Download 05 Natural Resources - Burnet Middle School

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Transcript
Supplemental
Worksheets
Name
Date
Class
Quick Vocabulary
Lesson 1
Lesson 2
nonrenewable resource resource that
biomass energy is energy produced
is used faster than it can be replaced
by natural processes
by burning organic matter, such as
wood, food scraps, and alcohol
nuclear energy is energy released
from atomic reactions
geothermal energy thermal energy
from Earth’s interior
reclamation process in which mined
hydroelectric power electricity
land must be recovered with soil
and replanted with vegetation
produced by flowing water
regulation rule dealing with
procedures, such as safety
solar energy is energy from the Sun
wind farm group of wind turbines
that produce electricity
renewable resource a resource that
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
can be replaced by natural processes
in a relatively short amount of time
Natural Resources
3
Name
Date
Class
Quick Vocabulary
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
deforestation cutting of large areas
acid precipitation is precipitation
of forests for human activities
ore deposit of a mineral that is large
enough to be mined for a profit
preserve to keep safe from injury,
harm, or destruction
that has a pH less than 5.6
photochemical smog brownish haze
produced when nitrogen compounds
and other pollutants in the air react
in the presence of sunlight
runoff rainwater that does not soak
into the ground and flows over
Earth’s surface
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
A. Sources of Energy
1.
is used for electricity, transportation, and other needs.
2. Resources that are used faster than they can be replaced by natural processes are
called
resources.
3. Uranium, which is used in
reactions, and fossil fuels,
such as coal and oil, are both
4.
energy resources.
resources are resources that can be replaced by natural
processes in a relatively short amount of time.
5. Energy from the Sun, also called
energy, is a(n)
energy resource.
B. Nonrenewable Energy Resources
1. In the United States, the energy to power lamps, heat houses, and run vehicles
comes mostly from
energy resources, such as fossil fuels.
2. Coal, oil, also called petroleum, and natural gas are
fuels.
of
organisms that lived millions of years ago.
b. The type of fossil fuel that formed over millions of years depended on three
factors: the type of
matter, the temperature and
pressure, and the length of time that the organic matter was buried.
c. Dead plants first formed peat and then eventually changed into harder and
harder types of
d. The hardest coal,
.
, contains the most carbon per unit
of volume and burns most efficiently.
e. Scientists theorize that oil and natural gas formed from the remains of
microscopic marine organisms called
.
f. Most of the oil and natural gas used today formed where forces within Earth
folded and tilted thick
layers.
g. Deposits of oil and natural gas formed under layers of
rocks.
10
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
a. The fossil fuels used today formed from the
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline continued
h. Two advantages of fossil fuels are that they are relatively
and easy to
.
i. Three disadvantages of fossil fuels are that they are
obtaining them can disrupt
pollution.
,
, and using them causes
j. Chemicals released when fossil fuels are burned can react with water in the
atmosphere and make rain and snow more
.
3. Energy released from atomic reactions is called
energy.
a. Nuclear power plants produce electricity using nuclear
, a process that splits
.
b. One advantage of using nuclear energy is that a relatively small amount of
produces a large amount of energy.
c. A well-run nuclear power plant does not
the air, the
soil, or the water.
d. Nuclear energy has disadvantages including the fact that nuclear power plants
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
use a(n)
resource—uranium—for fuel.
e. The
reaction in the nuclear
must be carefully monitored so that it does not get
out of control.
f. Nuclear
materials are very dangerous and must be
stored safely for thousands of years.
C. Managing Nonrenewable Energy Resources
1.
fuels and
about 93 percent of U. S. energy.
energy provide
2. The UnitedStates uses more than 22 percent of the world’s
total
although it contains only 4.5 percent of the world’s
.
3. The process in which mined land must be recovered with soil and replanted with
vegetation is called
.
4. The energy used by appliances and other electronic equipment when they are
plugged in but turned off is called
conserve energy by
Natural Resources
energy; you can
them when they are not in use.
11
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice A
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Directions: On each line, write the term from the diagram that describes each statement. Not all terms are used.
Energy Resources
Nonrenewable Energy Resources
fossil fuels
coal
oil
uranium
natural gas
Renewable Energy Resources
solar
wind
geothermal
water
biomass
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
1. These resources are used faster than they can be replaced by natural
processes.
2. This renewable energy source comes from Earth’s interior.
3. This energy source comes from plants that died millions of years ago.
4. This energy source comes from the Sun.
5. These are resources that can be replaced by natural processes in a relatively short
amount of time.
6. This nonrenewable energy resource comes from plankton that died millions of years
ago and is found layered over oil.
7. Energy gained from this renewable energy resource comes from burning food scraps,
wood, and other organic material.
8. This material is used in nuclear power plants to create nuclear energy.
Natural Resources
13
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice B
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Directions: Circle the term in parentheses that correctly completes each sentence.
1. One disadvantage of fossil fuels is the (pollution, fission) that results from their use.
2. A (renewable, nonrenewable) energy resource is one that is not easily replaced naturally.
3. One approach to managing nonrenewable energy resources is (reclaiming, conserving)
land that has been mined or drilled.
4. Oil and natural gas come from (peat, plankton) that died and were covered with
sediment millions of years ago.
5. A disadvantage of using nuclear energy is that the (chain reaction, future use) of the
nuclear reactor must be closely monitored.
6. Coal formation began with a prehistoric (inland sea, swamp).
8. (Vampire, Nonrenewable) energy is the energy used by appliances and other electronic
equipment while plugged in but not in use.
9. The waste materials from nuclear power plants remain (renewable, dangerous) for
thousands of years.
10. The supply of fossil fuels is (permanent, limited).
11. A disadvantage of using fossil fuels is that it disrupts (habitats, uranium).
12. A disadvantage of using nonrenewable resources is the (fragmentation, fusion) of forests.
13. Fossil fuels store (chemical, natural) energy.
14. When uranium atoms split, they release (thermal, solar) energy.
14
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
7. Solar energy is an example of a (nonrenewable, renewable) energy resource.
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the main sources of nonrenewable energy?
Directions: On each line, write the term from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence. Some terms
may be used more than once or not at all.
coal
energy resources
natural gas
nonrenewable
oil
petroleum
renewable
sediment
solar
uranium
1. Coal, oil, and the Sun are
.
2. Energy resources that can be replaced by natural processes in a relatively short amount
of time are called
resources.
3. Energy resources that are used faster than they can be replaced by natural processes are
called
resources.
4. Nonrenewable resources include fossil fuels and
.
5. Fossil fuels include
,
,
.
6. Most oil and
formed where forces within Earth folded and
tilted thick rock layers.
7. Oil and natural gas formed from the remains of plankton that were covered by layers
of
8. Another name for oil is
9.
.
.
formed as a result of bacteria, extreme temperatures, and
pressure acting on plants that died millions of years ago.
10. As oil and natural gas formed under rocks, less-dense
settled
over the denser oil.
11. Peat can change into
, a nonrenewable resource burned
as fuel.
12. One nonrenewable resource,
16
, is used in nuclear reactions.
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
and
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the advantages and disadvantages of using nonrenewable energy
resources?
Directions: Respond to each statement in the space provided.
Explain three advantages of
using fossil fuels.
•
Explain four disadvantages of
using fossil fuels.
•
•
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
•
•
•
•
Natural Resources
17
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the advantages and disadvantages of using nonrenewable
energy resources?
Directions: On the line before each statement, write T if the statement is true or F if the statement is false. If the
statement is false, change the underlined word(s) to make it true. Write your changes on the lines provided.
1. Nuclear power plants use uranium, a nonrenewable resource, for
fuel.
2. The nuclear energy produced in nuclear power plants is the result of
nuclear fusion.
3. To split the uranium atoms, electrons hit them, causing them to release
neutrons and thermal energy.
4. When uranium atoms are split, they releasing a small amount of thermal
energy.
steam.
6. A(n) advantage of nuclear energy is that it does not pollute the air or water
unless something goes wrong with the plant.
7. A disadvantage of nuclear power is that it requires carbon atoms, a nonrenewable
resource, to be placed in fuel rods.
8. Nuclear power plants can release radioactive substances into the environment,
an event that is a(n) advantage for living things.
18
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. One advantage of nuclear energy is that it easily uses electricity to produce
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Key Concept How can individuals help manage nonrenewable resources wisely?
Directions: Use the content map to answer the question.
1. What percent of U.S. energy comes
from nonrenewable sources?
oil 40%
hydroelectric
2.5%
natural gas
23%
coal 22%
Sources
of energy
in the U.S.
2007
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
nuclear
power
8%
biomass
3.5%
solar,
geothermal,
and wind
1%
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement on the lines provided.
2. List three laws that help the government manage nonrenewable energy sources.
3. Why does unplugging an unused appliance help manage nonrenewable energy resources?
4. Name three ways you can help manage nonrenewable energy sources.
5. Why is it important for individuals to manage and conserve nonrenewable energy
resources?
Natural Resources
19
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz A
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Matching
Directions: On the line before each definition, write the letter of the term that matches it correctly. Each term is
used only once.
1. any resource that can be replaced by natural
processes in a relatively short time
2. a process in which mined land is recovered with
soil and replanted with vegetation
A. nonrenewable
B. nuclear energy
C. reclamation
D. renewable
3. is produced during atomic reactions
4. any resource that is used faster than it can be
replaced by natural processes
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each question or statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
5. Which is a renewable energy resource?
A. uranium
B. natural gas
C. biomass fuel
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. Which statement gives an advantage of using fossil fuels?
A. They are relatively inexpensive.
B. They do not pollute air, land, or water.
C. They produce as much energy as fission.
7. What is one disadvantage of using nuclear energy?
A. Nuclear energy produces radioactive wastes.
B. Nuclear power plants cause much air pollution.
C. Fission generates only small amounts of energy.
8. To personally manage nonrenewable resources wisely, you could
A. work with others to reclaim mined lands.
B. use renewable energy resources whenever possible.
C. increase the amount of vampire energy you consume.
24
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz B
LESSON 1
Energy Resources
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
1.
is a renewable energy resource.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Oil
Coal
Nuclear energy
Geothermal energy
2. Reclamation is a process in which land is
A. mined to recover resources.
B. restored after it has been mined.
C. treated to destroy nuclear waste.
D. drilled to recover oil and natural gas.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. An advantage of fission is that it
A. is relatively cheap to use.
B. doesn’t produce radioactive waste.
C. generates small amounts of energy.
D. generally does not pollute other resources.
Short Answer
Directions: Respond to each statement on the lines provided.
4. State the main difference between renewable and nonrenewable resources.
5. Identify one advantage and one disadvantage of using fossil fuels.
6. Identify one disadvantage of using nuclear energy.
7. Describe two ways in which you can personally manage nonrenewable resources wisely.
Natural Resources
25
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
A. Renewable Energy Resources
1. Renewable resources come from
processes that have
been happening for billions of years and will continue to happen.
2. Solar energy is energy from the
.
a. Solar cells in watches and calculators capture
and transform it to
energy
energy, while solar power plants
generate electricity by transforming energy in
to turn turbines connected to
.
b. Technology, such as solar panels, that gathers and stores solar energy that heats
water and homes is called
solar energy.
c.
solar energy uses design elements that capture
energy in sunlight.
3.
energy is a renewable resource that has been used since
ancient times to sail boats and to turn windmills.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. A group of wind turbines that produce electricity is called
a(n)
5.
.
power is electricity produced by flowing water.
a. To produce hydroelectric power, humans build a(n)
across a powerful river.
b. Coastal areas that have great differences between high and low tides can be a
source of
power.
c. Tidal power uses water that flows across
as the tide
comes in during high tides and as it goes out during low tides.
6. Thermal energy from Earth’s interior is called
a.
energy.
energy can be used to heat homes and generate
electricity in power plants.
b. Geothermal energy from hot rocks or
heats water
that makes steam, which turns turbines connected to
that produce electricity.
Natural Resources
29
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline continued
7. Energy produced by burning organic matter such as wood, food scraps, and
alcohol is called
energy.
a. The most widely used biomass is
b. Ethanol and
.
are two vehicle fuels that can be made
from biomass.
c. Ethanol is made from
in plants such as corn.
d. Biodiesel is made from
oils and fats.
B. Advantages and Disadvantages of Renewable Resources
1. The main advantage of using
energy resources is that
they will be available for millions of years to come.
2. Renewable energy resources produce less
than fossil fuels.
3. Two disadvantages associated with using renewable resources are that some are
or limited to certain areas.
C. Managing Renewable Energy Resources
1.
energy currently meets only 7 percent of U.S. energy
needs.
2. The renewable energy resource used most in the United States
energy.
3. Some states require power companies to produce a percentage of electricity using
resources, and U.S. government has programs to
encourage use of
resources.
4. You can encourage the use of
energy resources by
educating others and buying products made using these resources.
30
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
is
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice A
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Directions: On the line before each description, write the letter of the term that matches it correctly. Some terms
may be used more than once.
A. biomass
E. water
B. solar
Renewable
Energy
Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
D. geothermal
C. wind
1. thermal energy from Earth’s interior
2. provides energy from burning wood scraps
3. energy captured from the Sun
4. low and high tides produce electricity
5. needed for wind farms to generate electricity
6. burning this type of energy resource causes pollution
7. less of this type of energy is captured on cloudy days
8. type of energy used to power some calculators and watches
32
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice B
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement on the lines provided.
1. Name one advantage and one disadvantage of wind energy.
2. What is the difference between active solar energy and passive solar energy?
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Compare and contrast hydroelectric power and tidal power.
4. Identify one way biomass energy is used to power vehicles. Why do you think this use
is important?
5. Do you think the advantages of geothermal energy outweigh the disadvantages? Explain.
Natural Resources
33
Name
Date
Class
Language Arts Support
LESSON 2
Word-Usage Activity: Parts of Speech
Nouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs are four main parts of speech. A noun names a
person, place, thing, or idea. An adjective modifies, or describes, a noun. A verb gives an
action or state of being. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or another adverb. The chart
below contains examples of each of these four parts of speech.
Part of Speech
Examples
noun
tree, friendship, nail, Chicago
adjective
large, warm, blue, old
verb
be, cause, jump, describe
adverb
quickly, easily, often, early
Directions: On each line, write the correct part of speech for the underlined word in each sentence.
1. Even when turned off, appliances that are plugged in still
consume energy.
2. Nonrenewable resources will eventually be used up.
4. Coal burns more efficiently than peat.
5. Oil and natural gas deposits are found under layers of
impermeable rocks.
6. The Sun and wind are two examples of renewable energy
resources.
7. Water energy produces electricity through hydroelectric
power and tidal power.
34
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Pollution is a disadvantage of fossil fuel use.
Name
Date
Class
Language Arts Support
LESSON 2
Language-Usage Activity: Using Its and It’s
It is easy to confuse it’s and its, but they have very different uses in the English language.
It’s is a contraction of “it is.” The apostrophe takes the place of the letter i in the word is.
Anytime you use the word it’s, the sentence should still make sense if you replace it’s with
the words it is.
The word its is not a contraction; it’s a possessive. Just like hers, his, and yours, the word its
shows ownership or possession. When you form the possessive of some nouns, you use an
apostrophe. Toni’s sweater, the dog’s leash, the chair’s legs are possessive nouns, which require
an apostrophe. In contrast, the possessive forms of pronouns, such as hers, his, yours, and
its, do not have an apostrophe.
Directions: Circle the correct form of the word that completes each sentence.
1. Solar energy is a renewable resource because (its/it’s) not possible to use it up.
2. The wind turbine stopped spinning because (its/it’s) blade was broken.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. (Its/It’s) possible to produce electricity using geothermal energy from deep within Earth.
4. Like other fossil fuels, today’s coal has an ancient past. (Its/It’s) beginnings can be
traced back hundreds of millions of years.
5. Although oil is widely used, one of (its/it’s) drawbacks is that (its/it’s) nonrenewable.
6. Although mines damage land, (its/it’s) possible to recover the land through reclamation.
7. Geothermal energy has many advantages, but one disadvantage is that (its/it’s) only
available in regions with tectonic activity.
Natural Resources
35
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the main sources of renewable energy?
Directions: Use the diagram to answer each question on the lines provided.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
1
Water behind
the dam forms a
reservoir.
2
Water behind the dam is
released into tunnels. The
stored energy of the water
changes into kinetic energy
as it flows downhill.
3
The energy of the
flowing water turns
a turbine that is
connected to a
generator.
4
As the generator
spins, it produces
electricity.
1. What is the energy source for electricity produced by hydroelectric power plants?
2. How is electrical energy generated in a hydroelectric power plant?
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement on the lines provided.
3. Name another type of water power beside hydroelectric power.
4. Beside water, what are four other sources of renewable energy?
,
,
,
and
5. Why is water considered to be a renewable resource?
Natural Resources
37
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the main sources of renewable energy?
Directions: Answer the questions in the space provided.
Renewable
Energy Resource
How is it captured?
Where is it found?
1.
2.
wind
3.
4.
water
5.
6.
geothermal
7.
8.
biomass
9.
10.
38
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
solar
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Key Concept What are the advantages and disadvantages of using renewable energy resources?
Directions: On the line before each statement, write Yes if the statement describes an advantage of renewable
resource use or No if the statement describes a disadvantage of renewable resource use.
It is an advantage that ….
1. some energy sources are renewable.
2. renewable energy sources produce less pollution than fossil fuels.
3. geothermal drilling disrupts habitats.
4. drought can affect areas dependent on water energy.
5. biomass energy reduces the amount of organic matter in landfills.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. large-scale geothermal plants are limited to areas with tectonic activity.
7. wind energy is nonpolluting.
8. wind turbines interfere with migrating birds.
9. geothermal energy produces little pollution.
10. wind energy is relatively inexpensive.
11. wind farms are limited to large, windy areas.
12. solar cells are expensive.
13. hydroelectric plants can disrupt aquatic ecosystems.
14. biomass is less energy efficient than fossil fuels.
Natural Resources
39
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Key Concept What can individuals do to encourage the use of renewable energy resources?
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement in the space provided.
2. Explain what management of renewable
energy resources means.
3. Explain ways the U.S. government manages
energy resources.
4. Explain ways your local community manages
energy resources.
5. How can renewable energy resources be
managed better in your home?
6. How can I manage renewable energy
resources better?
40
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
1. List five renewable resources.
Name
Date
Lesson Quiz A
Class
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
True or False
Directions: On the line before each statement, write T if the statement is true or F if the statement is false. If the
statement is false, change the underlined word(s) to make it true. Write your changes on the lines provided.
1. A disadvantage of solar energy is that it can be used only in tectonically active
areas.
2. An advantage of using biomass as an energy resource is that it reduces the
amount of organic matter thrown into landfills.
3. A disadvantage of solar energy is that it can harm birds.
4. Water energy is essentially nonpolluting.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. A disadvantage of water energy is that cannot be used on cloudy days.
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
6.
is NOT a renewable energy resource.
A. The Sun
B. Natural gas
C. Moving water
7. A disadvantage of hydroelectric power is that it
A. is nonpolluting.
B. is relatively inexpensive.
C. can harm fish and other organisms.
8. Renewable resources are NOT wisely managed when
A. the government passes laws to encourage their use.
B. people buy products that are made with these resources.
C. people do not use them whenever it is possible to do so.
Natural Resources
45
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz B
LESSON 2
Renewable Energy Resources
Completion
Directions: On each line, write the term from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence. Some terms
may be used more than once or not at all.
biomass
geothermal
solar
1. A disadvantage of
water
wind
energy is its negative impact on aquatic
ecosystems.
2. The best sites for
3.
energy plants are far from urban areas.
,
, and
energy are nonpolluting, but large-scale use of these
resources is limited to certain areas.
4. One disadvantage of using
energy is that it is less energy
efficient than fossil fuels.
5. The availability of using
6. A disadvantage of
energy can be affected by drought.
energy use is that it is limited to certain
times of the day.
Directions: Respond to the statement on the lines provided.
7. Describe how individuals and governments are managing renewable energy resources
wisely.
46
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Short Answer
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline
LESSON 3
Land Resources
A. Land as a Resource
1. Something from Earth that living things use to meet their needs is called
a(n)
.
2.
includes natural habitats and the land on which
buildings, sidewalks, parking lots, and streets are built.
3.
make up only a small percentage of land use in the
United States; most land is used for
, grasslands, and forests.
B. Forests and Agriculture
1. Forests have regrown since 1920, but the new trees are not as
as the original trees.
2. Forests are cut down to get wood for
, paper products,
and wood products and to clear land for development
and
.
a. The amount of land used for agriculture has
in
recent years.
in some parts of the country
due to advances in farming techniques.
3. Certain
are mined to make products that people use
every day.
a. Deposits of minerals that are large enough to be mined for a profit are
called
.
b. Ores such as bauxite and hematite are called
mineral
resources and are used to make metal products.
c.
mineral resources include sand, gravel, gypsum,
halite, sulfur, and fluorite.
C. Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Land Resources
1. One advantage of using
resources is that they are
widely available and easy to access.
2. Another advantage of using land resources is that crops and trees are
—they can be replanted and grown in a relatively short
amount of time.
50
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
b. Crop production has
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline continued
3. Disadvantages of using land resources include the following:
are nonrenewable and using land resources can result
in
and pollution.
a. The cutting of large areas of forests for human activities is
called
.
b. Deforestation can lead to soil
and loss of animal
habitats.
c. Deforestation can affect global
because trees remove
from the atmosphere during photosynthesis.
d.
that contains chemicals from mineral mines can
pollute soil and water.
e. Chemical fertilizers in
from farms can pollute rivers,
soil, and
water supplies.
D. Managing Land Resources
1. There is competition for
because the amount of land is
limited.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
2. On
land, logging and development is banned or strictly
controlled.
3. According to government regulations, public and private mined lands must
be
.
4. Land used for farming and grazing can be managed to conserve
and improve crop
5. Organic farming techniques do not use
6. By recycling yard
.
fertilizers.
and vegetable
, you can help conserve land resources.
Natural Resources
51
Name
Date
Content Practice A
Class
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Directions: Complete the chart by writing the correct phrase from the list in the space provided.
• wood products such as fuel and paper
• soil erosion and loss of animal habitats
• agriculture, forests, living space
• by preserving them
• minerals resources such as coal or iron
• by recycling
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
• mix chemicals with soil and water
In what ways do people
use land?
1.
Name a product that
comes from forests.
2.
Name a product that
comes from mines.
3.
What can happen when
forests are cut down?
4.
How can coal mines
affect soil and water
quality?
5.
How can governments
manage forests and
other ecosystems?
6.
What is one way you can
manage land resources?
7.
Natural Resources
53
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice B
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Directions: Answer each question in the space provided.
What is the advantage of using
land in this way?
What is the disadvantage of
using land in this way?
1.
2.
Using farmland for a
large housing
development
3.
4.
Clear-cutting a large
forested area so the
wood can be sold for
wood products
5.
6.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Tearing down old
houses in the middle
of a city to create a
park
7. How do you think land resources can best be managed?
54
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Key Concept Why is land considered a resource?
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement in the space provided.
1. What is a natural resource?
2. Why are forests considered to be land resources?
3. Why are agricultural fields considered to be land resources?
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. Why are minerals considered to be land resources?
5. Three uses of land resources include:
6. Three products that come from forests are:
7. Two minerals used in building homes are:
56
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Key Concept Why is land considered a resource?
Directions: Answer each question on the lines provided.
1. Which type of land use is the largest in the United States?
2. Beside natural habitats, what are two other ways land is used as living space?
3. How were forests used in the past? How has this use changed?
4. How does housing development affect the amount of forested area?
5. About how much land in the United States is used for growing crops?
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. About how much land in the United States is used for grazing livestock?
7. Though the amount of land used for agriculture has decreased in recent years, crop
production has increased? What makes this possible?
8. What effect did land use have on forested areas in the United States between 1620 and
1920?
9. What are ores?
10. What are two metallic mineral resources used for living spaces?
11. What are two examples of nonmetal mineral resources used in paints?
12. Why is coal an energy resource and a mineral resource?
Natural Resources
57
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Key Concept What are the advantages and disadvantages of using land as a resource?
Directions: Respond to each statement in the space provided.
Advantages of Using Land Resources
1. Identify two advantages of using land resources.
Disadvantages of Using Land Resources
2. List three disadvantages of using land resources.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. List four ways deforestation negatively affects areas.
4. Identify two types of pollution that result from runoff.
58
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Key Concept How can individuals help manage land resources wisely?
Directions: Answer each question in the space provided.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Land Resource Management Solutions
1. How can
governments
manage land
resources for a
positive result?
Governments:
2. How can farm
communities
manage land
resources for a
positive result?
Farm Communities:
3. How can urban
communities
manage land
resources for a
positive result?
Urban Communities:
4. How can you
manage land
resources for a
positive result?
You:
Natural Resources
59
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz A
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Completion
Directions: On each line, write the term from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence. Each term is
used only once.
composting
deforestation
fertilizers
lumber
ores
preserving
1.
growing crops
land helps protect ecosystems and manage forest resources.
2. Using small amounts of fertilizers while
is a wise use of the
land.
3. Minerals that can be mined at a profit are called
.
4. The removal of larges numbers of trees from an area is
.
5.
adds organic matter to a garden.
6.
can pollute water resources when they enter runoff.
7.
is a resource that comes from trees that grow on the land.
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each question or statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
8. Why is land considered to be a resource?
A. It is needed for landfills.
B. It is easily restored when polluted.
C. It is used to grow crops and mine minerals.
9.
is NOT a way in which individuals manage land wisely.
A. Composting vegetable scraps
B. Clear-cutting trees for lumber
C. Planting a community garden
10.
62
is one way in which government manages land wisely.
A. Clearing forests for lumber
B. Strictly controlling logging
C. Encouraging massive development
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Lesson Quiz B
Class
LESSON 3
Land Resources
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
1.
A.
B.
C.
D.
is NOT a wise use of land resources.
Agriculture
Composting
Preservation
Deforestation
2. An ore is any mineral that
A. is used in agriculture.
B. forms in Earth’s crust.
C. is profitable when it is mined.
D. comes from preserved land resources.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Land is considered to be a resource because
A. it is nonrenewable.
B. it covers much of Earth’s surface.
C. people use it to meet some of their needs.
D. it can no longer be used after it becomes polluted.
Short Answer
Directions: Respond to each statement on the lines provided.
4. List four resources that come from land.
5. Explain how fertilizers can be beneficial and harmful to land resources.
6. Describe how individuals can manage land resources wisely.
7. List ways in which the government manages land wisely.
Natural Resources
63
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
A. Importance of Air and Water
1. Air and
a.
are resources that you cannot live without.
from air helps your body provide energy for your cells.
b. Water helps protect body tissues and maintain body
.
c. Water also has a role in many chemical
such as the
digestion of food.
d. People use water for other purposes including
,
transportation, and recreation.
2. Burning
in homes, vehicles, and power plants produces
air pollution.
a. Air pollution can also be caused by
events, such as
volcanic eruptions or forest fires.
b.
is a brownish haze produced when nitrogen
compounds and other pollutants in the air react in the presence of sunlight.
c. Smog can be particularly harmful when it is trapped under a layer of warm
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
and remains in an area for several days.
d.
forms when nitrogen and sulfur compounds released
when fossil fuels burn react with water in the atmosphere.
e. Acid precipitation is precipitation that has a(n)
less
than 5.6.
f. Materials from forest fires and
eruptions can cause
health problems similar to those caused by smog.
3. About 97 percent of water on Earth is
a. Out of the total amount of
water.
on Earth, only about
0.9 percent is available for humans to use.
b.
water containing fertilizers can run off from fields
into rivers and groundwater, reducing the quality of water supplies.
c. In industry, water is often
to a point that it can harm
aquatic organisms.
Natural Resources
67
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Outline continued
B. Managing Air and Water Resources
1. Management of air and water resources must consider both
needs and the needs of
other
2.
.
can be used to reduce pollution of water and air.
a. The U.S.
Act limits the amount of certain pollutants
that can be released into the air.
b. The U.S.
Act works to reduce of water pollution.
c. The Safe
Act has regulations to protect drinking
water supplies.
3. People can help reduce water pollution by properly disposing of harmful chemicals
so less
runs off into rivers and streams.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
68
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice A
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Directions: On each line, write the term or phrase from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence.
Some terms may be used more than once.
agriculture
conserving water
drinking water
freshwater
legislation
life functions
natural events
nitrogen
recreation
salt water
sulfur
sunlight
transportation
1. Water is needed for many
.
2. Four uses of water are
,
,
, and
3. Smog is produced when
.
compounds and other pollutants
in the air react in the presence of
.
and
compounds react with water in the atmosphere.
5. When polluted water runs off into rivers and groundwater, it reduces the amount of
available for sustaining life.
6.
is an effective way to reduce air and water pollution.
7. One way people can help manage water resources is by
8. Forest fires and volcanic eruptions are
.
that release gases
and dust into the atmosphere.
9. Most of Earth’s water is
is
70
, and about 3 percent
.
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. Acid precipitation results when
Name
Date
Class
Content Practice B
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Directions: Complete the cause and effect chart with the correct information in the space provided.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Cause
Effect on Air and Water Resources
A volcano erupts.
1.
Fossil fuels are burned.
2.
Acid precipitation falls on lakes.
3.
Precipitation with a pH level of less
than 5.6 falls on plants.
4.
A large forest fire occurs in California.
5.
Government officials want to limit
the amount of industrial air pollution.
6.
A citizen is concerned about the
amount of litter found along a
riverbank.
7.
Natural Resources
71
Name
Date
Class
School to Home
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Directions: Use your textbook to respond to each statement.
1. Most living things can survive for only a few minutes without air.
Describe how your body uses the oxygen in the air.
2. Water is needed for many body functions.
List five ways in which your body depends on water.
3. Certain substances can pollute the air.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Name five air pollutants.
4. Water, both at Earth’s surface and deep within the ground, can become
polluted.
Explain how farming and certain industrial processes can pollute water.
5. Water and air are two fluids that you cannot live without.
Defend why it is important to manage these resources wisely.
Natural Resources
73
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Key Concept Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely?
Directions: On each line, write the term from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence. Some terms
may be used more than once or not at all.
air
asthma attack
freshwater
manage
nitrogen
pH
photochemical smog
pollutants
pollution
water
soil
sulfur
All living things need air and water. Without air and water, living things would die. We
need to protect our air and water from (1.)
, which is harmful
to all living things.
Air pollution is produced when fossil fuels are burned and (2.)
compounds are released into the air. A reaction occurs when these molecules mix with
other (3.)
found in the air in the presence of sunlight. The
brownish haze that results is called (4.)
, which can irritate
(5.)
. This particular type of pollution is especially harmful
when it is trapped under a layer of warm (6.)
for several days
in a row.
Water pollution can be caused by fertilizers, or it can be caused by acid precipitation. Acid
precipitation results when nitrogen and (7.)
with water in the (8.)
compounds react
. It has a (9.)
of less than 5.6. When acid precipitation falls on land and on lakes, it pollutes the
(10.)
and the water. This can kill plants and aquatic animals.
It is important to (11.)
air and water resources wisely because
they are essential to the survival of all living things. Given that only 0.9 percent of all
(12.)
is available for human use, it is important to find ways to
protect and conserve air and water resources.
74
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
respiratory systems. In some individuals, it also can increase the chance of a(n)
Name
Date
Key Concept Builder
Class
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Key Concept Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely?
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement on the lines provided.
1. List three reasons why water is needed for life functions.
2. List six ways freshwater is used.
3. How much of Earth’s water is freshwater?
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. Why is air needed for living things to survive?
5. Identify the effect smog has on some people.
6. What is acid precipitation?
7. Name two harmful effects of acid precipitation when it falls on land.
8. Given what you know about the importance of air and water for survival, why is it
necessary to manage both resources wisely?
Natural Resources
75
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Key Concept Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely?
Directions: On the line before each statement, write T if the statement is true or F if the statement is false. If the
statement is false, change the underlined word(s) to make it true. Write your changes on the lines provided.
1. Water and air resources are essential for life.
2. There is a relatively short supply of salt water on Earth.
3. Carbon dioxide is needed to provide energy for human cells.
4. Our bodies need water, because it is a main component of blood.
5. Runoff that contains fertilizer can be harmful to aquatic life.
7. The burning of fossil fuels causes air pollution.
8. Smog is precipitation that has a pH less than 5.6.
9. Dust and ash from natural events is limited to confined spaces around the world.
10. Acid precipitation occurs when nitrogen and sulfur compounds react with
water in the air.
11. Burning fossil fuels releases nitrogen compounds into the air.
12. It is important to manage resources wisely to sustain life on Earth.
76
Natural Resources
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. The body uses water to help digest food.
Name
Date
Class
Key Concept Builder
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Key Concept How can individuals help manage air and water resources wisely?
Directions: Use the diagram to answer each question on the lines provided.
Concentration (ppm)
Sulfur Compounds in the Atmosphere
0.03
0.02
0.01
0.00
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
2005
Year
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
1. What does the line graph show about levels of sulfur compounds in the atmosphere?
2. Based on the trend shown on the graph, do you think the concentration of sulfur
compounds in the atmosphere today is greater than, the same as, or less than in 2005?
Why?
Directions: Answer each question or respond to each statement on the lines provided.
3. Name two examples of how government has managed air and water resources.
4. What are three things you can do to wisely manage the air and water resources you use?
Natural Resources
77
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz A
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Multiple Choice
Directions: On the line before each question or statement, write the letter of the correct answer.
1. Why is air an important resource?
A. Most living things use air to digest their food.
B. Every living thing on Earth needs air to survive.
C. Many living things use oxygen in air to provide energy for cells.
2. Water is important to people because
A. they need it to breathe.
B. it helps maintain the body’s temperature.
C. they can live for only a few minutes without it.
3. Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely?
A. Both are nonrenewable resources.
B. Almost all living things need these resources.
C. After they are polluted, they can never be restored.
True or False
Directions: On the line before each statement, write T if the statement is true or F if the statement is false. If the
statement is false, change the underlined word(s) to make it true. Write your changes on the lines provided.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. The Clean Water Act protects drinking water supplies.
5. People can help keep air clean by using more fossil fuels.
6. Photochemical smog can damage buildings and statues.
7. Photochemical smog can irritate your respiratory system.
8. Most of the freshwater on Earth is stored in glaciers.
9. Using energy-saving lightbulbs helps reduce air pollution.
80
Natural Resources
Name
Date
Class
Lesson Quiz B
LESSON 4
Air and Water Resources
Completion
Directions: On each line, write the term or phrase from the word bank that correctly completes each sentence.
Some terms and phrases are used more than once or not at all.
acid precipitation
air
Clean Air
Clean Water
glaciers
photochemical smog
rivers and lakes
Safe Drinking Water
water
1.
is a(n)
damage buildings and statues.
pollutant that can
2.
is a(n)
irritate your respiratory system.
pollutant that can
3. Most of Earth’s freshwater is in
4. The
.
Act protects the water that comes from your faucets.
5. Using energy-saving lightbulbs helps reduce
6. Chemicals in runoff cause
pollution.
pollution.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Short Answer
Directions: Respond to each statement on the lines provided.
7. State why air is an important resource.
8. Name two reasons why water is important to humans.
9. Describe three ways individuals can manage air and water resources wisely.
Natural Resources
81
Lesson Outline for Teaching
Lesson 1: Energy Resources
A. Sources of Energy
1. Energy is used for electricity, transportation, and other needs.
called nonrenewable resources.
2. Resources that are used faster than they can be replaced by natural processes are
3. Uranium, which is used in nuclear reactions, and fossil fuels, such as coal and oil,
are both nonrenewable energy resources.
relatively short amount of time.
4. Renewable resources are resources that can be replaced by natural processes in a
5. Energy from the Sun, also called solar energy, is a(n) renewable energy resource.
atmosphere and make rain and snow more acidic.
Natural Resources
j. Chemicals released when fossil fuels are burned can react with water in the
them can disrupt habitats, and using them causes pollution.
i. Three disadvantages of fossil fuels are that they are nonrenewable, obtaining
to transport.
h. Two advantages of fossil fuels are that they are relatively inexpensive and easy
g. Deposits of oil and natural gas formed under layers of impermeable rocks.
f. Most of the oil and natural gas used today formed where forces within Earth
folded and tilted thick rock layers.
microscopic marine organisms called plankton.
e. Scientists theorize that oil and natural gas formed from the remains of
d. The hardest coal, anthracite, contains the most carbon per unit of volume and
burns most efficiently.
harder types of coal.
c. Dead plants first formed peat and then eventually changed into harder and
b. The type of fossil fuel that formed over millions of years depended on three
factors: the type of organic matter, the temperature and pressure, and the length
of time that the organic matter was buried.
millions of years ago.
a. The fossil fuels used today formed from the remains of organisms that lived
2. Coal, oil, also called petroleum, and natural gas are fossil fuels.
1. In the United States, the energy to power lamps, heat houses, and run vehicles
comes mostly from nonrenewable energy resources, such as fossil fuels.
B. Nonrenewable Energy Resources
T2
1/30/10 6:05:22 PM
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i100 100
Lesson Outline continued
3. Energy released from atomic reactions is called nuclear energy.
atoms.
a. Nuclear power plants produce electricity using nuclear fission, a process that splits
produces a large amount of energy.
b. One advantage of using nuclear energy is that a relatively small amount of uranium
c. A well-run nuclear power plant does not pollute the air, the soil, or the water.
use a nonrenewable resource—uranium—for fuel.
d. Nuclear energy has disadvantages including the fact that nuclear power plants
does not get out of control.
e. The chain reaction in the nuclear reactor must be carefully monitored so that it
of years.
f. Nuclear waste materials are very dangerous and must be stored safely for thousands
1. Fossil fuels and nuclear energy provide about 93 percent of U.S. energy.
C. Managing Nonrenewable Energy Resources
contains only 4.5 percent of the world’s population.
2. The United States uses more than 22 percent of the world’s total energy although it
vegetation is called reclamation.
3. The process in which mined land must be recovered with soil and replanted with
4. The energy used by appliances and other electronic equipment when they are
plugged in but turned off is called vampire energy; you can conserve energy by
unplugging them when they are not in use.
Discussion Question
How does a nuclear power plant produce electricity?
1/30/10 6:05:23 PM
T3
Neutrons hit uranium atoms in fuel rods. Each atom splits, releasing two to three neutrons
and thermal energy. The released neutrons hit other atoms, causing a chain reaction of
splitting atoms. Countless atoms split and release large amounts of thermal energy. This
energy heats water and changes it to steam. The steam turns a turbine connected to a
generator, which produces electricity.
Natural Resources
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i101 101
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Lesson Outline for Teaching
Lesson 2: Renewable Energy Resources
A. Renewable Energy Resources
1. Renewable resources come from natural processes that have been happening for
billions of years and will continue to happen.
2. Solar energy is energy from the Sun.
a. Solar cells in watches and calculators capture light energy and transform it to
electrical energy, while solar power plants generate electricity by transforming
energy in sunlight to turn turbines connected to generators.
b. Technology, such as solar panels, that gathers and stores solar energy that heats
water and homes is called active solar energy.
c. Passive solar energy uses design elements that capture energy in sunlight.
3. Wind energy is a renewable resource that has been used since ancient times to sail
boats and to turn windmills.
4. A group of wind turbines that produce electricity is called a(n) wind farm.
5. Hydroelectric power is electricity produced by flowing water.
a. To produce hydroelectric power, humans build a(n) dam across a powerful river.
source of tidal power.
b. Coastal areas that have great differences between high and low tides can be a
tides and as it goes out during low tides.
c. Tidal power uses water that flows across turbines as the tide comes in during high
6. Thermal energy from Earth’s interior is called geothermal energy.
plants.
a. Geothermal energy can be used to heat homes and generate electricity in power
which turns turbines connected to generators that produce electricity.
b. Geothermal energy from hot rocks or magma heats water that makes steam,
is called biomass energy.
7. Energy produced by burning organic matter such as wood, food scraps, and alcohol
a. The most widely used biomass is wood.
b. Ethanol and biodiesel are two vehicle fuels that can be made from biomass.
c. Ethanol is made from sugars in plants such as corn.
d. Biodiesel is made from vegetable oils and fats.
available for millions of years to come.
2. Renewable energy resources produce less pollution than fossil fuels.
Natural Resources
1. The main advantage of using renewable energy resources is that they will be
B. Advantages and Disadvantages of Renewable Resources
T4
1/30/10 6:05:24 PM
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i102 102
Lesson Outline continued
costly or limited to certain areas.
3. Two disadvantages associated with using renewable resources are that some are
1. Renewable energy currently meets only 7 percent of U.S. energy needs.
C. Managing Renewable Energy Resources
2. The renewable energy resource used most in the United States is biomass energy.
3. Some states require power companies to produce a percentage of electricity using
renewable resources, and U.S. government has programs to encourage use of
renewable resources.
buying products made using these resources.
4. You can encourage the use of renewable energy resources by educating others and
Discussion Question
How does a hydroelectric power plant produce electricity? Compare hydroelectric power
with tidal power.
1/30/10 6:05:24 PM
T5
Water from behind a dam flows downhill through tunnels. As it flows, the stored energy in
the water changes into kinetic energy. The energy of the flowing water turns a turbine
connected to a generator. The generator spins, producing electricity. Tidal power is similar,
except that water flows across turbines as the tide comes in at high tides and as it goes out
at low tides. The flowing water turns turbines connected to generators that produce electricity.
Natural Resources
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i103 103
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Lesson Outline for Teaching
Lesson 3: Land Resources
A. Land as a Resource
natural resource.
1. Something from Earth that living things use to meet their needs is called a(n)
parking lots, and streets are built.
2. Living space includes natural habitats and the land on which buildings, sidewalks,
3. Cities make up only a small percentage of land use in the United States; most land
is used for agriculture, grasslands, and forests.
B. Forests and Agriculture
1. Forests have regrown since 1920, but the new trees are not as tall as the original trees.
Lesson Outline continued
1. There is competition for space because the amount of land is limited.
D. Managing Land Resources
2. On preserved land, logging and development is banned or strictly controlled.
restored.
3. According to government regulations, public and private mined lands must be
crop yield.
4. Land used for farming and grazing can be managed to conserve soil and improve
5. Organic farming techniques do not use synthetic fertilizers.
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
1/30/10 6:05:26 PM
T7
6. By recycling yard waste and vegetable scraps, you can help conserve land resources.
Where do aluminum and iron come from and what are they used for?
Discussion Question
to clear land for development and agriculture.
2. Forests are cut down to get wood for fuel, paper products, and wood products and
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i105 105
Natural Resources
Aluminum comes from the ore bauxite and is used for products like cars and appliances.
Iron comes from the ore hematite and is used for products like nails and faucets.
1/30/10 6:05:25 PM
a. The amount of land used for agriculture has decreased in recent years.
farming techniques.
b. Crop production has increased in some parts of the country due to advances in
a. Deposits of minerals that are large enough to be mined for a profit are called ores.
3. Certain minerals are mined to make products that people use every day.
used to make metal products.
b. Ores such as bauxite and hematite are called metallic mineral resources and are
fluorite.
c. Nonmetallic mineral resources include sand, gravel, gypsum, halite, sulfur, and
C. Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Land Resources
access.
1. One advantage of using land resources is that they are widely available and easy to
they can be replanted and grown in a relatively short amount of time.
2. Another advantage of using land resources is that crops and trees are renewable—
nonrenewable and using land resources can result in deforestation and pollution.
3. Disadvantages of using land resources include the following: minerals are
a. The cutting of large areas of forests for human activities is called deforestation.
b. Deforestation can lead to soil erosion and loss of animal habitats.
the atmosphere during photosynthesis.
c. Deforestation can affect global climates because trees remove carbon dioxide from
d. Runoff that contains chemicals from mineral mines can pollute soil and water.
water supplies.
Natural Resources
e. Chemical fertilizers in runoff from farms can pollute rivers, soil, and underground
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i104 104
T6
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Lesson Outline for Teaching
Lesson 4: Air and Water Resources
A. Importance of Air and Water
1. Air and water are resources that you cannot live without.
a. Oxygen from air helps your body provide energy for your cells.
b. Water helps protect body tissues and maintain body temperature.
c. Water also has a role in many chemical reactions, such as the digestion of food.
recreation.
d. People use water for other purposes including agriculture, transportation, and
2. Burning fossil fuels in homes, vehicles, and power plants produces air pollution.
forest fires.
a. Air pollution can also be caused by natural events, such as volcanic eruptions or
and other pollutants in the air react in the presence of sunlight.
b. Photochemical smog is a brownish haze produced when nitrogen compounds
and remains in an area for several days.
c. Smog can be particularly harmful when it is trapped under a layer of warm air
fossil fuels burn react with water in the atmosphere.
d. Acid precipitation forms when nitrogen and sulfur compounds released when
e. Acid precipitation is precipitation that has a(n) pH less than 5.6.
similar to those caused by smog.
f. Materials from forest fires and volcanic eruptions can cause health problems
3. About 97 percent of water on Earth is salt water.
humans to use.
a. Out of the total amount of water on Earth, only about 0.9 percent is available for
groundwater, reducing the quality of water supplies.
b. Polluted water containing fertilizers can run off from fields into rivers and
c. In industry, water is often heated to a point that it can harm aquatic organisms.
Natural Resources
c. The Safe Drinking Water Act has regulations to protect drinking water supplies.
b. The U.S. Clean Water Act works to reduce of water pollution.
released into the air.
a. The U.S. Clean Air Act limits the amount of certain pollutants that can be
2. Legislation can be used to reduce pollution of water and air.
needs of other living things.
1. Management of air and water resources must consider both human needs and the
B. Managing Air and Water Resources
T8
1/30/10 6:05:26 PM
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i106 106
Lesson Outline continued
so less pollution runs off into rivers and streams.
3. People can help reduce water pollution by properly disposing of harmful chemicals
Discussion Question
Describe two ways that uses of water can affect water quality.
T9
1/30/10 6:05:27 PM
Water used to irrigate fields can mix with fertilizers. This polluted water then can run off
into rivers and groundwater, reducing the quality of these water supplies. Water used in
industry often is heated to high temperatures and then returned to the environment. The
hot water can harm aquatic organisms.
Natural Resources
C180_100_107_CRF_AnsOut_892479.i107 107
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.