mental Skills for
Performing Artists
Repair and Restoration
[email protected]
www.victormio.com
Lisa Chisholm
www.masterperforming.ca
occasions? Advertise your ensemble right
here for as little as $24 plus tax!! Contact
[email protected] by August 25
for the September edition!
SERVICES
ACCOUNTING AND INCOME TAX SERVICE
for small business and individuals, to save
you time and money, customized to meet
your needs. Norm Pulker, B. Math. CMA.
905-251-0309 or 905-830-2985
CD LINER NOTES, PROMO MATERIAL,
CONCERT PROGRAMS, LIBRETTI, WEB SITE
CONTENT AND MEMOIRS need proofreading
and editing for correct spelling and grammar,
clarity and consistency. Contact Vanessa
Wells, [email protected], for a copy editor
with a music background. Quick turnaround
and reasonable rates! wellsreadediting.ca
VENUES AVAILABLE / WANTED
ARE YOU PLANNING A CONCERT OR
RECITAL? Looking for a venue? Consider
Bloor Street United Church. Phone: 416-9247439 x22. Email: [email protected]
PERFORMANCE / REHEARSAL / STUDIO /
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE: great acoustics,
reasonable rates, close to Green P Parking,
cafés & restaurants. Historic church at
College & Bellevue, near Spadina. Phone
416-921-6350. E-mail [email protected]
gmail.com.
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VEGASNORTH ENTERTAINMENT
(A Canadian Enter tainment Company)
WANT VEGASNORTH TO COME PERFORM
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For a quote or to reach us contact
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CORPORATE EVENTS | THEATRES | NIGHTCLUBS & CASINOS | RESORTS | GALAS & BANQUETS | WEDDINGS
thewholenote.com
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 69
WE ARE ALL MUSIC’S CHILDREN
June’s Child
Alex Pangman
NEW CONTEST
Who is September’s Child?
YOU are, that’s who!
TOM PARKER
MJ BUELL
That childhood photo? I remember the smell of
“Canada’s Sweetheart of Swing,” Alex
the wooden record player – when record players were
Pangman is a singer whose love for popular
still furniture! I can still smell the wood as I would
music from 1920 to 1940 charms people in a
graciously old-fashioned way. Her sparkly energy have when I opened the lid, and feel the shag carpet
under my feet.
seems to come from some limitless source.
Anything you’d like to say to young Alex in that
People love her beautifully wrought covers of
photo? I might encourage her to write more songs. I
older standards – her smooth warm delivery will
think the most original songs I ever wrote were as a
remind you a little of your own favourite singer
child! Ha! That, and don’t drop the needle!
from that time. But Pangman’s voice is truly her
Where did you grow up? I was born/raised in
own, and she makes a specialty of breathing life
This summer make some
Mississauga, Ontario, to John and Connie Pangman.
into lesser-known music from the period. The
musical memories
Dad worked in finance and for a time Mom was a
style may sound familiar but “new” old songs
to sustain yourself
have to be offered with first-rate diction and this, V.O.N. nurse. My big sister, Jennifer, was into music
all year round.
via ballet. We both attended Froebel [independent]
along with her special way of letting the song’s
school where we learned to be self-active and creative. Learn to play something new.
own narrative shine, makes for pretty irresistible
listening. She has led her regular swing band, the I was terrible at math (and music theory) even into
Play some music
high school. So bad in fact, that instead of studying
Alleycats, since 1998.
you thought you’d forgotten.
post-secondary music, I went to
Pangman was born
Get outside and find
UofT for art history! To be honest, my summer’s music in
with cystic fibrosis: an
jazz education happened listening
incurable genetic disease
unexpected places.
to thousands of old records, mostly
which destroys the
And bring a child.
driving to and from the stables.
lungs. Pangman’s first
Horses have brought me many good
double lung transplant
A new contest will appear
things in life to offset having been
in 2008 was considered
in our September edition
born with lung disease.
successful, but by early
Your earliest memories of music? Mom had a guitar and I’m sure
2013 her health was
sang to me, but I think my first memories of music were at Gramma and
failing. Only the people
Grampa’s house in London. Gramma had an electric organ (with all the
closest to her knew – she
foot pedals!). Grampa played the uke and the spoons. Grampa used to
continued to sing (sitting
strum on his uke and sing “Five foot two, eyes of blue…” Mom and Dad
down) and opened for
liked the oldies, and we often listened to an oldies show over dinner.
Willie Nelson at Massey
And that record player in the photo was stocked with a lot of LPs.
Hall in June 2013 while
I remember getting those Mini Pops albums and singing along a lot. I
waiting to hear if a
got my first uke quite young and would wake up early on weekends to
second transplant donor
sneak downstairs and play it “quietly” to myself. Keener!
could be found – the call
When did you first think of yourself as a career musician? I got sick
came six weeks later.
Pangman’s courage,
and lost my university year. When I got better I realized I didn’t want a
energy and capacity to
career in academia or a museum. Life is short (when you have a serious
seize every moment is deeply
lung disease, more so!) and I decided to do something immediately thrilling:
Alex Pangman lives in
Toronto, Ontario with her
inspiring. Maybe it has somemusic! I didn’t want to spend years writing essays, I wanted to be on stage
musician husband “Colonel”
thing to do with choosing to
singing, and I pretty much did just that! I didn’t think of it as a career. It was
Tom Parker. When she’s not
live a life where you truly love
just living in the moment.
singing or attending to music
what you do.
Please read the full-length interview at thewholenote.com
business she’s likely to be at
the farm, horseback riding.
UPCOMING
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS!
Live in Montreal is Alex Pangman and the Alleycats 2005 album,
recorded in front of an enthusiastic Montreal Jazz Festival audience.
These 12 tracks are essential Pangman and the record remains a
favourite among her fans. A copy each for ROBERT LESCOE and MEL
DADE
Alex Pangman’s New is her eighth record. It explores lesser-known
1930s songs some of which are Canadian-written, including I’ll Never
Smile Again, The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise and Pangman’s It’s
Never Enough. Recorded in New Orleans in a converted 1930’s woodframe church called The Living Room with the New Orleans Cotton
Mouth Kings. New [JTR 8587] was nominated for the 2015/16 JUNO
Award for Vocal Jazz Album of the Year. A copy each for MARGARET
OLDFIELD and CHARLES LEVI
June 4 Saturday Swing Night at Dovercourt House Swing
Dance Ballroom. (9:15pm, Toronto); June 16 Manhattans
Pizza Bistro and Music Club. (7 to10pm,Guelph); June 24
TD Toronto Jazz Festival presents “Heather Bambrick &
Friends” with the Russ Little Quartet at The Old Mill Home
Smith Jazz Bar. Bambrick will trade songs and duets with
guest Alex Pangman. (7:30pm, Toronto); June 25 TD
Toronto Jazz Festival presents Alex Pangman and her
Alleycats. The sextet will take over The Rex for 90 minutes
of pure swing. (8pm, Toronto). ALSO: July 30 at the
Niagara Jazz Festival, and Sept 2 and 3 at the CNE
(Toronto).
70 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
DISCOVERIES | RECORDINGS REVIEWED
DAV I D O L D S
M
aterial for this month’s column began with an email in early
April from a young man in Hawaii saying he was sending me
copies of two CDs featuring his music for baritone ukulele. I
don’t think I ever responded to the email, but my curiosity was whetted
– I was not familiar with the baritone member of that instrumental
family – and when the discs arrived I was pleased to find them both
interesting. The young man’s name is Ryan Choi (ryanckchoi.com) and
the two discs present different sides of his compositional activity.
The first, Whenmill (Off ODG049 offrecordlabel.blogspot.ca), presents four pieces
for solo baritone ukulele in a fairly traditional contemporary classical guitar idiom.
The rich tones of the instrument and the way
Choi makes full contrapuntal use of its limited
range makes it easy to forget that he is dealing
with two fewer strings than on a guitar. Set 1
is comprised of three pieces, Quixano and
Inn Blue, both from 2012, and Whenmill, composed the following
year. I wish there were some program notes for the pieces, but even
web searches turn up little information. The opening piece’s title, also
the honorific of “Don Quixote de la Mancha,” makes me wonder if
Inn Blue refers to the Don’s infamous adventure at a country inn and
whether Whenmill, a word I cannot find mention of except in connection with Choi, has something to with tilting at windmills…but that
is mere speculation on my part. Regardless of intent or inspiration,
the “set” is a satisfying and intriguing exploration of the potential of
this lesser-known instrument. At 12 minutes, the final track, South
Aleksandr, composed in 2011, is longer than the other three combined
and its virtuosic flamenco-like passages showcase Choi’s considerable
abilities.
Choi’s other disc Three Dancers (Accretions
ALP-060 accretions.com) is quite a different
offering including works for “prepared” baritone ukulele, percussion and electronics, all
performed by the composer. The title of the
20-minute EP, again about 20 minutes in all
(and of the third track,) refers to Picasso’s
painting Les Trois Danseuses and the cover art
is a line drawing by Choi. The brief opening
track Preparations I and IV is percussive in its approach, seemingly
achieved with preparations on the ukulele similar to those which
John Cage developed for piano, rather than through the use of traditional percussion instruments. It is very rhythmic and pointillistic,
but relatively tame compared to the dynamic second track, Apollon
at Eros, which combines hand drumming and stilted string plucking
which jumps erratically, although not randomly, around the fret
board. The electronic treatments are subtly present in Three Dancers,
with, as far as I can tell, textures produced by reversing recorded
sounds which actually seem almost as if they could be created live
in real time by this accomplished player. These two releases present
a remarkable portrait of an instrument not previously known for its
art music potential, and of an adventurous new voice on the contemporary scene.
I was pleased, but not surprised, by the
beautiful sounds on Old Wood – New Seeds,
the latest from Toronto classical guitarist/
composer William Beauvais (musiccentre.ca/
node/138158). The disc opens with the suite,
Appalachian Colours – Gold; Red; Green;
Blue, evidently inspired not by Copland’s
Appalachian Spring, but rather by that iconic
American composer’s orchestral suite Rodeo. From the contemplative opening movement through the lilting second and the lullabylike third, our attention is held by the lush colours Beauvais draws
from his instrument. The gently ebullient final movement, glistening
like sunlight off the surface of a rippling lake, held me wrapped in its
thrall from start to finish nearly seven minutes later.
Shakespeare has arguably provided inspiration for more composers
than any other literary figure throughout history. Beauvais has
followed this time-honoured path with a pair of works, Fallstaffe’s
Lament and Fallstaffe’s Charade, the first being a suitably mournful
theme and variations and the second in the form of an English jig. No
explanation is given for the aberrant spelling of the character’s name
(nor for a different spelling, one “l” but still the “e,” in the program
note), perhaps just to evoke the Elizabethan era before spellings were
standardized. Certainly the music does so effectively. We’ll return to
Shakespeare later in this column but Beauvais next takes us to Eastern
Europe in The Ancient Waters suite which uses two Bulgarian songs
You can find enhanced reviews of all discs below the yellow line in The WholeNote listening room.
What if you could
listen in?
Now you can!
•Read the review
•Click to listen
•Click to buy
New this month to the
Listening Room
Three compositions for prepared
baritone ukulele. Debut album of
composer Ryan Choi.
TheWholeNote.com/Listening
For more information Thom McKercher at [email protected]
thewholenote.com
Re-mastered original Grammy®winning album "pete" with the new
companion DVD of never before
seen footage of performances by
Pete with the Paul Winter Consort.
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 71
distinctive voice who can be heard on many of the recordings of this
family compact; his production credits include the album Therapy
which marked Wainwright’s return to recording after a three-year
hiatus in 1989.
Evidently happy in the shadows, it took much persuasion from
Tannenbaum’s friends to embark on this voyage to centre stage. His
belated debut album includes a number of traditional pieces – Coal
Man Blues, Moonshiner, Mama’s Angel Child – and the gospel song
Farther Along and Harburg/Rose/Arlen’s It’s Only a Paper Moon.
But it’s not all old-timey fare and Tannenbaum turns out to be a fine
storytelling songwriter too – the CD opens out to a double panel with
four paragraphs of prose I initially took to be a memoir, but which
turn out to be the lyrics for his song Brooklyn 1955. The booklet
includes extended encomiums by Wainwright (heard in harmony
vocals on several tracks) and by record producer (not this record)
Joe Boyd. Chaim Tannenbaum was produced by Dick Connette and
released on StorySound Records (storysoundrecords.com). This disc
is not just for aficionados of the Wainwright-McGarrigles, but it will
be of particular interest to them. Highly recommended.
Concert note: Chaim Tannenbaum launches his eponymous CD at
Toronto’s Tranzac Club on Sunday June 12.
I told you that Shakespeare would reappear
later and here he comes. April 23, 1616 is the
assumed date of the death of the Bard and
to mark the 400th anniversary Deutsche
Grammophon has released Take All My Loves
(4795508), a setting of nine Shakespeare
Sonnets by the above-mentioned scion of
the Wainwright-McGarrigle dynasty, Rufus
Wainwright. It is an eclectic offering, further
exploring the singer-songwriter’s interest in blending the worlds of
pop and high-art culture. There are readings by Siân Phillips, Frally
Hynes, Peter Eyre, Carrie Fisher, William Shatner and Inge Keller,
while the vocals are primarily shared by Austrian soprano Anna
Prohaska and Wainwright himself, with the participation of Florence
Welsh, Martha Wainwright, Fiora Cutler, Christopher Nell and
Jürgen Holtz.
The project grew out of an invitation from director Robert Wilson
back in 2009 – the 400th anniversary of the publication of the sonnets
– to set some of them for a production of the Berliner Ensemble,
a theatre company founded by Bertold Brecht in 1949. Although
Wainwright’s interest in the poems dates back to his youth when
he was encouraged to read them by his mother, they have been of
ongoing interest in recent years. Following the cabaret style production in Berlin replete with garish costumes, the San Francisco
Symphony commissioned Wainwright to orchestrate five of the
sonnets for the concert hall, three of which appeared on his 2010
album All Days Are Nights: Songs for Lulu.
The current production is kind of a mixed bag, with lush full
orchestral accompaniments featuring the BBC Symphony Orchestra,
smaller settings with the Berlin String Section and a number of
tracks with pop band instrumentation. All of the sung sonnets
are introduced by a dramatic reading of the text, with the exception of Wainwright’s performance of Take All My Loves (Sonnet 40)
which incorporates Marius de Vries’ recitation into the body of the
song. Prohaska’s voice, celebrated across a repertoire that spans
three centuries, is a highlight, especially in the gentle A Woman’s
Face (Sonnet 20) and the wickedly dramatic Th’Expense of Spirit
in a Waste of Shame (Sonnet 129). Wainwright’s distinctive voice is
particularly effective in the title track, but his reprise of A Woman’s
Face is something of a letdown with its straightforward pop arrangement and sensibility.
The extensive booklet includes an introduction by British actor
Peter Eyre, full texts, translations and production credits. What is
missing is an explanation of why two of the sonnets are presented in
German necessitating the translations, or more properly the English
originals, of All Dessen Müd (Sonnet 66) in a cabaret-like arrangement and Farewell (Sonnet 87) sung beautifully by Prohaska. I assume
this has to do with the Berliner Ensemble origins of the settings, but it
and a rhythmic Balkan folk dance.
Beauvais incorporates Renaissance-style “divisions” in the warm
and luscious Open Moonflower which is paired with the cascading
Shoveling Clouds. Carré St. Anne, the final track on this very satisfying disc, begins quietly but gradually builds to a driving conclusion based on a Brazilian dance form. Throughout, the recorded sound
is rich, but natural, and surprisingly free of extraneous finger and
string noise.
One thing I did not mention in the
Beauvais review was that several of the tracks
put me in mind of the Paul Winter Consort
and how classical guitarist Ralph Towner
was integrated into the fabric of that seminal
crossover band in the 1970s. I mention this
now because another package that found my
attention this past month was a reissue of the
1996 CD Pete (LMUS 0032) along with the
DVD Living Music Festival 1982 (LMU-45) featuring Pete Seeger and
the Paul Winter Consort, on Winter’s Living Music label (paulwinter.
com). Released 20 years ago when Seeger was 77, Pete – Pete Seeger
and Friends brings together Joanie Madden (pennywhistle), Howard
Levy (harmonica), Paul Winter (soprano sax), Paul Preston (banjo,
mandolin) and three different choirs, Gaudeamus, the Union Baptist
Church Singers and the Cathedral Singers, in 18 songs showing the
breadth of Seeger’s interest and experience. From straightforward folk
songs like Kisses Sweeter Than Wine, through protest, pro-environment and pro-humanity offerings, Garbage, To My Old Brown Earth
and My Rainbow Race, and to storytelling, Huddie Ledbetter Was a
Hell of a Man, and traditional songs like The Water is Wide, we are
presented with many facets of one of the most influential folk singers
of the 20th century, someone who brought so many people together
over the course of a career that spanned almost eight decades.
The DVD is a bit of a time capsule. Recorded at the Living Music
Festival in 1982 when Seeger was a sprightly 63, the footage never
saw the light of day until after his death in 2014 when Paul Winter
sought out filmmaker Phil Garvin who fortunately still had the raw
footage. The festival, organized by Winter in the Lichtfield Hills of
northwest Connecticut, featured the Paul Winter Consort in selections from their album Common Ground, singer Susan Osborn and
the Brazilian Pe de Boi Samba Band. Seeger performs an extended solo
set singing in English, Yiddish, French and Spanish, accompanying
himself on banjo, 12-string guitar and block flute. He also collaborates with the other performers and as you would expect there is
lots of audience participation. It is vintage Seeger and a wonderfully
nostalgic look at peace festivals of days gone by. There are bonus tracks
recorded at the “Pete-nic” at Winter’s farm in 1997 and a five minute
solo performance by Seeger for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society in
2005 on the 40th anniversary of the “Bloody Sunday” Pettus Bridge
March in Selma, Alabama. Although his voice had almost disappeared
by that time, his energy and conviction had not flagged. It is a moving
performance.
The CD/DVD set was supported by Music for the Earth, a non-profit
foundation dedicated to “exploring ways that music can be used to
enrich the lives of human beings and awaken a spirit of involvement
in the preservation of wildlife and the natural environment of the
Earth” – things to which Pete Seeger devoted his life and his art.
Chaim Tannenbaum is another who has
been involved in the folk music scene for
more than half a century, albeit in a peripheral role. Peripheral that is if you’re not part of
the Wainwright/McGarrigle musical dynasty.
The erstwhile professor of the philosophy
of mathematics and logic has been an integral part of that extended family throughout
the decades, managing to stay as friend and collaborator with both
Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle in spite of their breakup,
frequently performing with Wainwright and with Kate and Anna
McGarrigle and mentoring Loudon and Kate’s precocious offspring
Rufus and Martha. Tannenbaum is a multi-instrumentalist with a
72 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
Gergiev makes a very strong case for his interpretation – rough and
rhythmic, rather than romantic – and provides an insightful introduction that shows how this 100-year-old masterwork is still fresh
and vibrant.
Shameless self-promotion II: I am hosting a fundraiser on behalf
of New Music Concerts at “Coffee House 345” (aka Gallery 345 on
Sorauren) on Wednesday June 15. I will be bringing my eclectic repertoire, 6- and 12-string guitars and a few musical friends along for the
ride. Thanks to NMC’s board of directors there will be complimentary
snacks and libations. For reservations call 416-961-9594.
We welcome your feedback and invite submissions. CDs and
comments should be sent to: DISCoveries, WholeNote Media Inc.,
The Centre for Social Innovation, 503 – 720 Bathurst St. Toronto ON
M5S 2R4. We also encourage you to visit our website thewholenote.
com where you can find added features including direct links to
performers, composers and record labels, “buy buttons” for on-line
shopping and additional, expanded and archival reviews.
would have been nice if Eyre, whose English performance of Farewell
with Wainwright can be found on YouTube, would have explained.
Concert note: Toronto audiences can catch Rufus Wainwright’s
acclaimed recreation of Judy Garland’s 1961 Carnegie Hall show
“Rufus Does Judy” June 23 and 24 at the Hearn Generating Station as
part of this year’s Luminato Festival.
Concert note: On June 18 another Luminato
performance at the Hearn features soloists of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra with
concertmaster Jonathan Crow and narrator
Derek Boyes in Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du
Soldat. Naxos recently released a new
recording of that work, Stavinsky – The
Soldier’s Tale (Complete) featuring the
Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players with
violinist Tianwa Yang, narrator Fred Child and actors Jared McGuire
(The Soldier) and Jeff Biehl (The Devil) under the direction of JoAnn
Falletta (8.573537).
I have always liked this pocket drama – an hour-long Faustian
story of a young man who sells his soul – or in this case his violin
– to the devil and in so doing loses the things and people he loves.
Composed in 1917 while Stravinsky was living in Switzerland during
the First World War, it is scored for a modest orchestra of seven players
reflecting the ravaged ranks of musicians who survived that conflict.
Of principal interest is the violin, so dear to the soldier – its themes
will reappear in Stravinsky’s Violin Concerto some 14 years later. It is
a different take on the story because it is not the soldier’s greed which
leads him to his fateful error. He is actually perfectly content with his
modest life and his fiddle but is tricked by the devil into making the
trade. Although granted fortune through the book he trades for, which
foretells the future, it was never his idea and he is never comfortable in the role. Eventually he finds a way to beat the devil – by letting
him win at cards – and regain his life. Spoiler Alert: all does not end
well when you play with the devil and in a scene reminiscent of
Orpheus’ glance back at Eurydice, the devil regains the upper hand
and the violin.
The story is narrated effectively and Yang’s violin playing is flawless
and convincing in this new performance. It is a welcome addition to
my collection.
And a quick final note. The Story of
Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du Printemps with Valery
Gergiev (ArtHaus Music 109210) is a very
effective documentary film by Peter Rump.
Gergiev leads the Rotterdam Philharmonic
Orchestra through a rehearsal during which he
analyzes and explains his approach to the iconic
work. This is intercut with commentary and
piano examples by Gergiev and historic footage of
Stravinsky, Pierre Boulez and Alexander Toradze.
David Olds, DISCoveries Editor
[email protected]
W
TERRY ROBBINS
hen violinist Jacques Israelievitch
joined the Faculty of Music at York
University in 2008 he became a
colleague of pianist Christina Petrowska Quilico,
and it wasn’t long before they started performing
as a duo. They also sight-read all of the Mozart
sonatas for their own pleasure, and soon added
some of the late works to their concert recitals.
This led to their performing all of the sonatas in a marathon concert
of more than seven hours (with three short breaks), an experience
which convinced them to try to recreate the excitement by recording
the complete series. They were part of the way through the project
when Israelievitch was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. Despite
a break for hospital treatment he managed to find the strength to
complete the project, recording the final six sonatas in less than four
hours. He passed away on September 5, 2015.
Mozart: Sonatas and Variations for Piano and Violin Vol.1 is the
initial release in the series, issued “with a heavy heart” by Fleur de
Son Classics (FDS 58034). This first volume features the Sonata No.28
in E Flat K380, the Sonata No.32 in B-Flat Major K454, the Sonata
No.35 in A Major K526 and the Six Variations on a French Song K360.
These works are perfectly suited to Israelievitch’s distinctive style
and sound, which was always warm, gentle and sensitive. More
Visit the Listening Room Online. Enhanced reviews. Click to listen. Click to buy.
Rufus Wainwright commemorates
Shakespeare’s in dramatic fashion
in this collection of sonnets
performed by both actors and
vocalists, including Anna Prohaska.
thewholenote.com
Stravinsky wrote The Soldier’s Tale
work in collaboration with author
Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz and
artist Rene-Victor Auberjonois, and
is based on a Russian folk tale by
Alexander Afanasyev.
Irish-born Victor Herbert - a cellist,
conductor, composer of light
operas, and recording artist - was
one of the most celebrated names
in American music in the late-19th
and early-20th centuries.
Few harpsichordists have come
to the defence of the harpsichord
repertoire on the modern piano
with such conviction and audacity.
Fascinating!
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 73
friends and musical partner with Varga since
2004, and one wonders why a solo CD has
been so long in coming. Still, it was certainly
worth the wait.
Two works on the disc by young American
composers are world premiere recordings:
Caleb Buhrans’ Phantasie and Dan Visconti’s
very brief but joyful Hard-Knock Stomp.
There are also works by José Bragato, Bohuslav
Martinů, Alberto Ginastera and Marin Marais. A student work by a
young George Enescu, the single movement Sonata in F Minor, was
only recently discovered and is still unpublished.
The CD’s title comes from the phrase “paths of the first day” from
the Francis Poulenc song Les Chemins de l’amour, the final track on
the album. Metcalf adds a vocal performance to bring an excellent CD
to a simply lovely close.
This also seems to be a great month for violin
and piano CDs. Interchange is a new release
from the Australian violinist Sarita Kwok (a
longtime resident in the United States) and
pianist Wei-Yi Yang featuring Violin & Piano
Duos of the 20th Century (Genuin GEN 16548).
Janáček’s Sonata is a late work that shows
the influence of the First World War as well
as the composer’s fascination with the
speech patterns of his native Moravia that gave his late music such a
distinctive sound. It’s a difficult, intense, passionate and constantly
changing work, and Kwok captures every element perfectly.
Stravinsky’s Duo Concertante and Prokofiev’s Five Melodies are
given equally sympathetic performances, and there is a stunning sense
of style in Ravel’s Sonata No.2 in G Major, particularly in the Blues
middle movement and the final Perpetuum mobile.
Kwok displays a gorgeous tone, a dazzling technique and a beautiful
focus throughout a terrific CD, and is matched in all respects by Yang’s
outstanding piano playing.
The latest issue from the outstanding
American violinist Rachel Barton Pine
is Testament, a 2CD set of the complete
Bach Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin
(Avie 2CD AV2360).
As I’ve noted before, comparative reviews
of these sets are not only extremely difficult,
given the huge number of performer choices
available, but also irrelevant. Probably more
than with any other works in the solo repertoire, recorded performances of the Sonatas & Partitas are about making an intimate personal
statement. The sheer size and scope of the work means that there will
always be countless variations – small and large – between various
interpretations; all that matters is that each performer’s personal
views and feelings come through, for nothing lays a violinist’s soul
bare more than these astonishing pieces.
Barton Pine makes no attempt to hide the work’s spiritual significance for her, choosing to record the CD in her church, St. Paul’s
United Church of Christ in Chicago, the place she calls her “emotional
home” for Bach’s music and where she first encountered the violin
and first played Bach in a worship setting at the age of four. There’s
certainly a spirituality to her playing, which is quite superb.
The recording is, she says, a testament to her lifelong relationship
with one of the cornerstones of the violin repertoire and to all who
have inspired and supported her. And what a testament it is.
Canadian violinist Andréa Tyniec has
released a simply stunning recording of the
Six Sonatas for Solo Violin Op.27 by Eugène
Ysaÿe (Really Records REA-CD-5898D).
Tyniec raised the money to fund the recording
through the online fundraising site Indiegogo
and boy, was it worth it!
These astonishing sonatas, apparently
mapped out within the space of 24 hours in July 1923 and published
so than in the early juvenile sonatas written before Mozart turned
11, where the violin is little more than an accompaniment to the
piano, the instruments are on equal terms here, and it’s obvious
that Israelievitch and Petrowska Quilico are of one mind in their
performances.
I’m not sure how many volumes there will be in this series – there
are 19 mature sonatas as well as the 17 juvenile works – but if this first
volume is anything to go by then it will be a series to treasure, and one
that will be a wonderful memorial tribute to a great and much-loved
violinist.
There seems to be a never-ending stream
of emerging top-notch violinists these days,
but every now and then a talent emerges that
simply stops you in your tracks. One such
talent is the 19-year-old Canadian violinist
Kerson Leong, who makes his CD debut with
Bis on the Analekta label with Canadian
pianist Philip Chiu (AN 2 9160).
Leong is by no means an unknown, having
won the Junior First Prize at the 2010 Menuhin Competition in Oslo,
as well as numerous awards here in Canada, but from the very first
bars of the opening track it’s clear that this is a very special violinist
with qualities that lift him from the general crowd and place him in
the stratosphere.
In a blog from the 2012 Menuhin Competition, Nancy Pellegrini
called Leong “a 15-year-old with a 45-year-old’s stage presence.” The
level of musical maturity on display here is simply staggering. Leong
chose to make his first album a series of encore-style pieces, saying
that he thought it would be the ideal way to introduce himself, and
it was a wise decision: the wide range of composers and styles allows
him to display his dazzling talents to the fullest.
From the rich, deep, passionate tone of the Brahms Hungarian
Dances Nos.1 and 17, through Kreisler’s Liebesfreud and Liebesleid, a
Gluck Melodie, the Bartók Romanian Dances, Medtner’s Fairy Tale,
the three Gershwin Preludes, Rachmaninoff’s Vocalise, a simply
ravishing Debussy Clair de lune and Valse, to Wagner’s Albumblatt
and the final Hebrew Melody Op.33 by Joseph Achron, this is magnificent playing by a young violinist who must surely be on the cusp of a
stellar international career. Chiu’s finely judged accompaniments add
greatly to an outstanding CD.
The Juilliard graduate and Itzhak Perlman
protégée, Francesca dePasquale (francescadepasquale.instantencore.com), has also
released a self-titled debut album, with pianist
Meng-Chieh Liu. Like Leong, dePasquale has
been around for quite a while – she made her
debut at the age of nine touring Spain – and
for her first album chose works that she feels
are not only dear to her heart but that also show her wide range as an
artist; also like the Leong CD, it’s a choice that works extremely well.
DePasquale has a beautiful tone and impressive technique. There’s
a lovely reading of the Bach Partita No.2 in D Minor for Solo Violin,
and a really strong extended melodic line in Messiaen’s Thème et
Variations. Paola Prestini’s very effective Oceanic Fantasy for Solo
Violin and Electronics, a 2015 commission from dePasquale, incorporates field recordings of southern Italian songs, although the work is
almost entirely for violin alone, with Bach-like arpeggios and doublestopping and strong melody lines. The remaining works are the brief
Schumann Intermezzo from the F.A.E. Sonata, Bartók’s Rhapsody
No.1 and a simply gorgeous performance of Marietta’s Lied from
Korngold’s opera Die Tote Stadt; there is a video of the recording
session of the latter, along with audio samples of all the tracks on the
CD, on dePasquale’s website. It’s well worth a visit.
This seems to be a good month for debut albums. First Day is the
solo debut CD of the American cellist Laura Metcalf, accompanied by
pianist Matei Varga in another varied program of works to which both
performers feel deeply connected (Sono Luminus DSL-92201).
Metcalf has extensive experience as both a chamber musician
and soloist, and has a lovely tone and a fine legato. She has been
74 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
in 1924, manage to look back to Bach as well as forward to the 20th
century, and are arguably the greatest solo works in the violin literature after the Bach Sonatas & Partitas. This is the sixth complete
set I’ve received in the past five years and, as with the Bach works,
comparative reviews are almost impossible in the space available.
Suffice it so say that Tyniec’s faultless technique, outstanding musicianship and a crystal-clear recorded sound make this marvellous set
one to revisit and to treasure.
One of the Ysaÿe sonatas – the No.4 in E
Minor – is featured on Perspectives on Light &
Shadow, the new CD from violinist Ann Miller
(annmillerviolin.com) with pianist Sonia
Long. Although a more-than-capable reading,
it doesn’t quite match Tyniec’s; a rather muddy
recorded sound doesn’t help. The same could
be said for the Bartók Sonata No.1 for Violin
and Piano, which doesn’t really come up to the
Tanja Becker-Bender recording reviewed last month.
The real gem here, though, and what makes this CD so interesting,
is the Sonata for Violin and Piano by the American composer Robert
Beaser (b.1954). Consisting of a theme and 15 variations divided into
three contrasting movements of five variations each, it was reworked
for violin in 2002, having been originally written in 1981 for flute and
piano, although you would never guess: it’s strong, idiomatic writing
for the violin, and a striking and quite brilliant work that brings the
best playing on the disc from Miller.
Fantasy & Romance – Schumann: Music
for Cello and Piano is the latest CD from
Emanuel Gruber, who has previously recorded
the complete music for cello and piano by
Beethoven and Mendelssohn; Keiko Sekino is
the pianist this time (Delos DE 3481).
Although Schumann loved and played the
cello he left only two works written specifically for the instrument: his Cello Concerto
in A Minor and the Five Pieces in Folk Style Op.102, the latter
included on this album. The other works here are all transcriptions
or arrangements, although Schumann did suggest that two works –
the Fantasiestücke Op.73 for clarinet and piano and the Adagio and
Allegro Op.70 for horn and piano – could also be played on the cello.
The Drei Romanzen Op.94, arranged here by Valter Dešpalj, were
originally for oboe and piano; the Märchenbilder Op.113, in a transcription by Alfred Piatti and Christian Bellisario, were originally
for viola and piano. Two piano pieces – Abendlied Op.85 and the
famous Träumerei Op.15, in lovely arrangements by Lothar Lechner –
complete a very attractive CD.
Gruber notes that the lyrical quality of Schumann’s music makes
the cello an ideal medium of expression, and regardless of the original
scoring of the works here, these lovely performances certainly support
that opinion.
Victor Herbert was another composer who
played cello, but in his case at full professional
level. He was born in Ireland in 1859, but
grew up in Germany, emigrating to the United
States in 1886. By the late 1890s he was one of
the most famous musicians in America, celebrated for his playing and conducting and for
his operettas.
His Cello Concertos Nos.1 and 2 are featured
on a new Naxos CD in performances by Mark Kosower and the Ulster
Orchestra under JoAnn Falletta (8.573517). Not surprisingly, both
works are typical of the late German Romantic school. The Concerto
No.1 in D Major Op.8 was performed by the composer in Stuttgart in
1885, and again in New York in 1887, but remained unpublished and
apparently unperformed for many years; it was first recorded in 1986.
The Concerto No.2 in E Minor Op.30 is the stronger of the two
works. Dvořák attended its premiere in New York in March 1894,
and was so impressed with Herbert’s balancing of the large orchestra
and the solo cello that it led directly to the composition of his own
B-Minor Concerto within the year.
Kosower is in great form in two really lovely performances, and
Falletta draws spirited playing from the orchestra for which she was
principal conductor from 2011 to 2014.
Herbert’s Irish Rhapsody for Grand Orchestra completes the disc;
it’s the expected mix of Irish tunes, much like the Bruch Scottish
Fantasy in mood and orchestration, and with some brilliant counterpoint to round it off.
There’s more Irish music on Dancing in
Daylight – Contemporary Piano Trios from
Ireland, a new CD featuring works by Seóirse
Bodley (b.1933), John Buckley (b.1951), Rhona
Clarke (b.1958) and Fergus Johnston (b.1959)
in performances by the Fidelio Trio (métier
msv 28556).
Last year the trio completed a residency in
the music department of St. Patrick’s College
in Drumcondra, Dublin, during which time they commissioned the
works by Bodley, Buckley and Johnston. Johnston’s Piano Trio dates
from 2011; Buckley’s Piano Trio from 2013; and Bodley’s Piano Trio
‘Dancing in the Daylight’ from 2014. Clarke’s Piano Trio No.2 was
originally written in 2001, but revised in 2007 and 2015, when it was
played during the Trio’s residency.
All four works are extremely strong, well-written, accessible and
effective, with performances and recording quality of the highest level
throughout a really interesting CD.
Nocturne is the second CD by the Thunder Bay flamenco guitarist
You can find enhanced reviews of all discs below the yellow line at TheWholeNote.com/listening
This is the sixth release in ATMA’s
project to record the sacred
cantatas of J.S. Bach in conjunction
with the Montréal Baroque Festival.
thewholenote.com
Baritone Jesse Blumberg and
pianist Martin Katz have immersed
themselves in Schubert's
monumental song-cycle, guiding
listeners through the varied
landscapes of Schubert's Winter
Journey.
Sudbin - hailed as ‘one of the
greatest pianists of the 21st century’
- releases this brilliant new Scarlatti
disc following a 7-year & 14-album
collaboration with BIS.
Organist Yves-G. Préfontaine is
featured in the first recording made
on the splendid Juget-Sinclair
Op. 35 organ installed in the
Chapelle du Musée de l’Amérique
francophone.
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 75
and composer Matt Sellick ([email protected]
gmail.com), whose first album After Rain was
very favourably reviewed in the February 2015
edition of The WholeNote.
Sellick has spent four summers studying
in Spain with some of the leading flamenco
guitarists, and it show. He admits that this new
CD is “more clearly flamenco” than his first,
but also acknowledges that there are other influences at work here
as well. All 11 pieces – some solo and some accompanied by bass and
percussion – are original compositions, and there is a lovely mix of
different moods and tempos.
He obviously has a great feel for flamenco, an outstanding technique
– clean, accurate and clearly defined – and plays with a warm rich
sound and a lovely range of tone colour and shading. The recording
quality and ambience are perfect.
Sellick is clearly a huge talent; this is a terrific CD, and it will be
very interesting to see what he does next.
KeyedIn
X
that Beethoven’s creative genius is for him, supreme.
Timothy Steeves, known for his six recordings with violinist Nancy Dahl as Duo
Concertante, has now released his first solo
disc, Haydn Sonatas (Marquis MAR 469).
Steeves admits to having a lifelong admiration
for Haydn’s music and his choice of the three
sonatas on this disc is meant to show Haydn’s
creativity and originality. While the modern
ear may have difficulty in hearing this music as original, because of
its similarities to baroque and Mozartian works, a quick self-reminder
as to where Haydn sits historically helps place him as the significant
bridge from the baroque to the classical period.
Steeves plays with great clarity, required especially in the upper
voices where Haydn tends to nest his melodies. He has a touch that
demonstrates impressive control of tonal colouring, so important
in the slow movements of the sonatas. The Adagio of the Sonata in
A-Flat Major Hob.XVI:46 is an example of how Steeves gives the
middle register a lovely dark sound while it supports a brighter upper
voice. And while Haydn rarely creates the complex counterpoint we
associate with Bach, Steeves pulls out inner voices whenever Haydn
sends them lower down the keyboard.
The Sonata in C Minor Hob.XVI:20 opening movement is a telling
example of how ornamentation remained a staple of keyboard writing
style from the Renaissance, through the baroque and into the classical
period. Steeves is meticulous throughout the first movement where
Haydn has inserted trills and grace notes liberally. The Andante is
noteworthy for the freedom Steeves takes with its phrasings, slowing a
select few to a near stop to heighten the impact of their final cadence.
Steeves’ affection for Haydn is obvious and makes this a recording
worth having.
In Baroque Session on Piano (Analekta AN
2 9128) harpsichordist Luc Beauséjour takes
to the piano with pieces that he argues work
well on that instrument for specific reasons.
Beauséjour points out that much of the harpsichord repertoire does not play well on our
modern keyboard because of the piano’s
inability to deliver the clarity of complex ornamentation so often required by 15th- and
16th-century repertoire. He also points out that the darker colours
of the piano’s middle registers can often obscure inner contrapuntal
voices. Greater resonance is yet another factor that requires pianists to
change phrasing techniques when playing harpsichord repertoire.
Selecting a program that avoids the worst of these problems,
Beauséjour presents an attractive mix of frequently recorded works
and others less well known. A couple of familiar Scarlatti sonatas and
Rameau’s Les Indes Galantes deliver wonderfully clear and fluid runs.
Bach’s Concerto in D Minor BWV974 after Marcello is an example of
how the piano’s touch-based colours can make the second movement
even more intensely expressive.
Other works by Louis Couperin and Georg Böhm, keep much of
their harpsichord character with graceful arpeggios that Beauséjour
retains more for a sense of period style than necessary technique. He
includes a set of four Correnti by Frescobaldi and imbues them with a
strongly rhythmic bounce and keyboard touch that suggests the crisp
attack of the harpsichord’s plectra.
Baroque Session on Piano is a very fine recording commendable for
ALEX BARAN
iayin Wang has recorded nearly a dozen
CDs. Tchaikovsky – Piano Concerto No.2;
Khachaturian – Piano Concerto; Royal
Scottish National Orchestra; Peter Oundjian
(Chandos CHSA 5167) is her fifth for this label.
The Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No.2 is a
big play at almost 45 minutes. This recording
is of the original version, not the shorter one
with significant cuts by Taneyev to the second
movement. Wang proves to be a very precise player with a lot of
stamina for whom Tchaikovsky’s wilder passages pose no difficulty.
She is also comfortable with long interpretive pauses that give better
definition to the deluge of musical ideas the composer releases in the
opening movement.
Very much in command of her music when pitted against the
orchestra, she also plays beautifully when more exposed with only
solo violin and cello, as she is in the second movement. Similarly, in
the Khachaturian Piano Concerto, Wang sustains long passages of
simple octaves with great discipline, always sensitive to the mystery of
the work’s Asiatic atmosphere.
Toronto-born conductor Peter Oundjian leads the Royal Scottish
National Orchestra of which he has been music director since 2012.
The RSNO is superb and deservedly claims its reputation as one of
Europe’s leading orchestras. Both concertos require a broad range of
stylistic and dynamic expression which the orchestra handles beautifully. They do especially well with the often angular nature of the
Khachaturian. This recording brings together a wonderful team of
musicians in a pair of truly demanding works. The result is a highly
energized and superb performance.
With all 32 Beethoven sonatas in his discography, Christian Leotta has now added
Beethoven – Diabelli Variations (ATMA ACD2
2485) to his growing list of recordings.
The Diabelli Variations have a history of
divided critical opinion. At worst, Anton
Diabelli’s original theme is considered a
trite offering containing very little that any
composer can use for a credible variation. That
Beethoven used the material to write an entire set of 33 variations, is
then something of a miracle that speaks directly to the composer’s
inventive gift. Regardless of the theme’s actual merits, or lack of them,
a performer needs to understand what Beethoven is actually doing in
each variation in order to perform them intelligently.
This is where Leotta proves his standing as a highly respected
Beethoven interpreter. He understands that Beethoven uses as little
as a single interval and often barely more than that, a pick-up note,
an ornament or a rhythmic pattern, to construct his variations. He
remains highly focused on this, and in doing so holds the set of variations together despite its diverse moments of comedy, tumult, melancholy and contemplation.
Leotta has discerned Beethoven’s deepest imprint and conveys it in
each of these utterances. What he makes clear by the end of it all is
76 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
conveying the dance-like nature and Eastern flavour of Cypriot music.
French pianist Jonas Vitaud has only a few recordings to his credit,
and while he’s already in his mid-30s, his
remarkable playing would suggest we should
really be hearing more from him. His newest
recording Tchaikovsky – Les Saisons (Mirare
MIR 308) offers two starkly contrasting works.
The Seasons Op.37a is an introspective work
constructed on a calendar scheme with 12
sections. The music has some programmatic
content based on activities or events associated with each month of
the year. It is, more significantly, marked by a constant presence of
fragility that is perhaps best known in the often quoted Barcarolle
representing June. Even December – Noël concludes the cycle lightly
and quietly. Maintaining this emotional posture with only a few energetic releases in sections like La Chasse is a challenge that Vitaud
handles beautifully. His tenderness and fragility never convey weakness but seem perfectly poised. His playing is assured, even in the
most tentative of Tchaikovsky’s moments.
By contrast, the Grand Sonata in G Major Op.37 begins with huge
chordal gestures of confidence. These are echoed with even greater
energy in the closing movement and played at furious speed. Still, the
Grand Sonata contains a remarkable moment in the second movement Andante (about a third of the way through) where Vitaud
strikes a dense chord and lets it sustain with all the dampers up off
the strings. The resulting resonances grow by the moment into a rich
texture not achievable by any other means. It’s a stunning device that
he repeats near the end of the movement with the same result. It’s
brilliant and creative.
We need more recordings by this fine musician who’s definitely
worth hearing.
Piano four-hands offers a texture not quite
achieved in any other keyboard configuration.
The possibilities for density and polyphony
have enticed composers since keyboards
became commonplace. Pianists Jerome
Lowenthal and Michael Brown have just
released Americans in Paris (Concert Artists
Guild Records VEC 116 concertartists.org)
and recorded some favourites including the Ravel Ma mère l’Oye that
includes short bits of introductory narration to setup the fairy-tale
background of each segment.
Samuel Barber’s Souvenirs Op.28 is a compilation of dances set
in New York’s Plaza Hotel about 1914 and evokes the music Barber
would have heard as a boy when taken there by his mother for tea.
Lowenthal and Brown make an outstanding piano duo and deliver
these dances, many of which have ample humour injected into them,
with impeccable precision.
its intelligence and musicality.
Unapologetic about the highly pianistic
approach he takes, Yevgeny Sudbin admits
that playing Scarlatti on the piano is in
reality a transcription for a new instrument.
Consequently, Scarlatti – 18 Sonatas (BIS-2138
SACD) is fully piano, with sustain pedal wherever needed, generous dynamic expression and
every other technique the modern instrument
can offer. Sudbin makes no effort at historical
performance practice and instead claims the freedom to do whatever
the music leads him to do – on the piano.
The result of all this might be a little shocking but is, ultimately, very
believable because of the quality of the musical decisions underlying
these controversial choices. Scarlatti remains identifiably Scarlatti,
albeit with a new voice. Sudbin’s playing is undeniably gorgeous, rich
in colour and texture, and everything the piano wants it to be.
As a litmus test for open mindedness on this issue compare the
familiar Sonata in C Major K159 to any other performance, especially
the Beauséjour described above.
Winner of the 14th Van Cliburn International
Piano Competition, Vadym Kholodenko
has released a new recording with a varied
program showing his remarkable versatility. In
Tchaikovsky/Balakirev/Chaplygin/Kurbatov
(Melodiya MEL CD 10 02365), Kholodenko
opens with Balakirev’s Sonata No.2 in B-Flat
Minor Op.102, a beautiful if curious work. The
first movement begins with a contrapuntal idea that could have been
written by Bach, and this is exactly how Kholodenko plays it. The
second and third movements become increasingly Chopinesque until
the Finale leaves no doubt where Balakirev’s French stylistic influences originate.
Despite this kaleidoscope of voices, Kholodenko provides a
consistent and expressive approach. His playing style feels very
choreographic. His keyboard presence is graceful yet powerful but not
overbearing. Videos of his performances show him to be a physically
restrained pianist but highly focused on expressiveness and this is, in
fact, the first and most lasting impression he makes.
Tchaikovsky’s rarely heard Six Pieces on a Single Theme, Op. 21 is
the only such short cycle he wrote. It uses a 15-note series embedded
in the opening bars of each piece, varied only in rhythm. Kholodenko
treats each section as a distinct character piece and closes the work
with an impressive and energetic Scherzo.
Little Cyprian Music (2003) by Evgeny Chaplygin is a contemporary piece that compiles a series of musical impressions of a holiday
on that island. It’s richly textured and technically very demanding
in some passages. Kholodenko focuses on the composer’s intent in
Visit the Listening Room Online. Enhanced reviews. Click to listen. Click to buy.
Between 1987 and 2014, German
soprano Ingrid Schmithüsen sang
in more than seventy performances
of Schönberg’s Pierrot lunaire cycle
with various ensembles.
thewholenote.com
Featuring flautist Marianne
Gedigian
Available now at CDBaby.com,
Amazon and iTunes
“simply the best recordings of the
Copland pieces I have ever heard…,
— James Abbott, The Jade Sphinx
This is Sam Broverman's third
album. It is an eclectic collection of
jazz and pop tunes.
“A first-rate interpreter of songs...
and her phrasing is oh-so natural
and flexible. In short, she’s the real
deal.” –All About Jazz, 4 stars
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 77
Plenty of piano students have played the four-hands Dolly Suite
Op.56 by Gabriel Fauré. This performance is well-paced. Messieu Aoul
and Le pas espagnol are especially admirable for the coordinated
energy and execution they require.
The highlight of the CD is a four-hands arrangement of George
Gershwin’s An American in Paris. It’s an autobiographical work
recounting Gershwin’s own time there in the mid-1920s. It features
some obvious references early in the work to the set of authentic
Parisian taxi horns Gershwin had purchased during his trip.
Lowenthal and Brown seem most at home in this piece, really feeling
the deep melancholy of the blues section, as well as the jazzy syncopations that drive so much of the music.
Ernst Krenek was one of the 20th century’s
most stylistically complete composers whose
vocabulary gave him creative access to both
historical and contemporary expression. On
Ernst Krenek – Piano Music, Volume One
(Toccata Classics TOCC 0298), Ukrainian-born
Stanislav Khristenko performs a well-balanced
program of Krenek’s compositions.
The Piano Sonata No.4 Op.114 (1948) is a
work in which Khristenko demonstrates Krenek’s ability to move
seamlessly between ideas that are tonally centred and others that
aren’t. Khristenko not only captures the neo-romantic essence of
Krenek’s language, but also the unsettling elements of the composer’s early life that express themselves in the edgy phrasing he uses to
evoke the changed world emerging from the two world wars.
Khristenko’s choice of the George Washington Variations, Op.120
(1950) is especially entertaining for its use of all of Krenek’s favourite
devices. Deployed as they are, they move an opening 19th-century
military march through a metamorphosis of clever changes in which
Khristenko never lets go of the initial musical idea.
Krenek held a lifelong devotion to the music of Franz Schubert. He
spent years coming to understand the genius of Schubert’s music, its
design and balance, especially as present in his lieder. Krenek’s decision to complete Schubert’s Piano Sonata in C Major D840 is based
solely on the existence of sufficient thematic material in the final
VOCAL
Alessandro Scarlatti – La Gloria di
Primavera
Moore; Ograjenšek; van der Linde; Phan;
Williams; Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
& Chorale; Nicholas McGegan
Philharmonia PDP-09
!!Alessandro Scarlatti
was a major composer
of the early 18th
century, particularly
known as a composer
of opera. Since then
his work has virtually
disappeared. La gloria
di primavera is not an opera but a serenata
composed to mark the birth of the Archduke
Leonard, the son of the emperor Charles VI,
in 1716. Structurally the work is like an opera
seria, with its alternation of recitatives and
arias (mostly da capo), only one duet and
few ensembles. The characters are allegories
of the four seasons: Spring (the mezzo
Diana Moore), Summer (the soprano Suzana
Ograjenšek), Autumn (the countertenor Clint
van der Linde) and Winter (the tenor Nicholas
two movements to make credible development possible. Naturally,
it’s difficult to listen to this Schubert without also listening for
some Krenek.
Khristenko is also currently working on recording the complete
works of Krenek as well as a recording of Soler sonatas.
It can be understandably difficult to get
terribly excited about a recording of an
upright piano, especially if it’s old, really old,
say 1834. So why would Alex Szilasi record
Chopin Berceuse, Barcarolle & Impromptus
(Hungaroton HCD32473) on an old Pleyel
upright? Evidently this one is special – Chopin
played it. Pleyel Company archives show that
Chopin played it at the factory in Paris and selected it for the Russian
ambassador. He liked this particular model so much that he ordered
one for himself. Both instruments were delivered to adjacent apartments at the ambassador’s residence where Chopin was a frequent
guest. While Chopin’s piano was eventually lost, the other instrument
has survived fully authenticated. This is its recording debut.
Chopin favoured the Pleyel piano for its soft tone. It was doublestrung in its middle and upper registers and therefore softer than later
triple-strung instruments. It responds to the gentlest touch to produce
nearly inaudible pianissimos. Aggressive or heavy touch tends to cause
distortion on these instruments, so Chopin would have favoured them
for very specific repertoire, and certainly nothing terribly bombastic,
hence this CD’s program of more tender compositions.
Szilasi creates some amazing effects with the instrument. The rapid
chromatic runs in the right hand through the upper octaves of the
keyboard sound extremely fragile like a web of silk threads, yet they
remain clear although very soft. This is best heard in the Impromptu
in F-Sharp Major Op.36. The familiar Fantasie-Impromptu in
C-Sharp Minor Op.72 is also a dramatic contrast to the more muscular
performances commonly heard on modern pianos.
Alex Szilasi has created a thought-provoking recording that gives us
a glimpse of how Chopin would have heard and played his own music
180 years ago.
Phan). The four cannot agree on who can take
the credit for the birth of the baby and they
agree to ask Jove (the bass-baritone Douglas
Williams) to adjudicate.
The singing and the orchestral playing on
this CD are splendid but overall my sense is
that the work does not represent Scarlatti at
his best. The section near the end contrasting
the devastation caused by the War of the
Spanish Succession with the peace established in 1713 (the Peace of Utrecht) is
splendid, but the basic plot strikes me as
pretty flimsy.
Hans de Groot
La Pentecôte: Bach –
Cantates 68, 173, 174, 184
Mauch; Bertin; Daniels; Sarragosse;
Montréal Baroque; Eric Milnes
ATMA ACD2 2405
!!The Montreal
Baroque Festival is
held every summer
in the historic
churches, factories
and warehouses
of Old Montreal,
and for the past six
summers recording label ATMA has partnered with them to produce a recording
of Bach’s cantatas, with discerningly spare
vocal forces (one voice to each part) accompanied by period ensemble. This latest in
the series features cantatas Bach composed
between 1724 and 1729 for Pentecost, celebrated in the liturgical calendar 50 days
after Easter Sunday. Bach’s realization of the
themes of the Pentecost, the tongues of flame,
the rushing wind, the spreading of the word
as well as Christ’s revelation of God’s love for
the world in BWV68, Also hat Gott die Welt
geliebt (God so loved the world) which begins
with chorale and ends with a quite busy
and complex choral movement on a quotation from the Gospel of John, in which the
four soloists race along beautifully together.
In this and many of the others featured on
the disc, Bach borrows from previous works,
in this case two arias from his Hunting
Cantata. Soprano Monika Mauch, countertenor Pascal Bertin, tenor Charles Daniels and
bass Jean-Claude Sarragosse have lovely arias
throughout the cantatas and the orchestra
some lovely mirroring of parts throughout.
Such a gem; we hope for many more annual
releases from the festival.
Dianne Wells
Concert Note: Eric Milnes conducts Bande
Montréal Baroque and a cast of rising young
singers in Bach Cantatas 76, 79 and 80 at the
Montreal Baroque Festival June 26.
Ferdinando Bertoni – Orfeo
Genaux; Lombardi-Mazzulli; Petryka;
Accademia di Santo Spirito de Ferrara;
Ensemble Lorenzo da Ponte; Roberto
Zarpellon
Fra Bernardo FB 1601729 (frabernardo.
com)
!!Ferdinando
Bertoni’s Orfeo ed
Euridice was first
performed in 1776,
14 years after Gluck’s
opera on the same
subject. The two operas
use the same libretto
(by Calzabigi) and, in
both cases, the role of Orfeo was first sung
by the castrato Gaetano Guadagno. Bertoni
was clearly aware of the Gluck opera and
the two works have a great deal in common:
no more da capo arias and an increased
role for the orchestra and for the chorus. No
one is likely to prefer Bertoni’s work to that
of Gluck: it lacks the aggressiveness of the
Furies or the celestial calm of the Elysian
Fields or the pathos of Orfeo’s lament when
he loses Eurydice for the second time. The
English 18th-century musicologist Charles
Burney once wrote that Bertoni’s operas
“would please and soothe by their grace
and facility, but not disturb an audience by
enthusiastic turbulence.” The comment is a
little snarky and certainly very English but
not altogether unfair.
Casting a singer for a role created by a
castrato always involves problems. John Eliot
Gardiner has both performed and recorded
Gluck’s opera and has always used a countertenor in the main part. He argues that casting
a female mezzo or alto constitutes a “deplorable” distortion. But we don’t really know
what an 18th-century castrato sounded like
and we have no guarantee that a modern
countertenor comes closer than a female
singer. In this recording the part of Orfeo is
taken by the mezzo Vivica Genaux and she
is splendid.
It is probably true that Bertoni “never
had sufficient genius and fire to attain the
sublime” (Burney again) and that he was
not a major composer like Gluck. Still,
there is plenty to enjoy in this recording.
Recommended.
Hans de Groot
Schubert – Winterreise
Jesse Blumberg; Martin Katz
Blue Griffin Records BGR393
(bluegriffin.com)
!!It is a rare occur-
rence when the
accompanist in a
recording is more of
a household name
than the singer; at
the same time, it is
refreshing to see the
older, accomplished musician supporting a
younger generation of singers. Pianist Martin
Katz, who is well known for his performances
with Marilyn Horne, Frederica von Stade,
José Carreras, Kiri Te Kanawa and Kathleen
Battle, first performed Schubert’s poignant
song cycle Winterreise with Jesse Blumberg
at Chicago’s Collaborative Works Festival,
an annual celebration of art song, showcasing up-and-coming singers. While the
young baritone clearly possesses the ability
to provide all the necessary dramatic aplomb,
Katz underscores the performance with all
the intelligent expressivity of a supremely
knowledgeable and seasoned veteran. And, at
the same time, both manage to present this
mixture of pathos and bluster whilst never
sacrificing the beauty of exquisite tone and
lyricism. The richness of this baritone voice
also has a lovely upper register realized in
Die Nebensonnen near the end of the song
cycle, finishing with the tender yet strangely
detached observation of the Hurdy-Gurdy
Man (Der Leiermann). A lovely and sensitive rendition of a most complex and challenging work.
Dianne Wells
Concert Note: Jesse Blumberg is one of four
young singers featured in Bach Cantatas 76,
79 and 80 at the Montreal Baroque Festival
June 26. Eric Milnes conducts Bande
Montréal Baroque.
Bizet – Carmen
Rice; Hymel; Argiris; Kovalevska; Royal
Opera House; Constantinos Carydis
Opus Arte OA 1197 D
Bizet – Les Pêcheurs de perles
Ciofi; Korchak; Solari; Tagliavini; Orchestra
e Coro del Teatro di San Carlo; Gabriele
Ferro
Cmajor 719508
!!This release calls itself
a film, but in reality
it’s a DVD of Francesca
Zambello’s 2006 staging
that has seen better days
like Jonas Kaufmann
and Anna Caterina
Antonacci, big name
stars, but in another
video. There were
movies made of Carmen
very successfully in the past with beautiful
Seville as backdrop, real mountains, real bullfights, but this is nothing of the sort. It is shot
in HD and even in 3D, obviously aimed at the
mass market, because “Carmen sells” even for
people who don’t know or care much about
opera. The score is cut heavily by leaving
out the “boring bits” like the intermezzos
between acts, some of Bizet’s most beautiful
music, making a rather short opera even
shorter. The staging is traditional, expertly
directed with unremarkable sets that leave
lots of empty space for big crowds. There
You can find enhanced reviews of all discs below the yellow line in The WholeNote listening room.
This recording is most extensive
reconstruction of cabaret acts
created by brilliant Jewish artists in
the Theresienstadt concentration
camp during WWII, for the first
time in English!
thewholenote.com
The new album by pianist, Florian
Hoefner, winner of the Montréal
Jazz Festival Rising Star Award
2015.
32 CDs of the Complete Works
of Bartók, including never before
recorded early piano and vocal
works
“A composer-bandleader of
insightful resolve.” (NY Times)
Deutsche Grammophon’s 64 CD
set completes its deluxe survey of
this legend. Presented in original
sleeves and couplings!
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 79
are all kinds of animals on stage, chickens,
a donkey plus a beautiful black horse that
carries in the torero Escamillo (Aris Argiris)
who sings his big entry number on horseback. The production deserves praise for
giving a chance to young singers who are
attractive, enthusiastic, look the part, relaxed
and athletic with fine, strong voices.
American tenor Bryan Hymel is no Alagna
or Kaufmann, but has a strong, attractive
voice and a certain vulnerability of character
that makes him a believable Don José. His
Flower Aria gets the biggest applause, deservedly. The role of Carmen is certainly what
makes or breaks this opera and ROH chose
mellifluous British mezzo Christine Rice who
puts in an energetic and compelling performance and develops her character nicely from
a seductress to tragic, defiant heroine, but the
seconda donna, Maija Kovalevska (Micaela),
an already highly accomplished Latvian
soprano of wonderful stage presence, is a nice
surprise and a joy to hear and behold.
Most likely known by the famous duet Au
fond du temple saint between the two male
principals, Bizet’s second most famous opera
has shared the fate of Carmen by being a
disastrous failure on its premiere, so totally
unappreciated by the French petit bourgeoisie
that it pushed its genius composer into an
early grave.
Nevertheless Les
Pêcheurs de perles
remains an exotic, atmospheric, gorgeously
melodic score, coming to
us from the resplendent
18th-century San Carlo
opera house of Naples
that has a 250-year tradition of singing excellence. Fabio Sparvoli’s
visionary staging, all in shades of beautiful
blues, evokes sultry Arabian Nights. There
is an ever-present ballet of sinuous dancers
representing the spirits of the sea, sometimes playful, sometimes menacing as in
the third act when it all turns into bloodthirsty madness.
The heroine is a beautiful priestess enslaved
by the Brahmins to keep her chastity on pain
of death, but she defies her fate by falling in
love, bringing on the wrath of Brahma, the
creator god, and the morbidly superstitious
mob of the pearl fisher community. Italian
spinto soprano, Patrizia Ciofi, famous for her
supple, light, wonderfully expressive voice,
deserves the highest praise as the priestess
Leila, a role ranging from religious chant to
dreamy love song in the night, a love duet
and later tempestuous rage fighting for the
life of her beloved. The lover, Nadir, is Russian
lyric tenor sensation, Dmitry Korchak, who
delivers the romance Je crois entendre encore,
one of the most beloved melodies ever written
and even turned into a pop song. Uruguayan
baritone Dario Solari is a powerful and noble
Zurga who gives up the girl he loves and
brings death on himself by letting the lovers
escape. Conducted with great expertise by the
80-year-old master, Gabriele Ferro. Beautiful
story, enchanting music, eye-popping scenery.
A moving performance.
Janos Gardonyi
Nielsen – Saul & David
Reuter; Riis; Petersen; Kristensen;
Staugaard; Resmark; Royal Danish
Orchestra and Opera Chorus; Michael
Schønwandt
Dacapo 2.110412
!!This exciting DVD
presents Carl Nielsen’s
remarkable opera
Saul and David (1901)
recorded live at the
Royal Danish Opera,
in a production celebrating Nielsen’s 150th
birthday. It offers a
stellar cast, Michael
Schønwandt’s brilliant conducting, David
Pountney’s provocative stage direction and optional English
or Danish subtitles. The work’s availability
on DVD should gratify both Nielsen fans
and novices.
Bass-baritone Johan Reuter is outstanding
as the conflicted King Saul. Through powerful
acting and expressive singing he defines
the dominant yet crisis-ridden character
effectively. Morten Staugaard, as implacable Samuel, and Susanne Resmark, as
the Witch of Endor, are surely highlights.
Tenors Niels Jørgen Riis (David) and Michael
Kristensen (Jonathan) and soprano Ann
Petersen (Michal) are strong individually
and in ensemble; David grows from a tentative opening to energetic emergence as the
new king. This approach, to be sure, limits his
vocal effectiveness in Act One, compared to
David’s harp-accompanied solo and romantic
duet with Michal sung by Alexander Young
and Elisabeth Søderstrom on an Opera D’Oro
CD of the work.
Pountney’s production updates Saul and
David to our contemporary world: people in
apartments watching the action on television;
witty choreography of instrumental preludes
suggesting frustrating peace negotiations.
The director describes Samuel as a religious
fundamentalist, restricting us, I think, from
considering adequately his prophetic vision
for the people of Israel. By the end, though,
tremendous performances of Nielsen’s stunning choruses and orchestral support do
convey fully the people’s convictions.
Roger Knox
Rautavaara – Rubaiyat; Balada; Canto V;
Four Songs from Rasputin
Gerald Finley; Mika Pohjonen; Helsinki
Music Centre Choir; Helsinki Philharmonic;
John Storgårds
Ondine ODE 1274-2
!!Amongst the
works that took the
composer’s entire life
to complete, pride
of place belongs to
Rubaiyat. Rautavaara
vowed to set
Edward FitzGerald’s
19th-century translation of The Rubaiyat of
Omar Khayyam in 1949, while still a music
student. It took 63 years and prodding in the
form of a commission from Wigmore Hall for
a song cycle destined for Gerald Finley. Well, it
was well worth the wait. Rubaiyat is nothing
short of a magical piece of music. Over the
years, Rautavaara’s musical style transmuted
from neo-classicism, dodecaphony, serialism,
neo-romantic and post-modern styles into
a unique synthesis of all of these, as Kimmo
Korhonen writes in detailed liner notes. The
music shimmers and glistens, while creating
quite a challenge for the voice – the almost
continuous melodic lines, requiring circular
breathing. Finley, whose voice sounds even
better than in the past (a small gift that
Father Time dispenses to some baritones and
mezzos) excels at bringing into his interpretation the philosophical stance of Khayyam.
The rich mix of orchestral and vocal colour
is intoxicating. This is most definitely one of
those gems that will be taken out of its box
and admired frequently – both by listeners
and singers. The rest of the album is by no
means just filler. It contains Balada, an abandoned and then truncated opera based on
texts by Lorca, and arias from Rautavaara’s
latest opera, Rasputin.
The young Finnish tenor, Mika Pohjonen
and the Helsinki Music Centre Choir are
perfect partners to Finley in this venture.
Robert Tomas
Jennifer Higdon – Cold Mountain
Gunn; Leonard; Fons; Hunter Morris;
Honeywell; Santa Fe Opera; Miguel
Harth-Bedoya
PentaTone PTC 5186 583
!!The PentaTone
series continues with
yet another world
premiere recording,
this one better
known as an awardwinning novel (and a
Hollywood movie starring Nicole Kidman
and Renée Zellweger). A Civil War epic
detailing the desertion and journey home of
confederate soldier W.P. Inman and the struggles of his faithful wife Ada, Cold Mountain
is much admired by both readers and filmgoers. This creates a problem of its own – the
towering libretto, faithful to the book, seems
to subjugate Jennifer Higdon’s music and
almost relegates it to a form of soundtrack.
Higdon is a well-regarded composer and
recipient of a Pulitzer Prize, a Grammy and a
Guggenheim Fellowship. Here, the constraints
of the opera bear heavily on her, stifling full
creative freedom. She still delivers a score
full of beautiful moments and mesmerizing
violin writing, managing to endow each character with a musical signature of their own.
While listening to this recording, one can only
imagine how much greater the music could
have been if only it were burdened with a
lesser-known libretto.
I have no doubt that Cold Mountain was
more successful on stage. In fact, the visuals
would have helped greatly and perhaps this
release should have been a DVD film. For
listeners familiar with the book and the
movie, it will be a fine reminder of their
experience. For the rest of the audience, it
may remain a mystery – an opera hesitant to
assert itself beyond the libretto. The cast is
uniformly good, and we must add a shoutout to Toronto’s own Robert Pomakov, whose
agile bass is a pleasure to hear.
Robert Tomas
EARLY MUSIC AND PERIOD PERFORMANCE
Pardessus de Viole
Mélisande Corriveau; Eric Milnes
ATMA ACD2 2729
!!The elegant music
featured on this
recording was written
for a now largely
abandoned instrument
– pardessus de viole.
This smallest member
of the viola da gamba
family originated in
France at the end of the 17th century and
had a brief life span of just over 100 years.
While pardessus de viole exemplified French
aesthetics and their sophisticated musical
tastes and values, it was forsaken with the
arrival of the Revolution, which did not stand
for the same ideals. Featured composers –
Barrière, Caix D’ Hervelois, Boismortier and
Dollé – are among many prominent French
composers who wrote for this instrument
at the height of its popularity. However the
selection of pieces on this recording is mostly
unpublished and carefully chosen from the
microfilm collections of the Bibliothéque
nationale de France.
What grabbed me immediately was the
sound of the “woman’s violin” (as it was
nicknamed once upon a time) – pure, light
yet robust at times, textured as a crossover
between the flute and the violin. Mélisande
Corriveau elicits an array of emotions out of
her instrument. The virtuosic passages in Jean
Barrière’s Sonata in G Major suit her very
well but she is equally colourful in depicting
the feelings of sorrow in Dollé’s Les Regrets.
Eric Milnes is a resourceful and imaginative harpsichord player; together they offer a
charming array of ornamentations, making
this music a gesture of nobility from the past.
Ivana Popovic
thewholenote.com
Composed to the soul: Abel; Hasse –
Concerti; Quartetti; Arie
Dorothee Mields; Hamburger Ratsmusik;
Simone Eckert
CPO 777 911-2
!!This beauti-
fully programmed
recording offers two
quartets, a concerto
and an aria by the
esteemed 18th-century
gambist Carl Friedrich
Abel, and an aria by
his contemporary
Johann Adolf Hasse. Not household names,
perhaps, but well worth a listen. The quartets, contemporary transcriptions of two standard string quartets from 1768, make for most
pleasant listening. The shift in sonic balance
created by giving the first violin part to the
bass viol gives a welcome depth and richness
to the ensemble sound. The group’s playing
is expressive and focused, and it’s also nice
to hear tempos that are more laid-back than
today’s breakneck norm: the humour and
variety of musical gesture in the Allegro con
spirito of the Quartet in B Flat, for example,
isn’t trumped by the technical mastery
required to play it. Michael Fürst plays the
solo part of Abel’s two-movement harpsichord concerto with wit and thoughtful brilliance, and his colleagues of the Hamburger
Ratsmusik are stylishly eloquent throughout.
Soprano Dorothee Mields joins the group for
two substantial arias, Abel’s sole surviving
vocal piece, Frena le belle lagrime from Sifari
(1767), and an aria from Hasse’s La Didone
abbandonata (1742). As always, Mields sings
with extraordinary musical grace and suppleness. The latter aria is also a contemporary
transcription, giving the original obbligato flute part to the viol, which Eckert plays
beautifully. Composed to the soul, indeed.
I’ll be listening to this one again, and I hope
you do too.
Alison Melville
1753 – Livre de Montréal
Yves-G. Préfontaine
ATMA ACD2 2717
!!The brand-new
organ in this recording
is a replica of an
instrument (no longer
extant) built in 1753 in
Paris for the Cathedral
in Quebec City. It
contains ten stops,
all but two of which
are divided, offering different timbres to the
upper and lower halves of the keyboard.
The repertoire features works likely known
to 18th-century Quebec players, including a
six-movement Magnificat from the so-called
Montreal Organ Book, the manuscript transported to New France in 1724 and discovered
in the 1980s. The composers of the nearly
400 pieces in this collection are not named,
but a couple of dozen are definitively attributed to Nicolas Lebègue. Appropriately, a
further group by Lebègue (not from the MOB)
follows, alongside representative compositions from his period by Guillaume-Gabriel
Nivers, Louis Marchand and Jean Henry
D’Anglebert.
There are 34 tracks; each piece lasts on
average just over two minutes. Generally in
classical French keyboard music one anticipates descriptive titles but there is only one,
Lebègue’s “Les Cloches,” with its descending
four-note scale suggesting bells. The rest are
either liturgical pieces or fugues and other
abstract types. The divided stops show to
advantage in several pieces with prominent
bass solos or based on dialogue between
registers. Préfontaine demonstrates remarkable variety of approach and a good deal of
freedom within the French baroque style,
recalling the comment of a great figure in
this music, François Couperin: “We write
differently from what we play.” The performances are intelligently lifted off the page. The
disc is well produced and a pleasure to hear.
Listeners curious about how the Chapelle
instrument looks as well as how it sounds
may be disappointed however: front and back
cover photos show portions of it, but the only
artist photo shows Préfontaine at a much
larger console, unidentified.
John Beckwith
CLASSICAL AND BEYOND
The Last Concert: Mendelssohn –
Incidental music to A Midsummer Night’s
Dream; Berlioz – Symphonie Fantastique
Berliner Philharmoniker; Claudio Abbado
Berliner Philharmoniker Recordings BPHR
160081
!!Claudio Abbado
was conductor of the
Berlin Philharmonic
Orchestra from 1990
to 2002, succeeding
the iconic Herbert von
Karajan who had died in 1989. On an evening
in May 2013 Abbado returned to conduct his
last concert with the orchestra and as such it
was a rather special event. What to program
on such an occasion? There is no absolute answer but after hearing and seeing the
concert one must agree that the choice was a
right one. This wasn’t an audition for anyone
but a final get-together of equals to make
some music. This isn’t wishful thinking but
there was a oneness between conductor and
the orchestra here that produced a solidly
romantic view of the shenanigans in the
Mendelssohn and solidified the passing phantasmal delusions in the Berlioz. This really
was a splendid event.
To commemorate the second anniversary
of Abbado’s death, his last concert with them
has been issued by the Berlin Philharmonic
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 81
with full documentation of the evening in a
very fine cloth-covered hardcover edition,
24.5cm X 15.5cmX 2.3cm. Inside are two
CDs and a Blu-ray disc containing the
complete concert in HD audio plus an HD
video of the event with choice of stereo or
5.1 surround sound. On the same Blu-ray
disc are bonus videos including full documentaries, Claudio Abbado in Berlin –
The First Year and Members of the Berlin
Philharmonic Remember Claudio Abbado.
There are lots of discussions, rehearsals and
human interest events plus the reason Abbado
had to wait eight months after assuming the
post to receive a contract. A personal code
to download high resolution audio files is
also included.
A well-produced 56-page multilingual
booklet the size of the package contains information about the two works on the program
and how they are tied together. There are
interesting articles with many colour photographs. Also there are the names of the
personnel of the orchestra in May 2013.
Bruce Surtees
MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY
Schoenberg – Pierrot Lunaire; Max
Kowalsky – Pierrot Lunaire
Ingrid Schmithüsen
ATMA ACD2 2734
!!Arnold
Schoenberg’s celebrated 1912 song
cycle Pierrot Lunaire
is justly regarded as
a masterpiece of his
mid-period atonal
works. Don’t let the
bogeyman of atonalism scare you away; this is an extremely
compelling work that exudes an atmosphere of exuberance and playfulness.
Originally conceived to be performed by
an actress and an ensemble of five instruments, the vocal quality that Schoenberg
calls for in this multifaceted jewel of a work
is unique: not quite sung, not quite spoken,
but somewhere in between. The texts consist
of 21 poems by the Belgian symbolist Albert
Giraud in the German transliteration by
Otto Erich Hartleben published in 1892.
Many others have set these texts to music,
including the persecuted composer and
lawyer Max Kowalski (1882-1956), whose
cycle of 12 of these poems included here were
conceived and published in the same year
as Schoenberg’s. Kowalski’s charming and
supple settings are cast in a neo-romantic
style and are conventionally sung.
Having presented the work some 70 times
during her career, it’s fair to say that soprano
Ingrid Schmithüsen has become the very
embodiment of Pierrot and delivers an admirably nuanced account of Schoenberg’s opus.
In most cases this complex work involves a
conductor; here however, it is clear that the
soloist is calling the shots (and incidentally
owns the recording copyright). This emphasis
on the voice no doubt explains the frustratingly recessed sound of the ensemble, which
left me pining for the vivid instrumental presence in just about every other recording I’m
familiar with, notably the outstanding 1971 LP
by Jan DeGaetani. By contrast, the Kowalski
song cycle with pianist Brigitte Poulin is
perfectly balanced.
Daniel Foley
Noravank: Petros Shoujounian – String
Quartets 3-6
Quatuor Molinari
ATMA ACD2 2737
!!Composed to mark
the centenary of the
Armenian genocide, Noravank’s
title is derived from
a homeland monastery that was Petros
Shoujounian’s inspiration. Its 14 sections,
divided into string quartets of three, three,
three and five movements, are symbolically
named after rivers and are based on liturgical chants.
Quartet No.3 was the most affecting for me,
through its tiny echoes of melodies and treatments heard in Morricone’s Gabriel’s Oboe
and Pärt’s Spiegel im Spiegel; it concludes
with the provocative Dzoraget. The contradictions of Quartet No.4’s depressive second
movement, the energetic third and Quartet
No.5’s lamentoso first movement brought to
mind the power of nature and the current
plight of evacuated Fort McMurray folks –
if that’s not the musical equivalent of theological proof-texting. The balance of Quartet
No.5 and all of No.6 more overtly reflect the
influence of eastern folk songs, both in the
keys and the lilts they comprise. Another
memory of song, from Chopin’s “Raindrop”
Prelude in D-Flat Major No.15 Op.28, is
heard in the onomatopoeic burbling waters
of the Vedi.
This CD was suggested to me, a Pärt
fanatic, as a possibly similarly contemplative recording. While these aren’t tracks for
mindful meditation, there is an introspective quality to all the movements. Maybe the
invoked theme of migration is apt, after all:
fires, oppression, the liturgical life – these all
involve movement and change. But this introvert was soothed rather than discomfited
via the talent of the Quatuor Molinari, who
commissioned this work that is ultimately
about renewal. Fine liner-note editing and
the eponymous cover photograph round out a
very marketable product.
Vanessa Wells
Finding a Voice: The Evolution of the
American Sound
Walden Chamber Players
Independent (waldenchamberplayers.org)
!!This new disc from
the Walden Chamber
Players features
compositions which
might be described as
the linking species of
the American music
family tree. Ably
performed here are works by little-known
composers (Marion Bauer 1882-1955), lesserknown works by composers well known
(Aaron Copland’s Threnodies), and works by
modern composers who write close enough
in time to us that they might remain in our
blind spot (Ned Rorem).
Rorem is best-represented here, and rightfully so – after all, he is a still-living and
underappreciated American composer
whose healthy sense of deference to
American musical heritage is best exemplified by his Ives-tinged The Unquestioned
Answer (2002). But it is actually Virgil
Thomson’s ghost that looms largest over this
recording. In the middle of the 20th century,
Thomson achieved more infamy as cantankerous critic than fame as a composer. As
far back as 1944, he took aim at the cult of
the warhorse, noting that “the enjoyment
and understanding of music are dominated
in a most curious way by the prestige of the
masterpiece.” In that same essay, he wrote,
“this snobbish definition of excellence is
opposed to the classical concept of a Republic
of Letters.”
These words could serve as this disc’s
manifesto; it demands that we re-evaluate
these works which might have otherwise
been lost to the murk of history. They may
not be capital-M masterpieces (whatever that
actually means), but they are nonetheless
worth hearing.
Elliot Wright
WAM
Michael Finnissy; Michael Norsworthy
New Focus Recordings FCR157
(newfocusrecordings.com)
!!While it may not
move you to tears or
laughter, the music
of Michael Finnissy
should hold you in a
kind of rapt fascination, like an elaborate mechanism with
multi-coloured parts moving according to
mysterious laws. This new release features
American clarinetist Michael Norsworthy.
The composer provides the piano accompaniment; also performing are violinist
William Fedkenheuer and the New England
Conservatory Wind Ensemble.
Brief liner notes by the composer offer
some helpful information: his substantial
Clarinet Sonata unfolds calmly, the piano
part presenting a cantus firmus derived from
a late Beethoven piano sonata (Op.110). There
is no obvious link, but each bar of the original
is presented in retrograde (but presumably
in the original order) while the clarinet line
swans about lazily above. The second track,
for E-flat clarinet, two pianos and two bass
drums, uses a chance element: though the
material is defined, its synchronicity is not.
The E-flat colour is shocking; one at first
wonders if Norsworthy has forgotten his
better reeds at home.
Track three introduces cat screeches (yes,
literally) and still more chance elements. I
do believe my allergies were acting up so I
found it hard to concentrate. I kept waiting to
sneeze at the next feline interjection. As cute
as the kitties are, I preferred the jazzy final
track with wind ensemble: Giant Abstract
Samba is fun.
Just as Finnissy recomposes Beethoven
earlier, on the title track his musical source is
Mozart. He obviously has no fear of vengeful
ghosts seeking him out. WAM moves the
performers on- and offstage, a theatrical
effect somewhat diluted on record. You’ll hear
the violin and later the clarinet at a distance
at different moments. I have no idea what it
all means, but it’s…fascinating.
Max Christie
Paths Become Lines
Sirius Quartet
Autentico Music AMCDA00004
(autenticomusic.com)
!!Far from being a
spin-off or a clone of
the Kronos Quartet,
the Sirius Quartet is
a fiercely – individually and collectively
– creative ensemble
that explores an
aural landscape with no definable borders.
Violinists Fung Chern Hwei and Gregor
Huebner, violist Ron Lawrence and cellist
Jeremy Harman are composers who worship
at the altar of creativity. These are musicians
who enter the very grain of the wood of their
instruments, emerging after being subsumed
in the mysterious vibrations of the air within.
Wave after wave of sound forms rippling
tonal colours that come alive swathed in the
timbres of their instruments. Each time their
music is heard one can’t help being impressed
by their devilishly good virtuosity.
The present recording offers ten classic
selections – including a four-part suite – from
recent, original repertoire and also furnishes
further evidence of the development of
the ensemble as they mine an impossibly
deep world where jazz meets the classics. Alongside the high spirits of Huebner’s
Racing Mind, for instance, a profound
contemplative tone is struck in Huebner’s
composition, The Wollheim Quartet, a
remarkable piece of visceral drama as well
as sweetness of tone, with superbly poised
rhythm in its Presto movement. Harman’s
thewholenote.com
Paths Become Lines bursts out in expansive
chords and heaving with thick-textured agitation before the music builds into a heated
climax. And that is just the beginning of a
disc full of excitement and drama.
Raul da Gama
Tower Music – Bertolozzi Plays the Eiffel
Tower
Joseph Bertolozzi
Innova 933 (innova.mu)
!!American
composer/percussionist Joseph
Bertolozzi’s Tower
Music is the culmination of a ten-year
project to “play”
Paris’ Eiffel Tower
using various percussion mallets, etc. The
over 10,000 samples recorded live by contact
microphones were then reduced to 2,800
descriptively named sounds which he then
used to compose the nine exciting tracks.
Bertolozzi stresses that only tones made by
playing the actual surfaces of Eiffel Tower are
heard, and that no added effects were utilized.
The to-be-expected rhythmic percussive sounds are heard on A Thousand Feet of
Sound and the jump-up-and-boogie grooves
of Tower Music. A big surprise is the range
of pitches and dynamics comprising the earworm melodies of the lilting waltz Elephant
on the Tower. Especially intriguing is Evening
Harmonies, in which the composer abandons rhythmic and melodic compositional
traditions and lets the Tower play for its own
sound sake. The rich sonorities and soundscapes of this composed yet free-improvisational-feel-piece turn the Eiffel Tower into
a musical instrument of inherent deep tone,
abrasive power and wide dynamic range.
An informative bonus track has Bertolozzi
explaining the ins and outs of the recording,
production and details of this project.
This is more than just a raised eyebrow joie
de vivre sound installation. Bertolozzi is a
sensitive musician attuned to quality sound
production and dynamic rhythmical nuances.
His compositions are concise, clear and
accessible. There are plans for a future live
performance. For now, listen and enjoy!
Tiina Kiik
JAZZ AND IMPROVISED MUSIC
Full Circle
Debbie Fleming
Independent (debbiefleming.ca)
!!I need to confess
right off the top that
I’m a sucker for a
Bacharach-David
song. I consider them
to be one of the top
pop songwriting duos
in an era when songwriting was king and
duos like Lennon-McCartney, Elton John
& Bernie Taupin and so many others were
putting out great music. So when veteran
Toronto singer Debbie Fleming announced
she was working on an album of BacharachDavid covers I was pumped. Fleming’s background as an in-demand studio and group
singer equips her not only with strong vocal
skills but also with arranging expertise. I’m
also a sucker for covers that put a twist on the
original song. (Otherwise why not just listen
to the original?) So the takes on these songs –
several of them arranged by Mark Kieswetter,
who also plays keyboards on the album – feel
fresh. Standout tracks for me are his arrangement of I Say a Little Prayer and Fleming’s
arrangement of The Look of Love. The latter
has a Gene Peurling-esque vocal accompaniment with the stunning voices of Suba
Sankaran, Dylan Bell and Tom Lillington
(who, along with Fleming, make up the a
cappella singing group The Hampton Four).
Peter Mueller’s searing guitar solo on Anyone
Who Had a Heart adds to the epic rock ballad
feel of the piece. The more laid-back (from the
original), slightly bossa-ish feel of Promises,
Promises is enhanced by percussion from Art
Avalos and Ted Quinlan’s lovely nylon-string
guitar playing. All in all this is a finely crafted
album with a lot of heart and sensitive, solid
work from everyone involved.
Cathy Riches
Feelings of Affection
Sam Broverman
Independent (brovermusic.com)
!!With this release,
exquisite vocalist/
composer Sam
Broverman has
continued his theme
of presenting the
work of the world’s
finest tunesmiths.
Broverman has assembled a fine quintet, and selected five superb
standards as well as one excellent original
tune, I Want Everybody to Love Me. Skilled
keyboardist/arranger Mark Kieswetter serves
as producer here; also present are John
MacMurchy on sax, Tony Quarrington on
guitar, Jordan O’Connor on bass and Ernesto
Cervini on drums.
Broverman’s rendition of On A Clear Day
is a huge standout, and his sumptuous baritone (reminiscent of the late, great Mark
Murphy) soars and swings with both intimacy
and intensity, all the while honouring this
marvelous Lerner and Lane Broadway title
tune with his flawless interpretation and
adherence to the original melodic line. In fact,
happily, the listener will find no uninformed,
empty-caloried and gratuitous scat singing on
this recording.
Also of note is Broverman’s take on Michael
Franks’ Underneath the Apple Tree, which is
languid, bluesy and sexy, displaying a range
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 83
of emotions that Franks himself never chose
to express. The closing track, The Ballad of
the Sad Young Men, comes from the pens of
genius composer/lyricists Fran Landesman
and Tommy Wolf. Rarely performed and
deeply moving, this song of longing, loss and
the dream of redemption can only be properly done (as it is here) by an artist who has
lived and experienced life.
This EP is eminently satisfying on
every level, and underscores the fact that
Broverman continues to be one of the most
intriguing, skilled and consummately tasteful
jazz vocalists on the scene today.
Lesley Mitchell-Clarke
Ship Without a Sail
Mike Murley Trio
Cornerstone Records CRST CD145
(cornerstonerecordsinc.com)
!!Among tenor saxophonist Mike Murley’s
group configurations,
the trio has a special
status, a vehicle for
consummately lyrical
jazz with chamber
music dynamics.
Launched in 1998, the group included bassist
Steve Wallace and guitarist Ed Bickert until
his retirement in 2001. The guitar chair
has since been filled by Reg Schwager, who
invariably sounds like the only other person
for the job. Resembling the instrumentation of the original Jimmy Giuffre 3, it’s a
demanding format that requires everyone
to do more than they usually might – from
piano-like comping to counter melody –
while appearing to do less.
The repertoire tends toward seldom-heard
jazz and show tunes with a certain harmonic
subtlety. Murley’s timbral shifts are a highlight, as he modulates his sound from piece
to piece, even bringing different tones to adjacent ballads. Don Sebesky’s You Can’t Go
Home Again has something of the airiness of
Stan Getz but brought closer to earth, while
there’s a slightly harder, metallic edge to
Kenny Wheeler’s Ever After, a sound just as
beautiful, but different.
Though it’s the ballads and their stronger
melodies that stand out, like the gorgeous
samba Folhas Secas, the group is just as
happy at up-tempos, the instrumentation
lending a special lightness and clarity to
Charlie Parker’s Dexterity and Murley’s own
Know One, the latter highlighting the way
Schwager and Wallace interact creatively,
exchanging lead and accompanying roles
with aplomb. John Lewis’ Two Degrees East,
Three Degrees West points to the group’s cool
jazz roots and provides an outlet for everyone’s blues impulses.
Stuart Broomer
The Blue Shroud
Barry Guy
Intakt Records CD 266 (intaktrec.ch)
!!British bassist
and composer Barry
Guy has enjoyed an
unusual career, as a
member of original
instrument baroque
ensembles, as a
force in European
free improvisation and as a leader of large
ensembles (like the London Jazz Composers
Orchestra) exploring multiple compositional
methodologies. His 71-minute Blue Shroud
is an extraordinary work that integrates all of
those practices.
It’s inspired by Picasso’s Guernica, the
title commemorating the moment in 2003
when a reproduction was covered up at
New York’s U.N. building as Colin Powell
argued for the invasion of Iraq. A work of
furies and lamentations, The Blue Shroud
stretches from tumultuous collective improvisations to moments of melodic grace and
reflection, some coming from Guy’s own
pen, others from J.S. Bach and H.I.F. Biber’s
Mystery Sonatas. To execute the work, Guy
has drawn on the breadth of his musical associations to create a 14-member group that
includes violinist and Bach/Biber specialist
Maya Homburger; distinguished free improvisers like pianist Agustí Fernández and the
percussionists Lucas Niggli and Ramón López;
and others fully at home in both worlds,
like Michel Godard on tuba and serpent and
Michael Niesemann on wailing alto saxophone and baroque oboe.
The work includes songs on texts by
Irish poet Kerry Hardie that delineate the
figures in Guernica and a polyglot declaration of the Iraq invocation, all performed
by Savina Yannatou, whose expressive and
musical voice brings a sharp focus to the
work. At one point she and the accompanying
instruments become bird song; an orchestral passage juxtaposes manic conducted
improvisation with sudden interruptions of
silence, invoking the soundscapes of war and
concomitant death. Guy repeatedly combines
different techniques to maximize the impact
of this singular work, as alive to the possibility of beauty as it is to terror, somehow
making it all cohere.
The Blue Shroud hammers out its own
terrain, one that transcends its parts and
deserves to be heard widely.
Stuart Broomer
Border Crossing
Alex Goodman
OA2 Records OA2 22130 (originarts.com/
oa2)
!!Composition and
improvisation flow
freely into each other
on guitarist Alex
Goodman’s Border
Crossing. For his latest
recording Goodman
has assembled what
can best be described as a jazz chamber
group. His writing is ambitious and complex,
making full use of the wide range of colours
available from this outstanding ensemble.
Andrew Downing, who doubles on bass
and cello, and vocalist Felicity Williams
contribute to the group’s ability to cross
genres as does Goodman’s extensive use of
the acoustic guitar.
Acrobat opens the album with acoustic
guitar and percussionist Rogerio Boccato’s
unique and inventive textures. Williams
glides through the tune’s moody melody,
its lyrics equating a man’s searching nature
with an acrobat’s skills. Vibraphonist Michael
Davidson’s judicious phrasing builds the
intensity of his solo and Goodman demonstrates virtuosity, making use of wide intervals in a highly lyrical fashion.
With Thanks is an epic composition that
displays the full range of Goodman’s writing
skills as well as the band’s remarkable ability
to interpret them. Williams effortlessly negotiates the intricate melody and solos are individually framed to provide contrast and
variety. Drummer Fabio Ragnelli improvises fluidly over unpredictable rhythmic
shots as the piece segues smoothly through
what could be a disparate series of events.
Pure Imagination, the only other tune with
lyrics on the album, might offer an answer to
the yearning expressed in Acrobat. Williams
sings of the power of imagination to shape the
world, nicely bookending this impressive and
beautiful recording.
Ted Quinlan
Oop!
Al Muirhead; Tommy Banks; PJ Perry
Chronograph Records CR045
(chronographrecords.com)
!!Oop! by Calgarybased trumpeter Al
Muirhead exemplifies
the reasons that the
American songbook
continues to inspire
jazz musicians some
eight decades after
many of its tunes were originally written.
Accompanied by iconic musicians PJ Perry on
alto saxophone and Tommy Banks on piano,
Muirhead virtually owns the compositions
presented here and embodies the approaches
that are essential to getting deeply inside this
time-honoured material. All three of these
musicians (as well as percussionist Rogerio
Boccato who guests on Black Orpheus)
possess a longstanding connection to this
music and play it in the most natural way
possible.
Miles Davis’ The Theme (based on the
chord changes to Gershwin’s I Got Rhythm)
opens the album with Muirhead and Perry
playing the line in harmony over Banks’
relentlessly swinging piano. Perry, one of the
world’s finest exponents of the bebop tradition, solos brilliantly followed by Muirhead
who exhibits impeccable taste and tone in his
relaxed, melodic delivery. Tommy Banks plays
one perfect chorus of unaccompanied piano,
demonstrating his blues-infused bop style.
Rhythm changes, as we refer to tunes based
on the classics, are a test piece for jazz musicians and The Theme firmly establishes the
impressive credentials of these players.
The ballad medley is a testament to the
deceptively simple art of playing a melody
beautifully. Alfred Newman’s Street Scene,
featured in the overture of How To Marry
A Millionaire, and an uncharacteristically languid reading of Mean To Me, are
pleasant surprises from this superb trio of
seasoned pros.
Ted Quinlan
She Sleeps, She Sleeps
Fire!
Rune Grammofon RCD 2178
(runegrammofon.com)
!!Specializing in
blending basement
timbres, so all of their
gradations are audible,
the Swedish trio of
drummer Andreas
Werliin, double bassist
Johan Berthling and
saxophonist Mats
Gustafsson welcomes a couple of guests here
to add additional textures. But the auxiliary
tones simply intensify the trio’s characteristically powerful stance.
Cellist Leo Svensson’s intermittent string
plucks and swipes are permeable enough, so
like a youngster mimicking an adult’s movements, he merely strengthens Werliin’s thick
power stops. On the other hand Gustafsson’s
foundation-shaking bass saxophone gusts
not only provide a bonding continuum
throughout, but also showcase multiphonics
encompassing glossolalia, split tones and
concentrated overblowing. Most notably, that
ad hoc foursome’s more-than-18-minute She
Penetrates The Distant Silence Slowly never
plods, but is invested with rhythmic swing,
even as it plays out at a tortoise-like gait.
Gustafsson is equally powerful playing
baritone saxophone on the title track, plus
visitor Oren Ambarchi’s fuzzy guitar drones
and Werliin’s high-density polyethylene
bottle-like reverberations played on steel
guitar overlay a variety of contrasting tones
onto the nearly opaque narrative. But drum
beats, migrating from martial to shuffle,
and wrenching double bass slaps provide a
solid enough foundation for the saxophonist’s output. Slurping, honking, burping and
blowing as if he were a bull moose yearning
for his mate, Gustafsson manages to express
his individuality in every solo.
Don’t look for subtlety or elegance in Fire!
– or Gustafsson’s – playing. But be prepared
to be bowled over by the sheer audacity of
expression that highlights every low-pitched
nuance here.
Ken Waxman
thewholenote.com
Concert note: Mats Gustafsson plays as part
of The Thing on Saturday, June 18 at Hamilton’s Artword Artbar.
Hotel Grief
Tom Rainey Trio
Intakt Records CD 256 (intaktrec.ch)
!!Comfortable in
settings from big band
to solo, guitarist Mary
Halvorson joins with
soprano and tenor
saxophonist Ingrid
Laubrock to roughen
the edges of the five
instant compositions on this CD. Cultivated and self-effacing, leader/drummer Tom Rainey is as far
removed from a braggadocious percussion
show-off like Buddy Rich as Donald Trump is
from Martin Luther King. Discretion doesn’t
mean withdrawal however, and in context
the drummer’s sophisticatedly positioned
strokes contribute more to the architectures of the tracks than would any clamorous
rhythm display.
With the guitarist’s strategies ranging from
distorted reverb to sly, slurred fingering, and
the reed tessitura soaring from clenched
squeaks to harsh rasping whispers, the drummer’s role is analogous to a U.N. peacekeeper
in the Balkans: maintaining consistency
without favouring either side and keeping
their extended techniques from occupying
the other’s territory.
Proud Achievements in Botany, the CD’s
almost-19-minute centrepiece, is a microcosm of how Hotel Grief’s tracks evolve.
Halvorson’s widening or winnowing licks
take on spacey qualities at the same time as
Laubrock’s intense single reed bites settle
into linear melodies. With the saxophonist’s now modulated tones circumscribed by
string chording, drum rattles manipulate any
stray lines so that the three eventually move
like regimental guards in formation. Breaking
the concordance with what could be a slo-mo
version of Wipe Out, Rainey’s tough drum
beats join with Halvorson’s lopping reverb
and Laubrock’s slurps and snarls to create a
finale that may rattle like an old jalopy, but
still conveys the grace and speed of wellplotted locomotion.
Although titled Hotel Grief, this musical
dwelling offers very little despondency except
for fleeting moods in context. Instead, by
imagining each track as a separate room, the
CD offers a set of quietly resplendent chambers furnished with innovative touches by a
trio of sonic designers.
Ken Waxman
Concert note: Mary Halvorson is a member
of The Outlouds trio in concert on Saturday,
June 18 at Array Space.
Some Other Time: The Lost Session from
the Black Forest
Bill Evans
Resonance HCD-2019 (resonancerecords.
org)
!!For six months
in 1968, Bill Evans
led one of the great
versions of his trio,
with bassist Eddie
Gomez and drummer
Jack DeJohnette, a
group previously
heard only in a single
concert recording from the Montreux Jazz
Festival. However, they did a studio session
for the German MPS label, a session of trio,
piano-bass duets and solo piano pieces for
which contracts were never signed and which
was never released until the appearance of
this two-CD set.
In company with the singularly gifted
bassist Scott LaFaro, Evans had redefined
the jazz piano trio by 1960, treating it as a
highly interactive unit in which the bass
regularly functioned as melodic counterpart as well as rhythmic and harmonic foundation. By 1968 Gomez was two years into
his 11-year tenure with the trio, probably the
most adroit and inventive bassist to play with
Evans following LaFaro’s death in 1961. The
presence of DeJohnette added another level
of rhythmic definition to the group, feeding
Evans’ increasing interest in detailed, shifting
accents in his improvisations.
The material consists of standards,
superior show tunes (Leonard Bernstein’s
Some Other Time stands out) and a couple
of Evans originals, typically filled with
subtle harmonic recastings that create
complex moods, much of it enlivened here
by DeJohnette’s light, sparkling balance of
cymbal and snare. Among numerous highlights, the trio shines on performances of
Evans’ own Very Early and a brilliant version
of My Funny Valentine.
Stuart Broomer
In Paris – The ORTF Recordings
Larry Young
Resonance HCD-2022 (resonancerecords.
org)
!!Larry Young
emerged in the
mid-60s, taking the
Hammond B-3 organ
in a fresh direction,
shifting it away from
its soul jazz roots
toward the modal jazz
of John Coltrane and
exploring the instrument’s subtler timbres
for atmospheric effects. By the end of that
revolutionary decade, he would be playing
with Miles Davis and Jimi Hendrix, but in
1964 and ’65, he was working in Paris as a
sideman in expatriate American saxophonist
Nathan Davis’ quartet, along with drummer
Billy Brooks and trumpeter Woody Shaw,
who would turn 20 in the midst of these
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 85
recordings.
This two-CD set consists of recently discovered recordings from French radio archives
that include the quartet, an expanded version
called the Jazz aux Champs Elysées All-Stars,
and organ and piano trios led by Young.
Virtually unknown at home, these musicians
roar with surging invention in the post-bop
style then in flower. Anthemic pieces such
as Young’s Talkin’ About J.C., Shaw’s Zoltan
(beginning with a quotation from Kodály’s
Háry János Suite) and Wayne Shorter’s Black
Nile give rise to hard-driving, extended modal
explorations. Davis will fasten on a phrase,
repeating it with increasing focus to generate
tremendous tension. Shaw, the last to emerge
in a cohort of brilliant young trumpeters,
was already demonstrating the fluid creativity that would distinguish him. Young is
almost a band in himself, creating bass lines
and surging rhythms, constantly feeding new
material to the horns until he breaks free in
his solos.
The booklet that accompanies the CDs has
extensive background on the mid-60s Paris
milieu, along with interviews with Young’s
collaborators and followers, including John
McLaughlin and John Medeski.
Stuart Broomer
POT POURRI
Do Right
Sari Kessler
Independent (sarikessler.com)
Do Right is Sari
Kessler’s debut album,
and it’s an impressive
one. Although a scan
of the track list with
its frequently covered
songs initially didn’t
give me high expectations, right off the top we get a nicely reimagined treatment of the Bacharach-David hit,
Walk on By. Arranged by James Shipp, with a
darker feel than the original, young trumpeter
Nadje Noordhuis adds to the noir. The album
continues in its tastefully inventive vein as
Kessler and Shipp’s arrangements breathe
new life into tunes like Sunny and provide an
appropriately contemplative take on I Thought
About You. One of the lesser-known songs
on the album is The Gal From Joe’s by Duke
Ellington, handled with understated poignancy by Kessler and the band. Based in the
U.S., Kessler took up a career in jazz singing a
little later than some, and that’s given her an
ability to inject some genuine depth and soul
into her delivery. Coached by the wonderful
Kate McGarry (who also co-produces the
album) Kessler has a fine voice with a warm
tone, spot-on pitch and jazzy phrasing. The
creative and able playing of the musicians,
including John di Martino on piano, guitarist
Ron Affif and sax man Houston Person, round
out this skilled collection of songs.
Cathy Riches
Long Time Leaving
Christa Couture
Black Hen Music BHCD0079
(christacouture.com)
!!With the release
of her fourth CD,
Edmonton-based,
eclectic, rootsinspired chanteuse,
pianist and gifted
composer Christa
Couture has recorded
a brilliant careerdefining project. Featuring all original music,
and described by Couture as a “celebration of ordinary heartache,” she has almost
cinematically plumbed the depths of her
own inspiring journey (teenage cancer, the
unimaginable loss of two children and more)
and transmuted those experiences into a panrelatable, uplifting and delightfully quirky
project. Recorded in Nashville and skillfully produced by JUNO-winning guitarist/
multi-instrumentalist Steve Dawson, the CD
includes members of Blackie and The Rodeo
Kings, notably Dawson on pedal steel and
electric guitars, John Dymond on bass, Gary
Craig on drums and venerable Nashvillebased fiddler, Fats Kaplin.
There is no wallowing in self-pity here.
In fact, the instrumentation, arrangements,
compositions and Couture’s lithe, sheer,
roots-influenced vocals all underscore the
unconquerable human spirit – and make this
recording an appropriate listening choice for
almost any mood or activity.
Of special note are The Slaughter, with
its haunting, almost childlike, echo-infused
vocals and a lyric that ponders breakups with
both men and women; Michigan Postscript
– a melodic travelling song with a lilting
vocal and stunning slide work by Dawson;
Zookeeper – replete with fine acoustic
piano and heavy surf guitar saturating this
insightful and witty ode to couples therapy;
and Lovely Like You – a sweet stunner
featuring the honeyed tones of fiddler Kaplin.
Also memorable is the closing track, Aux
Oiseaux – a charming, pristine and deliciously melancholy anthem of survival and
the art of learning to embrace life again – no
matter what has transpired.
Lesley Mitchell-Clarke
KAMP! Songs and Satire from
Theresienstadt
Amelia DeMayo; Curt Buckler; Sergei
Dreznin
Analekta AN 2 8789
!!When DISCoveries editor David Olds
approached me about reviewing a CD of satirical songs written inside the Theresienstadt
concentration camp, we both expressed our
reservations about it. But curiosity (and the
fact that the World Jewish Congress sponsored the project) got me to listen.
KAMP! Songs and Satire from
Theresienstadt is the
first English recording
of songs written and
performed by some
(of the many) Jewish
poets, composers,
musicians and cabaret
stars imprisoned in Theresienstadt (1942-44),
and marks the 70th anniversary of the liberation of that infamous “model ghetto.”
These songs were brought to light, given
life and presented in a cabaret-like setting in
Vienna in 1992. Russian-Jewish pianist and
composer, Sergei Dreznin, served both at the
piano and as music director. Dreznin, who
also wrote several new melodies to existing
poems, went on to direct an English version
called KAMP! in 1994. The eponymous CD is
the culmination of Dreznin’s 20-plus-yearresolve to keep alive this material created as
a means of survival, a way for prisoners to
mock their unbearable circumstances and
maintain their sanity.
The material is indeed subversive and
unsettling. It is also brilliantly executed by
Dreznin and singing actors Amelia DeMayo
and Curt Buckler.
If nothing else, KAMP!, with its gallows
humour and shades of Tom Lehrer, G&S,
Weill, Brecht, Brel and Brooks (Mel), deserves
a listen for its celebration of the human spirit.
To quote Dreznin, “I hope you will laugh. You
will cry. And you will definitely learn.”
Sharna Searle
Sephardic Journey
Cavatina Duo
Cedille CDR 90000 163 (cedillerecords.
org)
!!Sephardic Journey
is the result of a
20-year exploration taken by the
Cavatina Duo – the
husband and wife
team of Bosnianborn guitarist,
Denis Azabagic, and
Spanish-born flutist, Eugenia Moliner – into
their Sephardic Jewish heritage. In 1996,
Azabagic learned that a great aunt of his was a
descendant of Sephardic Jews who left Spain
at the end of the 15th century. Later, Moliner
discovered her own connection: to avoid
being expelled, some Jews living in medieval
Spain converted to Christianity, taking on last
names according to their vocations; a miller,
for example, adopted the name “Moliner.”
From this shared background comes a
compelling CD of new works commissioned
specifically for the Cavatina Duo, all drawing
on traditional Sephardic folk tunes – mostly
love songs with their often-dramatic, Ladino
(Judeo-Spanish) texts – for inspiration.
The recording is infused with gorgeous,
evocative melodies, soulful and plaintive
laments, lyrical flights of fancy, sultry twists
on the tango, startling percussive passages
and an exhilarating energy. Azabagic and
Moliner are virtuosic, passionate musicians,
deftly accompanied by David Cunliffe on
cello, Desirée Ruhstrat, violin, and the Avalon
String Quartet.
Joseph V. Willams II’s Isabel is the lone
flute and guitar duo on the CD; the remaining
four works include trios by Alan Thomas and
Carlos Rafael Rivera, and sextets by David
Leisner and Clarice Assad. I was particularly
struck by the third movement of Leisner’s
Love Dreams of the Exile, which juxtaposes
a jarring, percussive introduction with a
generous, heartachingly beautiful quote from
the beloved Ladino ballad, Tu madre cuando
te parió (Adio Querida).
I wholeheartedly recommend joining the
Cavatina Duo on their journey.
Sharna Searle
Something in the Air | Those Who Teach Can Also Play
A
KEN WAXMAN
s shibboleths go, the hoary “those who can do, those who can’t
teach,” must rank at the very top of the list. Besides libelling
the majority of educators who devote themselves to the task
of imparting knowledge to students, it negates the activities of those
who teach and do. Here are some musicians who maintain a full-time
teaching career along with consistent gigging.
Case in point is American drummer
Gerry Hemingway, now on the faculty of
the Hochschule Luzern in Switzerland. This
commitment doesn’t stop him from being part
of many working bands. One is The Who trio,
filled out by pianist/synthesizer player Michel
Wintsch and bassist Bänz Oester, both Swiss
natives. Zoo (Auricle Aur 14+15; gerryhemingway.com/auricle) is one all-acoustic CD and another featuring
Wintsch on keyboards, each of which demonstrates the drummer’s
sensitivity. On some of the electronic tracks his percussion colouration is such that its unobtrusiveness is reminiscent of the drum
pulses in the film Birdman. Hemingway is a full partner on these discs
however. On Sloeper for instance, which could define the acoustic jazz
trio, he relaxes into poised and positioned accents which chime clockwork-like alongside Oester’s juiced-up thwacks, allowing Wintsch
to extend the line. Subsequent nimble piano inventions are met with
Gatling gun-like swats from the drummer until the exposition reverts
to simple swing. Hemingway’s unfussy paddling keeps the exposition
flowing even when the pianist unleashes evocatively flowery chords.
Introduced by arpeggiated double-bass string shaking, Raccitus
confirms that hard back beats and cymbal clangs can manoeuvre
a gentle melody into a dramatic narrative of resonating strength.
With capricious echoes and processing from the synthesizer adding
unforeseen granular synthesis and oscillated wiggles to the program,
the percussionist adopts cutting-edge techniques. On the extended
Lamp Bowl for example, dealing with timbres that could come from
Hammond organ, murmuring computer programs or signals from
outer space, Hemingway’s polyrhythms break up the narrative at the
same time as they steady the beat. Considering Wintsch’s playing
is equally protean, highlighting both vivid acoustic melodies and
buzzing electric oscillations, the drummer’s rugged pops plus staccato
interjections from the bassist further ground the piece. Hemingway’s
artful shadings in both settings confirm why the professional development days on his teaching calendar are marked by playing opportunities with ensembles of various sizes.
Size is no hindrance for bassist Michael
Formanek, who teaches at Baltimore’s Peabody
Institute. The 71-minute, multi-sectional The
Distance suite he composed is performed with
élan and ebullience by the specially organized 19-member Ensemble Kolossus (ECM
2484 ecmrecords.com). Notable for more
than its enormity, the effect of listening to the
CD’s ten tracks is like standing in front of a
large painting of an important 19th-century battle. While the canvas
initially draws you to the conflict in the foreground, very soon you
thewholenote.com
begin noticing the details on the scene’s periphery. It’s the same with
Exoskeleton, the CD’s eight-part centrepiece. Introduced by the bassist’s own pedal-to-the-metal string pumping, the work quickly settles
into sequences that alternate vamping section work with solo expression. With five reed and eight brass players, the undulating horn
crescendos often put into bolder relief, or are put into bolder relief by,
the sophisticated musings issuing from Kris Davis’ linear piano lines
or guitarist Mary Halvorson’s darkened finger picking. This means
that despite huffing theme variations by the four trombonists in the
early sequences, a finger-snapping rhythm remains. Subsequent tonal
deconstruction in the form of a duet between tenor saxophonist Chris
Speed and cornetist Kurt Knuffke, or trumpeter Ralph Alessi’s tongue
flutters contrasting with trombonist Alan Ferber’s more moderated
blasts, are kept in check by Formanek’s strong arrangements. Not
only does the layered note colouration flow around the soloists, but
acting like a drill sergeant, the guitarist’s hammered notes never allow
the sound excursions to travel off into uncharted musical paths. All
this doesn’t weaken the compositional thrust in any way and by the
penultimate section, A Reptile Dysfunction, concentrated polyphony
generated by growling horns plus thick smacks from the bassist and
drummer Tomas Fujiwara give way to a polished chamber-like duet.
Oscar Noriega’s contralto clarinet tones brushing up against Patricia
Brennan’s chiming marimba reveals one more painterly detail of
the composition. Finally, Metamorphic, the climax, involves trumpeter Dave Ballou’s polished grace notes soaring like a dove of peace
over vamping, bellicose multiphonics that involve every other player.
Ballou’s brassy resolution helps direct the suite to wrap up with
the same intensity with which it began. With detailing demanding
repeated listening, Formanek’s creative triumph is confirmed.
On a much smaller scale, but with the same
sort of sonic concordance is Cosmopolitan
Greetings (Red Piano RPR 4699-4419-2
redpianorecords.com), where a quartet
featuring pianist Frank Carlberg, who teaches
at Boston’s New England Conservatory, plays
three of his originals and three free improvisations. Although not a regular group, there’s
no fissure between the academic and the jobbing musicians: guitarist
Joe Morris, bassist Pascal Niggenkemper and drummer Luther Gray.
If anything, the pianist’s writing and versatility come across like line
drawings which break a solid page of text in a publication. Thematic
links to Thelonious Monk’s crooked time sense (especially on Now
and Forever) and Herbie Nichols’ joyous abandon (more pointedly
on Get it?), allow Carlberg to create a space where bop, cool and free
impulses intersect. On the second tune for instance, the melody is
paramount, with a drum solo offering a lesson in how to gradually
minimize the tempo while maximizing swing. Elsewhere, as on the
title tune, Niggenkemper’s string segmentation suggests minimalism,
tempered with keyboard clip-clops; while walking and sliding bass
stops plus ratcheting guitar licks turn Cadillac Squawk, another
Carlberg line, into unexpectedly relaxed Third Stream-like music. Like
a champion kayaker crewing on a larger boat, veteran free improviser Morris expresses himself with nuanced distinction within the
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 87
Old Wine, New Bottles
group improv that’s Who Eats Who. As his guitar picking creates time
dislocation alongside Gray’s clattering fills, the piece reaches its zenith
as keyboard swabbing gives away to fluid squirms from Carlberg,
making the finale as dramatic as it is didactic.
Piloting a mid-course between freedom and
formalism are the seven compositions on Life
After Life (Allos Documents 012 allosmusica.
org), written and performed by percussionist
Eric Platz. Platz, a music professor at Brandon
University (BU) in Manitoba, is joined by cellist
Leanne Zacharias who also teaches at BU,
local electric bassist Don Benedictson, who
recorded the disc, and Chicagoan James Falzone, who plays clarinet
and adds a shruti box drone to some tracks. Three successive variants
on the title track are chamber music-like duos, the last confirming
the near-identical timbres of cello and clarinet; the first two demonstrating that Falzone and Platz can produce enlightened textures
with the organization of synchronized swimmers plus the improvisational smarts that could imagine Jimmy Giuffre playing with Max
Roach. Elsewhere, Zacharias, equally capable of plucking a swing
line, emphasizes the innate woodiness of her instrument which joins
with moderato clarinet tones and the timbered parts of Platz’s kit to
form an appropriately tree-spanning confluence that delineates the
composer’s mystical vision of Redwood Vesper. These inferences, plus
sonic seasoning that bring in rock music-like rhythms via Platz’s back
beat plus an exotic shruti box buzzing, are part of the CD’s 21-minute
chef-d’oeuvre Blood Meridian. More closely related to the integration of separated impulses than blood, the sectional piece begins with
droning undulations that sound electronic as well as acoustic, then
introduce a rhythmic undertow that shares space with wheezing
clarinet puffs, marimba pops and cello riffs. Like a radio shunting
from one station to another, additional sequences include a duet with
dreamy cello strokes and whimsical clarinet yelps; maracas shakes,
bell pealing, wood-block echoes; and human-sounding panting and
breathing. Ultimately the composition memorably resolves itself as the
wave form oscillations cease and an overlay of clarinet trills signal a
triumphant resolution. Conclusively, the drummer’s echoing pop puts
an onomatopoeic period on the program.
Musically, Luminosity (Origin
Records 82706 originarts.com) may be the
most straight ahead of the sessions here, but
it’s also the one with the most varied cast. The
program is eight compositions by Germanborn-and-raised pianist Florian Hoefner, who
after a long period in New York, now teaches at
Memorial University in St. John’s. The quartet
is completed by American bassist Sam Anning, Austrian drummer
Peter Kronreif and Vancouver-raised, Manhattan-based tenor and
soprano saxophonist Seamus Blake. Obviously attracted to his new
surroundings, Hoefner penned two fluid ballads The Narrows and
North Country, which flow like the clear water in a Newfoundland
harbour, and more obviously Newfound Jig. A frolicking piece that
manages to bring in the tenth province’s old country musical history,
Newfound Jig swings and swirls as Blake outputs John Coltrane-like
slurs and slides and the pianist builds up intense modal chording.
Ebullient, Blake adds the necessary crunch to the bossa-nova-like
In Circles, working up a piston-driven head of steam without ever
lapsing into screech mode. Dipping into the tenor’s lowest registers on
Elements, Blake doubles the jazz-rock feel engendered by Kronreif’s
scrambling thrusts. Overall though, Hoefner’s linear comping keeps
the piece moving like a veteran sailor righting a scow in an ocean
storm. Perhaps the key to the session is appropriately expressed on
The Bottom Line. Pushed by tremolo piano chords and rattling drums,
the melody expresses toughness without discontent. Those sentiments
would seem to be the perfect way to adapt to the sometimes rugged
life in Newfoundland – as well as describing the skills needed to be
both a patient teacher and an innovating musician.
88 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Fine Old Recordings Re-Released
P
BRUCE SURTEES
rior to the 1950s, when the name of Béla Bartók was mentioned
it was only the Concerto for Orchestra that came to mind.
Commissioned in 1943 by Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the
Boston Symphony Orchestra, at the urging of violinist Joseph Szigeti
and conductor Fritz Reiner, the work was a phenomenal success and
was featured in performances around the world and enjoyed some
prestigious recordings. RCA Victor documented the second evening of
the world premiere under Koussevitzky on December 30, 1944. There
is something unusual about this score: Bartók wrote two endings for
the last movement. In addition to the more elaborate ending he wrote
a shorter, less difficult one, suitable for less virtuosic ensembles.
Bartók’s early works for orchestra belong
to the late Romantic era as heard in the two
Suites for Orchestra (Op.3 & 4) in which the
composer introduced a tangy Hungarian
flavour for his Viennese audiences. An even
earlier work, Kossuth, Op.1, was written in the
shadow of another Hungarian. Kossuth, a redblooded late-Romantic orchestral tone poem,
is just the sort of conservative composition that
we do not associate with Bartók the innovator. It is a frankly Lisztian
tone poem in a lush romantic sense that Bartók was to put behind
him as he forged his dissonant new style. One of the many strengths
of Béla Bartók Complete Works (Decca 4789311, 32 CDs plus booklets) is finally having all his early works in stunning performances.
For the first time we can handily trace Bartók’s development through
the tonal phases of his compositions that were long suppressed
by music critics and pundits alike who had sought to support the
modernist agenda throughout the 20th century. Bartók never ever
considered embracing the Second Viennese School, nevertheless his
music became ever more difficult after his exhaustive ethno-musicological absorption, through which he embraced an evolving dissonant
style that enabled him to completely sidestep the 12-tone idiom. His
late masterpiece, the Concerto for Orchestra is the prime example,
heard in this collection by the Budapest Festival Orchestra conducted
by Iván Fischer who are also responsible for a brilliant performance
of Kossuth.
Other conductors on the ten orchestral and stage works discs
and elsewhere are György Lehel, Antal Doráti, Pierre Boulez, Georg
Solti, Christoph von Dohnányi, Essa-Pekka Salonen, David Zinman
and István Kertész. Six CDs contain the complete chamber works
including the six string quartets played by the Takács Quartet. Four
CDs hold the complete vocal and choral music, while the nine discs
of piano works are dominated by Zoltán Kocsis who also joins mezzo
Martá Lukin in the Mikrokosmos. Finally, three CDs of celebrated
performances from an earlier time include the three piano concertos
with Géza Anda conducted by Ferenc Fricsay; 28 tracks of piano
music played by Andor Foldes, Julius Katchen, Stephen Kovacevich
and Sviatoslav Richter; and the Violin Concerto No.2 played by Zoltán
Székely with Mengelberg and the Concertgebouw Orchestra, Music
for Strings, Percussion and Celesta conducted by Fricsay and the suite
from The Miraculous Mandarin under Dorati. All three are very listenable with allowances made for the 1939 Szekely/Mengelberg.
As Bartók devotees know already, here, for the others, is the
evidence that there is a wealth of listener-friendly music beyond the
usual repertoire pieces, the violin and the piano concertos, the Dance
Suites, the volumes of piano works, the stage works and choral music.
The first of the two fine booklets gives complete details of the recordings and a biography with timelines of Bartók’s compositions with
lots of glossy photos of the artists. The second contains translations,
Hungarian into English, of all the sung texts.
thewholenote.com
SummerVocations
Decca has chosen to list the repertoire in the index by DD numbers,
1 through 128 and identifies the disc where the work is to be found. As
identified above, the 32 CDs are in five easily seen groups; Orchestral
and Stage Works, Chamber Works, Choral and Vocal Works, Piano
Works and a fifth group of Celebrated Performances.
Bartók was one of the very greatest composers of the 20th century,
a unique figure. Listening to his Complete Works has been and
continues to be a constant pleasure. Except as noted, the sound
throughout is exemplary. I haven’t seen it memorialized but in the
1950s and 60s the hippest members of the Beat Generation “dug the
Bartók scene” and their enthusiasm may have got the ball rolling. Link
to contents: deccaclassics.com/en/cat/4789311.
There is no doubt that Leonard Bernstein’s
later years were his very best, confirmed by
all his recordings for Deutsche Grammophon,
including those with the Vienna Philharmonic
which had not played any Mahler for a
long, long time until Bernstein stood before
them. Volume One of The Leonard Bernstein
Collection on DG (4791047, 59 CDs)
covered composers from Beethoven to Liszt;
completing his legacy on DG CDs, Volume Two (4795553, 64 CDs)
takes us from Mahler to Wagner plus the earlier American Decca
recordings.
Orchestras in this second volume are the Vienna Philharmonic, the
Royal Concertgebouw, the Berlin Philharmonic (arguably the very best
Mahler Ninth on record), the New York Philharmonic, the Chicago
Symphony, Orchestre National de France, the Israel Philharmonic,
Bavarian Radio Symphony and the Accademia Nazionale del Santa
Cecilia. Collectors will be very happy to have the following assured
performances, each followed by a spoken informative analysis, as
recorded by American Decca in 1953 by Bernstein and the New York
Philharmonic in Carnegie Hall: Beethoven’s Eroica, Dvořák’s New
World, Schumann’s Second, Brahms Fourth and the Tchaikovsky
Sixth. If you have a chance, compare this confident 1953 Pathétique to
the searching 1986 version – two very different worlds.
The care and attention lavished on the two editions, including the
illustrated enclosures, honours the late maestro. Link to contents:
deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4795553.
The art of the late conductor Hans
Knappertsbusch is to be heard on countless performances of Wagner’s Ring Cycle from
Bayreuth as well as other Wagner music dramas
and in performances of the orchestral works of
the Romantic composers – all audio discs, with
only four works on video. They are Beethoven’s
Leonora Overture No.3 and the Fourth Piano
Concerto with Wilhelm Backhaus together with
the Vorspiel und Isoldes Liebestod from Tristan sung by Birgit Nilsson,
all from the Wiener Festwochen in 1962. From 1963, only one item:
Act One of Die Walküre in a concert performance sung by Claire
Watson (Sieglinde), Fritz Uhl (Siegmund) and Josef Greindl (Hunding).
The orchestra throughout is the Vienna Philharmonic.
Arthaus Musik has issued them on a single Blu-ray disc, A Tribute
to Hans Knappertsbusch (109213) in a video quality typical of the
time or maybe a little better, supplied by the ORF. Filmed in black
and white in 4:3 format. Watching Knappertsbusch in action it is easy
to see how he achieves those long lines with such ease. He seems to
draw the orchestra out rather than imposing on them. Hard to explain
but I believe it is there to see. The veteran Backhaus, still well in
command of his instrument, and Knappertsbusch are of one mind in
this elegant, patrician performance. Nilsson is Nilsson. The Walküre
first act is sung flawlessly but today we have been spoiled by so many
videos of the actual opera that it is very hard to visualize what they
are singing about or to empathize with any confrontation when they
are simply standing there awaiting their turn. I think that the disc
is still desirable if only to see and hear Knappertsbusch, Backhaus
and Nilsson.
thewholenote.com
continued from page 11
How you might know him:
Organist and music director at Our
Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church;
executive producer of ORGANIX
CONCERTS
Summer Vocation: “I recharge by
pushing my musical limits, by going
to Europe to perform organ concerts
in massive medieval cathedrals.
The tour this coming August will
be the result of my third invitation
to perform in Poland (2012, 2015,
2016)...I am often the only Canadian
in a festival of European organists
and of course, it is an honour that I
do not take for granted.
I am energized by learning and
preparing new music for my concerts.
Gordon Mansell
For me, it is not a rest at all but a
change and an opportunity to experience baroque instruments and
the occasional example of the continuing vibrancy of the North
German organ-building craft first-hand. By the end of this coming
tour, I will have performed concerts on 11 different organs, including
one museum organ dating back to 1653 in its original state. Overall,
these concert tours are exhilarating opportunities for musical and
personal growth.
My itinerary for this summer includes the first concert in Słupsk
(August 11) followed by a very special performance as part of the
Fiftieth International Organ Music Festival at St. Mary’s Cathedral
(August 12 – Koszalin) and the Cathedral Basilica of St. James the
Apostle (August 13 – Szczecin). After these concerts, my wife and I
will then vacation in Germany and plan to visit Bach’s hometown and
church, and play the famous Bach organ.”
Hear him this summer: Before Mansell departs for his tour, he plays
a noontime organ recital on July 20, at All Saints Kingsway. Details in
our GTA listings and at allsaintskingsway.ca.
Name: Aimée Butcher
Instrument: Jazz vocalist
How you might know her:
Performer at The Rex and Jazz
Bistro; Singer-songwriter on
debut 2015 CD The World Is
Alright
Summer Vocation: “What
I am looking forward to most
about my summer vacation is a chance to create new
musical memories. I have
my first festival gig ever on
July 31 at the TD Newmarket
Jazz+ Festival, which I am very
excited about, and plan to
schedule a few house concerts
up in northern Ontario around that date. I also plan to do a little bit of
recording with a couple of bands that I am a part of, which is something that we had to wait to do until summer because all of us have
been very busy throughout 2016. In addition to singing for some
enjoyable gigs, I am looking forward to a reduced teaching schedule so
that I may enjoy some time with family and friends over the summer,
as well as taking some time to myself so that I may do some songwriting and planning for 2017.”
Hear her this summer: Butcher’s performs at the TD Newmarket
Jazz+ Festival as part of the Sunday, July 31 lineup, at 3:30pm, in a set
featuring songs from her debut album. Flip to our Green Pages (pages
G1 to G10) in this issue to read up on what this festival, as well as 40
others, have planned for the summer ahead.
continues to page 90
June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 89
Name: Julia Wedman
Instrument: Baroque violin
How you might know her:
Violinist with Tafelmusik
Baroque Orchestra, I FURIOSI
and the Eybler Quartet
Summer Vocation: “Since I
travel a lot and play so many
concerts during the year, I like
to have a little time away from that in the summer!
I love to recharge by filling my soul with beauty. I go to art galleries,
gardens, beaches and parks. I look after the flowers and plants on
my little terrace. I play music that I love but don’t have to play in a
concert any time soon. I spend time with all of the people I love but
don’t get to see enough during the concert season. A perfect summer
day includes a little art, a little Bach, a lot of kids, a beautiful blue sky
and a big long table in my backyard with way too much food on it,
surrounded by beloved friends and family.”
Hear her this summer: The Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival
runs from June 6 to 18, and features four free concerts by Tafelmusik
musicians alongside students of the orchestra’s annual summer institute (TBSI). Details in our listings and at tafelmusik.org.
INTERNATIONAL
PIANO SERIES
Simone Dinnerstein
July 21 at 7pm, July 23 at 11am
Tony Yike Yang
August 3 at 7pm
Joey Alexander Jazz Trio
August 14 at 2pm
Name: Ryan Scott
Instrument: Percussion
How you might know him:
Artistic Director of Continuum
Contemporary Music; percussionist with Soundstreams
Canada, New Music Concerts,
Esprit Orchestra and the COC
Summer Vocation:
“Summertime is very special
to me and I clear my schedule as much as possible for several weeks.
My overwhelming priority is to spend meaningful quality time every
day with my three children (11, 9 and 5) and my wife, harpist Sanya
Eng. In addition to many excursions and activities, we’ll spend over
two weeks camping on the shores of Lake Huron at The Pinery. I find it
is absolutely necessary to stop performing like this every year so that I
can recharge – as former Nexus member John Wyre once said “the less
music I do, the better I play.” In the background, I will slowly prepare
a new concerto, some newly commissioned recital repertoire and
convert my doctoral dissertation on the emergence of the marimba in
Tokyo to a book. I will also return to the faculty of the National Youth
Orchestra of Canada to coach the chamber music program – I always
leave feeling inspired. Of course, the work at Continuum never really
slows down, but thanks to new technologies, one can get quite a bit of
work done while waiting for the fish to bite!”
Hear him this summer: The National Youth Orchestra of Canada
will present a festival of chamber music in collaboration with Wilfrid
Laurier University in Waterloo, from June 22 to July 15. The festival will
feature concerts by both faculty and youth orchestra members; entry
for faculty concerts is by donation and entry to student concerts is
free. Details in our listings and at nyoc.org.
Luca Buratto
August 17 at 7pm
Jan Lisiecki
August 26 at 7pm, August 27 at 2pm
CHORAL SERIES
Harlem Gospel Choir with
Measha Brueggergosman
July 20 at 7pm
Choir of Holy Trinity Church, UK
August 4 at 7pm, August 6 at 2pm,
Choral Vespers August 7 at 5pm
Theatre of Early Music Choir
& Daniel Taylor August 11 at 7pm
Canadian Choral Spotlight,
Massed Choir August 12 at 7pm
Off-season though it may be, this summer offers no shortage of
musical opportunities, for performers and concert-goers alike. Be sure
to check thewholenote.com throughout the break, where, in addition
to blog posts, concert reviews and news, we’ll continue to feature local
musicians’ stories about how they’re spending their own summer
vocations. And if you are a musician and want to share your own
summer vocation plans, get in touch with us at
[email protected] (attach photos if you like). The coming
months are starting to sound a lot more refreshing, already.
Tickets: 1.866.288.4313
stratfordsummermusic.ca
SEASON
SPONSOR
Sara Constant is social media editor at The WholeNote and
studies musicology at the University of Amsterdam. She
can be contacted at [email protected]
90 | June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
thewholenote.com
CBC Radio Two: The Golden Years
DAV I D J A E G E R
eople sitting in Winnipeg’s Centennial Concert Hall on February 1,
2002, for the opening concert of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra’s 11th New Music Festival, as well as those listening to Two
New Hours, the contemporary music series I created on CBC
Radio Two, got a real jolt of high energy as the concert opened with the
performance of Brian Current’s orchestral work, This Isn’t Silence. It
truly was not anything resembling silence, but rather a work that quickly
reached its maximum intensity and then sustained that level forcefully
throughout its nearly 12-minute duration. “The notion of cranking it
up and just letting it rip was borrowed from electronic music,” Current
confided. In this he was also echoing the late Frank Zappa (1940–1993)
who, in a 1987 interview on Two New Hours, compared writing for
orchestra to creating rock music, pointing out that, “When you write
fff in either case, you expect to hear some real F’s coming out.” Brian
Current also admits to referencing Murray Schafer at a certain point in
his composition when he requires the trombonists in the orchestra to
“Howl like wolves through their trombones.”
Current had originally drafted This Isn’t Silence in 1998 while
serving as composer-in-residence for the University of California
Berkeley Symphony Orchestra. But he revised the work for the
Winnipeg orchestra and their, by then, internationally famous New
Music Festival, and this performance in Winnipeg was the premiere
of that revised version. But in the meantime, Brian was also writing
other orchestral music, including his superb composition, For The
Time Being, the work that won him the Grand Prize in the CBC/RadioCanada National Radio Competition for Young Composers, in its 2001
edition in Vancouver. It seemed the logical choice for me, as CBC’s
delegate to the International Rostrum of Composers (IRC) in Paris,
to bring Brian’s winning piece, and that prize-winning performance
by the CBC Radio Orchestra and conductor Bramwell Tovey as one
of CBC’s submissions to the 2001 Rostrum. It was the right decision,
as Brian’s composition was selected by the IRC delegates that year as
the outstanding work by a composer under the age of 30. His work
would eventually be broadcast on the public radio services in all the
33 participating countries. It was also given a fresh live production by
the Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra in Warsaw.
Current’s success at the IRC began a string of positive results in
the international arena for the Two New Hours team’s productions of Canadian works. At the 2002 IRC, Lacrimosa, by the young
Vancouver-based composer Jocelyn Morlock, was voted to the top
ten list of works presented, and in 2003 it was Brandon, Manitobacomposer Patrick Carrabré, whose Inuit Games was also voted to
the top list. In 2004, Dissolve, by young Toronto composer Abigail
Richardson-Schulte, not only shared the award for the best work by a
young composer, she was also offered a commission by Radio France
for a new string quartet to be produced in Paris. Incidentally, 2002 was
also the year that our production of Christos Hatzis’ Constantinople
(with the Gryphon Trio plus guest vocalists Trish O’Callaghan and
Maryam Toller) was awarded a medal at the International Radio
Festival of New York. And there were more honours yet to come.
There was another notable development at the conclusion of that
2002 session of the IRC in Paris. After having served as CBC’s IRC delegate for 25 years, I suddenly found myself first nominated and then,
elected IRC president. This was a remarkable turn of events in several
respects. First of all, it was the only time in the 63-year history of the
IRC that a non-European was elected its president. Secondly, aside
from any personal assets I was perceived to be bringing to the leadership of the project, it signalled that Canadian music, and of course
| June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016
Brian Current
CBC Radio as its producer, was garnering an increasing amount of
respect from the international delegation participating in the IRC. The
investment that we at CBC Radio Music had made in Canadian music
was recognized by our sister public broadcasters around the world,
who showed an intense curiosity about new Canadian repertoire. And
the series of Canadian composers who had been selected and recommended by this international delegation over the years, from Murray
Schafer to Brian Cherney, to Chris Paul Harman, to Paul Steenhuisen,
to Jocelyn Morlock, to Brian Current and others, represented an
endorsement by a highly influential group of producers. This broad
international recognition also began to bear another surprising result:
the commissioning and production of contemporary Canadian works
by foreign broadcasters. Whether it was Harman and Schafer being
produced by NHK in Japan, Steenhuisen by ORF in Austria, Current
by PRT in Poland, Richardson-Schulte by Radio France or Marjan
Mozetich by Slovenian Radio, our steadfast development of Canadian
composers had demonstrably positive and concrete results. We were,
for example, able to reap the benefits of offshore productions by
obtaining the rights to these performances through the system of
international program exchange. Clearly, in the eyes of the world, new
Canadian music, just like Current’s composition, “wasn’t silence!”
Our Two New Hours recordings of Current’s This Isn’t Silence, For
the Time Being, and three more of his orchestral works were leased
from CBC Radio archives by the Canadian Music Centre for their
Centrediscs label and released on a CD in 2007. The title of that CD,
as might have been expected, is This Isn’t Silence, and it’s still available as Centrediscs CMCCD 12607. And just as Current’s This Isn’t
Silence was used to kick off the 2002 New Music Festival in Winnipeg,
the very same programming idea was repeated in 2012 by the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra when guest curator Peter Eötvös chose the work
to open the TSO’s New Creations Festival that year.
A final footnote to this very creative and productive period of CBC
Radio and Canadian musical history is that in 1998, the year Brian
Current composed his energetic This Isn’t Silence, the late and highly
esteemed Russian/Canadian composer Nikolai Korndorf (1947–2001)
completed a CBC Radio commission, The Smile of Maud Lewis.
Composed for the now defunct CBC Radio Orchestra, this work stands
as one of the gentlest, most sublime works ever commissioned by CBC
Radio. Nikolai Korndorf died, unexpectedly, while playing soccer with
his son, 15 years ago this month. And that was a thundering silence.
David Jaeger is a composer, producer and
broadcaster based in Toronto.
thewholenote.com
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June 1, 2016 - September 7, 2016 | 93
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