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8/15/2003
Page 1 of 14
Science 9 - Outcomes /AOC Lessons Cross-Reference
This document outlines the online resources, or lessons, that are available for Beta Testing through the Alberta Online Consortium for the 2003-2004 school year. Alberta teachers
wishing to access the online resources MUST complete the “Application to Beta-Test Content – 2003/2004” form on the AOC web site.
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
AOC
Lesson
Resources Identified1 2 (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
Unit A – Biological Diversity
A 1. Investigate and interpret diversity among species and within
species, and describe how diversity contributes to species survival
A 1-1 observe variation in living things, and describe examples of
variation among species and within species (e.g., observe
and describe characteristics that distinguish two closely
related species)
A 1-2 identify examples of niches, and describe the role of
variation in enabling closely related living things to
survive in the same ecosystem (e.g., investigate different
bird species found in a local park ecosystem, and infer
how each is adapted to life within that ecosystem)
A 1-3 investigate and interpret dependencies among species that
link the survival of one species to the survival of others
(e.g., by providing habitat, food, means of fertilization,
or a source of oxygen)
A 1-4 identify the role of variation in species survival under
changing environmental conditions (e.g., resistance to
disease, ability to survive in severe environments)
A 2. Investigate the nature of reproductive processes and their role
in transmitting species character istics
A 2-1 distinguish between sexual and asexual reproduction, and
identify and interpret examples of asexual and sexual
reproduction in different species, by:
o
describing representative types of asexual reproduction
(e.g., fission in the amoeba, budding in hydra,
production of zoospores in some fungi)
o
describing representative types of sexual reproduction
(e.g., cross-fertilization in seed plants, sexual
1
SF: : 6-12
SA: 20 – 24
http://www.cbc.yale.edu/courseware/diversity.html
A1-2and1-3
SF: 16-19
SA: 18 –19
http://www.bears.org/
http://www3.gov.ab.ca/srd/fw/amphib/
http://www.aquatic.uoguelph.ca/animal.htm
http://www.aquatic.uoguelph.ca/wetlands/wetlandframes.htm
http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/index.htm
A1-2and1-3
SF: 21-22
SA: 16 – 17
http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/index.htm
http://www.snre.umich.edu/NRE425/PP/pred-prey.htm
SF: 13-15 19-20, 23-24
SA: 20-23
http://www.nightscribe.com/Animals/Jaguar_java.htm
http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/game/
http://homeschooling.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.edbydesign.com
/scr%5Fanimal.html
SF: 26-36
SA: 30 – 34
http://www.pearson-college.uwc.ca/pearson/biology/asex/asex.htm
The publishers did not provide the text pages correlation provided in the following chart. You are encouraged to verify the text correlations. Utilize the publisher resources as you
analyze the resources. Science in Actions provides the learning outcomes at the beginning of each topic. The SCIENCEFOCUS Teacher Resource provides learning outcomes and ICT
outcomes for each topic.
2
National Geographic Science resources will be available for some outcomes on the LearnAlberta.ca website by the end of February 2004. Also the Learning Technologies Branch
distance learning course will be available later in the year. Check out the LRC for more information. Additional resources may also be accessed from the Telus2Learn website
(http://www.2learn.ca/ )
3
E-textbooks are available on LearnAlberta.ca website. SF represents McGraw-Hill: SCIENCEFOCUS 9 and SA represents Pearson: Science in Action 9
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
reproduction in mammals)
o
describing examples of organisms that show both
sexual and asexual reproduction (e.g., yeasts that
reproduce both by budding and sexual reproduction;
plants that reproduce through suckering, runners or
bulbs, as well as by seed production)
o
describing the formation of zygote and embryo in plant
and animal reproduction
A 2-2 describe examples of variation of characteristics within a
species, and identify examples of both discrete and
continuous variation (e.g., hand clasping preference is an
example of a discrete variation, the length of human
hands varies on a continuum)
A 2-3 investigate the transmission of characteristics from
parents to offspring, and identify examples of
characteristics in offspring that are:
o
the same as the character istics of both parents
o
the same as the characteristics of one parent
o
intermediate between parent characteristics
o
different from both parents
A 2-4 distinguish those characteristics that are heritable from
those that are not heritable, and identify characteristics
for which heredity and environment may both play a role
(e.g., recognize that eye colour is heritable but that
scars are not; recognize that a person’s height and
weight may be largely determined by heredity but that
diet may also play a role)
A 3. Describe, in general terms, the role of genetic materials in the
continuity and variation of species characteristics; and investigate
and interpret related technologies
A 3-1
describe, in general terms, the relationship of
chromosomes, genes and DNA; and interpret their role as
repositories of genetic information
A 3-2 distinguish between cell division that leads to identical
daughter cells, as in binary fission and mitosis, and cell
division that leads to formation of sex cells, as in meiosis;
and describe, in general terms, the synthesis of genetic
materials that takes place during fertilization [Note: At
this level, students should understand that the formation
of sex cells involves the halving of the parent cell’s
genetic materials and that this process leads to zygote
formation. Opportunity for further study of the specific
mechanis ms of cell division—mitosis and meiosis—will be
provided in senior high school courses.]
Page 2 of 14
AOC
Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 37-39, 41
28-29
http://www.exploratorium.edu/exhibits/mutant_flies/mutant_flies.html
SF: 41
SA: 45
http://suhep.phy.syr.edu/courses/mirror/biomorph/
http://www.sonic.net/%7Enbs/projects/anthro201/exper/
SF: 42-44
SA: 28-29, 54
http://www.sonic.net/%7Enbs/projects/bio115l/
SF: 46-49
SA: 38-44
A3-2
SF: 50-51
SA: 46–48
http://www.stolaf.edu/people/giannini/flashanimat/celldivision/crome3.swf
http://www.stolaf.edu/people/giannini/flashanimat/celldivision/meiosis.swf
http://biologyinmotion.com/cell_division/
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/baby/divi_flash.html
http://www3.telus.net/byngscience/sc10/Sc10~Biology/s_tan_division.swf
http://www.micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/virtual/confocal/index.html
http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/3dcell.htm
http://www.nobel.se/medicine/educational/2001/cellcycle.html
A 3-3 compare sexual and asexual reproduction, in terms of the
advantages and disadvantages (e.g., recognize that
SF: 51-52
SA: 35-36
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
asexual reproduction provides an efficient means of
transmitting characteristics and that sexual reproduction
provides an opportunity for recombination of
characteristics)
A 3-4 distinguish between, and identify examples of, natural and
artificial selection (e.g., evolution of beak shapes in
birds, development of high milk production in dairy cows)
A 3-5 describe, in simple terms, some of the newly emerging
technologies for recombining genetic material; and
identify questions and issues related to their application
A 4. Identify impacts of human action on species survival and
variation within species, and analyze related issues for personal and
public decision making
A 4-1 describe the relative abundance of species on Earth and in
different environments (e.g., note the overall abundance
of insect species; note that in harsh environments there
are relatively fewer species found than in temperate and
tropical environments)
A 4-2 describe ongoing changes in biological diversity through
extinction and extirpation of native species, and
investigate the role of environmental factors in causing
these changes (e.g., investigate the effect of changing
river characteristics on the variety of species living in the
river; investigate the effect of changing land use on the
survival of wolf or grizzly bear populations)
A 4-3 evaluate the success and limitations of various local and
global strategies for minimizing loss of species diversity
(e.g., breeding of endangered populations in zoos,
development of seed banks, designating protected areas,
development of international treaties regulating trade of
protected species and animal parts)
A 4-4 investigate and describe the use of biotechnology in
environmental, agricultural or forest management; and
identify potential impacts and issues (e.g., investigate
issues related to the development of patented crop
varieties and varieties that require extensive chemical
treatments; identify issues related to selective breeding
in game farming and in the rearing of fish stocks)
Page 3 of 14
AOC
Lesson
A3-4
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 11, 43-45, 58-65
SA: 66–71, 24
SF: 29, 53-56
SA: 67-71
A4-1and4-2
SF: 17-23
SA: 8–13
http://www.micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/electronmicroscopy/magnify1/index.html
http://www.micro.magnet.fsu.edu/moviegallery/pondscum.html
http://www.mbayaq.org/efc/cam_menu.asp
A4-1and4-2
SF: 66-70, 72
SA: 58–65
SA: 72-81
SF: 53-56
SA: 67-71
http://www.jordan.palo-alto.ca.us/staff/grant/public/Chemistry%20Links.html
http://www.sprocketworks.com/topics/default.asp?topic=6
http://www.hazelwood.k12.mo.us/~grichert/sciweb/chemvl.htm
http://www.edinformatics.com/il/il_chem.htm
http://www.mpcfaculty.net/ron_rinehart/exptdemo.htm
http://www.mhhe.com/physsci/chemistry/essentialchemistry/flash/flash.mhtml
http://www2.chemie.uni-erlangen.de/education/medprak/videos/flammenfaerbung.mpg
http://www2.chemie.uni-erlangen.de/education/medprak/videos/
http://www.versuchschemie.de/modules.php?name=Content&pa=list_pages_categories&cid
=3
http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/demos/index.html
http://users.erols.com/merosen/demos.htm
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
Page 4 of 14
AOC
Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
http://genchem.chem.wisc.edu/demonstrations/Inorganic/inorganic_demos.html
http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/CCA/CCA4/LISTS/AQURXN2.HTM
Unit B – Matter and Chemical Change
B 1. Investigate materials, and describe them in terms of their
physical and chemical properties
B 1-1 investigate and describe properties of materials (e.g.,
investigate and describe the melting point, solubility and
conductivity of materials observed)
B 1-2 describe and apply different ways of classifying materials
based on their composition and properties, including:
o
??distinguishing between pure substances, solutions and
mechanical mixtures
o
??distinguishing between metals and nonmetals
o
??identifying and applying other methods of classification
B 1-3 identify conditions under which properties of a material
are changed, and critically evaluate if a new substance
has been produced
B 2. Describe and interpret patterns in chemical reactions
B 2-1 identify and evaluate dangers of caustic materials and
potentially explosive reactions
B 2-2 observe and describe evidence of chemical change in
reactions between familiar materials, by:
o
describing combustion, corrosion and other reactions
involving oxygen
o
observing and inferring evidence of chemical reactions
between familiar household materials
B 2-3 distinguish between materials that react readily and those
that do not (e.g., compare reactions of different metals
to a dilute corrosive solution)
B 2-4 observe and describe patterns of chemical change, by:
o
observing heat generated or absorbed in chemical
reactions, and identifying examples of exothermic and
endothermic reactions
o
identifying conditions that affect rates of reactions
(e.g., investigate and describe how factors such as
heat, concentration, surface area and electrical energy
can affect a chemical reaction)
o
identifying evidence for conservation of chemical
substance (e.g., identify and apply techniques for
comparing the quantity of reactants and products in a
SF: 118-120
SA: 90-92, 97-101
http://chemmovies.unl.edu/chemistry/smallscale/SS035c.html
http://capital2.capital.edu/faculty/wbecktel/ionicmpds.htm
http://www.uis.edu/~trammell/organic/carboxylicAcids/carboxylicacids.htm
http://www.chem.ufl.edu/~itl/2051_s97/week_1/ionic.html
http://users.senet.com.au/~rowanb/chem/chembond.htm
http://www.cofc.edu/genchemlab/properties.htm
http://chemmovies.unl.edu/Chemistry/MicroScale/MScale27.html
SF: 95-98. 118-135
SA: 102–103, 132
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/wtc/metal.html#
SF: 99-104
SA: 119-125
B2-1
SF: 92-94, 100-103
SA: 93-96
SF:105, 146, 158-162
SA: 160, 161
SF: 103-104
SF: 149-150
SA: 160
SF: 122–123, 153-157
SA: 166-169
SF: 108 -109
SA: 163-164
8/15/2003
Page 5 of 14
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
chemical reaction)
B 3. Describe ideas used in interpreting the chemical nature of
matter, both in the past and present, and identify example
evidence that has contributed to the development of these ideas
B 3-1 demonstrate understanding of the origins of the periodic
table, and relate patterns in the physical and chemical
properties of elements to their positions in the periodic
table—focusing on the first 18 elements
B 3-2 distinguish between observation and theory, and provide
examples of how models and theoretical ideas are used in
explaining observations (e.g., describe how observations
of electrical properties of materials led to ideas about
electrons and protons; describe how observed differences
in the densities of materials are explained, in part, using
ideas about the mass of individual atoms)
B 3-3 use the periodic table to identify the number of protons,
electrons and other information about each atom; and
describe, in general terms, the relationship between the
structure of atoms in each group and the properties of
elements in that group (e.g., use the periodic table to
determine that sodium has 11 electrons and protons and,
on average, about 12 neutrons; infer that different rows
(periods) on the table reflect differences in atomic
structure; interpret information on ion charges provided
in some periodic tables) [Note: Knowledge of specific
orbital structures for elements and groups of elements is
not required at this grade level.]
AOC
Lesson
B 3-4 distinguish between ionic and molecular compounds, and
describe the properties of some common examples of
each
B 4. Apply simplified chemical nomenclature in describing
elements, compounds and chemical reactions
B 4-1 read and interpret chemical formulas for compounds of
two elements, and give the IUPAC (International Union of
Pure and Applied Chemistry) name and common name of
these compounds (e.g., give, verbally and in writing, the
name for NaCl(s) (sodium chloride), CO2(g) (carbon
dioxide), MgO(s) (magnesium oxide), NH3(g) (nitrogen
trihydride or ammonia), CH4(g) (carbon tetrahydride or
methane), FeCl2(s) (iron(II) chloride), FeCl3(s) (iron(III)
chloride)
B 4-2 identify/describe chemicals commonly found in the home,
and write the chemical symbols (e.g., table salt
[NaCl(s)], water [H2O(l)], sodium hydroxide [NaOH(aq)]
used in household cleaning supplies)
B3-4
B 4-3 identify examples of combining ratios/number of atoms
per molecule found in some common materials, and use
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 116–135
SA: 117-125
SF: 106-124
SA: 112-121
B3-3
SF: 116–135
SA: 126-134
http://www.chemsoc.org/viselements/pages/pertable_fla.htm
http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/periodic-table/key.html
http://www.thecatalyst.org/m03ptabl.html
http://www.ilpi.com/genchem/periodicquiz.html
http://education.jlab.org/elementconcentration/results.html
http://www.sprocketworks.com/shockwave/load.asp?SprMovie=buildmoleculesweb
http://www.flashkit.com/movies/Interfaces/Sites/Atoms_an-Gunjan_B-7750/index.php
http://www.funbrain.com/periodic/
http://www.zerobio.com/drag_gr9.htm
SF: 136–144
SA: 144-154
B4-1and4-2and4-3
SF: 138, 141-143
SA: 138-143
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/RayLec/rasmol.htm
http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/library
B4-1and4-2and4-3
SF: examples through the section 136-145
SA: 152-153
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/RayLec/rasmol.htm
http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/library
B4-1and4-2and4-3
SF: 138-139
SA: 146-147
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
information on ion charges to predict combining ratios in
ionic compounds of two elements (e.g., identify the
number of atoms per molecule signified by the chemical
formulas for CO(g) and CO2(g); predict combining ratios
of iron and oxygen based on information on ion charges
of iron and oxygen) [Prerequisite Skill: Grade 8
Mathematics, Number, Specific Outcome 15]
B 4-4 assemble or draw simple models of molecular and ionic
compounds (e.g., construct models of some carbon
compounds using toothpicks, peas and cubes of potato)
[Note: Diagrams and models should show the relative
positions of atoms. Diagrams of orbital structures are not
required at this grade level.]
B 4-5 describe familiar chemical reactions, and represent these
reactions by using word equations and chemical formulas
and by constructing models of reactants and products
(e.g., describe combustion reactions, such as: carbon +
oxygen →? carbon dioxide [C(s) + O2(g) →? CO2(g)];
describe corrosion reactions, such as: iron + oxygen
→? iron(II) oxide [Fe(s) + O2(g) →? FeO(s)]; describe
replacement reactions, such as the following: zinc +
copper(II) sulfate →? zinc sulfate + copper [Zn(s) +
CuSO4(aq) →ZnSO4(aq) + Cu(s)]) [Note 1: This outcome
does not require students to explain the formation of
polyatomic ions. Some chemicals with polyatomic ions
may nevertheless be introduced; e.g., a brief
introduction to CuSO4(s), ZnSO4(s) and H2SO4(aq) can
help prepare students for further study of these
materials in units C and D.] [Note 2: At this grade level,
students are not required to balance reactants and
products in chemical equations. Teachers may want to
inform students about opportunities for further study of
chemistry in Science 10 and in Science 14–24.]
Page 6 of 14
AOC
Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/RayLec/rasmol.htm
http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/library
SF: 141, 144, 138
SA: 148
SF: 148 -149
SA: 149, 158-161
http://www.shsu.edu/%7Echm_tgc/sounds/flashfiles/copper.swf
http://www.chem.ox.ac.uk/vrchemistry/complex/default.html
http://www.crocodile-clips.com/absorb/AC4/m2.htm
http://chemmovies.unl.edu/chemistry/beckerdemos/bd000.html
http://www.plec.com.sg/Metal%20Reactivity.htm
http://www.pc.chemie.uni-siegen.de/pci/versuche/pics/anim/exo.mpg
Unit C – Environmental Chemistry
C 1. Investigate and describe, in general terms, the role of different
substances in the environment in supporting or harming humans and
other living things
C 1-1 identify common organic and inorganic substances that
are essential to the health and growth of humans and
other living things, and illustrate the roles served by
these materials (e.g., identify calcium as an essential
material for bones; identify minerals that are known to
enhance plant growth but that limit growth if too little
or too much is available)
C 1-2
describe, in general terms, the forms of organic matter
synthesized by plants and animals
C 1-3 describe and illustrate processes by which chemicals are
C1-1
SF: 176-181
SA: 182–183, 196-198
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/index.html
SF: 182
SA: 199–203, 248
SF: 193
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
introduced to the environment or their concentrations are
changed (e.g., dilution in streams, biomagnification
through food chains)
C 1-4 describe the uptake of materials by living things through
ingestion or absorption, and inves tigate and describe
evidence that some materials are difficult for organisms
to break down or eliminate (e.g., DDT, mercury)
C 1-5 identify questions that may need to be addressed in
deciding what substances —in what amounts—can be safely
released into the environment (e.g., identify questions
and considerations that may be important in determining
how much phosphate can be released into river water
without significant harm to living things)
C 2. Identify processes for measuring the quantity of different
substances in the env ironment and for monitoring air and water
quality
C 2-1 identify substrates and nutrient sources for living things
within a variety of environments
Page 7 of 14
AOC
Lesson
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SA: 186–187, 248
C1-4and1-5
SF: 183-192
SA: 204–207
http://www.biology.ualberta.ca/facilities/multimedia/index.php?Page=284
C1-4and1-5
SF: 186, 222-227
SA: 224
SA: 208–209
SF: 178-184
C 2-2 describe and illustrate the use of biological monitoring as
one method for determining environmental quality (e.g.,
assess water quality, by observing the relative abundance
of various vertebrate and invertebrate species)
C 2-3 identify chemical factors in an environment that might
affect the health and distribution of living things in that
environment (e.g., available oxygen, pH, dissolved
nutrients in soil)
C 2-4 apply and interpret measures of chemical concentration in
parts per million, billion or trillion [Prerequisite Skills:
Grade 8 Mathematics, Number, Specific Outcomes 14,
15]
C 2-5 identify acids, bases and neutral substances, based on
measures of their pH (e.g., use indicator solutions or pH
meters to measure the pH of water samples)
C 2-6 investigate, safely, and describe the effects of acids and
bases on each other and on other substances (e.g.,
investigate and describe the reaction that results when
baking powder is dissolved; describe the role of acids and
bases in neutralizing each other)
C 2-7 describe effects of acids and bases on living things (e.g.,
acid rain in lakes, antacids for upset stomachs, pH in
shampoos and conditioners)
C 3. Analyze and evaluate mechanisms affecting the distribution of
potentially harmful substances within an environment
C 3-1 describe mechanisms for the transfer of materials through
air, water and soil; and identify factors that may
accelerate or retard distribution (e.g., wind speed, soil
1 2
SF: 230-235
SA: 213–251
SF: 236-241
SA: 215-219
SF: 213-218
SA: 216
SF: 197-203
SA: 191 – 193
http://ir.chem.cmu.edu/irproject/applets/virtuallab/Applet_wPI.asp
http://michele.usc.edu/java/acidbase/acidbase.html
SF: 207-208
SA: 194 – 195
C2-7
SF: 204-206
SA: 240, 220, 195
SF: 236-241
SA: 237–242
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
porosity)
C 3-2 describe mechanisms for biodegradation, and interpret
information on the biodegradability of different materials
C 3-3
comprehend and interpret information on the biological
impacts of hazardous chemicals on local and global
environments (e.g., interpret evidence for environmental
changes in the vicinity of a substance release; interpret
LD50 data and other information on toxicity; identify
concerns with the disposal of domestic wastes, such as
paints and oils, and industrial wastes) [Note: LD50refers
to the amount of a substance found to be lethal to 50% of
a population, if ingested.]
C 3-4 describe and evaluate methods used to transport, store
and dispose of hazardous household chemicals
Page 8 of 14
AOC
Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 242-243
SA: 243 - 246
C3-3
SF: : 244-246
SA: 250 – 252
SF: 247-252
SA: 253
C 3-5
investigate and evaluate potential risks resulting from
consumer practices and industrial processes, and identify
processes used in providing information and setting
standards to manage these risks (e.g., interpret and
explain the significance of manufacturer’s information on
how wood preservatives can be safely applied; recognize
that some individuals may have greater sensitivity to
particular chemical substances than do others in the
general population)
C 3-6 identify and evaluate information and evidence related to
an issue in which environmental chemistry plays a major
role (e.g., evaluate evidence that the use of insecticides
to control mosquitoes has an effect/has no effect on bird
populations)
SF: 219-221
SA: 254 – 257
SF: 209-211, 256-257
SA: 249
Unit D – Electrical Principles and Technologies
D 1. Investigate and interpret the use of devices to convert various
forms of energy to electrical energy, and electrical energy to other
forms of energy
D 1-1 identify, describe and interpret examples of mechanical,
chemical, thermal (heat) and electrical energy
investigate and describe evidence of energy transfer and
transformation (e.g., mechanical energy transformed into
electrical energy, electrical energy transferred through
power grids, chemical energy converted to electrical
energy and then to light energy in a flashlight, thermal
energy converted to electrical energy in a thermocouple)
D 1-3 investigate and evaluate the use of different chemicals,
chemical concentrations and designs for electrical storage
cells (e.g., build and test different forms of wet cells)
SF: 264-265
SA: 318 323
http://www.lightlink.com/sergey/java/java/indcur/index.html
http://lectureonline.cl.msu.edu/~mmp/applist/induct/faraday.htm
D 1-2
SF: 293-299
SA: 324 – 331
http://ippex.pppl.gov/interactive/electricity/moving.html (includes some other topics as
well resistance, batteries, magnetism)
D1-3
SF: 300-307
SA: 228 – 294
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
Page 9 of 14
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Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/electro/electro.htm
D 1-4
construct, use and evaluate devices for transforming
mechanical energy into electrical energy and for
transforming electrical energy into mechanical energy
SF: 309-317
SA: 330
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/magneticlines/index.html
http://lectureonline.cl.msu.edu/~mmp/kap18/RR4460app.htm
D 1-5 modify the design of an electrical device, and observe and
evaluate resulting changes (e.g., investigate the effect of
changes in the orientation and placement of magnets,
commutator and armature in a St. Louis motor or in a
personally-built model of a motor)
D 2. Describe technologies for transfer and control of electrical
energy
D 2-1
assess the potential danger of electrical devices, by
referring to the voltage and current rating (amperage) of
the devices; and distinguish between safe and unsafe
activities
D 2-2 distinguish between static and current electricity, and
identify example evidence of each
SF: 316-317
SA: 328
http://www.walter -fendt.de/ph11e/electricmotor.htm
http://demoroom.physics.ncsu.edu/html/demos/496.html
http://www.walter -fendt.de/ph11e/mfwire.htm
SF: 330-331
SA: 284 – 287
D2-2
SF: 266-272
Static electricity defined, but current electricity is not – introduced through circuit.
SA: 275 – 279
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/lightning/index.html
http://physics.weber.edu/amiri/director/dcrfiles/electricity/pithBallS.dcr
http://www.mos.org/sln/toe/VDG_works.mov
http://ippex.pppl.gov/interactive/electricity/intro.html
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/lightning/index.html
D 2-3 identify electrical conductors and insulators, and compare
the resistance of differ ent materials to electric flow
(e.g., compare the resistance of copper wire and nickelchromium/Nichrome wire; investigate the conduction of
electricity through different solutions; investigate
applications of electrical resistance in polygraph or lie
detector tests)
D 2-4 use switches and resistors to control electrical flow, and
predict the effects of these and other devices in given
applications (e.g., investigate and describe the operation
of a rheostat)
D 2-5 describe, using models, the nature of electrical current;
and explain the relationship among current, resistance
and voltage (e.g., use a hydro-flow model to explain
current, resistance and voltage)
SF: 268-269, 279-280
SA: 298 – 301
http://users.compaqnet.be/eddy/galvanisch.html
http://www.shep.net/resources/curricular/physics/P30/Unit2/
D 2-6 measure voltages and amperages in circuits, and calculate
resistance using Ohm’s law (e.g., determine the
resistance in a circuit with a dry cell and miniature light;
SF: 276-277, 281-282, 284-285
SA: 306 – 309
SF: 283
SA: 302
SF: 278
SA: 304 – 305
http://www.bgu.ac.il/~phys/COURSES/physics2_se_2001/classes/electricity/java/resist2/
http://www.bgu.ac.il/~phys/COURSES/physics2_se_2001/classes/electricity/java/resist4/
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/filamentresistance/
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
determine the resistances of copper, nickelchromium/Nichrome wire, pencil leads and salt solution)
[Note: At this level, students are not required to use
Ohm’s law to calculate current flow.] [Prerequisite Skill:
Grade 8 Mathematics, Patterns and Relations, Specific
Outcome 5]
D 2-7
develop, test and troubleshoot circuit designs for a
variety of specific purposes, based on low voltage circuits
(e.g., develop and test a device that is activated by a
photoelectric cell; develop a model hoist that will lift a
load to a given level, then stop and release its load; test
and evaluate the use of series and parallel circuits for
wiring a set of lights)
investigate toys, models and household appliances; and
draw circuit diagrams to show the flow of electricity
through them (e.g., safely dismantle discarded devices,
such as heating devices or motorized toys, and draw
diagrams to show the loads, conductors and switching
mechanisms)
D 2-9
identify similarities and differences between
microelectronic circuits and circuits in a house (e.g.,
compare switches in a house with transistors in a
microcircuit)
D 3. Identify and estimate energy inputs and outputs for example
devices and systems, and evaluate the efficiency of energy
conversions
D 3-1 identify the forms of energy inputs and outputs in a device
or system
D 3-2
apply appropriate units, measures and devices in
determining and describing quantities of energy
transformed by an electrical device (e.g., measure
amperage and voltage, and calculate the number of
watts consumed by an electrical device, using the
formula P = IV [power (in watts) = current (in amps)
? ? voltage (in volts)]; calculate the quantity of electric
energy, in joules, transformed by an electrical device,
using the formula E = P ? t [energy (in joules) = power (in
watts) ?time (in seconds)]) [Prerequisite Skill: Grade 8
Mathematics, Patterns and Relations, Specific Outcome
5]
D 3-3 apply the concepts of conservation of energy and
efficiency to the analysis of energy devices (e.g., identify
examples of energy dissipation in the form of heat, and
describe the effect of these losses on useful energy
Page 10 of 14
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Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 287-288, 290
SA: 311, 313 “quick labs”
Circuits:
http://jersey.uoregon.edu/circuit/Circuit_plugin.html
http://jersey.uoregon.edu/Voltage/index.html
Voltage:
http://jersey.uoregon.edu/Voltage/index.html
http://www.hazelwood.k12.mo.us/~grichert/sciweb/electric.htm
http://www.electronicsworkbench.com/understandelectricity/ewb.html
http://library.thinkquest.org/10796/ch15/ch15.htm?tqskip1=1&tqtime=0623
D 2-8
SA: 311 – 315
SF: 289
SA: 315
SF: 318-320
SA: 332
SF: 323-325
SA: 332-334
D3-3and3-4
SF: 328-329
SA: 335
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
output)
D 3-4 compare energy inputs and outputs of a device, and
calculate its efficiency (e.g., compare the number of
joules of energy used with the number of joules of work
produced, given information on electrical consumption
and work output of a motor-driven device) [Prerequisite
Skills: Grade 7 Mathematics, Number, Specific Outcome
18; Grade 8 Mathematics, Number, Specific Outcome
12]
D 3-5 investigate and describe techniques for reducing waste of
energy in common household devices (e.g., by eliminating
sources of friction in mechanical components, using more
efficient forms of lighting, reducing overuse of
appliances as in “over drying” of clothes)
D 4. Describe and discuss the societal and environmental
implications of the use of electrical energy
D 4-1 identify and evaluate alternative sources of electrical
energy, including oil, gas, coal, biomass, wind, waves and
batteries (e.g., identify renewable and nonrenewable
sources for generating electricity; evaluate the use of
batteries as an alternative to internal combustion
engines)
D 4-2 describe the by-products of electrical generation and their
impacts on the environment (e.g., identify by-products
and potential impacts of coal-fired electricity
generation)
D 4-3 identify example uses of electrical technologies, and
evaluate technologies in terms of benefits and impacts
(e.g., identify benefits and issues related to the use of
electrical technologies for storing and transmitting
personal information)
D 4-4
identify concerns regarding conservation of energy
resources, and evaluate means for improving the
sustainability of energy use
Page 11 of 14
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Lesson
D3-3and3-4
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
SF: 326-327
SA: 336
SA: 339 – 342
SF: 332-335, 337-338
SA: 345 – 349
SF: 336-338
SA: 351 – 352
SF: 339-342
SA: 354 – 358
D4-4
SA: 352 – 353
E1-1
SF: 356-365
SA: 371-376
http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/chaissonat4/chapter2/medialib/video/copern
ican1.mov
http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/chaissonat4/chapter2/medialib/video/ptolem
aic1.mov
http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/academy/space/solarsystem/solarsystemjava.html
http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~zhu/ast210/geocentric.html
•
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/Videos/StarChild/solar_system/comet.mov
•
http://www.shsu.edu/%7Echm_tgc/sounds/flashfiles/earth.swf
•
http://ethel.as.arizona.edu/~collins/astro/subjects/observation.html
Unit E – Space Exploration
E 1. Investigate and describe ways that human understanding of
Earth and space has depended on technological development
E 1-1 identify different perspectives on the nature of Earth and
space, based on culture and science (e.g., describe
cosmologies based on an Earth-centred universe [Note:
detailed knowledge of epicycles is not required]; describe
aboriginal views of space and those of other cultures;
describe the role of observation in guiding scientific
understanding of space)
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
E 1-2
Page 12 of 14
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Lesson
1 2
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
•
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/mythology/stars.html
•
http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/Academy/Earth/Sundial/Sundial-ConstructSimple.html
•
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/980215e.html
•
http://www.iki.rssi.ru/magbase/REFMAN/STARGAZE/Ssolsys.htm
•
http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/johannes.html
•
http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/index.ht ml
•
http://www.jimloy.com/cindy/ptolemy.htm
•
http://www.astro.utoronto.ca/~zhu/ast210/both.html
•
http://www.kstrom.net/isk/stars/starmenu.html
•
http://www.uvm.edu/~sawhite/13thgoddesspleiades.html
http://www.learnalberta.ca/sci9/Acrobat%205.1/SF9-U05_T01.pdf -bottom p 358
http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/humnet/french/faculty/gans/java/SolarApplet.html
http://www.ras.ucalgary.ca/~gibson/pleiades/pleiades_myth.html
SF: 366-386
SA: 377-378
investigate and illustrate the contributions of
technological advances —including optical telescopes,
spectral analysis and space travel—to a scientific
understanding of space
•
http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/vc/jen_pres_files/frame.htm - radio telescopes
•
http://jersey.uoregon.edu/elements/Elements.html - Elemental Spectra
•
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/highlights/index.html - fact below:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/flash/sirtf/hires.html - several sections that may apply to other
outcomes
May 12
NASA FACT
Did you know that every day, the Hubble Space Telescope archives 3 to 5 gigabytes of data
and delivers between 10 and 15 gigabytes to astronomers all over the world?
SA: 379-381, 384-400
E 1-3 describe, in general terms, the distribution of matter in
space (e.g., stars, star systems, galaxies, nebulae)
E 1-4 identify evidence for, and describe characteristics of,
bodies that make up the solar system; andcompare their
characteristics with those of Earth
E 1-5 describe and apply techniques for determining the
position and motion of objects in space, including:
o
constructing and interpreting drawings and physical
models that illustrate the motion of objects in space
E1-5
SF: 373-374, 409-419
SA: 382-383, 392
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/NASA.Educational.Products/Solar.System.
Puzzle.Kit/Solar.System.Puzzle.Kit.pdf
http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/planets/
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/missions/profile.cfm?Sort=Planet&Object=Venus
http://sseforum.jpl.nasa.gov/educators/index.cfm?Display=SSE_Timeline
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/solar_system/planets/planets_index.html
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/Curriculum.Support/Space.Science/Our.S
olar.System/.index.html
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/Online.Educational.Activities/Planets/index.html
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/education/modules/webpages/activitypage.htm
http://stardate.org/nightsky/moon/ -moon phases – teacher resource?
http://stardate.org/nightsky/planets/– teacher resource?
SF: 359-360, 371
SA: 375, 446-449, 401-403
http://www.jgiesen.de/sunshadow/index.htm
http://www.autodidacts.evesham.net/astro/index.html
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
(e.g., represent the orbit of comets around the Sun,
using a looped-string model)
o
describing techniques used to estimate distances of
objects in space and to determine their motion
o
describing the position of objects in space, using
angular coordinates (e.g., describe the location of a
spot on a wall, by identifying its angle of elevation and
its bearing or azimuth;
o
describe the location of the Sun and other stars using
altitude-azimuth coordinates, also referred to as
horizon coordinates or local coordinates) [Note: A
description of star positions based on right ascension
and declination is not required.] [Prerequisite Skills:
Grade 7 Mathematics, Shape and Space, Specific
Outcomes 11, 13; Related Skills: Grade 9
Mathematics, Shape and Space, Specific Outcomes
13, 14]
E 1-6 investigate predictions about the motion, alignment and
collision of bodies in space; and critically examine the
evidence on which they are based (e.g., investigate
predictions about eclipses; identify uncertainties in
predicting and tracking meteor showers)
Page 13 of 14
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Lesson
SA: 404
http://www.shsu.edu/%7Echm_tgc/sounds/flashfiles/earth.swf
http://eclipse99.nasa.gov/pages/traditions_Calendars.html
SF: 430-431
SA: 420
SF: 416, 423
SA: 421-423
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/videos/mars/mars_pathfinder.html
E 2-3
E 2-5
describe the development of artificial satellites, and
explain the major purposes for which they are used (e.g.,
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
http://learnalberta.ca/Math/math6web/math6shell.asp
http://www.jgiesen.de/SME/details/basics/index.htm
E 2. Identify problems in developing technologies for space
exploration, describe technologies developed for life in space, and
explain the scientific principles involved
E 2-1 analyze space environments, and identify challenges that
must be met in developing life-supporting systems (e.g.,
analyze implications of variations in gravity,
temperature, availability of water, atmospheric pressure
and atmospheric composition)
E 2-2
describe technologies for life-support systems, and
interpret the scientific principles on which they are based
(e.g., investigate systems that involve the recycling of
water and air)
describe technologies for space transport, and interpret
the scientific principles involved (e.g., describe the
development of multistage rockets, shuttles and space
stations; build a model vehicle to explore a planet or
moon)
E 2-4 identify materials and processes developed to meet needs
in space, and identify related applications (e.g.,
medicines, remote sensing, microelectronics, polymers,
medical imaging, wireless communication technologies,
synthesis of fuels)
1 2
SF: 399-402
SA: 409-417, 424, 444-445
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/kids/activities.cfm - model directions
E2-4
SF: 427
SA: 418, 431
SF: 403-406
SA: 428-430
8/15/2003
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and
Knowledge
(Outcomes for Skills and Attitudes are included in the lessons.)
Students will:
communication, GPS—global positioning system, weather
observation)
Page 14 of 14
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Lesson
SF: 366-386
SA: 434-439, 441-443
http://planetquest.jpl.nasa.gov/Planet_Quest-movies/keckanim2_quickTime.html
http://planetquest.jpl.nasa.gov/keck_qtvr/keck.html
explain the role of radio and optical telescopes in
determining characteristics of stars and star systems
E 3-3 describe and interpret, in general terms, the technologies
used in global positioning systems and in remote sensing
(e.g., use triangulation to determine the position of an
object, given information on the distance from three
different points) [Note: This example involves the use of
geometric approaches rather than mathematical
calculations.]
E 4. Identify issues and opportunities arising from the application of
space technology, identify alternatives involved, and analyze
implications
E 4-1
recognize risks and dangers associated with space
exploration (e.g., space junk, fuel expenditure, satellites
burning up in the atmosphere, solar radiation)
E 4-2 describe Canadian contributions to space research and
development and to the astronaut program (e.g.,
Canadarm)
Resources Identified (not all resources have been cleared for used – teachers will need to
seek permission from the copyright holder if they wish to use this resource beyond the Beta
Testing period.)3
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/Curriculum.Support/Space.Science/Satelli
tes/.index.html
E 3. Describe and inter pret the science of optical and radio
telescopes, space probes and remote sensing
Technologies
E 3-1
explain, in general terms, the operation of optical
telescopes, including telescopes that are positioned in
space environments
E 3-2
1 2
SF: 366-386
SA: 440, 443, 452-455
SF: 387-391
SA: 450-451
E4-1
E4-2
SF: 422
SA: 457-459
SF: 424-428, 432-433
SA: 426, 460-463
http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/youth_educators/kidspace/games/games.asp
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/video/station/canadarm2/html/canadarm2.html
E 4-3
identify and analyze factors that are important to
decisions regarding space exploration and development
(e.g., identify examples of costs and potential benefits
that may be considered; investigate and describe
political, environmental and ethical issues related to the
ownership and use of resources in space)
SF: 420-421, 430-431
SA: 427, 465-469