Summer Assignment 2016-17 Download

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AP WORLD HISTORY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT 2016-17
A major part of this course will be thinking about the division of history into time periods. We will look at history in
six periods, but I want you to realize from the very beginning that these six time periods are only one way to think
about history!
In fact, to point this out, consider the following: As I just stated, the course designed by the College Board is based
around the division of history into six time periods (see below “Note on Periodization”).
A Note About “Periodization”
PLEASE WRITE A 1-2 SENTENCE SUMMARY OF EACH TIME PERIOD BELOW. WRITE THESE IN YOUR OWN
WORDS!
It should come as no surprise that historians examine and explain history by breaking it into time periods. This course is
arranged into six time periods and the reasons why we are using this “periodization” will constantly be at the heart of this
course. (Please note that BCE is the same as B.C.cand CE the same as A.D., something we will talk about in the beginning
of the course.)
1) to c. 600 BCE- “Technological and Environmental Transformations”- Though in many ways it is may be the most
important era of history as far as human existence is concerned, we will spend the least amount of time on this era. The
“Neolithic Revolution” saw the rise of agriculture allowing for the permanently settled societies to exist for the first time
as many humans gave up nomadic lifestyles to become sedentary. Sedentary societies developed and humanity
experienced a major population boom that has never stopped and which allowed for many things that had not previously
been possible.
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2) c. 600 BCE to c. 600 CE- “Organizations and Reorganizations of Human Societies” – This period is known as the
“classical age.” The classical age witnessed the birth of much more complex ideas about government, religion, art,
literature, science, etc. that still survive to this day and in many ways, solidified the differences found between regions
around the world today. At the same time, interactions between societies increased through trade, war, and migrations.
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3) c. 600 CE to c. 1450- “Regional and Transregional Interactions”- With the fall of the “classical societies,” the
postclassical age saw peoples struggle to adjust to the tremendous instability that followed collapse. The early part of this
era was greatly dominated by the rise of Islam and later by the power of nomadic peoples from Central Asia— the
Mongols and Turks. Throughout most of this period, Western Europe experienced a Dark Age in which it was relatively
isolated from much of the world, while places like China and the Middle East flourished. Toward the end of the period,
Europe began to rise out of the ashes as the Renaissance (“rebirth”) foreshadowed its rise in the “early modern era” that
followed.
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4) c. 1450 to c. 1750- “Global Interactions”- This period marks the beginning of the permanent interaction between the
Western and Eastern hemispheres which had never previously been in ongoing contact. The exchanges that resulted
brought about a huge shift for many of the world’s peoples. As it was Western Europeans who began these new contacts
when their search for trade routes to Asia brought about the “discovery” of the Americas, this period saw the beginning of
their rise to power. A brand new world was created in the Americas as the decline of native populations, the rise of the
trans-Atlantic slave trade, and European migrations led to major changes in the western hemisphere’s population and
way of life. The Protestant Reformation, scientific revolution, and“Enlightenment” further shook up Europe as
established ideas were questioned.
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5) c. 1750 to c. 1900- “Industrialization and Global Integration”- This period saw the growth of European dominance of
world affairs. Sparked by the American Revolution, this era also witnessed a wave of revolutions which brought
independence to most of the western hemisphere which had previously been colonies under the political control of
Europeans. The revolutionary spirit spread to Europe and led to a tremendous growth of nationalism on both sides of the
Atlantic as huge amounts of peoples began to define themselves in terms of a national identity. Meanwhile, the Industrial
Revolution allowed Europeans (and the U.S. and Japan) to expand their power and build truly global empires during the
“age of imperialism.”
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6) c. 1900 to the Present- “Accelerating Global Change and Realignments”- The long 20th century witnessed world wars
and a worldwide depression. It saw the decline of European empires and the dramatic rise of the U.S. As European power
weakened, nationalism spread to the colonized peoples of their empires, and independence spread across Asia and Africa
in an era of “decolonization.” The rise of a new political ideology, fascism, led to World War II and the defeat of fascism
led to nearly half a century of Cold War between two competing ideologies backed by two world superpowers, the U.S. and
the Soviet Union. Today in a post-Cold War era, the world is, in a sense, smaller than ever, as computer technology and
the rise of “globalization” has brought us into greater contact than ever before. During this century, changes to human
lifestyles were as dramatic as ever as the middle class exploded and cheap energy in some ways allowed for more change
than in the previous 10,000 years of the course.
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The Rest of the Summer Assignment consists of 2 parts:
Part I- Short Map Activity
Part II- Historical thinking skills, Prologue from textbook, reading Guides for Chapters I and 2
of your textbook along with sample AP Exam style questions (Multiple Choise, Short Answer
Questions (SAQ), Long Essay Questions (LEQ), and the Document Based Question (DBQ)
These will be the equivalent of a test score. Make sure you provide substantial effort and answer
questions thoughtfully! In addition, there could be an actual test based on the first two chapters
of the textbook during the first week of classes.
Summer Assignment Part II: MAP SECTION
AP
Students
need to be
thoroughly
familiar with
the following
regions and
countries. This
is an integral
aspect of the
course and a
skill that needs
to be mastered
prior to the
beginning of
the year.
Identify the
following AP
World Regions
and at least
three countries
within each
region (except
for South Asia
since there are
only two
countries).
Summer Assignment Part II: AP Historical Thinking Skills, Prologue, chapters 1 and 2 of your
textbook
Strayer- Ways of the World
Chapter Learning Objectives- CHAPTER 1
●
●
●
●
●
●
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in gathering and hunting societies
To make students aware that agriculture evolved independently in several regions of the world
To trace development of agriculture and its local variations
To consider the social implications of the Agriculture Revolution
CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES- CHAPTER 2
•
•
To establish the relationship between the First Civilizations and the Agricultural Revolution
To contrast civilizations with other forms of human communities
•
•
•
To explore when, where, and how the First Civilizations arose in human history
To explore how the emergence of civilizations transformed how humans lived and how their societies were structured
To show the various ways in which civilizations differed from one another
•
To explore the outcomes of the emergence of civilizations, both positive and negative, for humankind
Please fill out the following reading guides for Chapters 1 and 2 as you read the textbook. You
will then be given AP style questions that fit the new test format. Please complete these.
!
Reading Guide Chapter 1:
First Peoples, First Farmers: Most of History in a Single Chapter, to 4000 B.C.E.
!
1. What arguments does this chapter make for paying serious attention to human history before the coming of
“civilization?”
I. OUT OF AFRICA TO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH: FIRST MIGRATIONS P. 12
2. What are some examples of technological innovation or development of culture by the early humans in Africa?
3. What was the sequence of human migration across the planet?
A. INTO EURASIA
4. List some examples of humans adapting to their new environment in Eurasia.
B. INTO AUSTRALIA
5. Humans used what technology for the first time in order to facilitate their migration into Australia?
C. INTO THE AMERICAS
6. What is the name of the first culture that emerged in the Americas? Describe their lifestyle.
7. What happened to Clovis culture?
D. INTO THE PACIFIC
8. How and when did the Austronesian (Pacific) migrations occur?
9. How did Austronesian migrations differ from other early patterns of human movement?
II. THE WAYS WE WERE P. 20
A. THE FIRST HUMAN SOCIETIES
10. Descibe the size of most Paleolithic societies.
11. How did Paleolithic societies typically aquire food?
12. Define “Nomadic”
13. Why were Paleolithic societies unable to stockpile food and other resources?
14. Define “egalitarian”
15. In what ways did a gathering and hunting economy shape other aspects of Paleolithic societies?
B. ECONOMY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
16. What are some positives and negatives to life in Paleolithic socities?
a. Positives:
b. Negatives:
17. List at least 2 ways Paleolithic peoples altered their environments.
C. THE REALM OF THE SPIRIT
18. What evidence exists that prove Paloelithc peoples had a religious or spiritual realm as a part of their culture?
D. SETTLING DOWN: THE GREAT TRANSITION
19. Why did some Paleolithic peoples abandon earlier, more nomadic ways and begin to live a more settled life?
20. Define “ sedentary”
21. Why did the ability to store and acumulate goods cause egalitarianism to end?
22. Your text argues that sedentary life led to domestication of animals. Define “domestication” and list the first
animal ever domesticated. (hint: see page 27 for definition)
23. How did becoming sedentary change the way humans altered their enviornment? (Hint: the Gobekli Tepe is an
example of this)
III. BREAKTHROUGH TO AGRICULTURE P. 26
24. Define “Neolithic Revolution”, or “Agricultural Revolution.”
25. How did the Neolithic Revolution change the relationship between humans and their environment? (Give examples
of new way humans are altering their environment.)
26. How did the Neolithic Revolution affect the population of the globe?
A. COMMON PATTERNS
27. What accounts for the emergence of agriculture after countless millennnia of human life without it?
28. Historians think whom was responsible for discovering the technique of farming? Explain why this argument is
logical.
29. What contributed to the growing need for agriculture (farming) around the globe?
B. VARIATIONS
30. Define “horticulture”
31. What was the first place in the world to experience the “Agricultural Revolution?”
32. Explain the difference in the process of domestication in the Fertile Crescent and Africa.
33. How did domestication in the Americas differ from that in Africa and Eurasia? (2 ways- think animals and crops)
34. Why could agricultural practices spread more rapidly in North Africa and Eurasia than in the Americas?
IV. THE GLOBALIZATION OF AGRICULTURE P. 34
35. In what 2 ways did agriculture spread?
A. TRIUMPH AND RESISTANCE
36. Provide at least 2 pieces of evidence for the following statement: “The spread of languages accompanied the spread
of agriculture.”
37. Where and why was agriculture sometimes resisted?
B. THE CULTURE OF AGRICULTURE
38. What are some positive and negative changes brought about by the agricultural revolution?
A. Positives:
B. Negatives:
V. SOCIAL VARIATION IN THE AGE OF AGRICULTURE P. 39
A. PASTORALISTS
39. Define “Pastoralist”
B. AGRICULTURAL VILLAGE SOCIETIES
40. How did pastoralists differ from agricultural village societies in terms of what they domesticated?
41. Compare/Contrast the role of women in pastoral societies and agricultural vllage societies.
C. CHIEFDOMS
42. How were chiefdoms politically different than pastoralists and agricultural village based societies?
VI. REFLECTIONS P. 43
43. List some argumnets modern thinkers use to critizise the effects of the Neolithic Revolution and simultaneously
praise Paleolithic societies.
Please complete the Chapter Wrap-up on page 1a-1b as well.
AP Exam Practice Questions
(Put some serious thought into these responses)
PART I- AP World Multiple Choice Questions
Use the chart below and your knowledge of world history to answer questions 1.1-1.3
1.1 Which of the following could be considered the oldest domesticated plant?
a. Potatoes
b. Rice
c. Squash
d. Sunflowers
1.2. Based on the information provided, which of these is the most likely conclusion that can be drawn regarding
domestication?
a. All animals were domesticated at the same time as plants.
b. Every region domesticated plants and animals before 5000 BCE.
c. Inhabitants of the New Guinea highlands relied solely on vegetarian diets since they had no domesticated
animals.
d. Cattle were among the earliest domesticated animals.
1.3. Based on the information provided, what conclusions can be drawn about the development of agriculture?
a. Agriculture initially developed in a few specific areas through independent innovation.
b. Agriculture initially developed through widespread technological diffusion.
c. Agriculture initially developed after the rise of civilizations.
d. Agriculture developed as humans migrated out of Africa.
Questions 2.1 to 2.3 refer to the table below.
World Population to 7,000 years ago
Year
1,000,000 years ago
300,000 years ago
25,000 years ago
10,000 years ago (8000 BCE)
7,000 years ago (5000 BCE)
Population
100,000
1,000,000
3,300,300
4,000,000
5,000,000
2.1. How did culture change between 1,000,000 years ago and 10,000 years ago?
a.
b.
c.
d.
People changed how they lived and thought very little.
People adapted to new environments and developed new tools.
People developed writing and formed the first cities.
People survived primarily by farming crops that were easy to grow.
2.2 The best explanation for the change in world population between 10,000 years ago and 7,000 years ago is the
development of
a. better weapons to fight off predators
b. early forms of religious belief, such as animism
c. better means of food production
d. standing armies that could protect people
2.3 Most historians agree with which theory explaining early human migration?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Humanity spread while all the continents were still connected.
The human species developed independently in several different parts of the world.
Humanity began in East Africa and spread to the rest of the world.
The first region to be populated by humans was the Middle East and the last region was the Americas.
Questions 3.1 to 3.3 refer to the passage below.
“Within four thousand years of its introduction, agriculture had dramatically transformed the face of the
earth. Human beings multiplied prodigiously, congregated in populated quarters, placed the surrounding
lands under cultivation, and domesticated several species of animals… Like the transition from foraging to
agricultural society, the development of cities and complex societies organized around urban centers was a
gradual process rather than a well-defined event. Because of favorable location, some neolithic villages and
towns attracted more people and grew larger than others. Over time, some of those settlements evolved into
cities.”
-Jerry Bentley and Herbert Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters: Global Perspectives on the Past, 2003
3.1 Which of the following would be the most important factor determining a “favorable location” in the evolution
of a village to a city?
a.
b.
c.
d.
nearby mountains that could provide a barrier to foreign invasion
a plentiful supply of clay to produce pottery
surrounding areas filled with animals to be hunted
a predictably supply of drinking water
3.2 A major difference between a village and a city in Neolithic times was
a.
b.
c.
d.
cities possessed greater specialization of labor
cities tended to be on higher ground for defensive reasons
villages were more democratic and cities were more autocratic
religion was more important in villages
3.3 Which feature was most important in the complex societies of the Neolithic times?
a.
b.
c.
d.
matriarchy
stone tools
monotheism
specialization of labor
Questions 4.1 and 4.2 refer to the image below
4.1 This pestle for mashing taro found in Papua, New Guinea, believed to be 8,000 years old indicates that the
people in the region had
a.
b.
c.
d.
developed the ability to farm
lived nomadic lives
developed trade with other oceanic cultures
independently developed the ability to smelt iron
4.2 The creation of this pestle indicates that the people who made it had which form of technology?
a.
b.
c.
d.
stone tools
the control of fire
possession of the wheel
farming implements
AP World History Rubric and Historical Thinking Skills for SAQs (Short
Answer Questions) and LEQs (Long Essay Questions)
(The next few pages include the actual AP Rubric for evaluating these essays and
short answer questions. This also includes the historical thinking skills that you
will be mastering in this course- utilize this while writing responses for these
questions)
PART II- Short-Answer Question (question 2 refers to the passage below)
“For most of our history we supported ourselves by hunting and gathering: we hunted wild animals and
foraged for wild plants. It's a life that philosophers have traditionally regarded as nasty, brutish, and short...
How do you show that the lives of people 10,000 years ago got better when they abandoned hunting and
gathering for farming?... Are twentieth century hunter-gatherers really worse off than farmers? Scattered
throughout the world, several dozen groups of so-called primitive people, like the Kalahari bushmen,
continue to support themselves that way. It turns out that these people have plenty of leisure time, sleep a
good deal, and work less hard than their farming neighbors. For instance, the average time devoted each
week to obtaining food is only 12 to 19 hours for one group of Bushmen, 14 hours or less for the Hadza
nomads of Tanzania. Skeletons from Greece and Turkey show that the average height of hunger-gatherers
toward the end of the ice ages was a generous 5' 9'' for men, 5' 5'' for women. With the adoption of
agriculture, height crashed, and by 3000 B. C. had reached a low of only 5' 3'' for men, 5' for women.”
- Jared Diamond, evolutionary biologist, “The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race,” 1999
2. Answer parts A, B, and C
A. Identify the main argument the author is making in the passage.
B. Identify and explain ONE piece of evidence not given in the passage that supports the author’s argument.
C. Identify and explain ONE piece of evidence not given in the passage that refutes the author’s argument.
Reading Guide Chapter 2:
First Civilizations: Cities, States, and Unequal Societies (3500 B.C.E.–500 B.C.E.)
1. The introduction of the chapter discusses some peoples’ desire to “escape from civilization”- if you decided to go
off the grid and eave civilization, what do you think you’d miss the most? The least?
2. What distinguished “civilizations” from earlier Paleolithic and Neolithic Societies?
I. SOMETHING NEW: THE EMERGENCE OF CIVILIZATIONS P. 62
3. When and where did the first civilizations emerge? (hint: use Map 2.1 for the locations)
!
A. INTRODUCING THE FIRST CIVILIZATIONS
4. The College Board defines a “civilization” as having all of the following characteristics:
a. Use agriculture and have surpluses that allow for specialized labor (enough food is grown that not everyone had to be a
farmer)
b. Contained cities
c. Had complex institutions: this could be any or all of the following
i. A state (government)
ii. Armies
iii. Religious hierarchies
iv. Record keeping (writing)
d. Had social hierarchies (not everyone had equal status in society)
e. Engaged in trading relationships
Select 2 of the civilizations discussed in detail in this section (Notre Chico, Indus Valley, Shang China, Oxus, or
Olmec) and describe each of these characteristics in terms of how they were uniquely expressed in that particular
civilization by completing the chart below:
Name of civilization
1. How they engaged in agricultural
production
2. Describe their cities
3. Describe their complex institutions
4. Describe their social hierarchies
5. Who did they trade with?
5. Important vocabulary:
a. Define “quipu”:
b. Explain the concept of the “Son of Heaven” and the “Mandate of Heaven”:
B. THE QUESTION OF ORIGINS
6. What is the one cause for the development of civilizations that historians can agree on?
7. Historians argue that since not all agricultural societies developed into “civilizations” there must have been other
factors involved in creating civilizations. List some of the other theories historians have given as to why
civilizations emerged.
C. AN URBAN REVOLUTION
8. Cities often had two defining features- monumental architecture and urban planning
A. Give an example of monumental architecture created in the Mesopotamian city of Uruk:
B. Describe the Urban planning in the city of Mohenjo Daro in Indus River Valley (How was the city purposefully
designed?):
9. What was the role of cities in the early civilizations? (What purpose did they serve?)
II. THE EROSION OF EQUALITY P. 71
10. Define “specialization of labor”
A. HIERARCHIES OF CLASS
11. In what ways was social inequality expressed in early civilizations?
12. Your text makes the argument that “ From the days of the earliest civilizations until the 19th century, the practice of
‘people owning people’ was an enduring feature of state-based societies everywhere.” How was slavery in ancient
civilizations different than the slavery that existed in the Americas during recent centuries?
B. HIERARCHIES OF GENDER
13. Your text argues that the emergence of civilizations also led to the emergence of patriarchy. Define “patriarchy”
(patriarchal):
14. In what ways have historians tried to explain the origins of patriarchy? (List at least 3)
a.
b.
c.
C. PATRIARCHY IN PRACTICE
15. How did Mesopotamia and Egyptian patriarchy differ from each other?
III. THE RISE OF THE STATE P. 75
16. Define “state”
17. How were most early states organized/run?
A. COERCION AND CONSENT
18. What were the sources of state authority in the First civilizations? (How did they justify their right to rule?) – 3
ways
a.
b.
c.
B. WRITING AND ACCOUNTING
19. How did writing reinforce the authority of kings and the status of the elites in society?
20. Early writing was used primarily for record keeping purposes- give at least 2 examples of writing being used to
keep records in early civilizations.
21. What was the world’s first written language and where was it developed? (Hint: look at the Snapshot on page 79)
C. THE GRANDEUR OF KINGS
22. How did kings use rituals and art/architecture to reinforce their power?
IV. COMPARING MESOPOTAMIA AND EGYPT P. 80
*** complete the following chart while reading pages 80-87
Mesopotamia
Both
Egypt
Environment
Culture
State
Cities
Interaction and Exchange
9focus on what they traded
and whom they traded
with)
23. List some ways that Mesopotamia and Egypt influenced other cultures (pg. 86-87)
a. Mesopotamia
b. Egypt
24. List some examples of Mesopotamia and Egypt being influenced by other civilizations. (pg. 87-88)
V. REFLECTIONS: “CIVILIZATION”: WHAT’S IN A WORD? P. 89
25. What are Strayer’s 2 reservations with using the term “civilization?”
26. List some of the positives and negatives of the development of civilizations
a. Positives:
b. Negatives:
Please complete the Chapter Wrap-up on page 2a-2b as well.
Final Questions to Answer Chapter 2- AKA- AP Exam Practice Questions
(Put some serious thought into these responses)
Part I- Multiple Choice Questions
Questions 1.1 to 1.3 refer to the excerpts below.
1. If a man commits a murder, that man must be killed.
3. If a man commits a kidnapping, he is to be imprisoned and pay 15 shekels of silver.
18. If a man knocks out the eye of another man, he shall weigh out ½ a mina of silver.
28. If a man appeared as a witness, and was shown to be a perjurer (liar), he must pay 15 shekels of silver.
"
Laws!of!Ur*Nammu,!Mesopotamia,!c.!2100!BCE!
6. If anyone steal the property of a temple or of the court, he shall be put to death, and also the one who receives
the stolen thing from him shall be put to death.
195. If a son strike his father, his hands shall be hewn off.
196. If a man put out the eye of another man, his eye shall be put out.
229. If a builder build a house for someone, and does not construct it properly, and the house which he built fall in
and kill its owner, then that builder shall be put to death.
282. If a slave say to his master, “You are not my master,’ if they convict him his master shall cut off his ear.
"
Law!Code!of!Hammurabi,!Mesopotamia,!C.!1750!BCE!
" !
1.1 The two excerpts above best support which conclusion?
a. Rulers wanted to create order in growing cities.
b. People desired to incorporate the gods into everyday life.
c. Merchants hoped to expand existing intraregional trade networks.
d. Societies needed to address the growing patriarchal nature of cities.
1.2 Which explains why the second excerpt is more harsh than the first?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Constant attacks by neighboring empires
Demands made my slaves for more justice
the growth and complexity of civilization
the growing lack of religion and immorality
1.3 Which statement can best be concluded from the two excerpts above?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Mesopotamian society was decentralized in its governance.
Mesopotamian society was plagued by theft.
Mesopotamian society did not have highly developed legal codes.
Mesopotamian society was socially stratified.
Questions 2.1 to 2.3 refer to the images below.
Olmec Statue, c. 1200 BCE
Easter Island Statues, c. 1300 CE
2.1 A historian examining the statues from the Olmec and the Easter Island civilizations above would have the most
evidence to support which of the following conclusions?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Both civilizations benefited from long distance trade with the other.
Both civilizations chose to honor key people, ancestors, or gods.
Both civilizations disappeared due to deforestation.
Both civilizations were primarily matrilineal societies.
2.2 Which conclusion about the period between 8000 BCE to 600 BCE is most directly supported by the images
above?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Systems of record keeping arose independently in all early civilizations.
Social hierarchies became less strict as states expanded.
New religious beliefs altered the political development of early civilizations.
Elaborate artistic expression suggest a surplus of agricultural labor.
2.3 Which statement identifies the clearest difference between the two civilizations represented in the images
above?
a. The Olmec created a written language and developed a monotheistic religion, while the people of Easter Island
had no written language and believed in ancestor veneration.
b. The language, beliefs, art, and athletics of the Olmec influenced later civilizations in MesoAmerica, while the
people of Easter Island had limited influence on other civilizations due to their isolation.
c. The people who settled Easter Island were primarily agricultural, while the Olmec were not.
d. Easter Island made use of slave labor for public works projects, while the Olmec did not.
Questions 3.1 and 3.2 refer to the passage below.
"
Tom!Standage,!A"History"of"the"World"in"6"Glasses,"2006!
3.1 Which conclusion is best supported by the passage above?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Religious authorities wielded great control over the Sumerian economy.
People first developed writing to record important religious ideas.
Compulsory taxation allowed Sumerians to conquer neighboring areas.
Sumerians established trade routes, which spread their goods to other civilizations.
3.2 Compared to the development of the Sumerian civilization as described in the passage above, the Chavin
civilization (located in modern-day Peru)
a.
b.
c.
d.
was more self-sufficient so it carried on little trade
had a much weaker political system
required much less irrigation in order to carry on farming
had much less interest in organized religion
Part II- Short Answer Question (SAQ)-remember to utilize the rubric and historical skill info that I included
with the Chapter 1
1. Answers part A and B.
A. Analyze ONE reason why the Mandate of Heaven was developed by the Zhou Dynasty in China.
B. Identify and explain ONE similarity and ONE difference between the power of Chinese rulers under the
mandate of heaven and the power of the Egyptian pharaoh.
Question 2 refers to the passage below.
-Gerder Lerner, The Creation of Patriarchy, 1986
2. Answer parts A and B.
A. Provide TWO pieces of evidence from ancient civilizations that support this argument, and explain how each
piece of evidence supports the argument.
B. Provide ONE piece of evidence from ancient civilizations that undermines (goes against) this argument, and
explain how it undermines the argument.
Part III- DBQ (Document Based Question)
Remember to use historical skills that were included previously.
Rubric for the DBQ