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Transcript
Electromagnetic Induction
(1) Motional EMF
●
●
●
B is constant.
The magnetic flux changes in
time, because S moves.
There is EMF around C,
because of the magnetic force
q v x B.
In this frame of reference there is no
electric field.
(2) Electromagnetic Induction
●
●
B changes in time.
S does not move but the flux
through S changes in time.
● By the principle of relativity, we
should expect EMF around C; EMF
= -dO/dt.
In this frame of reference there is an
induced electric field;
Faraday’s Law
A magnetic field B(x,t) that changes
in time produces an electric field E(x,
t) that curls around the change of B.
Example (qualitative)
As the magnet moves toward
increasing z, what is the electric field
at points on the circle C (at z = 0 )?
Lenz’s Law
If a conductor is present then the
direction of the induced current
opposes the change of flux.
Example
-- The magnet is above the
conductor, moving downward.
-- Calculate the clockwise EMF.
-- Define n to be the downward
normal vector.
Is the direction of the EMF in
agreement with Lenz’s Law?
The currents induced in the copper
plate (“eddy currents”) are
counterclockwise.
By Ampere’s law, the eddy currents
create a magnetic field directed
upward (right hand rule again!). This
opposes the change of flux.
Example (quantitative)
Consider two poles of an electromagnet. We
can change the magnetic field by varying the
current (not shown). Determine the electric field
in the gap between the poles.
The betatron condition …
(1) The circular motion implies
(2) The electric force implies
Thus we must require
which is arranged by designing the correct
shape of the magnet poles.
The second betatron at the University of Illinois (1950)
produced 300 MeV electrons.
Donald Kerst and the first betatron (1940)