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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: 1- and 2-Dimensional Kinematics
Unit Number: 1
Enduring Understanding:
1.1 – The motion of objects (both one-dimensionally and two-dimensionally) can be analyzed using vectors, graphs and
calculations.
Standard
Essential Questions

What are the differences in scalar vs. vector quantities?

How can vector addition be used to determine resultant
displacement and velocity of an object?

How can position vs. time graphs be used to determine an object’s
position, average velocity and instantaneous velocity?

How can velocity vs. time graphs be used to determine an object’s
acceleration and displacement?

What are the mathematical relationships between displacement,
velocity, and acceleration for an object moving in one dimension?
1.1.2 – Analyze motion in one
dimension using time, distance, and
displacement, velocity and
acceleration.

What are the mathematical relationships between displacement,
velocity, and acceleration for an object moving in one dimension?
1.1.3 – Analyze motion in two
dimensions using angle of trajectory,
time, distance, displacement,
velocity, and acceleration.

What are the relationships between horizontal and vertical motion
for an object launched either horizontally or at an angle?

How can the components of a two-dimensional vector be resolved
using trigonometry (and how can two components be used to
produce the resultant vector)?

How does an observer’s frame of reference affect the apparent
relative motion of an object?
1.1.1 – Analyze motion graphically
and numerically using vectors,
graphs and calculations.
Pacing
Guideline
~10 days
(for 1.1.1 & 1.1.2
combined)
Key Academic
Vocabulary
Magnitude
Direction
Scalar
Vector
Resultant
Position
Distance
Displacement
Velocity
Acceleration
Average vs.
Instantaneous
Tangent
(Essentially a
continuation of 1.1.1)
Uniform acceleration
Free fall
~10 days
Projectile
Trajectory
Horizontal
Vertical
Gravity
Air resistance
Sine
Cosine
Tangent
Uniform velocity
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013

For an object moving with uniform circular motion, how is the
object’s velocity related to its speed, acceleration and radius of
curvature?
(Supplemental:
 For projectiles launched at an angle, how do the projectile’s launch
angle, launch velocity and gravity affect its range, maximum height
and time aloft?)
Suggested Resources by Unit
1-Dimensional Kinematics Notes
2-Dimensional Kinematics Notes
DVAT Lab
Vector Addition WS
Displacement & Velocity WS
Average Velocity & Displacement WS
Average Acceleration WS
Postion vs. Time Graph Simulation
Displacement with Constant Acceleration WS
Velocity & Displacement with Constant Acceleration WS
Final Velocity After Any Acceleration WS
The Moving Man Interactive Simulation
Motion in 2D Interactive Simulation
Falling Objects WS
Vectors WS #2
Vector Addition WS
Resolving Vectors WS
Vector Addition Interactive Simulation
Shoot For Your Grade Lab
Projectiles Launched at an Angle WS
Projectile Motion Interactive Simulation
Projectiles Launched at an Angle Lab
Relative Velocity Problems WS
Circular Motion Problems WS
Uniform acceleration
Circular motion
Centripetal acceleration
Frame of reference
Relative motion
Period
Location of these resources
http://www.webassign.net/serway/af/AF_0202.swf
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/moving-man
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/motion-2d
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/vector-addition
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/projectile-motion
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Forces
Unit Number: 2
Enduring Understanding:
1.2 – Forces acting on objects cause them to accelerate, and these forces can be described using vectors, graphs, force
diagrams, and calculations.
Standard
1.2.1 – Analyze forces and systems of forces
graphically and numerically using vectors,
graphs, and calculations.
1.2.2 – Analyze systems of forces in one
dimension and two dimensions using free
body diagrams.
1.2.3 – Explain forces using Newton’s laws of
motion as well as the universal law of
gravitation.
Essential Questions

How can the components of a free body diagram be used
to produce a resultant force vector (and how can a single
force vector be resolved into its component forces)?

How is an object’s acceleration related to its mass and the
force(s) acting on it?

How can information regarding forces acting on an object
be used to produce a resultant force vector (and how can
a single force vector be resolved into its component forces
or their constituents)?

How do contact forces and forces at a distance (field
forces) differ?

How is an object’s state of motion affected by the forces
acting on it?

How is an object’s acceleration related to its mass and the
force(s) acting on it?

When two objects interact, what is the relationship
between the forces these objects exert on each other?

How is the gravitational force of attraction between two
objects related to the objects’ masses and distance apart?
Pacing
Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
~2 days
Force
Agent
System
Free body diagram
Static equilibrium
Newton’s second law
Net force
Unbalanced force
~3 days
Contact force
Field force
(Forces at a distance)
Normal force
Weight
Friction
Tension
Applied force
~5 days
Newton’s first law
Newton’s second law
Newton’s third law
Inertia
Net force
Unbalanced force
Universal law of
gravitation
Action-reaction pair
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
1.2.4 – Explain the effects of forces
(including weight, normal, tension and
friction) on objects.
1.2.5 – Analyze basic forces related to
rotation in a circular path (centripetal force).

How is weight related to mass and gravity?

What constitutes forces such as the “normal” force,
tension and air resistance?

What is the difference between static friction and kinetic
friction?

What creates centripetal force for objects moving in a
circle?
Suggested Resources by Unit
Forces Notes
Free Body Diagrams WS
Net External Force WS
Newton’s 2nd Law WS (#1)
Newton’s 2nd Law WS (#2)
Gravity and Newton’s 2nd Law: The Baseball Drop Lab
Newton’s 2nd Law: Glider Lab
Coefficient of Friction WS (suggested but not in curriculum)
Overcoming Friction WS (suggested but not in curriculum)
Determining the Coefficient of Friction Lab
Forces in One Dimension Interactive Simulation
Forces and Motion Interactive Simulation
Ramp: Forces and Motion Interactive Simulation
Universal Gravitation WS
Gravity Force Lab Interactive Simulation
Centripetal Force WS
Circular Motion Lab
Forces Review WS
~3 days
Weight
Normal force
Tension
Static friction
Kinetic friction
Air resistance
~2 days
Centripetal acceleration
Centripetal force
Newton’s second law
Circular motion
Location of these resources
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-1d
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-and-motion
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/ramp-forces-and-motion
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gravity-force-lab
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Energy
Unit Number: 3
Enduring Understanding:
2.1 – All objects possess energy by virtue of their position, composition, or motion, and this energy (or changes in energy, in
the form of work or power) can be expressed in graphs and calculations.
Standard
2.1.1 – Interpret data on work and energy
presented graphically and numerically.
2.1.2 – Compare the concepts of potential
and kinetic energy and conservation of total
mechanical energy in the description of the
motion of objects.
Essential Questions

How is the work done on an object related to the force
acting on it and the distance the object moves (both
mathematically and graphically)?

How is work done on an object related to the change in its
spring potential, gravitational potential, and/or kinetic
energies?

How is energy converted from potential to kinetic (and vice
versa) when objects move up or down, or back and forth
in simple harmonic motion?

How is energy conserved in reactions and physical
processes?

What happens to mechanical energy as a result of
friction?
Pacing
Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
~5 days
Joule
Energy
Kinetic energy
Potential energy
Gravitational potential
energy
Zero level
Elastic/Spring potential
energy
Relaxed length
Spring/Force constant
Work
Work-energy theorem
~4 days
Thermal energy
Temperature
Heat
Hooke’s Law
Mechanical energy
Non-mechanical energy
Conserved
Periodic motion
Equilibrium
Pendulum
Restoring force
Simple harmonic motion
Period
Amplitude
Frequency
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
2.1.3 – Explain the relationship among work,
power and energy.

How is power related to the concepts of work, time,
applied force and velocity?
Suggested Resources by Unit
Energy Notes
Kinetic Energy Problems WS
Potential Energy Problems WS
Work Problems WS
Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem Problems WS
The Ramp Interactive Simulation
Hooke’s Law WS
Masses & Springs Interactive Simulation
Hooke’s Law and Spring Constants Lab
Power Problems WS
People Power Lab
Conservation of Mechanical Energy Problems WS
Energy Skate Park Interactive Simulation
Pendulum, Mass-Spring Problems WS
Pendulum Lab Interactive Simulation
Determining “g” Using a Pendulum Lab
The Bungee Jumper: Conservation of Energy Lab
1-2 days
Power
Watt
Location of these resources
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/the-ramp
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/mass-spring-lab
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/energy-skate-park
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/pendulum-lab
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Momentum
Unit Number: 4
Enduring Understanding:
1.3 – Momentum and energy are usually conserved in interactions between objects.
Standard
1.3.1 – Analyze the motion of objects in
completely elastic and completely inelastic
collisions by using the principles of
conservation of momentum and
conservation of energy.
1.3.2 – Analyze the motion of objects based
on the relationship between momentum and
impulse.
Essential Questions

What does it mean to say that momentum is conserved in
an interaction?

What is the difference between elastic and inelastic
collisions, in terms of conservation of energy and
momentum?

In what sorts of interactions or collisions would momentum
and energy be conserved, and when would either or both
of them not be conserved (offer specific examples)?

How is momentum different from inertia and velocity?

How is impulse related to momentum and force?

How can impulse be derived from a force vs. time graph?

How is impulse related to real-world concepts such as
follow-through and bending your knees when you jump
from a height to the ground to prevent injury?
Pacing
Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
~3 days
momentum
conserved
isolated
conservation of
momentum
conservation of energy
recoil
elastic collision
inelastic collision
perfectly inelastic
collision
ideal gas
real gas
kinetic-molecular theory
~3 days
impulse
follow-through
force-time graph
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Suggested Resources by Unit
Momentum Notes
Momentum Problems WS
Momentum, Force & Impulse WS
Meteorite Impulse Simulation Lab
Stopping Distance Problems WS
Conservation of Momentum Problems WS
Collision Lab Interactive Simulation
Law of Conservation of Momentum Lab
Momentum Review WS
Location of these resources
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/collision-lab
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Waves
Unit Number: 5
Enduring Understanding:
2.2 – The behavior of mechanical and electromagnetic waves is a function of their properties, including wavelength, frequency,
and amplitude, and the behavior of these waves both within and between various media can be described with mathematical
equations.
Standard
2.2.1 – Analyze how energy is transmitted
through waves, using the fundamental
characteristics of waves: wavelength, period,
frequency, amplitude, and wave velocity.
2.2.2 – Analyze wave behaviors in terms of
transmission, reflection, refraction and
interference.
Essential Questions

How do different types of waves transfer energy through a
medium?

What are the relationships between wave frequency,
period, wavelength and energy?

How does the frequency of sound or light change based
on the position of the observer relative to the source of the
waves?

What types of waves require a medium to be propagated,
and what types do not require a medium?

What happens when a wave encounters a new medium?

How is the speed of electromagnetic waves related to their
Pacing
Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
2 days
Pendulum
Mass-spring system
Tuning fork
Slinky
Ripple tank
Work-Kinetic energy
theorem
Wavelength
Period
Frequency
Amplitude
Wave Speed
Crest
Trough
Oscillation
Hertz
Medium
Density
Elasticity
Doppler effect
3 days
Mechanical waves
Electromagnetic waves
Vacuum
Reflection
Refraction
Speed of light (c)
Photon
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
medium?
2.2.3 – Compare mechanical and
electromagnetic waves in terms of wave
characteristics and behavior (specifically
sound and light).

How is the angle at which light strikes a boundary with
another transparent medium related to whether or how the
light is transmitted or reflected?

What happens when waves moving in opposite directions
in a medium interact with each other?

What are similarities and differences between mechanical
and electromagnetic waves?

What are similarities, differences and examples of
longitudinal (compressional), transverse and surface
waves?
Suggested Resources by Unit
Waves Notes
Wave on a String Interactive Simulation
Wave Problems WS
Measuring the Speed of Light With Marshmallows Lab
Sound Interactive Simulation
Speed of Sound: Mach 1 Lab
Snell’s Law WS
Bending Light Interactive Simulation
Wave Interference Interactive Simulation
Refraction Through a Glass Block Lab
Critical Angle and Total Internal Reflection Lab
Index of refraction
Normal
Snell’s Law
Total internal reflection
Critical angle
Law of reflection
Angle of incidence
Superposition
Constructive
interference
Destructive interference
Node
Antinode
Standing wave
2 days
Longitudinal
(compressional) waves
Transverse waves
Surface waves
Compression
Rarefaction
Pitch
Loudness
Timbre
Decibel
Location of these resources
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-on-a-string
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/sound
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/bending-light
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-interference
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Electricity
Unit Number: 6
Enduring Understanding:
2.3 – The rate at which charge flows through a circuit is related to the potential difference across the circuit, and the
resistance to flow encountered by the charge.
3.1 – Electrical charges create electrical fields, and these fields exert forces on other electrical charges.
Standard
Essential Questions
Pacing Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
2.3.1 – Explain Ohm’s law in relation to
electric circuits.

What is the relationship between electrical potential
(voltage), current and resistance?
2-3 days
Electrical potential
(voltage)
Potential difference
Current
Resistance
Volts
Amperes
Ohms
Ohm’s Law
Electric circuit
2.3.2 – Differentiate the behavior of moving
charges in conductors and insulators.

What is the difference between a conductor and an
insulator?
1 day
Conductor
Insulator
Semiconductor
Conservation of
Charge
2.3.3 – Compare the general characteristics
of AC and DC systems without calculations.

What is the difference between alternating and direct
current, and what are the advantages and limitations of
each?
1 day
Alternating current
Direct Current
Alternator
Transformer
2.3.4 – Analyze electric systems in terms of
their energy and power.

How is electrical power related to electrical potential,
current, resistance, work, energy and time?
1 day
Power
Watts
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
2.3.5 – Analyze systems with multiple
potential differences and resistors
connected in series and parallel circuits,
both conceptually and mathematically, in
terms of voltage, current and resistance.

What is the behavior of and relationship between
electrical potential, current, and resistance in series,
parallel and combination circuits?
5 days
Series circuit
Parallel circuit
Combination circuit
Voltmeter
Ammeter
Equivalent
resistance
Switch
Resistor
Battery
Ground
3.1.1 – Explain qualitatively the fundamental
properties of the interactions of charged
objects.

What is the nature of electrical charge?
1 day
Positive
Negative
Conservation of
charge
3.1.2 – Explain the geometries and
magnitudes of electric fields.

How can you illustrate electric fields between two
charges or around objects?
4-5 days

How do you determine the strength at various points in
an electrical field?
Electric field
Test charge
Force lines
Field line
Electric dipole
Electric field
Strength
Electric potential
energy
Joules
Capacitor
Dielectric

How is the force of attraction or repulsion between two
charges related to the magnitude of the charges and the
distance between them?
1 day
Coulomb’s Law
Point charge
3.1.3 – Explain how Coulomb’s law relates to
the electrostatic interactions among charged
objects.
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
3.1.4 – Explain the mechanisms for
producing electrostatic charges including
charging by friction, conduction, and
induction.

What are the different ways in which an object can
become charged?
1 day
Friction
Conduction
Charging by
contact
Induction
Separation of
charge
Electron affinity
Grounded
Electroscope
3.1.5 – Explain how differences in
electrostatic potentials relate to the potential
energy of charged objects.

How is work done on an object by lifting it similar to and
different from work done on a charged particle by
pushing it against the electric field of a charge object?
1 day
Electric potential
energy
Gravitational
potential energy

What is electric potential energy?

How are electric fields similar to and different from
gravitational fields?
Suggested Resources by Unit
Electricity Notes
Balloons & Static Electricity: Friction & Induction Interactive Simulation
Coulomb’s Law Problems WS
Coulomb’s Law Lab
Charges & Fields Interactive Simulation
Electric Field Hockey Interactive Simulation
Electric Field Strength Problems WS
Potential Difference Problems WS
Capacitor Lab Interactive Simulation
Ohm’s Law Problems WS
Ohm’s Law Interactive Simulation
Battery Voltage Interactive Simulation
Battery-Resistor Circuit Interactive Simulation
Series Circuit Problems WS
Location of these resources
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/balloons
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/charges-and-fields
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/electric-hockey
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/capacitor-lab
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/ohms-law
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/battery-voltage
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/battery-resistor-circuit
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Series Circuit Lab
Parallel Circuit Problems WS
Parallel Circuit Lab
Combination Circuit Problems WS
Circuit Construction Kit Interactive Simulation
Electric Power Problems WS
Electricity Review WS
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/circuit-construction-kit-ac
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Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Common Core Unit Name: Magnetism
Unit Number: 7
Enduring Understanding:
3.2 – Moving electric charges create magnetic fields.
Standard
3.2.1 – Explain the relationship between
magnetic domains and magnetism.
3.2.2 – Explain how electric currents produce
various magnetic fields.
3.2.3 – Explain how transformers and power
distributions are applications of
electromagnetism.
Essential Questions

What causes magnetism?

How are magnetic field lines oriented around bar
magnets?

What are magnetic domains and how are they affected
by magnetic fields?

What is a solenoid and how does it work?

What causes electromagnetism, and what factors affect
the strength of an electromagnet?

How does electromagnetic induction occur, as described
by Faraday’s law?

How does a generator produce alternating current?

How do transformers alter current and voltage?
Pacing Guideline
Key Academic
Vocabulary
1 day
Magnetism
Magnetic field lines
Magnetic poles
Electron spin
Diamagnetism
Paramagnetism
Ferromagnetism
Domains
1 day
Right-hand rule
Solenoid
Electromagnet
1 day
Electromagnetic
induction
Faraday’s law
Flux
Generator
Alternating current
Transformers
Eddy currents
Hysteresis loss
Flux transport failure
15
Physics Common Core Curriculum Map 2012-2013
Suggested Resources by Unit
Location of these resources
Magnetism Notes
Mapping a Magnetic Field Lab
Strength of a Magnet’s Field Lab
Constructing a Homemade Speaker
Magnet and Compass Interactive Simulation
Faraday’s Law Interactive Simulation
Faraday’s Electromagnetic Lab Interactive Simulation
Magnets and Electromagnets Interactive Simulation
Generator Interactive Simulation
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/magnet-and-compass
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/faradays-law
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/faraday
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/magnets-and-electromagnets
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/generator
16
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