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Transcript
DO NOW
Invasive Species
1. House sparrows from England were released in the U.S.
They have competed with native bluebirds causing the
bluebird population to decline. These sparrows are a
____________________ species
10 MINUTES NEMO POSTERS
ARIZONA’S MOST WANTED
Arizona’s Most Wanted stations and Invasive Species REVS
At Each station fill in your chart about the invasive species
You will have 3 minutes at each station
CRAYFISH
Complete the questions as a Think-Pair-Share
http://www.pbs.org/video/2365636215/
EXIT TICKET
1. How can humans minimize their impact on the desert?
2. House sparrows from England were released in the U.S. They have competed with
native bluebirds causing the bluebird population to decline. These sparrows are a
____________________ species
3. Crayfish are a non-native species, which means they are not a natural part of any of
Arizona’s aquatic ecosystems. They compete for habitat and resources with sport fish,
as well as with native fish, insects, frogs, snakes, turtles, and snails, and they
ravenously consume submerged aquatic plants. What would be the result of
introducing crayfish into an Arizona lake or river?
DO NOW
Silent Spring
Bio-magnification and DDT
DDT
A BIT OF DDT HISTORY:
During the World War II era, DDT was hailed as the "savior of
mankind". The chemical had proved itself to be an efficient means of
preventing diseases like malaria, associated with the mosquito. In its
heyday, DDT was the most widely used insecticide of its time. Because
DDT remains in its toxic state for years, farmers enjoyed many
seasons of protection from a single spraying. (still around today)
Upon discovering the housefly’s immunity to DDT, several scientists
began to become skeptical of the actual safety of DDT. In 1946, two
scientists, Elmer Higgins and Clarence Cottam, published an article
about the hazardous affects of DDT on various animal species. The
scientists concluded that DDT had a tendency to accumulate in the
fatty tissue of certain animals.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ipbc-6IvMQI
HOW DOES DDT ENTER
THE FOOD CHAIN?
1. DDT enters a food chain by entering the
environment through water supplies
2. Producers absorb water and other abiotic factors
that are contaminated
3. Consumers eat the producers
As DDT goes up a food chain it can effect an
animals health and ability to reproduce. An
Example would be birds of prey that are exposed
to DDT through the food chain have really thin
eggshells that break before young birds have a
chance to hatch
BIOMAGNIFICATION
The increasing concentration of a
substance, such as a toxic chemical, in the
tissues of organisms at successively higher
levels in a food chain.
1. How is this important for humans?
2. If DDT is used to kill certain insects, what might
happen to other insects that are immune to it?
3. If DDT is used to kill insects, what happens to
the rest of the food web if one species is
removed?
SILENT SPRING
Written by American Author Rachel Carson
Exposed DDT and its harmful effects leading to more
awareness of human impacts on the environment.
Explained bird shells and biomagnification
1. Close read the passage and answer the questions in complete
sentences.
DO NOW
Clean Water act/ laws
Sustainable Practices
 Clear Cutting
 Composting- recycling
 Strip mining/ habitat restoration
SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES
Sustainability
Recycling
Composting
CLEAN WATER ACT
Clean Water Act of 1977 is the primary law that
protects our nations waters.
Before 1977 there were little to no regulations on
polluting water.
Its objective is to restore and maintain the chemical,
physical, and biological integrity of the nation's
waters by preventing pollution, providing help to
publicly owned water treatment sites for wastewater
treatment, and maintaining the integrity of wetlands
STRIP MINING
Strip mining (also known as open cast, mountaintop or surface mining) involves scraping
away earth and rocks to get to coal buried near the surface. In many cases, mountains are
literally blasted apart to reach thin coal seams within, leaving permanent scars on the
landscape as a result. Even though it's highly destructive, industry often prefers strip mining
as it requires less labor and yields more coal than underground mining.
Impacts of strip mining:
1.
Strip mining destroys landscapes, forests and wildlife habitats at the site of the
mine when trees, plants, and topsoil are cleared from the mining area. This in turn
leads to soil erosion and destruction of agricultural land.
2.
When rain washes the loosened top soil into streams, sediments pollute
waterways. This can hurt fish and smother plant life downstream, and cause
disfiguration of river channels and streams, which leads to flooding.
3.
There is an increased risk of chemical contamination of ground water when
minerals in upturned earth seep into the water table, and watersheds are
destroyed when disfigured land loses the water it once held.
A federal law requires mining companies to complete habitat restoration
CLEAR CUTTING
Clearcutting is a logging practice which involves
completely clearing an area of trees, regardless of
their size and usability. Remaining scrub and brush
are usually burnt in large burn piles that can cast a
smoky haze over the area for several days.
1. Causes habitat destruction for animals
2. Leaves no trees
3. River temperatures can rise without shade
harming fish
4. Soil erosion and flooding occur because there
are no tree roots left to keep water or soil in place.
HABITAT RESTORATION
Federal Laws
EXIT TICKET
1. Clean water act question
2. Mining habitat restoration question
3. Plant tree monoculture- soil erosion question
4. When cities protect question
PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE
A very hardy plant which can rapidly destroy wetlands,
lessening their value for wildlife habitat. Hundreds of
species of plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish
and amphibians rely on healthy wetland habitat for their
survival.
However, when purple loosestrife gets a foothold, the
habitat where fish and wildlife feed, seek shelter,
reproduce and rear young, quickly becomes choked
under a sea of purple flowers. Areas where wild rice
grows and is harvested, and where fish spawn, are
degraded. An estimated 190,000 hectares of wetlands,
marshes, pastures and riparian meadows are affected in
North America each year, with an economic impact of
millions of dollars.
RUSTY CRAYFISH
Rusty crayfish are invasive crustaceans spreading to lakes,
rivers, and streams in several areas of North America. They
are more aggressive than other native crayfish, better able
to avoid fish predation, and can harm native fish
populations by eating their eggs and young. They can
displace native crayfish, hybridize with them, and graze on
and eliminate aquatic plants.
Native to the Ohio River drainage, rusty crayfish have
spread to several U.S. states and Ontario. They have likely
spread through bait bucket release by anglers, aquarium
release by hobbyists, activities of commercial harvesters,
and live study specimen release by teachers and students
who buy them from biological supply houses.
DO NOW
Sustainable Practices (gallery walk? Stations notes?)
Clear Cutting/ Topsoil erosion
Habitat restoration
EXIT TICKET
QUIZ