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Transcript
1258
Friday
10:00-16:00
Oxford Internet
Institute
Preconference: China and the New Internet World
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Randy Kluver, Texas A&M U, USA
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Robert Georges Picard, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Nicole Stremlau, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Guobin Yang, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Guoliang Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Peter K Yu, Drake U, USA
Ernest J. Wilson III, U of Southern California, USA
Victoria Nash, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Linchuan Jack Qiu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Yong Hu, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
This preconference is organized around a small number of plenary sessions and parallel panels. The
preconference focuses on China in the New Internet World. The preconference is organized by the Oxford
Internet Institute (OII) in collaboration with the Programme of Comparative Media Law and Policy
(PCMLP) and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) at the University of Oxford, in
partnership with the Chinese Internet Research Conference (CIRC), the Annenberg School for
Communication & Journalism at USC, the Center for Global Communications Studies at the Annenberg
School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, the Global Communication Research
Institute at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Singapore Internet Research Center at Nanyang
Technological University. Additional sponsorship will be provided by Taylor and Francis/Routledge.
2261
Preconference: Governance Through Communication: Stakeholder Engagement, Dialogue, and
Corporate Social Responsibility
Saturday
09:30-16:30
Centre for
Dialogue
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Mette Morsing, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Participants
George Cheney, Kent State U, USA
Bobby Banerjee, U of South Australia, AUSTRALIA
Peter Fleming, Queen Mary, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Martin Parker, Leicester U, UNITED KINGDOM
This two-part preconference investigates the topical question of governance, focusing on the role
communication expertise and practices play in the way in which the idea is constructed and enacted by
government and business organizations. The second part of the conference will focus more closely on
corporate contexts and legitimacy by critically examining key assumptions about corporate social
responsibility (CSR). The conference begins in Scotland’s historic capital of Edinburgh at Queen
Margaret University, home to the Dialogue Centre. After a day of discussing stakeholder engagement and
dialogue – as well as experiencing some key aspects of Scottish culture – we transfer to London with new
perspectives to take forward in discussions of future directions for CSR communication research.
3153
Sunday
08:30-17:00
Media and
Communication
Department
Preconference: 10 Years On: Looking Forwards in Mobile ICT Research
Sponsored Sessions
Respondents
Rich Ling, IT U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Raz Schwartz, Rutgers U, USA
Brett Oppegaard, Washington State U, Vancouver, USA
Christian Licoppe, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Didem Ozkul, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Kathleen Mae Cumiskey, CUNY - Staten Island, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Jason Farman, U of Maryland, USA
This one-and-a-half day preconference, sponsored by the Communications and Technology Division, will
consist of expert panel presentations and reflections at the start and end and strands for the presentation of
papers. The venue will be the Thai Theatre, New Academic Building on the London School of Economics
and Political Sciences. Contemporary studies are already identifying challenges in achieving consistency,
reliability and quality of results in a fast moving world of Big Data, petabytes and change. New research
has already highlighted the effects of people on the move around the globe – migration within and
between nations; as well as emotions, affect and sentiment with regard to using mobile devices.
3172
Sunday
08:45-17:30
Regent Street
Campus Board
Room
Preconference: Global Communications and National Policies: The Return of the State?
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Jeanette Steemers, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Stuart Duncan Cunningham, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Peter Goodwin, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The Reemergence of the Regulatory State
Petros Iosifidis, City U, UNITED KINGDOM
Legal Globalization and Communication Law
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Media Policies Under Populism and the Blindspots of Media Globalization: Insights From Latin America
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: Media, States, and the Global Dimension
Colin Sparks, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Return of the State @ the Heart of “New Internet-Centric Media Order”
Dwayne Roy Winseck, Carleton U, CANADA
The Emergence of New Global Online "Media" Companies: Convergence With a Vengeance
Stuart Duncan Cunningham, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Jon Silver, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Privatization of Global Development: How National Policies Support Private Funding From Global
Communications Industries
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Cultural Policy, Chinese National Identities, and Globalization
Anthony Y.H. Fung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
The Return of Speech: Concepts of Free Speech in Changed Media Regimes
Andrew Kenyon, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
The Implications of Transnational TV for Broadcasting Regulation in Small States
Manuel Puppis, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
State Control, Media Hierarchies, and Globalization: The Case of Xinhua News Agency
Xin Xin, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Public Broadcasters Meet Google: National Cultural Policy vs. Global Competition Policy?
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
The Sound of One Hand Computing: IT Policy and the Indian State
Biswarup Sen, U of Oregon, USA
A Dwarf Fighting Giants: Flemish Media Policies in an Age of Globalization
Karen Donders, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
Hilde Dy Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
The Nation-State and Media Globalization: Has the State Returned -- or Did it Never Leave?
Graeme Turner, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
The State That Never Left: Policy Laundering in Global Communications
Katharine Sarakakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Media Regulation and the Tensions Between a Global, Regional, and National Perspective
Joan Barata Mir, Blanquerna Communications School, ITALY
Challenges for Media Regulation Given the Context of Convergence and Global/Regional Media in the
East African Community
Nassanga Goretti, Makerere U, UGANDA
Nakiwala Sembatya, Makerere U, UGANDA
Need for a Helping Hand? Media Policy Paradigm Shifts in Times of Crisis
Corinna Wenzel, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
Stefan Gadringer, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
Josef Trappel, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
Between Google and Godliness: Government Regulation of Blasphemy
Cherian George, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Media and Citizenship
Christina Slade, Bath Spa U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Media Welfare State: Nordic Media in the Era of Globalization
Ole J. Mjos, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Gunn Enli, , NORWAY
Trine Syvertsen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Global Social Media and the Challenges to European Audiovisual Regulatory Frameworks
Ole J. Mjos, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Global E-Commerce and National and EU Policies: The Case of Value Added Tax on Ebooks in Europe
Terje Colbjornsen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Power Behind the Scene: State-Aided Media Concentration in Transitional Taiwan
Ya-Chi Chen, Chinese Culture U, TAIWAN
The Emergence of New Players in the Southern Europe Media Markets: How Regulation and the
Financial Crises Are Altering Media Ownership
Nelson Costa Ribeiro, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Rita Maria Figueiras, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Between Economic Objectives and Public Remit: Positive and Negative Integration in European Media
Policy
Eva G. M. Nowak, Jade U Wilhelmshaven, GERMANY
Enforcement of National Legislation on Global Social Networks; Mission Impossible?
Eva Lievens, KU Leuven, BELGIUM
Narrating Neoliberalism via Financial Media: Comparing China’s Accession Into WTO in Economist and
Caijing
Jingwei Piao, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Digital Copyright and the State: Enforcing International Norms on Citizens
Lucas Logan, Texas A&M U, USA
Harmonization and Autonomy of Media Policy Within the European Union
Cornelia Wallner, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Public and Private Ordering: The Case of Search Engines
Joelle Farchy, U of Paris - Sorbonne, FRANCE
Cecile Meadel, Mines ParisTech, FRANCE
Global Communications and National Policies: The View From the EU
Maria Michalis, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Building a Regional Film Space through National Policies? Analysis of Film Policies of Mercousr
Countries Aimed at Regional Integration
Daniele Pereira Canedo, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
National vs. Global Media Policies: The Case of Mediaset and SkyItalia’s Struggle Over the Italian
Television Sector
Cinzia Padovani, International Association for Media and Communication Research, USA
From “Foreign Propaganda” to “Cultural Soft Power”: Reading the National Regulations on Global Media
in China
Min Tang, U of Illinois, USA
There has been much discussion as to whether forces associated with globalization (economic, political,
cultural) weaken the capacity of nation-states to regulate media institutions and media content. These
debates intersect with the shift towards convergent digital media, with the associated rise of user-created
content, multi-platform content distribution, and moves from the mass communications paradigm that
dominated 20th century media policy. At the same time, arguments have been made that the scalar shift
towards media globalization has been overstated, and national governments remain key players in shaping
the media environment, with media corporations responding to the legal and policy frameworks they deal
with at a national level. This one-day preconference event will consider the relationship between global
communications and national policies from a multidisciplinary perspective, incorporating global media
studies, political economy, technology studies, and law and policy studies. This preconference event is
sponsored by the Communication and Media Research Institute, University of Westminster, with the
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation. It is cosponsored by the Global Communications & Social Change Division, the Communications Law & Policy
Division, and the Communications & Technology Division of the ICA.
3251
Sunday
09:00-17:00
Conference Room
3265
Sunday
09:00-20:00
Khalili Lecture
Theatre
Preconference: New Histories of Communication Study
Sponsored Sessions
This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as
a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA,
ECREA, IAMCR, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field
conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to
push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to
overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and
comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies,
journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural,
discursive, and material history.
Preconference: New Media, Old Media, Social Media: Changing South Asian Communications
Scholarship
Sponsored Sessions
Home to more than a billion and one half people, South Asia enjoys a shared history combined with a
unique cultural, religious, political, linguistic, and ethnic diversity. South Asian media reflects this
diversity through its cultural products, which are becoming increasingly popular throughout the region
and in other parts of the world. This 2-day preconference will explore the emerging media systems,
mediated publics and communications pedagogy in South Asia, in the context of the region’s growing
salience in the dynamics of globalization. It will cover a range of topics on new media as well as
conventional media, to provide a critical account of the media changes underway in South Asia and their
implications for national politics, regional political dynamics, public cultures and communications
scholarship. The preconference workshop will focus on themes of topical relevance for South Asia and for
ICA members studying the region, by combining invited presentations with an open call for papers for
each issue-specific panel.
4115
International Communication Association Executive Committee Meeting
Monday
08:00-12:00
Clarence
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
4125
Monday
08:00-17:00
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Preconference: Transmedia Storytelling: Theories, Methods, and Research Strategies
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Indrek Ibrus, Tallinn U, ESTONIA
Carlos Alberto Scolari, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
The objective of this preconference is to create an interdisciplinary environment for exchanging research
experiences on transmedia storytelling. 21st century media convergence processes – that could be
interpreted not only as a concentration of media ownership but as a complex series of operations that
involve technological, professional, and cultural aspects – have completely changed the traditional
communication landscape. In this context, many contemporary media productions are characterized by: 1)
the expansion of their narrative through different media (film, TV, comics, etc.) and platforms (blogs,
YouTube, etc.), and 2) the creation of user-generated contents that contribute to expanding the original
story. In 2003 Henry Jenkins defined such productions as transmedia storytelling. In this preconference
we place transmedia storytelling at the centre of a scientific exchange environment. Transmedia
storytelling is one of the main strategies of media companies, and a significant practice for the consumers
that cooperate in the expansion of a narrative. On the other side, transmedia storytelling is an
interdisciplinary research object that can be studied under different approaches: Media Studies, Political
Economy, Media Economics, Narratology, Ludology, Film Studies, Semiotics, Ethnography, etc.
International research on TS is expanding but it is still a fragmented field. This preconference will provide
a venue for innovative scholars from around the world who are doing research in exploring transmedia
storytelling.
4152
Monday
08:00-16:30
3.21 Old Building
Preconference: Beyond the Brand (Popular Communication Preconference)
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Devon Powers, Drexel U, USA
Melissa Aronczyk, Carleton U, CANADA
One of the most vital shifts in contemporary communication relates to the ways in which interpersonal
and public communication have been (re)located and transformed in increasingly promotional contexts.
The “work” of the brand is to stand at once for representation and identity, communication and control,
market and media. As concept, metaphor, technology and communicative logic, the brand is part popular
culture and part commerce, part personal and part collective, part rationality and part affect. It appears to
be everywhere even as it effectively seeks to hide its origins. What resources do scholars have to get
“beyond the brand”? How can we come up with more effective and trenchant definitions and analytical
tools to overcome the brand’s seeming ubiquity, and to defuse its apparent power in language and in
practice? The goal of this preconference is to develop resources and strategies in four thematic areas:
brands and methods/critique; brands, knowledge, and surveillance; brands and communities of resistance
(locally and transnationally); and brands and industrial/institutional change.
4164
Monday
08:00-17:00
Clore Management
Centre
Preconference: Conditions of Mediation: Phenomenological Approaches to Media, Technology, and
Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Tim Markham, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Paddy Scannell, U of Michigan, USA
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Lisa Parks, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Graham Harman, American U of Cairo, EGYPT
David Berry, U of Swansea, UNITED KINGDOM
Media theory seems to have reached a moment in which it is effectively orthodox to presume we must pay
attention first and foremost to the intricacies of everyday experience. Studies of digital and networked
media, meanwhile, have put into question the very notion of ‘audiences’ as the starting point for
understanding mediated experience. For some, accounting for the intricacies of everyday mediated
experience has implied asking people what they actually do with media. But for others this is not enough:
instead, the question is what constitutes the conditions of media experience in the first place. Such
questions point to a renewed confidence in explaining not just how but also why media, technology and
communication are experienced as they are – all the while resisting a reversion to functionalism. These
interests in the very conditions of mediation suggest, if sometimes only implicitly, an emerging interest in
a phenomenology of media. Indeed, phenomenology – broadly the structuring of perception – has
seemingly obvious relevance for recent academic interests in media experience. Yet its use or invocation
in media studies has been scattered. This preconference seeks to bring together scholars from a very wide
range of perspectives – such as media history, media archaeology, audience studies, political theory,
metaphysics, software studies, science and technology studies, digital aesthetics, cultural geography and
urban studies – to reflect explicitly on the phenomenological groundings of their work on media.
4166
Preconference: Multilingual and Multicultural Communication
Monday
08:15-17:30
V211
Sponsored Sessions
Recent research, including that by MERCATOR (The Fryske Akademy, The Netherlands) an
independent European Research Centre for Multilingualism, has begun to acknowledge multilingual
communication as a norm worldwide, with an increasing amount of research being focused on the
complexities underlying multilingualism in individual, developmental, and societal perspectives. With
this proposal, which is a joint enterprise of MERCATOR, the School of Oriential and Asian Studies
(University of London), the ICA-affiliated International Association of Language and Social Psychology,
and the ICA Intergroup Communication Interest Group, we aim to explore some of these recent trends
from an interdisciplinary perspective with insights from sociolinguistics, sociology, social psychology and
communication theory.
4108
Preconference: Organizational Communication Division Doctoral Consortium: Expanding Your
Scholarly Comfort Zone
Monday
08:30-17:00
York
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Brenda J. Allen, U of Colorado, USA
Kevin J Barge, Texas A&M U, USA
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montréal, CANADA
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Johny T. Garner, Texas Christian U, USA
Matt Koschmann, U of Colorado, USA
Debashish Munshi, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Anne M Nicotera, George Mason U, USA
Linda L. Putnam, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Sarah J. Tracy, Arizona State U, USA
Paaige Kelle Turner, Saint Louis U, USA
Bart J. van den Hooff, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Every 2 years the division has sponsored its doctoral consortium to help socialize students as they move
toward finishing their degrees. This full-day workshop brings together doctoral students and faculty to
examine contemporary issues related to the development of our next generation of scholars. This is open
to all doctoral students, but targeted toward more advanced students who are dissertating and/or who are
about to finish coursework. As we hold our division’s first doctoral consortium outside the familiarity of
North America, it is appropriate to discuss various ways in which we must learn to expand our scholarly
comfort zone amid a variety of changes in our world. This preconference will use a diverse set of faculty
mentors to help doctoral students think through the promises (and perils) of various transitions that take us
beyond what may be most comfortable to us.
4122
Monday
08:30-17:00
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
4143
Monday
08:30-12:30
Graduate School of
Journalism
Preconference: Language and Engagement in Changing Forms of Public Interaction
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Joanna Thornborrow, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Mats Ekstrom, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Åsa Kroon Lundell, Örebro U, SWEDEN
Kay Richardson, U of Liverpool, UNITED KINGDOM
Marianna Patrona, Hellenic Military Academy, GREECE
Richard Fitzgerald, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Andrew Tolson, De Montfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
Michal Hamo, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Stephanie Marriott, Bangor U, UNITED KINGDOM
Evelyn Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
David Boromisza-Habashi, U of Colorado, USA
Richard Buttny, U of Syracuse, USA
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Saskia Witteborn,Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Preconference: Internationalizing Journalism Studies
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Michael Stuart Bromley, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Howard Tumber, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Ibrahim Mostafa Saleh, International Association for Media and Communication Research, USA
Hillel Nosseck, College of Management Academic Studies, ISRAEL
Vera Slavtcheva-Petkova, U of Chester, UNITED KINGDOM
Janet Ellen Steele, George Washington U, USA
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
Although Journalism Studies has matured rapidly as a scholarly field in recent years, the question of the
attention it pays to its object of study globally remains a vexed one. Even the terminology of
‘internationalization’ is contested. The aim of this pre-conference, following on from the journalism
extended session organized by Stephanie Craft in Phoenix, is to explore why and how Journalism Studies
may become more routinely attuned to the multiplex nature of journalism through theorisation and
methodological practices. Its objective is to offer suggestions for enhancing the internationalization of the
field through individual scholarship and institutional infrastructure.
4144
Monday
08:30-17:00
Conference Room
4153
Monday
08:30-13:00
Media and
Communication
Department
Preconference: The Objects of Journalism: Media, Materiality, and the News
Sponsored Sessions
Studying the “objects of journalism” involves looking at the role of actual things in the journalism
production process. This pre-conference aims at moving away from perspectives focusing on overarching
forces — be they of an economic, ideological or technical nature — as the main explanation of what
happens in the making of the news. Without denying the existence of such forces, the approach advocated
here tentatively explores the very material objects, sometimes seemingly innocuous or univocal, involved
in journalistic production. It is an effort, in other words, towards fully embodying a vast set of
heterogeneous objects that were or are enrolled in the making of the news: from the carrier-pigeon to
Google algorithms, from Remington typewriters to robot-journalism. Taking objects seriously strikes us
as being an approach towards which some very challenging research and researchers are currently
tending, but also as lacking a larger, unified framework for discussing potential items of research. We also
aim, finally, to help to facilitate discussion between those who scholars who might embrace this "material
turn" and those who might see it as a return to a realist ontology perhaps best left behind. In a word, this
preconference is concerned to reveal the very concrete materiality of journalism.
Preconference: 10 Years On: Looking Forwards in Mobile ICT Research
Sponsored Sessions
Respondents
Rich Ling, IT U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Raz Schwartz, Rutgers U, USA
Brett Oppegaard, Washington State U, Vancouver, USA
Christian Licoppe, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Didem Ozkul, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Kathleen Mae Cumiskey, CUNY - Staten Island, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Jason Farman, U of Maryland, USA
This one-and-a-half day preconference, sponsored by the Communications and Technology Division, will
consist of expert panel presentations and reflections at the start and end and strands for the presentation of
papers. The venue will be the Thai Theatre, New Academic Building on the London School of Economics
and Political Sciences. Contemporary studies are already identifying challenges in achieving consistency,
reliability and quality of results in a fast moving world of Big Data, petabytes and change. New research
has already highlighted the effects of people on the move around the globe – migration within and
between nations; as well as emotions, affect and sentiment with regard to using mobile devices.
4154
Preconference: ICA Political Communication 2013 Graduate Student Preconference
Monday
08:30-16:00
TW1.2.01
Sponsored Sessions
4156
Preconference: The Political Communication of Young Citizens Through Social Media
Monday
08:30-16:00
STC.S75
Sponsored Sessions
Aims: The preconference goals include providing guidance, feedback and professional socialization to
political communication graduate students at the master's and doctoral levels, introducing graduate
students to ICA and inviting them to take part in the academic discourse on political communication
through ICA, and cultivating a network among young political communication scholars. To achieve these
goals, the preconference will bring together a select group of graduate students working on political
communication projects and provide them with the opportunity to present and discuss their projects in a
constructive atmosphere. The preconference will also address common issues graduate students face,
including working toward publication and building a CV.
Participants
The Civic Network: Young Citizens, Political Engagement, and Social Media
ariadne vromen, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
Brian Loader, U of York, UNITED KINGDOM
Does Participatory Culture Create Civic Youth?
Mats Ekstrom, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Tobias Olson, Lund U, SWEDEN
Johan Östman, Örebro U, SWEDEN
Political Influence Within Parent-Child Dyads: Partisanship, Candidate Preference, and Political
Participation
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
It's Communication, Stupid
Stephen Coleman, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
YouTube's Fantasies of Political Agency
Nico Carpentier, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
Organization in the Crowd: Twitter as Integrative Mechanism in the Networked Organization of the
Occupy Protests
W. Lance Bennett, U of Washington, USA
Alexandra Segerberg, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Islam on the Visual Battleground
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Young Citizens and the Fine Art of Disengaging Online
Kjerstin Thorson, U of Southern California, USA
Social Media and Citizenship Education: What Do Teachers and Students Do, Why, and What Do They
Want for the Future?
Ian Davies, U of York, UNITED KINGDOM
Networking Young Citizens
Suzanne Mellor, ACER Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Thinking Beyond the Usual
Chris Waller, Association for Citizenship Teaching, UNITED KINGDOM
Key Issues in Researching Citizenship Education
David Kerr, Citizenship Foundation, UNITED KINGDOM
The Outraged Young: Young Europeans, Civic Engagement, and the Social Media in a Time of Crisis
James Sloam, Royal Holloway, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
This one-day preconference explores the influence of social media communications technologies upon the
participatory culture of young citizens. Comprising a number of leading international communications
scholars in this field, it will consider these issues from a number of theoretical and methodological
approaches, attempting to move beyond simplistic notions of young people as ‘the internet generation.’
4121
Monday
08:45-16:00
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
4126
Monday
08:45-16:00
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Preconference: Exploring and Remaking Critical Studies of Advertising
Sponsored Sessions
Few other areas of communication research are as ripe for reassessment and reformulation as is the critical
study of advertising. Current and impending practices of advertising have outstripped in many ways the
reach of traditional modes of critique. The purposes of this preconference program are to present and
discuss constitutive relationships between traditional critiques of advertising and the contexts of their
emergence; probe, discuss, and evaluate recent and emergent theoretical resources for more historically
responsive bases of a critical assessment of advertising in society; track, explain, and characterize changes
in the advertising ecosystem (including changing role of media planners, buyers, third-party ad networks,
data-mining companies, and online intermediaries; identify potential social and political implications due
to changes in the advertising industry; and explore and assess new or neglected critical approaches to
advertising.
Exploring and Remaking Critical Studies of Advertising (Breakout Room)
Sponsored Sessions
4171
Preconference: The BRICS Nations: Between National Identity and Global Citizenship
Monday
08:45-18:00
Conference
Building
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Peter Goodwin, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Xin Xin, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Xin Zhong, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Zhengrong Hu, Communication U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Paula U. Chakravartty, U of Massachusetts, USA
Jian Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Kaarle Nordenstreng, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Daya Thussu, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Elena Vartanova, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Participants
Panel One: New Trends in the Media Industries and Popular Cultures of the BRICS Nations: A
Comparative Perspective
Hongmei Li, Georgia State U, USA
Panel Two: National/Global Identity Building, Nationalism, and Cosmopolitanism
Jeanette Steemers, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Panel Three: Public Diplomacy, External Communications, and Soft Power
Leslie Louise Marsh, Georgia State U, USA
Panel Four: Theoretical and Methodological Issues on Transcultural Studies of the BRICS Nations:
Roundtable Discussions
Colin Sparks, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
This preconference aims to compare the construction of national identities and global citizenship among
five leading emerging economies—Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa or the “BRICS” nations.
It draws particular attention to the internal and external challenges and opportunities the five countries
face in the process of construction and reconstruction of their national and global identities in the digital
environment. It will discuss the pressing issues the five nations face in the context of emerging consumer
culture and reconstructing their national and global identities. It aims to advance research on emerging
nations by bringing together scholars who conduct interdisciplinary research with a comparative
approach.
4211
Monday
09:00-17:00
Waterloo/Tower
Preconference: From Feminism, With a Feminist Agenda: Digital Interventions to Incite Change in
Publishing, Pedagogy, the Academy, and Our Networks
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Carol A. Stabile, Center for the Study of Women in Society, USA
Mari Castaneda, U of Massachusetts, USA
Kimberly Anne Sawchuk, Concordia U, CANADA
Lisa Nakamura, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Lisa Parks, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Anne Balsamo, U of Southern California, USA
Alex Juhasz, Pitzer College, USA
Bryce Peake, U of Oregon, USA
Nina B. Huntemann, Suffolk U, USA
Nermin Moufti, OCAD U, CANADA
Sarah Kember, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Mél Hogan, Concordia U, CANADA
Tara McPherson, U of Southern California, USA
Jessie Daniels, Hunter College, USA
YeonJu Oh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Emma Westecott, OCAD U, CANADA
Angela McRobbie, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Joan Haran, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Shakuntala Banaji, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Phyllis Dako-Gyeke, U of Ghana, GHANA
Kimberly Juanita Brown, Northeastern U, USA
Karen Estlund, U of Oregon
Micha Cardenas, Independent Researcher
Urmila Goel, Independent Scholar and Trainer
Sumana Harihareswara, Wikimedia Foundation
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U of Ohio
Leslie Regan Shade, U of Toronto
Caroline Seck Langill, OCAD U
Caroline Bassett, U of Sussex
Kate Riordan, U of Sussex
Ursula Huws, U of Hertfordshire
This preconference produces a space for Feminist Communication scholars using or seeking to use new
media tools for activist agendas to dialogue on strategies in the areas of pedagogy, publishing and
networking. Reflecting the spirit of the ICA 2013 conference, “Challenging Communication Research,” it
“storms” traditional methods of pedagogy, publishing, mentoring, and networking, at the fulcrum where
feminist scholarship meets digital methods. It brings together two key networks using feminist methods
with agendas in publishing and pedagogy, FemBot and FemTechNet, which are led and facilitated by
leading Feminist Communication scholars. These groups, working in tandem and collaboratively, will
present their work to date, offering models for collaboration and creation. In the spirit of our work, the
preconference is facilitated by a diversity of speakers and dialogue leaders: academic and non-academic,
junior and senior, and from a range of institutions, nation states and ethnic, class and racial backgrounds.
4212
Monday
09:00-16:30
Chelsea/Richmond
The Power of Play Breakout II
Sponsored Sessions
4213
The Power of Play Breakout I
Monday
09:00-16:30
St. James
Sponsored Sessions
4214
Preconference: The Power of Play: Motivational Uses and Applications
Monday
09:00-16:30
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
4216
Preconference: 4th Annual Doctoral Consortium of the Communication and Technology Division
Monday
09:00-17:00
Belgrave
Sponsored Sessions
4217
Preconference: Communication Science: Evolution, Biology, and Brains: Innovation in Theory and
Methods
Monday
09:00-17:00
Berkeley
Sponsored Sessions
The goal of this preconference is to shed light on the motivational aspects of digital games and gameplay,
how they relate to the ways in which games are used for entertainment and other purposes, the domains in
which they are applied, the challenges in their design and application, and the ways in which they are
studied. There will be three concurrent sessions of presentations scheduled for each hour. The roundtable
luncheon discussion will be facilitated by the preconference organization commitee with discussion topics
allocated for each round table. Participants will be asked to sit at a table of their interest to discuss the
allocated topic and exchange contact information with other participants. After the pre-conference, all
accepted extended abstracts, unless stated other vice by the presenter, will be published on ICA GSIG's
website and will be accessed by public free of charge.
The Communication and Technology (CAT) Division proudly announces the fourth Doctoral Consortium
to be held in conjunction with the 2013 Conference of the International Communication Association. The
consortium brings together PhD candidates working on Communication and Technology to give them the
opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and international atmosphere. The goals
of the event are to provide feedback and advice to participating PhD candidates on their in-progress
research thesis. Moreover, the doctoral consortium will provide the opportunity to meet experts as well as
fellow PhD candidates from different backgrounds working on related topics. During the consortium,
students will be invited to present their work, following which they will receive feedback from their
fellow students and faculty participants, all of whom will have read the proposals in advance of the
Doctoral Consortium. In addition, at least one faculty participant will be assigned to respond in detail to
each proposal.
Chairs
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Allison Eden, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Frequency of Online Involvement and Neural Sensitivity to Exclusion
Joseph Bayer, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew Brook O'Donnell, U of Michigan, USA
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Christopher Cascio, U of Michigan, USA
Telepresence by Choice: Evolution of Media Uses
Cheryl Campanella Bracken, Cleveland State U, USA
Gary R. Pettey, Cleveland State U, USA
Towards a Science of Television News Research: Nonverbal Analysis of News Visuals
Erik P. Bucy, Texas Tech U, USA
Neural Correlates of Social Influence in Adolescence: Attitudes Towards Mobile Game Applications
Christopher Cascio, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew Brook O'Donnell, U of Michigan, USA
Frank Tinney, U of Michigan, USA
Joseph Bayer, U of Michigan, USA
Kristin Shumaker, U of Michigan, USA
Josh Carp, U of Michigan, USA
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Loving a Fantasy: How Neuroscientific and Biophysical Measures Can Provide Insight Into Parasocial
Romance and Sexual Socialization
Sarah Erickson, U of Michigan, USA
Humans Are People, Too: Nurturing an Appreciation for Nature in Communication Research
Kory Floyd, Arizona State U, USA
Music, Morality, Mind: Voices From Jamaica’s Music Community, Ethical Universals, and Neuroscience
Intersect
Vernita Pearl Fort, U of Illinois, USA
Patterns of Change in Heart Rate During Interpersonal Communication
Steven Michael Giles, Wake Forest U, USA
Jack Rejeski, Wake Forest U, USA
Jennifer S Priem, Wake Forest U, USA
Cooperative Video Game Play and Generosity: Oxytocin Production as a Causal Mechanism Regarding
Prosocial Behavior Resulting From Cooperative Video Game Play
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Evolution of What? A Network Approach to the Definition of Evolving Populations
Martin Hilbert, U of Southern California, USA
Poong Oh, U of Southern California, USA
Peter Monge, U of Southern California, USA
Study of the Impact of Imagined Interactions and Arguing Among Couples on Heart Rate
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Does Signaling Theory Predict Aggressive Behaviors in Video Games?
Richard Wayne Huskey, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Communication Optimization Model: A Proposal for an Evolutionary Model of Communication Media
Yoram M. Kalman, Open U of Israel, ISRAEL
May I Have Your Attention Please? A Neuroscientific Study Into Message Attention for Health
Information
Loes Kessels, U of Maastricht, THE NETHERLANDS
Exploring the Relations Between Video Games, Emotional Responses, and Eye Tracking
Jeroen S Lemmens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sindy R. Sumter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Multilevel Emergence of Communication Phenomena: A Philosophical Review of Subjectivity and
Evolutionary Psychology From a Neurophysiological Perspective
J. Michael Mangus, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Biology, Beauty, and the News: Do Evolutional Factors Influence Decision Making of Journalists?
Dana Markowitz-Elfassi, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Exploring Neural and Linguistic Correlates of Enthusiastic Idea Propagation and Recommendation
Matthew Brook O'Donnell, U of Michigan, USA
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Kristin Shumaker, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew D Lieberman, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Perceived Distance Between Accents, Religious Groups, and Attraction to Ingroup-Accented Speakers, is
Calibrated to the Costs of Infection Risk
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jinguang Zhang, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jessica Gasiorek, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Marko Dragojevic, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Susana Peinado, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Becky Robinson, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Grace Leigh Anderson, Samford U, USA
How Evolutionary Theory Improves Health (Communication)
Doreen Reifegerste, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Personalized Media Processes and Effects: A Look at Relevant Biologically Based and Socially
Constructed Individual Differences and Emotional Responses to Media
Bridget E Rubenking, U of Central Florida, USA
Exploring Narrative Comprehension Through Neural Networks: Challenges of Leveraging Neuroimaging
Techniques in Communication Research
Scott W Ruston, Arizona State U, USA
Gene Brewer, Arizona State U, USA
Adam Cohen, Arizona State U, USA
Steven R. Corman, Arizona State U, USA
Anthony J. Roberto, Arizona State U, USA
Risk Perception Affects Neural Responses to Real-Life Risk Communication
Ralf Schmälzle, U of Konstanz, GERMANY
Frank Häcker, U of Konstanz, GERMANY
Britta Renner, U of Konstanz, GERMANY
Christopher Honey, Princeton U, USA
Harald Schupp, U of Konstanz, GERMANY
Cross-Validating a State Empathy Scale With fMRI Data
Lijiang Shen, U of Georgia, USA
Tianming Liu, U of Georgia, USA
Kaiming Li, U of Georgia, USA
Two Mechanisms to Rule Them All: The Cognitive Science of Media Experience
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Passive-Active Brain Control Interface for Collaborative Artistic Interaction in a Virtual World
David Harris Smith, McMaster U, CANADA
Kiret Dhindsa, McMaster U, CANADA
Orienting Responses to Expectation Violations in Narrative Processing
Freya Sukalla, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Heather Shoenberger, U of Missouri, USA
Exploring Physical Mobility in Interactive Media Use From an Embodied Cognition Perspective
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
This preconference responds to the critical mass of communication researchers who have taken up
biological explanations, and seeks to bring together researchers under the explicit umbrella of our field
and our questions. The preconference brings together scholars who are working across subfields of
communication studies and use evolutionary theory, biological explanations as well as neuroscience and
other biological measures to address core questions in communication studies. Most importantly, the
preconference participants will share new data and ideas and discuss a vision for how communication
studies can best leverage such new theorizing and study paradigms moving forward. The main theme of
this pre-conference is that models and relationships discovered throughout the history of our field must
continue to play an important role in our thinking, but those models and relationships must be updated to
reflect current scientific thinking.
4223
Monday
09:00-17:30
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Preconference: New Media and Citizenship in Asia: Researching the Practices, Functions, and
Effects of the New Media in Asian Politics
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Junho Choi, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Participants
How is the Television Political Program Twittered?: Twitter’s Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effect
Sohei Lim, Ewha Womans U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Seung-hee Lee, Ewha Womans U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Playing With Hegemony: Changing Receptions of the CCTV’s Annual Spring Festival Gala in China
Jin Wang, New York U, USA
Internet and Civic Engagement in the Midst of Social Differentiation: An Analysis From a Nationwide
Survey in China
Baohua Zhou, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Regime Change and Social Media Adoption: Identifying Contextual Determinants of Facebook Diffusion
Shin Haeng Lee, U of Washington, USA
Getting News Everywhere: How Incidental News Exposure on the Internet Promotes Young Adults’
Political Participation
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Byung-Gu Lee, U of Wisconsin, USA
Use of Political Podcast in South Korea During Election Campaign: Twitter-Mediated Communication
Network of “Naggomsu”
Jiyoung Kim, Yeungnam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Steven Sam, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
Han Woo Park, Yeungnam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Social Media, Political Efficacy, and Political Engagement
Chang Sup Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
A Trigger or a Muffler?: Examining the Dynamics Between Online Social Media Use and Participation in
the 2012 Presidential Election of South Korea
Soo Young Bae, U of Michigan, USA
South Korean Young Adults’ Dependency on Parents and Their Political Engagement in the Digital Age
Jiwoo Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Chang Sup Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Being a Real Journalist Who Tells the Truth: A Case Study of the Newstapa
Wooyeol Shin, U of Minnesota, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jiyoon Ryu, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Developing Bridging Social Capital Using Smartphones
Tetsuro Kobayashi, National Institute of Informatics, Japan, JAPAN
Jeffrey Boase, Ryerson U, CANADA
Tsutomu Suzuki, Research Organization of Information and Systems, JAPAN
Takahisa Suzuki, Graduate U for Advanced Studies, JAPAN
Social Media and Offline Political Participation: Uncovering the Paths From Digital to Physical
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Impact of Social Media on Political Participation: The Case of Taiwan’s 2012 Presidential Elections
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Media Scandals in China
Ruoyun Bai, U of Toronto, CANADA
New Media and Citizenship: Online Communicative Spaces and the Dialectics of Identity-Based Political
Mobilisations
T.T. Sreekumar, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Cheryll Ruth Reyes Soriano, De La Salle U, PHILIPPINES
Internet Aggregators Constructing the Political Right Wing
Muneo Kaigo, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Examining Korea’s 2012 Presidential Election Campaigns Using (Negative) Entropy Indicator
Han Woo Park, Yeungnam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Mobile Communication and Civic Engagement in South Korea: Examining the Interactions Between
Public and Private Realms of Use
Hoon Lee, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Rich Ling, IT U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Framing and Misframing in Microblogging Sites in China: Online Propagation of Animal Cruelty
Campaign
Yuanxin Wang, Temple U, USA
Water-Data Community: Making Social Media Relevant to Local Citizenship and Participation
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Deepak Menon, Arghyam and Leader of the India Water Portal (digital commons) Bangalore,
INDIA
Where They Agree: How Media Exposure, Political Cynicism and Supporting Online Deliberation
Influence Consonance in Online and Offline Public Opinion
Debbie Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Natalie Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
This preconference aims to showcase innovative scholarly work examining various subjects concerning
the role of social media, mobile phones, and other new communication technologies in the formation of
democratic citizenship writ large—in Asia. The preference seeks studies that address relevant topics in a
particular Asian county, and comparative research on Asian countries or Asian and non-Asian countries is
also welcome. In particular, the preconference welcomes research on recent national elections in Asian
countries, which presents a theory-driven analysis of the role of social media in real-world, offline civic
and political action.
4227
Monday
09:00-12:30
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Preconference: Teaching CAM: Pedagogical Issues and Practical Strategies for Sharing Theory and
Research Related to Children, Adolescents, and Media
Sponsored Sessions
Participant
CAM Presession Overview
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Senior scholars have volunteered to share their “best practices” for teaching and learning around five key
themes (see below). Thematic panels will include short presentations (2-3 minutes each) by a team of
CAM scholars. We invite the participation of all workshop attendees who have questions or experiences
they want to share.
4241
Monday
09:00-17:00
Cass Business
School
Preconference: Governance Through Communication: Stakeholder Engagement, Dialogue, and
Corporate Social Responsibility
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Mette Morsing, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Participants
George Cheney, Kent State U, USA
Bobby Banerjee, U of South Australia, AUSTRALIA
Peter Fleming, Queen Mary, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Martin Parker, Leicester U, UNITED KINGDOM
This two-part preconference investigates the topical question of governance, focusing on the role
communication expertise and practices play in the way in which the idea is constructed and enacted by
government and business organizations. The second part of the conference will focus more closely on
corporate contexts and legitimacy by critically examining key assumptions about corporate social
responsibility (CSR). The conference begins in Scotland’s historic capital of Edinburgh at Queen
Margaret University, home to the Dialogue Centre. After a day of discussing stakeholder engagement and
dialogue – as well as experiencing some key aspects of Scottish culture – we transfer to London with new
perspectives to take forward in discussions of future directions for CSR communication research.
4251
Monday
09:00-17:00
Conference Room
4263
Monday
09:00-15:40
Charels Wilson
Building
Preconference: New Histories of Communication Study
Sponsored Sessions
This preconference seeks to broaden, internationalize, and advance the history of communication study as
a family of overlapping configurations and practices. It aims to bring together scholars from ICA,
ECREA, IAMCR, and select rhetoric societies in an effort to stoke new, cross-national and cross-field
conversations about the study of communication in long and broad historical perspective. It aspires to
push the empirical and theoretical boundaries of histories and pre-histories of the field by attending to
overlooked research areas, emerging conceptual orientations, and new axes of understanding and
comparison among distinct traditions cutting across communication, media studies, cultural studies,
journalism, and rhetoric, among other fields—and across institutional, intellectual, social, cultural,
discursive, and material history.
Preconference: Audiences, Elsewhere? Reviewing the Applicability of Audiences and Audience
Research to Those in Other Fields
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Ranjana Das, U of Leicester, GERMANY
Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Jacob Bjur, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Geoffroy Patriarche, FUSL, BELGIUM
Helena Bilandzic, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Including keynote addresses from Professor Sonia Livingstone and Professor Kirsten Drotner, this preconference looks back at the past 50 years of audience research to ask - in what ways can insights from
the field be applied, carried over or at least communicated to researchers working elsewhere? Such an
approach places the tradition of audience research into a direct dialogue with other trajectories
communication scholars walk on. For instance, for the scholar of communication technologies, the textreader metaphor that lies at the heart of audience reception becomes a tool worthy of interest in the face of
discussions about technologies as texts or the affordances and appropriation of technologies. But just as
we take note of the retention-worthiness of insights and concepts from audience research, we need to also
question these – which insights need updating in the age of media convergence? What can audience
research as a field do, to communicate itself better to researchers elsewhere?
4265
Monday
09:00-15:00
Khalili Lecture
Theatre
Preconference: New Media, Old Media, Social Media: Changing South Asian Communications
Scholarship
Sponsored Sessions
Home to more than a billion and one half people, South Asia enjoys a shared history combined with a
unique cultural, religious, political, linguistic, and ethnic diversity. South Asian media reflects this
diversity through its cultural products, which are becoming increasingly popular throughout the region
and in other parts of the world. This 2-day preconference will explore the emerging media systems,
mediated publics and communications pedagogy in South Asia, in the context of the region’s growing
salience in the dynamics of globalization. It will cover a range of topics on new media as well as
conventional media, to provide a critical account of the media changes underway in South Asia and their
implications for national politics, regional political dynamics, public cultures and communications
scholarship. The preconference workshop will focus on themes of topical relevance for South Asia and for
ICA members studying the region, by combining invited presentations with an open call for papers for
each issue-specific panel.
4245
Preconference: Strategies for Media Reform: An International Workshop
Monday
09:30-17:30
Small Hall
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Victor W. Pickard, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Minna KM Aslama, New America Foundation, USA
Given the crises of funding, legitimacy and accountability facing media systems across the world, there
are currently unprecedented opportunities for media reform: for re-imagining, restructuring, and reviving
our means of communication in the public interest. In Mexico, activists in the Yo Soy 132 movement
have taken to the streets to protest the power of the main broadcast networks and to call for media
democratization. Governments across Latin America have responded to the partisan political role of media
conglomerates by passing progressive legislation on media ownership. In the UK, activists in Hacked Off
and the Coordinating Committee for Media Reform have faced down the power of News Corporation in
the context of the phone hacking scandal by launching important campaigns to secure ethical journalism
and challenge media concentration. This international pre-conference will highlight efforts across a range
of countries to build vibrant and viable media reform movements and offer all participants the chance to
reflect on the strategies required to grow and sustain campaigns for media democracy.
4404
International Communication Association Annual Board of Director's Meeting
Monday
13:00-17:00
Blenheim
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Roberta G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
Jiro Takai, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Rahul Mitra, Purdue U, USA
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Richard J. Doherty, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Adrienne Shaw, Temple U, USA
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A&M U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, National U of Singapore, USA
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Brandi N Frisby, U of Kentucky, USA
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Ted Zorn, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jonathan Alan Gray, U of Wisconsin, USA
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
The ICA Board of Director's Meeting is open to all members. Members are encouraged to attend to better
understand how your association works.
4427
Monday
13:00-17:00
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Preconference: Successful Publication in Top-Ranked Communication Journals: A Guide for
Nonnative English Speakers
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Addressing the Challenges of English-Language Journals for an International Association: Current Issues
and Initiatives
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Issues in Publication for Nonnative English Speaking Scholars: An Editor’s Perspective
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Progress, But We’re Not All the Way There Yet: A Historical Perspective on International Authors in
English-Language Communication Journals
Pamela J. Shoemaker, Syracuse U, USA
A Reviewer’s Perspective
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
A View From Both Sides: Editing and Publishing in English and German
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Guidance for Successful Publication in English-Language Journals: A Workshop Presentation
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
As for many international academic associations, ICA employs English as the primary language for
scholarly publication and exchange. The advantages of using a single language to share ideas and
research findings are obvious. Challenges are equally apparent, notably the potential to disadvantage
scholars for whom English is a second language and who may be less familiar with the norms of how
scholarly articles are structured in such journals. The purpose of this preconference is to review these
issues and provide guidance regarding publication in such journals, from journal editors, reviewers, and
from scholars for whom English is a second language, who have had substantial success publishing in the
major English language communication journals. This preconference is intended primarily to serve
younger faculty and graduate students, or more senior faculty, planning or beginning to publish in
English-language journals. It should also be of interest to native English-speaking scholars who are more
senior, and serving or likely to serve as journal editors or active editorial board members, as well as to
native English-speaking graduate students who might benefit from an in-depth discussion of journal
publication issues.
4442
Monday
13:00-16:00
Conference Room
Preconference: Global Media Ethics: Problems and Perspectives
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Stephen John Anthony Ward, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Clifford Christians, independent s , USA
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Shakuntala Rao, SUNY – Plattsburgh, USA
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Lee Wilkins, U of Missouri, USA
Muhammad Ayish, American U of Sharjah, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Richard Keeble, Lincoln, UNITED KINGDOM
The global media ethics preconference will follow a separate morning pre-conference event at City
University on the internationalization of Journalism Studies.
4548
Monday
14:00-17:00
Conference Room
Preconference: Power Through Communication Technology in a 21st Century Global Society:
Questions That Must Be Addressed
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Dean Kruckeberg, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Maryland, USA
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Participants
Another Inconvenient Truth
Dean Kruckeberg, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Social Media Silos and Civil Society: A Role for Public Relations in Contemporary Development
Communication Efforts
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Maryland, USA
Taking a Critical Look at Technology in Public Relations: We Have an App for That
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Social Mediars: The New Online Stakeholders for Public Relations?
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
In @ We Trust? Public Relations Realities of Fake Online Personalities
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Public relations scholars have thus far reflected very little on the use and abuse of communication
technologies, on public relations’ role in such use and abuse, on the potential of these technologies for
development communication as well as on those who use them and on their motivations for doing so. A
critical need exists for a more thorough discussion that examines the historical development of
communication technologies and their use, both by organizations and by those who represent the interests
of organizations, i.e., public relations practitioners, and by these organizations’ publics. The goal of this
preconference program is to bring together scholars of public relations and social media in a forum to
examine a broad range of perspectives on this phenomenon and to explore the impact of communication
technologies for public relations from a more critical perspective.
4703
ICA London Opening Plenary: Born Challenging: The Mark of Cultural Studies on
Communication Research
Monday
18:00-19:30
Buckingham
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
David Morely, Glodsmiths, UNITED KINGDOM
Jackie Stacey, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Richard Hebdidge, U of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Cultural Studies have developed by challenging the existing ways of conceiving, conducting and reporting
research. To challenge is often to meet scepticism or even resistance. To challenge is always to prompt
debate and foster creativity. Cultural Studies have grown into a body of research that sheds new light on
objects typically investigated in media and communication science. This panel will feature prominent
figures of contemporary Cultural Studies to discuss the mark of cultural studies in communication
research.
4800
ICA's 63rd Annual Conference Opening Welcome Reception
Monday
19:30-22:00
King's Suite
Sponsored Sessions
5102
GIFTS: Great Ideas for Teaching Students
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Balmoral
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Brandi N. Frisby, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
GIFT: Postman, Pictures, Persuasion: Showing the Power of Video vs. Words, Plus Public Relations, in
Electronic News
Chris Roberts, U of Alabama, USA
GIFT: Service Learning at its Best: Creating a Social Media Plan for Local Nonprofit Organization
Courtney Carpenter Childers, U of Tennessee, USA
GIFT: Teaching Students to Become Curators of Ideas: An Exercise in Applied New Media Literacy
Corinne Weisgerber, St. Edward's U, USA
GIFTS: Brand Your Website Using Multimedia on the About Page
David Lynn Painter, Full Sail U, USA
GIFTS: Building Community Through VoiceThread Speech Reflections
Leslie Collins, Modesto Junior College, USA
GIFTS: Computer-Mediated Communication Project
Scott Christen, U of Tennessee, USA
Stephanie Kelly, North Carolina A&T State U, USA
GIFTS: Improving Interviewing Skills With “Speed Interviewing”
Colleen Arendt, Fairfield U, USA
GIFTS: Teaching Argumentation and Debate With a Presidential Play-By-Play
Ashley Noel Mack, U of Texas, USA
GIFTS: Teaching Students the Process of Theory Building
Theon Edward Hill, Purdue U, USA
GIFTS: Using the Critical Process to Evaluate Media Portrayal of Specific Groups
Katie Clune, Rockhurst U, USA
This interactive session will feature 10 different instructors sharing their Great Ideas for Teaching
Students about a variety of communication topics including interviewing, social media, theory building,
and media portrayals, among other topics relevant to both face-to-face and online courses.
5105
Antecedents and Effects of International News
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Katharina Kleinen-von Knigslw, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Participants
All the News That is Fit to Print? Gatekeeping Effects in Newspaper Coverage of International Affairs
Sean Jeremy Westwood, Stanford U, USA
Rebecca J Weiss, Stanford U, USA
Shanto Iyengar, Stanford U, USA
News Coverage and Perceptions of China in the United States: Considering the Impact of Agenda-Setting
and Framing
Lars Willnat, Indiana U, USA
Emily T. Metzgar, Indiana U, USA
Shuo Tang, Indiana U, USA
Tunga Lodato, Indiana U, USA
Not All Countries Are Created Equal: Foreign Nation Visibility in U.S. News and Entertainment Media
Dror Walter, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Lilach Nir, Hebrew U / U of Pennsylvania, USA
Shaul Shenhav, The Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Promoting Stories About Terrorism to the International News Media: A Study of Public Diplomacy
Moran Yarchi, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Gadi Wolfsfeld, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Shaul Shenhav, The Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
5106
Cultural Experience, Interaction, and Adjustment
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Palace B
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Wuyu Liu, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
The Potentiality of Ethnography of Communication in Asian Communication Study
Bingjuan Xiong, U of Colorado, USA
A Study on Chinese-American Cultural Differences in Interpersonal Conflict Management
Paul S. N. Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Biologically Wired or Communally Formed?: Assessing Sex Differences in Friendship Expectations
Across Five Countries
Uttara Manohar, Ohio State U, USA
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Wen Song, Ohio State U, USA
Cultural Identifications as Manipulation Checks of Chinese International Students’ Acculturation
Strategies: U.S. American Host Nationals’ Perspective
Makiko Imamura, Saint Mary's College of California, USA
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
Culture and Intercultural Experience as Predictors of Decision-Making Styles
Weidan Cao, Temple U, USA
Deborah A. Cai, Temple U, USA
Edward L. Fink, U of Maryland, USA
5107
Deliberation and Opinion Formation
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Edith Manosevitch, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Participants
Emanating Effects: The Impact of Microlevel Deliberation on the Public’s Political Attitudes
Katherine Rhodes Knobloch, Colorado State U, USA
Michael Barthel, U of Washington, USA
John W. Gastil, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Fully Considered Healthcare Policy Preferences and Deliberation Effects on Opinion Change
Jin Woo Kim, U of Pennsylvania, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Investigating Predictors of Preferences for Deliberative Qualities of Political Conversations Using the
Analytic Hierarchy Process
David Lee Brinker, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Sumana Chattopadhyay, Marquette U, USA
Ready to Deliberate? The Effects of Prior Opinions on Deliberation Preparedness
Wenjie Yan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Influence of Diversity of Opinions Within Discussion Groups on Attitude Changes in the
Deliberation Polling®
Yushu Zhou, Stanford U, USA
5108
Media Literacy and Internet Usage
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
A Skills Framework to Understanding Digital Engagement
Ellen Johanna Helsper, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Rebecca Eynon, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Traditional Literacy and Internet Skills as Determinants of Internet Usage: A Structural Model
Alexander van Deursen, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Oscar Peters, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Understanding J-Twitter Adoption: Factors That Influence Korean Journalists’ Twitter Adoption
Na Yeon Lee, U of Texas, USA
Yonghwan Kim, U of Alabama, USA
Soliciting Reciprocity Socializing, Communality, and Other Motivations for Linking on Twitter
Avery E. Holton, U of Texas, USA
Kanghui Baek, U of Texas, USA
Carolyn Yaschur, U of Texas, USA
Mark Coddington, U of Texas, USA
5109
Internet-Mediated Businesses
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Effects of Product Type and Source of Customized Recommendations on Attitudes Toward the Website
Yeuseung Kim, DePaul U, USA
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
What Others Are Saying About the Product? Anonymity, Argument Quality, and Valence Effects in
eWOM
Qian Xu, Elon U, USA
Barbara M. Miller, Elon U, USA
Brooke Barnett, Elon U, USA
Show Me The Goods: The Warranting Effect of User-Generated Photographs in Online Auctions
Benjamin K. Johnson, Ohio State U, USA
Mao Houamoua Vang, Ohio State U, USA
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
How Product Representation Shapes Virtual Experiences and Repatronage Intention
Suzanne Overmars, Antwerp U, BELGIUM
Karolien Poels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
5111
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Waterloo/Tower
Narrative Approaches to Illness and Health
Health Communication
Chair
Lynn Marie Harter, Ohio U, USA
Participants
Application of the Health Belief Model to Illness Narratives Expressing Help-Seeking Behaviors of
Depressed Adults
Jessica Castonguay, U of Arizona, USA
Christine R. Filer, U of Arizona, USA
The Ability of Narrative Communication to Address Health-related Social Norms
Meghan Bridgid Moran, San Diego State U, USA
Sheila Teresa Murphy, U of Southern California, USA
Lauren B. Frank, Portland State U, USA
Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, U of Southern California, USA
The Role of Autobiographic Similarity and Narrative Perspective Under Different Processing Motives for
a Health Message
Hye Kyung Kim, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Narrative Health Messages in a Story Context
Anja Kalch, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Helena Bilandzic, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
5112
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Chelsea/Richmond
More Challenging Issues in Health Communication
Health Communication
Participants
An Experimental Study of Medical Error Explanations: Do Apology, Empathy, Corrective Action, and
Compensation Alter Intentions and Attitudes? Top Student Paper/Health Communication Division
Kristin Pace, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
It’s Out of My Hands: God Control and Decreased Quality of Life for Cancer Patients
Bryan McLaughlin, U of Wisconsin, USA
Woohyun Yoo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jonathan D'Angelo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Stephanie Jean Tsang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Bret Shaw, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Timothy Baker, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Understanding High School Athletes’ Use of Androgenic Anabolic Steroids: The Role of Source
Proximity in the Theory of Normative Social Behavior
Jules Woolf, U of Windsor, CANADA
Rajiv N. Rimal, George Washington U, USA
Pooja Sripad, Johns Hopkins U, USA
From Perceived Effectiveness to Actual Effectiveness: A Further Exploration of the Relationship
Ye Sun, U of Utah, USA
5113
Aggregate Search Behavior and Communication Research (Panel Session)
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Jens Vogelgesang, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
Online Search Behavior and Political Communication: Building Theory With Unobtrusive Internet Data
Brian E Weeks, Ohio State U, USA
Using Google Trends to Study Public Interests in Science
Elad Segev, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Ayelet Baram-Tsabari, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, ISRAEL
Understanding the Influence of News Media Coverage on Search Query Volume
Laura A. Granka, Stanford U, USA
Is Aggregate Online Search Behavior a Valid Measure for Issue Salience?
Jens Vogelgesang, U Münster, GERMANY
The Value of Aggregate Online Search Behavior for Forecasting and Decision-Making
Andreas Graefe, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Respondent
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
On May 10, 2006, Google launched Google Trends (GT, http://www.google.com/trends/). Based on
searches conducted on Google, this public web tool allows researchers to assess how often a particular
search term has been entered into the Google search engine relative to the total search volume. GT results
are represented as plot graphs or can be downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV) files. GT provides
search volume data across time periods (from 2004 to present), various regions, and languages.
Communication researchers from various subfields have recently used aggregate search data as an
indicator for a variety of studies. Today there is an ever-growing amount of research evidence that GT
provides valuable insights into human behavior. The rationale of this panel is to bring together researchers
from various disciplines, such as political communication, science communication and forecasting. We
believe that aggregate search behavior studies can deepen the understanding of online communication and
that, therefore, the panel has much to offer to the communication community.
5114
Covering Conflicts and Disasters: Recent Case Studies
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Matt Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
Participants
Communication in Conflicts: Instrumentalizing Fukushima
Hans Mathias Kepplinger, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Richard Lemke, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Narratives Used to Portray in-Group Terrorists: A Comparative Analysis of Israeli and Norwegian Press
Tal Samuel-Azran, IDC Herzliya, ISRAEL
Amit Dinur, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Yuval Karniel, Interdisciplinary Center, ISRAEL
Communicative Complexity and Stability of Agendas and Frames in the Financial Crisis
Dirk Oegema, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Friederike Schultz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van Atteveldt, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
News of Crisis: The Economic Crisis as a Generic Frame in Romanian News Media
Hanna Orsolya Vincze, Babes-Bolyai U, ROMANIA
Lights, Camera, Conflict! Newspaper Framing of the 2008 Screen Actors Guild Negotiations
Ryan Patrick Fuller, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
5116
From Arab Spring to Occupy: Journalism and Social Movements
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Adrienne Russell, U of Denver, USA
Participants
Al Jazeera English’s Networked Journalism During the 2011 Egyptian Uprising
William Lafi Youmans, George Washington U, USA
The Media Work of Syrian Diaspora Activists: Brokering Between the Protest and Mainstream Media
Kari Anden-Papadopoulos, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Mervi Pantti, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Narratives of US: The National Narrative and the Disruptive Moments Hypothesis
Robert Lyle Handley, U of Denver, USA
Get to Know Your Local Occupiers: A Framing Analysis of the Coverage of the Occupy Movement
Alison N. Novak, Drexel U, USA
Ronald Bishop, Drexel U, USA
Ernest A. Hakanen, Drexel U, USA
Occupy Messages: Social Justice and Legitimacy in the New York Times
Camille Marie Reyes, Rutgers U, USA
5117
Media Use & Political Observations in Eight Arab Countries (Panel Session)
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Participants
Everette E Dennis, Northwestern U in Qatar, QATAR
Princess Rym Ali, Jordan Media Institute, JORDAN
Justin D. Martin, Northwestern U in Qatar, QATAR
Rami Khouri, American U of Beirut, LEBANON
Jad Melki, American U of Beirut, LEBANON
Northwestern University in Qatar is conducting a large survey assessing media consumption patterns in
eight Arab countries (Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates,
and Jordan). The data will be collected by Harris Interactive in mid-November 2012, and will include
feedback from roughly 10,000 respondents. Northwestern University in Qatar has assembled a panel of
scholars to discuss some of the findings and patterns at ICA’s 2013 convention in London. Panelists will
discuss the findings both in light of prior research on media use in the Arab world, as well as in the
tailwind of the region’s recent, and ongoing, uprisings. The panel will take place over a standard 75-90
minute session, with at least 25 minutes preserved for panelists to field questions.
5118
Biological Perspectives on Interpersonal Processes
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Kory Floyd, Arizona State U, USA
Participants
Attachment Security and Oxytocin Receptor Gene Polymorphism Interact to Influence Affectionate
Communication
Kory Floyd, Arizona State U, USA
Amanda Denes, U of Connecticut, USA
Women’s Voices as a Cue of Physical Attractiveness and a Courtship Signal: The Interaction Effect of
Perceived Vocal Attractiveness and Pitch Shifts on Men’s Mating Motivation
Jinguang Zhang, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
On the Role of Static and Dynamic Faces on Attributions of Attractiveness, Social Competence, and
Dominance
Sabrina Sobieraj, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Katharina Nowak, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Ovulatory Cycle Changes Women’s Clothing Choices and How They Dress to Impress Same-Sex Rivals
Grace Leigh Anderson, Samford U, USA
The Effects of Target Sex, Presence of Others, and Attractiveness on Desire for Targets: A ReExamination of Hill and Buss (2008)
Allison Zorzie Shaw, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
5121
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Beyond Entertainment: Storytelling for Social Change
Popular Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
SoundBites Experience, an Interactive EE Film
Martine P.A. Bouman, Center for Media and Health, THE NETHERLANDS
Entertainment-Education Collaboration Processes Between Television Professionals and Sustainability
Communication Experts in Germany
Sarah Lubjuhn, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Entertainment or Education? Telling Health Stories in Primetime UK Television
Lesley Henderson, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Role of the Writer in Entertainment-Education
Lucy Hannah, Commonwealth Foundation, UNITED KINGDOM
Entertainment-Education Capacity Building in Niger
Francis Rolt, Radio for Peacebuilding, UNITED KINGDOM
Popular media entertainment programs reach large sections of the public and can be a powerful vehicle for
the promotion of healthy and sustainable lifestyles, social and ethnic tolerance. In both Western and nonWestern countries, a number of organizations have sought ways to incorporate health and other prosocial
issues into diverse entertainment formats (prime time television, radio soap operas or web series). This
concept is commonly referred to as ‘the entertainment-education (EE) strategy.’ This panel explores the
collaboration processes between communication scholars, creative media professionals, and subject matter
specialists in designing and implementing innovative and effective EE strategies.
5122
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Challenging Concepts in the Study of Global Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Bingchun Meng, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Go "East"! A New Agenda for Comparative Research in Communication
Bingchun Meng, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Terhi Rantanen, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Moral Acceptability of Nanotechnology and Human Development Values: A Multilevel Analysis
Tsung-Jen Shih, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Infrastructural Media and Sociocultural Change: A Case Study
Meng Li, U of Iowa, USA
Transclusion vs. Demediation: Ambiguities of Media Practices in Cosmopolitan Re-Embedding Processes
Andr Jansson, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
5123
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Messages and Credibility
Public Relations
Chair
Ansgar Zerfass, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Participants
Enhancing the Spokesperson’s Credibility Through Appearance
May O. Lwin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Nur Arina bte Dafir, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Siti Hanna binte Ruslan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Chrystal J. Yeong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Lack of Credibility Accompanying Public Relations Messages Distributed Through Corporate Channels:
A Longitudinal Experimental
Coy Callison, Texas Tech U, USA
Patrick Merle, Texas Tech U, USA
Curtis Blaine Matthews, Kansas State U, USA
Norman E. Youngblood, Auburn U, USA
Does the Race of the Spokesman Matter in Times of Crisis?
Seoyeon Hong, U of Missouri, USA
Maria E. Len-Rios, U of Missouri, USA
The Effect of Disclosure of Third-Party Influence on an Opinion Leader’s Credibility and Influence in
Two-Step Flow: Public Relations via Social Media
Caleb T. Carr, Illinois State U, USA
Rebecca A. Hayes, Illinois State U, USA
5124
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Visual Design, Persuasion, and Branding
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Participants
Attention and Memory for Explicit and Implicit Print Advertisements
Jaana Simola, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Markus Kivikangas, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Christina M Krause, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Meaning-Conveying Role of Typeface in Advertising and its Influence on Brand Evaluation
Mihyun Kang, Eastern Connecticut State U, USA
Sejung Marina Choi, U of Texas, USA
Beauty, Body, and Weight: An Evolution of Messages and Persuasion Techniques in Weight-Loss
Advertising in the New York Times (1930-1990s)
Suman Mishra, Southern Illinois U, Edwardsville, USA
Optimizing Advertisement Design: An Application of the Elaboration Likelihood Model in an
Experimental Setting
Tobias Dienlin, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Mediating Science and Nature: Representing and Consuming Infant Formula Advertising in China
Qian Sarah Gong, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Peter Jackson, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
Co-Opt This! Guerrilla Marketing and the Subversive Limits of Appropriation
Michael Glassco, U of Iowa, USA
Occupy Wall Street Posters: Analysis of Publically Created Visuals in Global Branding
Pamela Kay Morris, Loyola U, USA
5125
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: De-/Recentering Whiteness
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Khadijah White, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Discourses of Affirmation in the Spatialization of Whiteness
Joshua Hoops, William Jewell College, USA
The “Whitening” of Methamphetamine Use in America
Jeffery Chaichana Peterson, Washington State U, USA
Sheila S. Lee, Washington State U, USA
Cameron Moody, Washington State U, USA
Critical Interrogation of Transparency in Indian Movies
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Shaheed Nick Mohammed, Pennsylvania State U - Altoona, USA
Exfoliating Colorism: Contestations, Comedy, and Critique in a Transnational Field
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Pieces of Democracy: Neoliberal Epideictic, Western Feminism, and the War on Terror
Kim Hong Nguyen, Oregon State U, USA
Respondent
Khadijah White, U of Pennsylvania, USA
5126
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Digital Identities, Stages, Histories, and Uses
Popular Communication
Chair
Jason Striker, Arizona State U, USA
Participants
Staging Identities: A Comparison of Video Gamers’ and Social Media Users’ Digital Identities
Angela M. Cirucci, Temple U, USA
Redefining Regions and Roles: The Case of Twitter and the Food Service Industry
Katherine Felsburg Wong, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Long History of Participatory Video: YouTube, Public Access Television, and New Media History
Danny Kimball, U of Wisconsin, USA
Why is File Sharing Called File Sharing?
Nicholas A. John, London School of Economics and Political Science, ISRAEL
Music Use in the Digital Media Age: Early Insights From a Study of Music Cultures Among Young
People in Moscow and Stockholm
Sofia Johansson, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
5127
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Negotiating Europe: Perspectives on the Mediation of the Eurozone Crisis
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Maria Kyriakidou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The Symbolic Crisis of the Euro: Trust and Distrust in the European Currency as Medium of Identity
Formation
Johan Fornas, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
The Story is Us -- The Media Are Us: Critical Media Practices of Crisis-Related Protest Movements
Anne Kaun, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
How Greeks and Germans Make Sense of the Eurozone Crisis: A Comparative Analysis of Two Public
Spheres
Maximillian Theodore Hanska-Ahy, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED
KINGDOM
Maria Kyriakidou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Articulating the Role of Greece in the Economic Crisis: An Analysis of the Media Discourses of the
Extreme Right in Denmark and Sweden
Yiannis Mylonas, Lund U, SWEDEN
Tina Askanius, Lund U, SWEDEN
Respondent
Inaki Garcia-Blanco, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
The financial crisis of the Eurozone has been at the centre of public debate as one of the biggest
challenges Europe has faced. Originating in structural economic causes, the crisis has been rapidly spilled
into the cultural domain and transformed into a political and ideological struggle manifested in the
interests of different countries and often expressed through national stereotypes. Debates about the crisis
have moved beyond its economic nature to (re-)negotiate the very meaning (and nature) of the European
Union, its idea(l)s and practices. The present panel examines the mediation of the crisis, to shed light onto
its cultural dimension and the negotiations of its meaning through symbolic and political practices in
different European contexts.
5128
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
The Body Politic: Gendered Excursions, Performances, and Violations
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Participants
Below the Belt: Gender Portrayal in Women’s Boxing During the 2012 Summer Olympic Games
Sim Butler, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
Egypt's Nude Blogger: Sexuality, Citizenship, and Arab Body Politics
Sara Mourad, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ironically Trashy and Fashionably Porn: Implications of Pornification in the Social Network Sites
Kaarina Nikunen, Stanford U, USA
Rape in the Era of Post-Identity Politics: The Controversy Over Rihanna’s “Man Down” Video
Dayna Earlene Chatman, U of Southern California, USA
5131
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 1
The Public Soundscape: Acoustic Ecology
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Thom Gencarelli, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Participants
Acoustic Ecology: Busking Against the Machine
brian cogan, Molloy College, USA
New York City Soundscape: A Cage-ian Analysis
Thom Gencarelli, MEA - Media Ecology Association, USA
Sounds of Public Silence
Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation, USA
Susan Drucker, Hofstra U, USA
From the Crack of the Bat to the Digital Crackle: The Changing Soundscape of the Baseball Stadium
Harvey Jassem, U of Hartford, USA
Municipalities around the world have taken on the issue of noise. Noise level standards and noise
abatement requirements are in effect in many cities. Part of our public experience is an encounter with
sounds, yet noise pollution and nuisance are increasingly associated with environments of public
communication. Sound amplification systems enhance, but may also be perceived as a form of
aggression. Entering the public realm can result in listening to imposed “music,” advertising, or other
undesired audio programs. A cellphone call can lead to being put on hold and forced to listen to
recordings, making the caller a captive audience. Pitch correction in live performance is commonplace,
raising issues of authenticity. One person’s music is another person’s noise. One person’s improvement
is another person’s manipulation. Technological delights of communication reveal the delicate balance of
sense ratios in a technological age. This panel will explore the diverse practices and technologicallyrooted changes in the public soundscape.
5132
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 2
Ways of Speaking About Ways of Relating: Comparative Research in Ethnography of
Communication
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Donal Carbaugh, U of Massachusetts, USA
Participants
Ways of Speaking and Competing Cultural Dialectics on Campus: Student Dating and Advisor-Advisee
Relationships
Daniel Chornet, Saint Louis U Madrid, SPAIN
Saila Poutiainen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Maija Gerlander, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Marriage and Motherhood: Cultural Communication at Intersections of Public and Private
Todd L. Sandel, U of Macau, MACAU
Kristine Munoz, U of Iowa, USA
Daena Goldsmith, Lewis & Clark College, USA
Relating With/Through/in the Environment: Examining Human-Nature Relationships in Water
Controversies
Trudy Milburn, U of Washington, USA
Leah Sprain, U of Colorado, USA
Relating in the Political Community: German Jammern and Hungarian Kommunkáció
Michaela R. Winchatz, DePaul U, USA
David Boromisza-Habashi, U of Colorado, USA
This panel discusses relationships in a comparative mode, bringing together nine ethnography of
communication case studies of relating in diverse social and cultural scenes. The case studies are arranged
around four themes and presented in three pairs and a trio. Co-presenters will describe initial comparisons
between at least two sites on the following topics: 1) relational dialectics and the competing cultural
premises on university campuses, 2) marriage and motherhood at the intersection of public and private, 3)
the cultural relationship(s) between humans and nature (water), and 4) culturally-specific ways of
speaking used by community members to relate politically.
5133
Tuesday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 3
Maybe This Isn't Our Planet: Rethinking the Human Relationship With the Environment
Environmental Communication
Chair
Johanne Saint-Charles, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
Participants
Embracing the Mongrel: Transcendence, Material Engagement, and Hybrid Identity in Ecological
Discourse
Natasha Seegert, U of Utah, USA
Revisiting the Death of Environmentalism
James Everett Hein, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Visual Rhetoric and Anthropocentrism in Whale Wars
Collin Jacob Syfert, U of Rhode Island, USA
The Influence of Psychological Distance and Emotion on Public Support for Climate Mitigation Projects
Philip Solomon Hart, American U, USA
Richard C. Stedman, Cornell U, USA
Katherine A. McComas, Cornell U, USA
5202
ICA Annual Member Meeting and New Member and Graduate Student Orientation
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Balmoral
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Rahul Mitra, Purdue U, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
This session is designed for all members and provides an occasion to raise issues regarding the
association. it will also include a general overview of ICA as an organization, an overview of the
conference and ways to participate in ICA. This is your opportunity to interact with the Executive
Committee of ICA and help shape the association and its future direction. ALL MEMBERS ARE
STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND. Refreshments will be provided.
5205
Comparing Political Communication Across Countries
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Participants
Media Choice and Informed Democracy: Towards Increasing News Consumption Gaps in Europe?
Toril Aalberg, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
Arild Blekesaune, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
Eiri Elvestad, Vestfold U College, NORWAY
Distinct Approaches to Newsmaking in Western Journalism? Comparing Political Affairs Coverage in Six
Press Systems
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Andrea Umbricht, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Conditions of Europeanized Voting Behaviour: News Exposure and Information Environment Effects on
Voting in European Parliament Elections
Jil Fitzner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hajo Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Media Selection and Partisan Fragmentation: A Comparative Study of Advanced Western Democracies
Michael F. Meffert, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
5206
Challenges of Creating Inclusivity and Exclusivity: Insights Into the Communicative Constitution of
Organizational Boundaries in Various Cultural Contexts
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montréal, CANADA
Participants
The Identity of Anonymous: Communicating Community Boundaries
Leonhard Dobusch, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Dennis Schoeneborn, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Where is the Border of Wonderland? Understanding Boundary Management and Identity Transformation
Through the Case of a Chinese Community Organization
Xi Liu, Tsinghua U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Guowei Jian, Cleveland State U, USA
Reaching out in No Man’s Land: The Boundary Spanning Struggles of Outreach Workers
Mark Van Vuuren, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
The Autopoietic Constitution of a Buddhist Humanitarian Organization Through Symbolic and Material
Boundaries That Include and Exclude
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montréal, CANADA
Jennie M. Hwang, U de Montréal, CANADA
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Respondent
Lars Thoeger Christensen, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
While extant research has underlined the significance of studying organizational boundary management, it
is important to gain deeper insight into the ways organizations are produced and reproduced through the
communicative constitution of boundaries. In the spirit of the 2013 ICA conference theme, “Challenging
Communication Research,” this panel will explore this question by investigating the challenges involved
in using organizational boundaries to create a simultaneous sense of inclusivity and exclusivity. The panel
will bring together a set of expert international scholars from various continents of the world whose
research looks at topics related to this issue from different perspectives and in different cultural contexts.
5207
Framing and Priming in Political Communication
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Lars Willnat, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Issue Comparisons and Ordinal Priming
Bruce Bimber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jennifer Brundidge, U of Texas, USA
Meredith Conroy, Occidental College, USA
Erica Lively, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
News Frames, Intermedia Frame Transfer, and the Financial Crisis
Mathias Weber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Thomas Bach, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Priming Effects During the Financial Crisis: Accessibility and Applicability Mechanisms Behind
Government Approval
Kajsa Larsson Falasca, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Adam Shehata, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Priming Personal and National Perceptions of the Affordable Care Act
Lauren Guggenheim, U of Michigan, USA
5208
Big Data and Communication Research: Prospects, Perils, Alliances, and Impacts
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Eric Thomson Meyer, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Deconstructing Big Data: Database Ethnography, and Lessons Learned From Geocoding Wikipedia
Bernie Hogan, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Mark Graham, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Wide Open or Locked Down? Platform Politics and Research Quality in Big Data Research
Cornelius Puschmann, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, GERMANY
Making Sense of Big Data: Developing a Social Science Research Agenda
Matthew Scott Weber, Rutgers U, USA
The Production of Big Data Knowledge
Danah Michele Boyd, Microsoft Research, USA
Kate Crawford, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Big Data and Communications Research
Ralph Schroeder, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Eric Thomson Meyer, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Research using what has been referred to as big data is growing in the social sciences, and particularly in
communication research. While early debates focused on still unresolved issues such as access to data,
representativeness of samples, and privacy threats, the aim of this panel is to advance the discussion to the
next. The panel will encourage a wider debate with the range of researchers who attend the session to
answer these and other emergent questions. The aim of the panel is to take stock, draw together
experiences, and provide guidance towards how to support, strengthen and critically interrogate big data
methods in communications research.
5209
Inequalities and Digital Divides
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Alexander van Deursen, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Digital Divides of Internet Awareness, Adoption, and Use Due to Low Economic Wellbeing and Foreign
Language Skill in the Caucasus
Katy Elizabeth Pearce, U of Washington, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Bottom-up Technology Transmission: Exploring How Youths Influence Their Parents’ Digital Media
Usage With Dyadic Data
Teresa Correa, U Diego Portales, CHILE
Persistant Inequalities and Heavy Tails in International Internet Connections: 2002-2011
Hyunjin Seo, U of Kansas, USA
Stuart Thorson, Syracuse U, USA
Learning of Digital Skills, Social Support Networks, and Digital Inequality: Evidence From the
Netherlands
Uwe Matzat, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
5211
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Waterloo/Tower
Tensions and Challenges to Effective Communication About Men's Health Issues: The Impact of
Communication Networks
Health Communication
Chair
Franzisca Weder, U of Klagenfurt, AUSTRIA
Participants
Women, Look for Your Men! Women as Target Audience in Prostate Cancer Campaigns in Austria and
the Effects on Men’s Health Communication
Franzisca Weder, U of Klagenfurt, AUSTRIA
The Challenges to Effective Health Communication Concerning Prostate Cancer Across the Continuum of
Cancer Care
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
How Does the “The Good Kiwi Bloke” Communicate When He is Diagnosed With Prostate Cancer?
Dorothy Brown, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
HIV and Men’s Health: Patterns and Stories From People Living With HIV in New Mexico
John Oetzel, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Respondent
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
This panel addresses tensions and challenges for effective communication about men’s health issues. Men
are perceived as to be more indifferent towards their health when compared to the efforts of women who
proactively and publicly address their health issues. The levels of awareness, understanding and
sometimes funding for men’s health issues lag behind other causes. This panel focuses on two health
issues: prostate cancer and HIV. Specifically, this panel will consider issues relate to prevention and
screening, stereotypes about men’s health communication, linkages to information and providers, and
stigma. The central theme of this panel is the issue of communication networks and how men are or are
not connected to key sources of information and support as well as key resources.
5212
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Uncertainty, Health Information-Seeking, and Social Support
Health Communication
Chair
Lance S. Rintamaki, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Participants
Uncertainty Management and Social Support in Cancer Clinical Trials Treatment Decision-Making
Janice Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Angela Lynn Palmer-Wackerly, Ohio State U, USA
Phokeng M Dailey, Ohio State U, USA
Jessica Krok, Ohio State U, USA
How Do Individuals Seek Information to Manage Health-Related Uncertainty? An Experimental Study
Examining Web Use to Acquire Skin Cancer Information
Steve Rains, U of Arizona, USA
Riva Tukachinsky, Chapman U, USA
Functions of Social Support and Self-Verification in Association With Loneliness, Depression, and Stress
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Shawn King, U of Oklahoma, USA
Jenny Rosenberg, Kent State U, USA
The Downsides of Online Support Groups: When Patients' Ability to Cope With Emotions Matters
Anika Batenburg, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Enny Henrica Das, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
5213
Selective Exposure and Polarization (Session Begins With a TOP Student Paper)
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
Selective Exposure Without Avoidance: Examining Selective Exposure in a Media Saturated
Environment
Seung Mo Jang, U of Michigan, USA
Audience Polarization in Newspaper Use
Thomas N. Friemel, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Jesse Bächler, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Political Polarization as a Function of Citizen Predispositions and Exposure to News on the Internet
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Julius Matthew Riles, U of Illinois, USA
Why Do Knowledgeable Partisans Polarize?: Cueing Knowledge, General Political Knowledge, and
Policy Attitudes
Daniel E. Bergan, Michigan State U, USA
Why Does Ideological Selective Exposure Promote Polarization? Climate of Opinion Perceptions and Use
of Arguments Originating From Media in Conversations as Mediating Factors
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Adi Chotiner, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
5214
New Practices in Newsrooms
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Participants
Newsroom 2.0: Organizational Culture and Managing Change at a Daily Newspaper in the Digital Age
Carrie Brown, U of Memphis, USA
Al-Jazeera English Online: Understanding Web Metrics and News Production When a Quantified
Audience is Not a Commodified Audience
Nikki Usher, George Washington U, USA
The Invisible Giants Emerge: Social Media and Professional Culture in Global News Agencies
Bronwyn Jones, Liverpool John Moores U, UNITED KINGDOM
Mobile Phones and the News: A Study of the Use of Mobile Phones in the Production and Presentation of
News in UK Broadcasting
Adrian John Chaplin Hadland, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
Eddy Leonardo Borges-Rey, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
Towards a Classification of Participatory News Websites: Comparing Heuristic and Empirical Types
Sven Engesser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
5216
Beyond Corporate Media: Alternative Models for News
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Robert Lyle Handley, U of Denver, USA
Participants
What is Happening to Regional Online News Systems: A Study of the Bay Area News System
David M. Ryfe, U of Nevada - Reno, USA
Donica Mensing, U of Nevada - Reno, USA
The Effect of the Nonprofit Business Model on News Content: A Case Study
Magda Konieczna, U of Wisconsin, USA
How Ethnic Media Producers Constitute Their Communities of Practice: An Ecological Approach (Top
Three Faculty Paper)
Matthew D. Matsaganis, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Vikki Sara Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Dimensions of Māori Journalism Culture: Exploring Indigenous News-Making in Aotearoa New Zealand
Folker Christian Hanusch, U of the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
Family-Owned Newspaper: Filling Niches in Rural Communities
Angela Marie Powers, Kansas State U, USA
Ardyth Broadrick Sohn, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Jane Briggs-Bunting, Michigan State U, USA
5217
Health and Risk Communication in Mass Media
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
Testing Effects of Fear, Threat, and Efficacy on Smokers’ Acceptance of Novel Smokeless Tobacco
Products
Lyudmila Popova, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Pamela M. Ling, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Reducing Stigma and Out-Group Distinctions Through Perspective-Taking in Narratives
Adrienne Haesun Chung, Ohio State U, USA
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
The Effects of Perceived Media Dependence and Presumed Media Influence on College Students’
Responses to the Swine Flu
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
Ven-Hwei Lo, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
The Role of Cultural Worldviews and Message Framing in Shaping Public Opinions Toward the HPV
Vaccination Mandate
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Kelly Madden, U of Maryland, USA
5218
New Methods and Measures
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Michael Scharkow, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Participants
Analyzing Continuous Response Measurement Data Using Cross-Classified Growth Curve Models
Marko Bachl, U of Hohenheim
Jens Vogelgesang, U Münster, GERMANY
Finding Patterns of Co-Occurrence: Explorative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis With Automated Item
Exclusion
Martin Wettstein, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
The Relative Trustworthiness of Popular Inferential Approaches to Testing Indirect Effects in Statistical
Mediation Analysis: Does Method Really Matter?
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Michael Scharkow, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Applying IRT and Rasch Measurement Models to Deception Detection Accuracy Data
David D. Clare, Michigan State U, USA
Ryan P. Bowles, Michigan State U, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Explicating Psychological Reactance: Comparing Self-Report and Psychophysiological Measures
Glenn M. Leshner, U of Missouri, USA
Elizabeth L. Gardner, Texas Tech U, USA
Brandon Harley Nutting, U of South Dakota, USA
Development and Validation of Information Anxiety Scale
Kexin Wang, Insititute of Psychology Chinese Academy of Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE'S
REPUBLIC OF
Mingjie Zhou, Institute of Psychology Chinese Acedemy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Mental
Health, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Development and Validation of The Adolescent Measure of Empathy and Sympathy (AMES)
Helen Vossen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jessica Taylor Piotrowski, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Estimating Intercoder Reliability: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach
Guangchao Feng, Hong Kong Baptist U, HONG KONG
5221
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Challenging Identities in Local, Regional, and Transnational Music Media, Industries, and Cultures
Popular Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
Open Mics: Mediating Voices in Contemporary Black British Music
Nabeel Mustafa Zuberi, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
The (Re)Production of Regional Identity in Brazil by Festival Tourism, Migration, Radio, and the Music
Industry
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
New Asian Dance Music and the Politics of Production
Anamik Saha, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
The New Cultural Politics of a Modern, Digital Age: Mexico’s Regional Musics Meet Global Trends
Magdelana Red, U of Colorado, USA
Respondent
Jason Toynbee, Open U, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel brings together scholars from three continents to examine how various stakeholders use
popular music to articulate a politics of interregional, racial, or transnational identity. The panel is
inherently multidimensional, with each panelist approaching questions of politics, identity, and cultural
production from distinctive fields and approaches within media and communication research. This panel
puts into conversation interdisciplinary perspectives on the role of popular music in highly mediated,
politically challenging and globalized contexts.
5222
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Perception as Key: Signals from Audiences, Readers, Participants
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Participants
Critical Media Literacy in a Nondemocratic Regime: How Young Russians Navigate Their News
Florian Toepfl, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Cultural Beacons: Grassroots Indicators of Change
Lucia Dura, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Laurel Jeanne Felt, U of Southern California, USA
Arvind Singhal, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Playing Catch Up: Alternative Political Information Online and the Democratic Divide in Singapore
Debbie Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Soft Power, Bollywood Cinema, and Cultural Proximity: Comparing Viewer Reactions to Popular Hindi
Cinema in India and the Diaspora
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Kavita Karan, Southern Illinois U Carbondale, USA
5223
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
An Emerging Sociocultural Paradigm of Public Relations Research? Perspectives, Research
Agenda, and Methodological Issues
Public Relations
Participants
On Being a Theoretical Magpie: All That Glitters is Not Gold
Lee Edwards, Institute of Communications Studies, UNITED KINGDOM
Radical Knowledge: Action Research and Public Relations
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Creative Voices: The Role of Participatory Research in Telling an Alternative Story of PR
Caroline Hodges, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Ethnography in Sociocultural PR Research: Benefits, Challenges, and Alternatives
Mathis Danelzik, U of Tübingen, GERMANY
In recent years, various authors have identified a turn in Public Relations towards socio-cultural
approaches to research. These approaches have been welcomed as a complement to the traditional
functional paradigm, taking the understanding of public relations beyond organizational boundaries.
However, while they may open up new horizons for PR thinking and research, they also bring challenges.
The advantage of a clearly defined research paradigm such as Excellence in PR, is that it permits a clear
focus for the allocation of resources and an agenda for research and teaching. In contrast, the sociocultural turn is complex and varied. A wide range of theories are relevant, each offering different
directions for development. While intellectually inspiring, such diversity runs the risk of fragmenting the
field and detracting from its academic identity. This panel engages with these dilemmas and considers
whether the socio-cultural turn is capable of constituting a ‘paradigm’, in the traditional sense.
5224
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Measuring and Understanding Young People's Practices and Preferences in Advertising and Other
Media Forms
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Broadening the Scope, Dispelling the Myths: Younger Children and Online Social Networking—Towards
a More Inclusive Research Agenda
Sara Grimes, U of Toronto, CANADA
Deborah Fields, Utah State U, USA
Capturing Children’s Advertising Exposure: Comparing Methods and Measurements
Suzanna Johanna Opree, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Challenging Eurocentrism in International Comparative Research: Reflections on an International Youth
Media Participation Study
Manisha Pathak-Shelat, U of Wisconsin, USA
Irma Hirsjarvi, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Sirkku Kotilainen, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Children’s Responses to Advertising in Social Games: Persuasion Knowledge and Susceptibility to Peer
Influence
Esther Rozendaal, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, NL
Explaining the Effects of Targeted Online Advertising on Children’s Cognitive, Affective and Behavorial
Brand Responses
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Esther Rozendaal, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Nadia Smink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
5225
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Ethnic Incorporation and National Identity
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Kumi Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Participants
A Nation of Immigrants and a Nation of Laws: Race, Ethnicity, and the Neoliberal Exception in President
Barack Obama’s Immigration Discourse
Josue David Cisneros, Northeastern U, USA
Challenging Hegemonic Multiculturalism: Spain’s “New Citizens” as Economic Givers
Susana Martinez Guillem, U of New Mexico, USA
Racial Incorporation; Asian Indian Immigrant Alignments With Whiteness
Somava Pande, Washington State U, USA
Jolanta Alicja Drzewiecka, Washington State U, USA
In the Middle of Two Worlds: Identities Negotiation of 2nd-Generation Migrants Between Media
Consumption and Family Guidance
Marta Cola, U of Lugano, SWITZERLAND
Manuel Mauri Brusa, U della Svizzera Italiana, SWITZERLAND
Framing Immigration, Migrant Integration, and Ethnic Diversity: Party Discourse in Electoral
Competition
Oliver Gruber, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Respondent
Aymar Jean Christian, Northwestern U, USA
5226
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Ordinary Grammars: The Rules for Representing and Performing the Ordinary in Popular
Culture
Popular Communication
Chairs
Jason Vincent Cabanes, Ateneo de Manila U, PHILIPPINES
Sue Collins, Michigan Technological U, USA
Participants
Performing the Ordinary: Politicians, Political Style, and Celebrity
Sue Collins, Michigan Technological U, USA
Ordinary News
Nancy Thumim, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Extra-Ordinary
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
The Ordinary as Extraordinary: Indians, Koreans, and Their Photo Essays About Diasporic Life in Manila
Jason Vincent Cabanes, Ateneo de Manila U, PHILIPPINES
Respondent
Beverly Skeggs, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
The ordinary as an unmarked reference to ‘the people’ and a performance marked by ethnic, racial, class
and caste hierarchies has permeated popular communication since well before Raymond Williams
commented on it in “Culture Is Ordinary” some 50 years ago. This panel will interrogate the ordinary and
its rules of performance and representation across types of media production and their genres. Ultimately
we show precisely how vexed and, at the same time, useful the idea(l) of ordinariness is.
5227
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Young Scholars’ Roundtable: Visual Narrative
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
Mediation of the Crisis in America: Hollywood’s Pendulum Between Individualism and Evil
Corporations
Evren Dincer, Cornell U, USA
Ergin Bulut, U of Illinois, USA
Challenging “Callas”: An Exploration of the Intersections of Emotion and Meaning in Film as
Constructed via Visual, Narrative, and Audio Streams
Stephanie K. Brehe, Indiana U, USA
Are Hollywood's Biggest Hits Getting Both More Formulaic and Better Critical Reviews?
Sean Connolly, Indiana U, USA
Telling Stories or Representing Topics? Theoretically Conceptualizing and Empirically Analyzing Visual
Episodic and Thematic Frames
Michael Grimm, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Stephanie Geise, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Visualizing Conflict: Creating Posttraumatic Narratives Through Cartoons and Photography
Robin Emily Hoecker, Northwestern U, USA
“Us vs. Them” Depictions of Immigrants in Campaign Posters of European Right-Wing Populist Parties
Franziska Marquart, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Respondents
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Catherine L. Preston, U of Kansas, USA
This roundtable presents an opportunity for young scholars in the field of Visual Communication Studies
to obtain detailed feedback and engage in constructive conversation with senior scholars in the field
regarding the challenges and methodologies of Visual Communication research. The overarching theme
of this roundtable is that of narrative, the conveyance of story through the medium of imagery: in film,
documentary, photography, and cultural narratives surrounding a series of discrete images. Informal and
free-flowing dialogue on the topic of methodologies and the particular challenges inherent within studying
the type of media under examination will follow each presentation, with the overarching goal of
advancing the research presented in this roundtable to the next level, in professional development,
preparing for future conferences, and preparing for publication.
5228
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
The Global Politics of Change: ICT, Trafficking, and Protest
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Participants
Gender Issues in ICT Policy: A Case Study of Jamaica
Dominique Harrison, Howard U, USA
Seelampur Women and Labor Away From the Doorsteps of the ICT Center
Sreela Sarkar, U of Massachusetts, USA
Raid, Rescue, Silence: Why a Feminist Approach to Antitrafficking Policy in Thailand is Needed
Erin Michelle Kamler, U of Southern California, USA
Online Media Representation of a Protest Woman Leader in Israel
Dalia Liran Alper, Communication School, ISRAEL
Orly Tsarfaty, Max Stern Academic College of Emek Yezreel, ISRAEL
5231
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 1
Showcasing ICLASP13: 2013 Research Directions: International Association of Language and
Social Psychology
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Bernadette M Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Language Attitude Conflict: A Case of Secondary School Students in Postcolonial Hong Kong
Bennan Zhang, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
How the Doc Should (Not) Talk: When Breaking Bad News With Negations Influences Patients’
Immediate Responses and Medical Adherence Intentions
Christian Burgers, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Camiel J. Beukeboom, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California - Irvine, USA
European Americans’ Cultural Orientations and Conflict Management Styles With Peers and Older
Adults
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
The Effectiveness of Apologies and Thanks in Favor Asking Messages: A Cross-Cultural Comparison
Between Korea and the United States
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Giving Radon Gas Life Through Language: Effects of Linguistic Agency Assignment in Health Messages
Marko Dragojevic, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Robert Alan Bell, U of California - Davis, USA
Matthew S. McGlone, U of Texas, USA
Visualizing Conversations Between Care Home Staff and Residents With Dementia
Rosemary Baker, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Daniel Angus, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Erin R. Conway-Smith, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Katharine S. Baker, Stanford U, USA
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Andrew Edward Smith, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Janet Wiles, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Helen J. Chenery, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Respondents
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Bernadette M Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
This panel will reflect the scholarship of IALSP members who adopt a language and social psychology
(LSP) approach to communication research. The selected papers will showcase the application of this LSP
approach across communication contexts that overlap and extend the interests of the International
Communication Association. The 2013 ICA theme “Challenging Communication Research” provides an
ideal forum to demonstrate IALSP’s diverse communication endeavours.
5232
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 2
To Good Health and Hospitality: Rituals, Code-Switching, and Conversational Management
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of New Hampshire, USA
Participants
Nigerianese and Socio-Discursive Errandry in Simulated Interactions: A Critical Analysis of Tatolo
Alamu’s "Snooping Around"
Lasisi Adeiza Isiaka, Adekunle Ajasin U, Akungba-Akoko, NIGERIA
Gauging and Responding to Patient Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Preferences in
Acute Primary Care Visits
Christopher J. Koenig, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
The Edge of Precise Measurement: When Smoking and Drinking Don’t Count
Timothy Halkowski, U of Wisconsin - Stevens Point, USA
Parlez in the Parlor: Goal-Achievement in Tattoo Artist-Studio Client Greeting Rituals in the Learning
Channel (TLC)’s Television Program NY Ink
Sabrina Kim Pasztor, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Bilingualism in Hospitality Properties: Language Choice and Code Alternation as a Resource for
Organizing the Multiple-Participant Check in Activity
Yulia Ponomareva, Linköping U, SWEDEN
5233
Tuesday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 3
Relationships and Expectations: Instructor-Student and Student-Student Communication
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Lynne M. Webb, U of Arkansas, USA
Participants
Academic and Social Integration in the Basic Communication Course: Gateways to Students’ Other
Curriculum
Robert John Sidelinger, Oakland U, USA
Derek Bolen, Angelo State U, USA
Meghan Carroll Kelly Nyeste, Oakland U, USA
Audra McMullen, Towson U, USA
Emotion in the Classroom: How Teachers Influence Students’ Enjoyment, Hope, and Pride
Scott Titsworth, Ohio U, USA
Timothy McKenna, Ohio U, USA
Joseph Paul Mazer, Clemson U, USA
Margaret Mary Quinlan, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
No Nights or Weekends Off: College Students’ Expectations, Experiences, and Satisfaction With EMailing Their Professors
Courtney Waite Miller, Elmhurst College, USA
Rachel M. Reznik, Elmhurst College, USA
Role Communication and Peer Mentors
Janet Colvin, Utah Valley U, USA
Nancy Tobler, Utah Valley U, USA
5302
ICA Plenary: The Network Tradition in Communication Research and Scholarship: A Round
Table Conversation
Tuesday
12:00-13:15
Balmoral
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Leah A. Lievrouw, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Participants
Elihu Katz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Richard Rogers, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
The proliferation of new media and information technologies over the last 30 years has captured the
interest and imagination of communication scholars across the discipline, helping to move the concept of
“network” to the forefront of theorizing and empirical study in diverse corners of the field. In this plenary
session, a group of prominent scholars considers the long-term intellectual influence – what might be
called the archaeology – of network thought, theory and methods in the communication discipline.
5402
Challenging Core Concepts in Communication and Media Studies
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Participants
Challenging Identities
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Challenging Globalization Theories
Colin Sparks, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Challenging Public Sphere Theories
Peter Lunt, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Forty years ago communication technologies were thought of as central media institutions that spoke to
national-popular audiences within the frame of the nation state. National newspapers and broadcasting
systems defined ‘the media’ in many countries. These ‘old media’ now sit alongside a host of new media
that did not exist back then. All interact with each other today. All have contributed to the structural
transformation of the contemporary worldwide public sphere. All have contributed to reconfiguring
identity politics. The meaning of identity, the character of public life and the impact of global
connectivity have been constant concerns in our field in continually changing circumstances. The panel
reflects on how they have been thought, how they are now thought and how they might be thought as the
field continues its journey looking back to the future.
5405
Changing Media Environments, Changing Media Use Patterns
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Myiah J Hutchens, U of Arizona, USA
Participants
Explaining Media Choice: Predictors of News Selection
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Lauren Feldman, American U, USA
Natalie Jomini Stroud, U of Texas, USA
Bruce Bimber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
News Media Use and the Informed Public in the Digital Age
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin, USA
Doo-Hun Choi, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Cacciatore, U of Wisconsin, USA
Sara Yeo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Leona Yi-Fan Su, U of Wisconsin, USA
Partisan Enclaves or Diverse Repertoires? A Network Approach to Understanding Citizens’ Political
Media Environments
Brian E Weeks, Ohio State U, USA
Thomas Burton Ksiazek, Villanova U, USA
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Public Service Broadcasting, Inadvertent News Exposure, and Political Learning: An Empirical Test
Using Panel Data
Adam Shehata, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Lars W. Nord, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
5406
Disaster and Emergency Communication Around the Globe: Opportunities for Organizational
Communication Research
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Participants
Disasters as Punctuated Equilibrium: Chance for Change or Not a Chance
Marya L. Doerfel, Rutgers U, USA
Timebanking and Community Resilience: Pre and Post Disaster Communication Processes at Port
Lyttelton
Shiv Ganesh, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
This is Urgent! This is Important! Organizations Using Productive Redundancy to Reach Audiences
During Emergencies
Ashley Katherine Barrett, U of Texas, USA
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Cindy Posey, U of Texas, USA
Narratives of Emergency Response in the Norway Shooting Massacre
Jan-Oddvar Soernes, U of Bodo, NORWAY
Peer J. Svenkerud, Norsk Tipping AS, NORWAY
Using Mobile Devices for Emergency Response in the UK
Laura Meadows, HTK Limited, UNITED KINGDOM
Letting Everyone Know That Yes, I'm Okay: AT&T's Global Approach to Safety
Caroline Sinclair, U of Texas, USA
This panel focuses specifically on how organizations and organizing processes function in the preparation,
response, and sensemaking activities of urgent events, drawing from work by prominent scholars and
practitioners in a number of countries. By combining various global perspectives, this panel will provide
an agenda for organizational communication scholars to make an impact on the existing bodies of
research in disaster and emergency response. In addition to our individual research papers and
presentations, we will provide attendees with a five-page summary of the most relevant research that can
substantiate our arguments for the value of this research focus. Over half of this complied research will be
from outside of the communication discipline; thus, the panel will also incorporate a multidisciplinary
perspective on this topic. Panel members will also propose their top directions for future research and
they will share best practices observed in diverse parts of the world.
5407
Agenda Setting in a New Media Environment
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Gilg U.H. Seeber, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
Participants
Agenda Setting, Attitude Strength, and Motivated Reasoning
Na Yeon Lee, U of Texas, USA
Yoonmo Sang, U of Texas, USA
All Things Considered? Investigating the Breadth of Public Affairs Issues That Individuals Think About
Jae Kook Lee, Indiana U, USA
Jihyang Choi, Indiana U, USA
Sung Tae Kim, Korea U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Are You Rich?: Media Choice and Agenda Setting in Digital Media Environment
Seok Ho Lee, U of Texas, USA
The Agenda-Building Function of Political Tweets
John Houston Parmelee, U of North Florida, USA
5408
Social Networks, Social Capital, and Motivations
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Nicole Ellison, School of Information, USA
Participants
Social Media and First-Generation High School Students’ College Aspirations: A Social Capital Lens
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, School of Information, USA
M Laeeq Khan, Michigan State U, USA
Ryan Fewins-Bliss, Michigan State U, USA
Rebecca Gray, Michigan State U, USA
Calling All Facebook Friends: Exploring Broadcasted Mobilization Requests on Facebook
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Rebecca Gray, Michigan State U, USA
Cliff Lampe, U of Michigan, USA
Jessica Vitak, U of Maryland, USA
Andrew T Fiore, Michigan State U, USA
Motives for Mobile Phone-Mediated Social Interactions and Social Capital Outcomes
Keunmin Bae, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Facebook Feature Use by Dutch Students and Their Teachers: Effects of Motivation and Generation
Sonja Utz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Klaas Jan Huizing, Noordelijke Hogeschool Leeuwarden, THE NETHERLANDS
5409
Developing Hyperpersonal Relationship in Mediated Communications
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Participants
The Warranting Value of Online Relationship Status Disclosure: An Indicator of Real World Relational
Characteristics
Cameron Wade Piercy, U of Oklahoma, USA
Brianna L. Lane, U of Oklahoma, USA
Caleb T. Carr, Illinois State U, USA
How Individuals Cause Hyperpersonal Effects in CMC: Expectations, Malleability, Efficacy, and Channel
Interactions
Stephanie Tom Tong, Wayne State U, USA
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Glancing Up or Down: Mood Management and Social Comparisons on Social Networking Sites
Benjamin K. Johnson, Ohio State U, USA
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Communicating Social Relationships via the Use of Photo Messaging
Daniel Scot Hunt, Newbury College, USA
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
David J. Atkin, U of Connecticut, USA
5411
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Waterloo/Tower
Health and the City: Challenges for and Insights From Communication
Health Communication
Chair
Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation, USA
Participants
Identifying, Understanding, and Deploying a Community's Health Communication Assets
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
George Allen Onas Villanueva, U of Southern California, USA
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Leveraging Social Networks to Promote HIV/AIDS Education in Urban Minority Communities: The
Community Liaison Project
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
Does Size Really Matter? Combating Reproductive Health Disparities in a Small City Through a
Communication Infrastructure Approach
Matthew D. Matsaganis, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Annis G. Golden, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Urban Health Communication: Defining a New Subfield of Study
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Respondent
Susan Drucker, Hofstra U, USA
The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Commission on the Social Determinants of Health stressed in
its 2008 report that, “where people live affects their health and chances of leading flourishing lives.
Communities and neighborhoods that ensure access to basic goods, that are socially cohesive, that are
designed to promote good physical and psychological well-being, and that are protective of the natural
environment are essential for health equity.” Communication as a discipline is underrepresented in this
body of work and, more significantly, the role of communication as a social process in urban
communities’ health is understudied. In this context, the Urban Communication Foundation (UCF)
convenes a panel of scholars from four different institutions conducting research in very different urban
contexts across the world to discuss the realized and potential contributions of communication theory and
research to the multidisciplinary literature on health and the city.
5412
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Division Spotlight: Highly Rated Competitive Papers in Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Participants
When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational
Communication Between Online Daters
Artemio Ramirez, Jr., Arizona State U, USA
Erin Michelle Bryant, Trinity U, USA
Christina Fleuriet, Arizona State U, USA
Megan Cole, Arizona State U, USA
Maintaining Romantic Relationships as a Function of Cultural Values and Equity
Young-ok Yum, Kansas State U, USA
Daniel James Canary, Arizona State U, USA
Joyce Baptist, Kansas State U, USA
Narrating Adoption: Resisting Adoption as “Second Best” in Online Stories of Domestic Adoption Told
by Adoptive Parents
Leslie A. Baxter, U of Iowa, USA
Kristen Norwood, St. Louis U, USA
Bryan Asbury, U of Iowa, USA
Kristina M. Scharp, U of Iowa, USA
Romantic Relationship Dissolution on Social Networking Sites: Social Support, Coping, and Rituals on
Facebook
Jesse Fox, Ohio State U, USA
Elizabeth Jones, Ohio State U, USA
Kathryn L Lookadoo, U of Oklahoma, USA
5413
Diffusion Studies in New Media
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Conceptualizing Media Generations: The Print, Online, and Individualized Generations
Oscar Westlund, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Mathias A. Fardigh, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Neural Precursors of Successful Diffusion: Using Neuroimaging and Sentiment Analysis to Examine
Enthusiastic Idea Sharing
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew Brook O'Donnell, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew D Lieberman, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
"Gangnam Style": A Theoretical Overview of Viral Propagation in the Social and Digital Media Age
T. E. Dominic Yeo, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Unfolding Digital Inequality in China: Survey Evidence on Social and Demographic Characteristics of
Internet Use
Jiawen Zheng, U of Wisconsin, USA
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
5414
Theoretical Challenges in Comparing Media Systems
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Participants
“Area Studies” Versus Cosmopolitan Media Studies
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
The Challenges of Comparative Communication Research
Daya Thussu, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Unpacking the Role of Technological Developments in Media System Change
Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
From Media Effects to System Theory: The Journey of Comparative Research in Journalism Studies
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Respondent
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini’s Comparing Media Systems and its 2012 companion volume
Comparing Media Systems: Beyond the Western World has helped spark a wave of comparative research
in journalism studies, but also raised new challenges and been subject to much criticism for the particular
ways in which the authors conceptualize media systems, the empirical approaches they suggest, and the
hypotheses they formulate concerning how they change over time (see for instance Norris 2009, Curran
2010, Hardy 2011, and Humphreys 2012). This panel is dedicated to the theoretical challenges involved in
comparing media systems and in understanding the changing institutional preconditions such systems
provide for professional journalism around the world.
5416
Television News in a Postbroadcast Society
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Adrian John Chaplin Hadland, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Changes in TV News-Making After Implementing the Integrated Newsroom: A Longitudinal Study
Trisha Tsui-Chuan Lin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Di Cui, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Live Co-Produced News: Emerging Forms of News Production and Presentation on the Web
Asa Kroon Lundell, Örebro U, SWEDEN
Mats Erik Ekstrom, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Goran Eriksson, Örebro U, SWEDEN
The “Status” of News: Implementation of Networked Technologies in Television News Organizations
Tamar Ashuri, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Atara Frenkel-Faran, Sapir Academic College & Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Long Live Soft News: How Economic Content With Human Interest Angles Favor Recall
Patrick Merle, Texas Tech U, USA
Clay Craig, Texas Tech U, USA
Boom or Bust? U.S. Television News Industry is Booming but Burnout Looms for Some
Scott Reinardy, U of Kansas, USA
5417
Extended Session: Playing With Fire? Intense Game Experiences and Discussions and Debates in
Pathological Gaming
Tuesday
13:30-16:15
Berkeley
Game Studies
Mass Communication
Chair
Christopher J. Ferguson, Texas A&M International U, USA
Participants
"High-Density" Paper Presentations Introduction
Christopher J. Ferguson, Texas A&M International U, USA
Addictive Playing: The Role of Implicit and Explicit Motives
Julia Kneer, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sabine Glock, U of Luxembourg, LUXEMBOURG
Drying Tears With Pacman: The Impact of Interactive and Noninteractive Media on Reported Mood and
Physiological Arousal
Diana Rieger, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Julia Kneer, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gary Bente, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Is a Game More Effective in Raising Self and Collective Efficacy? How Media Modes Change
Interpretation of the Game Experience
Yu-Hao Lee, Michigan State U, USA
Promoting Physical Activity Through an Active Video Game Among Young Adults
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Karin Pfeiffer, Michigan State U, USA
Brian Winn, Michigan State U, USA
Jih-Hsuan Lin, National Chiao Tung U, TAIWAN
Darijan Suton, Michigan State U, USA
Studying the Pleasures of the Discerning Gamer: Subjective Quality Judgments as Predictors of Good
Video Game Experiences
Christina Evelin Schumann, Technische U Ilmenau, GERMANY
Nicholas David Bowman, West Virginia U, USA
Daniel Schultheiss, Ilmenau U of Technology, GERMANY
The (Co-)Occurrence of Problematic Video Game Play, Substance Use, and Psychosocial Problems in
Adolescents
Antonius J. Van Rooij, IVO Addiction Research Institute, THE NETHERLANDS
Daria Kuss, Nottingham Trent U, UNITED KINGDOM
Mark Griffiths, Nottingham Trent U, UNITED KINGDOM
Gillian Shorter - Smith, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Dike van de Mheen, IVO Addiction Research Institute, THE NETHERLANDS
The Effects of Playing Versus Watching a Digital Game on the Perception and Evaluation of in-Game
Violence
Johannes Breuer, U Münster, GERMANY
Michael Scharkow, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Thorsten Quandt, U Münster, GERMANY
The Relationship Between Playing Shooting Games and Desensitization to Violence. A Multifactor
Approach
Wannes Ribbens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
Steven Malliet, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Video Games, Moral Emotions, and Repeated Play: The Desensitizing Effect of Repeated Play on the
Ability of Virtual Behaviors to Elicit Guilt
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Poster Browsing Session/Intermission
Christopher J. Ferguson, Texas A&M International U, USA
"Discussions and Debates in Pathological Gaming" Panel Introduction
Christopher J. Ferguson, Texas A&M International U, USA
Video Game Addiction: Past, Present and Future
Mark Griffiths, Nottingham Trent U, UNITED KINGDOM
Treatment of Pathological Video-Gaming: The State-of-the-Art
Daniel King, U of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Online Gaming Addiction: The Issue of Diagnostics
Daria Kuss, Nottingham Trent U, UNITED KINGDOM
The issue of pathological gaming remains debated and discussed within the research community and
general public. Given the potential for moral panic, good information may often be lost among the bad.
This panel will address several of the major controversies in the field, such as the prevalence of
pathological gaming, how pathological gaming may be best defined and assessed, whether pathological
gaming arises from qualities of games, players or both, and whether pathological gaming should be
considered as synonymous with chemical addictions as is often implied by media depictions and by some
scholars. Several leading scholars will have the opportunity to present recent breakthroughs in this field
as well as to debate these topics among each other and with the attending audience.
5418
Theoretical Perspectives
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Edward A. Mabry, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Participants
Dynamic Social Impact Theory: Comparative Effects for Computer-Mediated and Mixed-Mode Groups
Edward A. Mabry, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Flow Theory and Media Exposure: Advances in Experimental Manipulation and Measurement
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Richard Wayne Huskey, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Motivated Threaded Cognition: A Theory of Multitasking in CMC
Jatin Srivastava, Ohio U, USA
Prabu David, Washington State U, USA
Reflective Play and the Use of Game Genres. Predicting Preferences by Extrinsic and Intrinsic Activities
Claudia Wilhelm, Eberhard Karls U Tübingen, GERMANY
The Construal Level Theory of Persuasion
Sherri Jean Katz, Cornell U, USA
The Social Network Experience: A Two-Level Reception Model of Users’ Exposure to Social
Networking Sites
German Neubaum, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
The Relationship Between Online and Off-Line Fear of Crime: A Mediated Model
Kathleen Custers, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Jan Van den Bulck, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Time-Bounded Ethicality: The Interplay of Temporal Frames on Moral Judgments of Media Characters
Sungjong Roh, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
5421
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Ten Years of Popular Communication: The International Journal of Media and Culture
Popular Communication
Participants
Internationalizing Popular Communication
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Breaking the Filter Bubble of Popular Communication
Patrick Burkart, Texas A&M U, USA
What is Popular Communication Research?... Or, Rather, What Isn’t? A History of the Field Through the
Lens of Special Issues
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
The Sound Garden of Forking Paths: Tracing Music in 10 Years of Popular Communication Towards a
Special Issue on the Topic
Nabeel Mustafa Zuberi, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Respondent
Nancy Thumim, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Popular Communication made its debut in 2003 as an independent, but affiliated, journal of the ICA.
Editors Sharon Mazarella and Norma Pecora stated in their editors’ introduction to the first issue that a
primary intellectual challenge of the journal was to break free of the productivist bias of the media studies
of its time and to investigate the ways in which “communication is ‘made popular.’” This panel brings
together the new editors of Popular Communication to discuss the journal’s history of documenting the
culture-communication analytic and consider future directions.
5422
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Cartographies of Media Activism/Activism With Media
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
Participants
A Social Movement Network and the Internet: An Analysis of Websites of South Korean Anti-G20
Movement Organizations
Kanghui Baek, U of Texas, USA
***TOP PAPER*** Cyberspace as Contested Spaces: The Networks of Mass Collaboration, Grassroots
Surveillance, and Popular Protests in China
Zixue Tai, U of Kentucky, USA
Fengbin Hu, Shanghai U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Making of a Collective Mind Through a Symbiotic Relationship Between the Protesters and the News
Media
Wooyeol Shin, U of Minnesota, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Muslimah Media Watch: Media Activism and Muslim Choreographies of Social Change
Nabil Echchaibi, U of Colorado, USA
5423
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and Managing Crisis
Public Relations
Chair
Timothy Coombs, U of Central Florida, USA
Participants
Commodity Theory as a Theoretical Explanation for the Impact of the Self-Disclosure of Organizational
Crises
An-Sofie Claeys, U College Ghent, BELGIUM
Verolien Cauberghe, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Mario Pandelaere, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Jan Leysen, Royal Military Academy, BELGIUM
Evaluating the Crisis Response Strategies of a University Basketball Program: How Do Reactions Differ
Based on Apologies, Crisis Severity, and Team Identification?
Tom E Isaacson, Northern Michigan U, USA
Scale Development for Measuring Publics’ Emotions in Organizational Crises
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Brooke Fisher Liu, U of Maryland, USA
Deepa Anagondahalli, U of Maryland, USA
Lucinda L. Austin, Elon U, USA
Using Press Releases to Manage a Crisis: A Framing Analysis of Press Releases Dealing With the
Fukushima Nuclear Power Station Crisis
Jinbong Choi, SungKongHoe U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
5424
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Why Don’t They Believe Us? Why Are Media Effects on Children & Adolescents Routinely Ignored
or Downplayed
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Media Violence (Including Video Games)
Ed Donnerstein, U of Arizona, USA
Sex (Including Sexting and Sexual Exploitation Online)
Victor C Strasburger, U of New Mexico, USA
Obesity
Russell Viner, Institute of Child Health, UNITED KINGDOM
The Myth of the Fairness Doctrine: Why Both Sides of the Issue Don’t Need to be Represented!
Douglas A. Gentile, Iowa State U, USA
Worldwide, the general public and mainstream media remain skeptical that the media play any role in
crucial child health areas like aggression, obesity, or early sexual activity, despite more than 50 years of
research and thousands of research studies that say otherwise. An international panel will discuss the
current state-of-the –art knowledge about 3 crucial areas in child and adolescent health – aggression, sex,
and obesity – and what can be done to communicate the significant findings to a currently non-believing
public. Emphasis will be placed on evidence-based conclusions regarding these key health-related areas,
as well as what aspects of the research can or can not be successfully disseminated to the general public.
Other public relations obstacles – including the presumed "Fairness Doctrine" in U.S.media – will be
discussed as well.
5425
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Soundscapes of Meaning: Radio as a Cultural Force
Communication History
Chair
Jefferson D. Pooley, Muhlenberg College, USA
Participants
Producing the “Amateur” in Preregulation U.S. Radio, 1899-1912
Kevin Driscoll, U of Southern California, USA
Media Memories: The Case of Youth Radio DT64
Anne Kaun, Sodertorn U, SWEDEN
Fredrik Stiernstedt, Södertörn U, SWEDEN
Talk Back and Particiapte: The Making of the Active Audience Within Swedish Local Radio 1977-2000
Michael Forsman, Södertörn U, SWEDEN
Listening to the Community: The Goals and Instructional Methods of Local Educational Radio
Broadcasters
Brian C Gregory, Columbia U, USA
Socio-Cultural Pluriformity on the Dutch Airwaves, 1979–2005
Ruben P. Konig, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Johannes Bardoel, U of Amsterdam/Radboud U, THE NETHERLANDS
Koos Nuijten, NHTV Breda U of Applied Sciences, THE NETHERLANDS
The question of the influence of radio is a pervasive topic in the development of communication history,
bringing together the various agendas which have shaped ongoing discussions about, for instance,
audiences, technologies and consumption. This session examines the develpment and influence of radio in
a variety of social and cultural contexts, and speaks to its central importance to the field.
5426
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Complexities of Representing the Other
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Briar Thompson, U of Oxford
Participants
Challenging the Frame of Hopelessness: Engagement and Compassion in Western Mediations of Distant
Suffering
Anna Camilla Haavisto, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Mari Maasilta, U of Westminster/U of Helsinki, UNITED KINGDOM
Bring Schemata of Interpretations Back: The Structured Framing Process of the Anti-CNN Movement
Fen Jennifer Lin, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Dingxin Zhao, U of Chicago, USA
How American Media Framed the Egyptian Revolution
Byung Wook Kim, Iowa State U, USA
Xuan Zhang, Iowa State U, USA
The Challenges of Visually Representing Poverty for NGO Communication Managers in New Zealand
Briar Thompson, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Celia Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
5427
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Mediating Digital Religion: Creatives, Confession, and Eloquence
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Knut Lundby, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
Conductors for Religion Across Media
Knut Lundby, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Religious Digital Creatives as New Cultural Authorities
Heidi Ann Campbell, Texas A&M U, USA
Digital Confession, Gender, and Religion
Mia E. Lovheim, Uppsala U, NORWAY
On Digital Religious Eloquence
Peter D. Simonson, U of Colorado, USA
Respondent
Stig Hjarvard, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
5428
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Visual-Verbal Rhetorics in Play, Persuasion, and Politics
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
Text, Image, Violent Games, and God: A Concept Explication of Depiction
Gregory Pearson Perreault, U of Missouri, USA
Importance of Visual and Verbal Synchronicity in Health Arguments: Super Size Me and Fat Head
Emma Frances Bloomfield, U of Southern California, USA
Angeline L. Sangalang, U of Southern California, USA
Speaking Under Duress: Verbal and Visual Elements of Personal and Political Messages in Captive
Videos
Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem / Ono Academic Colledge, ISRAEL
Akiba A. Cohen, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
Multimodal Campaign Strategies in U.S. Presidential Election 2012
Ognyan A. Seizov, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
The Role of Interactive Graphics in Reducing Misperceptions in the Electorate
Nick Geidner, U of Tennessee, USA
Ivanka Radovic, U of Tennessee, USA
Iveta Imre, U of Tennessee, USA
Ioana Alexandra Coman, U of Tennessee, USA
Dzmitry Yuran, U of Tennessee, USA
Visual Corporate Communication Strategies Between Documentary Sobriety and Marketing Persuasion
Carmen Daniela Maier, Aarhus U, DENMARK
The City and its Marks: Writing Practices Over Official Discourses
Laura Guimaraes Correa, U Federal de Minas Gerais, BRAZIL
5431
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Board Room 1
Convergence Models: Innovations in Daily Newspaper Economy. Cases of Russia, Finland,
Germany, and Austria (Panel Session)
Mass Communication
Chair
Gregory Ferrell Lowe, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Participants
General Presentation of the Research Project Convergence and Business Models: Innovations in Daily
Newspaper Economy
Mikhail Makeenko, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Mike Friedrichsen, Stuttgart Media U, GERMANY
Convergence and Business Models: Innovations in Daily Newspaper Economy -- Case of Russia
Elena Vartanova, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Mikhail Makeenko, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Andrei Vyrkouski, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Convergence and Business Models: Innovations in Daily Newspaper Economy -- Case Germany
Mike Friedrichsen, Stuttgart Media U, GERMANY
Wolfgang Muehl-Benninghaus, Humboldt U of Berlin, GERMANY
Convergence and Business Models: Innovations in Daily Newspaper Economy -- Case Finland
Katja Koikkalainen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Hannu Veli Nieminen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Convergence and Business Models: Innovations in Daily Newspaper Economy -- Case Austria
Johanna Grueblbauer, U of Applied Sciences, AUSTRIA
Jan Krone, Applied U St. Pölten, AUSTRIA
Respondent
Robert Georges Picard, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
In this panel the results of comparing the differences in the strategies and innovations adopted by the daily
newspapers in Russia, Germany, Austria and Finland will be presented. The presentation focuses to
question, where do the newspaper publishers seek innovations for converged platforms, what are the
elements of new business models of newspapers, and how does this affect newspaper production chain
and contact with readers as well as economic and financial performance of major, regional and local
dailies. The panel will identify common challenges that news media organizations face everywhere, while
also taking into account differences in audience demand, market structure and business practices between
these countries. By comparing the strategies and experiences of daily newspapers in these countries, the
panel will offer a better understanding of the dynamics and implications of current technological, social
and economic transformations associated with media convergence.
5432
Tuesday
13:30-16:15
Board Room 2
Extended Session: Changing Media Regimes, Changing Media Law, and Policy?
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Andrew Kenyon, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Convergent Media, Regulation, and the Question of Platform Neutrality
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Protecting Freedom of Speech and Press in the Digital Era
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
"Simply Scan, Print and Repeat": New Challenges to Intellectual Property Laws and Potential Futures
Nadine Irene Kozak, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Cloud-Based Facial Recognition: Establishing the Citizen at the Center of Policy and Design
Jenifer Sunrise Winter, U of Hawaii, USA
Road to Neo-Authoritarianism? A 25-Year Review of China’s Internet Policies
Min Jiang, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Media Regulation for Small Countries: A Case Study of Bhutan
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yuanyuan Cao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Search Engines, Markets, and Democracy
Minjeong Kim, Colorado State U, USA
The Troublesome Norm of International Police Enforcement of Digital Copyright
Lucas Logan, Texas A&M U, USA
“Local and Local and Local, local”: Conversations With Regulators About the Future of Media Localism
in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom
Christopher Ali, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
This session aims to encourage cross-area dialog about broader trends in technology design and use,
media industry organization and practice, sociopolitical developments, and their implications for
communication law and policy. Participants and attendees will discuss what has changed, or should
change, in approaches to media law and policy given developments in media industries, technologies,
environments and political contexts over the last few decades. Are new theories or approaches needed to
understand law and policy in this changing environment? How have societal changes and developments
interacted with different areas of law and policy and with what implications?
5433
Tuesday
13:30-14:45
Board Room 3
Bullying, Dissent, and Misbehaviors: The Dark Side of Instructional Communication
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Robert John Sidelinger, Oakland U, USA
Participants
Emotional Intelligence: A Framework for Examining Bullying in Schools
Nancy Burrell, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Melissa Maier, Upper Iowa U, USA
DeeAnne Priddis, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Angela Victor, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Jennifer Jackl, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Clare Gross, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Mike Allen, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Instructional Dissent in the College Classroom: A Test of the Instructional Beliefs Model
Sara LaBelle, West Virginia U, USA
Matthew M. Martin, West Virginia U, USA
Keith David Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Student Misbehaviors in Online Classrooms: Scale Development and Validation
Li Li, U of Wyoming, USA
Scott Titsworth, Ohio U, USA
Students’ Academic Orientations and Instructional Dissent
Alan K. Goodboy, West Virginia U, USA
Brandi N Frisby, U of Kentucky, USA
5502
Everything You Wanted to Know About Peer Review, but Were Afraid to Ask
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Balmoral
Journalism Studies
Chair
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Participants
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Howard Tumber, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
Bob Franklin, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Peer review lies at the center of professional life in academia, yet so much mystery surrounds it. Why,
when and how should scholars get involved in reviewing? What makes for a constructive review? How
should authors respond to reviews? The session brings together the editors of Communication Theory,
International Journal of Press/Politics, Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism, Journalism Studies,
Journalism Practice, and Digital Journalism to discuss the state of peer review as well as the nuts and
bolts of journal publishing. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask editors about the
reviewing and publishing process. This session is valuable for those who are just starting to submit their
work, as well as for those who are veteran reviewers.
5505
Methodological Opportunities and Challenges in the Age of Social Media and “Big Data”: Beyond
the Survey
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Palace A
Theme Sessions
Participants
Methods for Examining Language and Behavior in Virtual Communities
Adam Nicholas Joinson, U of the West of England, UNITED KINGDOM
Quant E-Data for the Qual Researcher: Tools for Gathering and Processing Online Data
Mike Arijan Thelwall, U of Wolverhampton, UNITED KINGDOM
Pairing "Big" Data With Not So Big Data: Opportunities and Challenges
Lauren Sessions Goulet, Facebook, USA
Methodological Diversity in Studying Facebook
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
The Importance of Interpretation
Danah Michele Boyd, Microsoft Research, USA
Respondent
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
This panel brings together researchers who study social media using a range of methods. The presenters
will share their insights, advice, and experiences with methods that are not as commonly employed by
communication researchers. The panel will appeal to researchers from multiple divisions who are
interested in taking advantage of newer, diverse methodological opportunities, especially in regard to
social media research. It will focus on helping communication scholars from different divisions become
aware of other methods for exploring social media and taking advantage of these new opportunities to
explore both how social media is reshaping many communication processes as well as to test other
communication theories in naturalistic settings using the affordances of social media applications.
5506
Culture and Identity
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Palace B
Intercultural Communication
Chair
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Participants
Cultural Identity in Everyday Interactions and Relationships at Work: The Experiences of Russian
Immigrants in Finland
Malgorzata Lahti, Jyvskyl, FINLAND
Identity and Intercultural Conflict
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
New Challenges for Old Identities: The Future of Basque Media in the Current Context
Txema Ramirez de la Piscina, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
Beatriz Zabalondo, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
Antxoka Agirre, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
Alazne Aiestaran, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
Estefania Jimenez, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
Maria González Gorosarri, U of the Basque Country, SPAIN
The Impact of National Culture on Conceptions of Meaningful Work and Identity Negotiation: A Study
Across Several Norwegian Organizations
Ashley Katherine Barrett, U of Texas, USA
IndiaUnheard: Vernacular Voices of Dalit Subaltern From Below
Purba Das, Ohio U Southern, USA
5507
Talking Politics, Online and Offline
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Kjerstin Thorson, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Online Media Use, Social Norms, and Aggressive Online Communication: A Communication Process of
Political Flaming
Jay D. Hmielowski, U of Arizona, USA
Myiah J Hutchens, U of Arizona, USA
Vincent Cicchirillo, U of Texas, USA
Perception of Politics and Political Conversation Behavior: A Step Towards New Directions for the Study
of Informal Political Conversation
Ilka Jakobs, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Nicole Nadine Podschuweit, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Processes of Online Political Discussions and Public Opinion(s) Formation/Expression: A Three-Stage
Model Based Upon Emergent Social Identities
Sijia Yang, U of Pennsylvania, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Rational Information Sharing or Emotional Expression in the Online Discussion: How Do Leadership
Spark Conversations and Trigger Feedbacks
Pianpian Wang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Chengjun Wang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
5508
Online Interaction and Offline Interaction
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Participants
Mobilizing the Gay Bar: Grindr and the Layering of Spatial Context
Brett A. Bumgarner, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Internet Engagement and Community Participation: Implications for Digital Inequalities
Chul-joo Lee, U of Illinois, USA
Investigations on Empathy Towards Humans and Robots Using Psychophysiological Measures and fMRI
Astrid Marieke Rosenthal-von der Puetten, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Frank Paul Schulte, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Sabrina Sobieraj, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Laura Hoffmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Stefan Maderwald, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, GERMANY
Matthias Brand, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole Claudia Krämer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Intimacy in Computer-Mediated Communication: The Underestimation of Affective Influence Leads to
the Illusion of Liking Online
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
Jeong-woo Jang, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole C. Kashian, Michigan State U, USA
James Falin, Michigan State U, USA
Soo Yun Shin, Michigan State U, USA
Aditi Paul, Michigan State U, USA
Stephanie Tom Tong, Wayne State U, USA
5509
Consequences of Individual Differences in Online Environments
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Han Ei Chew, United Nations U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Bystanders of Cyberbullying: Personal Characteristics and Contextual Factors That Determine "Helping,"
"Joining In," and "Doing Nothing’"
Katrien Van Cleemput, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Sara Pabian, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
The Role of Sexual Orientation and Personality Traits on Gratifications Obtained Through Online Dating
Websites
Chris Clemens, U of Connecticut, USA
David J. Atkin, U of Connecticut, USA
Archana Krishnan, Yale U, USA
Opportunistic Discovery of Information: Scale Validation
Eunjin Kim, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Suyoung Moon, U of Missouri, USA
Chi Yao, U of Missouri, USA
Just How White or Black Are You? Effects of Race and Stereotype-Congruence on Evaluations of Online
Daters’ Attractiveness and Behavioral Intentions
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Michigan State U, USA
Kayla Danielle Hales, Michigan State U, USA
Jong-Hwan Baek, Michigan State U, USA
Hyun Jung Oh, Michigan State U, USA
5511
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Waterloo/Tower
Communication Perspectives on Death, End-of-Life Challenges, and Organ Donation
Health Communication
Chair
Keith Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
Fear and Death: A Meta-Analytic Review of Fear Appeals From a Terror Management Perspective -- Top
Three Paper/Health Communication Division
Nancy Rhodes, Ohio State U, USA
David M. Hunt, U of Wyoming, USA
Scott Radford, U of Calgary, CANADA
Managing Communication Tensions and Challenges During the End-of-Life Journey: Perspectives of
Māori Kaumātua and Their Whānau
John Oetzel, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Kay Berryman, Waikato Tainui College, NEW ZEALAND
Tiwai Iti, Rauawaawa Kaumatua Charitable Trust, NEW ZEALAND
Rangimahora Reddy, Rauawaawa Kaumatua Charitable Trust, NEW ZEALAND
The Living Donor Study: Themes, Expectations, and Obligations in the Transplant Assessment Clinic
Aimee Cunningham, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
The Role of Perceived Similarity and Education in Increasing Minority Organ Donor Consent
Keith David Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Hannah Ball, West Virginia U, USA
Melissa Wanzer, Canisius College, USA
5512
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Advances in Deception and Deception Detection
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Are Human Judges as Accurate as Automated Tools in Detecting Truth and Deceit?
Judee K. Burgoon, U of Arizona, USA
Aaron Elkins, U of Arizona, USA
Jay F. Nunamaker, U of Arizona, USA
Dimitris Metaxas, Rutgers U, USA
Deceptive Minds: Indirect Advantage in Judging Deceit When the Lie Detector is Turned Off
Anne Solbu Slowe, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Mark G. Frank, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
I Couldn’t Lie to his Face (but I Could Omit): Deception, Detection, Demeanor, and Truth Bias in Faceto-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication
Lyn M. Van Swol, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Braun, U of Wisconsin, USA
An Exploration of Concealment and Discovery in Romantic Infidelity
Megan M. Dowd, Hamilton College, USA
Claudia L. Hale, Ohio U, USA
Respondent
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
5513
Bias in News
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Journalism Studies
Chair
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
How Real is Economic Mass Media Reality? Comparing the Real Economy and Economic News in
German News Outlets
Juliane Anke Lischka, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Motivated Evaluation of Mediated Information: The Role of Content and Source Affiliation in the Hostile
Media Effect
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin, USA
Bryan McLaughlin, U of Wisconsin, USA
Melissa R Gotlieb, Texas Tech U, USA
David A. Wise, U of Wisconsin, USA
Network TV Microframing of Bush vs. Obama: A Longitudinal Lexical Analysis of Relative News Bias
Dennis Thomas Lowry, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Mohammad Delwar Hossain, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Jiachun Hong, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Stephanie C KANG, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
The Perceived Source Bias and Race: The Influence of Mainstream Versus Ethnic Media on Audience
Responses to HIV/AIDS News Coverage
Yuki Fujioka, Georgia State U, USA
Tonia East, Edison State College, USA
5514
Political Scandals: Journalistic Swings From Overkill to Neglect?
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Regent's
Political Communication
Chair
Sigurd Allern, U of Oslo, SWEDEN
Participants
When Watchdogs Sleep. Explaining the Nonscandals of Campaign 2012
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Scandals and the Silent Processes of Political Power
Anu Marjaana Kantola, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Sensationalizing the Trivial?
Ester Edla Pollack, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Anything Goes: The Discursive Strategies of "Calculated Ambivalence and Provocation" in Rightwing
Populist Political Rhetoric
Ruth Wodak, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
The main aim of this panel, drawing on case studies from the US, Austria and the Nordic countries, is to
discuss the contradictory status of journalism as both a “scandal machine” and a “watchdog” that often
ignores serious political misdeeds that could lead to political revelations of importance for democracy. We
also point to how politicians may provoke mediated scandals in order to influence the public agenda.
5516
Living as if Survival Mattered: Sustaining Ourselves, Our World, and Our Economies
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Belgrave
Environmental Communication
Chair
Mark Pedelty, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Eating Meat and Climate Change: The Media Blind Spot
Nuria Almiron, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
Ethnography of the Sustainable Agriculture Program: A Case Study of Social Change Rhetoric
Benjamin Jared Triana, U of Kentucky, USA
Signaling Environmental Product Benefits: The Interactive Influence of Eco-Label Source and Argument
Quality on Consumer Trust
Lucy Atkinson, U of Texas, USA
Sonny Rosenthal, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Sustainability, Health, and Well-Being: Challenging the Agendas of Food Production
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Ben Worth, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
5518
The Best of Information Systems
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Egoistic versus Eco-Friendly Message for Eco-Driving: Importance of Consistency Effects
Key Jung Lee, Stanford U, USA
Rishabh Bhandari, Stanford U, USA
Motivated Cognitive Processing of In-Game Advertising
Sungwon Chung, Texas Tech U, USA
Johnny V. Sparks, Central Michigan U, USA
How Twitter Connects to Information Sources: A Network Analysis of the Sourcing Structure of the
OWS Tweets
Wenlin Liu, U of Southern California, USA
Construal Level Theory and Psychological Reactance Theory: Theoretical Interactions, Message Salience
and Message Effectiveness
Sherri Jean Katz, Cornell U, USA
5521
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Political Narratives and the Horizon of Imagination
Popular Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Participants
Elections as Storytelling Contests
Stephen Coleman, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
The Disappearance of "Utopia": Pop Culture's Obsessions With the Dark Side of Politics
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
"We" or "Me", "Us" or "Them": The Moral Imagination of Television Narratives
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
Soft Power: Political Narrative and the Scale of Group Identities
John Hartley, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
The political process is underpinned by political narrative. It is at one and the same time true (news) and
fictional (drama), universal (one represents all) and adversarial (we are different from they). Narratives
create the polity, literally through electoral campaigns and founding stories (the U.S. Declaration of
Independence), and imaginatively through the stories told within news and popular culture. Political
narratives, furthermore, are the mechanisms by which individuals are ‘recruited’ to citizenship, and
through which the polity comes to ‘see’ itself and its relationship to others. Despite the importance of
political narratives, they are understudied in political communication research.
5522
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Broadcasting, Networking, and the Forging of Identities
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Deborah James, Governors State U, USA
Participants
How Structure Shapes Content: The Politics of Indian TVs Hindi Turn
Santanu Chakrabarti, Rutgers U, USA
Television, Popular Culture and Latin American and Brazilian Identity
Carolina Oliveira Matos, U of Essex, UNITED KINGDOM
***TOP STUDENT PAPER*** The Periphery That Speaks: FLN Radio and Post/Colonial Identity
Discourse in the Algerian Revolution
Annemarie Iddins, U of Michigan, USA
Sitting on Two Stools | Ne Možeš Sjediti Na Dvije Stolice: Networked Between Home and the Homeland
Deborah James, Governors State U, USA
5523
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and CSR
Public Relations
Chair
Oyvind Ihlen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
Corporate Social Responsibility and Media Social Responsibility: An Innovative Classification of
Corporate Responsibility
Philipp Bachmann, U of Fribourg, SWITZERLAND
Diana Ingenhoff, U of Fribourg, SWITZERLAND
Exploring the Practices of Dialogue Management Within CSR Field
Laura Illia, IE U, SPAIN
Stefania Romenti, Iulm U, ITALY
Grazia Murtarelli, Iulm U, ITALY
Belen Rodriguez-Canovas, ICADE Business School of Madrid, SPAIN
Craig E. Carroll, New York U, USA
Public Relations in Social Media: Opening the CSR Discourse for Critical Stakeholders in Social Media
Michael Andreas Etter, Center for CSR Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
The Influence of International Reporting Standards on CSR Reporting
Sabine A. Einwiller, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Alexandra Schnauber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
5524
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Top Papers in Intergroup Communication
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
The Reference Frame Effect: An Intergroup Perspective on Language Attitudes
Marko Dragojevic, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Irony Bias: How Verbal Irony Reflects and Maintains Stereotypic Expectancies
Christian Burgers, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Camiel J. Beukeboom, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tuning in to the RTLM: Tracking the Evolution of Language Alongside the Rwandan Genocide Using
Social Identity Theory
Brittnea Roozen, Marquette U, USA
Hillary Cortney Shulman, North Central College, USA
Does Virtual Diversity Matter? Effects of Avatar-Based Diversity Representation on Willingness to
Express Offline Racial Identity
Jong-Eun Roselyn Lee, Ohio State U, USA
Online Intergenerational Communication of Young Adults in the United States, Australia, and Guam
Lilnabeth P. Somera, U of Guam, USA
Francis Dalisay, Cleveland State U, USA
Amy L Forbes, James Cook U, AUSTRALIA
5525
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Race and Ethnicity in Communication: Two Sides of the Same Coin or Separate Concepts for
Scholarly Discussion?
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Christine L. Ogan, Indiana U, USA
Participants
White Logic, White Methods: Mass Communication, Race, and Ethnicity
Hemant Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Postracial Retreat From Ethnicity and Race
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Race, Ethnicity, and Migration in Europe
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
For Conceptual Juxtapositions
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Going Global With Race and Ethnicity
Kumi Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Ethnicity and Race: Central Issues in the Contemporary Global Moment
Angharad N. Valdivia, U of Illinois, USA
Race and Ethnicity as Coconstructed Processes
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Race and Ethnicity as Autonomous/Codependent Modes of Analysis
Charles Husband, U of Bradford, UNITED KINGDOM
This roundtable addresses the question of whether ethnicity and race actually deal with the same issues,
concepts, theories--even have the same foundation in our scholarly work in communications. The race
and ethnicity division has the responsibility to explicate these concepts as they form the core of the
group’s scholarship as laid out in the mission statement. This roundtable will attempt to flesh out the
relationship between these concepts as they apply to the field of communications for scholarship in the
current era. The panel members are diverse in terms of their own research topics, use of research
methodologies, and their affiliations with communication programs across the United States, Europe and
Asia.
5526
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
The Business of Media History: News and Surveillance
Communication History
Chair
Stephanie Schulte, U of Arkansas, USA
Participants
Robert McCormick, the Industrial Newspaper, and the Ironies of Planning
Michael Stamm, Michigan State U, USA
Overhead Costs and News-Agency Crises: An Innisian Analysis of Canadian Press
Gene Allen, Ryerson U, CANADA
Direct-Mail, Lists, and the Birth of Target Marketing, 1870-1930
Richard K. Popp, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Encoding the Consumer: The Rise of Computerized Credit Reporting in the United States
Josh Lauer, U of New Hampshire, USA
Respondent
Richard John, Columbia U, USA
Following the conference theme, this panel challenges the boundaries of communication research by
highlighting the fertile, but often underappreciated, overlap between communication history and business
history. This panel demonstrates the profound influence of commercial strategy, competitive pressures,
and organizational forces in the development of two major twentieth-century enterprises: the North
American newspaper business and the consumer surveillance industry. Together, the panelists underscore
the parallel concerns of communication and business historians and suggest common thematic, analytical,
and conceptual frameworks.
5527
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Rethinking Media Theory for the Post-Mass Media Era
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Welcome to the Grey Zone: Interpreting the Death and Strange Afterlife of Mass Media
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Toward a Critical Refrigerator Studies
James Hay, U of Illinois, USA
Emerging Conceptions of Audiences and Audiencing in a Digital Age
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Towards a Convergent Theory of the Media
Graeme Turner, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
As media platforms, formats and technologies both proliferate and converge, it has become increasingly
difficult to reconcile our accounts of the changing environment with traditional theories of the media. The
presentations in this panel will discuss ways in which we might construct theoretical bridges between
approaches to ‘old’ and ‘new’ media in a context where the media is no longer necessarily addressing a
mass audience, when the precise make up of its structure, economy and use is increasingly reflective of a
range of local, national, and regional conditions, and when the comprehensiveness of traditional accounts
can no longer be taken for granted.
5528
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Feminism LOL and the Postfeminist Agenda: Repoliticizing Feminist Media Studies in a
Postfeminist Age
Feminist Scholarship
Chairs
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
Participants
Postfeminism, Enlightened Sexism, and the Republican "War on Women"
Susan J. Douglas, U of Michigan, US
"Sexy-Fit Femininity": the New Cheerleader as Post-Feminist Icon
Laura Grindstaff, U of California - Davis, USA
Emily Elizabeth West, U of Massachusetts, USA
Postfeminism and the Depressive Position
Maria Mastronardi, Northwestern U, USA
Postfeminist Culture in the Age of Austerity
Yvonne Tasker, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Diane Negra, U College Dublin, IRELAND
Class, Propriety, and "Postfeminist" Sex Work on Geordie Shore
Helen Wood, De Montfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
As if Postfeminism Had Come True: The Search for Agency in Cultural Studies of "Sexualisation"
Rosalind Gill, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
This roundtable will address the lexicon of concepts feminist media scholarship has used to describe the
“post”-feminist situation, contextualized within each scholar’s theoretical contribution to this discussion,
and their ongoing research on the issue. Scholars will address the questions of how a feminist political
agenda, with reference to specific issues they have researched, is or is not possible in the current cultural
and economic climate; how feminist media studies can transcend the postfeminist paradigm as we move
into a more global framework and a world-wide recession economy; whether postfeminism describes only
a “western” situation, and what theoretical alternatives might be found.
5531
Tuesday
15:00-16:15
Board Room 1
Opinion Leadership in a Changing Media Environment: Responses to Conceptual and Empirical
Challenges
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Patterns of Opinion Leadership in New Media Environments: Theoretical Challenges and Empirical
Findings
Mike Schaefer, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Monika Taddicken, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
“Masspersonal” Opinion Leaders: The Role of Situational Factors in Opinion Leadership
Katrin Jungnickel, Ilmenau U of Technology, GERMANY
Parasocial Opinion Leadership: Theoretical Concept and Empirical Evidence
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Laura Leissner, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Paula Stehr, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Friederike Schönhardt, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Esther Döringer, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Influence vs. Selection. A Network Perspective on Opinion Leadership
Thomas N. Friemel, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Respondent
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Questions remain, both conceptually and empirically, as to how opinion leadership configures itself, and
potentially changes, in this new media environment. What exactly does it mean when media increasingly
penetrate interpersonal communication and when the communication to family and friends – which
protects ‚opinion followers’ from media effects in the classic model of opinion leadership – becomes
mediatized? What effects does it have when internet and social media offer apparently direct interactions
with other individuals, including celebrities and experts, and potentially pave the way for new forms of
virtual or parasocial opinion leadership. How can this be incorporated in the existing concept(s) of opinion
leadership, and in turn, how do they have to adapt to these new developments? These questions will be
tackled in the proposed panel.
5533
Tuesday
15:00-17:45
Board Room 3
Extended Session: Challenging Transitions: Representation, Bodies, Identities, and Policy in GLBT
Studies
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Participants
My Gay is Great! The Heteronormative Gaze of Girls Who Like Boys Who Like Boys (Top Student
Paper)
Evan Brody, U of Southern California, USA
“Diversifying” Masculinity: Super Girls, Happy Boys, Cross-Dressers, and Real Men on Chinese Media
Huike Wen, Willamette U, USA
Transgender, Transmedia, Transnationality: Chaz Bono in Documentary and Dancing With the Stars
Katherine Sender, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
This is Not a Queer Utopia: Contested Cultural Discourses in the Chinese Slash Fandom FSCN
Jing Zhao, Chinese U of Hong Kong, USA
Locating the "Scruff Guy": From Bodies to Communities in Bear-Targeted Social Media
Yoel Roth, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Queer in Polish: English Names Travelling to Central and Eastern Europe
Lukasz Szulc, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Butch in the Sheets: Representations of Masculine Women in Pornography
Stephanie Mannis, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Traumatized Sick: A Look at the Post-Yugoslav Queer Cinema
Dijana Jelaca, U of Massachusetts, USA
“Put Your Rainbow Flag Away!” Discursive Confrontations Over Registered Partnerships in Slovakia
Viera Lorencova, Fitchburg State U, USA
Trans Advocacy and Public Relations: A Rhetorical Analysis of Mediated Transfemininity in the 2012
Miss Universe Pageant
Erica Ciszek, U of Oregon, USA
Possibilities for Queering Surveillance Infrastructure: The Case of the Quantified Self
David J. Phillips, U of Toronto, CANADA
Brian Harding, U of Toronto, CANADA
Danielle Leighton, U of Toronto, CANADA
Beyond Inclusion: The Differential Visions of Queer Migration Manifestos *Top Faculty Paper
Karma Ruth Chavez, U of Wisconsin, USA
Respondents
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
Lisa Henderson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Travers Scott, Clemson U, USA
In this extended session, participants will reflect on the state of the field of GLBT/Q research in
communication. Instead of traditional panel presentations, the session will feature moderated half-hour
discussions, followed by open discussion, on each of these three themes: 1) Representation; 2) Bodies and
Identities; 3) Policy.
5602
Journalism Studies Business Meeting
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Balmoral
Journalism Studies
5605
Challenging Online Research: Insights From Across the Field
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Palace A
Theme Sessions
Chair
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Chairs
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Anders Olof Larsson, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
‘Catching the User’ in Online Research: An Innovative Approach for Respondent Recruitment
Peter Mechant, iMinds-MICT-UGent, BELGIUM
Pieter Verdegem, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Doing Software Supported Facebook Analysis
Anja Bechmann, Aarhus U, DK
Content Analysis is Dead, Long Live Content Analysis?
Michael B. Karlsson, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Political Communication and Methodological Triangulations in the Era of “Big Data”
Anders Olof Larsson, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Jakob Svensson, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Respondent
Maria Bakardjieva, U of Calgary, CANADA
This panel brings together international scholars who have all made efforts to further our understanding of
how online research can be performed, expanding the methodological toolbox in the process. Each
presenter will discuss the pros and cons of various approaches to online data gathering and analysis,
providing hands-on examples of specific cases. Given its focus on the “Do’s and Dont’s” of online data
gathering and analysis, the panel promises to raise cross-divisional interest and contain something of
relevance for members of all ICA divisions. As the panel will show, challenges pertaining to data
collection still remains in the digital era - and are growing even bigger in the face of “big data” research
and the likes.
5606
Agenda Setting for 21st Century Leadership Communication Research: Views From Management
and Communication Scholars
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Participants
Kevin J Barge, Texas A&M U, USA
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
David Collinson, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
Keith Grint, U of Warwick, UNITED KINGDOM
Dennis Tourish, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
This diverse panel of management and communication scholars is expected to discuss and debate, inter
alia, how communication scholars can better contribute to the understanding of 21st century leadership
forms; theory-practice tensions in theorizing about leadership and communication; the challenges to
discursive leadership vis-à-vis materialities, including that of the body; dilemma-centered leadership and
the role of tension, contradiction, and paradox in managing modern day “wicked” problems; and the
future of cross paradigm work and multiple methodologies. In short, amidst lively and spirited debate, we
hope to chart a future course for communication scholarship.
5607
Election Campaigns and Campaign Effects
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Participants
A New Look at Campaign Advertising and Political Engagement: Do Opinion-Incongruent and Congruent Ads Matter?
Jorg Matthes, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Franziska Marquart, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Collateral Damage: Involvement and the Effects of Negative Super PAC Advertising
David Lynn Painter, Full Sail U, USA
Political Communication and Direct Democracy at Local and National Level
Julia Metag, U Münster, GERMANY
The Dynamics of Recall campaigns: An Analysis of Issue Ownership Theory in the 2012 WI Recall
Gubernatorial Debates
Sumana Chattopadhyay, Marquette U, USA
David M. Rhea, Governors State U, USA
5608
Communication and Technology Business Meeting
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Lee Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
5609
Culture, News, Magazine, and Television
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Lancaster
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Yang-Soo Kim, II, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
Participants
Cultivating Host Receptivity and Host Conformity Pressure: Exploring Media Use and Host Attitudes on
Immigration
Kelly McKay-Semmler, U of South Dakota, USA
Shane Michael Semmler, U of South Dakota, USA
Culture and Politics in News Framing of Obesity in the United States and Japan
Suman Mishra, Southern Illinois U, Edwardsville, USA
Domestication of Foreign Emotion: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Over News Representation in 2011
Japan Earthquake by Journalists From China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan
Yue Wang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Magazine Readership Study: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of South Korean and U.S. Women Readers Lysis
of South Korean and U.S. Women Readers
Leara Rhodes, U of Georgia, USA
Jungwon Lee, U of Georgia, USA
Watching Indian Television in America: A Study Across Five Major U.S. Cities
Indira S. Somani, Howard U, USA
Jing Guo, U of Maryland, USA
Soo-Kwang Oh, U of Maryland, USA
5611
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Waterloo/Tower
Making a Difference: Evaluating the Influence of Health Communication Strategies
Health Communication
Chair
Marisa Greenberg, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
The Direct and Indirect Media Influence on Perceived Smoking Prevalence
Mena Ning Wang, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
L.Crystal Jiang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Influence Attempts Using Efficacy Sources as Weight Loss Evidence
Melanie Sarge, Texas Tech U, USA
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Mood and Time Influence Defensive Affect Regulation Following Self-Threatening Health Information:
Evidence at the Implicit Level
Enny Henrica Das, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Jonathan Vantriet, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Influencing Health Discussions: The Effects of Emotions on Conversational Valence and Binge Drinking
Hanneke Hendriks, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gert-Jan De Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5612
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Competitive Papers in Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Young-ok Yum, Kansas State U, USA
Participants
Cohabitation, Involvement, and Trajectories of Commitment to Wed
Jennifer S Priem, Wake Forest U, USA
Perceptions of Communication Technology: Collective Instrumentalisation Through Everyday Social
Practice
Kenzie Burchell, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Preaching, Community, and Convergence: The Use of Media and New Media by Progressive Indonesian
Islamic Leaders to Communicate With Their Followers
Nurhaya Muchtar, Indiana U of Pennsylvania, USA
Jeffrey Ritchey, Indiana U of Pennsylvania, USA
Styling Matters: The Impact of Styling on Perceived Competence and Warmth of Female Leaders
Jennifer Klatt, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Sabrina Cornelia Eimler, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole Claudia Krämer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
The Effects of Cognitive and Affective Processes on Message Content in Same-Culture and Cross-Culture
Instant Messaging Conversations
Duyen T. Nguyen, Cornell U, USA
Susan R Fussell, Cornell U, USA
5613
Mass Communication Business Meeting
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
St. James
Mass Communication
5614
Sound Bites, Negativity, and Horse-Race Style: Is Campaign Communication Getting Worse and
Worse Again? Long-Term Research in Germany and Austria on the Eve of the 2013 Elections
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Regent's
Political Communication
Chairs
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Veronica Hefner, Chapman U, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Chair
Patricia Moy, U of Washington, USA
Participants
How German Parties Court Their Voters: An Analysis of Electoral Advertising on Television From 1957
to 2009
Christina Holtz-Bacha, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Eva-Maria Lessinger, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Candidates for Chancellor: A Comparison of German Television Channels and Election Years Since 1990
Winfried Schulz, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Reimar Zeh, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Going Interpretive? Television Coverage of Austrian Election Campaigns Since the 1980s
Gabriele Melischek, Austrian Academy of Sciences, AUSTRIA
Josef Seethaler, Austrian Academy of Sciences, AUSTRIA
Linear and Non-Linear Trends in Election Coverage (1949-2009): Looking Back and Looking Ahead
Juergen Wilke, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Melanie Leidecker, U of Mainz, GERMANY
The Decline of Media Performance: Myth or Reality? A Cross-National Comparison of German and
Austrian Newspapers (1949-2009)
Melanie Magin, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Just a few months ahead of the 2013 elections, this panel aims to present an overview of the results of the
main longitudinal research studies into campaign coverage in Germany and Austria in order to identify
more reliable indicators with which to assess future media performance during election periods. The
papers gathered in this panel apply a comprehensive set of indicators related to the “Americanization” or
“modernization” of campaign communication to analyze the coverage by the news media – or better: to
analyze the content of the news media, as the panel includes political ads as well, for the reason that such
ads allow parties and candidates to speak directly to voters via the media.
5616
Watch Out for That Tree! Human Interaction and Response to the Environment
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Belgrave
Environmental Communication
Chair
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
You Owe it to Yourself to See This Film: The First-Person Effect and Environmental Issues
Sue-Jen Lin, I-Shou U, TAIWAN
Felling a Tree to Save Paper: Short- and Long-Term Effects of Immersive Virtual Environments on
Environmental Self-Efficacy, Attitude, and Behavior
Sun Joo (Grace%29 Ahn, U of Georgia, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Dooyeon Park, U of Georgia, USA
The Role of Social Toxicity in Responses to a Slow-Moving Environmental Disaster
Rebecca J. Cline, Kent State U, USA
Heather Orom, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Jae Eun Chung, Kent State U, USA
Tanis Hernandez, Center for Abestos Related Disease, USA
When Happy Drivers Go Green: Effects of Egoistic/Altruistic Framing and Affective States on EcoDriving
Yeon Kyoung Joo, Stanford U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jong-Eun Roselyn Lee, Ohio State U, USA
5617
Game Studies Interest Group Business Meeting
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Berkeley
Game Studies
Chair
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Joyce L.D. Neys, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5618
Information Systems Business Meeting
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Prabu David, Washington State U, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Jolanda Veldhuis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5621
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
5622
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
5623
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Popular Communication Business Meeting
Popular Communication
Participants
Stijn Reijnders, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Melissa Aronczyk, Carleton U, CANADA
Jason Striker, Arizona State U, USA
Global Communication and Social Change Business Meeting
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A&M U, USA
Social Cause and Health Campaigns
Public Relations
Chair
Bree Devin, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Can Media Relations Promote Public Health?
Teresa Ruao, U of Minho, PORTUGAL
Sandra Marinho, U of Minho, PORTUGAL
Challenging Resistance to Uncomfortable Messages: Obesity Communication Research
Johanna Fawkes, Charles Sturt U, AUSTRALIA
Ralph Tench, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Planned Parenthood Take on Live Action: An Analysis of Media Interplay and Image Restoration
Strategies in Strategic Conflict Management
Leslie Rasmussen, Utah Valley U, USA
The Impacts of Different Types of Social Cause Messages in Corporate Communication Campaigns
Kihan Kim, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yunjae Cheong, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joon Soo Lim, Mississippi State U, USA
5624
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
5625
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Intergroup Communication Business Meeting
Intergroup Communication
Participant
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Business Meeting
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Participant
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
5626
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
5627
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
5628
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
5631
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Board Room 1
Communication History Business Meeting
Communication History
Chair
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Philosophy, Theory, and Critique Business Meeting
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Feminist Scholarship Business Meeting
Feminist Scholarship
Media Studies and Latin American Perspectives
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Latin American Communication Thought and the Challenges of the XXI Century
César Bolaño, Federal U of Sergipe, BRAZIL
Narrating Latin American Critical Thought, Keys for Understanding the Field and Research in
Communication in Latin America
Eliseo Colón, U of Puerto Rico, USA
Latin American and Media Accountability Experiences
Fernando Oliveira Paulino, U de Brasilia, BRAZIL
Challenges for Latin American Urban Communication Research
Patria Roman-Velazquez, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Alejandra Garcia Vargas, U Nacional de Jujuy, ARGENTINA
Organized by Latin American Communication Researchers´ Association (ALAIC), this panel at the ICA
Conference intends to present and analyze Latin American perspectives on Communication and Media
Studies. We also aim to establish a permanent dialogue on interregional activities and common projects
among International Communication Researchers´ organizations (IAMCR, ICA, ECREA, and ALAIC)
and their members. We argue that Latin American urban communication research needs to formulate new
questions and methodological approaches that will be at the forefront of new urban questioning.
5632
Tuesday
16:30-17:45
Board Room 2
Challenges to Regulating Copyright, Trademark, and Defamation
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Seamus Simpson, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Gunboat Diplomacy and Pirate Sanctuaries: The Use of Trade Agreements to Promote Copyright Reform
Patrick Burkart, Texas A&M U, USA
Jonas Andersson, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Set the Fox to Watch the Geese: Voluntary IP Regimes in Piratical File-Sharing Communities
Balazs Bodo, Budapest U of Technology and Economics, HUNGARY
To Speak or Not to Speak: Recent Developments in U.S. Copyright and Defamation Law
Heath Hooper, U of Missouri, USA
Lost in the Semiotic Maze: Empirical Approaches to Proof of Blurring in Trademark Dilution Law
Matthew D. Bunker, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
5702
Journalism Studies Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
Balmoral
Journalism Studies
5708
Communication and Technology, Information Systems, and Game Studies Joint Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
York
Communication and Technology
5708
Information Systems, Communication and Technology, and Game Studies Joint Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
York
Information Systems
Game Studies
Communication and Technology
5708
Game Studies, Communication and Technology, and Information Systems Joint Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
York
Game Studies
Communication and Technology
Information Systems
Game Studies
Participants
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, US
This reception is sponsored jointly by the Communication and Technology Division, the Information
Systems Division, and the Game Studies Special Interest Group for members of the three ICA sections.
Information about the event's location will be made available at the business meetings of the hosting
sections.
5709
In Memoriam: A Tribute to Sam Becker
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
Lancaster
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Linda L. Putnam, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Steve Duck, U of Iowa, US
Robert K. Avery, U of Utah, USA
Roderick P. Hart, U of Texas, USA
This panel honors Professor Emeritus Sam Becker, who passed away November 8, 2012, for his many
contributions to communication studies, our professional associations, and the University of Iowa. As an
ICA Fellow and a Distinguished Scholar of NCA, Sam was an active scholar, the advisor of nearly 60
dissertations, an incredible mentor, and a stellar leader in the field. Author of six books and more than
110 journal articles, Sam was known for his work in persuasion and his “mosaic model” of mediated
communication. This panel pays tribute to his legacy and the many ways that he shaped our field.
5713
Mass Communication Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:00
St. James
Mass Communication
5728
Teresa Award Ceremony and Reception
Tuesday
18:00-19:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Chairs
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Veronica Hefner, Chapman U, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Participant
Marian J. Meyers, Georgia State U, USA
Award Ceremony and reception for Teresa Award, presented by Feminist Scholarship Division.
5828
Tuesday
19:30-20:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Special Film Screening: Flirting with Danger:
P ow
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
This session will screen the new documentary film from the Media Education Foundation, Flirting with
Danger: Power & Choice in Heterosexual Relationships, featuring social and developmental psychologist
and author Lynn Phillips. Phillips, who has taught in the Department of Communication at the University
of Massachusetts since 2005, conducted interviews with hundreds of young women about their
relationships and hookups. The film features dramatizations of these interviews, which, together with
images from popular culture and analysis from Phillips, examines how the wider culture's frequently
contradictory messages about pleasure, danger, agency, and victimization enter into women's most
intimate relationships with men.
5846
ICA Graduate Student Reception
Tuesday
20:00-22:00
Reception
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Rahul Mitra, Purdue U, USA
6059
Wednesday
06:30-08:30
Dining Room
Communication History Division Family Breakfast
Communication History
Chair
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Members of the Communication History Division, and any members of their families who may be
accompanying them, will be very welcome at the Division's first family breakfast. Held in a restaurant
which is just a few steps from the Conference hotel and which caters for all tastes and styles of breakfast,
this new event will allow members and their families to meet and mingle informally.
6014
ICA Fellows' Breakfast
Wednesday
07:00-09:15
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
6102
Theories and Applications in Intercultural Communication
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Balmoral
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Chair
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
Participants
From “Laying the Foundations” to Building the House: Extending Orbe’s (1998) Cocultural Theory to
Include "Rationalization" as a Formal Strategy
Gina Castle Bell, Texas Tech U, USA
Melinda Weathers, Clemson U, USA
Mark C. Hopson, George Mason U, USA
Katy A Ross, Texas Tech U, USA
The Application of Renewal and Symbolic Convergence Theory to the Ivory Coast Peace Process
Benjamin Jared Triana, U of Kentucky, USA
The Indonesian-African Encounter in a Multiethnic Housing District: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
GLENNY FRANSISCA, The London School of Public Relations Jakarta, ID
Rudi Sukandar, London School of Public Relations - Jakarta, INDONESIA
A Theoretical Model for Cultural Fusion Theory
Stephen Michael Croucher, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
Respondent
Che Baysinger, Kaplan U, USA
6105
Political Communication and Voter Behaviour
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Hajo Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Accuracy of Vote Expectation Surveys in Forecasting Elections
Andreas Graefe, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
News Exposure, Trust in the EU and European Parliament Election Turnout: How Determinants of Voting
Differ Between Citizens of Established and New Member States
Yioryos Nardis, U of Michigan, USA
What Took You So Long? The Determinants of Time of Voting Decision
Poong Oh, U of Southern California, USA
By Ground or By Air? Voter Mobilization During the 2008 Presidential Campaign
Jacob Neiheisel, U of Wisconsin, USA
Sarah Niebler, Vanderbilt U, USA
Matthew Holleque, U of Wisconsin, USA
Issue and Leader Voting in U.S. Presidential Elections
Andreas Graefe, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
6106
Women's Work? Communication and Gender in the Workplace
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Robin P. Clair, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Designing Engineering Mentoring Cultures for the Professoriate: Men and Women Faculty’s Stories of
Mentoring for Diversity and Inclusion
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Ziyu Long, Purdue U, USA
Klod Kokini, Purdue U, USA
Lindsey B. Anderson, Purdue U, USA
Jennifer Carrie Batra, Purdue U, USA
Robyn Wilson, Purdue U, USA
Market Women, Disenfranchised Work, and the Reworking of Stigma
Joelle Cruz, Clemson U, USA
Sustaining Liminality: Challenging Communication Research on International Female Engineers in U.S.
Graduate Programs
Debalina Dutta, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
Organizational Memories in Uncertain Contexts: Remembering War in Postconflict Organizations
Joelle Cruz, Clemson U, USA
Respondent
Rebecca Gill, Texas A&M U, USA
6107
Online Political Engagement and Participation
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Ericka Menchen-Trevino, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Longitudinal Data Analysis of Social Media Use, Political Expression, and Their Effects on Political
Participation
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
Logan Molyneux, U of Texas, USA
PEI ZHENG, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Political Engagement via Mobile Communication: Unraveling the Effects of Political Trust and Efficacy
on Political Participation in South Korea
Chang Sup Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Kavita Karan, Southern Illinois U Carbondale, USA
The Power of the Multiple Groups: A Study of Facebook Group Membership and Political Participation
Kanni Huang, Michigan State U, USA
Amy Lynn Hagerstrom, Michigan State U, USA
The Public as Active Agents in Social Movement: Facebook and Gangjeong Movement in Korea
Ji Won Kim, U of Texas, USA
Yonghwan Kim, U of Alabama, USA
Joseph Jai-sung Yoo, U of Texas, USA
6108
Analyzing Media Content and Use Across Platforms
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chairs
Frauke Zeller, U College London, GERMANY
Kjetil Sandvik, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Participants
Data on the Fly: Mobile Technologies and the Documentation of Media Use in Everyday Contexts
Anne Mette Thorhauge, Copenhagen U, DENMARK
“Being There, Everywhere”: How to Trace Interactions on Social Media in Real-Time
Jacob Ørmen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Analysing News Sharing on Social Network Sites
Jakob Linaa Jensen, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Mixed Methods in Social Network Analysis
Frauke Zeller, U College London, GERMANY
Miguel Vicente-Marino, ACOP - Asociacion de Comunicacion Politica, SPAIN
Respondent
Klaus Bruhn Jensen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
The panel combines more quantitative approaches originating in traditional network analysis with creative
research strategies emerging from a qualitative tradition. It includes strategies for combining various
methods through frameworks based on mixed methods as well as specific research tools and practical
implications of the methods employed. By combining these different approaches the panel seeks to
explore the frontline of research on media content and use across platforms as well as facilitating a
dialogue between qualitative and quantitative approaches to studying cross-media use.
6109
Cognitive and Behavioral Aspects of Media Use
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Participants
Cognitive Dimensions of Media Multitasking
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Matt Irwin, Ohio State U, USA
Cody Kenneth Cooper, Ohio State U, USA
Jatin Srivastava, Ohio U, USA
Looking for the Signposts on the Web: Clickstream Analysis of the Flow of Public Attention
Chengjun WANG, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jing Liu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Freeways, Detours, and Dead Ends: Unequal Searching Among Partially Wired Youth
Jeremy Schulz, U of California - Berkeley, USA
Laura Robinson, Santa Clara U, USA
Motivations and Information Structures: A Closer Look at Web Searching Behavior
Stephanie Edgerly, Northwestern U, USA
Emily Vraga, George Mason U, USA
Bryan McLaughlin, U of Wisconsin, USA
German Adolfo Alvarez, U of Wisconsin, USA
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Young Mie Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
6111
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Waterloo/Tower
Pursuing Effective Antismoking Message Strategies in Health Campaigns
Health Communication
Chair
Rebecca Katherine Ivic, U of Akron, USA
Participants
Targeting Smokers With Empathy Appeal Antismoking PSAs: A Field Experiment
Lijiang Shen, U of Georgia, USA
Exploring the Effects of Antismoking Ads on Optimistic Bias and Cessation Intent
Jungsuk Kang, U of Connecticut, USA
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
Translating the Link between Social Identity and Health Behavior Into Effective Health Communication
Strategies: An Experimental Test Using Anti-Smoking Advertisements
Meghan Bridgid Moran, San Diego State U, USA
Steve Sussman, U of Southern California, USA
The Effectiveness of Physical and Social Threat Appeals in Antismoking Massages Among Flemish
Adults
Joyce Koeman, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
6112
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Food for Thought: Navigating Food Choice and Nutrition Communication Issues
Health Communication
Participants
Work as a Means of Navigating Nutrition and Exercise Concerns in an Online Cancer Community
Brad Love, U of Texas, USA
Charee Thompson, U of Texas, USA
Brittani Crook, U of Texas, USA
Making Sense of Childhood Messages: Family Communication's Impact on Adult Eating Behaviors and
Attitudes
Trisha Hoffman, Arizona State U, USA
How to Persuade Adolescents to Use Nutrition Labels
Zhuowen Dong, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Defending America’s Food Supply: An Evaluation of the FDA’s ALERT Program
Christine Skubisz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, George Washington U, USA
6113
Sex and Romance and Sexual Identity: Exploring Links With Media (High Density Session)
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
St. James
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
Participants
Does Country Context Matter? Investigating the Predictors of Teen Sexting Across Europe
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sindy R. Sumter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Fotologs and the Socialization of Love: "Traditional" or "Alternative" Depictions?
Yolanda Tortajada, U Rovira i Virgili, SPAIN
Cilia Willem, U de Barcelona, SPAIN
Nuria Arauna, U Rovira i Virgili, SPAIN
Lucrezia Crescenzi, U de Barcelona, SPAIN
Men's Magazines, Beliefs About Feminine Courtship Strategies and the Objectification of Women: A
Longitudinal Study Among Adolescent Boys
Laura Vandenbosch, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Steven Eggermont, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Lucretia Monique Ward, U of Michigan, USA
Relationships Between Unintentional Exposure to Internet Sexual Content and Sexual Behavioral
Intention Among Chinese Youth
Jingwen Zhang, U of Pennsylvania, USA
John B. Jemmott, III, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Impact of Television Viewing, Sensation Seeking and Gender on Adolescents’ Attitude Toward
Uncommitted Sexual Exploration
Laura Vandenbosch, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Ine Beyens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
The Mediating Role of Self-Discrepancies in the Relationship Between Media Exposure and Emotional
Well-Being Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents
Bradley J Bond, U of San Diego, USA
Under Pressure to Sext? Applying the Theory of Planned Behaviour on Adolescents’ Sexting
Michel Walrave, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Wannes Heirman, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
“I Want to Go Out With You” vs. “I Want to Talk to You”: Corpus Analysis of Gender Differences in
Mobile Text Messages of Adolescents
Tae Joon Moon, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jonathan D'Angelo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Stephanie Tsang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Yangsun Hong, U of Wisconsin, USA
Shawnika Jeanine Hull, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
6116
The Power of the Media: Mediatization, Influence, and Technology
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Henrik Ornebring, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Participants
The Medium of the Media. Journalism, Politics, and the Theory of “Mediatization”
Risto Kunelius, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Esa Reunanen, U of Tampere, FINLAND
The Mediatization of Politics: Interpreting the Value of Live vs. Edited Journalistic Interventions in UK
Television News Bulletins
Stephen Cushion, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Richard Thomas, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Do Even Journalists Support Media Restrictions? Presumed Political Media Influences and its
Consequences
Uli Bernhard, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Marco Dohle, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Gerhard Vowe, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
The Uncivilized Camera: Television Technology During the Vietnam War
Mathias Crawford, Stanford U, USA
Respondent
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
6117
Methodological Challenges in Communication Research
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Jens Vogelgesang, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
Adapting the Capability Approach to Evaluate New Media Literacy: A Structural Equation Modeling
Methodology
Uma Shankar Pandey, Surendranath College for Women, INDIA
Between Big Data and Deep Analysis? Scaling Digital Media Research
Merja Mahrt, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Michael Scharkow, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Inter-Coder Reliability Assessment With Fuzzy Kappa: Climate Change Discourse, Travel Reviews, and
Visual Images Applications
Andrei Kirilenko, U of North Dakota, USA
Svetlana Stepchenkova, U of Florida, USA
Tell it Like it is? Inaccuracies of Self-Reported TV Exposure in Comparison to People-Meter Data
Anke Wonneberger, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Mariana Irazoqui, Stichting KijkOnderzoek, THE NETHERLANDS
Total-Effect Test is Superfluous for Establishing Complementary Mediation
Xinshu Zhao, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
6118
High Density: Social Support
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
David D. Clare, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
An Analysis of Esteem Support Messages Received by College Students Preparing to Enter the
Workforce
Amanda J. Holmstrom, Michigan State U, USA
David D. Clare, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Russell, Michigan State U, USA
Factors Influencing Friends’ Coping With Sexual Stressors and Their Impact on Relational and Coping
Satisfaction
Tara G. McManus, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Alysa Ann Lucas, Mansfield U, USA
Further Experimental Tests of the Cognitive-Emotional Theory of Esteem Support Messages: Order
Effects and Interactions
David D. Clare, Michigan State U, USA
Amanda J. Holmstrom, Michigan State U, USA
Ashley A Hanna, Michigan State U, USA
Is a Profile Worth a Thousand Words?: How Online Support-Seeker’s Profile Features May Influence the
Person-Centeredness and Politeness of Received Support
Bo Feng, U of California - Davis, USA
Siyue Li, U of California - Davis, USA
Na Li, U of California - Davis, USA
Predicting Perceived and Actual Effectiveness of Social Support: Examining Disclosure Strategies of
Infertile Women
Keli Ryan Steuber, U of Iowa, USA
Andrew High, Pennsylvania State U, USA
The Effect of Social Support Type on Resilience: The Moderating Effects of Sex and Sex Roles
JooYoung Jang, U of California - Davis, USA
Carol Bishop Mills, U of Alabama, USA
The Social Support Process and Facebook: Soliciting Support From Strong and Weak Ties
Amy Janan Johnson, U of Oklahoma, USA
Brianna L. Lane, U of Oklahoma, USA
Michael Tornes, U of Oklahoma, USA
Shawn King, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Caleb T. Carr, Illinois State U, USA
Cameron Wade Piercy, U of Oklahoma, USA
Bobby L. Rozzell, U of Oklahoma, USA
6121
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Mediated Geographies and Experiences of Globalization
Popular Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Urban Cultures of Consumption: Articulating Hegemonic and Vernacular Cosmopolitanisms
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Geographies of Sound: The Flow and Entrapment of Syrian Jazeera Music
Omar Alghazzi, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Watching From an Arm’s Length: The Foreign Hand in Tamil Cinema
Preeti Mudliar, U of Texas, USA
Joyojeet Pal, U of Michigan, USA
Internet Jokes: The Secret Agents of Globalization?
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Hadar Levy, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Michael Thelwall, U of Wolverhampton, UNITED KINGDOM
Television’s Changing Role in Social Togetherness in the Personalized Consumption of Foreign TV
Shows Online
Yu-Kei Tse, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
6122
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Deconstructing Discourses of Class, Diaspora, and Authorship in an Era of Globalization
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Joan Ramon Rodriguez-Amat, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Participants
Analyzing Variations and Stability in Danish Immigration Discourse
Ferruh Yilmaz, Tulane U, USA
The "Affordable Fashion" Discourse in TV Advertisements During Economic Hardship: An Analysis of
UNIQLO in Taiwan
Wei-Fen Chen, U of Illinois, USA
iAuthor: The Fluid State of Creativity Rights and the Vanishing Author
Joan Ramon Rodriguez-Amat, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Communicating the Homeland’s Relationship With Its Diaspora Community: The Cases of El Salvador
and Colombia
Maria De Moya, North Carolina State U, USA
Vanessa Bravo, Elon U, USA
6123
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Roles in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Chun-ju Flora Hung-Baesecke, Hong Kong Baptist U, HONG KONG
Participants
A Longitudinal Co-Orientation Study on PR and Marketing Practitioners’ Perception Toward the Need for
Public Relations, its Role, and Effect
MYUNG OK YIM, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jung Ho Han, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyun Soon Park, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Challenging PR as a Management Function: Building Inclusive and Sustainable PR Theory and Practice
Patricia A. Curtin, U of Oregon, USA
Erica Ciszek, U of Oregon, USA
T. Kenn Gaither, Elon U, USA
Enacting the Manager Role: Questioning the Norm
Hongmei Shen, San Diego State U, USA
Hua Jiang, Towson U, USA
David Michael Dozier, San Diego State U, USA
The Realities of Public Relations: Applying the Circuit of Culture to the Knowledge of Practitioners
Jennifer E. Vardeman-Winter, U of Houston, USA
Katie Place, Saint Louis U, USA
6124
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Mapping the Visual Coverage of Death
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
Why About To Die Matters in the Global Flow of News Images
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Visualizing Death Across Cultures: Differences in News Images of Disaster Deaths Around the Globe
Folker Christian Hanusch, U of the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
Picturing Tragedy: What’s Too Graphic to Arab Audiences?
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
Death Images in Israeli Newspapers: Ethics and Praxis
Tal Morse, London School of Economics and Political Science, ISRAEL
While there has been increased scholarly attention to the visibility of death in journalism, research so far
has mainly focused on Anglo-American cultures, lacking a comparative perspective. This panel aims to
fill that gap by offering a comprehensive understanding of the field, as it maps the different approaches to
visualizing death.
6125
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Politicized Digital Intimacy of Race, Ethnicity and Gender
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Kaarina Nikunen, Stanford U, USA
Participants
Producing Particularized Black Queerness: Drama Queenz and the Reification of Whiteness
Alfred Leonard Martin, Jr., U of Texas, USA
Politics of Race and Sexuality and Moral Proximity: The View From Sweden
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Sex Networking and the Politics of Intersectional Queer Hyper/In/Visibility
Amber Lauren Johnson, Prairie View A&M U, USA
“We Take All Your Women”: Intimized Politics of Ethnicity and the Fear of Foreign Body on the Finnish
Social Network Sites
Kaarina Nikunen, Stanford U, USA
Hide Yo’ Black With Yo’ Gay: The Public "EnCampment" of Antoine Dodson
Lamiyah Bahrainwala, U of Texas, USA
This panel investigates how notions of race, ethnicity and sexuality are circulated and re-shaped in the
complex structure of digital media. The four authors offer different views on the ways in which online
environment allows and limits self-expression of sexuality. The panel looks at the politicized, affective
intimacy that is emerging through the clusters of social media sites with implications of intimate publicity
and individualized politics of sexuality.
6126
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Inclusions and Exclusions in the Public Sphere in India, China, Mexico, and the US
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Lorena Frankenberg Hernandez, U Metropolitana de Monterrey, GERMANY
Participants
Green Public Sphere, Solidarity, and Exclusions: Online and Offline Interactions
Hao Cao, U of Texas, USA
Rhetorics of Substantive Citizenship: Homelessness, Political Exclusion, and Critical Dialogue
Michael Keith Middleton, U of Utah, USA
Make it Count! Interactivity and Deliberative Democracy in Mexican Online Journalism
Lorena Frankenberg Hernandez, U Metropolitana de Monterrey, GERMANY
Jose-Carlos Lozano, Tecnologico de Monterrey, MEXICO
Twenty 20 Vision: The Indian Premier League, New Media, and the Public Sphere in India
Colin Agur, Columbia U, USA
6127
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Media, Politics, and Space
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
Challenging the Intersections of Media and Communication Research: Terra Incognita of Surveillance
Studies
Ilkin Mehrabov, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Communicative Practices and the City: The Mediated Phenomenologies of Urban Politics
Scott Rodgers, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Clive Barnett, Open U, UNITED KINGDOM
Allan Cochrane, Open U, UNITED KINGDOM
Digital Parrhesia: Towards a New Ethical and Reflexive Framework for Digital Communication
Nicholas Gilewicz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Francois Allard, U of Paris - Sorbonne, FRANCE
The Biopolitics of Sacrifice: Securing Infrastructure at the G20 Summit
Alessandra Renzi, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Greg Elmer, Ryerson U, CANADA
6128
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Are We There Yet? Cyberfeminists Across Generations Challenging Communication Researchers
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Participants
Ubiquitous Cyberfeminisms
Sarah Kember, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
"A Colorful Plastic Method of Indoctrination": Consumer Citizens and the Politics of Amazon Reviews
Carol A. Stabile, Center for the Study of Women in Society, USA
Youtubing From the Margins
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Ethics and Politics of Knowledge Production Among Female Software Programmers in FOSS
Development
YeonJu Oh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
From Active Aging to Activist Aging: Intergenerational Cyberfeminism
Kimberly Anne Sawchuk, Concordia U, CANADA
What Does Feminism Mean to You: Making Sense of Feminist Memes
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Paula M Gardner, OCAD U, CANADA
Shakuntala Banaji, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Feminist Communication researchers have always had to straddle activist and academic worlds in order to
conduct communication research. Feminists have both researched and participated in Social movements
done for generations. The present panel collection sets out to explore what it means to be a feminist or a
cyberfeminist today as more and more activists use online communication tools and advocacy campaigns
that incorporate social media to reach a so-called “global” audiences. The panel is based on an
examination of current manifestations of feminist activities that engage and use online web 2.0
environments.
6131
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 1
Media Accountability in the Digital Age: International Perspectives
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Susanne Fengler, U Dortmund - Communication Studies Department, GERMANY
Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
Participants
The (Behavioral) Economics of Media Accountability: Corrections Policies, Complaint Management, and
Coverage of Media in a Convergent Environment
Stephan Russ-Mohl, U della Svizzera italiana, SWITZERLAND
A Question of Conscience: On the Efficacy of Media Self-Regulation in the Digital Age
Tobias Eberwein, U of Dortmund, GERMANY
Media Accountability Instruments and External Communication Through the Eyes of Journalists
Cristina Coman, U of Bucharest, ROMANIA
Raluca-Nicoleta Radu, U of Bucharest, ROMANIA
How Polish is France (and Backwards)?
Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
Michal Glowacki, U of Warsaw, POLAND
Michal Kus, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
Olivier Baisnée Baisnée, U of Toulouse, FRANCE
Sandra Vera Zambrano, Institut D'Etudes Politiques, FRANCE
Media Accountability in Transition: Survey Results From Tunisia and Jordan
Judith Maria Pies, Technische U Dortmund, GERMANY
Respondents
Kaarle Nordenstreng, U of Tampere, FINLAND
David H. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Scott R. Maier, U of Oregon, USA
As journalism changes in a converging media environment, traditional institutions of media selfregulation and accountability are facing many problems: press councils often fail to address the new
challenges imposed by digitalization processes, few critical reporting about the mass media is being done
in the media, and ombudspersons remain an anomaly in the international media landscape. At the same
time, the Internet offers new impulses to the endeavor of holding the media accountable: in many
instances, cyber-ombudsmen, media blogs and media criticism via Twitter or Facebook have
demonstrated their potential as a means for improving journalistic performance. These questions are
currently being tackled by an EU-funded international research consortium which involves 14 partners
from Western and Eastern Europe as well as the Arab world. In the proposed panel, members of the
consortium present hitherto unpublished findings from the ongoing project, focusing on the results of a
comparative journalists’ survey in all 14 participating countries.
6132
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 2
"In View of All of the Citizens": The Public Broadcasting Act, 1962-1967
Communication History
Chair
Richard John, Columbia U, USA
Participants
Education’s 5-Year Plan: The “Public” Precedent of the ETV Facilities Act of 1962
Josh Shepperd, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Peculiar Politics of Noncommercial Television: Race, the State, and the Impact of the Public
Broadcasting Act
Allison Perlman, U of California - Irvine, USA
A Civic Network: The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967
Chris Loomis, U of Virginia, USA
The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967: Communication Policy Precedent or Political Fluke?
Robert K. Avery, U of Utah, USA
Respondent
Hugh Slotten, U of Otago, NEW ZEALAND
Calling upon new primary document research, this panel examines the legacy of cultural and regulatory
debates surrounding the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, which created a self-regulating federal
infrastructure for educational and noncommercial programming. This panel complicates dominant
narratives of broadcast history by looking at the concurrent development and implementation of the
noncommercial public sphere as it reached fruition during the Great Society era.
6133
Wednesday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 3
Paging Dr. Communication: The Intersection of Instructional Communication and Health
Communication
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participants
An Individual Differences Receiver-Based Examination of Instructional Crisis Communication
Deanna Dee Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Derek Ray Lane, U of Kentucky, USA
Robert Littlefield, North Dakota State U, USA
Timothy Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Bethney Wilson, U of Kentucky, USA
Kimberly Beauchamp, North Dakota State U, USA
The Moderating Role of Media Literacy in Adolescent Sexual Decision Making
Bruce Pinkleton, Washington State U, USA
Erica Weintraub Austin, Washington State U, USA
Ming Lei, Washington State U, USA
Marilyn Cohen, U of Washington, USA
Tick Talk: Communication of Protective Practices Against Ticks for Children Using Multimedia Design
and Curriculum
David Murphy, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Karen Bartlett, U of British Columbia, CANADA
Bonnie Henry, BC Centre for Disease Control, CANADA
Anne-Marie Nicol, U of British Columbia, CANADA
Who is the Doctor in This House?: Analyzing the Moral Evaluations of Doctors and Medical Students of
House M.D.
Serena Daalmans, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Merel van Ommen, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Addy Weijers, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
This panel of papers explores how instructional communication can be used to encourage behavioral
changes in health decision making, in times of crisis, or in classes where medical students are learning
about ethics.
6202
Challenging Communication Research Through Engaged Scholarship
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Chair
Lawrence R. Frey, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Reflections on Communication Activism Research
Kevin Michael Carragee, Suffolk U, USA
Lawrence R. Frey, U of Colorado, USA
Sustaining Thought Partnerships Through Engaged Communication Activism and Scholarship
Charlotte Ryan, U of Massachusetts - Lowell, USA
Lessons Learned From Funding Scholar, Activist, and Advocacy Collaborations: A Philanthropic View
Roberta G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
One Step Forward: Translating Across the Clash of Organizational Cultures
Stefania Milan, Tilburg U, CANADA
Panelists reflect on opportunities and challenges of conducting engaged communication scholarship. They
explore a range of significant issues, including the difficulty of forging meaningful partnerships between
scholar-activists and marginalized groups and communities, and the need for researchers to respect “local
knowledge” of activists and marginalized groups. Additionally, panelists reflect on how to evaluate
engaged communication scholarship as a form of both research and as a form of activism.
6205
Political Deliberation and Public Opinion
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Participants
Communicative Inequalities in Online Discussion Forums
Hai Liang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Making Deliberation Public: Argumentation in Reports of Deliberative Civic Forums
Christopher Karpowitz, Brigham Young U, USA
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Mobile Communication and Democracy: Interactive Role of Disparate Mobile Phone Usage Patterns in
Facilitating Deliberative and Participatory Democracy
Hoon Lee, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Promoting Online Deliberation Quality: Cognitive Cues Matter
Edith Manosevitch, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Nili Steinfeld, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Azi Lev On, Ariel U Center, ISRAEL
6206
Organizations and Their Social Context: Community, Transparency, and Civic Engagement
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Kirstie Lynd McAllum, IESE Business School, SPAIN
Participants
Community Oorganizing, Social Movements and Collective Action
Shiv Ganesh, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Seeing Through Transparency
Lars Thoeger Christensen, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
George Cheney, Kent State U, USA
Sociomateriality as Problem-Centered Organizing: The Case of Technology-Enabled Civic Engagement
Amanda J. Porter, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
That Doesn’t Sound Like My Neighborhood: Corporate and Community Efforts to Contest and Redefine
“Neighborhood” in a Public Meeting
Disraelly Cruz, U of West Florida, USA
Respondent
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
6207
Strengthening Systematic Normative Assessment in Political Communication Research: A
Challenge to the Field
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Hartmut Wessler, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Participants
What Systematic Normative Assessment is and How it Can Be Applied in Political Communication
Research
Scott L. Althaus, U of Illinois, USA
How to Bridge Tensions Between Normative and Empirical Research: Deriving Measures for
Deliberation From a Systemic Approach to Deliberative Democracy
Rousiley Celi Moreira Maia, Federal U of Minas Gerais, BR
Systematic Normative Assessment in Online Political Communication
Deen Goodwin Freelon, American U, USA
Multiperspectival Normative Assessment of Mediated Contestation
Eike Mark Rinke, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Hartmut Wessler, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Respondent
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
This panel both calls for and offers state-of-the-art examples of systematic normative assessment in
political communication research. Systematic normative assessment is proposed as a standard procedure
for empirical research in political communication. It essentially involves systematically deriving
evaluative standards from normative democratic theories and using these to subject empirical results to
normative evaluation in order to more clearly understand which results seem problematic or laudable
according to which democratic theory. Ideally, systematic normative assessment is multiperspectival, i.e.
it specifies evaluative standards from competing democratic theories. While normative thinking does have
a tradition in the field of political communication, on closer inspection normative judgments often remain
implicit or ad hoc. Empirical scholarship can benefit from explicit connections to normative thinking in
several ways.
6208
Diverse Facets of ICT Use (CAT High Density Panel I)
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
The Effects of Source Cues in Online News on Credibility Perception
Eun Go, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Eun Hwa Jung, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mu Wu, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Tweeting Television: Exploring Communication Activities on Twitter While Watching TV
Christopher Buschow, HMTM Hannover, GERMANY
Beate M Schneider, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Simon Ueberheide, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Bodystorming with a Wood Block: Formative Design Ideas for Mobile Content, Shaped by Activity
Theory
Brett Oppegaard, Washington State U, Vancouver, USA
Perceiving Spaces Through Digital Augmentation: An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Navigational
Augmented Reality
Sebastian Andreas Richard Hofmann, Erasmus U Rotterdam, GERMANY
Lela Mosemghvdlishvili, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Twitter as Social TV: A Full-Season Analysis of #serviziopubblico Hashtag
Fabio Giglietto, U of Urbino Carlo Bo, ITALY
Luca Rossi, U of Urbino Carlo Bo, ITALY
Multifaceted Companion Devices: Applying the New Model of Media Attendance to Smartphone Usage
Karel Verbrugge, iMinds-MICT-UGent, BELGIUM
Isabelle Stevens, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Lieven De Marez, Ghent U, BELGIUM
The Effects of Risk Content on Online Decision Making
Tracy Loh, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Integrating Uses and Gratifications Theory With Social Exchange Theory: An Empirical Study of Internet
Prosumers
Orly Melamed, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Sam N. Lehman-Wilzig, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
6209
Privacy and Trust in the Online Environment
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Kayla Danielle Hales, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Usable Security: What Do Stakeholders Expect From Secure Communication and Cooperation
Technologies?
Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Kadri Tõldsepp, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Towards an Apomediation Effect: Technological and Social Aspects of Online Trust
Andrew Duffy, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
My Privacy is Okay, But Theirs is Endangered! Social Origin of Online Privacy Concern and its
Behavioral Implications
Young Min Baek, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun-Mee Kim, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Young Bae, Soongsil U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Trusted Surprises? Antecedents of Serendipitous Encounters Online
Christoph Lutz, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Giulia Ranzini, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
6211
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Waterloo/Tower
Communication Challenges in Cancer Prevention Among High-Risk Populations
Health Communication
Chair
Sophie H Janicke, Florida State U, USA
Participants
Laughing and Crying: Mixed Emotions, Compassion, and the Effectiveness of a YouTube PSA About
Skin Cancer
Jessica Gall Myrick, U of North Carolina, USA
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Challenging Conversations for High-Risk Mothers and Their Daughters and Communication Strategies to
Enhance Their Interactions
Carla Fisher, George Mason U, USA
Erin K. Maloney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Emily Glogowski, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Karen Hurley, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Shawna Edgerson, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Wendy Lichtenthal, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
David Kissane, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Carma L. Bylund, U of Iowa, USA
Cancer Prevention Information Seeking and Health Consciousness Among American Indian, Hispanic,
and Non-Hispanic White Cancer Patients and Family Members
Tamar Ginossar, U of New Mexico, USA
Patient Navigation and Cervical Cancer Prevention: Communication Strategies for Addressing Barriers to
Follow-up Care in Appalachia Kentucky
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
Allison Marie Scott, U of Kentucky, USA
6212
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Strategies for Improving Health Communication Across Diverse Racial/Ethnic Groups
Health Communication
Chair
Dyah Pitaloka, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
The Social Meanings of Illness Management: Embodied Experiences of Indonesian Women With Type II
Diabetes
Dyah Pitaloka, U of Oklahoma, USA
Elaine Hsieh, U of Oklahoma, USA
Interdependent Self Construal, Social Norms, and Latina’s Intent to Vaccinate Their Daughters Against
Human Papilloma Virus
Nan Zhao, U of Southern California, USA
Joyee Shairee Chatterjee, U of Southern California, USA
Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, U of Southern California, USA
Application of Communication Infrastructure Theory in Health Communication: Strategies to Improve
Racial/Ethnic Minority Health
Zheng An, U of Southern California, USA
Influences of Immigration on Health Information Seeking Behaviors Between Korean Americans and
Native Koreans
Kyeung Mi Oh, George Mason U, USA
Quiping (Pearl) Zhou, George Washington U, USA
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
Wonsun Kim, George Mason U, USA
6213
Media Uses and Motivations (Session Begins with a TOP Student Paper)
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Media Habits: The Core of Media Repertoires
Anna Schnauber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Cornelia Wolf, U of Passau, GERMANY
Development and Validation of a Response-Frequency Measure of Media Habit
Teresa K. Naab, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Anna Schnauber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Do I Need to Belong? Development of a Scale for Measuring the Need to Belong and its Predictive Value
for Media Usage
Nicole C. Kramer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Laura Hoffmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Alberto Fuchslocher, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Sabrina Cornelia Eimler, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Jessica Martina Szczuka, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Matthias Brand, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
News Audiences Revisited: Theorizing the Link Between Audience Motivations and News Consumption
Angela M. Lee, U of Texas, USA
Predicting Social Media Use and Online Communication Practices Among Adolescents
Drew Cingel, Northwestern U, USA
Alexis Lauricella, Northwestern U, USA
Ellen Wartella, Northwestern U, USA
Annie Conway, Museum of Science and Industry, USA
6216
Examining Audiences for Old and New Media
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Joshua Braun, Quinnipiac U, USA
Participants
Audience Expectations of Media Accountability: More Professionalization of Journalism
Richard van der Wurff, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Klaus Schoenbach, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Discovering Media Repertoires: Daily News Source Use by College Students as a Function of Daypart
Margaret Ellen Duffy, U of Missouri, USA
Eunjin Kim, U of Missouri, USA
Bokyung Kim, U of Missouri, USA
Between Viewing and Commenting: What Makes Users Click on Online News and What Provokes Them
for Discussion
Ori Tenenboim, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Akiba A. Cohen, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
Biological-Based Motivational Differences in Perceptions of Assessing News With Mobile Devices and
Social Engagement With Online News
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Heather Shoenberger, U of Missouri, USA
Anthony Sean Almond, U of Missouri, USA
Respondent
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
6217
Media and Minorities
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Brian E Weeks, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Aversive Enjoyment From Racially Disparaging Humor
Riva Tukachinsky, Chapman U, USA
Coviewing Effects of Ethnic-Oriented Programming: An Examination of In-Group Bias and Racial
Comedy Exposure
Omotayo Banjo, U of Cincinnati, USA
Osei Appiah, Ohio State U, USA
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Christopher Brown, Ohio State U, USA
Whitney Walther, U of Minnesota, USA
John Tchernev, Ohio State U, USA
Eleanor Pierman, Ohio State U, USA
Dose-Dependent Media Priming Effects of Stereotypic Newspaper Articles on Implicit and Explicit
Stereotypes
Florian Arendt, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Putting the “Self” in Self-Deprecation: When Deprecating Humor About Minorities is Acceptable
Sarah Esralew, Ohio State U, USA
Morgan E. Ellithorpe, Ohio State U, USA
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Racial and Gender Exclusion Affect Novel Group Identity: Effects of a Single Instance of Symbolic
Annihilation
Charisse L'Pree Corsbie-Massay, U of Southern California, USA
6218
High Density: Showcasing a Variety of Interpersonal Communication Topics
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Anne Merrill, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
A Communicative Interdependence Perspective of Close Relationships: The Connections Between
Mediated and Unmediated Interactions Matter
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Liesel Sharabi, U of Illinois, USA
A Theoretical Model Explaining the Intersection of Research on Security and Uncertainty in Close
Relationships
Anne Merrill, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Emerging Adults and Parental Idealization: Examinations of Communication Modality, Geographic
Distance, and Living Arrangements
Erin Michelle Bryant, Trinity U, USA
Artemio Ramirez, Jr., Arizona State U, USA
Formative Communication Experiences and Message Production Ability in Adulthood: Family
Communication Patterns and Creative Facility
John O. Greene, Purdue U, USA
Melanie Morgan, Purdue U, USA
Lindsey B. Anderson, Purdue U, USA
Elizabeth Gill, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Elizabeth Dorrance Hall, Purdue U, USA
Brenda L. Berkelaar, U of Texas, USA
Lauren Elizabeth Herbers, Purdue U, USA
LaReina Hingson, Purdue U, USA
Right to Refuse: An Application of Politeness Theory to a Compliance-Gaining Exchange
Allison Zorzie Shaw, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Tobias Reynolds-Tylus, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Tanuka Mukherjee, U at Buffalo – SUNY, USA
Jessica M. Covert, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
The Content of Goal Inferences in Conversation: How Goal Congruency Influences the Goals People
Infer
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Na Li, U of California - Davis, USA
Siyue Li, U of California - Davis, USA
Katherine L Grasso, U of California - Davis, USA
The Daily Use of Imagined Interaction Features
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Andrea Vickery, Louisiana State U, USA
Laura C Hatcher, Louisiana State U, USA
Watching Television With Others. The Influence of Interpersonal Communication on Enjoyment
Arne Freya Zillich, Friedrich Schiller U Jena, GERMANY
6221
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Big Bird in the Thick of It: Challenging Communication in the Interplay Between Popular and
Political Communication
Popular Communication
Political Communication
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The 2012 Debate Goes Pop: Stewart v. O’Reilly and the Complex State of American Political Discourse
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
The Popularisation of Politics: From Public Relations to Pussy Riot
John Street, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Yes Dutch Minister; Political Fiction in Multiparty Systems
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Celebrity First Families? A Comparative Examination of the Mediated Visibility of National Leaders'
Spouses and Children in Seven Advanced Industrial Democracies
James Stanyer, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Emily Harmer, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Daily Kos, Fanzines, and the Textual Boundaries of Political Fandom: Analyzing Community and
Partisanship in the 2012 Presidential Election
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel builds on the growing tradition of interdisciplinary research that challenges assumptions in
popular and political communication research alike and explores the contexts, impacts, consequences and
opportunities of these overlapping spheres, as well as its associated conventions and consumption
practices.
6222
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Challenging Development Communication in Jordan, Benin, South Africa, and Turkey
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Altug Akin, Izmir U of Economics, TURKEY
Participants
A Network Perspective of Social Capital: Linking Effective ICT Use to Human Capability and
Development
Rong Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Challenges to Participatory Communication in a Youth Video Project in Benin, West Africa
Robert Huesca, Trinity U, USA
Marshall Plan Films in Turkey: A Prologue to Communication for Development and Social Change
Altug Akin, Izmir U of Economics, TURKEY
Teaching and Preaching About Reproductive Health: Evidence From a Study of Religious Leaders in
Jordan
Carol R. Underwood, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Sarah Kamhawi, Johns Hopkins U, JORDAN
6223
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and Not For Profits
Public Relations
Chair
Johanna Fawkes, Charles Sturt U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Virtual Stewardship: Have Nonprofit Organizations’ Moved Beyond Web 1.0 Strategies
Richard D. Waters, U of San Francisco, USA
PR Capacity on Nonprofit Boards
Timothy S. Penning, Grand Valley State U, USA
The Role of Reputation to Engender Support for Nonprofit Organizations
Christian Schultz, U of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, SWITZERLAND
Sabine A. Einwiller, U of Mainz, GERMANY
The Influence of Message Source and Cultivation Strategies in a Nonprofit Public Relations Context
Elizabeth L. Gardner, Texas Tech U, USA
Trent Seltzer, Texas Tech U, USA
Rachel Page, Texas Tech U, USA
6224
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Cyberbullying, Aggression, and Violence: Harm to Others in Traditional and New Media Forms
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
The Implications of Chronic Exposure to Political Violence via Media: Evidence From a Longitudinal
Analysis
Shira Dvir-Gvirsman, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Rowell Huesmann, U of Michigan, USA
Simha Landau, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Eric F. Dubow, Bowling Green State U, USA
Paul Boxer, Rutgers U, USA
Khalil Shikaki, Palestinian Center for Policy and Survery Research, USA
Adolescents’ Cyberbullying Behavior and Their Exposure to Media With Antisocial Content
Anouk H. den Hamer, VU U - Brussels, THE NETHERLANDS
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Micha G. Keijer, VU U - Brussels, THE NETHERLANDS
Determinants of Bystander Behaviour in Cyberbullying Incidents Amongst Adolescents
Ann DeSmet, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Sara Bastiaensens, Antwerp U, BELGIUM
Katrien Van Cleemput, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Karolien Poels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Who Bullies Who Online: A Social Network Analysis of Cyberbullying in a School Context
Denis Wegge, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Steven Eggermont, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
How Family Conflict Moderates the Relationship Between Media Violence and Adolescents' Aggression
Karin Fikkers, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jessica Taylor Piotrowski, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Helen Vossen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Cynthia A. Hoffner, Georgia State U, USA
6225
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Diaspora Blues
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Robeson Taj Frazier, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Media Reception, Ontological Security and Imaginative Copresence: Haitian Immigrants and Wellbeing
in Miami
Sallie L. Hughes, U of Miami, USA
Elena Sabogal, William Paterson U, USA
Hymn of the Hyphens: Construction of American-Muslim Identity in Taqwacore Songs
Syed Saif Shahin, U of Texas, USA
Affective Belongings Across Geographies: Locating YouTube Viewing Practices of Moroccan-Dutch
Youths
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Mariëtte de Haan, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Homeland Politics and Politics of Homeland: Hegemonic Discourse of China in Minority-Newspapers in
the Netherlands
Cindy Cheung-Kwan Chong, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Mediating Palestine
May Farah, American U of Beirut, LEBANON
“As if I Never Left”: Homeland Media Connectivity and Denial of Diasporic Identity Among Israelis in
USA
Vered Malka, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
Amit Kama, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
“Hawaiian Identity Crises”: A Postcolonial Deconstruction of Diasporic Hawaiian Narratives of Ethnicity
David A Maile, U of New Mexico, USA
6226
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Media and Sport: Perspectives on Scholarly Inquiry and Key Issues
Popular Communication
Chair
Andrew C. Billings, U of Alabama, USA
Participants
Media and Sport: On Mediatization and Cultural Analysis
Garry Whannel, U of Bedfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Media and Sport: On Spectacle and Mega Events
Michael R. Real, Royal Roads U, CANADA
Media and Sport: On Reading Sport and Narrative Ethics
Lawrence Wenner, Loyola Marymount U, USA
Media and Sport: On Nation and Globalization
David Rowe, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Media and Sport: On Journalism and Digital Culture
Raymond Boyle, U of Glasgow, UNITED KINGDOM
In taking stock of both the challenges in and prospects for scholarly inquiry on media and sport, this panel
features leading scholars from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States in an
assessment of the development of research on media and sport. Each of these panelists is recognized as a
key figure in the scholarly development of media, communication, and sport as an area of inquiry and
brings a nuanced and distinct theoretical perspective along with experiences from different parts of the
world. Each panelist has published numerous major works that have been influential to the study of
media and sport and brings broad experiences that have spanned media, sport, and cultural studies.
Looking back and looking forward, each paper considers why the study of media and sport is important,
the nature of the scholarly journey that has enabled the growth of research in this area, the promises and
prospects for key topic areas within the larger area of study, and future needs and directions in the
research agenda.
6227
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
In Pursuit of Meaning: The Theory and Philosophy of Hermeneutics in the Networked Age
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Tereza Pavlickova, Charles U, CZECH REPUBLIC
Participants
Dynamics of Dialogue: Connecting the Past, Present, and Future
Tereza Pavlickova, Charles U, CZECH REPUBLIC
Prospecting, in Retrospect: Three Concepts From Wolfgang Iser’s Reception Aesthetics in the Networked
Age
Ranjana Das, U of Leicester, GERMANY
The Hermeneutics of Desire
Johan Isaac Siebers, U of London, GB
Let's Take a Simple One: Apples': What is Pursued @ Mall/Media Visitor Reception Research?
Tony J. Wilson, Jeffrey Cheah Educational Foundation, MALAYSIA
Respondent
Maria Bakardjieva, U of Calgary, CA
This panel brings together four international contributions and a response, from panellists with diverse
media research interests and at different stages in their academic careers. The panel demonstrates that
despite hermeneutics being primarily preoccupied with the understanding of an individual text, the five
main hermeneutical concepts of prejudice, tradition, expectation, anticipations and horizons, in particular,
are all of great importance and relevance to (new) media research.
6228
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Gender Blind/Gender Vision: One Step Forward
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Mél Hogan, Concordia U, CANADA
Participants
Challenging Communication Research: Elizabeth Edwards’ Walk of Shame, The Mediated
Representations of a Betrayed Political Wife
Sorin Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
Diana Iulia Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
Letting Go of Superwoman: Embodying the Mother-Child Dyad
Beth Lee Sundstrom, College of Charleston, USA
Where Are the Women? The Presence of Female Columnists in U.S. Opinion Pages
Dustin M. Harp, U of Texas, US
Ingrid Bachmann, Catholic U of Chile, CHILE
Jaime Loke, U of Oklahoma, USA
Queering Everything: Thomas Beatie, Male Pregnancy, and the Mediation of New Gender Politics
Bernadette Barker-Plummer, U of San Francisco, USA
6231
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 1
Chinese Communication: From Media Use to Framing China in the Internet Age
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Ven-Hwei Lo, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Revisiting the Gaps Between Journalism Education and Practice in the Digital Age: The Twin Surveys in
Hong Kong
Ying Roselyn Du, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
S.C. Eric Lo, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Officials’ Openness at News Conferences: Their Influences on Foreign Media Coverage of the Chinese
Government
Di Zhang, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Perceived Issue Importance, Information Processing, and Third-Person Effects of News About the
Imported U.S. Beef Controversy
Ven-Hwei Lo, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Hung-Yi Lu, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
Hsin-Ya Hou, National Chengchi U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Privacy in Semantic Networks on Chinese Social Media: The Case of Sina Weibo
Elaine J. Yuan, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Favor (Renqing): Characteristics and Practice From a Resourced-Based Perspective
Christine Huang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
National Image Strategies: An Analysis of the London Olympics Opening Ceremony in Chinese
Mainstream Media
Xin Zhong, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Bin Shen, U of Alabama, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Chao Huang, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
This panel session presents six papers about a wide array of current topics, including journalism
education, social media, and the Olympics. Presenters come from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the
United States, representing diverse perspectives in communication research in the Chinese context.
6232
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 2
6233
Wednesday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 3
Digital Frontiers of Communication Law
Communication Law & Policy
Participants
Code as Speech: Machine Language, Authorship, and Expression
Jennifer Petersen, U of Virginia, USA
The Law of Forgetting: A Case Study of Argentina
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
A Crooked Balance of Interests? Comparing Users’ Rights in Printed
Anna-Laura Markkanen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Hannu Veli Nieminen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Obscenity to the Max: Max Hardcore, Community Standards, and “Works as a Whole” Online
Ronald Leone, Stonehill College, USA
Dale A Herbeck, Northeastern U, USA
Top Papers in Instructional and Developmental Communication Division
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Brandi N Frisby, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Problematic Family Interaction: A Communication Model of Elder Abuse and Neglect
Mei-Chen Lin, Kent State U, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Role of Instructor Humor and Students’ Educational Orientations in Student Learning, Extra Effort,
Participation, and Out-of-Class Communication
Alan K. Goodboy, West Virginia U, USA
Melanie Booth-Butterfield, West Virginia U, USA
San Steven Bolkan, U of Texas, USA
Darrin J. Griffin, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Understanding Out-of-Class Communication and Social Support Received From Instructors Using
Leader-Member Exchange Theory
Michael Sollitto, West Virginia U, USA
Matthew M. Martin, West Virginia U, USA
Understanding the Impact of Multimodal Instructional Technology on Learning in a Simulated Online
Class
Anthony Michael Limperos, U of Kentucky, USA
Rachael A Record, U of Kentucky, USA
Brandi N Frisby, U of Kentucky, USA
6302
Top Theme Papers 2013: Challenging Communication Research
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Chair
Terhi Rantanen, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The Viewertariat as News Frame-Builders: Real-Time Twitter Sentiment, News Frames, and the
Republican “Commander-in-Chief” Debate
Theo Mazumdar, U of Southern California, USA
Francois Bar, U of Southern California, US
Laura Alberti, U of Southern California, US
Material Challenges to Communication Research: Rethinking the Dynamic Roles of Materiality in
Communication
Gina Neff, U of Washington, USA
Brittany Fiore-Silfvast, U of Washington, USA
Carrie Sturts Dossick, U of Washington, US
The Ironic Incongruity of Canonical Common Sense in Critical Communication: The Case of Stuart
Hall’s “Encoding, Decoding” Model
Anita Varma, Stanford U, USA
Eggnog and Community: A Case Study of Local Digital Commentary and the Emerging Role of
Television
Edgar C. Simpson, Central Michigan U, USA
Respondent
Ursula Maier-Rabler, ICT&S Center, U of Salzburg, AUSTRIA
6305
High Density Session: Online Political Campaigning
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Raluca Cozma, Iowa State U, USA
Participants
City Hall 2.0? Italian Local Executive Officials’ Presence and Popularity on Web 2.0 Platforms
Cristian Vaccari, U di Bologna, ITALY
My Voter, My Party, and Me. American and German Parliamentarians on Facebook
Sarah Geber, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Helmut Scherer, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Online Politics: A Cross-National Explanatory Analysis of Political Websites
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sanne Kruikemeier, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Adrian Paul Aparaschivei, National School of Political Science and Public Administration,
ROMANIA
Hajo Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Impact of Use Motives on Politicians' Social Media Adoption
Christian Pieter Hoffmann, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Anne Suphan, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
The Million Follower Fallacy? Measuring Candidates’ Political Twitter Activity in the 2010 Midterm
Elections
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Young Mie Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Relationship Between Campaigning on Twitter and Electoral Support; Present or Absent?
Sanne Kruikemeier, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6306
Communication Constituting Organizations: The CCO Perspective
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
James R. Taylor, U de Montréal, CANADA
Participants
Beware of the Spirits That You Call! Explorations Into the (Dis)ordering Properties of Communication
Consuelo Vasquez, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
Dennis Schoeneborn, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Viviane Sergi, HEC Montréal, CANADA
Communicating for High Reliability: How Wildland Firefighters Enact Safety Rules Through Their
Workgroup Routines
Jody Jahn, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Communication as Ecological Coherence: Examining the Constitutive Interplay of Bodies, Sites, and
Objects Within Organizational Practices
R. Tyler Spradley, Stephen F. Austin State U, USA
Who/What Constitutes IPCC? Exploring the Role of Strategic Communication in Constitution of
Organizations
Jagadish J Thaker, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Anne M Nicotera, George Mason U, USA
Respondent
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
6307
Off the Beaten Trail: Novel Approaches to Studying Media Coverage in the 2012 U.S. Presidential
Election
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
Participants
Fact-Checking the Campaign: How Political Reporters Use Twitter to Set the Record Straight (or Not)
Mark Coddington, U of Texas, USA
Logan Molyneux, U of Texas
Regina G. Lawrence, U of Texas, USA
The Long Tail of “47 Percent”: Disentangling Press and Publicity Metacoverage in Mainstream News
Coverage of a Seminal Campaign 2012 Episode
Paul D'Angelo, The College of New Jersey, USA
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Candidate Affinity, Political Competition, and Televised Leader Displays: Winning Over Hearts in the
2012 Presidential Election
Erik P. Bucy, Texas Tech U, USA
Patrick Stewart, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Linking to Alternative Views
Natalie Jomini Stroud, U of Texas, USA
Ashley Muddiman, U of Texas, USA
Joshua M. Scacco, U of Texas, USA
The Testosterone Factor: News Values as Gendered Frames in Covering U.S. Presidential Candidates
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Ozen Bas, Indiana U, USA
Similar to good reporting, each of the papers on this panel goes off the beaten trail to examine the
message environment that enables voters to engage with campaign messages. Centering on efforts within
mainstream news media, these message environments include tweets mainstream journalists communicate
during the party conventions, metacoverage in mainstream news that aims to cover the mediated
environment itself, the veritable smorgasbord of links on online news sites, the gendered portrayals by
mainstream news media of political parties themselves, and the televised nonverbal behaviors that
candidates communicate when talking to voters via mass media. Collectively, these papers tell the story
of campaigns that matters most—the story of how the press in its various guises connects people to
candidates and campaign organizations, while informing the electorate in subtle and symbolic ways.
6308
Diverse Facets of ICT Use (CAT High Density Panel II)
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Schmooze for Businesses in Digital Era Predicting Mediated Business Networking With Incentive and
Efficacy
Ji Pan, Nanyang Technological U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Wayne Fu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Moving Beyond the Digital Divide: Social Media and Social Influence Between Generations
Brian J. Bowe, Michigan State U, USA
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Exploring Factors Affecting Tablet PC Users’ Intention to Purchase
Sangwon Lee, Kyunghee U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun-A Park, U of New Haven, USA
Moonhee Cho, U of South Florida, USA
A Comparison of the Persuasive Tactics in the Websites of Violent, Ideological, and Nonideological
Groups
Norah E. Dunbar, U of Oklahoma, USA
Shane Connelly, U of Oklahoma, USA
Matthew Jensen, U of Oklahoma, USA
Bradley Adame, U of Oklahoma, USA
Bobby L. Rozzell, U of Oklahoma, USA
Jennifer Griffith, U of Oklahoma, USA
H. Dan O'Hair, U of Kentucky, USA
m-Health: A Systematic Review of the First 10 Years of Research
Maddalena Fiordelli, U of Lugano, SWITZERLAND
Nicola Diviani, U della Svizzera italiana, SWITZERLAND
Peter J. Schulz, U della Svizzera Italiana, SWITZERLAND
A User Study to Investigate Print Books vs. Tablet Reading Devices: Reading Experience of Comic
Books
Jinghui (Jove) Hou, U of Southern California, USA
Justin Rashid, U of Southern California, USA
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Status, Social Signaling and Collective Action: A Field Study of Awards on Wikipedia
Benjamin Mako Hill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Aaron Shaw, Northwestern U, USA
Yochai Benkler, Harvard U, USA
The Use of Contestation and Social Norms in Developing Radicalized Discourses Online
Rachel Lara Davis, U of Missouri, USA
6309
Embodied Experience in Virtual Environments
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Rabindra A. Ratan, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Sexualized Avatars and Women’s Experiences of Self-Objectification and Identification in a Virtual
Environment
Jesse Fox, Ohio State U, USA
Rachel Ralston, Ohio State U, USA
Framing Embodied Experiences in Virtual Environments: Effects on Environmental Self-Efficacy and
Behavior Over Time
Sun Joo (Grace%29 Ahn, U of Georgia, USA
Jesse Fox, Ohio State U, USA
Katherine R. Dale, Ohio State U, USA
Adam Avant, U of Georgia, USA
Virtual Self-Sexualization: The Consequences of Female Sexual Objectification in a Virtual World on
Self-Objectification
Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, U of Missouri, USA
Ashton Lee Gerding, U of Missouri, USA
Virtual Superheroes: Using Superpowers in Virtual Reality to Encourage Prosocial Behavior
Shawnee Baughman, Stanford U, USA
Robin Rosenberg, Private Practice, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
6311
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Waterloo/Tower
Let’s Talk About Sex: Toward an Understanding of Risky Behavior and Intervention Strategies
Health Communication
Chair
Sara LaBelle, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
Do Sexual Assault Bystander Interventions Change Men’s Intentions? Applying the Theory of Normative
Social Behavior to Predicting Bystander Outcomes
Amanda Mabry, U of Texas, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, George Washington U, USA
Karen McDonnell, George Washington U, USA
Testing a Model Predicting Risky Sexual Behavior
Katherine Hertlein, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Tara M. Emmers-Sommer, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
M Alexis Kennedy, U of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
A Communicative Analysis of a Sexual Health Screening Intervention Conducted in a Low-Income
Housing Complex
Muriel E. Scott, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Alana R. Elia, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Annis G. Golden, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
The Fear Factor: Augmenting Perceived Threat Through an Internet-Based Intervention for Condom Use
to Prevent STDs Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Hong Kong
Annisa Lai Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
6312
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Framing Health Risk in Traditional and New Media
Health Communication
Chair
Lauren B. Frank, Portland State U, USA
Participants
Framing Medical Tourism: Assessment of the Procedures, Appeals, Risks, and Interactivity in Medical
Tourism Broker Web Sites
Hyunmin Lee, Saint Louis U, USA
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Newspaper Coverage, Trust and Risk Knowledge, Perception, and Behavior Resulting From a Food
Safety Scandal
Lulu Rodriguez, Iowa State U, USA
Jing Li, Iowa State U, USA
Newspaper Coverage of the Risks and Benefits of Medical Radiation Imaging
Erin K. Maloney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Carma L. Bylund, U of Iowa, USA
Smita C. Banerjee, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Jennifer Hay, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Raymond Thornton, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Lawrence Dauer, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Constructing Local Risk for a Global Health Crisis: Framing Devices of H1N1 in Singapore News Media
Daniel Teo, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
6313
Media Violence and Aggression
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
A Content Analysis of Print News Coverage of Media Violence and Aggression Research
Nicole Martins, Indiana U, USA
Andrew J. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Daphna Yeshua-Katz, Indiana U, USA
Nicky Lewis, Indiana U, USA
Nancy E. Tyree, Indiana U, USA
Jakob D. Jensen, U of Utah, USA
Perceived Meaningfulness and Audience Attraction to Violent Content: Experimental Results From
Germany and the US
Anne Bartsch, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Effects of Violent Game Playing on Implicit Stereotyping and Aggressive Behavior
Grace S. Yang, U of Michigan, USA
Rowell Huesmann, U of Michigan, USA
Brad Bushman, Ohio State U, USA
The Mainstreaming of Verbally Aggressive Online Political Behaviors
Vincent Cicchirillo, U of Texas, USA
Jay D. Hmielowski, U of Arizona, USA
Myiah Hutchens, U of Arizona, USA
Toward a Better Understanding of Cultivation Processes: The Effects of Movie and TV Violence on
Chronic Accessibility
Karyn E. Riddle, U of Wisconsin, USA
6316
Journalism in China and Hong Kong
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Erik Albaek, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Participants
Journalism Discourse and Legitimacy in Postreform China
Jingrong Tong, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Poaching Professionalism: International Broadcasting in China’s Quest for Soft Power
Limin Liang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Professional Values of Investigative Journalists in China: Findings From a Census in 2010
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Zhian Zhang, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Journalists’ Perceptions of Media Influence in Hong Kong
Miao Li, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Political Implications of Cultural Identities of Hong Kong Journalists: Two Survey Studies in 2006 and
2011
Xiaoxiao Zhang, Jinan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
6317
Television/Film Viewing and Social Cognition (Session Begins with a TOP Faculty Paper)
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Allison Eden, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Self-Disclosure and Liking for Participants in Reality TV
Nurit Talor, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Michal Hershman Shitrit, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Social Television Viewing: Examining Social Engagement Tendencies With Different Television
Program Genres
Miao Guo, Ball State U, USA
The Effect of Adults’ Coviewing on Transportation
Nurit Talor, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Empathy or Schadenfreude: How Do Viewers of Reality Shows Really Feel About Participants?
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Michal Hershman Shitrit, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Begin Wherever You Please, As Long As You Keep Me Interested. Exposition Location Influence on
Interest in Film
Miruna Maria Doicaru, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6318
News and Message Factors
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
6321
Reality TV and "Postrepresentational" Approaches to Class Analysis
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Participants
All the News That’s Fit to See?: Effects of Sexy Female Anchors on Attention, Intention to Watch, and
News Perception
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Tom Reichert, U of Georgia, USA
Cui Zhang, U of Alabama, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Michael Nitz, Augustana College, USA
Steve Smith, U of Georgia, USA
Don’t Keep it (Too) Simple: How Representations of Scientific Uncertainty in Online Articles Affect
Laypersons’ Attitudes
Stephan Winter, U Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole Claudia Krämer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Leonie Roesner, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
German Neubaum, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Effects of Agency in New Media Storytelling on Attitudes and Behavior Intention
Ryan Rogers, U of North Carolina, USA
Lisa Marie Barnard, U of North Carolina, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
How Emotional Media Reports Influence Attitude Formation and Change
Fabian Ryffel, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Dominique Stefanie Wirz, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Rinaldo Kuehne, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
If You Want it to Count, Make it Visual? Effects of Poll Results and Exemplars on People’s Judgments on
Political Issues
Christina V. Peter, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Hans-Bernd Brosius, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Measuring Personalization Effects in Google Search Results
Pascal Juergens, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Birgit Stark, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Never Trust an Optimist! Effects of Valence-Framing on Message and Source Credibility
Thomas Koch, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Christina V. Peter, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Magdalena Obermaier, U of Munich, GERMANY
Selective Exposure as an Attitude Bolstering Behavior: Using Media to Affirm Attitudes and Reduce
Dissonance
Sean Garguilo, Ohio State U, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Teresa Myers, George Mason U, USA
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Scott M Alter, Morristown Medical Center, USA
Russell H. Fazio, Ohio State U, USA
Popular Communication
Chairs
Laura Grindstaff, U of California - Davis, USA
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
"It's Life Boyo - But Not as We Know it": Men Performing in the Valleys
Gareth Palmer, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
The Importance of Being Ordinary: Performing Class and Cultural Hierarchy in Reality TV
Laura Grindstaff, U of California - Davis, USA
At Risk Girls: Reality Television and Bio-Politics
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Looking Through Classes: Upward Mobility and Reflexivity in U.S. Makeover Television Audience
Research”
Katherine Sender, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Tournaments of Value: Affect, Ambiguity and Ideology
Beverly Skeggs, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Helen Wood, De Montfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
Blurring boundaries between fact and fiction, authenticity and performativity, public service and
commercialism, subject and celebrity, and viewer and participant, reality television raises new questions
and demands new theoretical tools from scholars. This panel showcases “post-representational” methods
for analyzing reality television’s complicated relationship to class difference and class inequality. Our aim
is not to re-theorize reality television in ontological terms, but rather to consider how the surge of reality
television entertainment pushes the boundaries of existing modes of critical media analysis.
6322
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Democratizing Public Spheres: Challenges and Opportunities
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
Networked Communication in Closed Regimes: Linking Broadcast and Social Media in Iran
Maximillian Theodore Hanska-Ahy, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED
KINGDOM
Media-Domestication and Citizen-Domestication: The 2011 Japanese Earthquake in Chinese Newspapers
and Blogosphere
Weiwei Zhang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Television and Public Sphere in Bangladesh: An Uneasy Relationship
Anis Rahman, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
***TOP PAPER*** The Right to Communicate in the Midst of Political Violence: Media Reform and
Social Change in Thailand
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
6323
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Best Student Papers Public Relations Division 2013
Public Relations
Chair
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Crisis Communicative Strategies, Organization Ownership Type, Confidence in Organization and Media
Image Coverage: An Investigation of Infant Milk Powder Product Safety Crisis Management in
Mainland China
Peiyi Huang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Credibility in Crisis: Agenda Building and Crisis Communicative Strategy at a Chinese NGO
Yang Cheng, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Yi-Hui Huang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Ching Man Chan, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Beyond the Corporate Lens: The Use of Humour in Activist Communication
Katharina Wolf, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
People Like You and Me: How Social Marketing Informed by Visual Communication Research Can
Change the Views on HIV-Positive People
Viorela Dan, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Laura Busert, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
The Strategic Nature of CSR Communication: An Institutional and Rhetorical Perspective
Bree Devin, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
6324
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Researching News and Young People’s Identities
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Cristina Ponte, U Nova de Lisboa, PORTUGAL
Participants
Inhibiting Two Worlds: The Role of News in the Lives of Jewish and Arab Children and Youth in Israel
Dafna Lemish, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Teen News in the UK: Young People’s Ideas for Improving the BBC’s News Provision
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Maire Messenger Davies, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Children and Young People Making Sense of the News: A Case Study in a Portuguese Low-Income
Neighborhood
Lidia Maropo, U Autonoma de Lisboa/U Nova de Lisboa, PORTUGAL
The Reciprocal Role of Media and Civic Literacies: A Case Study of News and Young Citizens in
Portugal
Maria Jose Brites, Media and Journalism Research Centre/ U Nova de Lisboa/Lusofona U,
PORTUGAL
Respondent
David Buckingham, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
How do young people, especially children, engage with news discourse? To what extent does this
engagement shape the construction of their personal identities as citizens? These two questions signal the
agenda informing this panel’s mode of enquiry. Its aim is to shift the focus of current debates – typically
framed within the realm of adults – regarding journalism, political socialization and participation in the
public sphere. More specifically, it will explore the complex ways in which the news media influence
young people’s civic cultures, including their incipient sense of citizenship, social responsibility and
empathy with distant others.
6325
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Producing the Nation
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Participants
The Spatial Production of the Civic Nation: Berlin’s World Cup Flag Fight
Kate Zambon, U of Pennsylvania, USA
A Europe of Rights and Values? Public Debates on Sarkozy’s Roma Affair in France, Bulgaria, and
Romania
Alex Balch, U of Liverpool, UNITED KINGDOM
Ekaterina Balabanova, U of Liverpool, UNITED KINGDOM
Ruxandra Mihaela Trandafoiu, Edge Hill, UNITED KINGDOM
Street Vendors as Global Entrepreneurs
Karin E. Becker, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Nancy Hauserman, U of Iowa, USA
The U.S. Supreme Court’s Justifications in the Chinese Exclusion Case: An Argumentation Analysis
Misti Hill Carter, Texas A&M U, USA
From National Threat to National Hero: Black Mixed-Race and the Struggle for Koreanness in
Contemporary South Korean Television
Ji-Hyun Ahn, U of Texas, USA
6326
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Television Intermediaries
Popular Communication
Chair
Goran Bolin, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Participants
It's Not HBO, it's TV: The View of Critics and Producers on Flemish "Quality TV"
Alexander Dhoest, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Israeli Drama: Constructing the Israeli Television Drama Series as an Art Form
Noa Lavie, The Tel Aviv-Jaffa Academic College, ISRAEL
Scholars as Audiences, Symbolic Boundaries, and Culturally Legitimated Prime-Time Cable Drama
Michael Wayne, U of Virginia, USA
Over the Top: Structure and Agency in Television Distribution
Joshua Braun, Quinnipiac U, USA
Questioning Entertainment Values: Moments of Disruption in the History of Swedish Television
Entertainment
Goran Bolin, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
6327
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Earth Observing Media
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Chris Russill, Carleton U, CANADA
Participants
Conceptual Cleavages of Earth Observing Media
Chris Russill, Carleton U, CANADA
Signal Territories: Studying US Broadcast Infrastructure Using Google Earth
Lisa Parks, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Digital Globe and Climactic Coming Attractions: From Theatrical Release to Theatre of War
Leon Gurevitch, Victoria U of Wellington, NEW ZEALAND
Ripple Effects: The Residual Uses of Undersea Cables
Nicole Starosielski, Miami U, USA
Surveillance Warfare: Intelligence and Anxiety in the Global Sonar Network
John Patrick Shiga, McGill U, CANADA
Logistics of Listening: Acoustic Location and the Extension of National Space
Judd A. Case, Manchester U, USA
This roundtable introduces key sites of earth observing and discusses the media theories, cultural forms,
institutional entanglements, and communication infrastructure that animate contemporary earth observing
processes. It builds on the recent work of Lisa Parks and Paul Edwards to explore the usefulness of an
infrastructural perspective for recasting key issues in media and communication studies, and pays special
attention to the way that air, water, and earth are not only objects of mediation, but ‘media’ as well.
6328
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Gender and Labour Citizenship in the Information Society
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U, USA
Participants
Connected but Atomised: Women's Voice in the New Media Labour Market
Ursula Huws, U of Hertfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Labour, Gender, and the Cultural Reserve
Alison C.M. Beale, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Will Women Information Workers of the World Unite? Indications From India and Malaysia
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U, USA
Hungry for the Job: Gender, Unpaid Internships, and the Creative Economy
Leslie Regan Shade, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Effacement of Labour in the Sex-Culture Industries
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
This panel interrogates the notion of labor citizenship through a gender lens. Current scholarship
emphasizes economic and labor citizenship due to a neoliberal environment characterized by economic
uncertainties, differential mobilities associated with migration and place-based labour, new transnational
forms of social organization, and contingent work. The panel takes an intersectional approach, addressing
not only gender, but “race”/ethnicity, nation, generation, and class.
6331
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Board Room 1
New Concepts in Political Communication and Their Importance for Research
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Explaining the Gap Between Performance and Perception: The Role of Public Policies’ Communication
Strategy in Building "City Reputation"
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Gildo Seisdedos, IE U, SPAIN
An Analytical Model of Online Political Reputation: Spanish 2011 Regional Elections
Karen Sanders, CEU San Pablo U, SPAIN
Francisco Diaz, CEU San Pablo U, SPAIN
María Sánchez, CEU San Pablo U, SPAIN
Negativity and Trust in Political News
Rosa Berganza, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Oller Martín, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Iñigo Ana Isabel, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Who is Really the “Watchdog” Now? News Political and Journalistic Approaches on Professional Media
Autonomy
Andreu Casero- Ripollés, U Jaume I de Castellón, SPAIN
PABLO LOPEZ-RABADAN, U Jaume I de Castellón, SPAIN
Mediated Trust: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of the Relation Between Trust, Media Use, and
Political Engagement
Silvia Majó, U Oberta de Catalunya, SPAIN
Political communication scholarship needs to “update” its focus to incorporate newly emerging concepts,
which become salient for citizens, stakeholders and governments. This panel focuses on three such
concepts: (1) reputation, (2) trust and (3) control. These concepts have been present in communication
research in general and in political communication research in particular. Yet the current sociopolitical
context internationally has recently underscored their ever increasing importance to research that aims to
understand and improve the interactions between governments and citizens, the citizens themselves,
various social groups, journalist and politicians and the media and audiences.
6332
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Board Room 2
Creative Industries and the Reconfiguration of Cultural Policy
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
The End of Cultural Policy
Toby Miller, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Cultural Economy and Development: A New Policy Configuration?
Justin O'Connor, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
The Goals of ‘After Neo Liberal’ Cultural Policy
Kate Oakley, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Melissa Nisbett, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
David Lee, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Academic Expertise and Cultural Policy-Making
Philip Schlesinger, U of Glasgow, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel brings together leading exponents of cultural policy research to discuss the concepts of
‘creative industries’ and ‘creative economy’, and how they have reconfigured cultural policy
internationally. These papers thus provide a sense of the importance of creative industries within the
cultural policy domain, and the significance of cultural policy itself.
6333
Wednesday
11:00-12:15
Board Room 3
Instructional and Developmental Communication Business Meeting
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participant
Aaron R. Boyson, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Business meeting. Chair: Brandi N. Frisby Vice-Chair: Aaron Boyson Secretary: Betsy Bach
6402
ICA Miniplenary: Challenges in Media and Communication Regulation
Wednesday
12:30-13:45
Balmoral
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Peter Lunt, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Colette Bowe, Chiar, Ofcom, UNITED KINGDOM
Sascha Meinrath, New America Foundation, USA
Rod Tiffen, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
The pace of evolution of media and communication technology and its uses outruns that of legislation and
regulatory mechanisms. Freedom of expression and free flows of communication collide with privacy,
intellectual property, and accountability. This panel will discuss the challenges of media, and
communication regulation in the face of a fast-changing communication ecosystem.
6413
ICA Fellows' Panel: Calvert, Jones, and Hartley
Wednesday
12:30-13:45
St. James
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Parasocial Relationships for Young Children's Learning
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
Rise of the Machines: Computer-Mediated Communication or Computer Communication
Steven Jones, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Malvoisin or the Bad Neighbour: Cultural Cooperation and the Problem of Scale
John Hartley, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
ICA honors its new Fellows each year with a special program that focuses on their life, work, and
contributions to the field of communication.
6414
ICA Fellows' Panel: Ellis, Fulk, and Mumby
Wednesday
12:30-13:45
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Theorizing Communication and Ethnopolitical Conflict
Don Ellis, U of Hartford, USA
Social Networks and the Etiology of Contagious Knowledge in Organizations
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Communication, Organizations, and Power: A Casual Perspective
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
ICA honors its new Fellows each year with a special program that focuses on their life work and
contributions to the field of communication.
6502
Creative Research in Chaotic Times: Workstyles, Structure, and Output in Cultural Industries and
Beyond
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Participants
Living for a Working: Cultural Labor, Lifestyle Creep, and the Gendered Problem of Affect in Media
Work
Gina Neff, U of Washington, USA
Concertizing Journalism
Christine Larson, Stanford U, USA
Career Structure and Experiences of Television Screenwriters in an Internationalizing Industry
Roei Davidson, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Postinstitutional Strategies in Media Work
Mark Deuze, Indiana U, USA
Respondent
Joseph Turow, U of Pennsylvania, USA
In the past decade, an emerging set of career practices and expectations, deeply rooted in creative and
cultural industries, has rapidly spread across sectors. These norms prize personal entrepreneurism and
blur lines between work and life, global and local, risk and opportunity. They have transformed economic
structures in music, journalism and other cultural fields. Understanding this complex interplay between
communication, norms and structure requires innovative, interdisciplinary approaches: Such a shift in
tactics is profoundly important as these employment modes spread to knowledge work in general,
reshaping patterns of opportunity, equality and self-expression. By reaching across fields, this panel
explores those relationships in a rich and productive theoretical context.
6505
Political Messages and Campaigning
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Donatella Campus, U of Bologna, ITALY
Participants
A Semantic Network Analysis of Political Party Platforms: Predicting Coalitions in Scottish Elections,
1999-2011
Barbara Myslik, U of California - Davis, USA
George A. Barnett, U of California - Davis, USA
Mainstreaming Gay Politicians Online: Verbal and Visual Presentations on LGBT Candidate Websites
David Lynn Painter, Full Sail U, USA
Nataliya Dmytrochenko, U of Florida, USA
Christine Eschenfelder, U of Florida, USA
Power and Agency in Political Communication: How Masculinist Politics Framed Competing Carbon
Campaigns in the Australian Legislature
Richard C. Stanton, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
The Structural Transformation of the Chinese Premier’s Press Conferences: A Study in
Institutionalization
Yan Yi, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
6506
The Richness of Organizational Contexts in Organizational Communication Research
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Jeffrey William Treem, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Habermas and the Garants: Narrowing the Gap Between Policy and Practice in French OrganisationCitizen Engagement
Judy Burnside-Lawry, RMIT U, AUSTRALIA
Carolyne Ruth Lee, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Sandrine Rui, U of Bordeaux, FRANCE
Organizing an On-Site Farmers Market: Accessing Resources Through Workplace Wellness Policies
Marianne LeGreco, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Beth Archie, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
The Media's Role in Demobilization: Framing Trends, Susan G. Komen, and the Planned Parenthood
Reversal
Brandon Chase Bouchillon, Texas Tech U, USA
Work-Life Conflict and Coping: Challenging the Individual-Centric Norm
Hongmei Shen, San Diego State U, USA
Hua Jiang, Towson U, USA
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Bey-Ling Sha, San Diego State U, USA
Respondent
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
6507
Framing and Frame-Building in Political Communication
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Paul D'Angelo, The College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
Framing Crime: A Comparison of Frame-Building Effects Between Newspapers and Parliament in France
and the Netherlands
Anoeska Schipper, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Framing the Financial Crisis: Political Actors Influence on Frame Building in the News Media
Kajsa Larsson Falasca, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Framing and Emotion in the Debate Over Health Care Reform
Kimberly A. Gross, George Washington U, USA
Emily Vraga, George Mason U, USA
Robert M. Entman, George Washington U, USA
Value Poaching: Issue Frames That Target the Same Value for Competing Political Ends
Thomas E. Nelson, Ohio State U, USA
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6508
Games, Civic Education, and Civic Engagement
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Participants
A Model for Civic Game Design in "Global Conflicts: Afghanistan"
Jeppe Nielsen, Serious Games Interactive, DENMARK
Civic Games and Civic Gaps: Which Students Benefit Most From Civic Game Play?
Christine Bachen, Santa Clara U, USA
Pedro Hernandez-Ramos, Santa Clara U, USA
Chad Raphael, Santa Clara U, USA
Teaching College Students to Build Networks: The "Reality" Game
Benjamin Stokes, U of Southern California, USA
Jeff Watson, U of Southern California, USA
Beyond Participation: How an Online Game Transformed Urban Planning in Detroit
Eric Gordon, Engagement Game Lab, USA
Jessica Baldwin-Philippi, Emerson College, USA
Increasingly, digital games are being designed not simply to prepare youth for civic life, but to immerse
people of all ages directly in civic participation. This panel brings together game designers and scholars to
advance our understanding of games for civic learning and engagement. By convening panelists with
experience in game design and research on ICTs and civic engagement, the panel will foster dialogue
between practitioners and scholars. The panel will stimulate discussion among participants by circulating
papers before the conference and asking each panelist to comment on useful aspects of each other’s work.
To spark discussion with the audience, the last 15 minutes of the panel will be devoted to discussion with
attendees, instead of a traditional discussant.
6509
Technology-Compatible Communications
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Cameron Wade Piercy, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Text Messaging in Long-Distance Parent-Child Relationships: A Test of the Theory of Electric
Propinquity
Shawn King, U of Oklahoma, USA
Michael Tornes, U of Oklahoma, USA
Dongya Wang, U of Oklahoma, USA
Work-Related Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and Work Life Balance: The Influence of
New Communication Technologies on Perceived Work Life Balance, Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and
Intention to Leave the Organization
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
How Technology Shapes Communicative Conduct: A Case Study in Online Trainer-Student Interactions
Tabitha Hart, San Jose State U, USA
Who's My Audience Again? How Users Perceive and Manage Their Audience on Online Social Networks
Ralf Patrick De Wolf, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
6511
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Waterloo/Tower
The Rise of Social Media in Disseminating Health Messages
Health Communication
Chair
Chul-joo Lee, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Stigma and its Effect on Social Interaction and Social Media Activity: Top Three Paper/Health
Communication Division
Vanessa Boudewyns, RTI International, USA
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Derek L. Hansen, Brigham Young U, USA
Brian G. Southwell, RTI International, USA
Health Campaign on Online Social Media: Evaluating CDC’s Antismoking Campaign on YouTube
Jae Eun Chung, Kent State U, USA
Social Media Use for Food Recall Information and Antecedent Factors: Application of the
Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking
Minsun Shim, Inha U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Vicki Freimuth, U of Georgia, USA
Laura Min Mercer Kollar, U of Georgia, USA
Nancy Ostrove, FDA, USA
Cari A Wolfson, Focus on U!, USA
Communicating Food Safety via the Social Media
Yi Mou, Macau U of Science and Technology, MACAU
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
6512
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Communication History High-Density Panel
Communication History
Chair
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Making Do With Media: Teachers, Technology, and Tactics of Media Management in Interwar American
Classrooms
Katie Day Good, Northwestern U, USA
Cinema With a Capitole C: A Cultural Economics Analysis of the 1953-1971 Capitole Ledgers
Khael Velders, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Daniel Biltereyst, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Liesbeth Van de Vijver, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Surveys of Public Opinion in the USA Concerning Latin America During the Second World War
Jose Luis Ortiz, U Panamericana, MEXICO
Modernity as "Urbanity" in Early Public Service Broadcasting: the Case of Flanders
Hilde Dy Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Sketching Jimmy Who: Tony Auth and the Production of a Presidency, 1976-1980
Lori Amber Roessner, U of Tennessee, USA
The Transnational Relations Between the BBC and the WDR (1960-1969)
Christian Potschka, Leuphana U Lüneburg, GERMANY
Between Censorship Execution and Record in Colonial Korea: A Comparative Analysis of the Monthly
Report of Chosun Publication Police and Pages of Newspapers
Min Ju Lee, Far East U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
"Darktown": The Ideal Black Community in Late-19th-Century White Imagination
Gretta Moody, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Communicating Dissent: Antiwar Voices in Early America
Abbe S Depretis, Christopher Newport U, USA
Ladies of the Times: Women’s Letters to the Editor in the 1880s and 1900s
Allison Cavanagh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Towards a New History of the American Movie Poster
Beth Corzo-Duchardt, Northwestern U, USA
Then Press #: A Brief History of Digital Labor
Michael Palm, U of North Carolina, USA
This high density panel provides an opportunity to meet a number of authors who, after each giving a
brief (2-3 minutes) introduction to their research, will make themselves available on a one-to-one basis or
in small groups to discuss their work, using an interactive display. This is a very real chance to engage
with the range and diversity of current work in communication history.
6513
Partisan Content and Selective Exposure: Consequences and Implications (Panel Session)
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Participants
Beyond the Mass Media: Fragmentation in Nonjournalistic Online Media Content on Climate Change
Pablo Porten-Chee, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Christiane Eilders, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Implications of Pro- and Counterattitudinal Information Exposure for Affective Polarization
R. Kelly Garrett, Ohio State U, USA
Benjamin K. Johnson, Ohio State U, USA
Rachel L. Neo, Ohio State U, USA
Aysenur Dal, Ohio State U, USA
Fragmentation and Hostile Media Effects? The Selection and Perception of Political Online and Offline
Content
Marco Dohle, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Uli Bernhard, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Gerhard Vowe, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Egocentric Publics and the Hostile Media Effect
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin, USA
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Respondent
Klaus Schoenbach, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
This panel will assess the effects of politically motivated selective exposure on individuals’ attitudes and
perceptions. This includes attitudes toward people with different political views or perceptions of hostile
media and of public opinion in society. With a view on different countries and with a special focus on the
role of online media, the presentations will address the key issues in this field of research.
6514
The Euro Crisis, Newspaper Coverage, Journalistic Practices, and Perceptions of European
Institutions and Institutional Challenges
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
David A. L. Levy, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Europe Between Economic and Political Integration: The Role of its Institutions in Print Press Coverage
of Euro Crisis
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Marco Mazzoni, U di Perugia, ITALY
Influences of Media Systems and Journalistic Cultures on Coverage of the Euro Crisis
Robert Georges Picard, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Susana Salgado, New U of Lisbon, PORTUGAL
The Metaphors of Crisis
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
Willem Joris, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
How the Press Depicted the Emergence of and Solutions for the Euro Crisis
Heinz-Werner Nienstedt, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Hans Mathias Kepplinger, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
This panel discussion focuses on coverage of the Euro Crisis and its implications. In response to the crisis
a large-scale comparative research project involving communications research teams in 10 European
nations developed and has been exploring how differences in coverage, media systems, and journalistic
practices have affected portrayals of the crisis and public perceptions of the crisis and European
institutions. The panel will present results relating to how differences in media system and journalistic
practice affected coverage, variations in how the roots and responsibility for the crisis were conveyed,
how the European Commission and European Central Bank were portrayed and the implications for
integration, and the metaphors used to describe the events. The study and the panel’s approach are solidly
cast within comparative media research theories and approaches and media effects theories.
6516
Networks of Journalism: New Linkages and New Actors
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Daniel Kreiss, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Imagined Networks: How International Journalism Innovators Negotiate Authority and Rework News
Norms (Top Three Faculty Paper)
Adrienne Russell, U of Denver, USA
Mike Joseph Ananny, U of Southern California, USA
Positioning Journalism Within Networks: Conceptualizing and Operationalizing "Connective Journalism"
Mohammad Yousuf, U of Oklahoma, USA
Journalists, Hackers, and the Boundary Object of News: Establishing a New Contact Language for News
Innovation
Nikki Usher, George Washington U, USA
Seth C. Lewis, U of Minnesota, USA
Todd Kominiak, George Washington U, USA
Normalizing the Hyperlink: How Bloggers, Professional Journalists, and Institutions Shape Linking
Values
Mark Coddington, U of Texas, USA
An Attempt at Corralling the Commons: The Mutual Shaping of a Content Management System for
Social Journalism at Five Levels of a News Organization
Mark Anthony Poepsel, Loyola U, USA
6517
International Perspectives on Mass Communication
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Mediated Disaster and Remote Care: Linking Trauma, Resource Losses/Gains
Shaojing Sun, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Ying Wang, Youngstown State U, USA
Portrayals of Women in Transnational Arab Television Drama Series
Tamara Kharroub, Indiana U Bloomington, USA
Andrew J. Weaver, Indiana U, USA
Social Impacts of Public Service Broadcasting News in Japan and South Korea
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yukio Maeda, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Misook Lee, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Kaori Hayashi, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
The Picture of China in Our Heads: Mapping China on Taiwan’s Network Media Agenda, 1987-2011
Hsiang Iris Chyi, U of Texas, USA
Lei Guo, U of Texas, USA
Value Predispositions as Perceptual Filters: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Public Attitudes toward
Nanotechnology in the United States and Singapore
Shirley S. Ho, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Xuan Liang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Xiaoyu He, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
6518
Extended Session: Violent, Antisocial, and Prosocial Media – New Insights and Future Perspectives
Wednesday
14:00-16:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Game Studies
Mass Communication
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
The More You Play, The More Aggressive You Become: A Long-Term Experimental Study of
Cumulative Violent Video Game Effects on Hostile Expectations and Aggressive Behavior
Youssef Hasan, U Pierre Mendès France, FRANCE
Macbeth and the Media: Effects of Violent Media on Perceived Moral Purity and Self-Regulatory
Behavior
Andre Melzer, U of Luxembourg, LUXEMBOURG
Mario Gollwitzer, Philipps U Marburg, GERMANY
Moral Judgment of Antisocial Media Content Among Rejected Adolescents
Xanthe S. Plaisier, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Developmental Trajectories of Media Violence Use and Aggression in Adolescence: Evidence From a
Five-Wave Longitudinal Study
Barbara Krahé, U of Potsdam, GERMANY
Robert Busching, U of Potsdam, GERMANY
Habitual Exposure to Media Violence in Childhood Predicts to Serious Aggression and Crime in Late
Adolescence and Adulthood: Evidence From Four Longitudinal Studies
Rowell Huesmann, U of Michigan, USA
Reducing Harm for Children Online: Risk and Protective Factors in Self-Reported Responses to InternetRelated Risks
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Breaking the Vicious Cycle of Media Violence Use and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Intervention
Ingrid Möller, U of Potsdam, GERMANY
Barbara Krahé, U of Potsdam, GERMANY
“Remain Calm. Be Kind”: Effects of Stressful and Relaxing Video Games on Aggressive and Helping
Behavior
Brad Bushman, Ohio State U, USA
The Benefits of Cooperative Game Play in Violent Video Games
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
John Velez, Ohio State U, USA
Social Psychological Perspectives on Prosocial Media Research and Application
Karen Elizabeth Dill-Shackleford, Fielding Graduate U, USA
Media can be used in multiple ways, depending on the content. Violent media content can increase
antisocial behavior, while prosocial media can increase cooperation and helping behavior. This session
includes two rounds of presentations and discussions, focusing on 1) underlying mechanisms in the
negative effects of violent and antisocial media and 2) reducing harmful effects and discuss positive
effects of prosocial media. Cutting edge work from Europe and the United States is brought together in a
lively format.
6521
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
The Ethics and Politics of Media Offence
Popular Communication
Chairs
Ranjana Das, U of Leicester, GERMANY
Jonathan Corpus Ong, Hong Kong Baptist U, HONG KONG
Participants
Sticks and Stones: Media Ubiquity, Victimhood, and the Expansion of Offence
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
The Politics of Being Offended: Censorious and Satirical Discourses in LGBT Media Activism
Joel Penney, Montclair State U, USA
The Socio-Political Potential of Viewing Offence: Is There Any? Can There Ever be?
Ranjana Das, U of Leicester, GERMANY
Offence as Presence, Presence as Offence: Classed Cultures of Visibility
Jonathan Corpus Ong, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Carolyn Marvin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
This panel brings together scholars working with media audiences in four different cultural contexts to
interrogate the role of ‘offence’ in popular media culture. It brings together four pieces of research from
Israel, USA, UK, and Hong Kong, and straddles texts as well as audiences, production as well as
consumption, and commutes between cultures to contextualize its findings across a range of genres in
popular communication.
6522
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Activist Community/Social Media and Global Youth Movements: Studies From the Global South
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Priya Kapoor, Portland State U, USA
Participants
The Potential of Social Media as a Public Countersphere in a Situation of Conflict: What the Kashmir
2010 Uprising Teaches Us
Rashmi Luthra, U of Michigan - Dearborn, USA
Mobilizing Latino Youth for Social Change: The Impact of Social Media and Traditional Latino-Oriented
Media
Federico Subervi, Texas State U, USA
Tools of Emancipation? Media Glare, Online Social Networks, and Discursive Choice in the Chilean
Student Movement
Jackson Bales Foote, U of Wisconsin, USA
Community and Transnational Media Trajectories: Radio in India and South Asia
Priya Kapoor, Portland State U, USA
Social Media as a Virtual Public Space for Global Citizenship and Activism
Manisha Pathak-Shelat, U of Wisconsin, USA
Respondent
Melissa M. Brough, U of Southern California, USA
Despite the absence, or scant presence, of policies facilitating the expression of dissent and the use of
media for social change, movements have used whatever spaces are available to mobilize dissent and to
create pressure for sociopolitical change. The questions that the participants in this panel will explore are:
1) how do chosen forms of social and community media transform local politics and movements? 2) Is
there something intrinsic in particular forms of media that leads to success in activism? 3) Since terms
given to successful mobilizations are unabashedly celebratory, such as “facebook revolution” for the
Tunisian Arab Spring, what part of the story of interpersonal and local dynamics, including media
dynamics, is not being told?
6523
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Methods in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Michael J. Palenchar, U of Tennessee, USA
Participants
Mapping and Measuring the Dimensions of Trust: Scale Development to Measure Trust in Organizations
Joosuk Park, Public Relations Consultant, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Candace L. White, U of Tennessee, USA
John W. Lounsbury, U of Tennessee, USA
Mixed-Methods: Measurement and Evaluation Among Investor Relations Officers
Matthew Wade Ragas, DePaul U, USA
Alexander V Laskin, Quinnipiac U, USA
"But Pottsie is a God": Researching Australian Public Relations History Using Interviews
Kate Fitch, Murdoch U, AUSTRALIA
Social Mood Reader: Mapping Citizen Engagement in Public Relations Using the Semantic Web and
Supercomputing
Mark Balnaves, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
Andrea Cassin, Newcastle U, AUSTRALIA
Melanie Brigid James, U of Newcastle, AUSTRALIA
6524
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Learning and Executive Function Among Young Children: The Role of Media
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
The Relation Between Television Exposure and Theory of Mind Among Preschoolers
Amy Nathanson, Ohio State U, USA
Molly Sharp, Ohio State U, USA
Fashina Mira Alade, Ohio State U, USA
Eric E Rasmussen, Ohio State U, USA
Katheryn Christy, Ohio State U, USA
Effects of Sesame Street: A Meta-Analysis of Children’s Learning in 15 Countries
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin, USA
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Relation Between Television Exposure and Executive Function Among Preschoolers
Amy Nathanson, Ohio State U, USA
Fashina Mira Alade, Ohio State U, USA
Molly Sharp, Ohio State U, USA
Eric E Rasmussen, Ohio State U, USA
Katheryn Christy, Ohio State U, USA
The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter Weeda, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lisa van der Heijden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mariette Huizinga, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Parental Beliefs About Childhood Activities: Media Use, Play, and Education
Marina Krcmar, Wake Forest U, USA
Drew Cingel, Northwestern U, USA
Erin Ruth Silva, Wake Forest U, USA
Mikaela Malsin, Wake Forest U, USA
Respondent
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
6525
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Game Studies Top Papers
Game Studies
Chair
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Participants
Play to the Camera: Audio-Visual Research and Spectatorship in e-Sports
Nicholas Taylor, North Carolina State U, USA
Information vs. Persuasive Effects of Advergames: Experiment in the Context of Prescription Drug
Advertising
Jisu Huh, U of Minnesota, USA
Yoshikazu Suzuki, U of Minnesota, USA
Michelle Gross, Ackmann and Dickenson Inc., USA
It Is Not Okay to Hit a Liked Character: The Effects of a Player’s Affective State Toward an Opponent on
the Enjoyment of a Violent Game
Keunyeong (Karina) Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael Schmierbach, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Eun Hwa Jung, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Red Dead Masculinity: The Power of the Masculine Narrative Found in Red Dead Redemption
Benjamin Jared Triana, U of Kentucky, USA
6526
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Exploring Theory and Practice
Public Relations
Chair
Lee Edwards, Institute of Communications Studies, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
A Literature Review on Public Relations Within the Energy Industry: Towards a New Theory
Alejandra Isabel Pinera-Camacho, U of Navarra, SPAIN
Elena Gutiérrez-García, U of Navarra, SPAIN
Excellence in Internal Public Relations: The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Symmetrical
Communication and Employee Outcomes
Linjuan Rita Men, Southern Methodist U, USA
Information Seeking and Information Sharing as Underlying Processes of Public Relations
Kirk Hallahan, Colorado State U, USA
The Linkage Between Ethical Behaviors and Job Satisfaction of Public Relations Professionals
Jin-Ae Kang, East Carolina U, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
6527
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Political Affective Communication: From Contagion to Control
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Jayson Harsin, American U of Paris, FRANCE
Participants
Making Flashpublics: Social Media, Network Sovereignty, and Transnational
Jack Zeljko Bratich, Rutgers U, USA
Attention Economy, Affect, and Circulatory Control
Jayson Harsin, American U of Paris, FRANCE
Short-Circuiting the Affective Network: Psychoanalysis, Political Drive, and Acting Out
Charles Talcott, American U of Paris, FRANCE
Beyond Deliberation: Affect, Collaboration, and Network Culture
Darrin Hicks, U of Denver, USA
Respondent
Carrie Rentschler, McGill U, CANADA
Much of that scholarship on the affective turn in communication has focused on the relationship of affect
between bodies and has often essentialized it as post-semiotic, pre-conscious and liberatory. This panel
aims to direct affect scholarship toward networked bodies mediated by communication technologies.
While accounting for the possible liberatory aspects of affective effects, the papers in this panel also
critically explore the ways in which affect is used for population control.
6528
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Creating Visual Culture Across Cultures
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
New Forms of Transborder Visuality in Urban China: Saving Face for Magazine Covers
Eric Ma, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The (Digital) Majesty of All Under Heaven: Affective Constitutive Rhetoric at the Hong Kong Museum
of History's Exhibition of Terracotta Warriors
David R Gruber, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Between Tradition, Imitation, and Innovation: Interactive Information Graphics in Asia
Wibke Weber, Stuttgart Media U, GERMANY
Hans-Martin Rall, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Appeals, Sexual Images, Visual Metaphors, and Themes: Differences in Condom Print Ads Across Four
Continents
Jo-Yun Li, Iowa State U, USA
Lulu Rodriguez, Iowa State U, USA
TV Talk Show, Visual Representation, and the Ascendency of “Philanthropic Capitalist” Political Leader
in South Korea
Su Young Choi, U of Massachusetts, USA
How Travelers “Make” and Not “Take” a Photo
Eunbyul Lee, Korea U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
6531
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Board Room 1
ICA Publication Strategic Planning Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Jake Harwood, U of Arizona, USA
Jonathan Sterne, McGill U, CANADA
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
John A. Courtright, U of Delaware, USA
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Maria Bakardjieva, U of Calgary, CANADA
John Downing, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
John Paul Gutierrez, International Communication Association, USA
Michael J. West, International Communication Association, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
This is a meeting of the ICA leadership, the publications committee, and the editors of ICA publications
to focus on a strategic plan for ICA publications.
6532
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Board Room 2
Technologically-Mediated Interactions: Problems and Promises for Civic Engagement and
Interpersonal Interactions
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Chaim Noy, U of South Florida, USA
Participants
Irony, Sarcasm, and Insults as Humor Devices for Solidarity Building in Adult-Oriented Internet Chat
Danielle Lawson, Edinboro U of Pennsylvania, USA
Identity, Sequential Organization, and Categorical Organization: Interactions in Comments on a Chinese
Microblogging Website
Luling Huang, U of Texas, USA
The Israeli Term for Talk "Tokbek" (Talk-Back - Online Commenting) and its Relevance to the Online
Public Sphere
Nimrod Shavit, U of Massachusetts, ISRAEL
Gonen Dori-Hacohen, U of Massachusetts, USA
The Writing on the Collapsing Walls: "Reversed Graffiti" in the Israeli Withdrawal, August 2005
Hananel Rosenberg, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Ayelet Cohen, Hadassa College, ISRAEL
Coordinating Affordances, Bridging Modalities: Managing Mobile Devices and the “Text-Based”
Summons During Copresent Conversation
Stephen DiDomenico, Rutgers U, USA
6533
Wednesday
14:00-15:15
Board Room 3
The Changing Social Climate of Global Warming
Environmental Communication
Chair
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Amplifying Hill Women’s Perceptions About Climate Change: Case of Henvalvani Community Radio,
Chamba, India
Aparna Moitra, U of Delhi, INDIA
Archna Kumar, U of Delhi, INDIA
Changes of Public Perceptions and Actions Concerning Climate Change in Taiwan
Mei-Ling Hsu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Yie-Jing Yang, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
Opening Up the Societal Debate on Climate Engineering: How Newspaper Frames Are Changing
Samantha Scholte, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eleftheria Vasileiadou, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Arthur C. Petersen, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Window Frames: The Interplay of Temperature Experiences and Emphasis Framing in Motivated
Reasoning About Climate
Jonathon P. Schuldt, Cornell U, USA
Sungjong Roh, Cornell U, USA
6602
Challenging the Identity of Communication Studies From International Perspectives
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Chair
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Mahdi Yousefi, U of Tehran, IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
Olena Igorevna Goroshko, National Technical U - Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, UKRAINE
Bagila Akhatova, Kazakh U of International Relations and World Languages, KAZAKHSTAN
Jiro Takai, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Fei Jiang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Mapping the Field of Communication: From the Perspective of an Encyclopedia Editor
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Is There Such a Field as Communication Studies in Russia? Challenges of Identifying the Discipline
Olga Ivanovna Matyash, Russian Communication Association, USA
The Development of Communication Studies in Ukraine
Olena Igorevna Goroshko, National Technical U - Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, UKRAINE
Problems and Prospects of Development of Communicative Education in Kazakhstan
Bagila Akhatova, Kazakh U of International Relations and World Languages, KAZAKHSTAN
The Story of Communication Studies in the Muslim World: A Struggle for the Identity and Legitimacy
Mahdi Yousefi, U of Tehran, IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
The Background of Communication Discipline in Japan
Jiro Takai, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Three Waves of Communication Studies in China: On the Problems and Directions of Chinese
Communication Studies
Fei Jiang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The purpose of this panel is to invite international scholars to critically reflect upon "what is going on"
with Communication Studies in their countries and regions, from a variety of perspectives: theoretical/
methodological, philosophical/epistemological, cultural/intercultural, spiritual, practical, political, or
educational. The following questions are also suggested as a framework for discussion: What are
intellectual approaches and traditions to studying and understanding communication in your country?
How is this understanding represented in national social discourses and metadiscourses? How do you
view the status and role of CS in social science and humanities in your country? What are prospects or
constraints in the development of the discipline? What is the role of national researchers and practitioners
(educators and policy-makers) in the formation of the discipline? We suggest that, considering the
potentially world-wide scope of the suggested topic, it would be beneficial to include this session into the
program of the ICA's virtual conference and to offer it as a live streaming session.
6605
Political Knowledge: Causes and Consequences
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Political Aptitude: A Revised Measure of Political Sophistication
Patrick Merle, Texas Tech U, USA
The Influence of Interactive Online Poll Features on Political Learning
Joshua M. Scacco, U of Texas, USA
Ashley Muddiman, U of Texas, USA
Natalie Jomini Stroud, U of Texas, USA
Testing Our Quasi-Statistical Sense: News Exposure, Political Knowledge, and False Projection
Shira Dvir-Gvirsman, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Jacob Shamir, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Democratic Norms and Social Learning: A Study of Influences on Iraqi Journalists' Attitudes Toward
Information Access
Jeannine E. Relly, U of Arizona, USA
Margaret Zanger, U of Arizona, USA
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
6606
Who Am I? Organizational Identification and Identity
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Boosting Employer-Sponsored Health Dissemination Efforts: Identification and Information Sharing
Intentions
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Angela Erin Pastorek, U of Texas, USA
Brittani Crook, U of Texas, USA
Michael S. Mackert, U of Texas, USA
Erin Donovan-Kicken, U of Texas, USA
Heidi Shalev, Austin Regional Clinic, USA
Communicative Constructions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Implications for Organizational
Identity
Vidhi Chaudhri, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
From Conflict to Creativity in Global Teams: The Moderating Role of Shared Identity and Perceived
Proximity
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Malgorzata Boyraz, Rutgers U, USA
Christine Goldthwaite, Rutgers U, USA
The Role of Values in Alternative Organizations: Examining Organizational Identification in Farmers
Markets
Carrisa S Hoelscher, U of Oklahoma, USA
Alaina Zanin, U of Oklahoma, USA
Michael W. Kramer, U of Oklahoma, USA
Respondent
Rebecca J. Meisenbach, U of Missouri, USA
6607
Perceptions and Misperceptions: Causes and Consequences
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Thomas Petersen, Institut Fur Demoskopie Allensbach, GERMANY
Participants
The Relationships Between Media Use and Fairness Perceptions in the Context of General and Specific
Uses of Agricultural Biotechnology
John C. Besley, Michigan State U, USA
Katherine A. McComas, Cornell U, USA
The Role of Conversation in Developing Accurate Political Perceptions: A Multilevel Social Network
Approach
William P. Eveland, Jr., Ohio State U, USA
Myiah J Hutchens, U of Arizona, USA
The Role of Emotions in the Hostile Media Effect: Testing the Mediation Function of Emotions
Chanjung Kim, Oklahoma State U, USA
Kenneth Eun Han Kim, Oklahoma State U, USA
Presumed Online Media Influence and Support for Censorship: Results From a Survey Among German
Parliamentarians
Marco Dohle, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Uli Bernhard, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Gerhard Vowe, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
6608
Effects of Realism Across Modalities
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U and Sungkyunkwan U, USA
Participants
The Effects of Avatar Realism on Heart Rate Variability, Feelings, Thoughts, and Behaviors
Sung Yeun Kim, Syracuse U, USA
Reid A Searls, Syracuse U, USA
Mark Costa, Syracuse U, USA
YONG-IL SHIN, Pusan National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Frank Biocca, Syracuse U, USA
Exploring Users’ Social Responses to Computer Counseling Interviewers’ Behavior
Sin-Hwa Kang, U of Southern California, USA
Jonathan Gratch, U of Southern California, USA
Elementary, My Dear Watson: Examining Interactivity as Exploration in Augmented Reality via a
Magnifying-Glass Simulator
Guan-Soon Khoo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Ruobing Li, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Shintaro Kitazawa, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Koh Sueda, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Henry Been-Lirn Duh, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Gameplay Controllers and Modalities for Older Adults: A User-Centred Perspective on Usability and
Experiences
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Tan Phat Pham, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
6609
Copyright and Digital Piracy
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jan Fernback, Temple U, USA
Participants
Tracking Configurable Culture From the Margins to the Mainstream
Aram A. Sinnreich, Rutgers U, USA
Mark Latonero, U of Southern California, USA
Estimating Prevalence of Digital Piracy: An Examination of Interacting Sources and Effects on
Downloading Behavior
Hichang Cho, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Siyoung Chung, Singapore Management U, SINGAPORE
Anna Filippova, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
No Copyright Infringement Intended: Emergent Discourses in Networked Media Sharing
Alex Leavitt, U of Southern California, USA
Public Science or Virtual Water Cooler? The Role of Academic Blogs in the Scholarly Communication
Ecology
Merja Mahrt, U of Dusseldorf, GERMANY
Cornelius Puschmann, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, GERMANY
6611
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Waterloo/Tower
Communication Influences on Health Behavior and Behavioral Change
Health Communication
Chair
Dyah Pitaloka, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Theory of Planned Behavior: Women’s Stories of Water Treatment and Safe Water Storage in Kenya
Keli FensonHood Okere, U of Denver, USA
Renee A. Botta, U of Denver, USA
Leah Scandurra, Johns Hopkins U, USA
When Sickness Closes in: Drivers of a Proactive Behavior During a Health Crisis
Avery E. Holton, U of Texas, USA
Angela M. Lee, U of Texas, USA
Self-Affirmation Before Exposure to Persuasive Health Communications Promotes Anticipated Regret
and Health Behavior Change
Guido M Van Koningsbruggen, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter R Harris, U of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM
Anjes J Smits, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Validating Measures of Health-Related Conversation Content in the Context of Sleep Behavior Among
College Students
Rebecca Robbins, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
6612
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Culture, Virtuality, Social Media, and Computer-Supported Interaction
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Douglas A. Boyd, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Agency and Deixis Across Virtualized “Turkish” Imagined Community
Ali Ersen Erol, Howard U, USA
A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Domestic and International Students’ Social Media Usage
Qiong Xu, U of Alabama, USA
Richard Mocarski, U of Alabama, USA
Cultural and Relational Effects on Awareness Information Gathering Behaviors
Nanyi Bi, Cornell U, USA
Jeremy Birnholtz, Northwestern U, USA
Susan R Fussell, Cornell U, USA
Social Networking Sites as Cultural Products: A Test With Facebook and Renren
Cong Li, U of Miami, USA
Jiangmeng Liu, U of Miami, USA
Testing News Trustworthiness in Online Public Sphere: A Case Study of The Economist’s News Report
Covering Riots in Xinjiang, China
Dexin Tian, SCAD-Savannah, USA
Chin-Chung Chao, U of Nebraska - Omaha, USA
6613
“I’m Ready for My Close-Up”: Representations of Women and Gender on Reality Television (Panel
Session)
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Participants
The Construction of Femininity in Reality Television: Bridalplasty as a Narrative of Resistance
Lara Stache, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
“Anybody Can Win, Even A Girl”: Reality TV Engendered Participation and Possibilities in India
Lauhona Ganguly, American U, USA
I Do, Don’t I?: Hyper-Femininity and Celebrity Aspiration in Reality Wedding Programming
Kirsty Fairclough, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Laughing at Little Girls: Class and Gender in “Honey Boo Boo” and “Toddlers and Tiaras”
Paul Myron Hillier, U of Tampa, USA
Respondent
Rachel E. Dubrofsky, U of South Florida, USA
This panel focuses on reality TV shows as a popular symbolic form, providing an opportunity to look
contextually at how the shows are national products that animate popular conceptions of gender and
femininity. The panelists examine the ways in which the images are global and local, in particular in terms
of playing out patriarchal norms – resisting and reinforcing these. The panel invites us to think of reality
TV’s ubiquity as socially specific and contingent, and also irrefutably important in understanding how
popular television engages and remaps gender roles and relations.
6614
Journalism at the Time of Big Data
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Communication and Technology
Chair
Stefania Milan, Tilburg U, CANADA
Participants
Towards a Genealogy of Data Journalism
C.W. Anderson, College of Staten Island - CUNY, USA
Is There Room for Big Data in Journalists' Skills?
Juliette De Maeyer, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
How Data Tells Stories
Lorenz Matzat, OpenDataCity, GERMANY
Data Validation Between Journalism and Social Sciences
Hille van der Kaa, Tilburg U, THE NETHERLANDS
Surveilliance, Sousveilliance, and Big Data (Journalism)
Lisa Lynch, Concordia U, CANADA
Respondent
Lorenz Matzat, OpenDataCity, GERMANY
This panel presents a mix of academic and practitioner presentations to address the numerous challenges
“Big Data” present contemporary journalism with. The five contributions situate the practice of data
journalism in its historical, socio-political, and professional context.
6616
Covering the World: Foreign Correspondents and Foreign News
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Hillel Nossek, College of Management Academic Studies, ISRAEL
Participants
The Marginal Majority: Foreign Journalistic Hires at the Associated Press
Soomin Seo, Columbia U, USA
The Role of Foreign Correspondents in Diplomacy: A Case Study
Thomas Birkner, U Münster, GERMANY
International News Coverage and Issue Relevance to the US
Heungseok Koh, U of Iowa, USA
Making the World a Distant Place? How Foreign TV News Affects Individual Cynicism in Post-Colonial
Hong Kong
Wan-Ying Lin, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Xinzhi Zhang, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Respondent
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
6617
Cognitive Processing of Media Messages
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Allison Eden, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Hedonist or Pragmatist? Conceptualizing Appreciation as Primary Emotion in the Framework of Metaemotions
Katharina Hoelck, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
An Jacobs, VU U - Brussels, BELGIUM
Media Induced Recovery: The Effects of Positive Versus Negative Media Stimuli on Recovery
Experience, Cognitive Performance, and Vitality
Diana Rieger, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Leonard Reinecke, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Julia Kneer, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lena Frischlich, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Gary Bente, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Processing Media Story Characters: A "Theory of Mind" Model
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Tae Kyoung Lee, Cornell U, USA
Hye Kyung Kim, Cornell U, USA
Sungjong Roh, Cornell U, USA
A Mediated Uncertainty Management Model: Uncertainty as Motivating Specific Uses and Gratifications
of Media Use
Robert Benjamin Lull, Ohio State U, USA
6621
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Meet Your Audience: Interacting with Fans and Antifans
Popular Communication
Chair
Nancy K. Baym, Microsoft Research, USA
Participants
Close Encounters: Ritualizing Proximity in the Age of Celebrity. An Ethnographic Analysis of Meet-andGreets With Dutch Singer Marco Borsato
Stijn Reijnders, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Perils and Pleasures of Tweeting With Fans
Nancy Baym, Microsoft Research, USA
So Far Yet so Close: A Case Study of Intimacy in Celebrity-Fan Communication on Chinese Microblog
Yue Dai, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
With Fans Like These, Who Needs Enemies? An Analysis of Celebrities’ Online Antifans
Nathalie Claessens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Hilde Dy Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Lesbian Romances in FSCN Fan Fiction: A Study of Online Chinese Slash Literature
Jing Zhao, Chinese U of Hong Kong, USA
6622
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Popular Culture and Identity Formation in Brazil, Salvador, Syria, and India
Global Communication and Social Change
Popular Communication
Chair
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Participants
A Kiss is (Not) Just a Kiss
Samantha Nogueira Joyce, Indiana U South Bend, USA
Dramatizing Syrian Identity: The Case of Bab al-Hara & the Damascene Milieu Television Series
Omar Alghazzi, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Race, Identity, Drumming, and Digital Inclusion in Salvador, Bahia
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Passing to India: A Critical Look at American Football’s Expansion
Erika Polson, U of Denver, USA
Erin Elizabeth Whiteside, U of Tennessee, USA
6623
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Social Media and Digital Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Emma Wood, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Building Relationships Online: Top 100 Global Brands’ Use of Websites, Facebook, and Twitter
Wonsun Shin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Hyo Jung Kim, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Does Being Social Matter? The Relationship Between Enabled Comments and Purchase Intention in
Blogs
Rebecca A. Hayes, Illinois State U, USA
Caleb T. Carr, Illinois State U, USA
Framing Digital Public Affairs
Martin Hoefelmann, U of Applied Sciences and Arts Hannover, GERMANY
Wiebke Moehring, U of Applied Sciences, GERMANY
The Relationship of Trust in Public Relations: Toward a Model of Optimal Contextual Matching
Anne-Marie Gagne, TELUQ, CANADA
Pierre Mongeau, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
6624
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Parenting and Parental Mediation in a Media-Saturated World
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Developing and Validating the Perceived Parental Media Mediation Scale: A Self-Determination
Perspective
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jessica Taylor Piotrowski, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jo Hermanns, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rebecca de Leeuw, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Identifying Household Television Practices to Reduce Children’s Television Time
Jessica Taylor Piotrowski, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Amy Bleakley, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Michael Hennessy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Parenting in the Age of Technology: Parent Attitudes and Behaviors Related to Children’s Media Use
Alexis Lauricella, Northwestern U, USA
Ariel Maschke, Northwestern U, USA
Sabrina Connell, Northwestern U, USA
Ellen Wartella, Northwestern U, USA
Victoria Rideout, Kaiser Family Foundation, USA
Stance-Taking in Talking to Children About Media: A Language Socialization Perspective
Letizia Caronia, U of Bologna, ITALY
Teenagers' Internet Use and the Relationship With Their Parents
Marjon Schols, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jos de Haan, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Amy Nathanson, Ohio State U, USA
6625
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Challenging Game Research: Methods and Perspectives
Game Studies
Popular Communication
Chair
Malte Elson, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
Concerning Interactivity: Effective Video Game Content Analysis
Ryan Rogers, U of North Carolina, USA
Game Studies: A View From Outside
Marcella Szablewicz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Standing Athwart the Ludic Turn: The Study of Games in the Field of Communication
William J. White, Pennsylvania State U - Altoona, USA
The Trojan Player Typology: A Cross-Genre, Cross-Cultural, Behaviorally Validated Scale of Video
Game Play Motivations
Adam S. Kahn, U of Southern California, USA
Cuihua Shen, U of Texas - Dallas, USA
Li Lu, U of Southern California, USA
Rabindra A. Ratan, Michigan State U, USA
Sean Coary, U of Southern California, USA
Jinghui (Jove) Hou, U of Southern California, USA
Jingbo Meng, U of Southern California, USA
Joseph C. Osborn, U of California - Santa Cruz, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Videorec as a Form of Gameplay: Ways in Which the Recording of Play Contributes to the Engagement,
Analysis, and Development of Videogames
Gabriel Menotti Gonring, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
6626
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Economic and Political Ripples and the Shaping of Media Industries
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Joe F. Khalil, Northwestern U in Qatar, USA
Participants
From Europe to the Arab World: Media Moguls, Cities, and Clusters
Joe F. Khalil, Northwestern U in Qatar, USA
Neoliberal Intimation, Colonial Administration, and the Privatization of Telegraphy in Gibraltar, 19141944 (Challenging the History of Neoliberalism in Communication Studies)
Bryce Peake, U of Oregon, USA
Postcrisis Globalization and Media Internationalization Strategy of Emerging Countries: The Angolan
Case
Rita Maria Figueiras, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Nelson Costa Ribeiro, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Rupture and Revitalization: Colonial Governance, China, and the Reconfiguration of the Hong Kong Film
Industry
Sylvia Janet Martin, Pomona College, USA
The Formation of a Global Formats Trade System
Jean K. Chalaby, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
6627
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
The Social, Economic, and Affective Materialities of Facebook
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Mark Edward Cote, Victoria U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Data Motility: The Nonhuman Materiality of Big Social Data
Mark Edward Cote, Victoria U, AUSTRALIA
Facebook as Multivalence Machine: The Continuity of Affect, Data, and Economic Value
Carolin Gerlitz, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Happy Accidents: Facebook and the Value of Affect
Tero Karppi, U of Turku, FINLAND
Accumulating Affect: Social Networks and Their Archives of Feelings
Jennifer Pybus, McMaster U, CANADA
Facebook has both expanded and intensified social relations in an unprecedented manner while
developing a new market paradigm for extracting value from the voluminous social data generated
therein. Existing conceptual frames offer partial understanding. Convergence and/or Web 2.0 clarify the
quotidian conflation of work and play, and new mediated cultural practices where consumption elides
with production. Also, the Foucauldian concept of biopower offers a robust analysis of how the everyday
life of the social body has become a focus of power and value. Yet key elements, such as social data,
affective relations, and the specific materialities of the platform in which it transpires, demand a sustained
theoretical focus and critique. Our panel will draw on its strong body of international research to offer
four highly resonant but unique lines of critical inquiry into the conflation of social and economic
relations in social networks.
6628
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Transcending Visual Communication: The Internet as Multimodal Discourse
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Hans-Juergen Bucher, U of Trier, GERMANY
Participants
Transcending Visual Communication: The Internet as Multimodal Discourse
Hans-Juergen Bucher, U of Trier, GERMANY
Christian Volker Pentzold, Chemnitz U of Technology, GERMANY
Gunther Kress, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Philipp Niemann, Trier U, GERMANY
Elisabetta Adami, U degli Studi "G. d'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, ITALY
Using Multimodal Analysis in Investigating Digital Texts: The Case of Food Blogs
Gunther Kress, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Elisabetta Adami, U degli Studi "G. d'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, ITALY
From Multimodality to Hypermodality: User Navigation as Semiotic Process of Meaning Making
Hans-Juergen Bucher, U of Trier, GERMANY
Multimodal Online Campaigning: The Relevance of the Modal Orchestration for the Potential Political
Impact of Party Website Features
Philipp Niemann, Trier U, GERMANY
The Structures and Practices of Multimodal Online Discourse
Christian Volker Pentzold, Chemnitz U of Technology, GERMANY
This panel will bring together experts from different research centres on multimodal discourse from
Germany, England and Italy to present different disciplinary approaches on multimodal online
communication. Therefore the four presentations refer to quite different theoretical traditions: to
functional linguistics and socio-semiotics (Adam/Kress), to audience research and reception theory
(Bucher; Niemann), to theories of public communication (Niemann; Pentzold), to discourse theory and
ethnography (Pentzold). The panel will discuss theoretical and empirical approaches and exemplify them
with case studies on weblogs dealing with food issues, political online communication, websites from
welfare organizations, online newspapers and online news media. The intention of the panel is first to
present the theoretical tools for analyzing online-communication as multimodal discourse and second to
demonstrate the potentials of a multimodal approach to the Internet.
6631
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 1
Challenging Values and Agency in Environmental Communication
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Mark S. Meisner, IECA, USA
Participants
Environmental Communication in Wider Context
Tom Crompton, World Wildlife Fund - UK, UNITED KINGDOM
Pride Campaigns and Community Values: An Examination of Positive Messaging
Stacey Kathryn Sowards, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Environmental Movements, Democratic Publics, and Rhetorical Culture: The Challenges of Public
Activism
Terence Check, College of St. Benedict / St. John's U, USA
The Environmentalist’s Dilemma Revisited: Intrinsic Values in Environmental Communication
Mark S. Meisner, IECA, USA
This panel challenges existing assumptions about the relationships between values and agency in
environmental communication. Questions related to values are at the heart of current debates about short
and long-term goals for environmental communication. This panel of practitioners and academics
considers these in terms of practical outcomes, as well as identity and sense of agency among the
citizenry, willingness to engage in civil society, and the rhetorical choices that stem from them.
6632
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 2
Constructing Group and Intergroup Identities Through Narratives and Dialogue
Intergroup Communication
Participants
Narratives of Trauma and Reconciliation
Leonard C. Hawes, U of Utah, USA
Identity Dilemmas for Israeli Settlers
Don Ellis, U of Hartford, USA
Dangerous Stories: Encountering Narratives of the Other in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Processes,
Effects, Identity, and Moral Response
Yiftach Ron, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Ifat Maoz, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
French–Israelis: Narratives of Hybrid Identities
Esther Schely-Newman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
The Arabic Language and Ideas of the Nation
Cameila Sulieman, Michigan State U, USA
Respondent
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
This panel will explore theoretical and methodological issues related to the construction and
reconstruction of group and intergroup identities through various practices of communication. This will
be explored in different research settings and while relating to diverse groups defined by different
parameters: national, ethnic, language, political and cultural - with special attention to the emergence of
hybrid identities through different societal processes and dynamics such as intergroup conflict, conflict
resolution and integration. In this framework we will also discuss and reassess methodologies and
practices such as the narrative approach, discourse analysis and ethnographic studies, through which
construction of identities through intergroup communication is studied as well as their societal and ethical
entailment
6633
Wednesday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 3
Status Quo and Future Perspectives of Children’s Film Research in Europe
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Franziska Matthes, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Lothar Mikos, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Becky Parry, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Malena Janson, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
This roundtable shall be used to bring scholars together to discuss about the status quo and future
perspectives in children’s film research from various scientific perspectives with a special note on
European films for children.
6702
International Communication Association Annual Awards and Presidential Address
Wednesday
17:00-18:15
Balmoral
Sponsored Sessions
6813
East Asia Networking Session
Wednesday
18:30-19:30
St. James
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Chair
Jiro Takai, Nagoya U, JAPAN
This session is designed as a networking opportunity for scholars from the East Asia region. You are
encouraged to attend and meet others from your geopgraphical region and discuss possible ways to
collaborate, explore ideas on how ICA can better meet your needs, and address issues such as journal
publication, conference presnetations, and any other topics that seem relevant. Refreshments will be
provided.
6814
European Networking Session
Wednesday
18:30-19:30
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
This session is designed as a networking opportunity for scholars from the European region. You are
encouraged to attend and meet others from your geopgraphical region and discuss possible ways to
collaborate, explore ideas on how ICA can better meet your needs, and address issues such as journal
publication, conference presnetations, and any other topics that seem relevant. Refreshments will be
provided.
6816
Oceania/Africa Networking Session
Wednesday
18:30-19:30
Belgrave
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
This session is designed as a networking opportunity for scholars from the Oceania/Africa region. You
are encouraged to attend and meet others from your geopgraphical region and discuss possible ways to
collaborate, explore ideas on how ICA can better meet your needs, and address issues such as journal
publication, conference presnetations, and any other topics that seem relevant. Refreshments will be
provided.
6817
The Americas (Not Including the US) Networking Session
Wednesday
18:30-19:30
Berkeley
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Roberta G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
This session is designed as a networking opportunity for scholars from the Americas (not including the
US)region. You are encouraged to attend and meet others from your geopgraphical region and discuss
possible ways to collaborate, explore ideas on how ICA can better meet your needs, and address issues
such as journal publication, conference presnetations, and any other topics that seem relevant.
Refreshments will be provided.
6818
West Asia Networking Session
Wednesday
18:30-19:30
Cadogan
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
This session is designed as a networking opportunity for scholars from the West Asia region. You are
encouraged to attend and meet others from your geopgraphical region and discuss possible ways to
collaborate, explore ideas on how ICA can better meet your needs, and address issues such as journal
publication, conference presnetations, and any other topics that seem relevant. Refreshments will be
provided.
6800
Wednesday
19:00-21:00
Dining Room
880
Wednesday
19:00-21:00
Dining Room
6800
Wednesday
19:00-21:00
Dining Room
Ethnicity and Race in Communication, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies, and
Popular Communication Joint Reception (OFF SITE)
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Joint Boat Party of the Popular Communication Division, Ethnicity and Race in Communication Division,
and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Interest Group on the River Thames. Sponsored by
Stockholm University, Department of Media Studies; Taylor and Francis and Popular Communication:
The International Journal of Media and Culture; and the Media, Culture and Society Programme at the
University of Surrey. Those wishing to take part in a guided walk to Westminster Pier should gather in the
lobby by 18:00. Those traveling by Underground should allow 30 minutes for their journey (Jubilee Line
to Embankment). A taxi will take 15-20 minutes. For more information on transport to and from the MS
Erasmus, please consult the PopComm, ERIC, and GLBT pages on the ICA website and/or their
Facebook pages.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies, Ethnicity and Race in Communication, and
Popular Communication Joint Reception (OFF SITE)
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Joint Boat Party of the Popular Communication Division, Ethnicity and Race in Communication Division,
and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Interest Group on the River Thames. Sponsored by
Stockholm University, Department of Media Studies; Taylor and Francis and Popular Communication:
The International Journal of Media and Culture; and the Media, Culture and Society Programme at the
University of Surrey. Those wishing to take part in a guided walk to Westminster Pier should gather in the
lobby by 18:00. Those traveling by Underground should allow 30 minutes for their journey (Jubilee Line
to Embankment). A taxi will take 15-20 minutes. For more information on transport to and from the MS
Erasmus, please consult the PopComm, ERIC, and GLBT pages on the ICA website and/or their
Facebook pages.
Popular Communication, Ethnicity and Race in Communication, and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and
Transgender Studies Joint Reception (OFF SITE)
Popular Communication
Joint Boat Party of the Popular Communication Division, Ethnicity and Race in Communication Division,
and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Interest Group on the River Thames. Sponsored by
Stockholm University, Department of Media Studies; Taylor and Francis and Popular Communication:
The International Journal of Media and Culture; and the Media, Culture and Society Programme at the
University of Surrey. Those wishing to take part in a guided walk to Westminster Pier should gather in the
lobby by 18:00. Those traveling by Underground should allow 30 minutes for their journey (Jubilee Line
to Embankment). A taxi will take 15-20 minutes. For more information on transport to and from the MS
Erasmus, please consult the PopComm, ERIC, and GLBT pages on the ICA website and/or their
Facebook pages.
7014
ICA Past Presidents' Breakfast
Thursday
07:00-09:15
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
7105
Nations, Corporations and International Structures: Perspectives on the History of International
Communication
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Palace A
Communication History
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Projecting Power Overseas: The 1863 Paris Postal Conference, the American Civil War, and the Creation
of International Communications Networks
Richard John, Columbia U, USA
Breaking the International News Cartel, 1933-34: New Evidence and a New Analysis
Gene Allen, Ryerson U, CANADA
Reuters and the Idea of a British Commonwealth News Agency in the Aftermath of the Second World
War
Peter Putnis, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
An Overview of News-Agency "Company" Archives: AP, Reuters (Thomson-Reuters), and France's
Havas, OFI, AFP...
Michael Palmer, U of Paris - Sorbonne, FRANCE
This panel provides four case studies of how the international communication system was shaped between
the 1860s and 1960s, concluding with a reflection on how knowledge about this evolution is created. The
case studies examine the varying roles of national interest and corporate strategy – two of the major
threads in analyzing the creation of international communication structures -- and the ways in which these
have overlapped.
7106
Dealing With Difficult Issues in Organizations: Gossip, Dissent, and Exit
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Justin P. Boren, Santa Clara U, USA
Participants
Communicating Organizational Exit: The Development and Validation of the Peer-Influenced Exit
Measure
Michael Sollitto, West Virginia U, USA
Keith David Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
Different Ways to Disagree: A Mixed Methods Exploration of Organizational Dissent
Johny T. Garner, Texas Christian U, USA
Exploring Others’ Perceptions of Dissent Expression: Testing the Viability of the Organizational Dissent
Scale as an Other Report
Stephen Michael Croucher, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
Jeffrey Kassing, Arizona State U, USA
Audra Rebecca Diers, Strategy Consulting, GERMANY
Gossip in the Workplace: An Exploration of Organizational Gossip Topics, Emotional Responses, and
Communication Changes
Jessalyn I. Vallade, West Virginia U, USA
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
Respondent
Vernon D. Miller, Michigan State U, USA
7107
Comparative Perspectives on Media and Political Communication
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Katrin Voltmer, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Deliberative Strengths and Weaknesses in Television News: Insights From the US, Germany, and Russia
Hartmut Wessler, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Eike Mark Rinke, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
News and Gendered Knowledge Gaps: A Media Systems Perspective
Lilach Nir, Hebrew U / U of Pennsylvania, USA
Parties, Ideology, and News Media in Central-Eastern and Western Europe
Laia Castro Herrero, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Sven Engesser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
The Content of the Message: Effects of Media and Interpersonal Communication on EU Evaluations
Pieterjan Desmet, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Joost van Spanje, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7108
Computer-Mediated Deception
Thursday
08:00-09:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Rabindra A. Ratan, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
People, Place and Time: The Daily Rhythms of Deception in Interpersonal Text Messaging
Madeline E Smith, Northwestern U, USA
Jeremy Birnholtz, Northwestern U, USA
Lindsay Reynolds, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Avatar-Driven Deception in a Virtual Environment
Rosalie Hooi, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Hichang Cho, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Lies in the Eye of the Beholder: Self-Other Asymmetry in Beliefs About Deception Across Interpersonal
Media
Catalina Laura Toma, U of Wisconsin, USA
L.Crystal Jiang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Everyday Deception or Prolific Liars? A New Approach to the Prevalence of Deception
Lindsay Reynolds, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Jeremy Birnholtz, Northwestern U, USA
Madeline E Smith, Northwestern U, USA
7109
Social Network and Social Support
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Yoram M. Kalman, Open U of Israel, ISRAEL
Participants
Lurking as an Active Participation Process: A Longitudinal Investigation of Engagement With an Online
Cancer Support Group
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
Jiran Hou, U of Georgia, USA
Eunkyung Kim, U of Georgia, USA
David H Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
How Does Online Social Networking Enhance Life Satisfaction? The Relationships Among Online
Supportive Interaction, Affect, Sense of Community, and Life Satisfaction
Hyun Jung Oh, Michigan State U, USA
Elif Yilmaz Ozkaya, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
The Weakness of Strong Ties: Online Social Support From Networks via Facebook Introduction
Bobby L. Rozzell, U of Oklahoma, USA
Cameron Wade Piercy, U of Oklahoma, USA
Caleb T. Carr, Illinois State U, USA
Shawn King, U of Oklahoma, USA
Brianna L. Lane, U of Oklahoma, USA
Michael Tornes, U of Oklahoma, USA
Amy Janan Johnson, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Online vs. Offline Social Support: How Do They Pay Into Satisfaction With Social Support and
Satisfaction With Life?
Sabine Trepte, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Tobias Dienlin, Hamburg Media School, GERMANY
Leonard Reinecke, U of Mainz, GERMANY
7111
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Waterloo/Tower
Framing Health Messages: From Campaigns to Mass Media Coverage
Health Communication
Chair
Hyunmin Lee, Saint Louis U, USA
Participants
Effects of Culturally Adapted Health Promotion Message Framing
Soojung Kim, U of Minnesota, USA
Jisu Huh, U of Minnesota, USA
Effectiveness of Cigarette Warning Labels: Exploring the Impact of Graphics, Message Framing, and
Temporal Framing
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Bo Yang, U of Maryland, USA
Irina Iles, U of Maryland, USA
Framing Attributes of Information Subsidies as Predictors of Pandemic News
Seow Ting Lee, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Coverage of Autism Spectrum Disorder in the U.S. TV News: An Analysis of Framing
Seok Kang, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
7112
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Health Communication and the Mass Media: Advertising and Journalism Issues
Health Communication
Chair
Jennifer Cornacchione, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Overcoming Consumer Suspicion of Advocacy Advertising: An Exploration of the Persuasive Effects of
Self-Brand Connections -- Top Paper/Health Communication Division
Christina Valerie Malik, U of North Carolina, USA
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
Consumers' Attitude Towards Advertising of Medical Professionals
Kara Chan, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Lennon Leung Lun Tsang, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Vivienne, Shuet Yan Leung, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Health Journalism Reform: Cultivating Solutions With Media Logic to Improve Communication About
Health Determinants
Amanda Hinnant, U of Missouri, USA
Joy Jenkins, U of Missouri, USA
Roma Subramanian, U of Missouri, USA
Analyzing Extended Parallel Process Model and Health Belief Model Constructs in Texting While
Driving News Coverage in Leading U.S. News Media Outlets
Taejin Jung, SUNY – Oswego, USA
Maria Brann, West Virginia U, USA
7113
Media Literacy/Media Education: Guiding Principles and Applied Research (Extended Session)
Thursday
08:00-10:45
St. James
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Media Education: Introductory Remarks
David Buckingham, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Conceptualizing Media and Other Literacies
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Using Media Literacy to Teach Young Children About Advertising, Nutrition and Persuasive Intent
Cynthia L. Scheibe, Ithaca College, USA
To Guide or to be the Sage: Varying Facilitator Prompts Following a Media Literacy Curriculum
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
Laras Sekarasih, U of Massachusetts, USA
Kimberly R. Walsh, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Christine Olson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Donica O'Malley, U of Massachusetts, USA
Media Production as a Way to Increase Collaboration Skills: A Media Literacy Experiment
Elizaveta Provorova, Temple U, USA
Young People, Sex and the Media: Challenging Assumptions About Media Literacy and Sexual Learning
Kath Albury, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Efficacy of a School-Based Intervention to Reduce Screen Media Time for 6th-8th Graders
David S. Bickham, Children's Hospital Boston/Harvard Medical School, USA
Yulin Hswen, Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard U, USA
Kristine Paulsen, Take the Challenge Foundation, USA
Media Education Research and Theory: Concluding Remarks
Renee Hobbs, U of Rhode Island, USA
Respondents
Erica Weintraub Austin, Washington State U, USA
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Esther Rozendaal, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Rebekah Willett, U of Wisconsin, USA
Allison Butler, Western Connecticut State U, USA
Srividya Ramasubramanian, Texas A&M U, USA
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
This extended session features remarks from internationally renowned media education scholars,
including David Buckingham, Sonia Livingstone, and Renee Hobbs. It will also feature the presentation
of competitively selected papers with Erica Weintraub Austin (one of the most prolific scholars of media
education) serving as expert respondent. Finally, there will be small group interactions--led by emerging
and established researchers in the field--that will involve the audience in discussion of relevant theoretical
principles and directions in research.
7116
Citizen Journalism: Global Perspectives on an Emerging Phenomenon
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Einar Thorsen, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Citizen Eyewitness Images and Audience Engagement in Crisis Coverage
Laura Ahva, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Maria Hellman, , SWEDEN
Beyond Control and Resistance: Transforming Journalism in the Chinese Microblogosphere
Le Han, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Collaborative, Complementary, and Negotiated Journalistic Professionalism: A Case Study of
OhmyNews in a Participatory Media Climate
Deborah S. Chung, U of Kentucky, USA
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
De-Westernizing New Media Discourse: The Case of Citizen Journalism in the Arab World (Top Three
Student Paper)
Omar Alghazzi, U of Pennsylvania, USA
7117
Cultivation Studies in Mass Communication
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Jan Van den Bulck, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Participants
A Cross-Cultural Test of the Implicit Cultivation Process
Florian Arendt, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Temple Northup, U of Houston, USA
Crime Fiction, Procedural Fairness, and Trust in the Police
Astrid Dirikx, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Jan Van den Bulck, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Meta-Analysis of Genre-Specific Cultivation Studies
Rachael A Record, U of Kentucky, USA
Online vs. Memory Based: Variables Explaining and Moderating the Occurrence and Interrelation of
First- and Second-Order Cultivation Effects
Anna Schnauber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Christine E. Meltzer, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Television Drama Viewing and Romantic Beliefs: Parasocial Interaction as Mediator and Attachment
Styles as Antecedent
Borae Jin, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
7118
Messages, Emotions, and Physiological Measures
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Satoko Kurita, Osaka U of Economics, JAPAN
Participants
Mediated Empathy as an Embodied Motivated Process
Anthony Sean Almond, U of Missouri, USA
Freya Sukalla, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Russell Brent Clayton, U of Missouri, USA
Disgust Responses as a Function of Trait Motivational Activation and Disgust Sensitivity
Bridget E Rubenking, U of Central Florida, USA
Event-Related Brain Potentials During Emotional Pictures as a Function of Violent Game Exposure and
Motivational Activation
Satoko Kurita, Osaka U of Economics, JAPAN
Intense News Photos, Motivational Activation and Processing of Online News
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Jennah Sontag, U of Missouri, USA
Rachel Lara Davis, U of Missouri, USA
Multitasking on a Computer: Emotions and the Frequency, Anticipation, and Prediction of TaskSwitching
Leo Yeykelis, Stanford U, USA
James J Cummings, Stanford U, USA
Byron Reeves, Stanford U, USA
Processing of Fear and Disgust in Natural Disaster Images
Rachel Lara Davis, U of Missouri, USA
Resting Heart Rate Variability as a Predictor of Trait Motivational Reactivity
Rachel L. Bailey, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Sneers and Double-Takes: An Examination of Emotional and Cognitive Responses to Mediated Disgust
Bridget E Rubenking, U of Central Florida, USA
7121
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Popular Constructions of Race, Ethnicity, and Otherness
Popular Communication
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Christopher Boulton, U of Tampa, USA
Participants
Trapped in a Generic Closet: The Black Sitcom and Containment of Gay Black Bodies
Alfred Leonard Martin, Jr., U of Texas, USA
Race, Place, and Performance: How HBO’s True Blood Imagines the South
Dayna Earlene Chatman, U of Southern California, USA
Asian Parties in the Netherlands: (Re)producing Asianness in Dutch Nightlife
Reza Kartosen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Homeland: The Homegrown Terrorist, The Enemy, “Our” Double -- Top Paper in Pop Comm
Piotr Michal Szpunar, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The "Guido" Situation: Constructing Ethnicity on MTV's Jersey Shore
Alexandra Sastre, U of Pennsylvania, USA
7122
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Digital Cultures, Migration, and the Regulation of Citizenship
Global Communication and Social Change
Communication and Technology
Chair
Karina Horsti, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Participants
Digital Islamophobia: Circulation of a Rape Image and the Scandinavian Woman as a Figure of Pure
Whiteness
Karina Horsti, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
A Voice of One’s Own? Migration, Gender, and Citizenship in a Polymedia Environment
Maria Mirca Madianou, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Rethinking Otherness: Cosmopolitanism and New Platforms
Elke Grittmann, Leuphana U Lüneburg, GERMANY
Tanja Thomas, U of Lueneburg, GERMANY
Accumulating Legitmacy: Digital Networks and the Documentation of Dreams
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
New media practices and convergence culture shape the spheres and structures where citizenship and
belonging are re-negotiated. Bordering capabilities of digitalization and globalization shift understandings
of binaries such as the national/ global, private/ public, and professional/ amateur. While newer pathways
of migration are emerging, nations are enforcing stricter versions of border control and regulating
citizenship. On the ground, cultural citizenship is increasingly shaped in popular and more participatory
forms of communication and narratives of migration are being shaped through newer forms and networks
of sociality. The intersection of digital technology and migration has opened up a vibrant area of study.
This panel hopes to contribute and extend this discussion by exploring the ways in which citizenship is
defined, performed and communicated in the global context.
7123
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and Crisis
Public Relations
Chair
Friederike Schultz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
A State TV’s Reputation Restoration After a Devastating Disaster: Framing Analysis of Journalistic
Reflection on Sichuan Earthquake
Joanne Chen Lyu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Kelly Yuying Dong, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Animal Rights vs. Nationalism: A Semantic Network Analysis of Value Advocacy in Corporate Crisis
Aimei Yang, U of Dayton, USA
Shari R. Veil, U of Kentucky, USA
Message Convergence as a Message-Centered Approach to Analyzing and Improving Risk
Communication
Kathryn Elizabeth Anthony, U of Kentucky, USA
Timothy Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Moving Toward a Stakeholder-Centric View of Crisis Communication: Implications for Practice and
Society
Timothy Coombs, U of Central Florida, USA
Sherry J. Holladay, U of Central Florida, USA
7124
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Culture, Work, and Organization
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Sorin Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Computing Social Networks and Clustering Culture: A Communication Research on a National Level
Jianxun CHU, U of Science and Technology of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Wenbo Luo, U of Science and Technology of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
EVE J. Yang, U of Michigan, USA
Shukun Tang, U of Science and Technology of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Explaining Cohesion Linkages in Workgroups: The Cooperative Communication in Collectivism and
High Power Distance Workgroup Context
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara - Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Haslina Halim, U Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Filling the Trust Gap in Transcultural and Transnational Business Relations: Sinicization Within SinoChilean Economic Exchange
Claudia Labarca, Pontificia U Catolica de Chile, CHILE
The Perception of “Cultural Awareness” in German-South Korean Business Negotiations
Christiane Geissler, Dresden International U, GERMANY
The Relationship between Individual, Organizational and Non-Work Factors and Cross-Cultural
Adjustment: The Mediating Role of Communication
Haslina Halim, U Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara - Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Che Su Mustaffa, U Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA
7125
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Ethnicity and Race in the Digital Age
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Participants
Vloggers and the "Black” Label: Audience Understandings of “Black” Media in the Digital Age
Gretta Moody, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Tweeting #Palestine: Twitter and the Mediation of Palestine
Eugenia Siapera, Aristotle U of Thessaloniki, GREECE
When Ethnic Humor Goes Digital
Lillian A Boxman-Shabtai, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Connected Viewing Across a Dangerous Border: Latino Families Watch Television in the Space of Flows
Ikram Toumi, U of Texas, USA
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Exploring the Impact of Ethnic Identity Through Other Generated Cues on Perceptions of Spokesperson
Credibility among Caucasian and African American Audiences
Patric R. Spence, U of Kentucky, USA
Stephen Spates, U of Tennessee, USA
Xialing Lin, U of Kentucky, USA
CJ Gentile, Western Michigan U, USA
Kenneth Alan Lachlan, U of Massachusetts - Boston, USA
Katie Reno, U of Tennessee, USA
Hispanics’ Motivations to Use Social Networking Sites for Brand Communication: The Role of Cultural
Factors
Sigal Segev, Florida International U, USA
Weirui Wang, Florida International U, USA
Rosanna Fiske, República, USA
7126
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Looking Outward: The Complexities of Public Diplomacy/Nation Branding
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Young-Gil Chae, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, USA
Participants
A New World of Spectacle: China’s Central Television and Its Significant Other, 1992-2006
Yunya Song, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Tsan-Kuo Chang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Beyond 2010: Assessing South Africa’s Domestic Nation Branding Strategy
Nora A Draper, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Cold War International Broadcasting in the Post-Cold War Era: South Korea, U.S., and China
Young-Gil Chae, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, USA
Baye Yoon, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Networks of Freedom, Networks of Control: The Internet's Complicated Role in Public Diplomacy
Amelia Hardee Arsenault, Georgia State U, USA
7127
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Technology and Society in the Digital Age
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
From Mediation to Mediatization: The Institutionalization of New Media
Stig Hjarvard, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Networked Individuality: Implications of Current Media Change for Social Theory
Marian Thomas Adolf, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Dennis Manfred Deicke, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Slices of Time: Exploring Temporal Capital in a Digital Age
Cynthia Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Understanding the Backbone of Technology: A Conceptual Model to Research Code
Lela Mosemghvdlishvili, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7128
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Provoke: Five Minutes Feminist Interventions Challenging Communication Research
Feminist Scholarship
Participants
Communication for Empowerment: Measurement and Questions of Power
Emily G LeRoux-Rutledge, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED
KINGDOM
Dr. Jenevieve Mannell, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Provoke: Disruption and Subversion in the Digital: Women Perform Public Memory
Deborah James, Governors State U, USA
The Gendering of Mobile Technology in South Asia: Examining How Mobile Phones Are Used by
Women/Girls in Rural Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India
Sadaf R. Ali, Eastern Michigan U, USA
Suture and Scars: Evidencing the Struggles of Academic Feminism
Mél Hogan, Concordia U, CANADA
Andrea Zeffiro, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Feminist Research Praxis in Multicultural Settings
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Changing the State of Play: Feminist Interventions in Game Culture
Alison Harvey, U of Toronto, CANADA
Kelly Bergstrom, York U, CANADA
Immaterial, Precarious, Affective: Academic Feminism and the Feminization of Academic Labour
Tamara Shepherd, Ryerson U, CANADA
“Your Body is a Battleground”: Theorizing the Politics of the Body in Barbara Kruger’s Feminist CultureJamming
Michael Glassco, U of Iowa, USA
Meenakshi Gigi Durham, U of Iowa, USA
Respondents
Sandra Ponzanesi, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Anne Balsamo, U of Southern California, USA
7131
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 1
Approaches to the Contemporary Study of Communication in Russia
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
Participants
Understanding as the Beginning of Agreement: The Challenges of Intercultural Family Communication
Olga Leontovich, Volgograd State Pedagogical U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Communication Research Paradigms in Russia: Challenges and Approaches
Viacheslav B. Kashkin, Voronezh State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Computer-Mediated Communication Research in Russia
Irina Rozina, Russian Communication Association, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Reframing Theoretical Concepts in Russian Media Studies: Interpreting Mass Media and Journalism
Elena Vartanova, Lomonosov Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Local and Glocal: Communicating Identity in a Globalized World
Elena Gritsenko, Linguistics U of Nizhny Novgorod, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Alexandra Laletina, Linguistics U of Nizhny Novgorod, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Key Features of Internet Communication
Svetlana Viktorovna Ivanova, Bashkir State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Verbal Abuse: Russian View
V I Zhelvis, K. D. Ushinsky State Pedagogical U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Culture-Specific Approach to the Study of Internet Communicative Behavior of Russian Users
Irina Privalova, Higher School of Realty (Institute), RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Theorizing Press in Post-Soviet Societies
Galina V. Sinekopova, Eastern Washington U, USA
Elderly People and Computers: New Perspective in Russian Communication Research
Olga Vyacheslavovna Sergeyeva, Volgograd State Pedagogical U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Urban Studies in Russian Public Relations Education
Alexandra Kvyat, Omsk State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
How Does Non-Bona-Fide Discourse Fit in the Existing Models of Communication?
Ksenia M Shilikhina, Voronezh State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
The study of communication in Post-Soviet Russia has become an important part of the academic scene in
Russia. Approaches have depended on both traditional perspectives and new theoretical developments.
This panel provides a survey of contemporary research programs in the areas of mass media, new media,
intercultural communication, public relations, interpersonal communication, and linguistics.
7132
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 2
Conceptualizing the Public, Localism and Coregulation in Broadcast Regulation
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Victor W. Pickard, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Advances and Uncertainties in the Laws for Public Radio and TV Broadcasting in Three South American
Countries: Argentina, Brazil, and Ecuador
Sonia Virginia Moreira, Rio de Janeiro State U, BRAZIL
The Canadian Digital Television Transition: Testing the Limits of Co-Regulation
Gregory A.K. Taylor, Ryerson U, CANADA
International Comparisons of "Local Media Ecology" Studies: Implications for the Canadian Regulatory
Context
Christopher Ali, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Public Value as a Media Policy Buzzword
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Hilde Dy Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
7133
Thursday
08:00-09:15
Board Room 3
From Theory to Practice: Exploring Social Media as an Instructional Tool
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Christine Greenhow, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
The Hybrid Schoolhouse: When Digital and Traditional Education Meet
Julia Sonnevend, Columbia U, USA
Digital Media, Copyright Reform, and Educational Progress
Nicholas Bramble, Yale U, USA
Mobile Learning: Connectivity and Education in Developing Countries
Colin Agur, Columbia U, USA
Interaction and Training: Social Media in News Organizations
Valerie Belair-Gagnon, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Laura Denardis, American U, USA
This panel explores uses for social media as a teaching tool in multiple educational contexts, with a
comparative and international set of papers. The participants represent several fields of study: education,
sociology, journalism, law, and political economy. They also bring perspectives from educational systems
in the United States, Canada, the UK, Eastern Europe, South Asia, and East Asia. This range of cultural
and disciplinary variety gives the panel members a rich set of experiences with learners and technologies
in multiple contexts. The panel conceives learning as a dynamic and multifaceted process, and examines
ways that social media can enrich the learning experience.
7205
Cultural Framing and Communication Practices
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Palace A
Communication History
Chair
David E. Morrison, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Top Student Paper: The Unobserved Observer: Humphrey Spender's Hidden Camera and the Politics of
Visibility in Interwar Britain
Annie Rudd, Columbia U, USA
Canned Music and Captive Audiences: The Battle Over the Public Soundscape at Grand Central Terminal
Matthew F. Jordan, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Good News: The Carmel Newsreels and Their Place in the Emerging Hebrew Language Media
oren Soffer, Open U of Israel, ISRAEL
Tamar Liebes, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Rumors of the Death of Cash: The Diners’ Club Card Network, 1950–1969
Lana Swartz, U of Southern California, USA
The constituent elements of a history of communication are open to ongoing debate, but one starting point
for discussion must be the nature and extent of the situation of communicaton practices in cultural forms.
These papers explore the complex nature of that embeddedness through personal, visual and aural case
studies.
7206
Follow Me: Leadership Communication and Rhetoric in Organizations
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara - Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Participants
Communicative Leadership: Leaders and Members Reflecting on Leadership and Communication
Solange Barros de Alcantara Hamrin, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Catrin E. Johansson, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Jody Jahn, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Conversation at Work: The Effects of Leader-Member Conversational Quality
Guowei Jian, Cleveland State U, USA
Francis Dalisay, Cleveland State U, USA
International Business Organism: The Mimetic Code in Corporate Rhetoric and Transformation at IBM
Jaclyn Lee Selby, U of Southern California, USA
Examining the Behavioral Aspect of Leader-Member Exchange: The Integral Roles of Leadership Style
and Communication Exchange
Vivian C. Sheer, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Dennis Tourish, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
7207
Shaping Political News Coverage
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Journalism Studies
Chair
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Changing Election News Coverage in Increasingly Commercialized Media: A Systematic Comparison
Across Time and Across Media Types
Linards Udris, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
To Be is to be Seen: Party Leaders in Swedish News Photographs
Johannes Bjerling, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Understanding the Influence of Journalists and Politicians on Content: A Cross-Longitudinal Analysis of
Chilean Political News Coverage
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Kevin Rafter, Dublin Institute of Technology, IRELAND
How Does Beauty Shape Political News in Television? The Effect of Physical Attractiveness of the Israeli
Politicians on the Tone of Their News Coverage
Dana Markowitz-Elfassi, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
7208
Research on Clicks: Liking and Sharing in the Air
Thursday
09:30-10:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Akiba A. Cohen, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
Participants
“What’s on Your Mind?": Why Facebook Users Click “Like”
Katie Lever-Mazzuto, Western Connecticut State U, USA
Liking as Affective Connection: Emotional Branding and Clicking Behaviors on the Facebook Web
Platform
Jay Brower, Western Connecticut State U, USA
City, Media Fans, and Social Media
Szu-Yin Yeh, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
Chick to Share: Touristic Experiences in Real Time
Yi-Fan Chen, Old Dominion U, USA
Respondent
James E. Katz, Boston U, USA
Millions of social media users click their mobile media and their computer mice to “like” or to “share”
media content each day. The panel examines clickable behaviors from both users and producers’ sides.
7209
New Marketing Strategies for New Consumers in New Media
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sun Joo (Grace) Ahn, U of Georgia, USA
Participants
Conceptualizing Social Media Integration: The Evolution of Online Marketing Communication
Andrea B. Hollingshead, U of Southern California, USA
Young Ji Kim, U of Southern California, USA
William Scott Sanders, U of Southern California, USA
Hierarchical Antecedents of In-App Advertising Effectiveness
Sang Chon Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Daniel Ng, U of Oklahoma, USA
You Got Coffee in My Racing Game: Brand Congruity and Reality in Video Game Advertising
Ted Dickinson, Ohio State U, USA
Michael Hanus, Ohio State U, USA
Jesse Fox, Ohio State U, USA
Understanding the Psychology of Mobile Shopping of the Millennial Generation in China: A Lifestyle
Approach
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Matthew Joseph Haught, U of South Carolina, USA
Yang Xuerui, Communication U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jin Zhang, Communication U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
7211
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Waterloo/Tower
Challenging Issues in Communicating Health Risk
Health Communication
Chair
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Improvements to and Utilization of the Risk Behavior Diagnostic Scale to Increase Outdoor Smoke-Free
Policy Compliance
Rachael A Record, U of Kentucky, USA
Risk and Efficacy: Genetic-Belief Profiles of Young Adults Using Latent Class Analysis
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Marisa Greenberg, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Roxanne Parrott, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Risk Promotion, Sensation-Seeking, and Behavior: Testing the Susceptibility Threshold
Maria Knight Lapinski, Michigan State U, USA
Lindsay Neuberger, U of Central Florida, USA
Meredith Gore, Michigan State U, USA
Katelyn Grayson, Michigan State U, USA
Bret Muter, Michigan State U, USA
Media Coverage as a Risk Factor for Suicide: New Evidence for a Werther Effect After Celebrity Suicide
Reporting
Markus Schaefer, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
7212
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Playing Well With Others: Games and Community
Game Studies
Chair
Thorsten Quandt, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
Death of a Child, Birth of a Guild: Rethinking the Function of Weak Ties in Online Communities
Nathaniel D. Poor, independent scholar, USA
Cliff Lampe, U of Michigan, USA
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Death of a Guild, Birth of a Network: Online Community Ties Within and Beyond Code
Nathaniel D. Poor, independent scholar, USA
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Laser Cannons and Placards: Social Movement Theory in Massively Multiplayer Online Games
Joshua Andrew Clark, U of Southern California, USA
Team Sports in Virtual Worlds: Are Clan Members Team Players in the Real World, too?
Elisabeth Guenther, U Münster, GERMANY
Ruth Festl, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Thorsten Quandt, U Münster, GERMANY
We Came to Play: Studying MMOGs in Public Settings
Nicholas Taylor, North Carolina State U, USA
Jennifer Jenson, York U, CANADA
Suzanne de Castell, U of Ontario Institute of Technology, CANADA
Barak Dilouya, York U, CANADA
7216
Does Journalism's For-Profit Ownership Orientation Matter? Evidence From News Coverage
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
Cracks in the Gates: The Market-Driven Newspaper Movement as a Precursor of “The-Future-of-NewsConsensus”
Anthony Nadler, Ursinus College, USA
Speed, Digital Media and News Coverage of Poverty
Joanna Redden, Ryerson U, CANADA
Framing Fraud: Discourse on Benefit Cheating in Sweden and the UK
Ragnar Lundstroem, Umea U, SWEDEN
Murder Incorporated: Organizational Influences on Coverage of the Annie Le Investigation
Patrick Ferrucci, U of Missouri, USA
Respondent
Theodore L. Glasser, Stanford U, USA
7217
Narrative Persuasion
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Angeline L. Sangalang, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Example, Please! Comparing the Effects of Single and Average Customer Reviews on Online Shoppers'
Product Evaluations
Marc Ziegele, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Mathias Weber, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Exploring Subtext Processing in Narrative Persuasion: The Role of Eudaimonic Entertainment Use
Motivation and a Supplemental Conclusion Scene
Elizabeth L. Cohen, West Virginia U, USA
The Effectiveness of Adaptation of the Protagonist in Narrative Persuasion
Anneke de Graaf, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Impact of Identification and Just Outcome Perceptions on the Evoking of Emotions
Hans Hoeken, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
7218
High Density: More Competative Papers in Interpersonal Communication
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Nancy Burrell, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Participants
A Mediation Model of Parents’ References to Their Past Substance Use and Youths’ Substance Use
Outcomes
Jennifer Andrea Kam, U of Illinois, USA
Ashley V Middleton, U of Illinois, USA
Breaking Good and Bad News: Face-Implicating Concerns as Mediating the Relationship Between News
Valence and Reluctance to Share the News
Jayson L. Dibble, Hope College, USA
Deaf or Hearing: A Hard of Hearing Individual's Navigation Between Two Worlds
Brittany Nicole Lash, U of Kentucky, USA
Donald W. Helme, U of Kentucky, USA
Managerial Workplace Conversations: Influences and Reflections on Future Intent
Ann M Rogerson, U of Wollongong, AUSTRALIA
Managing the Intersections of Disclosure: Gendered and Raced Privacy in Mandated Reports of Sexual
Violence
Kate Lockwood Harris, U of Colorado, USA
The Persistence of Interpersonal Resilience: Longitudinal Analysis of Communication in the Aftermath of
Job Loss
Gary A. Beck, Old Dominion U, USA
The Relationship Between Narcissism, Humor Uses and Humor Styles
Hailey Grace Gillen, West Virginia U, USA
Melanie Booth-Butterfield, West Virginia U, USA
“I Tell My Partner Everything . . . (or Not)”: Patients’ Perceptions of Sharing Heart-Related Information
With Their Partner
Maria G. Checton, College of Saint Elizabeth, USA
Kathryn Greene, Rutgers U, USA
7221
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Social Media as Big Data, Big Business, Big Brother
Popular Communication
Participants
The Political Economy of Algorithms: The Implications of Personalization Services in Social Media Sites
Robert Bodle, College of Mount St. Joseph, USA
Branded Content, Media Firms, and Data Mining: An Agenda for Research
Joseph Turow, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Tracing Worker Subjectivities in the Data Stream
Alison Mary Virginia Hearn, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Crowd-Sourced User Surveillance on Social Media
Daniel Trottier, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
What We Talk About When We Talk About Privacy
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
What Do Social Media Users Think of Social Media Monitoring?
Helen Kennedy, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Social media industries, experts, consultancies and companies have begun to emerge, offering a broad
range of social media intelligence services. This roundtable brings together key scholars whose research
interrogates the social media intelligence work that is undertaken in the name of big data, big business and
big brother. In so doing, it draws together approaches from surveillance studies, Marxism, critical
advertising studies, the philosophy of technology and social media usage studies to reflect key issues in
social media monitoring, data-mining and analytics.
7222
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Communicating Protest Camps: Politics and Communication in the Occupy Movement and Beyond
Global Communication and Social Change
Chairs
Anastasia Kavada, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Anna Feigenbaum, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
I Post, You Tweet, She Chats. And We All Occupy: Spaces of Struggles and Participation in Occupy Wall
Street
Alice Mattoni, European U Institute, ITALY
Protest Camps as Political Communication
Anna Feigenbaum, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Practices and Protest Camps
Patrick McCurdy, U of Ottawa, UNITED KINGDOM
Multiplatform Communication Strategies and the Occupy Movement
Anastasia Kavada, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Julie Uldam, Copenhagen Business School, UNITED KINGDOM
In 2011, urban protest camps and occupations captured the world’s attention and imagination. From
Tahrir Square to the tent city of Tel Aviv, from the encampments of the Los Indignados in Spain to the
Occupy movement, enduring protests arose to demand democracy and fight austerity measures. This
session seeks to examine some of the forms in which communication took place in these recent and
contemporary expressions of protest camps, and related social movement spaces. The panel will explore
how communication strategies arise and are implemented, and how practices become innovated and
reified in the protesters’ diverse communication spaces, both real and mediated.
7223
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Investigating Ethical Questions
Public Relations
Chair
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Unequal Investors: Questioning the Ethicality of Australia’s Financial Sector
Susan O'Byrne, Bellbird Consulting, AUSTRALIA
Christine Daymon, Murdoch U, AUSTRALIA
Public Relations as a Quest for Justice: Resource Dependency and the Philosophy of David Hume
Charles Marsh, U of Kansas, USA
Challenging Notions of Ethical Responsibility
Johanna Fawkes, Charles Sturt U, AUSTRALIA
Public Relations and Ethics Through Journalists’ Eyes: How the U.S. Journalism Review Movement
Viewed PR
Susan Keith, Rutgers U, USA
Nadia Riley, Rutgers U, USA
7224
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention to Change Institutional Practices
Language & Social Interaction
Participants
Overcoming Barriers to Mediation in Intake Calls to Services: Research-Based Strategies for Mediators
Elizabeth Stokoe, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Turning Practices Into Strategies: Evidence Based Training to Support Helpline Workers in the
Management of Caller Emotion
Alexa Hepburn, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Managing Caller Emotions in Emergency Calls
Tom Koole, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
The Real-Time Use of Medical Telephone Triage
Rebecca Barnes, Bristol U, UNITED KINGDOM
Supporting Adults With Intellectual Impairments: Interactional Challenges for Staff
Charles Antaki, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Challenges by and Challenges for Applied Conversation Analysis: The Example of Making
Recommendations for Communication in UK Jobcentres
Merran Toerien, U of York, UNITED KINGDOM
Conversation Analysis is the study of how social action is brought about through the close organisation of
talk. It can be applied, but the term 'Applied Conversation Analysis' has various shades of meaning. This
panel reports studies in which CA has been applied to practical institutional problems as they play out in
interaction, with the intention of bringing about some sort of change. Although much profitable work
emerged, the engagement with the practitioners was not always trouble-free, and the panelists will explain
some of the difficulties - ethical, legal and scholarly - that beset intervention research.
7225
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
The Uses of Extremism: Race, Muslims, and the Media
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Milly Williamson, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
They Called a War, and Someone Came: The Communicative Politics of Breivik's Hypertext
Gavan Titley, Centre for Media Studies, IRELAND
“Muslim Rage” Redux: U.S. Media Coverage of Anti-American Protests
Deepa Kumar, Rutgers U, USA
Free Speech and Racism: An Analysis of the UK Press
Milly Williamson, Brunel U, UNITED KINGDOM
Racialisation and Radicalisation: Extremism and the Limits of Multiculturalism
Arun Kundnani, New York U, USA
This panel examines the ways in which Muslim identity is constructed as essentially intolerant, extremist
and radical in recent European and US media and policy discussions of multiculturalism, freedom of
expression, and national security. It proposes that formations of anti-Muslim racism rest on a dialectical
exchange between the rightwing extreme and the mainstream of the media and political elites. It further
suggests that these formations of racism feed the notion that multiculturalism is in crisis and limit the
rights and freedoms of Muslim citizens.
7226
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Cultural Labor and Media Work Worlds
Popular Communication
Chair
Anthony Y.H. Fung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Popular Culture as Cultural Industries: Contradictions and Dilemma in China
Anthony Y.H. Fung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Avatar as Second Suit: Power and Participation in Virtual Work
Stina Bengtsson, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Commerce and Creative Agency in Factual Television Production
Anna Zoellner, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Looking Back at the Land: Technology, Work, Morality in Indian Cinema: Top Paper in Pop Comm
Padma Chirumamilla, U of Michigan, USA
"The Reality is Not as it Seems From Turkey”: Imaginations About the Eurovision Song Contest From its
National Production Field
Altug Akin, Izmir U of Economics, TURKEY
7227
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
7228
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Theoretical Explorations in Communication
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
An Aesthetic Approach to the Constitutive Metamodel of Communication
Jher, U of Oregon, USA
Building on a (Mis)understanding: Deleuze and Communication
Alexandre Macmillan, McGill U, CANADA
Culturing Latour: (Re)Constructing Culture in Latour's Actor-Network Theory
Jonathan Scott Brennen, U of North Carolina, USA
The-Interruption-That-We-Are: Acknowledging a Rhetorical Force of Nature
Michael Joseph Hyde, Wake Forest U, USA
Women Journalists in Turbulent Times: The Gendered Impact of Historical Shifts on Newsrooms
Feminist Scholarship
Participants
Overview of Panel
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
The Prevalence of Gender Discrimination and Sexual Harassment of Female Journalists in Lebanon
Jad Melki, American U of Beirut, LEBANON
Technology’s Mixed Blessing for Women Journalists in Nordic Nations
Maria Edstrom, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
The "Feminization" of the Media in Postcommunist Eastern Europe
Diana Iulia Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
South African Women Journalists Exceed Parity in Newsrooms, Now Face Threats to Media Freedom
Margaretha Geertsema-Sligh, Butler U, US
Women journalists are caught in a confluence of local world events that is not of their making but which
shapes their work lives nonetheless. This panel identifies some of these events – what we characterize as
“historical shifts”—and explores how these shifts are affecting women’s occupational status and ability to
do their work as reporters. The scope of concerns for panelists is intentionally broad to enable them to
look within their own nations and regions of Lebanon/Arab states, South Africa/Africa, Sweden/Nordic
Europe, and Romania/Eastern Europe in applying the concept of “historical shifts” to women’s
journalistic practice .
7231
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 1
A European Strategic Research Agenda for the Next Decade (ECREA Sponsored Panel)
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Peter Golding, Northumbria U, UNITED KINGDOM
Slavko Splichal, U of Ljubljana, SLOVENIA
Peter Dahlgren, Lund U, SWEDEN
Claudia Alvares, Lusofona U, PORTUGAL
Colin Sparks, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Hannu Veli Nieminen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Ola Erstad, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Gustavo Cardoso, ISCTE-IUL, PORTUGAL
Johan Fornas, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Charis Xinaris, European U Cyprus, CYPRUS
Given the pervasive presence of media in our daily lives, the important question presents itself as to how
so-called “new” media – and the implications of technological changes for “old” media – affect our lives
and society. In this context, the European Science Foundation (ESF) Media Studies Forward Look has
drawn up a strategic research and science policy agenda for Media Studies for the next 5 to 10 years.
Concrete recommendations for actions, which have been discussed with relevant science policy and
funding organizations, practitioners, technological developers and other stakeholders from across Europe,
will be discussed.
7232
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 2
Communication Policy Making in Political and Historical Perspective
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Manuel Puppis, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Amending Equal Time: Explaining Institutional Change in American Communication Policy
Tim P. Vos, U of Missouri, USA
Seth Ashley, Boise State U, USA
Film Policy and the Construction of a Nation: Regulating the Film Industry in Early Israel
Tamar Ashuri, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Mor Hassid Levi, The Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
The Communication Have-Nots: Understanding Communication Control and "Counterpublics" in
Contemporary China
Jun Liu, Lund U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The “Arab Spring” in North Africa and the Typological Validity of the Gateway Model of Internet
Regulation
Lyombe S. Eko, U of Iowa, USA
7233
Thursday
09:30-10:45
Board Room 3
Exploring the Conceptual Space Between Science Communication and Science Education
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participants
Information Seeking as Public Engagement: Accounting for Individual and Structural Components
Ashley A Anderson, George Mason U, USA
When Can Education on the Nature of Scientific Practice Help Science Communication?
neil stenhouse, George Mason U, USA
Defining Media-Based Knowledge About Science
Megan Anderson, U of Wisconsin, USA
The primary aim of this panel is to address issues of public engagement with science found in the
conceptual space between science communication and science education. In this panel, we address three
issues. These include information seeking, the nature of the media-based knowledge about science, and
the role of the nature of scientific practice. The second goal is to bring these two perspectives together to
reconsider related to public engagement with science according to research on aspects of educational and
communications research.
7305
Selecting and Attending Media
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Julia Metag, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
Automating the News: Understanding How Personalized News System Design Choices Impact News
Reception
Michael A. Beam, Washington State U, USA
How Social Distance Structures Selectivity and Evaluation of Content in Social Media
Solomon Messing, Stanford U, USA
Sean Jeremy Westwood, Stanford U, USA
Making Sense of the News in a Hybrid Regime: How Young Russians Decode State TV and an
Oppositional Blog
Florian Toepfl, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Collective Efficacy and Trusted Information Sources Shape Indians’ Support for Climate Change
Adaptation Policies
Jagadish J Thaker, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Edward Maibach, George Mason U, USA
Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale U, USA
Timothy Gibson, George Mason U, USA
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
7306
Extended Session: The Research Escalator
Thursday
11:00-13:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chairs
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Johny T. Garner, Texas Christian U, USA
Participants
Which Works Better? Global vs. Local CSR: The Role of Message Framing (CLT)
Mi Kyung Park, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Ga In Park, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Assessing the Credibility of Social Media Sources: Strategies From Human Rights Practitioners
Ella Elizabeth McPherson, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED
KINGDOM
“How Do I Participate? Let Me Count the Ways”: Constructing Participation in Local Self-Governance
Institutions
Preeti Mudliar, U of Texas, USA
Interruptions in the Court: Status and Information Control in the Oral Arguments of the Supreme Court
Nicholas Aaron Merola, U of Texas, USA
Vysali Soundararajan, U of Texas, USA
Selling Risky Products “in a Responsible Way:” Tobacco Industry Promotion of Reduced Harm Products
Ganna Yuryivna Kostygina, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Immense Pride and Intense Frustration: Structural Dialectics in Contemporary Military Nursing
Colleen Arendt, Fairfield U, USA
Organizing an Oasis: Using Community-Based Communication Practices to Reorganize a Low-Income
Food Desert
Marianne LeGreco, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Leadership Through Portraiture: An Analysis of Hispanic Leadership, Culture, and Performance
Ariadne Alejandra Gonzalez, Texas A&M U, USA
Performing Digital Careers: Identifying and Assessing Types of Online (Personal) Information
Management
Brenda L. Berkelaar, U of Texas, USA
Which Technological Attribute, Specifically? Experimenting Technological Potentials for Organizing
Collective Action
Young Mie Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Business Talking to Business: Challenging Organizational Communication Research Regarding Businessto-Business Communication
Helena Maria Stehle, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
New Ways of Conceptualizing Communication in Social Movement Networks
Alana Margaret Mann, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
TMS in Action: The Role of Professional Identity in Coordinating Organizational Knowledge Networks
Leonie Houtman, VU U - Brussels, THE NETHERLANDS
Julia Kotlarsky, Aston Business School, UNITED KINGDOM
Bart J. van den Hooff, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Professionalized Volunteering and Volunteers’ Wellbeing
Kirstie Lynd McAllum, IESE Business School, SPAIN
Towards an Integrative Framework for the Analysis of Public Diplomacy: Contributions From Agenda
Setting and Framing
Alice Srugies, Ilmenau U of Technology, GERMANY
Learning in Practice: A Study of Knowledge Development in Multinational Corporations in a Chinese
Context
Juana Juan Du, Polytechnic Institute of New York U, USA
Membership Negotiation in a Results-Only Work Environment: What Might be Different?
Emily M Dahlen, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Acceptance of Mobile Government From a Citizens' Perspective
Jakob Ohme, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
How to Resolve License Fee Conflicts Between Public Broadcasting and Audiences: Application of
Prospect Theory
HyeonJu Jeong, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Inho Park, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Structuration of Advertising Ethics: The Dynamic Relationship Between Leadership and Ethics
Erin Elizabeth Schauster, Bradley U, USA
"Messing Around": Glitches, Workarounds, and Repairs Using Media Technology for Daily Work
Justine Humphry, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Intranet in a University: From the Point of View of Developers and End Users
Tiiu Taur, U of Tartu, ESTONIA
Governance Communication in Russia and in the US: Interdisciplinary Comparative Research via
Discourse Analysis
Yulia Danyushina, U of Management, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Coauthorship Networks and Collaboration Typologies: The Case of CASCON
Zack Hayat, U of Toronto, CANADA
Kelly Lyons, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Constitutive Power of the #hashtag: Strategies and Practices of Identity Reconstruction in Social
Media
Michael Andreas Etter, Center for CSR Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Organizations Facing Systemic Shifts in Sociology
Andrea Pitasi, Gabriele d'Annunzio U, ITALY
Transformative Communication and Cooperation at Work: Toward a Conceptual Framework to Analyze
2.0 Technologies
Tatiana Domingues Aguiar, Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, FRANCE
Doing Understanding in Financial Consultations: Comprehension Checks
Marloes Herijgers, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Transparency and the Organizational Self: Everyday Politics of Identification in Cooperatives
Oana Brindusa Albu, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Online Labor: The Experience of Working Online
Tabitha Hart, San Jose State U, USA
Organizational Communication in Braga 2012 European Youth Capital
Ronaldo Mendes Neves, U do Minho, PORTUGAL
Using State-of-the-Art Qualitative Data Analysis Software NVivo10 in Organizational Communication
Research: Example and Reflections
Florian Kaefer, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Corporate Social Irresponsibility. Who Cares in Lifestyle and Luxury Business?
Stefan Jarolimek, U of Jena, GERMANY
The Communicative Constitution of an IT-Department: The Role of Conversation in Forming an ITDepartment
Therese Eva Maria Hedman Monstad, Uppsala U, SWEDEN
New Ways of Working, Vitality, and Employee Performance: The Role of Self Determination
Claartje L. ter Hoeven, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Frederique Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marieke L. Fransen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondents
Shiv Ganesh, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Sarah E Dempsey, U of North Carolina, USA
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montréal, CANADA
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Linda L. Putnam, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Lars Thoeger Christensen, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Oyvind Ihlen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Gail Fairhurst, U of Cincinnati, USA
Dennis Tourish, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Bart J. van den Hooff, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Joshua B. Barbour, Texas A&M U, USA
Laurie K. Lewis, Rutgers U, USA
George Cheney, Kent State U, USA
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Stacey L. Connaughton, Purdue U, USA
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Marya L. Doerfel, Rutgers U, USA
Patricia Riley, U of Southern California, USA
Jocelyn A. DeAngelis, Western New England U, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
In this extended session, contributing authors have been matched up with mentors--experienced
organizational scholars--to discuss how their papers can be "escalated" to prepare for publication or
conference submission. This session is open to ICA members who are interested in observing the process
by which papers are elaborated, edited, and prepared for publication. They can also join in the discussion
at the end focused on tips for success in publishing.
7307
Comparative Perspectives
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Arjen van Dalen, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Participants
Charismatic Leaders and Mediated Personalization in the International Arena
Meital Balmas, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Explaining European Political Elites’ Perceptions of Mass Media’s Influence on Democracy
Peter Maurer, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Florian Arendt, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Explaining Quality of Government in Europe Using Media Systems Characteristics
Mathias A. Fardigh, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
The Myth of “Voting With Dollars”: A Cross-Polity and Multilevel Analysis of Political Consumerism
Xinzhi Zhang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
7308
News, Reproduced by ICTs
Thursday
11:00-12:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Frequent Contributors in U.S. Newspaper Comment Forums: An Examination of Their Civility and
Informational Value
Robin Blom, Michigan State U, USA
Serena Carpenter, Michigan State U, USA
Brian J. Bowe, Michigan State U, USA
Ryan Lance Lange, Alvernia U, USA
Sharing Good News and Bad News Over Interpersonal Media: Patterns and Effects on Emotional WellBeing
Mina Choi, U of Wisconsin, USA
Catalina Laura Toma, U of Wisconsin, USA
Choose Your Own Exemplar: Exemplification and Risk in Interactive Online News
Bartosz Wojtek Wojdynski, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Temple Northup, U of Houston, USA
News in a Multiscreen World: A Taxonomy of Daily Screen Usage for News and Information
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Eunjin Kim, U of Missouri, USA
Margaret Ellen Duffy, U of Missouri, USA
7309
Contents Diffusion in Online Environments
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Chih-Hui Lai, U of Akron, USA
Participants
Epidemiology of Bieber Fever: GLEaMviz Simulation of Viral Video Diffusion
Sonny Rosenthal, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Malin Björnsdotter, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Entertaining Videos Go Viral: How Hedonic and Eudaimonic Aspects of Entertainment Affect Sharing of
Online Videos
Leonie Roesner, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Philipp Kulms, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
German Neubaum, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Elisa Wegmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Self-Determination and Long-Term Participation in Peer-Production Communities
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Cliff Lampe, U of Michigan, USA
Youyang Hou, U of Michigan, USA
Innovation Diffusion, Social Media, and the Simplicial Model of Social Aggregation: Computational
Simulation of Cluster Traversers for Community Health Interventions
Kerk F. Kee, Chapman U, USA
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California - Irvine, USA
Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman U, USA
Mirco Mannucci, George Mason U, USA
Alberto Damiano, Deledda International School, ITALY
7311
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Waterloo/Tower
Interpersonal Communication Issues Across Varied Health Contexts
Health Communication
Chair
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Participants
The Effects of Frequency, Valence, Partner, and Topic of Interpersonal Communication on Smoking
Cessation
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gert-Jan de Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Use of Modern Contraceptive Methods in Uttar Pradesh, India: The Role of Normative Influences and
Interpersonal Communication
Rajiv N. Rimal, George Washington U, USA
Pooja Sripad, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Ilene S Speizer, U of North Carolina, USA
Lisa Calhoun, U of North Carolina, USA
Nilesh Chatterjee, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Sanjanthi Velu, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Sukhpal Marwa, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Basil Safi, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Priya Nanda, ICRW, INDIA
Nursing the Identity: Mediating Roles of Learned Helplessness and Interaction Involvement in Predicting
Willingness to Confront Conflict and Turnover
Jennifer J. Moreland, The College of Wooster, USA
Digital House Calls: Health Care Professionals, Interest and Motivation for Online Media Interaction
Clay Craig, Texas Tech U, USA
Brittany Campbell, Texas Tech U, USA
Danette Baker, Texas Tech U, USA
Shannon Bichard, Texas Tech U, USA
7312
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Communication Challenges Involving Health Care Providers
Health Communication
Chair
Muriel E. Scott, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Participants
Nurses’ Perceptions of Conflict as Constructive or Destructive
Wonsun Kim, George Mason U, USA
Mollie Rose Canzona, George Mason U, USA
“Pain is What the Patient Says it is”: Nurse-Patient Communication, Information Seeking, and Pain
Management
Laura Elizabeth Miller, U of Tennessee, USA
Elizabeth Dortch Dalton, U of Tennessee, USA
Scott Eldredge, U of Tennessee, USA
Patient Preferences for Discussing Sexual Health With Physicians
Deya Roy, U of Connecticut, USA
Lance S. Rintamaki, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Narratives Featuring Dr. Horror and Dr. Nice: A Study of Status and Affect in Online Talk About Migrant
Physicians
Anna Camilla Haavisto, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
7313
Third Person Effects (Session Begins With a TOP Faculty Paper)
Thursday
11:00-12:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Theodore L. Glasser, Stanford U, USA
Participants
Media Use and Political Participation Reconsidered: The Actual and Perceived Influence of Political
Campaign Messages
Sue-Jen Lin, I-Shou U, TAIWAN
A Social Judgmental Model of the Third-Person Perception Hypothesis: Focusing on the Effect of PreExisting Attitudes, the Level of Knowledge, and Message Strength on Judgments on Media Impact
Sungeun Chung, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Wonji Lee, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jungwon Kwak, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Third-Person Effect of Rumors: Panic Purchase of Salt in China After Japan “3.11” Earthquake
Miao Li, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
“Biased” Media With “Discrepant” Effects: Mediated Sociotropic Perceptions and Political Participatory
Behaviors
Ye Sun, U of Utah, USA
Hyunseo Hwang, U of California - Davis, USA
7314
News Sources and News Values: Interrogating the Epistemologies of Journalism
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Helle Sjovaag, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Participants
How Journalists "Realize" Facts: Epistemology in Practice at Press Conferences
Yigal Godler, Ben Gurion U, ISRAEL
Zvi Reich, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Definitional Sources of Journalists in the United States (Top Three Student Paper)
Wendy Marie Weinhold, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Finding the Man on the Street: Challenges to the Use of Experiential Knowledge in News
Katherine Fink, Columbia U, USA
Mind the Gap. Consequences of Interrole Conflicts of Freelance Journalists With Secondary Employment
in the Field of PR
Magdalena Obermaier, U of Munich, GERMANY
Thomas Koch, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
News Values in Organizational Contexts and in the Journalistic News Selection Process
Ines Engelmann, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
7316
Innovations and Struggles for African and Middle Eastern Journalism
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
Beyond the Prison Cell: Comprehensive Study of Iranian Journalists Working in Iran
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Briar Smith, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Debating Darija: Telquel and Language Politics in Modern Morocco
Annemarie Iddins, U of Michigan, USA
Deconstructing the Community Radio Model: Applying Practice to Theory in East Africa
David Conrad, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Competing Loyalties: Journalism Culture in the Ethiopian State Media
Terje Steinulfsson Skjerdal, NLA U College, NORWAY
Print Journalism in Sudan After Separation: Writing Despite Official Constraints
Anke Fiedler, U of Munich, GERMANY
7317
Advertising Research
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Jorg Matthes, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Participants
Causes and Consequences of Trust in Direct-to-Consumer Pharmaceutical Advertising
Jennifer Gerard Ball, U of Minnesota, USA
Danae Manika, Queen Mary, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Patricia A. Stout, U of Texas, USA
Effect of Risk Disclosures on DTC Ads: The Role of Involvement and Need-for-Cognition
Ignatius Fosu, U of Arkansas, USA
Effects of Mental Imagery on Responses of Listeners to Advertisements on Commercial Radio
Anu Sachdev, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Anjali Capila, Delhi U, INDIA
Measuring Audience Perceptions of Prime-Time Television Commercials: An Update
Yunjae Cheong, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Federico de Gregorio, U of Akron, USA
Kihan Kim, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
7318
Guys Walk Into a Bar and Talk Theory
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Three Guys Walk Into a Bar: An Information Theoretic Analysis
W. Russell Neuman, U of Michigan, USA
Assessing Story Appraisal Theory: From Appraisal Dimensions to Implications and Impact
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
Yerheen Ha, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Dynamic Human-Centered Communication Systems Theory
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
How Deeply Do We Process Online Recommendations? Heuristic vs. Systematic Processing of Authority
and Bandwagon Cues
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U and Sungkyunkwan U, USA
Qian Xu, Elon U, USA
Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Northwestern U, USA
7321
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Meanings of “Audiences”: Western and Non-Western Discourses
Popular Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Chairs
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Richard Butsch, Rider U, USA
Participants
Politics, Religion, and Markets as Markers of Contemporary Discourses on Arab Audiences
Joe F. Khalil, Northwestern U in Qatar, USA
Shoppers and Dupes: The Television Audience in Contemporary Russian Discourses
Sudha Rajagopalan, U of Utrecht, THE NETHERLANDS
Super Fans, Citizens, or Kids: An Examination of the Discourses About Audience in Mainland China
Jingsi Christina Wu, Hofstra U, USA
Between Unruliness and Sociality: Discourses on Diasporic Cinema Audiences for Turkish and Indian
Films
Kevin Smets, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Iris Vandevelde, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Philippe Meers, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Roel Vande Winkel, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Sofie Van Bauwel, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Producing Loyal Citizens and Entertaining Volatile Subjects: Imagining Audience Agency in Colonial
Rhodesia and Postcolonial Zimbabwe
Wendy Willems, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel will present selected contrasting analyses from distinct cultures to reflect upon these questions
in an effort to understand how and when talk about audiences matters. It is based on a project, and an
edited book in progress (to appear with Routledge under the same title as the panel). This encompasses
diverse cultures and historical time periods in order to trace the trajectories and contexts that have shaped
the meanings of audiences in Western and, a particular contribution, Non-Western discourses.
7322
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Audiences in the Face of Distant Suffering: New Challenges for Old Idea(l)s?
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
"The Deserving Victim": Public Responses to Humanitarian Communication in the UK
Irene Bruna Seu, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Shani Orgad, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Mastoureh Fathi, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
"It's All False to Me": The Role of Celebrities in Mediating Distant Others
Martin Scott, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Domesticating Distant Suffering: How Do News Media Discursively Invite the Audience to Care?
Stijn Joye, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Facing the Mediated Pain of Others: New Directions for the Empirical Study of Audiences of Distant
Suffering
Johannes von Engelhardt, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Lilie Chouliaraki, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
An emerging field within humanities and social sciences concerns itself with the issue of distant suffering.
Also within communication and media studies, an increasing number of scholars have contributed to a
rich and diverse body of work on public perceptions of mediated, distant suffering and its socio-political
significance. However, this mostly theoretical literature has not yet been matched with substantial
empirical efforts. In particular, there is a striking scarcity of empirical studies of audiences’ reactions to
and interpretations of mediated suffering (Höijer, 2004; Wilkinson, 2005; Ong, 2009). Cottle (2009)
further refers to the need for closer empirical engagement with this field, refined concepts and further
analytical distinctions. This panel answers some of these calls by presenting ongoing research and
simultaneously setting out future research agendas.
7323
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Outcomes of Public Relations Efforts
Public Relations
Chair
Ian Somerville, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Attribution of Corporate Hypocrisy in Corporate Social Responsibility Perceptions: The Effect of Bad
Reputation and Responsiveness to Crisis
KyuJin Shim, Syracuse U, USA
Sung-Un Yang, Indiana U, USA
I’m Connected, Thus Powerful: Influence of SNS Use on Consumer Activism
Jounghwa Choi, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Playing to Publics: The Role of the Media and Public Relations in Negotiating Public Policy
Kenneth Dean Plowman, Brigham Young U, USA
Susan L. Walton, U of North Dakota, USA
The Role of Government Communication in the Reputation of a City: Communicating Spanish Local
Governments
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Karen Sanders, CEU San Pablo U, SPAIN
7324
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Excess or Moderation? From Internet Use to Media Influence on Nutrition, Food Choice, and
Perceptions of Appearance
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Parent TV Viewing Predicts Energy-Dense Food Choices in Preschoolers’ Pretend Healthy Meals
Kristen Harrison, U of Michigan, USA
Mericarmen Peralta, U of Michigan, USA
The Effect of Social Network Sites on Adolescents’ Appearance Investment and Desire for Cosmetic
Surgery
Dian de Vries, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Nikken, Netherlands Youth Institute/Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hanneke de Graaf, Rutgers WPF, THE NETHERLANDS
The Multifaceted Nature of Television Viewing Effects on Obesity: A National Multilevel Study
Leslie Snyder, U of Connecticut, USA
Tao Ma, U of Connecticut, USA
The Effect of Playing Advergames on Actual Food Intake Among Children
Frans Folkvord, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Using Psychological and Digital Inclusion Frameworks to Explain Excessive Internet Use by Young
Europeans
Ellen Johanna Helsper, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
David Smahel, Masaryk U, CZECH REPUBLIC
Respondent
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7325
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Contested Content: Mediated Spaces, Cultural Spheres, and Neoliberal Discourse
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Christopher Harris, Nevada State College, USA
Participants
Pimps, Pushers, and Predators: Neoliberal Discourse in Rap Lyrics, 1994-2004
Christopher Harris, Nevada State College, USA
Sebern Coleman, Nevada State College, USA
Krumpin' in North Hollywood: The Ecology of Street Dance and the Production of Space
Robeson Taj Frazier, U of Southern California, USA
Mediated Place-Making: Implicating News Media as Dominant Definers of Geography
Robert Gutsche Jr, Florida International U, USA
Cities of Illusion: Las Vegas, Miami, and Urban Environments of Mediated Neoliberalism
Moses A Shumow, Florida International U, USA
Christopher Harris, Nevada State College, USA
Redeeming White Heroes, Neoliberalism, and Black Martyrs in Changing Lanes
Michael G. Lacy, DePaul U, USA
Over the course of the last three decades neoliberalism, with its focus on deregulation, free markets,
hyper-consumerism, and the conflation of capitalism and democracy, has successfully entrenched itself as
the most dominant socio-political discourse of the Global North. Throughout this progression proponents
of this discourse have employed a range of strategies—including brutal state-sanctioned repression,
geographic displacement, economic coercion, and cultural co-optation—to quell resistance and push
forward their agendas. This panel seeks to illuminate some of the ways that neoliberal discourse flows
through the mediated spaces and cultural spheres of subordinated groups. By interrogating rap lyrics,
tourist city residents, grass roots multimedia storytelling, and street-dance contributing scholars endeavor
to add to deeper understandings of the imposition of and resistance to neoliberal ideals amongst urban
youth.
7326
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
New Questions of Audiences, Publics, and Participants
Popular Communication
Chair
Adrienne Shaw, Temple U, USA
Participants
Representation Matters (?): When, How and if Media Representation Matters to Marginalized Game
Audiences
Adrienne Shaw, Temple U, USA
Speaking of the Unspeakable? Reflections on Unacknowledged Dimensions of Media Experiences
Brita Ytre-Arne, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Forty is the New 65? "Older Adults" as Niche Market in the Online Dating Industry
Derek Blackwell, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Understanding Arab Blogospheres: Counterpublics or Enacting Cultural Citizenship?
Kristina Maj Riegert, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
TV Bullying as Viewed by “Gleeks”: An Exploratory Analysis of Fan Forum Posts
Kimberly R. Walsh, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
7327
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Witnessing Pain and Loss
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
Being-With a Loss: Aphasic Affects in Contemporary Installation Arts
Megan Patricia Toye, McGill U, CANADA
Testimony and the Failure of Communication
Sandra Ristovska, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Art of Self-Concretization in the Space of Appearance: The Self-Immolation of Chun Tae-il
Young Cheon Cho, California State U, Chico, USA
The Construction of Grievable Death
Tal Morse, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
7328
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Gender, Politics, and Social Media
Feminist Scholarship
Participants
Off Your Face(book): Gender, Politics, and Social Media
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Margie Comrie, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Susan Fountaine, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Twittering Women or Tweeting Candidates? The Case of the U.S. Presidential Election 2012
Valentina Cardo, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Slutwalk and Social Media
Kaitlynn D Mendes, De Montfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
Protesting Online and on the Street: A Study of Protest Against Religious Harassment of Women and
Girls in a Small Israeli Town
Keren Natalie Darmon, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel this seeks to address some of the gaps in the existing literature relating to the changes in
political communication brought about by social media. The first is the gender gap: to assume that
political women and men (both elected officials and activists) occupy equal positions in society, and that
any differences between them are due to personal, individual even biological characteristics, ignores
structural social, political and cultural processes. The second is the political representation gap: research
on women’s presence in the political sphere shows that women often adopt a different communicative
style from men. They are less argumentative and competitive, more consensual and cooperative. The third
gap is in the lack of international comparisons: Communication styles differ across polities, cultures and
communication environments.
7331
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Board Room 1
IAMCR Special Session: Crises, "Creative Destruction," and the Global Power and
Communication Orders
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Janet Wasko, International Association for Media and Communication Research, USA
Participants
How the Economic Crisis and "Creative Destruction" Matter for Communication Studies
Paschal Preston, Dublin Institute of Technology, IRELAND
The Governance of Communicative Spaces in Crisis: Systemic Failure and the Limits of "Creative
Destruction"
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
New Media, Different Actors, and Alternative Challenges: Egypt’s Dilemma Between Social Movements,
Religious Fascism and Socialist Anarchists
Ibrahim Mostafa Saleh, International Association for Media and Communication Research, USA
The Economical Crisis Management and Political Communication: Sarkozy and Hollande, Two Opposite
Ways of Government Communication Management?
Philippe J. Maarek, U of Paris - Est Créteil, FRANCE
Eyes in the Future With Hands in the Past: When Emerging Movements Rediscover the Meaning of
Public
Adilson Vaz Cabral Filho, Fluminense Federal U, BRAZIL
The panel will focus on the conference theme for IAMCR's 2013 conference in Dublin, Ireland. The
theme centres on whether and how the current economic crisis and its attendant gales of "creative
destruction" may serve to reshape the geo-political and communication orders. The panel will feature
several presentations that will address this theme.
7333
Thursday
11:00-12:15
Board Room 3
Analyzing and Addressing Student Apprehension Across Multiple Contexts
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Sara LaBelle, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
Are International Students Quiet in Class? The Influence of Teacher Confirmation and Classroom
Connectedness on Classroom Apprehension and Willingness to Talk Among International Students
I-Ting Huang, Yao Han Taiwan, TAIWAN
Chai-Fang Hsu, U of Wyoming, USA
Effects of Imagined Interactions and Rehearsal on Speaking Performance
Charles W. Choi, George Fox U, USA
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Graham Douglas Bodie, Louisiana State U, USA
Relationship Between Math Apprehension and Curricular Choices of Public Relations Students: An
Experiment
Alexander V Laskin, Quinnipiac U, USA
Hilary Fussell Sisco, Quinnipiac U, USA
7405
Media-Politics Interactions and Interdependencies
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Peter Van Aelst, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Participants
Media-Politics Interaction in Times of Economic Crisis: A Comparative Study of Spain and the
Netherlands
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Noemi Mena, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
The Canadian Parliamentary Press Gallery: Still Relevant or Relic of Another Time?
Daniel Pare, U of Ottawa, CANADA
Tweeting Conventions: Political Journalists’ Use of Twitter to Cover the 2012 Presidential Campaign
Regina G. Lawrence, U of Texas, USA
Logan Molyneux, U of Texas, USA
Mark Coddington, U of Texas, USA
Avery E. Holton, U of Texas, USA
Which Politicians Pass Media Gates and Why? A Preliminary Model and Review of Previous Studies
Debby Vos, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Cooperativeness or Adversarialness? Politics and the Watchdog Function in Key Moments of News
Production
Goran Eriksson, Örebro U, SWEDEN
Johan Östman, Örebro U, SWEDEN
7407
Partisan Selectivity and Opinion Polarization
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Lilach Nir, Hebrew U / U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Loud and Clear: Effects of Homogenous and Extreme Partisan Media Diets
Douglas Allen, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Devra C. Moehler, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Elizabeth Roodhouse, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Misperceptions in Polarized Politics: The Role of Knowledge, Religiosity, and Media
Michael Cacciatore, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Sara Yeo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
Doo-Hun Choi, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin, USA
Elizabeth A. Corley, Arizona State U, USA
Partisan News Media and Opinion Polarization: A Self-Categorization Theory Approach
Jiyoung Han, U of Minnesota, USA
Daniel B. Wackman, U of Minnesota, USA
The Extremists Across the Aisle: Selective Exposure and Evaluations of Presidential Candidate Extremity
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
7408
Positive and Negative Psychological Consequences of Information Technologies
Thursday
12:30-13:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Daniela M. Schluetz, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Participants
Towards a Working Definition of Social Network Fatigue
Thara Ravindran, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Alton Y.K Chua, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dion Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Smartphone as Daily Hassle: Exploring Communication Workers‘ Stress Experience and Coping
Strategies
Daniela M. Schluetz, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Friederike Mohr, Markenberatung, Munich, GERMANY
Christoph Klimmt, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Facebook Comparisons Among Adolescents: How do Identification and Contrast Relate to Social
Wellbeing?
Seok Kang, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
Wonjun Chung, U of Louisiana - Lafayette, USA
Adolfo Mora, U of Texas, USA
Mobile Phone Use, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being
Cynthia A. Hoffner, Georgia State U, USA
Sangmi Lee, Georgia State U, USA
7409
Nonverbal Cues Exchanges in Online Communications
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
L.Crystal Jiang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
The Waiting Game: Manipulating Response Time as a Form of Self-Presentation in CMC
Rebecca Gray, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, School of Information, USA
Explaining Online Self-Influence: Exploring the Effects of Computer-Mediation on Attitude Change
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
Ted Dickinson, Ohio State U, USA
Erin M. Schumaker, Ohio State U, USA
David C DeAndrea, Ohio State U, USA
Automatic Detection of Nonverbal Behavior Predicts Learning in Dyadic Interactions
Andrea Stevenson Won, Stanford U, USA
Le Yu, Stanford U, USA
Joris H. Janssen, Phillips Research, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
The Ubiquity and Influence of CMC Cues in Social Networking Sites
Yoram M. Kalman, Open U of Israel, ISRAEL
Darren R. Gergle, Northwestern U, USA
7411
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Waterloo/Tower
7412
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Effective Health and Safety Messages: Overcoming Processing and Dissemination Challenges
Health Communication
Participants
Self-Bolstering and Self-Motivating Through Selective Exposure to Online Health Messages
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Benjamin K. Johnson, Ohio State U, USA
Axel Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Individual and Social Determinants of Obesity in Strategic Health Messages: Interaction With Political
Ideology
Rachel Young, U of Iowa, USA
Amanda Hinnant, U of Missouri, USA
Glenn M. Leshner, U of Missouri, USA
Alpha Strategies for Persuasive Health Messages: The Interplay Between Source Credibility Perceptions
and Psychological Reactance
Hyunmin Lee, Saint Louis U, USA
Translating a Health Communication Sun Safety Program to Ski and Snowboard Schools Throughout
North America
Barbara J. Walkosz, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Peter A. Andersen, San Diego State U, USA
Michael D. Scott, Mikonics, USA
Xia Liu, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Gary Cutter, U of Alabama, USA
Mark Dignan, U of Kentucky, USA
Topics in Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Participants
Development and Validation of the Employee “Voice” Strategy Scale
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Parental Patterns of Cooperation in Parent-Child Interactions: The Relationship Between Nonverbal and
Verbal Communication
Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem / Ono Academic Colledge, ISRAEL
The Role of Family Communication on Emotion Coaching and Children's Emotion Regulation Capacity
Sung Jin Ryu, Daegu U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Understanding Immediate Behaviors Through Meta-Analyses: Immediate Behaviors as Related to SelfDisclosure and Liking
Stephanie Kelly, North Carolina A&T State U, USA
Michael R. Kotowski, U of Tennessee, USA
7413
News Audiences and Public Opinion (Session Begins with a TOP Faculty Paper)
Thursday
12:30-13:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Journalism Studies
Chair
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Would Habermas Enjoy The Daily Show? Entertainment Media and the Normative Presuppositions of the
Public Sphere
Udo Göttlich, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Martin Rolf Herbers, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Is Laughter the Best Medicine for Public Opinion?
Elise M. Stevens, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Ashley Han, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Examining Differential Gains From Political News on Mass Media in Nondemocratic Context: A Survey
Study From China
Tianjiao Wang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Web Metrics as Heuristics? How Online News Audiences Prioritize Economic and Cultural Capital When
Choosing Which News Stories to Read
Edson Jr. Castro Tandoc, U of Missouri, USA
7414
Challenging News Storytelling: Network Architectures, Mediality, and the Emotional Life of News
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Participants
Affective News and Electronic Elsewheres
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
The Emotional Architecture of Social Media: The Case of the Facebook "Like" Button
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Rewiring Journalism: The New Literacies of Networked Communication Architectures
Alfred Hermida, U of British Columbia, CANADA
Network Architectures, Storytelling and Polymedia Events
Maria Mirca Madianou, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Adrienne Russell, U of Denver, USA
The explosion of spreadable, social media platforms is transforming existing ecologies of journalism and
challenging traditional forms of news storytelling. Recent studies have observed how Twitter and other
social networking sites have emerged as alternative, and in some cases, primary channels for information.
Twitter in particular has received much attention as a news sharing mechanism during natural disasters
and as the platform of choice for social movements. This panel brings together papers which assess the
consequences of network architectures – for example, the design and software of social media – for
storytelling and for users’ emotional engagement.
7416
Transnational Advocacy, Global Journalism, and the International Public Sphere: Opportunities,
Challenges, and Transformations
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
Participants
Transnational Environmental NGOs in China: New Journalistic Spaces
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
Networks of Coproduction: How Mainstream NGOs and Journalists Create Common Interpretations of
the UN Climate Summits
Hartmut Wessler, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Julia Lueck, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Antal Wozniak, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Charlotte Loeb, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Do Transnational Advocacy Groups Remedy, or Reinforce, Global Attention Inequalities? The Case of
Humanitarian and Human Rights News
Matthew Powers, New York U, USA
Reporting Africa: When, Wow and Why Journalists Use NGO-Provided Photos and Audio-Visual
Materials
Kate Wright, Roehampton, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel examines the changing nature of contemporary global news and the role transnational
advocacy groups play in this transformation. As legacy news outlets slash foreign news budgets, scholars
have discussed advocacy groups as sources of both promise and caution with respect to the future of
global news. To optimists, such groups provide original, insightful reporting from neglected areas of the
world and help thematize issues for public deliberation and political action. To skeptics, the influence of
advocacy groups augurs a worrisome conflation of the lines between advocacy and journalism, with
deleterious consequences befalling both parties. This panel of international scholars offers empirical and
analytical clarity to these important normative concerns.
7417
Keeping Us Engaged: News Media's Role in Elections and Participation
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
An Ecological View of Multiplex Local News Consumption and Community Integration
Chih-Hui Lai, U of Akron, USA
Attack or Substance? Different Types of Conflict in the News and Their Effect on Citizen Engagement
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Media and Economic Voting in 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: Beyond Sociotropic and Egotropic
Dichotomies
Hyunjin Song, Ohio State U, USA
Moral Foundations in News: A Content Analysis of Government-Controlled Versus Market-Appeal
Newspapers in China
Lu Wang, Michigan State U, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Sujay Prabhu, Michigan State U, USA
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Red Media, Blue Media, and Purple Media: News Patterns in the Colorful Media Landscape
Stephanie Edgerly, Northwestern U, USA
7418
Social Media, Politics, and Promotion
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
7421
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Participants
Effects of Structural Features in Text Messages on Voters: Formality and Interactivity on Perceived Image
and Voting Intent
Byungho Park, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Moon Young Kang, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jiwon Lee, L’Oreal, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
When Less Means More: An Experimental Comparison of TV and Twitter as Political Campaign Tools
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Soo Yun Shin, Michigan State U, USA
The Moderating Effects of Motivational Reactivity and Implicit Bias on Processing Antialcohol Tweets
by White and Native American Protagonists
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Saleem Elias Alhabash, Michigan State U, USA
Jing Yang, Michigan State U, USA
Sookyong Kim, Michigan State U, USA
The Context is the Message. Social Influence of User-Generated Content on Online Advertising Effects
Johannes Knoll, Wuerzburg U, GERMANY
How Influential Consumers’ Characteristics, Motivations, and Product Type Interact to Predict BrandRelated User-Generated Content on Social Media
Daniel G. Muntinga, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marjolein Moorman, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Perceptions of Media as a Mood Management Tool: A Cross Medium Comparison of Intervention
Potential
John J. Davies, Brigham Young U, USA
“Understand a Fury in Your Words”: The Effects of Posting and Viewing Negative Online Word-ofMouth on Consumers’ Purchase Behaviors
Su Jung Kim, Northwestern U, USA
Rebecca Jen-Hui Wang, Northwestern U, USA
Edward Malthouse, Northwestern U, USA
Texting Among the Bottom of the Pyramid: Enabling Factors and Demographic Effects on SMS Use
Among Low-Income Mobile Users in Asia
Juhee Kang, Michigan State U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Maity Moutusy, Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, INDIA
Constantinos Coursaris, Michigan State U, USA
Media Policy and Popular Culture
Popular Communication
Participants
Graffiti, Media, and Cultural Policy: Beirut as a Contested “Creative City”
Marwan M. Kraidy, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Communicating Copyright: Media Policy and Everyday Life
Bethany Klein, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Control Over Personal Information in the Digital Era
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
When Media Policy Hits the Streets
Des Freedman, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Media policy is a current that runs through popular culture production, distribution and consumption, yet
it remains rarely confronted directly and explicitly by popular media users and popular communication
scholarship. Media policy can influence the shape of popular culture and the ways in which it is
distributed; it can alternately condemn user-created popular culture as illicit or exalt it as art; and it can
itself become the focus of popular media and everyday conversation. This panel explores various
intersections of media policy and popular culture through a range of international examples, with the goal
of fixing the spotlight on policy’s role in the popular.
7422
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Beyond WikiLeaks: Implications for the Future of Communications, Journalism, and Society
Global Communication and Social Change
Communication and Technology
Chair
John Downing, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Participants
Following the Money: WikiLeaks and the Political Economy of Disclosure
Benedetta Brevini, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Graham Murdock, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Leak Heard Around the World? Cablegate in the Evolving Global Mediascape
Lisa Lynch, Concordia U, CANADA
WikiLeaks and Whistleblowing: The Framing of Bradley Manning
Einar Thorsen, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Chindu Sreedharan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
From the Pentagon Papers to Cablegate: How the Network Society Has Changed Leaking
Patrick McCurdy, U of Ottawa, UNITED KINGDOM
Dimensions of Modern Freedom of Expression: WikiLeaks, Policy Hacking, and Digital Freedoms
Arne Hintz, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
WikiLeaks, Anonymous, and the Exercise of Individuality: Protesting in the Cloud
Stefania Milan, Tilburg U, CANADA
Respondents
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Marc Raboy, McGill U, CANADA
The presentations will discuss a variety of issues, from changes in journalism to new developments in
online activism, from questions of political economy to trends in policy, and from the representation of
whistleblowing to its social and political effects around the globe. In six brief presentations, followed by
comments from two renowned respondents, they will inquire about the challenges to freedom of
expression in the digital age, the roles of journalism and whistleblowing in a changing media ecology, and
the new forms of engagement, organizational models, and repertoires of action of online activism. The
rise and legacy of WikiLeaks will serve as a lens through which to try and understand the significant
changes which we can witness in the increasingly networked field of media and communication. This
panel will present findings from an edited volume on the subject which will be published by Palgrave in
2013. It will bring together several of the authors and editors for a roundtable discussion on the social,
political and communicative transformations in the wake of WikiLeaks.
7423
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Social Capital in Public Relations
Public Relations
Chair
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Maryland, USA
Participants
Public Relations in Advocacy: Building Online Influence and Social Capital
Adam J. Saffer, U of Oklahoma, USA
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Aimei Yang, U of Dayton, USA
The Challenge of Social Capital: Public Relations in the Public Sphere, Civil Society, and Democracy
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Maryland, USA
The Relationship Between the Professionalization of Public Relations and Societal Social Capital:
Evidence From a Cross-National Study
Aimei Yang, U of Dayton, USA
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Corporations' Involvement in Societal Debates: Towards Postreflective Organizations
Trine Susanne Johansen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
7424
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Youth in Formation: Digital Literacy and Knowledge Building for Today’s Teenagers
Children Adolescents and Media
Chairs
Urs Gasser, Harvard U, USA
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Youth and Information Quality: How Young People Search, Evaluate, Share, and Create Information
Online
Urs Gasser, Harvard U, USA
Sandra Cortesi, Harvard U, USA
Youth and Online News: The Battle for Control
Nathan Stolero, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Too Much of a Good Thing? Technostress and Information Overload Among Young Swiss
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Giulia Ranzini, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Christoph Lutz, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Parental Mediation and Adolescents’ Social Media Use: Assessing Beneficial Parental Strategies Among
Young Italians
Marina Micheli, U of Milano-Bicocca, ITALY
Marco Gui, U of Milano-Bicocca, ITALY
Giovanna Mascheroni, U Cattolica of Milano, ITALY
Through this panel, we aim at exploring how teenagers relate to information on the Internet, focusing in
particular on the processes beyond the search for data and news, as well as on the perception of what
elements constitute reliable, or even interesting, information online. Basing ourselves on the
connectedness that Social Media establish, both online and in the “real world”, we will also consider
elements of information overload, and the role of families in the establishment of a healthy relationship
with living and interacting online. The exposure of today’s youth to different formats through which
information is circulated, and knowledge is built (e.g. Youtube) makes for an interesting case regarding
what could constitute the education of tomorrow. We aim at exploring this possibility through both
qualitative and quantitative approaches, and based on a selection of papers from four different countries,
providing a broad overview of the subject.
7425
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Looking at the "Other"
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Aymar Jean Christian, Northwestern U, USA
Participants
How Many More Indians? An Argument for a Representational Ethics of Native Americans
Debra L. Merskin, U of Oregon, USA
Just Another Gypsy Dancer, Just Another Refugee: Constructions of Gypsies in Musical and World
Publications
Adina Schneeweis, Oakland U, USA
Poststructural Intersectionality and the Four-Woman Comedy Ensemble
Mary Elizabeth Durden, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Model Minority in the Zombie Apocalypse: Asian American Manhood on AMC’s The Walking Dead
Helen Ho, Saint Mary's College, USA
Unveiling Obsessions: Muslims and the Trap of Representation
Nabil Echchaibi, U of Colorado, USA
The Influence of Virtual Perspective Taking on Attitudes Toward Mexican Immigrants in the United
States
Scott Parrott, U of Alabama/U of North Carolina, USA
Temple Northup, U of Houston, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
Coverage of the Kyrgyz-Uzbek Ethnic Conflict of 2010 in Selected American Newspapers
Sagar Rajendra Atre, Ohio U, USA
Naubet Bisenov, Ohio U, USA
7426
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
News Framing Processes in Global Context
Global Communication and Social Change
Journalism Studies
Chair
Cherian George, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Framing the Jos Crisis in Nigeria: A Comparative Analysis of the Punch, the Guardian, and Thisday
Ngozi Agwaziam, Southern Illinois U, USA
Li Zeng, Arkansas State U, USA
Zhiwen Xiao, U of Houston, USA
Journalism and the Politics of Hate: Charting Ethical Responses to Religious Intolerance
Cherian George, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Remembering Tiananmen and Berlin Wall: the Elite U.S. Press's Anniversary Journalism, 1990-2009
Chin-Chuan Lee, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Hongtao Li, Zhejiang U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Seeing Europe From the Outside in: The Al Jazeera English Series Surprising Europe
Alexa Robertson, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
7427
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Media and Social Protest Movements
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
"The Story is Us, the Media Are Us": Occupy in the European Periphery
Anne Kaun, Sodertorn U College, SWEDEN
Challenging Idealism: A Materialist Critique of (New) Social Movements
Marco Briziarelli, U of New Mexico, USA
Susana Martinez Guillem, U of New Mexico, USA
Media and the Politics of the Earth
Patrick D. Murphy, Temple U, USA
The UN Climate Conferences and the Fantasy of the Postpolitical: Online Media and Protest Tactics
Julie Uldam, Copenhagen Business School, UNITED KINGDOM
7428
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Uses of the Past, Memories of the Future
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Sandra Ristovska, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Private Pasts and Future Publics: Mobilizing Histories Through Amateur Media
Daniel J. Mauro, U of Texas, USA
Redistricting the Face of America
Catherine L. Preston, U of Kansas, USA
Memories of Displacement and Diasporic Korean Women’s Documentaries
So Huyn Lee, Dongguk U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Roma Visuals Between the Symbolic and the Particular
Sandra Ristovska, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The past three decades have witnessed proliferating discussions about memory in the academy that
oscillate between two conceptual extremes—the disappearance of memory and the overabundance of
memory. The papers show how discussions of visual memories are interwoven in discussions of cultural
practice—of the ways in which images are made, preserved, presented, recycled, legitimized, challenged,
remembered and forgotten. Following Barbie Zelizer’s contribution to visual communication and
collective remembering, the panelists scrutinize the relationship between the material and discursive
dimensions of images and the inextricable link between “visual memories and a culture’s socially,
politically and economically mandated and sanctioned modes of interpretation.”
7431
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Board Room 1
2013 Steve Jones Internet Research Lecture
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Steven Jones, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
See ad on page XXX for details.
7432
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Board Room 2
Feminist Media Studies Editorial Board Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Lisa M. McLaughlin, Miami U, USA
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
Kumi Silva, Northeastern U, USA
Kaitlynn D Mendes, De Montfort U, UNITED KINGDOM
Alison C.M. Beale, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Monika Anna Lena Djerf-Pierre, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Kirsten Drotner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Meenakshi Gigi Durham, U of Iowa, USA
Romy Froehlich, U of Munich, GERMANY
Rosalind Gill, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
Isabel Molina-Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
Lisa Henderson, U of Massachusetts, USA
Dafna Lemish, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Toby Miller, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Andrea Lee Press, U of Virginia, USA
Jane Rhodes, Macalester College, USA
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Katherine Sender, U of Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Leslie Regan Shade, U of Toronto, CANADA
Linda C. Steiner, U of Maryland, USA
Celia Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
7433
Thursday
12:30-13:45
Board Room 3
Let's Talk About It: Learning From Assessment
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Deanna Dee Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Assessing the Assessors: JMC Administrators Critique the Nine ACEJMC Standards
Scott Reinardy, U of Kansas, USA
Jerry Crawford, U of Kansas, USA
Challenging Research on Classroom Communication: The Relevance of Dialogue and Practical
Theorizing
Heidi Lynn Muller, U of Northern Colorado, USA
Department Dialogue Increases Commitment to General Education Assessment
Sarah F. Rosaen, U of Michigan - Flint, USA
Rebecca A. Hayes, Illinois State U, USA
Marcus Paroske, U of Michigan - Flint, USA
Danielle DeLaMare, U of Michigan - Flint, USA
Rethinking and Challenge Communication Research Methods About the Effectiveness of Digital Literacy
Education
seunghyun Lee, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
This panel will include discussions about how assessment and dialogue can help to enhance departments
and classrooms.
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Plenary Interactive Paper/Poster Session
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Children, Adolescents, and the Media Interactive Poster Session
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
1. “Mauled by a Bear:” Narrative Analysis of Self-Injury Among Adolescents in U.S. News, 20072012
Warren Bareiss, U of South Carolina - Upstate, USA
2. Everyday Creativity: Online Creative Production by Teenagers in the Netherlands
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mijke Slot, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sam Tol, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Romy Verstraeten, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3. Media Exposure, the Three-Step Process of Self-Objectification and Adolescents’ Sexual Attitudes
Laura Vandenbosch, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
4. Predicting Parents' Support for Internet Risk Prevention Strategies
Theodore Lee, Cornell U, USA
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Communication and Technology Interactive Poster Session
Communication and Technology
Participants
5. A Study of 3D HDTV Adoption: An Analysis of Predictors, Perceptions, and Behavioral Intention
Xu Song, Colorado State U, USA
6. Effects of eWOM on Facebook
Lutz M. Hagen, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Daniel Hofmann, iCrossing GmbH, GERMANY
7. Public and Private Relational Maintenance in Social Network Websites: Effects on Social
Presence, Relational Satisfaction, and Uncertainty
Stephanie Tom Tong, Wayne State U, USA
David Keith Westerman, West Virginia U, USA
8. Do You Trust My Avatar? Influence of Seller Avatars on Trust in Online Transactions
Gary Bente, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Thomas Dratsch, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Simon Rehbach, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Matthias Reyl, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Blerta Lushaj, U of Cologne, GERMANY
9. The Usage of Information and Communication Technologies to Support Seeking and Sharing
Information About Plant Disease
Y. Connie Yuan, Cornell U, USA
Joseph S Steinhardt, Cornell U, USA
Katherine A. McComas, Cornell U, USA
Geri Gay, Cornell U, USA
Chris Smart, Cornell U, USA
10. Using the Coping Model of User Adaptation to Explore the Implementation Process of a New
Electronic Health Record in a Multispecialty Physician Group
Nancy Tobler, Utah Valley U, USA
Janet Colvin, Utah Valley U, USA
11. Networking Skills: A Link Between Facebook Use and College Students’ Civic Engagement
Kye-Hyoung Lee, U of Texas, USA
Wenhong Chen, U of Texas, USA
12. Gaming Motivations, Avatar-Self Identification, and Symptoms of Online Game Addiction
Zhi-Jin Zhong, Sun Yat-Sen U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
13. Sexing of the Avatar: Gender, Sexualization, and Cyber-Harassment in a Virtual World
Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, U of Missouri, USA
Shannon Schipper, Arizona State U, USA
14. A Comparison of Digital and Face-to-Face Communication Effects on Self-Esteem Using
Ecological Momentary Assessment
Amy L Gonzales, Indiana U, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Communication History Interactive Poster Session
Communication History
Participants
15. PoliMedia: Improving Analyses of Radio, TV, and Newspaper Coverage of Political Debates
Martijn Kleppe, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Henri Beunders, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Max Kemman, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
16. Mapping Addison and Steele's London
Jon Leon Torn, Northern Arizona U, USA
17. Personal History: An Autoethnography of Life and Work
Peter Joseph Gloviczki, U of Minnesota, USA
Communication Law and Policy Interactive Poster Session
Communication Law & Policy
Participants
18. A Comparative Study of China and the US: Defamation and the Liability of Internet Service
Provider in Social Media Era
Yanfang Wu, U of Missouri, USA
William Hein Freivogel, Southern Illinois U, USA
19. Municipal Broadband as Civic Infrastructure: The Australian Case
Ian Gerrard McShane, RMIT U, AUSTRALIA
Denise Meredyth, RMIT U, AUSTRALIA
20. The Spectrum Opportunity: A Case for Open and Shared Spectrum Policies to Maximize
Innovation
Aalok Mehta, U of Southern California, USA
Kevin Werbach, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Environmental Communication Interactive Poster Session
Environmental Communication
Participants
21. How Newspapers Represent Environmental Risk: The Case of Carcinogenic Hazards in South
Korea
Thomas Hove, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hye-Jin Paek, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Moonyoung Yun, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Bo Kyung Jwa, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
22. Making Waves: Mass Media, Opinion Leaders, and the Campaign for Environmental Change
Kajsa E. Dalrymple, U of Iowa, USA
Bret Shaw, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin, USA
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Interactive Poster Session
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Participants
23. Effects of Racial Stereotypes on Cognitive Dissonance as Displayed by Changes in Explicit
Attitudes
Nikita Hamilton, U of Southern California, USA
24. I’m Coming Out: Social Emergence and Sexual Risk Taking Among Young African American
MSM
Robin C Stevens, Rutgers U–Camden, USA
Stephen Bernadini, Rutgers U–Camden, USA
25. The Relationship Between Television News Viewing, Motivations for Viewing, Stereotypes, and
Prejudice
Bradley W. Gorham, Syracuse U, USA
26. When Racism and Professionalism Collide: Negotiating Racial Identity Threats on a
Predominantly White Campus
Marlo Goldstein Hode, U of Missouri, USA
Angela Gist, U of Missouri, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Feminist Scholarship Interactive Paper Session
Feminist Scholarship
Participants
27. Sexualized Branded Entertainment and the Male Consumer Gaze.
Matthew P. McAllister, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Lauren Jaclyn DeCarvalho, Pennsylvania State U, USA
28. Crossroads of Gender and Internet Studies: The Case of Spain in the European Context
Rainer Rubira, King Juan Carlos U, SPAIN
Sonia Núñez, King Juan Carlos U, SPAIN
Diana Fernández, King Juan Carlos U, SPAIN
29. Newspaper Framing of Domestic Violence
Eileen N. Gilligan, SUNY – Oswego, USA
Arvind Diddi, Michigan State U, USA
Christine Courtade Hirsch, SUNY – Oswego, USA
Game Studies Interactive Poster Session
Game Studies
Participants
30. How Much Choice Do Gamers Want? The Effects of Choice Assortment and Complexity on
Enjoyment, Frustration, and Regret
Travis Leigh Ross, Indiana U, USA
James J Cummings, Stanford U, USA
31. The Virtual Cityscapes of Rock Star Games
Jon Leon Torn, Northern Arizona U, USA
32. Video Games as Meaningful Entertainment Experiences
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, West Virginia U, USA
Julia K. Woolley, California Polytechnic State U, San Luis Obispo, USA
Ryan Rogers, U of North Carolina, USA
Brett Sherrick, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mun-Young Chung, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies Interactive Poster Session
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Participants
33. Are the Kids All Right? Family Status, Challenges, Public Opinion, and Gay Civil Rights
Amy B. Becker, Towson U, USA
34. It’s (Not) in His Kiss: Gay Kisses, Narrative Strategies, and Camera Angles in Postnetwork
Television Comedy
Alfred Leonard Martin, Jr., U of Texas, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Global Communication and Social Change Interactive Paper Session
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
35. Culture in the Time of Cholera: Crisis and the Limits of “Cultural Democracy” in Europe
Sarah Anne Ganter, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
36. Challenges of a Rejected Technology: Communication Solutions to the Bt Eggplant Case in
Rural India
Meghnaa Tallapragada, Cornell U, USA
37. Framing an Online Social Movement: 6th of April Youth Movement
manaf Bashir, Indiana U, USA
38. Global Negotiations of National Unity and Diversity in Public Media: A Comparative Study on
South Africa and Flanders
Hannelie Marx, U of South Africa, SOUTH AFRICA
Alexander Dhoest, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
39. How to Play the Game of Intellectual Property in China
Jing Liu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
40. The Popular Culture Celebrity and the Viewer: Awareness Through Entertainment-Education
and Parasocial Interactions in Lebanon
Jessica R. El-Khoury, Texas Tech U, USA
Kenton T. Wilkinson, Texas Tech U, USA
41. The Usage Behaviors, Motivations and Gratifications of Using User-Generated Media: The Case
Study of Taiwan’s YouTube
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Health Communication Interactive Paper Session
Health Communication
Participants
42. A Communication Infrastructure Approach to Reproductive Health Disparities: Engaged
Research as a Storytelling Network Intervention
Matthew D. Matsaganis, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Annis G. Golden, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Muriel E. Scott, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
43. Barriers to Patient-Centered Mammography Among Appalachian Kentucky Women
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
Robin C. Vanderpool, U of Kentucky, USA
Bethney Wilson, U of Kentucky, USA
44. Evaluation of a Social Norms Campaign Approach to Suicide Prevention: Are Celebrity Sources
More Effective Than Peer Sources?
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Kristin Pace, Michigan State U, USA
Evan Perrault, Michigan State U, USA
Jan Collins-Eaglin, Michigan State U, USA
45. Personal Protection Behaviors Against Malaria in India: Urban Attitudes and Health Info
Seeking Preferences
May O. Lwin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Santosh Vijaykumar, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Gentatsu Lim, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Schubert Foo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
46. Physician Communication in the Operating Room
Kris A. Kirschbaum, East Carolina U, USA
47. Seeking and Processing Information for Health Decisions Among Elderly Chinese Singaporean
Women
Leanne Chang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Iccha Basnyat, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Daniel Teo, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
48. Undocumented Struggles of Graduate Students: The Psychosocial Wellbeing of the Knowledge
Engine
Nadine A. Yehya, American U of Beirut, LEBANON
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, National U of Singapore, USA
49. Zombie Apocalypse: Can the Undead Teach the Living How to Survive an Emergency?
Marjorie Kruvand, Loyola U Chicago, USA
Fred B. Bryant, Loyola U Chicago, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Information Systems Interactive Poster Session
Information Systems
Participants
50. Exploring the Impact of Emotional Content During Media Multitasking
Cody Kenneth Cooper, Ohio State U, USA
51. In Sync: How Synchronous Movement Improves Social Identification and Cooperation in
Ivar Vermeulen, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Esther Weijkamp, VU U - Amsterdam, NL
52. Time-Orientation and Environmental Risk Perception and Attitudes in Two Cultures
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Jie Zhuang, Michigan State U, USA
Maria Knight Lapinski, Michigan State U, USA
53. Media Schema and Heuristic Processing in Third-Person Perception
Lelia Samson, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Instructional and Developmental Communication Interactive Paper Session
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participants
54. Age Differences in Media Multitasking: A Diary Study
Margot van der Goot, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hilde Voorveld, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
55. Children Process Advertisements in Video Games With More Cognitive Effort Than Adults
Christoph Klimmt, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Alexandra Ellen Sowka, Hanover U of Music, Drama, and Media, GERMANY
Franziska Susanne Roth, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Gregor Daschmann, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
56. Invading Public Spaces: Exploring the Effects of Media Type
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Jacqueline Y Borrett, U of North Carolina, USA
Sarah Erickson, Great Lakes Aquarium, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Intercultural Communication Interactive Poster Session
Intercultural Communication
Participants
57. A Longitudinal Study of Person-Culture Fit: Galileo Mental Models and Intercultural Adaptation
Processes
Lin Zhu, U of Massachusetts - Boston, USA
Meina Liu, U of Maryland, USA
Edward L. Fink, U of Maryland, USA
58. Effects of Physical Similarity Between the Models in Fashion Advertisements and Viewers on
Purchase Intention
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Xin Yi Chan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Cassandra Lew, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Derrick Lim, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Hyun Ou Lee, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
59. Individuals’ Perception of Others’ Self-Esteem and Psychological Well-being: Role of Body Size
and Peers’ Comments
Emiko Taniguchi, U of Texas, USA
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Intergroup Communication Interactive Poster Session
Intergroup Communication
Participant
60. Ingroup Versus Outgroup: Different Perceptions of Social Identities Between Students From
Mainland China and Local Taiwanese Students
Pei-Wen Lee, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
Interpersonal Communication Interactive Poster Session
Interpersonal Communication
Participants
61. An Examination of Equity and Interdependence Theory as Predictors of Maintenance Behaviors:
Interracial vs. Intraracial Dating Relationships
Narissra Maria Punyanunt-Carter, Texas Tech U, USA
Stacy Carter, Texas Tech U, USA
Natasha Rodriguez, Texas Tech U, USA
62. An Exploratory Investigation of Communication With Cousins
Krystyna S. Aune, U of Hawaii, USA
Robert Kelly Aune, U of Hawaii, USA
63. Incarcerated Mothers: An Examination of Parenting Style and Attitude
Alicia Romano, Beech Brook Organization, USA
Jill E. Rudd, Cleveland State U, USA
Kimberly Neuendorf, Cleveland State U, USA
Clare Gross, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Journalism Studies Interactive Poster Session
Journalism Studies
Participants
64. Climate Summits as Global Media Events: Journalistic Contributions to a Transnational Public
Sphere
Julia Lueck, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
65. How Journalists‘ and Scientists‘ Views on Objectivity Influence Their Accounts of Reality
Senja Post, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
66. Science Journalists’ Selection Criteria and Their Depiction of Nanotechnology and its
(Un)Certainty in German Media
Lars Guenther, Friedrich Schiller U Jena, GERMANY
Georg Ruhrmann, U of Jena, GERMANY
67. Analyzing Web Analytics: How Newsrooms Use Web Metrics in News Construction and Why
Edson Jr. Castro Tandoc, U of Missouri, USA
Michael M. Jenner, U of Missouri, USA
68. How Reddit Sees the World: Analyzing Secondary Gatekeeping and Geographic Patterns in
News Posted to a Social Link Aggregator
Jeffrey Kyle Riley, U of Florida, USA
Ashley Carnifax, U of Central Florida, USA
69. The Effects of Micropayments on Online News Story Selection and Engagement
Nick Geidner, U of Tennessee, USA
Denae Lynn D'Arcy, U of Tennessee, USA
70. The Influence of Elite Disagreement and Political Power Separation on Framing Competition
Over the Iraq Troop Withdrawal in 2006
Jihyang Choi, Indiana U, USA
71. We're Out Here: How the Daily Yonder's Political Coverage Builds Social Capital
Alecia Swasy, U of Missouri, USA
72. “Whose Team is it?”: The Construction and Deconstruction of National Identity in the Sports
Pages
Haim Hagay, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Language and Social Interaction Interactive Paper Session
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Participants
73. “Axi, Ma- Ze Nishma Kemo Shem Aravi Ma” (Bro, What- it Sound Like an Arabic Name,
What): The Hebrew Discourse Marker Ma in Spoken and Written Interactions
Chaim Noy, U of South Florida, USA
74. Exploring the Pragmatic Functions of the Acronym LOL in Instant Messenger Conversations
Kris M. Markman, U of Memphis, USA
75. LOL in Nonmediated Communication Contexts? Perceived Appropriateness and Text Speak
Frequency in Verbal Communication
David J. Park, Florida International U, USA
Weirui Wang, Florida International U, USA
Joseph Knuckles, Florida International U, USA
Respondent
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Mass Communication Interactive Poster Session
Mass Communication
Participants
76. An Experiment Investigating the Links Among Online Dating Profile Attractiveness, Ideal
Endorsement, and Romantic Media
Veronica Hefner, Chapman U, USA
Julie Kahn, Chapman U, USA
77. Bonding and Bridging Social Capital on Twitter: Differentiating Between Followers and
Followees
Matthias Hofer, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Viviane Bianca Aubert, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
78. Media Literacy and Information Literacy: Subset, Overlapping, or Parallel Relationship?
Alice Yuet Lin Lee, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Clement YK So, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
79. The Effects of Evidence Type, Peer Opinions, and Information Processing on Consumers’
Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Image in Online Journalism
Environment
Lei Jia, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Minchul Kim, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
80. Virtuous People Doing Noble Work: Professionalism and Public Service Among U.S. Media
Exemplars
Patrick Lee Plaisance, Colorado State U, USA
81. Webmalaise in the Social Media Era: Interactivity and Internet Effects on Trust
Michael Barthel, U of Washington, USA
Patricia Moy, U of Washington, USA
Eike Mark Rinke, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Sheetal Doshi Agarwal, U of Washington, USA
Muzammil M Hussain, U of Washington, USA
82. Women’s Rejection of Sexually Explicit Material: The Role of Hyperfemininity and Processing
Style
Johanna M.F. van Oosten, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Inge Boot, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
83. Antecedents and Consequences of Television Audiences’ Social Engagement With Primetime
Network Programming
Miao Guo, Ball State U, USA
Organizational Communication Interactive Poster Session
Organizational Communication
Participants
84. Discontinuities and Continuities in Constructing Work: Exploring Chinese Post80s Generation’s
Interpretations of Meaningful Work
Ziyu Long, Purdue U, USA
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Kai Kuang, Purdue U, USA
85. Looks Good to Me...or Not: The Impact of Web Site Aesthetics on Online Job Seekers
Steve Matuszak, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Bartosz Wojtek Wojdynski, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Kevin Carlson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
86. Stiffening and Bypassing the Organizational Text: The Case of the Electronic Patient Healthcare
Record
Anne Mayère, U of Toulouse, FRANCE
Consuelo Vasquez, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
87. The Quality vs. Accessibility Debate Revisited: A Contingency Perspective on Information
Source Selection
Lilian Woudstra, U of Tilburg, THE NETHERLANDS
Bart J. van den Hooff, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Alexander Peter Schouten, Tilburg U, THE NETHERLANDS
88. “It’s Difficult to Say.”: Discourse Analysis, Global Business, and the Difficulties of Distal
Contextualization
Iain Donald Macpherson, MacEwan U, CANADA
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Philosophy, Theory, and Critique Interactive Paper Session
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
89. Addressing Cultural “Barriers” in the Dominant Health Communication Paradigm: Theorizing a
Cultural Bridge Approach
Benjamin J. Li, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
90. Enlightenment, the Remix: Transparency as a DJ’s Trick of Seeing Everyone From Nowhere
Ethan Plaut, Stanford U, USA
91. Loss of Innovation: Reliance of Health Communication Research on Health Psychology
Yumeng Wang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
92. Performing Disrespect: Recognition, Civility, and Personhood in the French “Burqa” Debates of
2009-2011
Shazia Iftkhar, U of Michigan, USA
93. Technoculture Versus Big Brother: Pirate Politics as a Countercultural Movement
Patrick Burkart, Texas A&M U, USA
Political Communication Interactive Poster Session
Political Communication
Participants
94. Call Your Legislator: A Field Experimental Study of the Impact of Citizen Contacts on
Legislative Voting
Daniel E. Bergan, Michigan State U, USA
Richard T Cole, Michigan State U, USA
95. Gaining Attention Yet Communicating Little? On Episodic and Thematic Coverage of Protest
Events in Belgian Television News
Ruud Wouters, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
96. Political Homophily on Social Network Site and Users’ Poll Skepticism
Young Min Baek, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Irkwon Jeong, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
97. Race to the Starting Line: Voter Assessment of Media Coverage Before the 2012 Iowa Caucus
Jane B. Singer, U of Iowa, USA
Julie L. Andsager, U of Iowa, USA
98. Recognition and Ideology: Tensions in Honneth’s Justified and Ideological Recognition for
Rethinking the Case of Child Domestic Labor
Rousiley Celi Moreira Maia, Federal U of Minas Gerais, BRAZIL
Danila Gentil Rodriguez Cal, U Federal de Minas Gerais, BRAZIL
99. The Affective Citizen Communication Model: How Emotions Engage Citizens With Politics
Through Media and Discussion
Sebastian Valenzuela, Pontificia U Catolica de Chile, CHILE
100. Web 2.0 Spaces for Activism: Critiquing its Novelty Through a Historical Lens of Public
Political Space
Payal Arora, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Popular Communication Interactive Poster Session
Popular Communication
Participants
101. Roma and Sulukule: Heritage, Memory, Identity, and a Destruction of a Community
Sandra Ristovska, U of Pennsylvania, USA
102. 5,535 Hours of Impact: Effects of Olympic Media on Nationalism Attitudes
Andrew C. Billings, U of Alabama, USA
Kenon A Brown, U of Alabama, USA
Natalie Brown, U of Alabama, USA
103. Amplifying the People’s Mic: Internet Memes, Pop Polyvocality, and the Occupy Wall Street
Movement
Ryan M. Milner, College of Charleston, USA
104. Children’s Films on European Television: Between Concentration of Production Countries and
Diversity of Content
Franziska Matthes, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
105. Watching TV Fiction. Changing Viewing Practices in the Age of Digitization?
Nele Simons, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
106. The Social Side of Disruptive Innovations: An Analysis of Polaroid’s Cultural Legacy
Nora A Draper, U of Pennsylvania, USA
107. The Red Hatters: Negotiating Gender Through Fun, Fantasy and Play
Samira Van Bohemen, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Public Relations Interactive Poster Session
Public Relations
Participants
108. Community Relationship Strategies and Outcomes in Third Sector Organizations: A Colombian
Conservation Program Case Study
Jennie Pena, U del Norte, COLOMBIA
109. Problematizing Digital Transparency: The Normative and Axiological Functions of
"Transparency Discourse" in Online Public Relations
Sun ha Hong, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Francois Allard, U of Paris - Sorbonne, FRANCE
110. The Effects of the Stakeholder Engagement Strategy in CSR Communication on CSR Goal
Achievement
Joon Soo Lim, Mississippi State U, USA
Cary A. Greenwood, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
111. Whistleblowing in the Fortune 1000: What Did Public Relations Practitioners Tell Us?
Cary A. Greenwood, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
112. This Blog Brought to You by…: Exploring Blogger Perceptions of a Product Endorsement
Policy
Justin Walden, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Denise S. Bortree, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Marcia DiStaso, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Interactive Paper Session: Visual Storytelling and Impact
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
113. What Does Credibility Look Like? Tweets, Walls, and Websites in U.S. Presidential Candidates’
Visual Storytelling
Janis Teruggi Page, George Washington U, USA
Margaret Ellen Duffy, U of Missouri, USA
114. Examining the Impact of Antecedent Variables on Photo Messaging Use
Daniel Scot Hunt, Newbury College, USA
David J. Atkin, U of Connecticut, USA
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
115. The Genre of Street Photography as Visual Communication: The Myth of the Invisible Observer
Ruben Demasure, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
7501
Thursday
14:00-15:15
Sandringham
Interactive Theme Papers: Challenging Communication Research
Theme Sessions
Participants
116. Reconceptualizing Information in Light of Communication Contexts
Joseph M. Kayany, Western Michigan U, USA
117. Identity, Well Being, and Crisis Management in Social Interaction: Challenging Communication
Researchers to Examine the Adolescent Suicide Epidemic From a Communication Perspective
Stephen DiDomenico, Rutgers U, USA
118. When Course Evaluations Fail: A Whistleblower's Tale
A Anonymous, U of the Intermountain West, USA
7605
Key Concepts in News Research: A Comparative Examination of Political News in 16 Advanced
Democracies
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Journalism Studies
Chair
Susan Banducci, U of Exeter, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Interpretive Journalism
Susana Salgado, New U of Lisbon, PORTUGAL
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Rosa Berganza, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Personalization of Political News: A Comparative Study
Peter Van Aelst, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Nicolas Hube, U of Paris, FRANCE
Stylianos Papathanassopoulos, National and Kapodistrian U - Athens, GREECE
From Hard to Soft News
Carsten E. Reinemann, U of Munich, GERMANY
James Stanyer, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Sebastian Scherr, U of Munich, GERMANY
Guido Legnante, U of Pavia, ITALY
Partisan Biases in Newspaper, TV, and Online Journalism Across 16 Advanced Democracies
David Nicolas Hopmann, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Jorg Matthes, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Toril Aalberg, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
Respondent
Erik P. Bucy, Texas Tech U, USA
This panel presents results from a large-scale comparative content-analysis of political news coverage
across 16 advanced democracies. Each paper will focus on the analysis of one of six prominent concepts;
including personalization, negativity, soft vs. hard news, political balance, and strategy framing. Each
paper will outline the need for a comparative analysis, present the characteristics of news coverage across
media systems and explore the implications for our understanding of what shapes news coverage.
7606
Top Papers in Organizational Communication
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Bart J. van den Hooff, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Meanings of Organizational Volunteering: Diverse Volunteer Pathways
Kirstie Lynd McAllum, IESE Business School, SPAIN
The Conversational Constitution of the Task at Hand: A Temporal Work
Katharina Hohmann, U of Lugano, SWITZERLAND
Jeanne Mengis, U of Lugano, SWITZERLAND
The Institutionalization of Genetically Modified Food: A Longitudinal Semantic Network Analysis
Kimberlie Joy Stephens, U of Southern California, USA
Gail Fann Thomas, Naval Postgraduate School, USA
Worker Co-Rumination Mediates the Relationships Between Social Support and Stress and Burnout
Justin P Boren, Santa Clara U, USA
Respondent
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
These papers were selected through a double review process in which the most highly ranked in the first
round of reviews were then submitted to a panel of senior scholars who chose these four as the "best of
the best".
7607
Blogs, Boundaries, and Burly Brothers: Building New Environmental Understanding With New
Media TOP PAPERS PANEL
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Palace C
Environmental Communication
Chair
Charlotte Ryan, U of Massachusetts - Lowell, USA
Participants
An Online Narrative of Colorado Wilderness: Self-in-Cybernetic Space
Joseph Grant Champ, Colorado State U, USA
Daniel R Williams, U.S. Department of Agriculture, USA
Rhetorical Framing During Xiamen Environmental Movement in China: Boundary-Spanning Contention
and Schism of Civil Society
Hao Cao, U of Texas, USA
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
The Changing Nature of Environmental Discourse: An Exploratory Comparison of Environmental
Journalists and Bloggers
Edson Jr. Castro Tandoc, U of Missouri, USA
Bruno Takahashi, Michigan State U, USA
Climate Science vs. Distributing Responsibilities: A Content Analysis of The People’s Daily
Zhan Li, Xiamen U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
7608
Downsizing Data: Analyzing Social Digital Traces
Thursday
15:30-16:45
York
Communication and Technology
Participants
Creating Social-Science Grounded Algorithms to Analyze Communication Dynamics in Big Data
Jennifer Stromer-Galley, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Tomek Strzalkowski, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
George Aaron Broadwell, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Samira Shaikh, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Ting Liu, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Sarah Taylor, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Xiaoai Ren, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Feifei Zhang, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Jennifer Crowley, U at Albany – SUNY, USA
Where Everybody Knows Your Name: Tracing Regulars and Their Hubs From Social Media
Raz Schwartz, Rutgers U, USA
Occupies, Generators, and Tents: Resource Mobilization by OccupyNYC via Twitter
Shawn Walker, U of Washington, USA
Reblog If: Information Resharing on a Massive Creative Social Media Platform
Alex Leavitt, U of Southern California, USA
The recent flurry of interest in the potentials of "big data" has led to a number of critiques by social
scientists on the theories, methodologies, and analysis of large data sources. The emergent call for "small
data" inquiries highlights a defensive tone on the part of traditional social scientists in the face of the
popularization of large-scale, computationally-driven projects. This panel aims to bridge these discourses
by introducing research that begins in large collections of data and crafts research questions to fit their
application to particular social scientific inquiries. The panel brings together four qualitative or
quantitative projects that look at social dynamics of online, networked social media systems. They build
on prior theories and empirical research around critical questions regarding communication, identity,
information, and sociality, and inquire into data from their respective platforms.
7609
Political and Economical Empowerment by Online Media
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, NL
Participants
Collective Activism Through Social Media: The Role of Collective Efficacy
Alcides Velasquez, Pontificia U Javeriana, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
The Benefits and Burdens of Network Diversity: Political Engagement on Social Networking Sites
Weiai Xu, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Jian Rui, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Michael A. Stefanone, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Online Media and Offline Empowerment in Democratic Transition: Linking Forms of Internet Use With
Political Attitudes and Behaviors in Post-Rebellion Tunisia
Anita Breuer, German Development Institute, GERMANY
Jacob Groshek, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
The Amplification Effect of Mobile Phones: User Expectations and Economic Outcomes in the Context of
Development
Han Ei Chew, United Nations U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Vigneswara Ilavarasan, Indian Institute of Management Rohtak, INDIA
Mark Levy, Michigan State U, USA
7611
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Waterloo/Tower
Message Strategies and Risk Perceptions: Health Messages, Cognitive Processing, and Behavioral
Outcomes
Health Communication
Chair
Hyun Suk Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
The Utilization of the HSM to Assess Risk Belief and Attitude Formation From Translated Scientific
Messages About PFOA
Sandi W Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Rose Clark-Hitt, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Russell, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Atkin, Michigan State U, USA
Knowledge Types and Risk Perceptions: Driving Information-Seeking and Risk Prevention Behaviors
Danae Manika, Queen Mary, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Patricia A. Stout, U of Texas, USA
Linda L. Golden, U of Texas, USA
Michael S. Mackert, U of Texas, USA
Influence of Evidence Type and Narrative Type on HPV Risk Perception and Intention to Obtain the HPV
Vaccine
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Michael Field Dahlstrom, Iowa State U, USA
Adam S. Richards, U of Maryland, USA
Sarani Rangarajan, Iowa State U, USA
The Effects of Metaphor Use and Message Format on Cognitive Processing and Persuasive Outcomes of
Condom Promotion Messages
Stephanie Kay Van Stee, U of Kentucky, USA
Seth M. Noar, U of North Carolina, USA
Nancy Grant Harrington, U of Kentucky, USA
7612
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Studying Gender and Games: Using Multiple Methodologies
Game Studies
Participants
Postfeminism in Games: Views From the Contexts of Play and Production
Alison Harvey, U of Toronto, CANADA
Booth Babe or Games Researcher? Methodological Trade-Offs Between Theory and Situated Praxis
Florence Chee, IDRC, CANADA
There’s No Crying in New Eden: Theorizing Why Women Don’t Play EVE Online
Kelly Bergstrom, York U, CANADA
All's Fair in Love and War? Gaming Couples in League of Legends
Tracy L. M. Kennedy, Brock U, CANADA
Rabindra A. Ratan, Michigan State U, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Motivated by the call at the 2012 ICA Game Studies AGM for increased participation by qualitative
researchers, this panel brings together four diverse investigations of gender and gaming communities.
Differing in their methodological approaches and theoretical framing, each paper will present an example
of the nuanced ways that “gender” can be used as an interpretive lens within a larger investigation of
gaming cultures and player practices. Ultimately, the goal for this panel is to showcase the diversity of
methodologies, theories, and analytical frameworks open to games researchers who seek to move beyond
“gender” as a stable and binary category for sorting study participants.
7613
Mass Media and Body Image
Thursday
15:30-16:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Participants
Effects of Mediated Celebrity on Young People’s Attitudes Toward Cosmetic Surgery
Nainan Wen, Macau U of Science and Technology, MACAU
Stella C. Chia, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Identification With Media Celebrities: A Self-Discrepancy Theory Based Examination of Actual, Ideal,
and Ought Identification
Kari Michelle Wilson, Indiana U South Bend, USA
Hyunyi Cho, Purdue U, USA
Lijiang Shen, U of Georgia, USA
Real Ideal: The Effects of Attainable and Unattainable Video Game Bodies on Users’ Body-Image
Disturbance
Nicholas L Matthews, Indiana U, USA
Teresa Lynch, Indiana U, USA
Nicole Martins, Indiana U, USA
The Relationship Between Use of Ideal-Body Media and Men’s Drive for Muscularity: Considering the
Roles of Peer Expectations and Current Exercise Patterns
Alice E. Hall, U of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
7614
Exploring Global Implications of the UK Journalism Debacle
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washington U, USA
Participants
On the Relevance and Irrelevance of Place in the Journalistic Imaginary
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Leveson and Finkelstein: A Tale of Two Inquiries
Mathew Ricketson, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Abuse, Dope, and Charities: Armstrong and Savile, a Failure of Journalism
Howard Tumber, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Regulating Journalism: Thomas Jefferson in the Age of Monitory Democracy
Rodney Evan Tiffen, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Hackgate and Institutional Change in Journalism: Shock, Layering, Conversion, Drift, and Displacement
Michael Stuart Bromley, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
What in the UK is known as Hackgate – the scandal of, and surrounding, nefarious editorial activities at
the News of the World newspaper – and the consequent Leveson Inquiry into ‘the culture, practices and
ethics of the press’ were commonly represented as presaging an abrupt and wholesale transformation of
Britain’s distinctive modern tradition of freewheeling tabloid-inflected journalism. Was the UK
journalism debacle just a little local difficulty, or did it have wider, global implications? Systemic failure
on this scale has opened up opportunities to reconsider some of the assumptions underpinning journalism
research.
7616
New Perspectives on Journalistic Structures and Labor
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
C.W. Anderson, College of Staten Island - CUNY, USA
Participants
Online Sophistication of News Websites
Elisabeth Guenther, U Münster, GERMANY
Michael Scharkow, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Accountability Reporting in The Wall Street Journal Before and After Murdoch
Beth Knobel, Fordham U, USA
Communicating Imperfection: The Ethical Principles of News Corrections
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Efrat Daskal, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Time to Rethink Journalistic Labour? What We Can Learn From Studying Freelancers and Interns
Mirjam Gollmitzer, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Respondent
David M. Ryfe, U of Nevada - Reno, USA
7617
Media and Medals: Entertainment and Sports
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Nicholas David Bowman, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
Inspired by the Paralympics
Anne Bartsch, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Anja Kalch, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Cordula Nitsch, U of Düsseldorf, GERMANY
Medialization of Soccer: How TV Changed Our Favorite Sport
Michael Meyen, U of Munich, GERMANY
Olympics Everywhere: Predictors of Multiplatform Media Uses During the 2012 London Olympics
Tang Tang, U of Akron, USA
Roger Cooper, Ohio U, USA
Visualizing London: Analyzing Gender and Race on International Websites During the 2012 Olympics
Lauren Reichart Smith, Auburn U, USA
Skye C Cooley, Mississippi State U, USA
“Big Run, or Smart Gun”: How Racially-Based Sports Frames Influence Subsequent Audience Behaviors
and Attitudes of Audiences Towards Athletes
Gregory A. Cranmer, West Virginia U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, West Virginia U, USA
Zac W. Goldman, West Virginia U, USA
7618
Top 3 Papers in Interpersonal Communication
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Response Thresholds Predict Demand/Withdraw Communication in Division of Labor Conflict Among
Marital Dyads
Kendra Knight, Christopher Newport U, Select One
Janet K. Alberts, Arizona State U, USA
The Influence of Goals and Discussion Type on Emotional Experience and Expression Within
Interpersonal Conflict
Christin E Huggins, U of Georgia, USA
Jennifer A. Samp, U of Georgia, USA
“You Need to Stop Talking About This!”: Verbal Rumination and the Costs of Social Support
Tamara D. Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Anne Merrill, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Amanda Denes, U of Connecticut, USA
Sharde Davis, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Respondent
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
7621
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Antifandom, Hate, Annoyance, and Dislike in Media Reception
Popular Communication
Chair
Jonathan Alan Gray, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Antifandom as Social Performance
Anne Gilbert, Rutgers U, USA
Twitards and Tyler’s Van: Antifans, Twilight, and Textuality
Melissa A. Click, U of Missouri, USA
Holly Willson Holladay, U of Missouri, USA
Antifandom: The Next Generation? Exploring Textual Dislike and the Life Course
Matt Hills, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
What Were You Expecting? Negotiating the Mediated Center Through Annoyance
Sarah Anne Murray, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jonathan Alan Gray, U of Wisconsin, USA
Feelings of hate, dislike, disgust, and annoyance increasingly pervade mediated spaces, facilitated at least
in part by the democratizing forces of a converged, participatory media environment. Yet theorization and
empirical data that considers the role of negative affect for audiences are in too short supply. As a result,
some key questions that we might ask of a media audience – what does it mean to dislike or hate a text,
what rhetorical strategies are employed to voice this hate, and how are hate and love, anti-fandom and
fandom related? – continue to go largely unanswered. This panel therefore aims to turn from love to hate,
dislike, alienation, and annoyance, and from fandom to anti-fandom, to make sense of what dislike and
hate of media products are as sociocultural phenomena.
7622
Thursday
15:30-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Extended Session: Technological Determinism and Communication for Sustainable Social Change
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Jan E. Servaes, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Microproductivity, Creative Systems, and Digital Storytelling
John Hartley, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
Technology, Integrative Development and Intercultural Communication
Rico Lie, Wageningen U, THE NETHERLANDS
Development, Technology, and Sustainable Social Change From a Buddhist Perspective
Patchanee Malikhao, U of Massachusetts, USA
Technologies of Transformation?
David Morley, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Digital Inequality Still Exists, But "How to Change?"
Christine L. Ogan, Indiana U, USA
Issues of Development and Human Liberation Ultimately Remain Questions of Politics and Economics
Colin Sparks, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Being Meaningfully Mobile: Mobile Phones and Development
Jo Tacchi, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Creating Sustainable Programs for Women in Micro-Enterprise
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Video Technologies and Participatory Approaches for Sustainable Peace: Tackling Conflict Through
Social Change Communication
Valentina Bau, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Digital Communication and/as Participation? A Critical Analysis of New Media Initiatives for
Civic/Political Engagement and Development in Medellin, Colombia
Melissa M. Brough, U of Southern California, USA
Making the Global Local: Communicating the Transition Network On and Offline
Emily Polk, U of Massachusetts, USA
Tiger Gate: How ICT Empowered Activists Are Engaged in Social Change Actions to Increase
Government Accountability and Transparency in China
Song Shi, U of Massachusetts, USA
The Emancipatory Technology and Struggle for Independent Society: Dialectics of Culture and
Technology for Social Change in the Case of Iran
Mahdi Yousefi, U of Tehran, IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
Technological Determinism and Communication for Sustainable Social Change
Jan E. Servaes, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The aim of this panel is to shed new light on a theoretically and practically significant issue in
communication studies: technological determinism and communication for sustainable social change. It
provides insight into the role of technology and culture in social change, an issue that has been
increasingly central to communication for social change theories and practices around the world over the
past decades. Given the variety and depth of challenges in sustainable social change both researchers and
practitioners need to espouse a broad and contextualized understanding of the role of technology in social
change that transcends conventional technological deterministic approaches.
7623
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Best Papers in the Public Relations Division 2013
Public Relations
Chair
Sherry J. Holladay, U of Central Florida, USA
Participants
Action Research and Public Relations: Dialogue, Peer Learning, and the Issue of Alcohol
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Emma Wood, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
"Outnumbered Yet Still on Top, But for How Long?" Theorizing About Males Working in the Feminized
Field of Public Relations
Donnalyn Pompper, Temple U, USA
Taejin Jung, SUNY – Oswego, USA
Empowerment as a Key Construct for Understanding Public Relations' Potential for Community Building
Moonhee Cho, U of South Florida, USA
Maria De Moya, North Carolina State U, USA
Strategic Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Effects of Stated Motives and
Corporate Reputation on Stakeholder Responses
Yeonsoo Kim, Weber State U, USA
What Do Stakeholders "Like" on Facebook? Public Reactions to Organizations’ Informational,
Promotional, and Community-Building Messages
Gregory Douglas Saxton, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Richard D. Waters, U of San Francisco, USA
7624
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Media, Entertainment, and Play in the Lives of Young Children
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Children’s Preferences for TV Show Hosts: An International Perspective on Learning From Television
Andrea Holler, International Central Insititute for Youth and Educational Television, GERMANY
Maya Goetz, the International Central Institute for Youth and Educational Television, GERMANY
Meryl Alper, U of Southern California, USA
Predictors of Baby Video/DVD Ownership: Findings From a National Sample of American Parents With
Young Children
Sarah Ellen Vaala, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Matthew A. Lapierre, U of North Carolina - Wilmington, USA
The Effect of Foreground Television on the Quality of Young Children’s Concurrent Play Behaviors
Amy Nathanson, Ohio State U, USA
Laura Willis, Ohio State U, USA
Eric E Rasmussen, Ohio State U, USA
What’s Real and What’s Pretend? Preschoolers’ Judgments About TV Depictions of Ethnicity
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin, USA
Gayathri Sivakumar, U of Wisconsin, USA
Youth and the Internet: Developmental Implications of Website Preferences Among 8 to 12-Year-Old
Children
Courtney Blackwell, Northwestern U, USA
Alexis Lauricella, Northwestern U, USA
Ellen Wartella, Northwestern U, USA
Annie Conway, Museum of Science and Industry, USA
Respondent
Kristen Harrison, U of Michigan, USA
7625
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
The Discursive Negotiation of Controversy in Political and Institutional Contexts
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Participants
Speaking Out:Testimonial Rhetoric in Israeli Soldiers’ Dissent (Top Paper)
Tamar Katriel, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Nimrod Shavit, U of Massachusetts, USA
Managing the Problematic Relationship Between God and Government: Discourse Strategies in
Legislative Hearings About Same-Sex Marriage
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
The Transnational Convergence of the Discourse of Civic Integration
Marco Scalvini, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
“Why You Should Stay in Bulgaria”: (Re)constructing the Bulgarian Identity in Discourses on Emigration
Nadezhda Mihaylova Sotirova, U of Massachusetts, USA
Rhetorical Agency in Ideological Dispute: Party Members’ Discursive Legitimisation of Contested
Political Narratives
Jiska Engelbert, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7626
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Intercultural Top Four Papers
Intercultural Communication
Participants
“Outsourced,” (Re)presentation, and “The Politics of the Image”
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Shaheed Nick Mohammed, Pennsylvania State U - Altoona, USA
Value of International Experience and Cultural intelligence in Developing Global Mindset: The Role of
Global Mindset in Effective Intercultural Collaboration in Global Teams (Top Student Paper)
Malgorzata Boyraz, Rutgers U, USA
Negotiating the Landscape of Division: The Rhetorical Uses of Multiculturalism in Macedonia
Linda Ziberi, South East European U, MACEDONIA
Lara Lengel, Bowling Green State U, USA
Artan Limani, South East European U, MACEDONIA
Understanding Cultural Variations in Giving Advice Among Americans and Chinese
Hairong Feng, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Respondent
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
7627
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
The Materiality of Voice: International Perspectives on Digital Storytelling Practice
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
Creating Queer Referential Metaculture: Stories About Moving, Friends, and the Mainstream
Aristea Fotopoulou, U of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM
Digital Storytelling as a Method for Women’s Empowerment in South Africa
Sigrid Kannengieser, U of Bremen, GERMANY
Crossing Time and Space: Geohistories and Narrative Exchange
Wilma Clark, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Hilde Stephansen, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Sharing Migrant Stories Online. The Case of a Moroccan Discussion Forum in Germany
Cigdem Bozdag, U of Bremen, GERMANY
Voice and Recognition: An International Comparative Overview
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Richard Macdonald, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel considers more recent empirical projects that explore how voice is valued through processes of
narrative production and exchange sustained both through workshops, as in the now classical digital
storytelling methodology, but also using digital infrastructures in a sense that goes beyond the digital
format of the story itself. Potentially these new practices can be understood to approximate to a ‘story
circle’ in a fully digital form, so providing a way in which ‘voice’ is materialised in complex digital
practices across multiple times and spaces.
7628
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Visual Form, Aesthetics, and Affect
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Robert L. Craig, U of St. Thomas, USA
Participants
Visual Agenda-Setting, Emotion, and the BP Oil Disaster
Andrea L. Miller, Louisiana State U, USA
Victoria Leigh Bemker LaPoe, Louisiana State U, USA
The First Blink: Impacts of Information on Art Appreciation
Fen Jennifer Lin, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Pretty as a Website: Examining Aesthetics on Nonsurgical Cosmetic Procedure Websites
Adriane Jewett, U of Florida, USA
J. Robyn Goodman, U of Florida, USA
Thoroughfare, Speedway, Highway, Streetscape: The Urban Performances of Seattle’s Aurora Avenue
Giorgia Aiello, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Emotional Action Tendencies in Response to Narrative Film
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
7631
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 1
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) State of Art Research Panel
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Hye-Jin Paek, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Social-Media-Based Public Forums: How Does the Information Flow?
Sujin Choi, U of Texas, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Elderly Population and Community Engagement in the Republic of Korea: The Role of Community
Storytelling Network
Seok Kang, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
The Multitude and the Changing Face of Korean Democracy: The 2008 Candlelight Protests and “Swarm
Intelligence"
Keith Scott, Academy of Korean Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
A Case Study on KT Skylife’s Business Model Innovation
Minzheong Song, Korea Telecom, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Korean Wave: Enjoyment Factors of Korean Dramas in the US
Lisa Chuang, U of Hawaii, USA
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Narrative Effects of a Movie About Hearing-Impaired Rape Victims: Narrative Engagement and
Persuasion
Hyuhn-Suhck Bae, Yeungnam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Doohwang Lee, Kyunghee U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun-Gyuhl Bae, U of Pennsylvania, USA
They Do, but I Don’t: AIDS Stigma Gap, Its Causes and Consequences
Seyeon Keum, NHN Search Marketing Corporation, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Byoungkwan Lee, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyun Ou Lee, Hanyang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Framing Aid to North Korea: A Content Analysis of Four South Korean Newspapers on Humanitarian
Assistance to North Korea
Hwalbin Kim, U of South Carolina, USA
Eunjeong Soh, U of South Carolina, USA
Sang Hwa Oh, U of South Carolina, USA
Sei-Hill Kim, U of South Carolina, USA
Examining Perceptions of Climate Change Among South Koreans: An Image-Based Qualitative
Investigation
George Anghelcev, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mun-Young Chung, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Sela Sar, Iowa State U, USA
Brittany R. L. Duff, U of Illinois, USA
7632
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 2
Top Paper Session: Discourses, Power, and Internet Law
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Discourse Networks on State-Mandated Access Blocking in France and Germany
Yana Breindl, Georg-August U Goettingen, BELGIUM
Justifying Copyright: Discourse, Legitimation, and Critique
Lee Edwards, Institute of Communications Studies, UNITED KINGDOM
Bethany Klein, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
David Lee, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Giles Moss, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Fiona Philip, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Laundering Policies: The Case of the Ley Sinde in Spain
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Joan Ramon Rodriguez-Amat, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
The New Reputation Custodians: Repositioning Individuals as the Guardians of Their Online Reputation
Nora A Draper, U of Pennsylvania, USA
7633
Thursday
15:30-16:45
Board Room 3
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies Business Meeting
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
7705
Political Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Palace A
Political Communication
7706
Organizational Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Ted Zorn, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U de Montréal, CANADA
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
7707
Environmental Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Palace C
Environmental Communication
Participants
Merav Katz-Kimchi, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Janel S. Schuh, Stanford U, USA
Activity of group report. Awards presentation. New business. Elected officers introduction. Other
business.
7708
Censorship Machines, Mobile Networks, and Socialbots: Exploring the Overdetermination Between
Communication Technology and Culture
Thursday
17:00-18:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Robert William Gehl, U of Utah, USA
Participants
Recoding “Sensitive Words” on Chinese Social Media: Internet Censorship and the Politics of Visibility
Fan Yang, U of Maryland - Baltimore County, USA
Mobile Commerce: Bridging the "Digital Divide" in the Philippines?
Cecilia Uy-Tioco, George Mason U, US
The Computerized Socialbot Turing Test: The Encoding and Appropriation of Our Social Media States of
Mind
Robert William Gehl, U of Utah, USA
Respondent
Toby Miller, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Broadly speaking, this panel explores the overdetermination between communication technology and
culture: how machines and networks structure our actions, but also how within those structures human
agency shifts and changes. We examine the architectures of social and mobile media, looking at how
those architectures shape communication practices and culture. Ultimately, then, this panel will start a
conversation about the complex relationships between technology and communication, censorship and
polysemy, vertical and horizontal social networks, and human and nonhuman actors.
7709
Determinants of Online Participation
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sonja Utz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Promoting Participation: The Role of Communication in Online Crowdsourcing Contests
Lian Jian, U of Southern California, USA
Li Lu, U of Southern California, USA
L.Crystal Jiang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Operant Conditioning and the Moderating Role of Habit Strength on Behavior in an Online Community
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Modeling Proximal Determinants of Cyberbullying Perpetration
Sara Pabian, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Heidi Vandebosch, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
An Ecological View of Multiplex Participation and Organizing of Voluntary Associations
Chih-Hui Lai, U of Akron, USA
7711
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Waterloo/Tower
7712
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Health Communication Business Meeting
Health Communication
What is Critical Game Studies?
Game Studies
Popular Communication
Participants
Role-Playing the Atom Age: Diplomacy Fanzines and the RAND Corporation
Aaron Trammell, Rutgers U, USA
How Revenue Models Influence the Design of a Game: A Critical Perspective
Patrick Prax, Uppsala U, SWEDEN
From Gold Farmers to Water Army: The Gamification of Cyber-Labor in China
Jin Ge, U of California - San Diego, USA
Productive vs. Pathological: The Two Faces of Chinese Gamers as Consumer Labor
Lin Zhang, U of Southern California, USA
The papers presented in this panel intend to open up new avenues for thinking through critical game
studies. While Kellner’s approach to critical cultural studies was appropriate for thinking through the
cultural production of media in the 20th century, the present information landscape prompts meditation on
several related themes. These include transnational economic flows, cultural approaches to the history of
games, the present ambiguity of work and play, and questions of affective and immaterial labor. In short,
how can game studies scholarship avert the replication of exploitative business practices within the
technological sector? Can we incorporate new ways of understanding and unifying ourselves as a field
that focus on the activist potentials of games rather than their reductive commercial tendencies?
7713
Nonhedonic Entertainment Experiences: Determinants, Nature, and Effects (Panel Session)
Thursday
17:00-18:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Holger Schramm, U of Wuerzburg, GERMANY
Participants
The Role of the Need for Affect in Genre Preferences, Subjective Movie Evaluation Criteria, and the
Appreciation of Dramas
Frank M. Schneider, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Ines Clara Vogel, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Uli Gleich, U Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Markus Appel, U of Linz, AUSTRIA
Anticipated Meaningfulness and Mirth: Partial Explanations of Age Differences in Media Preferences
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin, USA
Anne Bartsch, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
The Role of Age in Eudaimonic Entertainment
Matthias Hofer, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
"Elevation!": Examining the Determinants of Users' Elevation Responses to Short Film Clips
Allison Eden, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tilo Hartmann, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Marie-Louise Mares, U of Wisconsin, USA
Responses to Lifestyle Transforming Reality-Based Television: Appreciating Human Kindness, Dignity,
and Compassion
Mina Tsay-Vogel, Boston U, USA
K. Maja Krakowiak, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
Respondent
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Scholars have theoretically developed and empirically studied several concepts to grasp so-called
nonhedonic entertainment experiences. However, the next step in the process of further examining these
conceptual innovations would be first to explore the factors that determine these experiences (e.g.,
different properties of genres or user characteristics such as age, genre preferences or psychological
traits). Second, it seems expedient to further examine the nature of entertainment experiences that might
challenge one’s view of the world. It seems to entail different cognitive and affective sensations, including
specific emotions like “elevation”, “admiration” and “awe”, or experiences of relatedness, competence,
and a sense that life has meaning. Third, what are (longer lasting) outcomes of more complex
entertainment experiences? Do such experiences affect increased altruism, self-reflection, or the desire to
live one’s life a better way? This panel aims to give some answers to these questions.
7714
Framing and Agenda Setting in the 21st Century
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Mass Communication
Chair
Seth Ashley, Boise State U, USA
Participants
Between Frame-Sending and Frame-Setting: A Conceptualization of how Journalists Contribute to News
Frames
Michael Brueggemann, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
An Experimental Investigation of News Frames and the Hostile Media Effect
Kenneth Eun Han Kim, Oklahoma State U, USA
Chanjung Kim, Oklahoma State U, USA
Connecting Campaign Content and Effects: “Game Frame” and Voter Learning in a U.S. Senate Election
Jason A. Martin, DePaul U, USA
Testing the Effects of Framing on Reader Comments
Brian Moritz, Syracuse U, USA
Greg James Munno, Syracuse U, USA
Extended Agenda-Setting in the Era of the Internet
Manuel Wendelin, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Julia Neubarth, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
7716
The Changing Coverage of Campaigns: The View from the 2012 U.S. Election
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Political Communication
Chair
Kjerstin Thorson, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Political Journalists and Twitter: Influences on Norms and Practices
John Houston Parmelee, U of North Florida, USA
A Commentary Echo Chamber: Twitter as an Information Subsidy in Coverage of U.S. Senate Candidate
Todd Akin
Alecia Swasy, U of Missouri, USA
Gregory Pearson Perreault, U of Missouri, USA
Political Performance and Active Spectatorship: Symbolically Organizing the Polity During the 2012
Democratic National Convention (Top Three Faculty Paper)
Daniel Kreiss, U of North Carolina, USA
Laura Meadows, U of North Carolina, USA
John Remensperger, U of North Carolina, USA
Transformations in Accountability Interviewing: Extended interviews on The Daily Show (.com)
Geoffrey Baym, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Respondent
Paul D'Angelo, The College of New Jersey, USA
7717
Media Portrayals of Interpersonal Issues
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
How Do You Rate Real Life? The Public’s Rating of the Documentary Bully: The Movie
Kelly Patricia Dillon, Ohio State U, USA
Brad Bushman, Ohio State U, USA
I Did it Because I Never Stopped Loving You: Effects of Media Portrayals of Stalking
Julia R Lippman, U of Michigan, USA
Maintaining You and Me: A Content Analysis of Relational Maintenance Behaviors on Prime Time
Television
Courtney E. Anderegg, Ohio State U, USA
Katherine R. Dale, Ohio State U, USA
Jesse Fox, Ohio State U, USA
Messages About Sex on Israeli Television
Keren Eyal, The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, ISRAEL
Yarden Raz, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Michaela Levi, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
7718
Interpersonal Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Cadogan
Interpersonal Communication
7721
Mediations of Gender and Bodies
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Chair
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Popular Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Derek Johnson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
“May the Force Be With Katie”: Pink Media Franchising and the Postfeminist Politics of Her Universe
Derek Johnson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Being Middle-Class as a Matter of Values: Women and Jobs in Popular Hindi Television and Cinema
Joyojeet Pal, U of Michigan, USA
Margaret Young, U of Michigan, USA
Media and the Intersectional Other: The Complex Negotiation of Migration and Gender on German
Television
Margreth Luenenborg, Free U Berlin, GERMANY
Elfriede Fursich, Boston College, GERMANY
“A Boy Once Broken”: Framing Oscar Pistorius’s Disability Within the 2012 Olympic Games
Sim Butler, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
“Why Women Like Boy’s Love Novels?”: Chinese Fujoshi Subculture and its Communication Practices
Around Boy’s Love Novels
Yuan Gong, U of Massachusetts, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
7723
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
7724
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
7725
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Public Relations Business Meeting
Public Relations
Chair
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Children, Adolescents, and the Media Business Meeting
Children Adolescents and Media
Language and Social Interaction Business Meeting
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Participants
Theresa R. Castor, U of Wisconsin - Parkside, USA
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of New Hampshire, USA
Alena L. Vasilyeva, Minsk State Linguistic U, BELARUS
7726
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
7727
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Intercultural Communication Business Meeting
Intercultural Communication
Pre-Industrial Limits of Paper Manufacturing and Their Impact on Print Culture: Historical
Parallels With the Spectrum Scarcity Debate
Communication History
Participants
From Rags to Riches: The Regulation of Paper Production in Renaissance Italy
Juraj Kittler, St. Lawrence U, USA
Paper Scarcity Issues and Print Business in Colonial America
Roger Mellen, New Mexico State U, USA
Press, Paper Prices and Public Sphere: The Rise of a Mass Press in Detroit, 1870-1900
Richard L. Kaplan, , USA
The Space for News: Ether and Paper in North America, 1900-1940
Michael Stamm, Michigan State U, USA
The Language of Scarcity an the New and Old Media in Portugal, 1939-1945
Nelson Costa Ribeiro, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Respondent
John Nerone, U of Illinois, USA
Since the 1920s, regulatory policies of most Western societies have evolved from the premise that
“spectrum scarcity” makes broadcast communication diametrically different from print technologies. Yet
up until its mass production in the industrial mills of the late nineteenth century, paper used to be a scarce
commodity itself. In the first four centuries after Gutenberg’s invention, paper was produced mainly from
old rags and manufactured in very limited quantities. Consequently, the genuinely occurring, but also
perceived or at some point even artificially created shortage of paper shaped the print era in a manner that
has many historical parallels with limitations peculiar to the electronic spectrum during the early stages of
the age of broadcasting.
7728
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
7731
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Board Room 1
7732
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Board Room 2
7733
Thursday
17:00-18:15
Board Room 3
Visual Communication Studies Business Meeting
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) Business Meeting
Sponsored Sessions
This is a business meeting where members of Korean American Communication Association (KACA)
discuss matters relevant to KACA. This year, we invite professors from US and Korea to discuss about
hiring trends in both countries. The panelists include: Hye-Ryeon Lee, U of Hawaii-Manoa, USA YongChan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF Minsun Shim, Inha U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF Hanna
Park, Middle Tennessee State U, USA
Communication Law and Policy Business Meeting
Communication Law & Policy
Contact Settings of Intergroup Communication
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Participants
Behind the Scenes: Domestic Students’ Perspectives on Interactions With International Students on a
South Florida University Campus
Jasmine Rene Phillips, U of Miami, USA
Intergroup Contact in Computer-Mediated Communication: Effects of a Disconfirming Behaviour and
Group Membership on Out-Group Evaluations
Salvador Alvidrez, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Valeriano Piñeiro, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
María Marcos, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Jose Luis Rojas, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
All Nonaccommodation is Not Created Equal: Differential Effects of Over- and Underaccommodation on
Perceptions of Social Distance
Jessica Gasiorek, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
A Pilot Study to Understand Physician Categorization: Implications for Patient-Provider Communication
Parul Jain, Ohio U, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
7801
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Sandringham
7801
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Sandringham
7801
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Sandringham
7801
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Sandringham
Communication History, Feminist Scholarship, Global Communication and Social Change, and
Philosophy, Theory and Critique Joint Reception
Communication History
Feminist Scholarship, Communication History, Global Communication and Social Change, and
Philosophy, Theory, and Critique Joint Reception
Feminist Scholarship
Global Communication and Social Change, Communication History, Feminist Scholarship, and
Philosophy, Theory, and Critique Joint Reception
Global Communication and Social Change
Philosophy, Theory, and Critique, Communication History, Feminist Scholarship, and Global
Communication and Social Change Joint Reception
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
7805
Political Communication Reception
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Palace A
Political Communication
7806
Organizational Communication Reception
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chairs
Disraelly Cruz, U of South Dakota, USA
Ted Zorn, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Organizational Communication Division members are invited to enjoy a drink, some nibbles, and good
company at an off-site venue to be announced at the OCD Business Meeting. Sponsored by Management
Communication Quarterly.
7811
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Waterloo/Tower
Health Communication Reception
Health Communication
7814
In Memoriam: The Legacy of Charles K. Atkin
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Regent's
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Judee K. Burgoon, U of Arizona, USA
Participants
Bradley S. Greenberg, Michigan State U, USA
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Kami J. Silk, Michigan State U, USA
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Charles Atkin was one of the most prolific and honored scholars in our field and someone who left a very
significant mark on scholarship and policy in media, political, campaign and health arenas. Speaking to
his legacy in these various streams of research are his colleagues, co-authors and collaborators spanning
four decades of research. Each presenter will review different aspects of Chuck's research and its impact
on communication scholarship and policy.
7823
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
7824
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Public Relations Reception
Public Relations
Children, Adolescents, and the Media Reception
Children Adolescents and Media
7826
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
7831
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Board Room 1
7847
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Dining Room
7847
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Dining Room
7857
Thursday
18:30-19:30
Board Room 2
7873
Thursday
18:30-20:00
Private Reception
Intercultural Communication Reception
Intercultural Communication
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) Reception
Sponsored Sessions
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) and the Nam Center for Korean Studies at
University of Michigan will cohost a reception for their members and guests.
Environmental Communication and Visual Communication Studies Joint Reception (OFF SITE)
Environmental Communication
Time and place will be announced at a later date.
Visual Communication Studies and Environmental Communication Joint Reception (OFF SITE)
Visual Communication Studies
Time and location will be announced at a later date.
Communication Law and Policy Reception
Communication Law and Policy
Cosponsored by The Donald McGannon Communication Research Center and Penn State's Institute of
Information Policy home of the Journal of Information Policy.
Language and Social Interaction Reception
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Participants
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of New Hampshire, USA
Alena L. Vasilyeva, Minsk State Linguistic U, BELARUS
The Windsor Castle Pub, 27-29 Crawford Place London W1H 4LJ, United Kingdom
8102
Where is Cultural Home? In Search of a Sense of Place Among Multicultural Individuals
Friday
09:00-10:15
Balmoral
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Finding a “Home” Beyond Culture: The Emergence of Intercultural Personhood in the Globalizing World
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
The Fate of the Minority Bilingual: Assimilation or Hybridization?
Richard Clement, U of Ottawa, CANADA
Multiculturalism, Identities and Acculturation in Immigrant Groups in the Netherlands
Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg U, THE NETHERLANDS
Growing up Among Worlds: Identity Negotiation of Second-Generation Chinese Migrants in Australia
Shuang Liu, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
This panel explores identity negotiation of multicultural and multilingual individuals, their sense of
cultural home, their identity conflict, and their psychological well-being. The four papers represent
intercultural research in four multicultural nations: USA, Canada, the Netherlands and Australia. The
papers collectively address the critical issue of searching for a “cultural home” in a multicultural society,
challenge the common conceptions about cultural identities, and suggest directions for future research.
8105
Immigration, Racial Attitudes, and Right-Wing Populism
Friday
09:00-10:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Birtherism, Racial Attitudes, and Media Use
Michael W. Traugott, U of Michigan, USA
Ashley E Jardina, U of Michigan, USA
Media Effects on Racial Attitudes: Evidence From Two Panel Surveys in Germany
Christian Schemer, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Media Cues and Citizen Support for Right-Wing Populist Parties
Penelope Helen Sheets, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Linda Bos, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hajo Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Owning the Immigration Issue
Bjoern Burscher, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Joost van Spanje, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8106
Studying Authority in Practice and Action From A Distance: A CCO Perspective
Friday
09:00-10:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Participants
Without Texts No Author/Authority! Studying the Power of Materiality to Act From a Distance
Consuelo Vasquez, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
Acceptance of Authority: Agents in the Accomplishment of Open and Distance Learning
Jean Anda Saludadez, U of the Philippines Open U, PHILIPPINES
Respondent
James R. Taylor, U de Montréal, CANADA
This panel engages questions of authority and its key role in understanding the constitution of
organization (Taylor & Van Every, 2011). It raises different issues about how to study authority from a
distance, how to account for it, and how to analyze it taking a communicative and practice-centered
perspective. Empirical studies in distinct organizational settings and regions of the world focus on
“authority at a distance” and explore the various ways by which sources of authorities are constantly
invoked and mobilized in discourse and interaction. With communication as the starting point of their
inquiry, these studies analyze how power relationships are enacted in practice.
8107
The Human Challenge in Information Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D)
research
Friday
09:00-10:15
Palace C
Communication and Technology
Chairs
Mark Levy, Michigan State U, USA
Han Ei Chew, United Nations U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Impact of Information Society Research in the Global South
Arul Chib, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Understanding Context for Designing ICTs for Global Development: Lessons From India
Edward Cutrell, Microsoft Research, INDIA
Challenges in ICT-Enabled Knowledge Sharing Among Agricultural Extension Workers in Lao PDR
Borort Sort, United Nations U, MACAU
Peter Haddawy, United Nations U, MACAU
Mattering Matters: Measuring Women Empowerment and Mobile Phone Use
Han Ei Chew, United Nations U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Vigneswara Ilavarasan, Indian Institute of Management Rohtak, INDIA
Mark Levy, Michigan State U, USA
The panel session brings together leading ICT4D researchers from across the world to examine the human
challenges in ICT4D research. Collectively, the papers in the session address the challenges in designing
ICT4D solutions as well as in assessing the impact of communication technologies on users. Goals of the
session include increasing the visibility of ICT4D scholarship among scholars of communication and
technology, encouraging communication and technology researchers to share theory and methods with
scholars in ICT4D studies and, in turn, considering how the interdisciplinary scholarship of ICT4D might
enhance work by CAT scholars. In addition, the panel will serve as a platform for discussing the
difficulties and opportunities in implementing technology-enabled solutions for poverty reduction.
8108
2014 Seattle Conference Planning Meeting
Friday
09:00-11:45
York
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Participants
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
Erica L. Scharrer, U of Massachusetts, USA
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Seamus Simpson, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Merav Katz-Kimchi, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Nicholas David Bowman, West Virginia U, USA
Adrienne Shaw, Temple U, USA
Travers Scott, Clemson U, USA
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Aaron R. Boyson, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Janice Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Theresa R. Castor, U of Wisconsin - Parkside, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Alison Mary Virginia Hearn, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Matt Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Natalia Rybas, Indiana U East, USA
Kevin B. Wright, Saint Louis U, USA
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Stephen Michael Croucher, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
Hua Wang, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
This meeting is for all Division and Interest Group planners for the 2014 conference in Seattle. All
sections need to be represented.
8109
Social Network and Social Influence
Friday
09:00-10:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Stephanie Tom Tong, Wayne State U, USA
Participants
Online Social Influence: Past, Present, and Future
Young Ji Kim, U of Southern California, USA
Like What You See? A Qualitative Exploration of Peer Influence Exerted Through the Display of Likes
on Facebook Pages
Tina Ganster, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
The Social Network Effect: The Determinants of Donations on Social Media Sites
Gregory Douglas Saxton, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Lili Wang, Arizona State U, USA
How Social Media Influences College Students’ Smoking Attitudes and Susceptibility: Focused on the
Influence of Presumed Influence Model
Woohyun Yoo, U of Wisconsin, USA
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Eunji Cho, U of Wisconsin, USA
8111
Friday
09:00-10:15
Waterloo/Tower
Challenging Issues Surrounding HIV Prevention Campaigns
Health Communication
Chair
Erin K. Maloney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Mass Media as HIV Prevention Information Sources Among Female Sex Workers in Beijing, China
Zhiwen Xiao, U of Houston, USA
Xiaoming Li, Wayne State U, USA
Li Zeng, Arkansas State U, USA
Empowering Women to Increase Condom Use: A Meta-Analysis of Empowerment HIV Prevention
Intervention Effectiveness
Janeane Nicole Anderson, U of Southern California, USA
Tanzanian Self Efficacy: Meta-Analysis of HIV Prevalence Research Through Situational Context
Perspective
Sarah Ward Merritt, American U, USA
James Kiwanuka-Tondo, North Carolina State U, USA
The Influence of Viewers’ Perceived Risk, Regulatory Focus, Behavior Inhibition/Activation System on
the Persuasiveness of Framed HIV Test Promotion Messages
Shawnika Jeanine Hull, U of Wisconsin, USA
Yangsun Hong, U of Wisconsin, USA
8112
Friday
09:00-10:15
Chelsea/Richmond
Social Contexts and Consequences of Games
Game Studies
Chair
Michael Schmierbach, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
A New Name for the Game: eSports Fans and Spectatorship
Elizabeth Newbury, Cornell U, USA
Playing Video Games to Become an Active Citizen? The Influence of Learning Prosocial Behaviors on
Real Life Civic Engagement
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Qinyuen Wong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Effects of Evaluative Reviews on Market Success in the Video Game Industry
Brett Sherrick, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael Schmierbach, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Video Game Involvement and Social Skills: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Rachel Kowert, U Münster, GERMANY
Video Game Therapy? The Use of Video Games to Cope With Stress
Jinghui (Jove) Hou, U of Southern California, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
8113
Beyond the Qualitative/Quantitative Dichotomy: Q Methodology as an Innovative Approach to
Audience Research (Panel Session)
Friday
09:00-10:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Kim Christian Schroder, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Participants
A Q Case Study: Researching Student Experiences in Art Gallery Education
Christian Kobbernagel, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Q Methodology as a Facilitator of Comparative Research: Exploring Landscapes of News Consumption
Cross-Nationally
Cedric Courtois, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Kim Christian Schroder, Roskilde U, DENMARK
On the Integration of Theory Within Q Research Design
Carolyn Michelle, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Large Cross-Cultural Q Research Projects Require Particular Operational and Analytical Approaches
Charles H. Davis, Ryerson U, CANADA
In this panel, a group of international scholars involved with a large-scale study of receptions of The
Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey will discuss the potential uses and challenges of Q methodology for
audience research. A methodological hybrid concerned with revealing similarities and differences in
people’s viewpoints, attitudes, beliefs, or experiences, Q methodology provides insight into audience
subjectivities in a richer way than that provided by conventional surveys, while providing more structure
and better replicability than purely qualitative approaches such as focus groups or ethnographic
observation. Thus, we believe this panel will be of interest to qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods
researchers interested in new approaches to studying individual and collective subjective responses to
various aspects of the communication circuit.
8114
Professional Roles Revisited: Between the Rhetoric on Role Conceptions and Journalistic
Performance
Friday
09:00-10:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Participants
Journalistic Roles and Revisiting Gatekeeping
Tim P. Vos, U of Missouri, USA
Journalistic Ideals Versus Journalistic Practice: The Relationship Between Role Perception and Valued
Skills Among Journalists in Six European Countries
Henrik Ornebring, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Between Rhetorics and Performance: Comparing Journalistic Role Conceptions and News Reporting
Styles Among Chilean Journalists
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Arjen van Dalen, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Facts From Friends: How Journalists’ Roles Influence Their Interaction With Politicians
Lea C. Hellmueller, U of Texas, USA
Professional Roles in News Content: Six Models of Journalistic Role Performance
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Respondents
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
This panel discusses how journalistic practices can be explained and operationalized by applying the
concept of professional roles as well as the relationship between professional role conception and role
performance. Journalism studies need a more thorough understanding of the processes of professional
practice in relation to the ideals of professional roles. In a contemporary era characterized by a journalistic
‘crisis of identity’, such scholarly effort is even more urgent. To accomplish that goal, the panel gathers
journalism scholars to analyze the evaluative and performative levels of journalism culture. Specifically,
the papers of the panel present conceptual and empirical examinations on key skills valued by journalists
as an indicator of role performance, new operationalizations of journalistic roles in content and the
relation between roles perception and role enactment, the influence of journalist´ roles on their reportying
styles and interation with politicians, and a re-examination of the standard gatekeeping model in light of
these issues.
8116
Tweeting the News: Adding Twitter and Social Media to Journalism
Friday
09:00-10:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Seth C. Lewis, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Inverting the Pyramid? The Interactions of Elite and Nonelite U.S. Political Journalists on Twitter
Kyle Heim, Seton Hall U, USA
Is Twitter an Alternative Medium? Comparing Gulf Coast Twitter and Newspaper Coverage of the 2010
BP Oil Spill
Brendan R. Watson, U of Minnesota, USA
The Social Journalist: Embracing the Social Media Life or Creating a New Digital Divide?
Ulrika Hedman, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Monika Anna Lena Djerf-Pierre, U of Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Why People Post News Through SNS? A Focus on Technology Adoption, Media Bias, and Partisanship
Strength (Top Three Student Paper)
Jayeon Lee, Ohio State U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyunjin Song, Ohio State U, USA
We Get "Marching Orders to Tweet": The Ethical Challenges of Digital Dilemmas for Professional
Journalists and the Rest of Us
Anup Kumar, Cleveland State U, USA
8117
Narrative Processes in Media
Friday
09:00-10:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Participants
I Would Ask Her Out if I Wasn’t a Cop: Vicarious Interaction, Perspective-Taking and Narrative
Comprehension
Daniel G. McDonald, Ohio State U, USA
James Collier, Ohio State U, USA
Katherine R. Dale, Ohio State U, USA
Kaitlyn Jones, Ohio State U, USA
Shu-Fang Lin, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
Influence of Narrative Trailer Political Advertising on Transportation and Resistance to Persuasion
Shane Michael Semmler, U of South Dakota, USA
The Nature and Embodiment of Narrative Engagement
Freya Sukalla, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Helena Bilandzic, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Paul David Bolls, U of Missouri, USA
Rick W. Busselle, Bowling Green State U, USA
The Triplets and the Incredible Shrinking Narrative. Transmedia Storytelling, Adaptation and Narrative
Expansion/Compression Strategies
Carlos Alberto Scolari, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
8118
Strategies for Marketing Brands, Ads, and Causes
Friday
09:00-10:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
Participants
A Negation Bias in Word of Mouth: How Negations Reveal and Maintain Expectancies About Brands and
Products
Camiel J. Beukeboom, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peeter Verlegh, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Making Ads Easy, Creative, and Persuasive: Effects of Conventional Metaphors and Irony in Print
Advertising
Christian Burgers, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Elly A. Konijn, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gerard J. Steen, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marlies A. R. Iepsma, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Positively Valenced Calming Political Ads Influence the Correspondence Between Implicit and Explicit
Attitudes
Florian Arendt, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Franziska Marquart, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Jorg Matthes, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
“That’s-Not-All” as a Media Influence Strategy: Exploring the Role of Excitement in Motivating
Purchase Desire
Robin Nabi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Marko Dragojevic, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ethan Hartsell, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ariel Hasell, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Katlyn Elise Roggensack, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
J. Michael Mangus, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
“This Program Contains Advertising”: How the Timing of Sponsorship Disclosure Influences Critical
Processing of Sponsored Content
Sophie Carolien Boerman, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Comparing the Effectiveness of Personalization and Tailoring for Charitable Fundraising Campaigns
Ewa Halina Maslowska, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Avatars and Expectations: Influencing Perceptions in an Online Consumer Setting
Rory Peter McGloin, U of Connecticut, USA
Kristine L. Nowak, U of Connecticut, USA
James H. Watt, U of Connecticut, USA
The “Foot-in-the-Door” Compliance-Gaining Effect and Psychological Moderators
Maria Leonora (Nori) G. Comello, U of North Carolina, USA
Jessica Gall Myrick, U of North Carolina, USA
April L. Raphiou, U of North Carolina, USA
8121
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Authority and Algorithm: Recommendation, Filtering, and Discovery in Popular Culture
Popular Communication
Participants
Lost in the Shuffle: A History of Musical Randomness
Devon Powers, Drexel U, USA
Curation by Code
Jeremy Wade Morris, U of Wisconsin, USA
Journalism and Popular Music: Converging Modes of Filtering
Henrik Bødker, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Branded Recommendation: Music Licensing Software and the Standardizing Search
Leslie M. Meier, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Respondent
Fernando Bermejo, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Through the insights music provides, this international panel considers how the increased delegation of
recommendation and curation activities to technology suggests we are moving from a world where “life is
random” to a world where it categorically isn’t.
8122
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Global and Local Advocacy for Social Change
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Catherine Harbour, BBC Media Action, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Do Transnational Advocacy Groups Remedy, or Reinforce, Global Attention Inequalities?
Matthew Powers, New York U, USA
Normative Influence, Household Smoking Restrictions, and Communication in Minya, Egypt
Catherine Harbour, BBC Media Action, UNITED KINGDOM
Speaking for Women's Rights in Pakistan: The Voice of Benazir Bhutto
Julia A. Spiker, U of Akron, USA
Strategic Climate Change Campaigns: A Case Study of Earth Hour
Marianne D. Sison, RMIT U, AUSTRALIA
8123
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and Communication Channels
Public Relations
Chair
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
A Social Networks Approach to Public Relations on Twitter: Social Mediators and Mediated Public
Relations
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Guy J. Golan, Syracuse U, USA
Bitt Beach Moon, Syracuse U, USA
Ryan J Suto, Syracuse U, USA
From Monophonic to Jazzy Integrated Communications
Simon Torp, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
If a Picture is Worth a Thousand Words, Are a Thousand Words Worth a Picture? Comparing the Effects
of Vivid Writing and Photographs on Moral Judgment in Public Relations
Rebecca Ann McEntee, U of Texas, USA
Carolyn Yaschur, U of Texas, USA
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
Privacy Concerns When Using Facebook: Does Relational Context Matter?
Kyung Jung Han, U of Missouri, USA
Bryan H. Reber, U of Georgia, USA
8124
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
How Do You Know?: Studies of Believability, Authenticity, and Epistemology
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Leah Sprain, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Believability: Epistemic Stance in Interviews With Abused Children (Top Student Paper)
Clara Iversen, Uppsala U, SWEDEN
“What Happened?” From Talk to Text in Police Interrogations
Tessa van Charldorp, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Communicating Deception: Differences in Language Use
Lyn M. Van Swol, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Braun, U of Wisconsin, USA
The (In)Authenticity of Simulated Talk: Comparing Role-Played and Actual Interaction
Elizabeth Stokoe, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
The Development of the "Quick Question" Instant Messaging Genre: Social Networking and the Moral
Economy of Contribution in "Connected” Organizations
Christian Licoppe, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Serge Proulx, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Renato Cudicio, U du Québec à Montréal, CANADA
8125
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Digital Crossroads: Youth, Migration, Diasporas and Networked Learning
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Olga Bailey, Nottingham Trent U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Digital Diasporas: Media, Postcoloniality, and Identity
Sandra Ponzanesi, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Intersectional Micropolitics of Digitized Identities and Digital Inequalities
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Learning Networks of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Youth: Reconsidering Learning
Mariëtte de Haan, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondents
Alexander Dhoest, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Alison Harvey, U of Toronto, CANADA
In this panel we will present the findings of a five-year research project “Wired Up” conducted in the
Netherlands which focused on the study the digital activities and identities of migrant youths. The panel
will illustrate the different theoretical perspectives adopted in this interdisciplinary project and present
some of the results and insights that focus on how race and ethnicity, along with the analysis of national
and transnational dynamics, inflect the online behaviour of young migrants online. We will explore, in
particular, how new forms of youthful digital diasporas are re-constituted across local and global spaces,
online and offline settings, creating multiple worlds of relations and identifications that go beyond the
straightjackets of ethnic, national, gender, religious and linguistic categories.
8126
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Theoretical and Methodological "Frames" for Visual Studies
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
Fractured Paradigm? Theories, Concepts, and Methodology of Visual Framing Research: A Systematic
Review
Cornelia Brantner, U of Virginia, USA
Stephanie Geise, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Katharina Lobinger, U of Bremen, GERMANY
Putting the Image Back Into the Frame: Modeling the Linkage Between Visual Communication and
Frame-Processing Theory
Stephanie Geise, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Christian Baden, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
"Participatory" Visual Research Revisited
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Understanding the Visual in Team Communication: A Collaborative Dimensions Approach
Sabrina Bresciani, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Martin J. Eppler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
The Hermeneutic Sublime: Fisting, Famine, and Frames
Melanie Joy McNaughton, Bridgewater State U, USA
The Role of Images for a Virtual 3D Reconstruction of Historic Artifacts
Sander Muenster, Dresden U of Technology, GERMANY
8127
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
8128
Friday
09:00-10:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Edifying Communication: Dialogue, Images, and Rhetoric
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
Challenging Communication Research: Toward a Practical Theory of Dialogic Classroom Discussion
Heidi Lynn Muller, U of Northern Colorado, USA
From Media Competence to New Literacies: Questioning the Literacification of Everything
Theo Hug, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
The Image is (Not) the Event: Negotiating the Pedagogy of Controversial Images
Sharrona Pearl, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Alexandra Sastre, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Toward a Theory of Metonymy With Implications for “The Poor”
Robin P. Clair, Purdue U, USA
Popular International Media on Gender: Taiwan News, French Pop Magazines, Cosmo in China,
Dutch Ads
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Mary Douglas Vavrus, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Feminism and Social Change: Women’s Place in Taiwan Newspaper and Public Opinion
Ping Shaw, National Sun Yat-Sen U, TAIWAN
Yue Tan, National Sun Yat-Sen U, TAIWAN
Forward to the Past? A Longitudinal Exploration of Gender Portrayal in Dutch Television Commercials
Serena Daalmans, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Ellen Hijmans, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Fred Wester, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Making a Sexual Contract? Discourse Analysis on the Construction of Female Sexual Subjectivity in
Cosmopolitan China From 1999-2011
qi ling, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
The Intimacy of Imagined Communities: New Possibilities for French Women Through Postwar Popular
Magazines
Edward Timke, U of Michigan, USA
8131
Friday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 1
International Encyclopedia Advisory Board
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Elizabeth P. Swayze, Wiley-Blackwell, US
Participants
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Akiba A. Cohen, Emek Yezreel Academic College, ISRAEL
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Youichi Ito, Akita International U, JAPAN
Hans Mathias Kepplinger, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Paolo Mancini, U di Perugia, ITALY
Robin Mansell, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Denis McQuail, U of Amsterdam, UNITED KINGDOM
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Alvaro Rojas Guzman, U Autónoma de Occidente, COLOMBIA
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Janet Wasko, U of Oregon, USA
Jane B. Singer, U of Iowa, USA
Michael E. Roloff, Northwestern U, USA
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Gianpietro Mazzoleni, U of Milan, ITALY
Young Yim Kim, Korea National Open U, USA
Klaus Bruhn Jensen, U of Copenhagen, DK
Hans-Bernd Brosius, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Robert N. Gaines, U of Maryland, USA
Bruce Gronbeck, n/a, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
John O. Greene, Purdue U, USA
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Carroll J. Glynn, Ohio State U, USA
Winfried Schulz, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Rebecca B. Rubin, Kent State U, USA
Katherine Miller, Arizona State U, USA
A. A. Betteke Van Ruler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Robert L. Heath, U of Houston, USA
K. Viswanath, Harvard U, USA
Cynthia Luanne Carter, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Debra L. Merskin, U of Oregon, USA
John Downing, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Juergen Wilke, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Kyu Ho Youm, U of Oregon, USA
Renee Hobbs, U of Rhode Island, USA
Joanne Cantor, U of Wisconsin, USA
8132
Friday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 2
Policy Failure in Confronting the Journalism Crisis: Evidence From the US and Europe
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
US: The Return of the Nervous Liberals: A Market Fundamentalist Approach to the Journalism Crisis
Victor W. Pickard, U of Pennsylvania, USA
UK: The Phone Hacking Crisis: What Happens to Media Policy When the Shit Hits the Fan
Natalie Fenton, International Association for Media and Communication Research, UNITED
KINGDOM
Des Freedman, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Switzerland: The Role of Research in Nondecision Making and Delaying Action
Manuel Puppis, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Sweden: Are Direct Press Subsidies the Preferred Solution?
Lars W. Nord, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Respondent
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
The media and especially newspapers are in a profound structural crisis. The resources available to news
organizations are shrinking, bringing about repeated buyouts and even newspaper closures. Increasingly,
scholars are voicing concerns about the repercussions of this media crisis for democracy, worrying that
whole sectors of civic life will go dark. While many commentators suggest that this crisis was caused by a
combination of the recession and the internet luring away readers and advertisers, the latter is also often
characterized as a possible salvation for journalism. Others observe that despite the many promises that
new online platforms holds for enhanced democracy, relatively few websites are journalistic in nature.
The proposed panel session sheds light on governments’ policy inaction in confronting the journalism
crisis. Bringing together scholars from the US and Europe, the panel consists of four presentations and a
subsequent discussion initiated by a respondent.
8133
Friday
09:00-10:15
Board Room 3
Instruction and Teaching in the 21st Century: Using Technology in the Classroom
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Communication and Technology
Chairs
Kathy Denker, Ball State U, USA
Lesile A. Rill, Portland State U, USA
Participants
A Tough Act to Follow: An Examination of Cognitive Performance and Attitudes Toward Multitasking in
Five Multimedia, Multitasking Classroom Environments
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Angela Tran, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Robert McMenemy, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Nahom Abegaze, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
College Students’ Adoption of New Media Production Technologies: The Role of Antecedents Over Time
Tobias M Hopp, U of Oregon, USA
Harsha Gangadharbatla, U of Oregon, USA
Learning in Digital Worlds: Commercial Video Games and Online Communities
Pilar Lacasa, U of Alcala, SPAIN
Laura Mendez-Zaballos, U Nacional de Educación a Distancia, SPAIN
Maria Rut Garcia-Pernia, U of Alcala, SPAIN
Maria Jose Estables, U of Alcala, SPAIN
Me, Myself, and My Eduction: Technology and Personalized Learning
Lisa Marie Barnard, U of North Carolina, USA
Because the process of teaching and learning is evolving, these papers examine the effects of technology
in face-to-face and online learning environments.
8202
Challenging Digital Communication Research: The Role of Social Theory
Friday
10:30-11:45
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Chair
Guobin Yang, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Media Systems and the Production of Value
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Music, Capabilities, and Flourishing in the Digital Era
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Classics of Social Theory and the Challenge of Digital Media: Simmel and Touraine
Leah A. Lievrouw, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Remediating Theory
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Social Theory and Digital Activism
Guobin Yang, U of Pennsylvania, USA
This theme session proposal addresses the conference theme by examining how social theory may help to
meet the challenges facing digital communication research. While expanding the boundaries of
communication research, the field of digital communication research faces serious challenges. This
roundtable brings together five scholars to explore the opportunities and challenges facing digital
communication research. Our hypothesis is that social theory, broadly defined, may be made to play a
bigger role in these endeavors. Panelists will examine how social theory may help to conceptualize and
analyze digital media institutions, practices, and forms, and what specific theories and theorists may be
appropriated.
8205
Effects of Political Communication I
Friday
10:30-11:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Lesile A. Rill, Portland State U, USA
Participants
Competitive Frames and Motivated Processing: Examining the Role of Ambivalence in Value Framing
Effects
Porismita Borah, Washington State U, USA
Effects of Partisan Rhetoric on Attention and Influence in the Blogosphere
Christopher Brown, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Devra C. Moehler, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Elizabeth Roodhouse, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Incivility in Political Discussion: Effects on Expressed Disagreement and Agreement, and OpenMindedness
Hyunseo Hwang, U of California - Davis, USA
Youngju Kim, U of Alabama, USA
Yeo Jin Kim, U of Alabama, USA
It’s Funny: but is it Appropriate? Political Humor in the Media and its Conditional Effects on Citizens’
Social Trust and Efficacy
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8206
Organizing the Social: Social Media Use in Organizations
Friday
10:30-11:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Matthew Scott Weber, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
The Promise of Social: Improving Work Outcomes in Large Multinational Organizations Through the Use
of Collaborative Technology
Heewon Kim, Rutgers U, USA
Matthew Scott Weber, Rutgers U, USA
Message Wars in the Blogosphere: Organizational Sensemaking in the 2007-2008 Writers Guild Strike
Ryan Patrick Fuller, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Katherine Sarah Holland, U of California – Santa Barbara, USA
Linda L. Putnam, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Connected to Impress: Communication Managers and Self-Representation on Social Media
Johannes Christian Fieseler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Giulia Ranzini, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Millennials’ Attitudes Toward Organizational Social Media Policies: Effects on Expected Openness,
Innovativeness, and Organizational Attractiveness
Jaehee Cho, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
Dong-Jin Park, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Talking Through Technology: The Duality of Maintaining Internal and External Organizational
Relationships Through Social Media
Muge Haseki, Rutgers U, USA
Matthew Scott Weber, Rutgers U, USA
When Social Media Meets Workplace Settings: Differing Technological Frames and Expectations of
Organizational Members
Jeffrey William Treem, U of Texas, USA
Stephanie Layne Dailey, U of Texas, USA
Casey B Spruill, Northwestern U, USA
The Worker as Politician: How Electoral Heuristics and Online Information Shape Personnel Selection
and Careers
Brenda L. Berkelaar, U of Texas, USA
Joshua M. Scacco, U of Texas, USA
Jeffrey L Birdsell, U of Texas, USA
What Does Really Matter in Organization Wikis? A Sociomaterial Approach
Thomas Martine, Heidelberg U, GERMANY
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Aurélien Bénel, U of Technology of Troyes, FRANCE
Manuel Zacklad, U of Trinidad and Tobago, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
Respondents
Michele H. Jackson, U of Colorado, USA
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
In this high density panel, authors will provide brief (3-4 minute) introductions to their research and then
make themselves available to discuss their research one-on-one or in small groups through the aid of an
interactive display. Respondents will provide feedback one-on-one to the authors, and pariticipants will be
invited to listen and join in the discussion.
8207
Political Knowledge and Learning Processes
Friday
10:30-11:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Shira Dvir-Gvirsman, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Participants
How Network Diversity, Centrality, and Context Influence Political Ambivalence, Participation, and
Knowledge
Hyunjin Song, Ohio State U, USA
William P. Eveland, Jr., Ohio State U, USA
Political Knowledge Test Performance as a Function of Venue, Time Pressure, and Performance Norms
Franklin J. Boster, Michigan State U, USA
Hillary Cortney Shulman, North Central College, USA
Spiral of Political Learning. The Reciprocal Relationship of News Media Use and Political Knowledge
Judith Moller, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
State or Trait? Validating the Effect of Elaboration on Learning From the News
Gabi Joachim Schaap, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Paul G. HendriksVettehen, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Doeschka Anschutz, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8209
Emergence of Opinion Leaders in Virtual Networks
Friday
10:30-11:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Kerk F. Kee, Chapman U, USA
Participants
Profiling Opinion Leaders in Twitter Discussion Network: The Case of the Wisconsin Recall Election
Weiai Xu, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Stacy Blasiola, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Yoonmo Sang, U of Texas, USA
Opinion Leadership in Social Networks: Preferential Attachment Versus Reciprocal Linking
Mark Tremayne, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Milad Minooie, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Being Popular While Being Authentic: The Need for Popularity and Authenticity Among Microblogging
Users
Joon Soo Lim, Mississippi State U, USA
Sung-Un Yang, Indiana U, USA
A New Perspective of Opinion Leaders on Twitter
Hitoshi Yamamoto, Rissho U, JAPAN
Kakuko Miyata, Meiji Gakuin U, JAPAN
Yuki Ogawa, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, JAPAN
Kenichi Ikeda, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
8211
Friday
10:30-11:45
Waterloo/Tower
Thinking Outside the Box: Overcoming Communication Challenges in Health Interventions
Health Communication
Chair
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
Participants
Testing Messages to Reduce Smokers’ Openness to Using Novel Smokeless Tobacco Products
Lyudmila Popova, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Torsten Neilands, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Pamela M. Ling, U of California - San Francisco, USA
Changes in Youth Intent to Use Substances Achieved by Dynamic Coupling: Dynamic Growth Modeling
of Community-Based Interventions
Emil Coman, Wesleyan U, USA
Carolyn A. Lin, U of Connecticut, USA
L Suzanne Suggs, ECREA - European Communication Research and Education Association,
SWITZERLAND
Communication Strategies to Redirect Patients From an Urban Hospital Emergency Department to
Primary Healthcare Clinics
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
Melissa Plew, Georgia Southern U, USA
Michael Adam Tannebaum, Georgia State U, USA
Elizabeth L. Cohen, West Virginia U, USA
Exploring the Potential of Communication Infrastructure Theory for Community-Level Health
Communication Interventions
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
8212
Friday
10:30-11:45
Chelsea/Richmond
Playing is Training: What Games Teach Us
Game Studies
Chair
Julia Kneer, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Improving Arithmetic Skills Through an Educational Game
Elena Nunez Castellar, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Jan Van Looy, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Arnaud Szmalec, U Catholique de Louvain, BELGIUM
Lieven De Marez, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Increasing Military Cognitive Readiness Through Computer and Video Game: Based Training
Jorge F. Pena, U of Texas, USA
Nicholas Brody, U of Texas, USA
Chris Miller, The Praevius Group, USA
Macbeth: Development of a Serious Game for the Mitigation of Cognitive Bias
Norah E. Dunbar, U of Oklahoma, USA
Scott Wilson, U of Oklahoma, USA
Bradley Adame, U of Oklahoma, USA
Javier Elizondo, U of Oklahoma, USA
Matthew Jensen, U of Oklahoma, USA
Claude Miller, U of Oklahoma, USA
Abigail Allums, U of Oklahoma, USA
Tobias Seltsam, U of Oklahoma, USA
Elena Bessarabova, U of Oklahoma, USA
Cindy S. Vincent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Sara Straub, U of Oklahoma, USA
Ryan Ralston, U of Oklahoma, USA
Christopher Dulawan, U of Arizona, USA
Dennis Paiz-Ramirez, U of Wisconsin, USA
Kurt Squire, U of Wisconsin, USA
Playing Singly, Playing in Dyads in a Computerized Simulation of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Ronit Kampf, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
The (De-)Evolution of Evolution Games: Analyzing the Accuracy of Evolution Depiction in Video
Games
Alex Page Leith, Michigan State U, USA
Rabindra A. Ratan, Michigan State U, USA
Donghee Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
8213
Harvey Milk’s Queer Inheritance
Friday
10:30-11:45
St. James
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Robert Brookey, Northern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Harvey Milk and the Crumbling Celluloid Closet
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Harvey Milk’s FAIR Future: K-12 Education and Queer Mnemonic World Making
Charles E Morris III, Syracuse U, USA
White Out: Filling the Cipher of Dan White
Thomas K. Nakayama, Northeastern U, USA
This panel marks the 35th anniversary of Harvey Milk’s assassination. Milk passionately lived as an
activist, community builder, stalwart campaigner, and one of the first openly gay U.S. political officials.
And Milk died a martyr, if not immediately, as some will quibble, than surely at the pronouncement of the
unjust, homophobic verdict in his assassin’s trial. Public memory is fraught, mutable, forceful,
consequential, and can be transformative—for GLBTQ people, for everyone. Here we explore Harvey
Milk’s queer inheritance. This panel is fitting not only because of the anniversary, but due to Milk’s
resurgent relevancy in GLBTQ culture and politics in recent years as a result of the 2008 film Milk.
8214
Comparing Media Practices Across Nations
Friday
10:30-11:45
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Jane B. Singer, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
Valued Skills Among Journalists: An Exploratory Comparison of Six European Nations
Henrik Ornebring, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
Media System, Public Knowledge, and Political Engagement: An 11-Nation Study
James Curran, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Sharon Coen, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Stuart Soroka, McGill U, CANADA
Zira Hichy, U di Catania, ITALY
Toril Aalberg, Norwegian U of Science and Technology, NORWAY
Kaori Hayashi, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Shanto Iyengar, Stanford U, USA
Paul Jones, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Gianpietro Mazzoleni, U of Milan, ITALY
Stylianos Papathanassopoulos, National and Kapodistrian U - Athens, GR
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin, USA
Rodney Evan Tiffen, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U of Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
David Rowe, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Pradeep Krishnatray, Mudra Institute of Communications Ahmedabad (MICA), IN
Yukio Maeda, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Assessing the Quality of Media Debates on Unemployment in Six European Countries
Rinaldo Kuehne, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Christian Schemer, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Martin Wettstein, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Katrin Reichel, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Adoption of Social Media Among Journalists in Australia, Canada, France, Finland, Germany, Sweden,
UK, US
Agnes Gulyas, Canterbury Christ Church U, UNITED KINGDOM
Kristine Pole, Canterbury Christ Church U, UNITED KINGDOM
Explaining the Use of Vox Pops in Television News: An International Comparison
Knut De Swert, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8216
News Audiences and New Media: What Do Users Want?
Friday
10:30-11:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Features, Blogs and User-Generated Content Might Not Save Journalism: Evidence From a Comparative
Study of the Supply and Demand of Online News
Pablo J. Boczkowski, Northwestern U, USA
Eugenia mitchelstein, Northwestern U, ARGENTINA
On the Measurement of Reader Preferences for News Topics: An Application of Choice-Based Conjoint
Technique
Vamsi Krishna Kanuri, U of Missouri, USA
Murali Mantrala, U of Missouri, USA
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Newspaper Consumption in the Digital Age: Measuring Multichannel Audience Attention and Brand
Popularity
Neil James Thurman, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
News Consumption Across Platforms: Exploring Media Complementarity and Media Substitution on the
Local Level
Christopher Brott, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Paying for Local Online Newspapers: An Analysis on Paying Intent, Price Elasticity of Demand, and
Predictors of Paying Intent
Mengchieh Jacie Yang, Texas State U, USA
8217
The Role of Social Media in Public Opinion
Friday
10:30-11:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
J. Michael Mangus, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Examining Societal-Level Predictors of Political Discussion in Online Forums
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Hai Liang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Examining the Relationship Between Perceived Opinion Climate Incongruence and Willingness to
Express One’s True Thoughts: A Survey Study From China
Tianjiao Wang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Talking About GM Foods
Sei-Hill Kim, U of South Carolina, USA
Hwalbin Kim, U of South Carolina, USA
Sang Hwa Oh, U of South Carolina, USA
Using Twitter to Assess Public Opinion About Nuclear Power Pre- and Post-Fukushima
Nan Li, U of Wisconsin, USA
Heather Akin, U of Wisconsin, USA
Leona Yi-Fan Su, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael Andrew Xenos, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dominique Brossard, U of Wisconsin, USA
“Was It Something I Said?” “No, It Was Something You Tweeted!” Applying the Spiral of Silence to
Social Media
Sherice Gearhart, Texas Tech U, USA
Weiwu Zhang, Texas Tech U, USA
8218
Advances in Health Communication
Friday
10:30-11:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Autumn Starr Shafer, Texas Tech U, USA
Participants
Do e-Patients “Like” High-Quality Information in Online Health Communities? Content Analysis of
Diabetic Connect
Young Ji Kim, U of Southern California, USA
Framing Effects in Narrative and Nonnarrative Health and Risk Messages
Joseph S Steinhardt, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
The Benefits of Drama and Contemplation: Examining the Mediating Role of Word-Use on Health
Guan-Soon Khoo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
“I Remember the One About…”: Examining Differences in Recall of Public Service Announcements
Elisabeth Bigsby, Northeastern U, USA
Jennifer L. Monahan, U of Georgia, USA
Motivated Processing of Message Frames: Third-Person Gain/Loss Frames and Vividness
Hilary Gamble, U of Missouri, USA
Rachel Lara Davis, U of Missouri, USA
Russell Brent Clayton, U of Missouri, USA
Di Zhu, U of Missouri, USA
Theory of Planned Behavior on Technology Adoption: A Systematic Review
Hsin-yi Sandy Tsai, Michigan State U, USA
Anger, Sadness, and Fear in Response to Breaking Crime and Accident News Stories: How Emotions
Influence Support for Alcohol-Control Public Policies via Concern About Risks
Tyler Solloway, Ohio State U, USA
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
Adrienne Haesun Chung, Ohio State U, USA
Catherine E. Goodall, Kent State U, USA
Effects of a Campaign to Promote Caregiver Self-Care for Parents of Children With Eating Disorders
Autumn Starr Shafer, Texas Tech U, USA
Sheetal Janak Patel, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Cynthia M. Bulik, U of North Carolina, USA
Nancy L. Zucker, Duke U, USA
Development and Evaluation of a Body Image App to Improve Adolescent Girls’ Body Perceptions
Jolanda Veldhuis, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marloes Spekman, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8221
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
New Media Labor: Reconfiguring Audiences and Industries
Popular Communication
Participants
The Labor of Logging On: Affective Labor and Gay Mobile Media
Hollis Griffin, Denison U, USA
Audiences, Captions, and Invisible Labor in Online Media
Elizabeth Ellcessor, Indiana U, USA
Shifty Business: The Communication Flows and Influence of Soundtrack Personnel in Contemporary
Feature Film Production
Natalie Lewandowski, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Networked Jamaican Reggae: Recording, Performance, and Race in a Transnational Music Industry
Benjamin Aslinger, Bentley U, USA
Tzarina Prater, Bentley U, USA
How do we understand the role of digital technologies in the labors carried out by creative professionals
and new media users? How can scholars study the relationships between digital media and labor in ways
that foreground both breaks from and continuities with long-standing paradigms of industry work? How
can this research move away from technological determinism and the fetishism of commodities? United
by their focus on labor, the presentations feature an array of case studies and research methodologies in
order to explore the varied, multivalent relationship between new media technologies and media industry
practices. The common thread across these presentations is how the labor of media users and media
professionals underlines the reconfiguration of audiences and industries in new media environments.
8222
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Bollywood in the Digital Era: Shifting Global Practices and Perspectives
Global Communication and Social Change
Popular Communication
Participants
De-Americanizing Soft Power
Daya Thussu, U of Westminister, UNITED KINGDOM
Twenty-First Century Labour: Globalization and Production Crews in Mumbai’s Media Industries
Sunitha Chitrapu, Sophia Polytechnic, INDIA
Marketing Bollywood: Integrating Traditional and Digital Media Strategies to Reach Local and Global
Audiences
Kavita Karan, Southern Illinois U Carbondale, USA
Brand Bollywood: The Political Economy of Product Placement in Hindi Movies
Azmat Rasul, Florida State U, USA
The 3-Ds of Globalized Bollywood: Digitalization, D-Cinema, and the Demassification of South Asian
Cinematic Public Spheres
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
This panel brings together Hindi film scholars from three continents to address multiple dimensions of the
digitalization-globalization nexus, including its impact upon India’s soft power potential, filmmaking
practices, marketing and product placement techniques, and digital exhibition and consumption.
Together, these presentations paint a dynamic portrait of an industry and culture in transition and suggest
important directions for future research.
8223
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations, Government, and Political Communication
Public Relations
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
Exploring New Frontiers of Agenda Building During the 2012 U.S. Presidential Election Preconvention
Period: Examining Linkages Across Three Levels
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
Ji Young Kim, Bradley U, USA
Matthew Wade Ragas, DePaul U, USA
Gillian Wheat, U of Florida, USA
Sarabdeep K Kochhar, U of Florida, USA
Emma Svensson, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Maridith Dunton Miles, U of Florida, USA
Technological Change and Transparency: The Effect on Government Public Relations
Melissa Wooten Graham, U of Tennessee, USA
Unveiling Government Ideology: Critical Metaphorical Analysis of Citizenship Education Discourse
Mary Lee, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
What is the Role of the Private Sector in Public Diplomacy? A Research Agenda for the Study of Global
Public Relations as Diplomacy
Candace L. White, U of Tennessee, USA
8224
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Exploring Relationships With Characters and Affinities Toward Media Forms
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
A Predictive Model of Young Children’s Parasocial Relationship Development
Bradley J Bond, U of San Diego, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
Parental Socialization of Children’s Internet Use
Wonsun Shin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participatory Influence Within Parent-Child Dyads: Rethinking the Transmission Model of Socialization
Leticia Bode, Georgetown U, USA
Emily Vraga, George Mason U, USA
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Stephanie Edgerly, Northwestern U, USA
Kjerstin Thorson, U of Southern California, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Christopher Wells, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Impact of “Unplugged” Day in the Life of Journalism Students
Cristina Maria Pulido, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Nuria Simelio, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Santigo Tejedor, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Beatriz Carballido Villarejo, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Beatriz Cervino, U Autónoma de Barcelona, SPAIN
Young Children’s Positive and Negative Parasocial Relationships With Media Characters
Meryl Alper, U of Southern California, USA
Nancy Jennings, U of Cincinnati, USA
Respondent
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8225
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
It's Not Easy Being Green: Hopping Along With Environmental Advertising and Consumerism
Environmental Communication
Chair
Katherine E. Rowan, George Mason U, USA
Participants
Green Makes it Feels Good: Articulating the Euphoria Appeal of Sustainable Consumption Through
Social-Media Conversations
T. E. Dominic Yeo, Hong Kong Baptist U, HONG KONG
How the Effectiveness of Environmental Advertising is Influenced by Mood-Message Regulatory Frame
Interactions
George Anghelcev, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Sela Sar, Iowa State U, USA
Brittany R. L. Duff, U of Illinois, USA
The Skeptical Green Consumer Revisited: Testing the Relationship Between Green Consumerism and
Skepticism Toward Advertising
Jorg Matthes, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Anke Wonneberger, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
The Green Meme: Perception, Reality and the Prevalence of Environmental Appeals in US TV
Advertising
Lee Ahern, Pennsylvania State U, USA
8226
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Locating the Trans/National in a Globalized Media Terrain
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Lina Dencik, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Alternative News Sites and the Complexities of "Space"
Lina Dencik, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Borders as Information Flows and Trasnational Networks
Peter Shields, Eastern Washington U, USA
Globalization or Renationalization? The Transformation of Chinese Television Programs Since 1997
Hong Zhang, Zhejiang U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Transnational Media and the European Public Sphere: An Exploratory Analysis of France 24’s Talking
Europe Program
Christopher Michael Toula, Georgia State U, USA
8227
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Precarity: Critical Discourse and Response to Disparity
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
The Lived Body: A Case Study in Disability Rhetoric
Michael Joseph Hyde, Wake Forest U, USA
Precarity: Critical Discourse and Response to the Abyss
Ronald C. Arnett, Duquesne U, USA
Always Already Being-on-the-Edge: Talk of the Precarious, Precarity, and the Precariat
Ramsey Eric Ramsey, Arizona State U, USA
Risk Communication and Transnational Youth Publics
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
This panel critically examines precarity within multiple philosophy of communication coordinates,
ranging from engagement of questions of disability, poverty, unexpected demands of debt, risk within the
youth culture, and Dorothy Day’s originative response and its implications for this historical moment.
Precarity announces the narrow ridge, the fragility, the interrupted routines of human conventions and
lives. This panel interrogates various dimensions of precarity through case studies and examples, pointing
not to solutions but to descriptive ways in which human beings have responded to precarity with the
dignity and tenacity that transformed and continues to transform their communicative environments.
8228
Friday
10:30-11:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Photojournalism Practices in the Face of New Media Contexts
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Participants
A Bleak Picture: How News Organizations Missed the Potential of Digitization to Improve
Photojournalism
Inbal Klein-Avraham, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Zvi Reich, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Picture This: Employing the Principles of Social Proof to Media Photographs to Identify Media Bias
Michael Friedman, Michigan State U, USA
Framing the Accused: Perp Walks, Media Rituals, and Image Recontextualization
Mary Angela Bock, U of Texas, USA
Gestures of Seeing: Amateur Photographers in the News
Karin E. Becker, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Photojournalism in a Changing Online Environment: A Co-Orientational Study
Tara Marie Buehner, U of South Carolina, USA
8231
Friday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 1
Only Connect: Contributions to the Debate on the Cultural Impact of Communication Technologies
Communication History
Chair
Nicole Maurantonio, U of Richmond, USA
Participants
Influence of 19th-Century Telegraphy on Urbanization, Mass Communications, and the Corporate
Economy
Gerald Sussman, Portland State U, USA
Telegraphy and 19th-Century Imperial Control in India
Colin Agur, Columbia U, USA
The Fast Printing Press and the Circulation of the Sunday Paper, 1886-1900
Paul S Moore, Ryerson U, CANADA
Sandra Gabriele, Concordia U, CANADA
Inventing Network Neutrality, 1973-1985
Peter D. Schaefer, Marymount Manhattan College, USA
Starting from the given in communication history that our engagement with specific forms is shaped, in
both the broadest and narrowest senses, by the available technlogy, these papers range over a long
historical period. They explore and revise our understanding of the role of technology, from the speed of a
printing press and the role of the telegraph to the development of online network architecture. Together
they argue the continuing centrality of old and new technologies in the communication landscape.
8232
Friday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 2
Post-Broadband Access: Comparative Assessments and Prospects
Communication Law & Policy
Participants
From "Open Internet" to "Mobile Enclosure:" The Case of 4G in the UK
Alison Powell, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Government or Market Investments in Network
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
East Asia Beyond Broadband
Linchuan Jack Qiu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Broadband for the People! Canadian Activism for Universal Broadband
Leslie Regan Shade, U of Toronto, CANADA
Socio-Technical Analysis of Korea’s Broadband Convergence Network
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Graham Murdock, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Over the past 15 years or so, the rhetorical excitement and aspirations around Information Society (or
Networked, or Post-Industrial society, depending on who one reads) have morphed into a variety of
policies for building communications infrastructure and for encouraging and facilitating access to the
Internet. Many of these initiatives have focused on broadband, the loose term for a high speed network
capable of delivering voice, video and text reasonably quickly and facilitating a variety of citizen/user
interactions. This panel of experts will create a discussion around how their respective countries have
framed the core issues and defined government responsibilities as well as expectations regarding
participation.
8233
Friday
10:30-11:45
Board Room 3
Challenging and Reimagining the Traditional Instructional Communication Concepts and
Processes
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Michelle Epstein Garland, U of Tennessee, USA
Participants
Student Perceptions of Teacher Power in the Contemporary Classroom
Jennifer H. Waldeck, Chapman U, USA
Members of COM 498, Chapman U, USA
The Role of Computer Mediated Instructional Message Quality on Perceived Message Effects in an
Academic Analytics Intervention
Zeynep Tanes-Ehle, Duquesne U, USA
Patricia North Gettings, Purdue U, USA
The Role of Teacher Self-Disclosure in Online Education
Hayeon Song, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Jihyun Kim, Bloomsburg U, USA
Wen Luo, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Amy May, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Web2.0PACK: Future Teachers’ Plans and Practices With Emerging Tools
Ugur Kale, West Virginia U, USA
Cheng-Hsien Wu, West Virginia U, USA
Chris Clausell, West Virginia U, USA
This collection of papers will reexamine, challenge, and propose revisions to traditional instructional
concepts including self-disclosure, power, teacher training, and academic interventions.
8302
Intergroup Communication and the Media
Friday
12:00-13:15
Balmoral
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Camiel J. Beukeboom, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Dealing With the Dark Side: Negative Ingroups and the Effects of Right-Wing and Islamic Extremist
Propaganda Videos
Lena Frischlich, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Diana Rieger, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Debating LGBT Workplace Protections in the Bible Belt:Contested Identities in Legislative and Media
Discourse
Claire Rhodes, U of Memphis, USA
Craig O. Stewart, U of Memphis, USA
The Image of Immigration in Spanish Prime-Time TV Fiction
Juan Jose Igartua, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Isabel Barrios, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Felix Ortega, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
María Marcos, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Valeriano Piñeiro, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Salvador Alvidrez, U of Salamanca, SPAIN
Understanding the Media’s Role in Immigration Attitudes: An Experimental Test of Intergroup Threat
Theory
Anita Atwell Seate, U of Maryland, USA
Dana Mastro, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
8305
Effects of Political Communication II
Friday
12:00-13:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Participants
Belief Echoes: The Persistent Effects of Corrected Misinformation
Emily Thorson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Mutual Reinforcement of Media Selectivity and Effects: Testing the Reinforcing Spirals Framework
in the Context of Global Warming
Lauren Feldman, American U, USA
Teresa Myers, George Mason U, USA
Jay D. Hmielowski, U of Arizona, USA
Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale U, USA
Mediated and Moderated Effects of Personalized Political Communication on Political Trust
Lukas Otto, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Michaela Maier, U Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Up Close and Political; Assessing the Consequences of Personalization in Political Communication, a
Survey Experiment
peter achterberg, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dick Houtman, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8306
Networks and Connections in Organizational Communication
Friday
12:00-13:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Bernadette Marie Gailliard, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Change Over Time in ICA Division Networks Based on Semantic Similarity of Papers Presented Versus
Co-Memberships
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
No Organization is an Island: Identifying the Theoretical Mechanisms That Motivate Collaboration
Amongst Community-Based Organizations
Lindsay Erin Young, Northwestern U, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
The Coevolution of Communication Networks and Expertise Recognition-Induced Information-Seeking
Behaviors
Young Hoon Kim, Rutgers, the State U of New Jersey, USA
Niclas Erhardt, U of Maine, USA
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
The Effects of Diversity on Collaborative Innovative Networks: The Emergence of Oncofertility
Alina Lungeanu, Northwestern U, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
Tracking Social Avalanches: Dynamics of Communication Networks
Iina Hellsten, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Networking Through the Recession: How Female Business Owners Utilized Advice Networks to Aid
Organizational Performance
Sandra K. Evans, U of Southern California, USA
Intraorganizational Collaboration at a Scientific Laboratory: A Case Study of Authority, Identity, and
Boudary Work
Matt Koschmann, U of Colorado, USA
Nicholas Burk, U of Colorado, USA
Toward a Communication-Centered Theoretical Framework for Temporary Organizations: The Example
of Film Production
Ritesh Mehta, U of Southern California, USA
Respondents
Steven R. Corman, Arizona State U, USA
Peter Monge, U of Southern California, USA
In this high density panel, authors will provide brief (3-4 minute) introductions to their research and then
make themselves available to discuss their research one-on-one or in small groups through the aid of an
interactive display. Respondents will provide feedback one-on-one to the authors, and pariticipants will be
invited to listen and join in the discussion.
8307
Virtual Representation of Self in Online Environments
Friday
12:00-13:15
Palace C
Communication and Technology
Chair
Catalina Laura Toma, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Women on Display: The Effect of Portraying the Self Online on Women’s Self-Objectification
Dian de Vries, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mirror or Megaphone?: How Narcissists Differ in Their Use of Facebook and Twitter
Elliot T. Panek, East Carolina U, USA
Yioryos Nardis, U of Michigan, USA
Sara Konrath, U of Michigan, USA
Building Better First Impressions Through More Information: The Impact of Quantity of Information
Shared on a Profile, Profile Owner’s Gender, and Profile Viewer’s Voyeuristic Curiosity on
Formation of Impressions
Lemi Baruh, Koc U, TURKEY
Yoram Chisik, Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, PORTUGAL
Christophe Bisson, Kadir Has U, TURKEY
The Relative Contributions of Implicit and Explicit Self-Esteem to Narcissistic Use of Facebook
Roma Subramanian, U of Missouri, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Doug Davis, U of Missouri, US
Erin Morris, U of Missouri, USA
Manu Bhandari, U of Missouri, USA
8309
Twitter Politics: How Twitter Facilitates Political Movement?
Friday
12:00-13:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
An Instantaneous Online Resource Mobilization in Twitter: A Temporal and Network Analysis of the
January 25th Egypt Protest 2011
Kyounghee Hazel Kwon, Arizona State U, USA
Onook Oh, U of Nebraska - Omaha, USA
H.R. Rao, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Come Together, Right Now: Retweeting in the Social Model of Protest Mobilization
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Narayanan Iyer, Southern Illinois U, USA
Wenjing Xie, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Benjamin A. Lyons, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Chang Sup Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Yang Feng, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Social Sedia Use and Participation in the January 25 Egyptian Uprising: Comparing Participants and
Nonparticipants in Street Protest
Peter Kerkhof, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andre Krouwel, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jacquelien van Stekelenburg, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bert Klandermans, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Internet, State Hegemony Versus Corporate Hegemony in the North African Arab Spring
Lyombe S. Eko, U of Iowa, USA
John Haman, U of Iowa, USA
8311
Friday
12:00-13:15
Waterloo/Tower
I Drink Therefore I Am (Drunk): Communication Issues Surrounding Alcohol Abuse, Policies, and
Prevention Strategies
Health Communication
Chair
Keith Weber, West Virginia U, USA
Participants
Injury News Coverage, Relative Concern, and Support for Alcohol-Control Policies: An Impersonal
Impact Explanation
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Adrienne Haesun Chung, Ohio State U, USA
Tapping Into Motivations for Drinking Among Youth: Normative Beliefs About Alcohol Use Among
Underage Drinkers in the United States
Rajiv N. Rimal, George Washington U, USA
Alisa Padon, Johns Hopkins U, USA
David Jernigan, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Michael Siegel, Boston U, USA
William DeJong, Boston U, USA
Binge Drinking and TMT: Evaluating Responses to Anti-Binge-Drinking PSAs
Norman C. H. Wong, U of Oklahoma, USA
Stephanie G Schartel, U of Oklahoma, USA
Message Framing and Student Alcohol Habit Strength
Gert-Jan de Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Amy Latimer, Queen's U, CANADA
Benjamin Gardner, U College London, UNITED KINGDOM
Jonathan Vantriet, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
8312
Friday
12:00-13:15
Chelsea/Richmond
High Density: Family Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Lynne M. Webb, U of Arkansas, USA
Participants
Inhibitory Forces on Family Communication About Difficult Topics
Jennifer Cornacchione, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Russell, Michigan State U, USA
David M Keating, Michigan State U, USA
Sandi W Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Multiple Goals During Complex Family Conversations: What Goals Do Family Members Pursue When
Talking With Returning Military Service Members About Seeking Mental Healthcare?
Steven Robert Wilson, Purdue U, USA
Patricia North Gettings, Purdue U, USA
Elizabeth Dorrance Hall, Purdue U, USA
Responsiveness and Control in Marital and Parental Communication: Exploring Consistencies Across
Family Subsystems and Between Perceived and Observed Behavior
Roi Estlein, Rutgers U, USA
Jennifer A. Theiss, Rutgers U, USA
The Content and Relational Implications of Children-in-law’s Relational Uncertainty Within the In-Law
Dyad During the Transition to Extended Family
Sylvia L Mikucki-Enyart, U of Wisconsin - Stevens Point, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Christine E. Rittenour, West Virginia U, USA
The Grandchildren Received Affection Scale: Examining Affectual Solidarity Factors
Daniel Hans Mansson, Pennsylvania State U - Hazleton, USA
The Role of Expectations and Perceptions of Sibling Maintenance Behavior in Ratings of Sibling
Relationship Quality
Elizabeth Dorrance Hall, Purdue U, USA
Jenna McNallie, Purdue U, USA
Trust as a Mediator Between Affection and Relational Maintenance in the Grandparent-Grandchild
Relationship
Daniel Hans Mansson, Pennsylvania State U - Hazleton, USA
8313
Looking at Them to See Who I Am: Using Media for Identity Building Through Social Comparison
(Panel Session)
Friday
12:00-13:15
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Mirror, Mirror on the (Digital) Wall: Social Comparison in Social Networks and the Effects on SelfConcept and Mood
Christina V. Peter, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Andreas M. Fahr, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Advertising Effects on Body Image Based on Social Comparison Processes. The Role of Physical
Attractiveness and Sex Appeals
Christian Schemer, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Rinaldo Kuehne, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Martina Livers, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Bettina Egger, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Social Comparison With Models in Gay Male-Targeted Magazines: Implications on Health Behaviors of
Gay Men
Catherine A. Luther, U of Tennessee, USA
“We Are Better Than the Others”: Bias in Intergroup Social Comparisons Within Media Coverage
Philipp Mueller, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Respondent
Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Ohio State U, USA
Media content helps people to constantly work on their personal identity. A major way for individuals to
do so is to compare their self-perception with their perception of others, a process which has been
introduced as “social comparison” by Festinger and attracted major attention in social psychology
research since the early 1950s. In this context, several questions arise: Why are media characters attractive
sources for comparison? What implications arise for the social comparison process due to the fact that it
takes place in the media environment? Can patterns of social comparison even be observed within media
content and how can that information help to convey messages to the audience (e.g., health information)?
Which consequences for the self (self-concept, self-esteem etc.) and for media usage itself arise from the
comparison with (idealized) media images? The presentations within the panel will address these
questions from different perspectives and provide a broad overview about recent research in the field.
8314
Gender and Journalism: Past and Present Challenges
Friday
12:00-13:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Randall Scott Sumpter, Texas A&M U, USA
Participants
Feminist Activism, News and Public Discourse
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Marcus Hill, Howard U, USA
Islands of Divergence in a Stream of Convergence: Comparing News Practices of Male and Female
Journalists
Zvi Reich, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Do Journalists Believe in Gender Specificities in News Work? The Impact of Professionalism and Family
Life
Sara X. T. Liao, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
African American Women in Local TV News: Breaking Stereotypes?
Marian J. Meyers, Georgia State U, USA
Respondent
Linda C. Steiner, U of Maryland, USA
8316
Participatory Journalism: Reimagining the Role of Audiences and Journalists
Friday
12:00-13:15
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Carrie Brown, U of Memphis, USA
Participants
From Public Spaces to Public Sphere: Rethinking Discursive Spaces on News Websites
Rodrigo Zamith, U of Minnesota, USA
Seth C. Lewis, U of Minnesota, USA
Part of the Game? Conceptualizing the Integration of Participatory Journalism in the Journalistic Field
Lea C. Hellmueller, U of Texas, USA
You Li, Oakland U, USA
New Opportunities to Revive an Old Relationship: Reader-Newsroom-Interaction on Online News Sites
Anna Kümpel, U of Munich, GERMANY
Nina Springer, U of Munich, GERMANY
Ramona Ludolph, U of Munich, GERMANY
“What is it Good for? Absolutely Nothing!?” Comparing Attitudes and Expectations of Journalists and
Users Towards Audience Participation in News Journalism
Nele Heise, Hans Bredow Institute, GERMANY
Wiebke Loosen, Hans Bredow Institute, GERMANY
Julius Reimer, Hans Bredow Institute, GERMANY
Jan Schmidt, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Participatory Journalism in Newspapers and Its Contribution to Diversity in Local Reporting
Annika Sehl, Technische U Dortmund, GERMANY
8317
Media and Morality
Friday
12:00-13:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Are There Genre-Specific Moral Lessons? A Content Analysis of Norm Violations Depicted in Four
Popular Television Genres
Matthias R. Hastall, Technische U Dortmund, GERMANY
Helena Bilandzic, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Freya Sukalla, U of Augsburg, GERMANY
Effects of Morally Ambiguous Character Behavior on Affective Disposition, Character Perceptions, and
Enjoyment
Erica Bailey, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Mina Tsay-Vogel, Boston U, USA
K. Maja Krakowiak, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Setting the Moral Agenda: News Exposure’s Influence on the Salience of Moral Intuitions
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Sujay Prabhu, Michigan State U, USA
Lu Wang, Michigan State U, USA
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Virtue in Media: The Moral Psychology of U.S. Exemplars in News and PR
Patrick Lee Plaisance, Colorado State U, USA
Moral Foundations Theory and Decision Making in Video Game Play: Using Real-Life Morality
Marina Krcmar, Wake Forest U, USA
Drew Cingel, Northwestern U, USA
8318
Back to Basics: Examining Best Practices for Developing and Evaluating Health Communication
Campaigns
Friday
12:00-13:15
Cadogan
Health Communication
Chair
Fuyuan Shen, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Examining Antecedents of Caregivers’ Access to Early Childhood Developmental Screening:
Implications for Campaigns Promoting Use of Services in Appalachian Ohio
Benjamin Roswell Bates, Ohio U, USA
Dawn Graham, Ohio U, USA
Katie Striley, Ohio U, USA
Aarti Arora, Ohio U, USA
Spencer Patterson, Alta Ventures, USA
Jane Hamel-Lambert, Ohio U, USA
“Smokers Are Still Going to Smoke”: Formative Research for a Smoke-Free Campus Campaign
Lindsay Neuberger, U of Central Florida, USA
Andra Vaduva, U of Central Florida, USA
Tom Hall, U of Central Florida, USA
Developing a Model for Mental Illness Stigma Reduction Campaigns
Virginia McDermott, High Point U, USA
John Oetzel, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Explaining the Effects of the National Youth Antidrug Media Campaign and Social Capital on Targeted
Parent-Child Communication About Drugs
Chul-joo Lee, U of Illinois, USA
Jennifer Andrea Kam, U of Illinois, USA
8321
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Popular Journalism in the Era of "Posttruth" Politics
Popular Communication
Political Communication
Participants
What Has Happened to Truth in an Era of Postjournalism News? And How Can We Tell?
John Hartley, Curtin U, AUSTRALIA
Why Aren’t Politicians Afraid of Journalists?: Insiders, Outsiders, Transparency and "Truth"
Stephen Harrington, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Leveson, Journalism, and the Degradation of Civic Life in an Era of "Post-Truth" Politics
John Steel, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
"Not the Greatest Anymore": Fictional Anchors, Nonfictional Events, and Semifictional Journalism in
HBO’s "The Newsroom"
Chris Peters, U of Groningen, THE NETHERLANDS
“We Built This”: Fox News’ Narrative Constructions of Truth
Jeffrey P. Jones, Old Dominion U, USA
This panel, comprising 5 leading scholars from around the globe, seeks to interrogate the changing role of
journalism in the ‘post-truth’ – and, post-journalism (Turner, 1996) – age. The theme of the conference is
“challenging research”, and here we are concerned with challenging the received wisdom regarding what
journalism is, the cultural space it occupies, who can undertake it, and how it facilitates the operation of
the public sphere.
8322
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
More Bad News for Africa? Challenging Research Into Afro-Pessimism and the International
Media
Global Communication and Social Change
Journalism Studies
Chair
Chris Paterson, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Towards Clarification of a Concept: Mapping the Nature and Typologies of Afro-Pessimism
Toussaint Nothias, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Politics, Aid, and the Media: BBC Reporting Africa in the 1980s
Suzanne Franks, City U, UNITED KINGDOM
How Not to Write About (Media Coverage of) Africa: Challenging Research Into Afro-Pessimism and the
International Media
Martin Scott, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
Foreign Correspondents in East Africa Today: New Storytellers, New Narratives?
Melanie Jane Bunce, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
The international news media has long been criticized for its negative, dark and pessimistic coverage of
the African continent. Despite the significance of these critiques, Afro-pessimism – sometimes referred to
as “Heart of Darkness reporting” - has not been developed as a coherent analytical concept, particularly
with regards to media coverage. Taken together, the papers make an important contribution to the concept
of Afro-pessimism in media studies both theoretically and empirically. The panel also draws attention to
key areas of debate and clash, and suggests avenues for future research.
8323
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and News
Public Relations
Chair
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Maryland, USA
Participants
Mapping Web Interactivity: A Comparative Study of Congressional Campaign Web Sites
Kevin Y. Wang, Butler U, USA
Hyung Min Lee, Sungshin Women's U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
David J. Atkin, U of Connecticut, USA
Cheonsoo Kim, Indiana U, USA
The Impact of Firms’ Corporate Social Performance on Their News Media Attention
Craig E. Carroll, New York U, USA
Stelios Zyglidopoulos, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Philemon Bantimaroudis, U of the Aegean, GREECE
What Are the Values and Impacts of Public Relations on Business News?: A Survey of Business
Journalists on the Use of Information Subsidies and the Determinants of That Use
Sun Young Lee, Texas Tech U, USA
What Can We Expect From Facebook?
Seoyeon Hong, U of Missouri, USA
Bokyung Kim, Rowan U, USA
8324
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Health Risks and Online Risks: Practices and Policies
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Evidence on the Extent of Harms Experienced by Children as a Result of Online Risks: A Critical
Synthesis of Research
Vera Slavtcheva-Petkova, U of Chester, UNITED KINGDOM
Monica Bulger, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Victoria Nash, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Predicting Adolescents’ Disclosure of Personal Information in Exchange for Commercial Incentives: An
Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behavior
Wannes Heirman, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Michel Walrave, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Koen Ponnet, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Gender and Grade as Moderators of the Relationship Between Music Television Viewing and Smoking: A
Longitudinal Study
Kathleen Beullens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
Jan Van den Bulck, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Let’s Get This Party Started!: An Analysis of Health Risk Behavior on MTV Reality Television Shows
Mark Allen Flynn, Coastal Carolina U, USA
David Morin, Bowling Green State U, USA
Sung-Yeon Park, Bowling Green State U, USA
Alexandru Stana, Bowling Green State U, USA
The Reinforcing Spirals Model Revisited: The Effects of Alcohol Advertising on Adolescents’ Changes in
Drinking and Association With Alcohol Using Peers
Jared J.W. Tu, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Chu-Jie Chen, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Respondent
Victor C Strasburger, U of New Mexico, USA
8325
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
ERIC Roundtable: Race Matters
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Federico Subervi, Texas State U, USA
Participants
Affect, Black Rage, and False Alternatives in the Hip-Hop Nation
Bryan J McCann, Wayne State U, USA
Gods, God, and Soul Food: Young Black Spirituality in Rap Music
Christopher Harris, Nevada State College, USA
Jesse and Barack: Examining How, and if, the Press Has Changed How They Frame African-American
Politicians
Lanier Frush Holt, Indiana U, USA
Mammie’s Cookie Jar: The Commodification of Racial Pain
Christopher A House, Ithaca College, USA
Nike’s Commodification of LeBron James: Intoning Jesus and Hegemonic Masculinity for “Maximized
Comfort”
Richard Mocarski, U of Alabama, USA
Andrew C. Billings, U of Alabama, USA
“Good Riddance, Nigga”: Symbolic Lynching and the Struggle for Authentic Blackness in the NAACP’s
2007 Funeral for the “N-Word”
Ashley Noel Mack, U of Texas, USA
8326
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Cultural Differences and Similarities in Technology Use
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Stephen Michael Croucher, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
Participants
Comparing Mobile App Acceptance Among U.S. and South Korean Smartphone Users
Sang Chon Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Doyle Yoon, U of Oklahoma, USA
Eun-Kyung Han, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Cultural Distance and Intercultural Consumption of Korean Pop Music on Social Media
Young Min Baek, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Insik Shin, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
How We Share: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Tablet Adoption and Usage Between the United States
and Taiwan
Yi-Fan Chen, Old Dominion U, USA
Parental Mediation of the Internet and Cultural Values Across Europe
Stefan Mertens, Hogeschool-U Brussel, BELGIUM
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
Respondent
Stephen Michael Croucher, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
8327
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
8328
Friday
12:00-13:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Critical Economies
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
"We Are Not Here for the Money": Founders' Manifestos
Yuval Dror, The College of Management Academic Studies, ISRAEL
Critiquing the Critique of “Neoliberalism”: A Meta-Analysis of Discourses That Question the Value of
the Concept
Sean Phelan, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Immortal Brands
Devon Powers, Drexel U, USA
Ashley Blake Farkas, Drexel U, USA
Specificity, Ambivalence, and the Commodity Form of Creative Work
Matt Stahl, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Branding Femininity: From Food and Dining to Bankable and Turkish Brands
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Michelle Rodino-Colocino, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
A Labor of Love: Fierce Model Citizens and a Bankable Brand
Dara Persis Murray, Rutgers U, USA
Vakko and the Veil: Negotiating History and Agency Through an Iconic Turkish Brand
Alexandra Sastre, U of Pennsylvania, USA
We Are What We Eat: Finding Femininity Through Food Narratives
Tisha Dejmanee, U of Southern California, USA
“Of Course the Diners’ Club Card is for You”: Gender and Payment Infrastructures at Midcentury in the
United States
Lana Swartz, U of Southern California, USA
8331
Friday
12:00-13:15
Board Room 1
Meet the Editors of ICA Publications
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Frank Esser, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Maria Bakardjieva, U of Calgary, CANADA
John Downing, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, US
John A. Courtright, U of Delaware, USA
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
Michael J. West, International Communication Association, USA
This panel provides the ICA membership the opportunity to meet the editors of ICA's journals and
Communication Yearbook. This session is devoted to answering and addressing issues you may have
about specific ICA publications.
8332
Friday
12:00-13:15
Board Room 2
Rights to Information and Access: Interpretation, Implementation, and Use
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Journalistic Role in Chinese Freedom of Information
Yong Tang, Western Illinois U, USA
Could Wild Horses Drag Access Away From Courtrooms? Expanding First Amendment Rights to New
Pastures
Matthew D. Bunker, U of Alabama, USA
Clay Calvert, U of Florida, USA
Supreme Court on Cameras in the Courtroom
Kyu Ho Youm, U of Oregon, USA
Uses and Misuses of the Freedom of Information (FOI) Legislation in Transitional Societies
Lindita Camaj, U of Houston, USA
8333
Friday
12:00-13:15
Board Room 3
The Ecology of Media Consumption
Communication History
Chair
Sheila Lodge, London Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Top Paper: Media Evolution: Emergence, Dominance, Survival and Extinction in the Media Ecology
Carlos Alberto Scolari, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
Participatory Innovation: The Culture of Contests in Popular Science Monthly, 1918-1938
Ioana Literat, U of Southern California, ROMANIA
Commodifying Alternative Media: Advertising and Ideology at the Jewish Daily Forward in the 1920s
and 1930s
Brian Dolber, SUNY – Oneonta, USA
A History of QUBE: Interactivity and the Evolution of Cable Television
Noah Arceneaux, San Diego State U, USA
Trust in Economy in Letters to the Editor
Liina Kaisa Puustinen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
As communication history is an emerging discipline, the writing of that history is contested ground.
Traditional linear approaches, arguably, are not as functional as those adopted through the ideas of media
ecology. This sesssion examines the concept of media ecology, and reflects on its relevance to a number
of significant case histories of media enterprises that tried to ensure their survival through creating
particular relationships with their audiences.
8402
The Politics of Algorithms
Friday
13:30-14:45
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Chair
Christian Sandvig, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
Censorship by Algorithm
Tarleton L. Gillespie, Cornell U, USA
When Television Programming is Computer Programming
Christian Sandvig, U of Michigan, USA
A Market of Algorithmic Identities: Total Information Awareness in Online Advertising
Fernando Bermejo, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Making Visible the Algorithm: Citizen Science, Data Art, and Social Media Hacks
Alison Powell, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Associational Algorithms and Public Work
Mike Joseph Ananny, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
On the Internet and beyond it, today’s media experiences are no longer planned by executives, they are
computed. Stored procedures on corporate servers—algorithms—produce totally individualized
experiences that order, evaluate, and even create new content, audiences, and truth. This panel addresses
the normative problems of algorithmic culture, investigating how opaque algorithms configure their users
and how the field of communication should respond to the algorithmic turn in the systems that we study.
8405
Of Pros and Amateurs: Changing the Quality of Political Communication
Friday
13:30-14:45
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Knowledge-Based Journalism: What it Means and What it Can Achieve
Thomas E. Patterson, Harvard U, USA
A New Quality of Political Participation: Direct Voter Engagement Through Social Media
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Christian Pieter Hoffmann, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
The Value of Objectivity as a Method of Professional Reporting: A Cross-Longitudinal Study of
Reporting Styles in Chilean Political News Coverage Between 1990 and 2011.
Claudia Mellado, U of Santiago, CHILE
The Pro vs. the Amateur: Do Professional Journalists Make Better News Decisions?
Cornelia Mothes, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technische U Dresden, GERMANY
Respondent
Stuart Allan, Bournemouth U, UNITED KINGDOM
Since the advent of the internet, impassioned debates have been waged over its expected consequences for
the quality of political communication, in general, and for journalism, in particular. While some experts
have predicted a ‘democratization of the news’ overcoming the ‘monopoly’ of professional journalists in
defining and covering the pressing events of the day, others have warned that this same transformative
shift may be decreasing the very legitimacy of the media in their conveyance of the political process to the
people. Although some evidence exists on the implications for different news outletsa general assessment
of overall patterns and trends cannot be made so far. This panel’s four papers, each focused on a different
national context, will discuss three key dimensions in the quality of political communication and news.
8406
Ask Me No Questions: Sharing and Seeking Information in Organizations
Friday
13:30-14:45
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chair
Claartje L. ter Hoeven, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Information Sharing as Strategic Behaviour: The Role of Social Motivation, Time Pressure, and
Information Display
Nicoleta Balau, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sonja Utz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Not in the Mood? Affective State and Transactive Communication
Jessica G. Neff, U of Southern California, USA
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Y. Connie Yuan, Cornell U, USA
Relationships Among Team Autonomy, Interpersonal Communication, and Burnout of Japanese Care
Workers: A Multilevel Analysis
Ikushi Yamaguchi, Meiji U, JAPAN
Sharing Personal Health Information at Work: What is Appropriate and Expected in Organizations?
Catherine Y Kingsley Westerman, U of Tennessee, USA
Laura Elizabeth Miller, U of Tennessee, USA
Respondent
Joshua B. Barbour, Texas A&M U, USA
8407
Politics Online: International Perspectives
Friday
13:30-14:45
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Guy J. Golan, Syracuse U, USA
Participants
An Unfulfilled Promise: Twitter and the Dictatorial Past in Brazil
Mariella Trilling, Technische U Dortmund, GERMANY
Damian Trilling, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Political Mapping of Korean Twitter Users
Yoonmo Sang, U of Texas, USA
Myunggoon Choi, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Han Woo Park, Yeungnam U, KR
The Functions of Media and Dynamic Mechanisms in Social Movement: An Ethnographic Study of
Wukan
Miao Li, Chinese U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Preaching to the Choir: Internet-Mediated Advocacy, Issue Public Mobilization, and Climate Change
Luis Hestres, American U, USA
8408
Diverse Perspectives on Presence and Telepresence Research, Theory, and Application
Friday
13:30-14:45
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Matthew Lombard, Temple U, USA
Participants
Diverse Perspectives on Presence and Telepresence: An Introduction
Matthew Lombard, Temple U, USA
Telepresence: An Important Concept for Crisis and Risk Communication
David Keith Westerman, West Virginia U, USA
Patric R. Spence, U of Kentucky, USA
Born for Presence: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Spatial, Self, and Social Presence
Jakki Bailey, Stanford U, USA
Measurement of Social Presence
Jihyun Kim, Bloomsburg U, USA
Hayeon Song, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Wen Luo, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Teletalker: Connecting Generations, But What Do They Talk About?
Marianne Markowski, Middlesex U, UNITED KINGDOM
Presence and Communication Technologies: Changing Forms, Changing Norms
Christian Licoppe, Telecom ParisTech, FRANCE
Self-Presence in a Revised Body Schema
Andrea Stevenson Won, Stanford U, USA
Telepresence (typically shortened to presence) refers to a sense of ‘being there’ in a technology-created
environment and more broadly to an illusion of nonmediation in which some aspect of the role of the
technology in a communication experience is intentionally or unintentionally misconstrued or overlooked.
The concept has a rich history in the study of communication and technology. No panel (or conference for
that matter) can relay all of the current scholarship related to presence and telepresence but this panel
provides an overview of exciting work being done by a diverse set of scholars. The diversity of the panel
applies in almost every category.
8409
The Challenges of Big Data for Communication Research
Friday
13:30-14:45
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Seth C. Lewis, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
The Relevance of Digital Trace Data for Communication Research
Deen Goodwin Freelon, American U, USA
Assessing the Bias in Communication Networks Sampled From Twitter
Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Content in Context: Applying Network Analysis to Examining Twitter Data
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Content Analysis in an Era of Big Data: Blending Computational and Manual Methods
Seth C. Lewis, U of Minnesota, USA
Rodrigo Zamith, U of Minnesota, USA
This panel brings together some of the most prominent such early adopters of Big Data in communication
research to discuss some of the key theoretical and methodological challenges involved in doing so. These
scholars will offer recommendations based on their own research practices, and suggest avenues for
negotiating the peculiarities of Big Data in communication. These contributions are sorely needed in light
of the lack of consensus on theoretical and methodological best practices for Big Data, let alone the
uncertain ethical questions surrounding the use of massive datasets representing human communication
online. The discussion will address some of the most relevant Big Data problems for communication
research, and in the process demonstrate its importance across communication subdisciplines.
8411
Friday
13:30-14:45
Waterloo/Tower
Challenges of Disseminating Health Information in the Digital Age: Blogs, Online News Sources,
and Search Engines
Health Communication
Chair
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California - Irvine, USA
Participants
Biased Assimilation and Need for Closure: Examining the Effects of Mixed Blogs on Vaccine-Related
Beliefs
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Kelly Madden, U of Maryland, USA
Presenting Health Information Online: The Effect of Modality and Communication Style on Satisfaction
and Recall
Nadine Bol, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ellen M.A. Smets, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hanneke C.J.M. de Haes, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eugène F. Loos, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Julia C.M. van Weert, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Online Cancer News: Trend Differences Between 2008 & 2012 Internet-Based Cancer News
Ryan James Hurley, North Carolina State U, USA
Angeline L. Sangalang, U of Southern California, USA
Julius Matthew Riles, U of Illinois, USA
Emily A Ford, North Carolina State U, USA
The Google Effect: Extending Communication Channel Behavior in Diffusion of Innovations Theory
Beth Lee Sundstrom, College of Charleston, USA
8412
Friday
13:30-14:45
Chelsea/Richmond
High Density: Interpersonal Communication and New Media
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Erin Spottswood, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Confirmed: Surveillance, Relational Satisfaction, and Social Media Use Among Romantic Partners
Stephanie Ann Smith, U of Arizona, USA
Margaret J. Pitts, U of Arizona, USA
Exploring the Roles of Narcissism, Uses and Gratifications of Microblog On
Ruo Mo, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Louis W. Leung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Internet Pornography and Relationship Quality
Linda Daphne Muusses, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Catrin Finkenauer, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Kerkhof, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Knapp's Model of Relational Development in the Digital Age
Robert Duran, U of Hartford, USA
Lynne Kelly, U of Hartford, USA
Alexandra Frisbie, U of Hartford, USA
Online Romantic Relationships Transitioning Offline: Impact of Intimacy and Relationship Uncertainty
on Relational Characteristics
Kimberly Mary Schaefer, Baker U, USA
Seeking Interpersonal Information Over the Internet: An Application of the Theory of Motivated
Information Management to Internet Use
Abel Gustafson, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Robert Shota Tokunaga, U of Hawaii, USA
The Effects of the Social Relations on Online Impression Formation
Mina Park, U of Southern California, USA
The Eyes Have It: How Publicness and Surveillance Primes Influence Prosocial Communication on
Facebook
Erin Spottswood, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
8413
Ostracism and Communication: Feeling Socially Excluded as a Motive for Media Use (Panel
Session)
Friday
13:30-14:45
St. James
Mass Communication
Chair
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Participants
Ostracism: A Temporal Need-Threat Model on the Effects of Being Ignored and Excluded
Kipling D. Williams, Purdue U, USA
“I Just Like To Be Permanently Connected”: Does The Need To Belong Serve As a Motive For Media
Use?
Niklas Johannes, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Dorothee Hefner, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Media as Shelter for the Socially Excluded: How Mediated Human Artifacts Help to Overcome Feelings
of Social Exclusion
Enny Henrica Das, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Tamara Eva Bouwman, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ostracism and the Effect Of Active vs. Passive Use of Facebook on Lethargy and Cognitive Decrements
Jeana H. Frost, VU U - Brussels, THE NETHERLANDS
Diena Jessica Schutten, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Annelies Visser, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
People have a fundamental need of being socially included and related to others (Deci & Ryan, 2000;
Baumeister & Leary, 1995). If this need is not fulfilled, people feel pain and are eager to end this
experience of exclusion and recapture connection to other people (Williams, 2007). In order to (re)gain
social inclusion, several courses of action are possible. In this panel, we would like to address media use
as an option of connecting to others and achieve the feeling to belong.
8414
Friday
13:30-14:45
Regent's
The Spectre of the Spectacle: How to Address the Haunting Anxieties Around the Visual Image in
Political Communication?
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Katy Jane Parry, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
“Bad Photos”: A Political Theorization of Lomography
Gil Pasternak, U of Huddersfield, UNITED KINGDOM
Politics Mitt Romney Style: Gangnam Style as a Cross-Cultural Visual Meme – Online Citizen Creativity
and the Power of Digitally Facilitated Political Prosumer Participation
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Arvid Kappas, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Towards Developing a Theoretical and Methodological Model for Studying Images on Social Media
Farida Aletta Vis, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Simon Faulkner, Manchester Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
Iconophilia in the Public Sphere: Embracing the Visual in Big "P" and Small "p" Politics
Katy Jane Parry, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Giorgia Aiello, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
This panel seeks to address how understanding various forms of ‘the political’ in mediated culture might
benefit from the insights offered in visual culture and communication approaches. The panel is based on
the observation that much of the past research which has sought to examine the ‘spectacle’ and the
‘image’ of the political world has not actually paid detailed attention to visual images themselves as
communicative expressions, or has been too ready to condone the nature of visuals as simplistic,
illustrative, ambiguous, misleading or lacking in their capacities to contribute to the ‘reasoned’ argument
or debate. This session offers a critical and empirical engagement with key dimensions of political culture,
such as parody, campaigning, social networking, counternarrative, and activism.
8416
Cultural Approaches to Understanding Journalism
Friday
13:30-14:45
Belgrave
Journalism Studies
Chair
Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Participants
Purity and Danger: Newsworthiness, Framing Image Crises, and the Kishon Diving Investigative Report
Oren Meyers, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Asaf Rozen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Journalism History in Popular Culture
Matthew Ehrlich, U of Illinois, USA
Mediated Constructions and Lived Experiences of Place: Applying “Communication Geography” to News
and Mental Mapping
Robert Gutsche Jr, Florida International U, USA
The Guttenberg Plagiarism: Myth in Germany's Leading News Magazines
Stine Eckert, U of Maryland, USA
Respondent
Daniel A. Berkowitz, U of Iowa, USA
8417
Challenges in Framing and Agenda-Setting Research (Session Begins With a TOP Student Paper)
Friday
13:30-14:45
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Volker Gehrau, U Münster, GERMANY
Participants
The Role of Frame Diversity in Perceived Quality of Media Performance: The Case in Economic
Journalism
Omar O. Dumdum, U of the Philippines - Diliman, PHILIPPINES
Framing Charitable Appeals: The Effect of Gain-and-Loss Framing and Perceived Susceptibility on
Donation Intentions
Xiaoxia Cao, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Institutional Justification of Frames: The Role of Social Institutions for Legitimizing and Stabilizing ReEmerging Meaning in Crises
Christian Baden, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Friederike Schultz, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Issue Definition and Agenda-Setting Effects in Communication Research
Gianna Haake, U Münster, GERMANY
Volker Gehrau, U Münster, GERMANY
Judith Väth, U Münster, GERMANY
Benjamin Fretwurst, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
What is Hot Online: Originality, Traditional Media Attention, and Agenda-Setting Time Lags Across
Topics
Yu Won Oh, U of Michigan, USA
Rebecca Ping Yu, U of Michigan, USA
8418
Message Processing and Persuasion
Friday
13:30-14:45
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Julia Fox, Indiana U, USA
Participants
A Multidimensional Analysis of Reactance, Restoration, and Cognitive Structure
Elena Bessarabova, U of Oklahoma, USA
Edward L. Fink, U of Maryland, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, George Washington U, USA
Applying the Cognitive-Affective Processing System to Communication Research
Martijn Jos Van Kelegom, U of Tennessee, USA
Kenneth J. Levine, U of Tennessee, USA
Buffering Social Influence: Neural Correlates of Response Inhibition Predict Resistance to Peer Influence
Christopher Cascio, U of Michigan, USA
Emily Falk, U of Michigan, USA
Josh Carp, U of Michigan, USA
Matthew Brook O'Donnell, U of Michigan, USA
Frank Tinney, U of Michigan, USA
Conceptualizing Audio Message Complexity as Available Processing Resources
Ya Gao, Indiana U, US
Rachel L. Bailey, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Seungjo Lee, Chung-Ang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Byungho Park, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Crash Fear and Crash Risk Perception as Mediators of the Relationship Between Medical Drama Viewing
and Speeding
Kathleen Beullens, Katholieke U Leuven, BELGIUM
Effects of Increasing Information Introduced by Camera Changes in Television Messages on Local
Recognition Sensitivity and Criterion Bias
Julia Fox, Indiana U, USA
Satoko Kurita, Osaka U of Economics, JAPAN
Encoding Systems and Evolved Message Processing: Pictures Enable Action, Words Enable Thinking
Rachel L. Bailey, Indiana U, USA
Sean Connolly, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
2D vs. 3D: The Effects of Additional Dimension in Visual Field on Information Processing
Byungho Park, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eunkyoung Lee, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Dal Woo Nam, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Kyunghee Lee, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
8421
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Game Industry in Local and Transnational Space
Popular Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Game Studies
Participants
Production of the Micro-Urban Space: Understanding Spatial Dynamics in the Gaming Industry
Ergin Bulut, U of Illinois, USA
Long Distance Game Licensing: The Negotiation of Place in Transnational/Transmedia Labor Networks
Derek Johnson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Transnationalization of the Local Online Game Industry: The Discourse of Contraflow of Popular Culture
Dal Yong Jin, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Localization: Making the Strange Familiar
Mia L. Consalvo, Concordia U, CANADA
Politicizing Art: Making Sense of the Transnational Reception of Global Terrorism in Resident Evil 6
Robert Mejia, College at Brockport – SUNY, USA
As cultures of gameplay have traveled across the spaces of arcades, living room consoles, and mobile
media, so too has the digital games industry become a transnational enterprise constituted by global flows
and power structures that cross economic, cultural, and geographic boundaries. Game publishing and
development increasingly occupy multiple regions, markets, and media capitals, forcing game scholars to
confront the production of game culture as diverse, dispersed, and decentralized. Yet this scope by no
means renders useless questions of locality, counter-cultural flows and production of meaning at the level
of specific spaces. While game studies has found significant opportunity to examine global flows of
desire, labor, and connectivity, it has often come at the cost of marginalizing the centrality of locality to
the maintenance of a transnational industry. In response to that growing oversight, this panel identifies
digital gaming industries as an opportunity to address the tensions and contradictions between the
transnational and local, in terms of production, text, and the sites of play in which game work is engaged.
8422
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Mapping Journalism Past and Present
Global Communication and Social Change
Journalism Studies
Chair
Anna A Popkova, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
Global News Broadcasting in the Pretelevision Era
Scott L. Althaus, U of Illinois, USA
Kaye Usry, U of Illinois, USA
Stanley Richards, U of Illinois, USA
Bridgette Van Thuyle, U of Illinois, USA
Isabelle Aron, U of Illinois, USA
Lu Huang, U of Illinois, USA
Monica Muehlfeld, U of Illinois, USA
Karissa Snouffer, U of Illinois, USA
Seth Weber, U of Illinois, USA
Patricia Frances Phalen, George Washington U, USA
Kalev Leetaru, U of Illinois, USA
Yuji Zhang, U of Illinois, USA
Post-Cold-War Journalism in the Post-Cold-War World: The Syrian Debate
Anna A Popkova, U of Minnesota, USA
Exploring Determinants and Frames of Eastern European News in American Newspapers
Nataliya Dmytrochenko, U of Florida, USA
The Geography of Travel Journalism: Mapping the Flow of Travel Stories About Foreign Countries
Folker Christian Hanusch, U of the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
8423
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Researching Public Relations and Strategic Communication in Conflict/Postconflict Societies: An
Essential Task for the Field?
Public Relations
Participant
Researching Public Relations and Strategic Communication in Conflict and Postconflict Societies: An
Essential Task for the Field?
Ian Somerville, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Margalit Toledano, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Owen Hargie, U of Ulster, UNITED KINGDOM
Most literature and published empirical studies on public relations (PR) practice focus on the activity as it
is engaged in in the context of ‘normal’ liberal democratic societies. Indeed arguably one ‘normal’ liberal
democratic society in particular, the USA. Although there have been a few attempts to investigate the
environmental factors influencing PR practice in non-Western contexts and even conflict societies this
‘normal’ liberal democratic context has had an hegemonic influence on attempts within the academy to
theorize PR practice.
8424
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Learning and Socializing Through Use of Mobile Devices and Games
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
Legos™ on Steroids: An Exploratory Analysis of the Constructivist Learning Principles in Minecraft
Maria Cipollone, Temple U, USA
Catherine Schifter, Temple U, USA
Rick Moffat, Temple U, USA
Mediating Sociality: The Use of iPod Touch Devices in the Classrooms of Students With Autism in
Canada
Rhonda McEwen, U of Toronto, CANADA
More Than Just a Phone: An Exploration of the Uses of the Mobile Phone Within Teen Friendship
Relations
Mariek Vanden Abeele, Tilburg U, THE NETHERLANDS
Parent-Child Joint Reading in Traditional and iPad Formats
Marina Krcmar, Wake Forest U, USA
Drew Cingel, Northwestern U, USA
Practice Makes Perfect: The Longitudinal Effect of Adolescents’ Instant Messaging on Their Offline
Social Competence
Maria Koutamanis, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Helen Vossen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Ellen Wartella, Northwestern U, USA
8425
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Communication Approaches to Reducing Health Disparities in Latino Communities
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Transnational Communication and Health Practices Among Latina Immigrants
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Sheila Teresa Murphy, U of Southern California, USA
Paula Amezola, U of Southern California, USA
The Communicative Construction of Civic Engagement and Access to Health-Enhancing Resources in
Ethnically-Diverse Residential Communities
Matthew D. Matsaganis, U at Albany - SUNY, USA
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
Mapping Community Health: Using GIS to Identify Neighborhood-Level Factors That Predict Latina
Residents’ Health
Nan Zhao, U of Southern California, USA
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Sheila Teresa Murphy, U of Southern California, USA
Minhee Son, U of Southern California, USA
Paula Amezola, U of Southern California, USA
Narrative Films to Address Health Disparities Among Latinas
Lauren B. Frank, Portland State U, USA
Meghan Bridgid Moran, San Diego State U, USA
Various health campaigns are shifting their attention to the neighborhood-level determinants of health in
immigrant and ethnic minority communities. In this panel we present research that addresses health
disparities in the Latino population by understanding both the communicative practices that influence
health decision-making and the neighborhood characteristics that may promote or hinder a healthy
community. The papers presented here respond to a growing need for culturally relevant research that can
directly inform health promotion efforts and provide effective health communication strategies for
reaching at-risk populations.
8426
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Culture and Health
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Children as Brokers in Their Immigrant Families’ Healthcare Interactions
Vikki Sara Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Coping With a New Culture: Predicting Online Health Information Seeking Among Chinese Immigrants
Weirui Wang, Florida International U, USA
Nan Yu, North Dakota State U, USA
Cultural Resonance: Examining Racial and Ethnic Concordance and Food Safety Message Efficacy for
Diverse Audiences
Lorin Brooke Friley, Purdue U, USA
Hyunyi Cho, Purdue U, USA
Mark A Tucker, Purdue U, USA
Health as a Site of Intercultural Adaptation for International Students in the United States
Marissa Joanna Doshi, Texas A&M U, USA
Health in Newspapers: A Culture-Based Comparative Content Analysis of Newspapers in the US and
China
Lu Tang, U of Alabama, USA
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
8427
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
Reconfiguring and Extending the Constitutive Metamodel
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Chair
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Responding to the Exigencies of Craig’s Seven Traditions: Communication as an Explanans
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Pragmatic Applications of the Consitutive Metamodel
Leonarda Garcia-Jimenez, U of Murcia, SPAIN
Extending “Metamodel Pragmatism” to Aesthetics
Jher, U of Oregon, USA
Metamodel Pragmatism
Chris Russill, Carleton U, CANADA
Response to “Reconfiguring and Extending the Constitutive Metamodel”
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Respondent
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
This panel offers background history and context situating emerging reconfigurations and extensions to
Robert T. Craig's constitutive metamodel of communication published in 1999. It begins by reviewing
published responses to it during the first decade of the 2000s by Myers, Russill and Cooren. It then,
continues by bringing together the original author as a respondent to a panel of scholars who will
elucidate different perspectives and provide comments regarding reconfiguring, extending, and/or
applying the constitutive metamodel. Each scholar will offer a different take on its evolution, and
directions for its development. Together this panel of scholars will explore the reconfigurations and
extensions to the constitutive metamodel. In addition to the original author and panelists, Larry Gross is
the chair for this unique panel.
8428
Friday
13:30-14:45
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Mentoring: Up, Down and Around
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Anne Balsamo, U of Southern California, USA
Carol A. Stabile, Center for the Study of Women in Society, USA
Angharad N. Valdivia, U of Illinois, USA
Radha S. Hegde, New York U, USA
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
Michelle Rodino-Colocino, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participant
Dialectical Tensions Experienced by Diversified Mentoring Dyads at a Midsized Midwestern State
University
Marcy Meyer, Ball State U, USA
This is a special session with feminist mentors from all stages in the academy. It features brief
presentations, and opportunities to engage in mentoring by key feminist academics in varied areas of
Communication.
8431
Friday
13:30-16:15
Board Room 1
Extended Session: Organizing and Integrating Knowledge About Environmental Communication
Environmental Communication
Participants
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
John C. Besley, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Cox, U of North Carolina, USA
Libby Lester, U of Tasmania, AUSTRALIA
Alison Anderson, Plymouth U, AUSTRALIA
Anders Hansen, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Environmental communication has emerged as an expanding academic field in the last three decades. This
session will bring together a group of five to six prominent environmental communication scholars with a
diversity of views and experiences within the field. These scholars will address four core topics:
knowledge, theories, actors, and future challenges for environmental communication. Guiding questions
for this session are: How may the field be mapped? Which aspects are central and which are peripheral?
How is environmental communication related to other fields of study? Are there any “settled” questions in
environmental communication? What are the opportunities, and challenges, for research in environmental
communication? How may knowledge best be organized and made accessible for researchers, students,
practitioners, and the general public?.
8432
Friday
13:30-14:45
Board Room 2
Self- and Other-Initiated Repair as Windows Into Action Formation, Epistemics, and the
Management of Understanding
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Jeffrey David Robinson, Portland State U, USA
Participants
On the Boundary of Repair: The Case of Questioning Repeats
John Heritage, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
Self-Repair and Action Construction
Paul Drew, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Using Open-Class Repair Initiation to Comment on the Generic Organization of Conversational Repair
Jeffrey David Robinson, Portland State U, USA
Epistemics in the Organization of Other-Initiated Repair
Galina Bolden, Rutgers U, USA
This panel brings together four, well-established conversation analysts from four different institutions,
who represent two different academic fields. Their respective research projects converge in the following
way: In addition to examining practices of repair themselves, each project examines how such practices
provide insight into other key topics in the analysis of language and social interaction more broadly, such
as action formation, epistemics, and the management of understanding or ‘grounding.’
8433
Friday
13:30-14:45
Board Room 3
Metapragmatics and Conversational Structuring in Ordinary Conversation, Broadcast
Interactions, and Dispute Mediation
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Metapragmatic Effects in Lexical Development
Jerzy Tomaszczyk, Lodz International Studies Academy, POLAND
Quotation Practices and Communication Ideals: Reporting Speech to Manage Potential Interactional
Troubles
Jessica Sarah Robles, U of New Hampshire, USA
Overall Structural Organization of Phone-Ins in Two Countries and Their Relations to Societal Norms
Gonen Dori-Hacohen, U of Massachusetts, USA
A Comparison of Political Interviews in Public Television and Commercial Broadcasters
Carles Roca-Cuberes, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
Strategic Maneuvering in Dispute Mediation
Alena L. Vasilyeva, Minsk State Linguistic U, BELARUS
8502
Challenging Communication Research: The Challenge of Ethics
Friday
15:00-16:15
Balmoral
Theme Sessions
Participants
Regulating for Communication
Onora O’Neill, none, UNITED KINGDOM
Host, Witness, Translator, Monstrator: News Media and Journalists as Public Performers
Daniel Dayan, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, FRANCE
Wikileaks, National Security, and Cosmopolitan Ethics
Damian Tambini, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
When Practice is Undercut by Ethics
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
The purpose of this panel is to present a fundamental challenge to existing research in communication and
media by recasting the relation between the “what ought” and the “what is”—in other words, by putting
ethics first. Such a challenge has bearing on almost every subfield in the communication discipline, as
well as on how the study of media translates into various fields practice. The challenge of ethics is also a
timely one. The humanities and social sciences have seen a surge of debates on ethical and moral
concerns in the past two decades, with some scholars even referring to the trend as “the turn to ethics.”
8505
Political Communication During the Arab Spring and its Aftermath
Friday
15:00-16:15
Palace A
Political Communication
Chair
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Participants
How Facebook Facilitated the Jasmine Revolution. A Case Study of the Events in Tunisia, 2010-2011
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Celina Huebner, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
Ideology and Instrumentality in Ikhwanweb: The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, the Mubarak Regime,
and the West
Soumia Bardhan, St. Cloud State U, USA
The Politics of Political Communication: How News Discourse Articulates Media and Politics in the 2011
Egyptian Protests
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Bahaa Ghobrial, U of Texas, USA
Attention Economy and the Rise of the Networked Microcelebrity Activist: New Dynamics, Old
Dilemmas
Zeynep Tufekci, Princeton U, USA
8506
A Roundtable Discussion on Work Pressures and Organizational Communication
Friday
15:00-16:15
Palace B
Organizational Communication
Chairs
Dawna I. Ballard, U of Texas, USA
Matthew S. McGlone, U of Texas, USA
Participants
The Untethered Professional: Making Time and Space for Contemplation in an Age of Connection
Dawna I. Ballard, U of Texas, USA
Managing Tensions in Distributed Collaboration
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Why Do We Blame Information for Our Overload?
Yoram M. Kalman, Open U of Israel, ISRAEL
Communicating Work-Life Support: Implications for Organizations, Employees, and Families
Jamie Ladge, Northeastern U, USA
Multitasking in the Workplace: Are We in an Era of Fragmented Information?
Gloria Mark, U of California - Irvine, USA
Time is Not on Our Side: Temporal Agency in the Enron E-Mail Corpus
Matthew S. McGlone, U of Texas, USA
Burnout: Etiology, Consequences, and Remedies
Stacey Passalacqua, Rollins College, USA
Pressure From Other People: Using Sociomateriality to Understand Communication Load
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Escalating workloads, long work hours, anxieties about job security, and the fragmentation of attention
across proliferating communication channels are taking a toll on organizational members’ lives—at home
and work. These “work pressures” create dialectic tensions between fundamental aspects of employees’
experience of work. In today’s competitive and challenging business environment, organizations cannot
afford to ignore their employees’ perceptions of work pressure. Given the tight link between work
pressures and contemporary shifts in communication technology and new media, the roundtable brings
together an interdisciplinary group of scholars whose interests lie at the intersection of communication,
work, and technology to discuss pertinent theory and research methods for investigating work pressure
issues and creating solutions.
8507
Methodological Perspectives
Friday
15:00-16:15
Palace C
Political Communication
Chair
Janice Barrett, Lasell College, USA
Participants
A New Era of Qualitative Political Communication Research? A History and a Case for New Approaches
David Karpf, George Washington U, USA
Daniel Kreiss, U of North Carolina, USA
Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Automatically Extracting Frames From Media Content using Syntacting Analysis
Wouter van Atteveldt, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tamir Sheafer, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Shaul Shenhav, The Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Janet Takens, VU U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Measuring Traits and States in Public Opinion Research: A Latent State–Trait Analysis of Political
Efficacy
Frank M. Schneider, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Lukas Otto, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Daniel Alings, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Manfred Schmitt, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Why Agreement Estimators Fail to Estimate Their Estimands?: Some Answers From a Reconstructed
Experiment
Xinshu Zhao, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
8508
Comments-Mediated Communication
Friday
15:00-16:15
York
Communication and Technology
Chair
Brianna L. Lane, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Collective Coping Through Networked Narratives: YouTube Responses to a School Shooting
Simon Lindgren, Umea U, SWEDEN
Click “Like” to Express: Recommendation Systems and Uses and Gratification Approach
JI WON KIM, U of Texas, USA
Intramedia Interaction and the Third-Person Effect: How Partisans Respond to YouTube Ads and
Comments
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Chang Sup Park, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Stephanie C KANG, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Benjamin A. Lyons, Southern Illinois U, Carbondale, USA
Narayanan Iyer, Southern Illinois U, USA
Others' Comments and the Role of Need for Cognition and Internal Political Self-Efficacy in Impression
Formation
Jayeon Lee, Ohio State U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
8509
Interaction or Conversation With Media
Friday
15:00-16:15
Lancaster
Communication and Technology
Chair
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Interactivity as Conversation: Can Back and Forth Interactions Affect User Cognitions and Attitudes?
Saraswathi Bellur, U of Connecticut, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U and Sungkyunkwan U, USA
The Impact of Anthropomorphic Cues on Personalized Health Assessment Users’ Privacy Concern and
Intention to Disclose
Yerheen Ha, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Tara Lurae Traeder, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Jessica Ruiz, Pennsylvania State U, USA
When is a Humanlike Interface Helpful? Effects of Visual and Linguistic Anthropomorphic Cues on
Response Behavior in a Website
Young June Sah, Michigan State U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
The Effect of Interactivity on User Experience: Comparing Visual Cues and Actual Use
Bo Zhang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Alyssa Appelman, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Youngjoon Choi, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Ashley Han, Pennsylvania State U, USA
8511
Friday
15:00-16:15
Waterloo/Tower
Communicating Grown-Up Ideas About Health to Children and Young People
Health Communication
Chair
Jennifer J. Moreland, The College of Wooster, USA
Participants
Let's Talk About Sex!: Acceptance of Sexual Health Communication in Pakistani School Curricula
Mariliis Vahe, Florida State U, USA
Khawaja Zain-ul-abdin, Florida State U, USA
Church Communication and Kenyan Church-Going Youths’ Safe Sex Attitudes and Behavior
Ann Neville Miller, U of Central Florida, USA
Kyalo Ngula, Africa Nazarene U, KENYA
Planting the Seed: Parental Evaluations of Children's Strategies for Initiating Discussion of Future Care
Needs
Craig Fowler, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Carla Fisher, George Mason U, USA
Margaret J. Pitts, U of Arizona, USA
Implementing Vegetable-Promoting Picture Books to Enhance Children’s Vegetable Consumption
Simone M. de Droog, Radboud U Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
8512
Friday
15:00-16:15
Chelsea/Richmond
High Density: The Dark Side of Interpersonal
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Jennifer Cornacchione, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Aggressive, Combative, and Aggression-Free: Assessing the Validity of the Relational ControlMotivated Aggression Perspective and Violent Couple Typology
Loreen N. Olson, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Jennifer Stevens Aubrey, U of Missouri, USA
Mark Fine, U of North Carolina - Greensboro, USA
Confronting Friends About Risky Behaviors: An Application of the GPA Framework
Melissa Maier, Upper Iowa U, USA
Nancy Burrell, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Dyadic Perceptions of Goals, Conflict Strategies, and Perceived Resolvability in Serial Arguments
Jennifer L. Bevan, Chapman U, USA
Managing Information About STI Testing in Intimate Relationships: Applying the Theory of Motivated
Information Management
Sara LaBelle, West Virginia U, USA
Megan R. Dillow, West Virginia U, USA
The Development and Preliminary Test of a Theory of Jealousy Expression: Jealousy Expression Profile
Theory
Jennifer L. Bevan, Chapman U, USA
When Hurt Continues: Taking Conflict Personally Leads to Rumination, Residual Hurt, and Negative
Motivations
Courtney Waite Miller, Elmhurst College, USA
Michael E. Roloff, Northwestern U, USA
You Did What? The Communication of Forgiveness in Married and Dating Couples
Pavica Sheldon, U of Alabama in Huntsville, USA
Eletra Gilchrist, U of Alabama in Huntsville, USA
James Lessley, U of Alabama in Huntsville, USA
Sources of Irritating Partner Behavior in Empty-Nest Marriages and Relationship Characteristics That
Predict Their Severity and Expression
Mary Elizabeth Nagy, Bloomsburg U, USA
Jennifer A. Theiss, Rutgers U, USA
8513
Digital Games in Communication Research: Perspectives on the Institutional Embedding of a
Growing Field
Friday
15:00-16:15
St. James
Game Studies
Participants
Orbital Drop Shock Curriculum? The Administrative Issues of Introducing Video Game-Related Classes
Into Communications Programs
David D. Perlmutter, U of Iowa, USA
Collegiate Gaming: Why Communication Programs Can’t Afford to Not Offer Games Courses
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Mapping the Field of Digital Games Research: Results of a Large International Survey
Jan Van Looy, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Thorsten Quandt, U Münster, GERMANY
Malte Elson, U Münster, GERMANY
James D. Ivory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U, USA
Frans Mäyrä, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Mia L. Consalvo, Concordia U, CANADA
As many of the ICA Game Studies Interest Group’s members continue to navigate and negotiate the role
of their research on games with their duties in academic units devoted to communication and journalism,
this panel shares multiple forms of insight about the developing role of video games in curricula and
faculty roles in the field.
8514
New Directions in Collective Memory and Journalism
Friday
15:00-16:15
Regent's
Journalism Studies
Chair
Motti Neiger, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Participants
Journalism and Collective Memory in a Postbroadcast World
Jill A. Edy, U of Oklahoma, USA
Journalism and Prospective Memory
Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Gone, but Not Forgotten: Memories of Journalistic Deviance as Metajournalistic Discourse
Matt Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
News is an Act of Faith: Failure and Religiosity in Final Issues of Failed Newspapers
Nicholas Gilewicz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Oren Meyers, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
8516
Loaded Words: Insights From Journalism, History, and Culture
Friday
15:00-16:15
Belgrave
Communication History
Journalism Studies
Chair
Richard K. Popp, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Participants
Journalism as Institution and Work in Europe, Circa 1860: A Comparative History of Journalism
Henrik Ornebring, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Challenging U.S. Exceptionalism in the Early 20th Century: The Spanish-Language Anarchist Press in the
US
Ilia Rodriguez, U of New Mexico, USA
Bringing the World to America: An Oral History of Foreign Correspondence
Giovanna Dell'Orto, U of Minnesota, USA
The Portrayal of German Anti-Semitism 1918-1933 in the Foreign Press: Comparative and Transnational
Research Perspectives
Stephanie Seul, U of Bremen, GERMANY
“New” Media and Political Change: The Case of International Broadcasts to Portugal, 1962-1974
Nelson Costa Ribeiro, Catholic U of Portugal, PORTUGAL
Informed by the broader themes of communicaton and media histories, the papers in this session draw on
the developed field of journalism history to argue the critical influence of various forms of journalism
practice in the cultural context. The range and interest of these papers together make a compelling case for
the contribution of journalism to the evolution of communicaiton history.
8517
Challenges in Research on Credibility
Friday
15:00-16:15
Berkeley
Mass Communication
Chair
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Asserting Credibility and Expertise in Times of Crisis: Bank Advertising During Economic Recession
Stephanie Aragao, U of Massachusetts, USA
Laras Sekarasih, U of Massachusetts, USA
Cognitive Dissonance or Credibility? A Comparison of Two Theoretical Explanations for Selective
Exposure to Biased News Content
Ethan Hartsell, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Andrew Flanagin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Credibility of Public Opinion Research: Influence of Source and Medium on People’s Attribution of
Credibility of Public Opinion Research Results
Julian Brocke, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Nora Denner, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Marlies Dumbsky, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Anja Hoefel, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Sven Joeckel, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Annicka Klausen, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Stella Loock, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Alexander Mainz, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Claudia Rose, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
The Repetition Paradox: Why the Repetition of a Statement Both Increases and Decreases its Credibility
Thomas Koch, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
Thomas Zerback, Ludwig Maximilian U of Munich, GERMANY
8518
New Media Research
Friday
15:00-16:15
Cadogan
Information Systems
Chair
Sabrina Cornelia Eimler, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Participants
Hold the Phone: Mobile Phone Haptics and Activation of Socially Relevant Concepts
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Rachel Young, U of Iowa, USA
Mary Ryan, U of Missouri, USA
How to Take Advantage of Tablets: Effects of News Structure on Recall and Understanding
Anna Van Cauwenberge, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Is Less More? The Role of Gender and Information Quantity in Business Network Profile Evaluation
Sabrina Cornelia Eimler, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Maria Kovtunenko, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Need to Belong, Social Norms and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Social Networking Site Usage
Julia Niemann, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Frank Mangold, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Michael Schenk, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Online Privacy and Social Gratifications: A Cross-Cultural Study on Privacy Management on Social
Network Sites
Leonard Reinecke, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Sabine Trepte, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Johannes Gutenberg U, GERMANY
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Marc Ziegele, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Show Me Your Contacts: Status of Contacts and Gender in Evaluations of Business Network Profiles
Sabrina Cornelia Eimler, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Vera J. Sauer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Smart TV: Are They Really Smart in Interacting With People?
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Viewing Experience of 3D Entertainment Technology: A Stereopsis Perspective
Chen-Chao Tao, National Chiao Tung U, TAIWAN
8521
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 1 & 2
Heritage, Collective Memory, and the Mediated Past
Popular Communication
Chair
Eyal Zandberg, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Participants
"Ketchup is the Auschwitz of the Tomatoes": Humor and Collective Memory of Traumatic Events
Eyal Zandberg, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
Owning American History: Whiteness and U.S. National Culture in American Pickers -- Top Paper in Pop
Comm
Andrew J Bottomley, U of Wisconsin, USA
Road Trips to the Past: Culinary Tourism as Commodified Heritage -- Top Paper in Pop Comm
Christina Maria Ceisel, SUNY – Oneonta, USA
The Localized Popular Music Heritage of the Netherlands in Museums and Archives
Arno van der Hoeven, Erasmus U Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Amanda Brandellero, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dinosaurs on Noah’s Ark? Representations of Science, Religion, and Popular Culture at the Creation
Museum
David William Scott, Utah Valley U, USA
8522
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 3 & 4
Blogs, Twitter, and YouTube as Contested Arenas
Global Communication and Social Change
Communication and Technology
Chair
Le Han, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
The Global News Network: the Structural Role of Chinese Bridge Blogs
Nan Zheng, James Madison U, USA
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
Tweet to Remember: Moments of Crisis in the Chinese Microblogosphere
Le Han, U of Pennsylvania, USA
When Big Brother Uses Twitter, Too: Productive Forms of Policing in the Seoul G20 Protests in South
Korea
Kyung Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Hyun Suk Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
YouTube Interventions: The Syria Conflict from YouTube to the Mainstream Media
Sean Aday, George Washington U, USA
Deen Goodwin Freelon, American U, USA
Marc Lynch, George Washington U, USA
8523
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 5 & 6
Public Relations and Nation Branding
Public Relations
Chair
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Participants
Country Reputation and the Power of Culture
Hyun-Ji Lim, Jacksonville U, USA
Ji Young Kim, Bradley U, USA
Credibility at Stake? Environmental News Discourse and its Potential Implications for New Zealand’s
Brand Positioning
Florian Kaefer, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Eva Collins, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
The Relevance of Brand Origin to the PR Efforts of Carmakers in the United States
Nadine Christina Billgen, U of Georgia, USA
Social Media Uses in Government Public Relations: A Content Analysis of Social Media Strategies
Between South Korea and the United States of America
EunJu Cho, U of Florida, USA
Moon J Lee, U of Florida, USA
8524
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 7 & 8
Wartime Images in Historical Memory
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
The 2011 World Press Photo: A Study of Modern-Day Hagar in Yemen Through Collective Memory in
Islam
Natalia Mielczarek, U of Iowa, USA
Visual Coverage of the 2006 Lebanon War: Framing Conflict in Three U.S. News Magazines
Carol B. Schwalbe, U of Arizona, USA
Shannon Dougherty, Arizona State U, USA
War as a Sober Spectacle: A Revised Critique of Roger Fenton’s 1855 Photographs of the Crimean War
Sandrine Boudana, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
The "Looking Into the Past" Photos and Their Potentially Comparative History
Ryan Lizardi, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Looking Back: The Shifting Public Life of the Abu Ghraib Photographs
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
8525
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 9 & 10
Contested Memories: Resituating Race, Ethnicity, and Contentious Pasts in Sites of Public Memory
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Miranda Jean Brady, Carleton U, CANADA
Participants
Digital Media and the Contestation of the Memory of the Roma Porajmos (Holocaust)
Anna Marie Reading, London South Bank U, UNITED KINGDOM
Representing Spectacle and Inventing the Other: Human Zoos, Circuses, and Colonial Exhibitions at the
Quai Branly
Irina Mihalache, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Embodiment of Memory: Exploring Beauty Practices as Holocaust Survival Tactics
Reisa Klein, Carleton U, CANADA
Managing Contentious Histories: The Digital Archive and Indian Residential School Survivor
Testimonials in Canada
Miranda Jean Brady, Carleton U, CANADA
Sites of public memory offer important forms of ritual communication by which people make sense of
contentious pasts and articulate collective identities. Whether state-sanctioned or initiated at the
grassroots, memory sites like museums present opportunities and limitations for understanding the past
through critiques of previous historical paradigms. However, their practitioners are not always reflexive
about the limitations of interpreting the past through institutional or mediated lenses. This panel provides
critical responses to contemporary memory sites addressing historical violence against racial and ethnic
minorities. It offers an exploration of four disparate cases, which share a number of commonalities,
regardless of their different historical and cultural contexts. This collection of papers demonstrates various
approaches for studying public memory and mediation, and examines the cultural nuances involved when
violent, historical events are interpreted by and for particular audiences/participants.
8526
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 11 & 12
Media, Ritual and Religion. Exploring Contemporary Implications in Mediatized Rituals
Online/Offline
Popular Communication
Chairs
Johanna Maaria Sumiala, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Mihai Coman, U of Bucharest, ROMANIA
Participants
Media and Ritual: A Challenge for the Anthropological Thought?
Mihai Coman, U of Bucharest, ROMANIA
Amnon Yitzhak Online: YouTube and the Production of Ritual Knowledge
Michele Rosenthal, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Synchronization Without Simultaneity? Media Rituals Beyond Program-Television and Media Events
Guenter Thomas, Ruhr U Bochum, GERMANY
Immortals: Ritualizing Death of a Celebrity in the Present-Day Media Culture
Johanna Maaria Sumiala, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Respondent
Eric W. Rothenbuhler, Ohio U, USA
In recent years the interplay between media, ritual and religion has stimulated interest in media, religion,
communications and anthropology scholarship. In this panel organized together with the ECREA
Temporary Working Group Media and Religion we look at rituals and ritualization as a cultural practice
carried out in relation to, via and through the contemporary religious and non-religious media including
the complex web of mass media as well as social networking sites (e.g. Television, YouTube). In this
panel we wish to argue that we need to rethink and reexamine symbolic communication and the place of
ritualized practice in the contemporary context. The panel’s task is to make the complex interplay between
media, ritual and religion theoretically and empirically more accessible to scholars and laypeople alike.
8527
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 13, 14, & 15
8528
Friday
15:00-16:15
Hilton Meeting
Rooms 16 & 17
Serving the Public: Critical Perspectives on Journalism
Philosophy, Theory and Critique
Participants
Radical Journalism, News Epistemology and Disruption in Paradigm in WikiLeaks Phenomenon
Anup Kumar, Cleveland State U, USA
Rethinking Truthfulness in Journalism
Natalia Roudakova, U of California - San Diego, USA
The Costs of “Free Radio”: Market Failure and the Clash of Media Policy Narratives
Victor W. Pickard, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Public in Public Media: Debates, Dilemmas, and Discrepancies Christopher Ali, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Women, Protest, and Patriarchy in the Post-Soviet World: Examining Pussy Riot and FEMEN
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Nadia Kaneva, U of Denver, USA
Participants
Pussy Riot: What Does it Mean?
Olga Ivanovna Matyash, Russian Communication Association, USA
The Punk Prayer, Balaclavas, and Putin: Tragicomic Culture Jamming in Modern Russia
Anna Baranchuk, Georgia State U, USA
Symbolic Violence in Nonviolent Social Movement Activism: Pussy Riot Performance and Suffragette
Attack on the Rokeby Venus
Ksenia Gorbenko, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Naked Rebels With a Cause: Framing FEMEN in International News
Elza Nistorova Ibroscheva, Southern Illinois U, Edwardsville, USA
Nadia Kaneva, U of Denver, USA
Affective Mediations: Social Media, Affect, and East European Feminist Activism
Marusya Bociurkiw, Ryerson U, CANADA
This panel aims to stimulate scholarly debate on the allegedly “new” forms of women’s protest that are
taking place in the post-Soviet cultural space. The panel’s chair will facilitate a discussion among the
presenters and the audience around some of the following questions: What do these examples of women’s
protest movements tell us about the variants of feminism emerging in the post-Soviet world? How do
these movements challenge or reproduce received ideas about the goals of feminism and about the best
strategies for achieving these goals? How are women’s bodies deployed in these protest movements and
to what end? And what is the role of mediation at the local and global level for these movements?
8532
Friday
15:00-16:15
Board Room 2
Deciding Who's In and Who's Out: Membership in Academic and Religious Contexts
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Alena L. Vasilyeva, Minsk State Linguistic U, BELARUS
Participants
Natural Criticism and Membering in Academia: The Study of an Extreme Case
David Boromisza-Habashi, U of Colorado, USA
Russell Parks, U of Colorado, USA
Managing Stacy: A Case Study on Turn-Taking in the Language Classroom
Hansun Zhang Waring, Columbia U, USA
"Who's the Decider?": Discursive Strategies for Maintaining Sociability in Negotiations in Preschoolers'
Peer Talk
Shoshana Blum-Kulka, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Michal Hamo, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
The Trajectory of Resistance to Authority in Online Academic Institutional Talk
Natasha Shrikant, U of Massachusetts, USA
Effective Evangelism: Discourse Surrounding Evangelizing Practices in a Chinese Indonesian Evangelical
Community in Boston
Sunny Lie, U of Massachusetts, USA
8533
Friday
15:00-16:15
Board Room 3
Free Speech, Content Regulation, and the State
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Katharine Sarikakis, U of Vienna, AUSTRIA
Participants
A Test of Legal Arguments Surrounding the FDA Proposed Cigarette Warning Labels
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Sherri Jean Katz, Cornell U, USA
Alan D. Mathios, Cornell U, USA
Media Pluralism Policy in a Postsocialist Mediterranean Media System: The Case of Croatia
Zrinjka Perusko, U of Zagreb, CROATIA
Noncommercial Mechanisms in North American Media Regulation: Institutional Reception of Al Jazeera
English
Ian Kivelin Davis, U of Illinois, USA
Valuing Expression Over Identity: Anonymity v. Compelled Disclosure in American Political Speech
Sarah Chenoweth, U of Arizona, USA
8602
ICA London Closing Plenary: The Bridge and the Barrier: The Challenges of Language Use in
Communication Research
Friday
16:30-17:45
Balmoral
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Francois Heinderyckx, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Participants
Toby Miller, City U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Michael Oustinoff, U Paris 3, FRANCE
Dafna Lemish, Southern Illinois U, USA
Chin Chuan Lee, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF
Jiro Takai, Nagoya U, JAPAN
The hegemony of English in international research and publication is perceived by many as a barrier
excluding scholars from many regions of the world. In spite of a consensus on the need for action to
overcome the language barrier, initiatives seem to have very limited results. This panel will explore
innovative ways to understand the causes and implications of these issues and to initiate new dynamics in
internationalizing communication research in a way that benefits scholars and scholarship on both sides of
the language barrier.
8749
Friday
17:30-19:00
Strand Campus
Postconference: Cultural Work, Subjectivity and Communication Technologies: Crossing Existing
Research Paradigms
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Christina Marie Scharff, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
Rosalind Gill, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
This one-day seminar will bring together communications research with specific areas of expertise at the
Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries and Digital Humanities, King's College London. In
particular, the event will put into dialogue research on three areas: work in the cultural and creative
industries; subjectivity in and at work; and the interplay between work and communication technologies.
9217
Postconference: Political Public Relations: Examining an Emerging Field
Saturday
09:00-12:00
Berkeley
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
Participants
Chiara Valentini, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Jesper Stromback, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Public relations efforts are more pervasive in political communication today than ever before. Still, there
is neither much theorizing nor empirical research on political public relations. Consequently, the goal of
this post-conference panel is to bring together scholars at the crossroads of public relations, political
communication, political science, and political marketing, and to serve as an initial forum to discuss
various perspectives on political public relations. The discussion will be based on studies in a forthcoming
special issue of the Public Relations Journal, edited by Spiro Kiousis and Jesper Strömbäck.
9218
Postconference: Bridging the Quantitative-Qualitative Divide in Comparative Communication
Research: Heading Towards Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)
Saturday
09:00-17:00
Cadogan
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Participants
Benoît Rihoux, U Catholique de Louvain, BELGIUM
Carsten Schneider, Central European U, HUNGARY
James Stanyer, Loughborough U, UNITED KINGDOM
Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
This postconference workshop will be an ideal opportunity for interested colleagues in the field to engage
with Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) getting to grips with its language and procedures. The
workshop brings together experts and users of the method with those who are interested in utilizing such
an approach in their own work. The aim is threefold: First, to provide a hands-on introduction to QCA
that acts as an impetus for researchers to use the method more widely in their own work. Second, to
showcase applications of QCA in the wider field of communication and media studies, demonstrating its
ability to bridge often gridlocked epistemological and methodological divides in comparative
communication research. Third, to specifically discuss the issue of calibration and identify possible
solutions.
9249
Saturday
09:30-17:45
Strand Campus
Postconference: Cultural Work, Subjectivity and Communication Technologies: Crossing Existing
Research Paradigms
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Christina Marie Scharff, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
Rosalind Gill, King's College London, UNITED KINGDOM
This one-day seminar will bring together communications research with specific areas of expertise at the
Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries and Digital Humanities, King's College London. In
particular, the event will put into dialogue research on three areas: work in the cultural and creative
industries; subjectivity in and at work; and the interplay between work and communication technologies.
A162
Monday
08:30-17:00
Conference Centre
Postconference: Advancing Media Production Research: A 1-Day Post-ICA / Pre-IAMCR
Conference
Sponsored Sessions
This one-day postconference will offer scholars researching within media organisations, and those who
have done so, an opportunity to reflect on the value and limitations of such research. Discussions will
focus on: How theories of news and cultural production have been advanced and challenged by recent
media production research; Understanding “that which we cannot see” – the ongoing challenge of access
to media and cultural institutions for in-depth, critical research; and pressing questions for production
research in the coming decade. This event is hosted by the University of Leeds Institute for
Communications Studies and is cosponsored by the IAMCR Working Group for Media Production
Research, ICA Journalism Studies, and the ECREA Media Industries and Cultural Production Working
Group.