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Transcript
Team Flight Club
Final Presentation
Evan Akselrad, Chris Anaya, Natalie Bixler,
Melanie Dubin, Logan Finch, Ted Maritz, and
Scott Williams
December 2, 2008
Mission Overview
• The BalloonSat Flight Club shall ascend to an altitude of
30 kilometers to image the curvature and surface of the
Earth, and to measure the light intensity at different
altitudes to determine if commercial aviation has an impact
on light intensity levels.
– This shall be accomplished by measuring current using
solar panels attached to the payload.
• Hypothesis:
– The research conducted on Flight Club will conclude
that there is a correlation between commercial aviation
and global warming. If there is a measurable increase in
light intensity above the flight level of aviation then one
can conclude that contrails reflect light thus decreasing
light intensity and decreasing the effect of global
warming.
Design Overview
Functional Block Diagram
Battery
Camera
Memory Card
Battery
Switch 1
Heating Circuit
Solar Film
10 Ohm Resistor
Battery
2-channel
Hobo Data Logger
Battery
Voltage Logger
Internal Temperature
Probe
External Temperature
Probe
Results and Analysis (3 to 5 minutes)
– Compare predicted and actual
– Data, Plots, Pictures, Videos
– All of the above should be analyzed and conclusions
made
– Include a recap of how your BalloonSat flight went
– NOTE: Use your HOBO Temp and RH data but it should not be the
focus of your results and analysis section. Show it, explain it, but then
move on. I am more interested in your HOBO data if it indicates a
failure mode.
– NOTE: Don’t show pre-flight structural testing.
Results and Analysis
Current vs. Altitude
Launch to Burst
0.65
Current (amperes)
•Data shows clear increase in
the light intensity and
therefore current before the
maximum altitude of
commercial aviation
•However from the data
gathered it is very
difficult to conclude
anything about the
effects of commercial
aviation upon light
intensity
•There are not
fluctuations in the light
intensity within the flight
levels as was predicted
0.6
0.55
0.5
0.45
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
Altitude (meters)
25000
30000
35000
•After about 15000m the light intensity
decreases as the satellite reaches into the
darkness of near space
Ascent
Through Flight Levels of Commercial
0.7
Aviation
0.6
Current (amperes)
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
Altitude (meters)
12000
14000
16000
Current vs. Altitude
Showing a Change in Slope at About 7000 Meters
0.65
y = 1E-05x + 0.477
Current (amperes)
0.6
y = 3E-06x + 0.5182
0.55
0.5
0.45
0.4
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
Altitude (meters)
10000
12000
14000
16000
Hobo Data
Pictures From Launch
Failure Analysis
• Camera:
– Failure due to computer glitch or temperature
– Believed to have failed due to the extreme temperature
– About eighty pictures were taken in the beginning of the flight before
the camera failed
– Testing the camera afterwards showed that it worked again
• Internal and external temperature readings on the HOBO:
– Even the initial temperature readings were wrong.
– After the flight, the HOBO was tested, this time receiving accurate
readings.
– While it is impossible to tell the source of the HOBO’s failure, some
possibilities have been eliminated. It can not be extreme cold
because the failing temperature is -20 degrees Celsius and the
camera worked at the beginning of the flight, proving the HOBO was
not too cold.
Conclusions
• It was found that there was an increase in the
rate of light intensity change at the maximum
flight level of commercial aviation (14300
meters)
– This is consistent with our hypothesis
– While we cannot absolutely confirm the
hypothesis, the retrieved data does not conflict
with the hypothesis.
Lessons Learned
•
•
•
•
Team Flight Club gained a large amount of valuable experience throughout
the course.
Changes that would be made to the satellite include, making sure that the
HOBO data logger is fully operational prior to launch by running more tests
and making sure the camera does not become frozen by adding another
heater. Because our HOBO failed prior to launch, we realize we should
have done more extreme cold tests too see where it stops functioning
properly.
In order to get more accurate data to prove or disprove our science
hypothesis, it is necessary to have a more standardized and consistent
method for gathering data. For instance when we standardized our solar
panels we found that each panel did not supply the exact same voltage
under the same light conditions
Among the lessons learned, Team Flight Club has gained valuable electrical
circuit-building experience, and expertise in critical problem solving and
failure analysis.
Ready to Fly Again
• How to store:
– upright, solar panels kept away from sharp objects, caution taken to ensure
that wires both inside and outside of the box are not pulled, at room
temperature.
• To prepare Flight Club for flight:
– Program HOBO and Lascar Voltage Data Logger to start at a specific time,
preferably 30 minutes prior to flight.
– Turn heater should be switched to the “ON” position at least 15 minutes
before flight
– Turn camera should be switched to the “ON” position and back to the
“OFF” position right before flight.
– Tape both switches down to secure.
– By listening to the camera for a long beeping sequence followed by camera
shutter sounds, it can be verified that the program is properly running and
taking pictures.
Appendix
Weight Budget
Part #
Objects
Weight Per Unit (Grams)
Number of Units
Company
Overall Weight (Grams)
n/a
Foam Core with Hot Glue and
Aluminum Tape
Space Grant
109.7
1
109.7
29
1
29
n/a
Hobo H08-004-02
n/a
External Temperature Cable
5
1
5
Space Grant
Space Grant
n/a
Space Grant
Canon A570IS Digital Camera plus
Battery and Memory Card
220
1
220
Heating System
202.7
1
202.7
9V Batteries
45.36
3
136.08
n/a
n/a
Solar Film
1.6
4
6.4
Flight String Tube
10
1
10
El-USB-3
40
1
40
11.34
2
22.68
Paper Clips
1
2
2
Wiring
Total (Grams)
1
5
5
788.56
n/a
n/a
Weight Margin (Weight Left)
211.44
Space Grant
MicroDAQ.com, LTD.
P.O. Box 439
879 Maple Street
Contoocook, NH 03229
n/a
Washers
Space Grant
MPT3.6-75 Sundance Solar
2 East Main Street
Warner, NH 03278
n/a
Lascar Voltage Data Logger plus
Battery
Space Grant
Space Grant
Space Grant
Space Grant
Appendix
Monetary Budget
Objects
Unit Price
Number of Units
Overall Price
Foam Core
Provided
1
n/a
Thermal Sheets
Provided
1
n/a
Hobo H08-004-02
Provided
1
n/a
Canon A570IS
Provided
1
n/a
Heating System
Provided
1
n/a
9V Batteries
Provided
4
n/a
Solar Film
$8.50
4
$34.00
UPS Shipping for Solar Film
$8.62
1
$8.61
Voltage Data Logger
$72.00
1
$72.00
Extra Voltage Logger Battery
$12.00
1
$12.00
UPS Shipping for Data Logger
$11.99
1
$11.99
Dry Ice
13.71
10
$13.71
Diodes
Provided
4
n/a
10Ω (1% Tolerance) Resistor
Provided
2
n/a
Paper Clips
Provided
2
n/a
Total
$152.31
Appendix
Requirements Matrix
Mission Requirements
Completed
Design shall have one additional experiment that collects science data.
The design implemented a light intensity experiment.
After flight, BalloonSat shall be turned in working and ready to fly again.
The BalloonSat shall be returned to Space Grant in working condition
Flight string interface tube shall be a non-metal tube through the center of the BalloonSat and shall be secured to the box so it will not pull through the BalloonSat or interfere with the flight string.
A non-metal tube has been installed into the BalloonSat.
Internal temperature of the BalloonSat shall remain above 0ºC during the flight.
Data received from the HOBO data logger is inconclusive.
Total weight shall not exceed 1000 grams.
The BalloonSat weighs 881.24 grams.
Each team shall acquire (not necessarily measure) ascent and descent rates of the flight string.
Ascent and descent rates were retrieved from the Helium Balloon operator.
Design shall allow for a HOBO H08-004-02 68x48x19 mm and 29 grams.
The HOBO has been implemented into the design.
Design shall allow for external temperature cable.
The external temperature cable has been implemented into the design.
Design shall allow for a Canon A570IS Digital Camera 45x75x90 mm and 220 grams.
The digital camera has been implemented into the design.
BalloonSat shall be made of foam core.
The BalloonSat has been constructed with foam core.
Parts list and budget shall include spare parts.
Spare parts have been included into the budget.
All Balloonists shall have contact information written on the outside along with a US Flag.
Contact information and a US Flag have been attached to the BalloonSat.
Units shall be in metric.
Units are in metric.
Launch is on November 15, 2008. Time and location: 7:30 AM in Windsor, CO. Launch schedule will be given later. Everyone is expected to show up for launch. Only one team member is required to
participate on the recovery. Launch and recovery should be completed by 3:00 PM.
Due to recent changes in FAA regulations, the launch occurred at 7:06 AM. Recovery occurred at 3:00 PM.
No one shall get hurt.
No one has gotten hurt.
All hardware is the property of the Gateway to Space program and must be returned at the end of the semester.
All hardware shall be returned following flight and analysis.
All parts shall be ordered and paid by Chris Koehler’s CU MasterCard by appointment to minimize reimbursement paperwork. All teams shall keep detailed budgets on every purchase and receipts shall be turned
in within 48 hours of purchase with team name written on the receipt.
All parts have been ordered using Chris Koehler’s CU MasterCard with proper documentation. A detailed budget has been kept.
All purchases made by team individuals shall have receipts and must be submitted within 60 days of purchase or reimbursement will be subject to income taxes.
All purchases made by team individuals have been properly documented.
Have fun and be creative.
All team individuals have been having fun and being creative throughout the project.
Absolutely nothing alive will be permitted as payloads with the exception of yellow jackets, mosquitoes, fire ants, earwigs, roaches, or anything you would squish if you found it in your bed.
No live animals shall be present during flight.
Completion of final report (extra credit if team video is included)
The final report shall be completed.
Appendix
•
The advice Team Flight Club would give to next year’s teams would be to figure out
what you want your scientific experiment to be as early as possible. It can be a bit
daunting given a blank slate, but try to come up with the general focus of your
experiment before doing anything else. Also, it’s nice to have an experiment that can be
applied to some real-world phenomena. Remember that the vast majority of the class is
setting up and executing your experiment. Throughout the class, it’s a good idea to keep
things as simple as possible. You’ll find that once you have the general idea for an
experiment, there’ll be many different ways to carry out this idea. More specifically,
there will be a distribution between simple and more complex designs, usually with the
more complex designs trying to explain more things at once. Right about this time you
should nail down the hypothesis for your experiment, which should try to answer how
one specific factor affects some general process. From there you should pick the
experimental design that describes both values as completely as possible. When building
your satellite, be creative and figure out how exactly you want to implement your
experiment. Also, don’t be afraid to utilize the resources that the professor gives you.
With the right question, almost any problem can be solved. Finally, make sure to enjoy
yourself throughout the semester and really get to know your teammates. Hopefully
you’re all in this class because you want to be; with a bit of determination, this can be
one of the most memorable classes you’ll ever take.
•
P.S. If at all possible, don’t sleep in on launch day.