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DEMYSTIFYING THE GRANT
WRITING PROCESS
KRISTEEN CHRISTIAN
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT
VALENCIA COLLEGE
[email protected]
(407) 582-2909
COMPONENTS OF A GRANT PROPOSAL
• Abstract or summary
• Introduction or organization background
• Problem or need statement
• Project Goals and Objectives
COMPONENTS OF A GRANT PROPOSAL
• Methods or implementation strategy
• Key personnel
• Project evaluation
• Project budget and budget narrative
• Sustainability plan
WHERE TO START
• Identify a significant need
• Does the significant need impact your students,
department, organization, or community?
HOW DO YOU KNOW?
• What data supports your need?
• Is this a local, state, national need?
• Is there comparative data?
HOW SIGNIFICANT IS THIS PROBLEM?
• List all of the long-term implications if this problem is
not addressed.
SO THERE IS A PROBLEM…
Now ask…
• What are the possible causes for this problem? Make a list!
• Can you categorize the causes?
• Is it an access or information problem?
Look at your list again…
• What items are out of your control? Strike those!
PROBLEM STATEMENT
• The list left should be items that you have control or
influence over.
THINK ABOUT THIS
• Is the problem measurable?
• The causes will be addressed in the methods
section of the proposal.
This is an important connection!!!
GOALS
• Goals are large statements of what you hope to
accomplish or see.
• Goals are not measurable.
• Goals create the setting for the proposal.
OBJECTIVES
• Objectives are operational and measurable.
• Two kinds of objectives:
• Outcome objectives
• Process objectives
OUTCOME OBJECTIVES
• Outcome objectives measure program’s
effectiveness
PROCESS OBJECTIVES
• Process objectives measure the steps that the
organization is taking to meet the goal.
• Examples of process objectives:
•
•
•
•
•
To establish
To attend
To purchase
To implement
To train
IMPORTANT
• To increase or decrease something is not an
objective.
• To make it an objective add by what degree the
increase or decrease will happen.
• All outcomes must be written in terms of the
participants or learners, not the organization!!!
USE THE S.M.A.R.T. APPROACH
• Specific
• Measurable
• Action Oriented
• Realistic
• Time and resource limited
METHODS/ACTIVITIES/IMPLEMENTATI
ON
• This is the most detailed part of the proposal and
scored the most points.
• It describes who, what, when and how
•
•
•
•
List all of the tasks/activities
Who is responsible
Add the timeline
How will you know this is accomplished?
EVALUATION
• Relates to the goals, objectives, and outcomes
of the proposal.
• Begin with the evaluation in mind
EVALUATION CONSIDERATIONS
• What data will be needed?
• Who and how will the data be collected and used?
• What measures will be used to collect the data?
• Is an outside evaluator needed or required?
TWO TYPES OF EVALUATION
• Formative evaluation is part of the
implementation plan.
• Summative evaluation asks, “have you achieved
the outcome objectives?”
"WHEN THE COOK TASTES THE
SOUP, THAT’S FORMATIVE; WHEN
THE GUESTS TASTE THE SOUP,
THAT’S SUMMATIVE."
- ROBERT STAKES
MEASURES
• Focus groups
• Surveys, questionnaires, checklists
• Pre-post tests
• Anecdotal information
• Case studies
• Interviews
BUDGET - A PICTURE OF THE
PROPOSAL USING NUMBERS
• Must relate to the activities in the grant proposal
• Be realistic
BUDGET ITEMS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Personnel - salary and fringes
Consultant and contractual
Travel
Supplies
Equipment
Other
Indirect costs
Administrative costs
A WORD ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY
• A sustainability plan must be included in the
proposal.
• Highest level of governance must agree to
the plan.
REMEMBER
• Read the RFP carefully and make notes.
• Most important information first.
• Use specific examples.
• Vague signals poor planning.
• Use grandma’s rule!!!
GRANT PROPOSALS/AWARDS
• Will be rejected more than funded.
• Are an investment for the funding source.
• Offer -0- budget relief.
• Funding sources want to fund something
unique, not current operating expenses.
• Are seed money for new projects.
• Not a short-term problem solving for long-term
problems.
PROVE TO THE FUNDING SOURCE
THAT YOU:
• Have a broad based understanding of the
problem.
• Have read and understand the current literature
in your discipline.
• Are qualified to design and deliver a solution to
the problem.
• Have a reasonable plan and budget!
• You have a plan for sustainability
WINNING PROPOSALS…
• Overwhelm the reader with hard core facts and
details.
• Bring the proposal to life - add stories and visuals.
• Textboxes often do not follow same formatting!
Questions