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Brian’s presentation about Epigraphy:
ATL Athenian Tribute Lists: at Athens epigraphical museum
IG Inscriptiones Graecae: THE big Greek one
SEG= Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum
IC Inscriptiones Creticae
SIG: Sylloge Insc. Graec. (pared down IG): big, but smaller than the big one
CIL: THE big Latin epigraphy source
AE= L’Annee Epigraphique (L. and J. Robert)
ILS: Insc. Lat. Sylloge: by Dessau: a compendium of CIL: big, but still a selection AND
HAS abbreviation list in back
RMD= Roman Military Diplomas
Horoi (boundary stones for property)
Fouilles de Delphes
Squeezes: now made out of latex, used to be paper
Meiggs and Lewis: nice smaller: 5th /6th c.: buy for Brian?
PJ Rhodes and R. Osborne: nice smaller Greek: from end of Pelop. war to Alexander
(404 on)
Tod’s Selection has been surpassed, but is worth having
Keppie: Latin side: smaller one:
Epigraphic Evidence by John Bodel is very good and short and works for beginners
Series: Translated Documents of Greece and Rome
Basic dichotomy: Public v. private
Prose v. poetry
Private: tombstones, religious dedications, Instruments (helmets, etc.)
Curses, graffiti
Public: Laws, treaties, economic
Language & Style
Lots of formulae
Lettering is typologied and chronologized by scholars
Dialects/morphology
Carl Darling Buck’s book on Greek dialects is still good
Greek Scholars: Boeckh, Dittenberger (SIG), L. and J Robert, Raubitschek
Latin: Boeckh, T. Mommsen
Famous Inscriptions: Nestor’s Cup (dactyls, found in west near Naples), Laudatio Turiae,
Senatus Consultum de bacchanalibus
Gortyn Law Code (hard to read doric, bustrophedon)
inscription on leg of statue of Rameses II dating from 591 BC is perhaps earliest Greek
prose insc.