Download ELEMENT FITNESS ELEMENTARY ALWAYS SORE? DON'T

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Vegetarianism wikipedia, lookup

Ketogenic diet wikipedia, lookup

Gluten-free diet wikipedia, lookup

Diet-induced obesity model wikipedia, lookup

Low-carbohydrate diet wikipedia, lookup

Raw feeding wikipedia, lookup

Human nutrition wikipedia, lookup

DASH diet wikipedia, lookup

Fish oil wikipedia, lookup

Dieting wikipedia, lookup

Nutrition wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
JANUARY 2013
ELEMENT FITNESS
VOL 1 ISSUE 1
ELEMENTARY
ALWAYS SORE? DON'T BLAME YOUR
WORKOUT, LOOK TO YOUR PLATE
"What's with these aches?"
Cook Fresh, Wild, and Pure






Lack of exercise, stress, heredity, and exposure to
harmful chemicals in our environment, and any
combination thereof can lead to inflammation.
Inflammation is often viewed negatively, but it is a
healing process that allows the cells to repair and
protect themselves.
By increasing the fluid volume in a specific area, the
body can more easily transport the materials that are
essential to the healing process. By swelling, cell
permeability is reduced, which prevents pathogens
from entering the cellular environment while the cell
is in a delicate state.2
Sometimes you may be stiff or sore after exercising,
but this is the body's proper response which leads to
repair, growth, and adaptation. Inflammation only
becomes problematic when it never ceases.
The inflammation experienced after exercising can go
from temporary to chronic as a result of a poor diet.3







Balance Your Fat





70% of our immune system cells are found in the
gastrointestinal tract. Therefore diet plays a major
role in recovery, repair, and adaptation.4
An excessive amount of refined sugar in the diet will
contribute to inflammation.5 Junk food is an obvious
source of refined sugar. Most fast food items,
including meat, also include a significant amount of
refined sugar. Even many restaurant menu items
include some form of hidden sugar.6
Inflammation may also occur from a lack of balance
in fatty acids in our diets. Our body can produce
many types of fatty acids, but we must get two
varieties from our diets: Omega-3s and Omega-6s.
An imbalance between them can prolong and in
some cases cause inflammation.7
The ideal ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 is 2-3 to 1, as
evidenced by the reduction in arthritis,
cardiovascular disease symptoms, and respiratory
disease symptoms achieved with this ratio.8
However, the standard American diet has a ratio of
15/1 - 16.7/1.9


The good news is that it's relatively easy to make the diet
modifications necessary to restore a proper Omega-6 to
Omega-3 ratio, and to reduce systemic inflammation.
One way to fight inflammation on your own is to know
the ingredients of the foods you are putting in your body.
The best way to do this is to shop for your own food and
cook your own meals.
Aim for variety in your diet. Eat a diet centered around
fresh vegetables and proteins high in Omega-3s.
Not all veggies are equal. Leafy green vegetables such as
spinach are high in anti-inflammatory carotenoids.2
Most varieties of fish contain nearly 100% Omega-3s.10
Wild-caught varieties have the highest levels of Omega-3s
and are now available in local grocery stores.
Meats with proper Omega 6-Omega 3 ratios include
grass-fed beef, bison, deer, and wild turkey.
Most cooking oils are heavy in Omega-6s. Olive oil is the
best option for cooking, as it displaces Omega-6s without
interfering with Omega-3s.1
Drink plenty of purified water. Hydration ensures that
your body can transport nutrients to the areas that
require repair. Quality of drinking water can be altered by
groundwater pollution and plumbing, so purification is a
must.
And remember, the key to success is remembering that
leaving the bad stuff out of your diet is just as important
as putting the good stuff in your diet.
As always, check with your physician before making any
dietary changes.
Medical News Today. (2012). "What Is Inflammation? What Causes Inflammation?"
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248423.php
2
Hardin, J., Kroeker, K., Chung, B., & Gall, D. G. (2000). Effect of proinflammatory interleukins on
jejeunal nutrient transport. Gut, 47, 184-191.
3
Esposito, K., Marfella, R., Ciotola, M., Di Palo, C., Giugliano, F., Giugliano, G., D'Armineto, M., &
Giugliano, D. (2004). Effect of a Mediterranean-style diet on endothelial dysfunction and markers of
vascular inflammation in the metabolic syndrome. Journal of the American Medical Association
292(12), 1440-1446.
4
Vighi, G., Marcucci, F., Sensi, L., Di Cara, G., & Frati, F. (2008). Allergy and the gastrointestinal
system. Clinical Experimental Immunology, 153, 3-6.
5
Schenk, S., Saberi, M. & Olefsky, J. M. (2008). Insulin sensitivity: modulation by nutrients and
inflammation. The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 118(9), 2992-3002.
6
USDA Agriculture Research Service. (2006). USDA database for the added sugars content of selected
foods.
7
Simonopoulos, A. P. (2002). Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune disease. Journal
of the American College of Nutrition 21(6), 495-505.
8
MedLine Plus. (2012). Fish oil. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/993.html
9
Simopolous, A. P. (2002). The importance of the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 essential fatty acids.
Biomed Pharmacotherapy, 56(8), 365-79.
10
Mayo Clinic Staff. (2010). Omega-3 in fish: How eating fish helps your heart.
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/omega-3/HB00087
1
Haban, P., Klvanova, J., Zidekova, E., & Nagyova, A. (2004). Dietary supplementation with olive oil
leads to improved lipoprotein spectrum and lower n-6 PUFAs in elderly subjects. Medical Science
Monthly, 10(4), 149-54.
12
Al-Okbi, S. Y. (2012). Nutraceuticals of anti-inflammatory activity as complementary therapy for
rheumatoid arthritis. Toxicology and Industrial Health.
MONTH DAY YEAR
ph 555.555.5555
fx 555.555.5555
mo 555.555.5555
[email protected]
www.webaddress.com
VOL 1 ISSUE 1