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26 delicious recipes and interesting
nutritional information
Great Recipes from the Lower North Shore
Copyright © 2006 Coasters Association
Produced by: Jocelyne Jones, Nutritionist and Priscilla Fequet Griffin, Coordinator
Edited by: Priscilla Fequet Griffin, Coordinator & Cornella Maurice, Executive Director
Illustrations: Lori-Lee Thomas, Artist
Recipes provided by: Lower North Shore Residents
The recipes were tested by: Jocelyne Jones and Réjeanne Marcoux, Nutritionists
The nutritional value of the recipes as well as the dietitian’s tips were carried out by: Jocelyne Jones, Nutritionist
We would like to acknowledge the Public Health Agency of Canada for their financial support in the creation of this cookbook.
Printed in Canada
No changes permitted. Reprint permission not required.
2
Table of Contents
Pages
Introduction and Acknowledgements
5
Lower North Shore Food Guide
7
Food Guide Servings
9
Nutrient Analysis per Serving
9
Interesting Nutritional Information
10
Recipes from the Student/Family Contest Winners
15
17
23
33
Soups and Chowders
Main Meals
Desserts
Recipes from Seniors at the Dr. Hodd Pavillon
Main Meals
Side Dish
Desserts
41
43
49
53
Recipes from Seniors at the Antoinette Malouin Pavillon
and the Seniors hospitalized at the CSSSBCN
59
Main Meals
Desserts
61
65
References
71
3
4
Introduction and Acknowledgements
On the Lower North Shore, there is an abundance of local foods available. The potential to
create a variety of delicious healthy recipes with the local resources needed to be brought to
the forefront. In order to ascertain if Lower North Shore residents knew how to cook their
local resources in a healthy manner, healthy recipes were obtained from the local residents via
a contest in the schools.
The first set of recipes is from students, who partnered with a family member, to submit a
healthy recipe. It is important to note that, while visiting all communities on the Lower North
Shore, during focus group meetings, the communities specified which local resource best
represented their community. Thus, each community had to submit a healthy recipe made
with the specific local food designated to their community. However, it is important to note
that there are some recipes provided by some Lower North Shore seniors, but their recipes are
more traditional ones which we are more use to eating.
Eating healthy does not mean that you must avoid foods such as pies, cookies, puddings, etc.
The importance of healthy eating is to add a variety of foods to your everyday diet and to
enjoy these foods, but in moderation!
Keep in mind that health begins in your plate and we hope that the recipes in this cookbook
will teach you new ways of cooking with local resources, but also to keep enjoying, once in a
while, the old time cooking. We hope that the dietitian’s tips will help you modify some of
your cooking habits in order to make them healthier.
Also included is a copy of our newly developed Lower North Shore Food Guide which can
assist you in making healthier choices for you and your families. We would like to extend our
thanks to Réjeanne Marcoux, Nutritionist, CSSSBCN, and our partners for their advice and
support in the development of this document.
At this time, we would like to thank all of those (students, family members and the local
schools) who provided us with great recipes for this cookbook. For those who participated,
(124) but didn’t win, we appreciate and thank you for your submissions. To those who did
win, Congratulations! We are proud that you were able to think healthy while cooking with
local resources and thank you for your contribution to this booklet.
A very special thank-you must go out to Lori-Lee Thomas for the beautiful illustrations in the
cook book as well as all of the illustrations in the Food Guide.
Thanks to the workers in both pavillons, Marie-Hélène Girard and Freda Joncas for helping to
obtain the recipes from the seniors.
Special thanks to Réjeanne Marcoux, Nutritionist, CSSSBCN, for assisting in selecting the
winning recipes and for helping to test some of the recipes.
With gratitude, special thanks must go to the Public Health Agency of Canada for their ongoing financial support and to the Coasters Association for their support in all aspects of this
project.
Jocelyne Jones, Nutritionist
Priscilla Fequet Griffin, Coordinator
5
6
7
8
Food Guide Servings
The Lower North Shore Food Guide provides daily recommendations of servings for the four
food groups (Fruits and Vegetables, Grain Products, Milk Products, Meat and Alternatives).
The number of servings provided by the recipes in this book is based on the serving sizes for
the different foods in each one of the four food groups (refer to page 5).
Nutrient Analysis per Serving
The recipes were all tested with the exact ingredients indicated in the list of ingredients for
each recipe. Certain recipes were modified if the final version once tested were not
satisfactory.
The nutrient analysis of each recipe was calculated individually by using the books: “Valeur
nutritive des aliments” and the “Nutrient value of some common foods” and on line at
http://www.arctic-flavours.fi/. In order to complete the nutrient analysis, the nutritional value
of the ingredients for each recipe was added, then, divided by the number of servings the
recipe provides in order to give the nutrient analysis per serving.
In the tables, depending on the type of recipe, the nutrient analysis is given for:
-
Calories (cal);
Carbohydrates in grams (g);
Proteins in grams (g);
Fats in grams (g);
Marine omega-3 fat (EPA+DHA) in grams (g);
Cholesterol, in milligrams (mg);
Dietary fibre, in grams (g);
Sodium, in milligrams (mg);
Calcium, in milligrams (mg);
Iron in milligrams (mg)
Vitamin C in milligrams (mg);
Vitamin A in international units (IU);
Vitamin B12, in micrograms (mcg).
9
Interesting Nutritional Information
The truth about Carbohydrates, Proteins and Fats
Carbohydrates are the main source of energy for your body and mind.
There are two groups of carbohydrates, the simple carbs and the complex carbs.
Simple carbs includes foods such as (milk, fruits and vegetables) and “Other Foods” such as
sugar, honey, jam, candies, fruit-flavoured beverages and soft drinks. The Other Foods can be
part of a healthy diet, but should not replace the more nutritious foods such as fruits and
vegetables, milk products, grain products, especially whole grain, and meat and alternatives.
Complex carbs includes foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, rice, pasta, some
vegetables (corn, potato and peas) and dried beans and lentils. Complex carbs are a good
source of fiber.
What about fiber???
Dietary fiber is only found in plant foods. Fiber helps to control the digestive system, blood
cholesterol, blood sugar and weight.
There are two types of dietary fiber: insoluble fiber and soluble fiber.
Insoluble fiber helps to promote bowel function and is found in foods such as wheat bran,
whole grain products and some vegetables.
Soluble fiber helps to lower blood cholesterol and to control blood sugar levels, especially for
people with diabetes. Soluble fiber can be found in foods such as oats, barley, psyllium, beans
and lentils, some vegetables and fruits (apples).
Adults should be aiming to eat 25-35 g of fiber per day. As for children from 3 to18 years old,
they can calculate their age plus 5 in order to determine how much fiber they should eat per
day. A 15 year old, for example, should consume (15+5=20), 20 grams of fiber per day.
Proteins
Protein is essential for the growth, maintenance and repair of the body tissues.
There are two types of protein, animal protein and vegetable protein.
Animal protein is found in foods such as milk products, meats, poultry, fish, seafood and
eggs. Animal protein provides all of the essential amino acids (primary structure of protein),
therefore they are complete.
Vegetable protein is found in plant foods such as soy products, nuts, peanut butter, seeds,
beans and lentils. Vegetable proteins are incomplete since they do not provide all of the
essential amino acids like the animal proteins. Vegetable proteins must be combined with an
animal protein or another vegetable protein to be complete.
10
Here are some examples of complete proteins:
- Pea soup and bread (2 vegetable proteins);
- Vegetarian chilli and a glass of milk (1 vegetable protein and 1 animal protein);
- Spaghetti and lentil sauce (2 vegetable proteins);
- Sliced bread and peanut butter (2 vegetable proteins).
Fats
It is important to know that fats are also necessary to maintain good health, but it becomes
problematic when people eat too much fat. Fat provides energy (calories), essential fatty acids
and helps absorb the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.
Diets that are higher in fat are often higher in calories, which in long term lead to weight gain
and obesity.
For Women, the daily fat intake is about 65 grams or less and for Men, 90 grams or less.
There are different types of fat, and they are:
Saturated fats are found mainly in animal foods (meats and milk products), tropical oils (palm
and coconut oils) and hydrogenated products (some margarines, cookies and crackers).
Increased amounts of saturated fat tend to increase the risk of heart disease by increasing the
levels of blood cholesterol.
Trans fats
These fats occur naturally in some foods, but they are also produced when a liquid fat is
hardened by a process called “hydrogenation”. Trans fats are also known for increasing the
risk of heart disease. Foods that contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oil are sources of
Trans fats and they are, shortening, some margarines, crackers, chips, cookies, bakery
products, deep fried products (doughnuts, french fries, etc).
Polyunsaturated fats are found primarily in nuts and seeds, in corn, safflower and sunflower
oils, but also in non hydrogenated margarines made with these oils. These fats are known to
decrease the risk of heart disease.
There are two types of polyunsaturated fats:
Linoleic acid (omega-6) and linolenic acid (omega-3), they are both essential fatty acids,
because the body cannot produce them on it’s own, we must get them from the food we eat.
Omega-3 fats are very popular and are found in fish oils and in fatty fish such as salmon,
sardines, trout, herring, mackerel, halibut, tuna, etc. They are also found in ground flaxseeds,
flaxseed oil, canola oil and soya oil. Omega-3 fats also help to decrease the risk of heart
disease.
Monounsaturated fats can be found mainly in canola, peanut and olive oils, into margarines
made with these oils and in nuts and seeds. These types of fats have a tendency to lower the
levels of blood cholesterol, which will help to reduce the risk of heart disease.
11
Cholesterol
Cholesterol is found in foods of animal origin such as eggs, milk products, meats, poultry,
fish and seafood. There is no cholesterol in plant foods (fruits and vegetables, grain products,
beans, nuts, seeds). To maintain a healthy heart it is recommended to consume no more than
300 mg of cholesterol from foods containing cholesterol per day. At one time it was suggested
that high amounts of cholesterol from foods increased blood cholesterol levels, but we know
now that a high intake of saturated fat has a greater effect on increasing the levels of blood
cholesterol than the cholesterol we eat.
Sodium
Most of the sodium in our diet comes from processed foods such as ready-to-eat meals, cold
cuts, corn beef, salt beef, canned foods, salty snacks, etc. Sodium is also found naturally in
most foods, which is why there is no need to add too much salt while cooking or at the table.
An excessive sodium intake can contribute to the risk of heart disease by increasing ones
blood pressure. The tolerable upper intake for sodium is 2300 milligrams (mg) and the
adequate intakes (AIs) recommended for an adult is around 1300-1500 mg.
Calcium
Calcium plays an important role in the health of our body. It is essential for good muscle
contraction and a normal development and maintenance of strong bones and teeth, which is
why calcium is important in the protection against osteoporosis. Milk and milk products
(cheese, yogurt) are the most easily absorbed sources of calcium. Calcium can also be found
in foods such as almonds, canned salmon with bones, canned or cooked beans, spinach,
rhubarb, turnip greens, seeds, but the calcium in these foods is not so easily absorb as the one
in milk products. The Lower North Shore Food Guide recommends 2-4 servings of milk
products a day, depending on the age and sex group. The general recommendation for an
adequate calcium intake for an adult is around 1000-1300 mg.
By following the guidelines of the Lower North Shore Food Guide you are sure to get all of
the nutrients you need in a day. Each food group provides a wide range of nutrients important
for good health. Whether it may be carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins or minerals, they
are all essential nutrients that help the body grow, function properly and remain healthy.
Iron
A sufficient iron intake keeps a person feeling energetic. Insufficient iron intake can lead to
anemia which can make a person feel tired and look pale.
There are two types of iron, the heme iron and non-heme iron.
The heme iron is found in animal products and is better absorbed than the non-heme iron.
Heme iron is found in meats, poultry, fish, shrimp, eggs, etc.
The non heme iron is found in different foods such as cooked clams, oysters, beans, peas,
lentils, iron enriched breakfast cereals, tofu, nuts, dried raisins, bread, etc.
Women need more iron than men. The recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for an adult
women is about 18 milligrams and for a man, 8 milligrams.
12
Vitamin A
There are three different forms of vitamin A active in the body, retinol, retinal and retinoic
acid, which are used by the body and known as retinoids. Vitamin A has a precursor, known
as beta-carotene, which is a carotenoid. A precursor is a compound that can be converted
into an active vitamin.
The retinol form is found in animal products. Plants however do not contain any retinoid,
they contain beta-carotene. Beta-carotene’s absorption and conversion is less efficient than
the retinol form of vitamin A.
The retinol form of vitamin A is known for playing a role in the reproduction of the body’s
cells. The retinal form plays a role in the promotion of vision, especially night vision. The
retinoic form is known for supporting the reproduction and growth of cells and for helping
with the health of tissues and skin. As for beta-carotene, it may act as an antioxidant capable
of protecting the body against disease.
Foods rich in the retinoid forms of vitamin A are found in animal products such as, liver,
fish, mussels, clams, shrimp, liver oils, milk products, butter and eggs. Margarine is usually
fortified so it provides the same amount of vitamin A as butter.
Foods such as dark leafy greens (spinach, broccoli and turnip greens) and rich yellow or deep
orange vegetables and fruits (carrots, cantaloupe, sweet potatoes, winter squash, bakeapples)
are rich in beta-carotene.
The recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for vitamin A are 900 µg (micrograms) per day
for an adult male and 700 μg per day for an adult female.
Vitamin C
Vitamin C plays different roles such as participating in the formation of the body’s collagen
tissue, participates in the making of hormones, helps to increase the absorption of iron and is
also known to be an antioxidant, which is known to prevent diseases such as cancer, heart
problems, old age, etc.
Antioxidants are substances found in foods which protect us from damages caused by free
radicals. Free radicals are molecules produced normally by the cells of our body and become
harmful when they exceed the capacity in which they can be neutralized by our organism.
Unlike Vitamin A, vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, that is not stored in the body for
long periods of time. Therefore, it is important to consume foods rich in vitamin C everyday.
Vitamin C is primarily found in fruits and vegetables, such as citrus fruits (oranges,
grapefruits, lemons, and their juices), cantaloupe, strawberries, bakeapples, raspberries,
yellow and orange peppers, cooked brussel sprouts, broccoli, spinach, cabbage, potatoes,
tomatoes and tomato juice, etc.
The recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for vitamin C are 90 mg (milligrams) per day
for an adult male and 75 mg per day for an adult female.
13
Vitamin B12
Vitamin B12 plays a role in the synthesis of new cells in the body, helps to maintain nerve
cells, activates folate and helps to break down some fatty acids and amino acids. Similarly to
vitamin C, vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin, therefore it is important to try and include
foods containing vitamin B12 in your daily diet. If by chance, you are a vegan, which means
that you do not consume any animal products at all, it is important for you to take a vitamin
B12 supplement to avoid any deficiency.
Vitamin B12 is only found in animal products, such as meats, wildmeats, poultry, fish, in all
shellfish, especially clams, which is very rich in vitamin B12, milk, cheese, eggs and in
fortified cereals.
The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin B12 is 2,4 µg (micrograms) per day
for an adult male and female.
To top it all off!!!
We trust that this information will help you to better understand some of the essential
components of good nutrition. As you will notice by going through this recipe book, not only
does it have some delicious nutritional recipes, but it also contains some interesting nutritional
tips and information to help you make better and more conscious choices in order to achieve
and/or maintain healthier eating habits.
Remember that balance is one of the most important components to good nutrition! There are
no bad foods; every type of food can be part of a healthy diet, as long as you keep in mind
that moderation is the key. What matters most to your health, is what you eat on a regular
basis from day to day.
Jocelyne Jones, Nutritionist
14
Recipes from the Student/Family Contest winners
(Blanc-Sablon to Kegaska)
Soups and chowders
Seafood (lobster) chowder (St-Augustine)
Rabbit soup and doughboys (Chevery)
Main Meals
Cod fish casserole (Blanc-Sablon)
Salmon wraps (St-Paul’s River)
Shrimp fettuccini (La Tabatière)
Duck stew (Mutton Bay)
Stir-braised scallops with vegetables (Harrington Harbour)
Macaroni and moose (La Romaine)
Crab cakes (Kegaska)
Desserts
Bakeapple parfait (Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon)
Chunky oatmeal redberry cookie mix (Brador Bay)
Sunday meshberry pudding (Middle Bay)
Rhubarb crumble (Old Fort Bay)
Blueberry muffins (Tête-à-la-Baleine)
15
16
Recipe by: Nelda Lavallée (mother) and Kiefer Martin (son) of St-Augustine
Number of servings: 10 servings of 1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 30-45 minutes
Ingredients
Potatoes, cut into cubes
Fresh milk, 2% M.F.
Baby clams, canned
Quantities
4 medium size
2 cups (500 ml)
2 cans of 142 g, keep the juice from only one
can
½ lb (227 g)
½ lb (227 g)
½ lb (227 g)
1 tsp (5 ml)
Crab meat, in pieces
Lobster meat, in pieces
Shrimp
Pepper
Preparation Method:
1- Peel the potatoes, cut them into cubes and place them in a medium size pot. Add the
milk to cover the potatoes and the juice from 1 can of baby clams. Bring to a boil and
cook until the potatoes are soft.
2- Add all of the seafood (baby clams, crab meat, lobster and shrimp) and let cook.
3- Add pepper to taste. It is also possible to add some water to the chowder, if you find it
to be too thick.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
165 cal
12 g
23 g
3g
90 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
0,6 g
319 mg
107 mg
9 mg
31 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Milk products: ¼ serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
This chowder can be served as a full meal with a slice or two of whole wheat bread and a side
dish of salad or raw vegetables. For dessert, why not have a Sunday meshberry pudding (see
page 37 for recipe) with a glass of milk or a fruit salad. You will not only have a wellbalanced meal, but also food from the 4 food groups of the Lower North Shore Food Guide.
19
20
Recipe by: Darlene Rowsell Roberts (mother) and Steve Roberts (son) of Chevery
Number of servings: 10 servings of 1 cup (250 ml) of soup and 10 doughboys
Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 3 hours
Ingredients
Quantities
For the soup:
Water
Rabbit, cleaned and washed
Salt
Pepper
Onion, chopped
Carrots, diced
Turnip, diced
Turnip greens, chopped
Celery, diced
Dainty rice or soup noodles
8 cups (2 L)
1 rabbitt
1 tbsp (15 ml)
1 tsp (5 ml)
1 large
1 cup (250 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
¼ cup (60 ml)
Doughboys: (optional)
1 cup (250 ml) of each flour
Whole-wheat flour/all purpose flour
2 tbsp (30 ml)
Baking powder
1 pinch
Salt
½ cup (125 ml) or until dough becomes firm
Water
Preparation method:
1- In a large pot, combine rabbit, water, salt and pepper. Boil for 2 hours.
2- Add the vegetables and continue to boil for another 20 minutes.
3- Add rice or noodles and continue to boil for another 15-20 minutes.
4- In a bowl, mix together all of the ingredients for the doughboys. Add doughboys to
boiling soup by dividing the dough into 10 portions. Cook for 10 minutes more. Serve.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup of soup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
98 cal
7g
14 g
1,5 g
49 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
1,7 g
768 mg
47 mg
2 mg
2,6 mcg
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 doughboy
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
94 cal
20 g
3g
0,4 g
Cholesterol
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
21
0 mg
2g
396 mg
77 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup of soup and 1 doughboy)
Vegetables and fruits: 1 serving
Grain products: 1 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: ½ serving
Dietitian’s tip:
For a thicker and even more nutritious soup, add more vegetables to the soup, use half
wholewheat flour and half all purpose flour to make the doughboys which will add that extra
taste and fibre you are looking for. To complete this meal, why not finish with a glass of milk
or a yogurt and one redberry cookie (see recipe on page 36).
22
Recipe by: Janice Letemplier (mother) and Aaron Hobbs (son) of Blanc-Sablon
Number of servings: 8 servings of 1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 60 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Cod Filets, skinned and cut into cubes
1-1/2 lbs (681 g)
Instant (minute) rice, uncooked
1 cup (250 ml)
Celery, chopped
½ cup (125 ml)
Green pepper, chopped
¼ cup (60 ml)
Mushroom soup, Campbell’s Half fat’
1 can of 284 ml
Can milk, 2% M.F.
1-1/2 cans of 385 ml
Cheddar cheese, grated
1 cup (250 ml)
Dry breadcrumbs
¼ cup (60 ml)
Preparation Method:
1- Grease a casserole dish and layer the bottom of the dish with the cod filets.
2- Add the uncooked rice, celery and green pepper to the fish. Stir until the ingredients
are well combined.
3- In a separate bowl, mix together the mushroom soup and milk. Poor over the top of the
fish mixture.
4- Cover the top with the grated cheese and finish with the breadcrumbs.
5- Cook in a preheated oven at 400°F for about 60 minutes.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
280 cal
22 g
30 g
8g
64 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
1,0 g
488 mg
352 mg
1 mg
1 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and Fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Milk products: ½ serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
More vegetables such as onions, carrots, mushrooms, etc, can be added to this recipe for extra
servings of vegetables and a greater nutritional value. The minute rice can be replaced by
another type of rice such as long grain rice, brown rice or even basmati rice, but if so, cook
these types of rice before hand to ensure that they are perfectly cooked. Serve this casserole
with a colourful green salad and why not finish off the meal with a blueberry muffin (see
recipe on page 39) and a glass of milk
25
Recipe by: Wanita Roberts (mother) and Brett Thomas (son) of St-Paul’s River
Number of servings: 4 wraps
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 0, if salmon already cooked
Ingredients
Salmon, cooked and in pieces
Red and green peppers, finely chopped
Green onion, finely chopped
Miracle whip
Pepper
Lettuce leaves
Wholewheat tortillas
Quantities
1 cup (250 ml)
2 tbsp (30 ml)
1 tbsp (15 ml)
2 tbsp (30 ml)
A pinch
8-12 leaves
4 tortillas
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, mix together the first 5 ingredients, cover and refrigerate for ½ hour, to
enhance the flavours.
2- Place lettuce leaves on the tortillas and spread some of the salmon mixture over the
centre and top with other lettuce leaves, roll up and enjoy.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 Wrap
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Marine omega-3 fat
(EPA+DHA)
117 cal
7g
11 g
5g
0,64 g
Cholesterol
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
27 mg
0,9 g
121 mg
19 mg
1 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 wrap)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: 1 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: ½ serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Serve this wrap with a salad, a soup or even with some “crudités” to add a serving or two of
vegetables to your meal. For a complete serving of meat and alternatives, use two cups of
salmon instead of one. Why not complete the meal with some rhubarb crumble (see recipe on
page 38) and a glass of milk.
26
Recipe by: Carol Vatcher (mother) and Jenna Robertson (daughter) of La Tabatière
Number of servings: 6 servings of 1 cup (250 ml) of pasta and ½ cup (125 ml) of sauce
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 15-20 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Fettucini, uncooked
½ lb (227 g)
Chicken base powder
1 tsp (5 ml)
Hot water
1 cup (250 ml)
Green onions, thinly sliced
6 stems
Garlic clove, minced
1 clove
Pepper
1 tsp (5 ml)
Canned milk, 2% M.F.
1 cup (250 ml)
All purpose flour
3 tbsp (45 ml)
Shrimp, cooked
¾ lb (340 g)
Frozen peas, cooked
1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a medium size pot, cook the fettucine according to the package directions.
2- In a saucepan, dilute the chicken base in the hot water and stir until well dissolved.
Add the green onions, garlic and pepper to the chicken broth.
3- In a bowl, use a whisk to stir together the milk and flour until the mixture is well
combined. Add to the chicken broth mixture and cook over medium heat while stirring
until it thickens and begins to boil. Cook and stir 1 minute more.
4- Add the shrimp and peas to the mixture. Cook and stir for approximately five minutes.
5- Serve the sauce over the fettuccine.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup of pasta and ½ cup of sauce
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
283 cal
41 g
23 g
3g
114 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
3g
465 mg
167 mg
3 mg
0,91 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup of pasta and ½ cup of sauce)
Vegetables and fruits: ½ serving
Grain products: 2 servings
Milk products: 1/4 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Serve this dish with a choice of green salad to add an extra serving of vegetables. White
sauces are usually filled with lots of fat, but this one is an exception, it is made with 2% can
milk instead of cream which decreases the amount of fat. Add extra fibre by using
wholewheat fettucini instead of the white version. Why not finish off the meal with some
blueberry pudding (see recipe on page 67) served with some yogurt or some fruit salad.
27
Recipe by: Lynda Viellette (mother) and Jennifer Mansbridge (daughter) of Mutton Bay
Number of servings: 8 servings of 1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 2-1/2 hours
Ingredients
Duck, in pieces (excluding back)
Canola or olive oil
Onion, diced
Carrots, sliced
Turnip, in cubes
Water
Potatoes, in cubes
Salt
Pepper
Quantities
1 duck
1 tsp (5 ml)
1
1 cup (250 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
3 cups (750 ml)
3 cups (750 ml)
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
1 tsp (5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a large pot, fry the onions in the oil; add the duck and some water if needed.
2- When the duck and onions are nice and brown, add remaining vegetables and water.
3- Add salt and pepper, add more water if needed.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
230 cal
17 g
27 g
6g
96 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
2g
247 mg
24 mg
1 mg
1 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and fruits: 1-1/4 servings
Grain products: 0 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Serve this stew with a slice of whole wheat bread and why not complete the meal with a
bakeapple parfait (see recipe on page 35) for dessert.
28
Recipe by: Tammy Green (mother) and Maria Roberts (daughter) of Harrington Harbour
Number of servings: 4 servings of 2 cups (500 ml)
Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
Carrots, sliced
Broccoli, in florets
Green pepper, chopped
Garlic clove, finely chopped
Chicken base powder
Green onions, chopped
Cabbage, shredded
Canned bean sprouts
Scallops, cut in half
Water
Soya sauce
White sugar
Cornstarch
Quantities
2
1 cup (250 ml)
1
1 clove
½ tsp (2.5 ml) dissolved in ½ cup hot water
2 stems
1 cup (250 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
1 lb (454 g)
1/3 cup (85 ml)
1 tbsp (15 ml)
2 tsp (10 ml)
2 tsp (10 ml)
Preparation Method:
1- In a large skillet, combine carrots, broccoli, green pepper and garlic.
2- In a cup dilute chicken base powder in hot water and mix until dissolved. Add the
chicken broth to the vegetables and cook for 3 minutes.
3- Add the green onions, cabbage, bean sprouts and scallops. Stir and cook for 5 minutes.
4- In a bowl, mix together water, soya sauce, sugar and cornstarch. Add this mixture to
the scallops and vegetables. Stir and cook for about 3 minutes or until the sauce
thickens.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 2 cups (500 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
203 cal
23 g
21 g
3g
32 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
4g
935 mg
90 mg
2 mg
1,5 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide servings
(Per serving of 2 cups)
Vegetables and fruits: 2 servings
Milk products: 0 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
To make this meal even more complete, serve it over wholewheat pasta (fettucine, linguine,
spaghettini, etc) or over brown rice. For dessert, why not finish the meal with some redberry
apple pecan crisp and topped with some natural yogurt (see recipe on page 55).
29
Recipe by: Janie Filion-Billort (teacher) and Annick Guillemette (student) of La Romaine
Number of servings: 16 servings of 1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes
Ingredients
Wholewheat macaroni
Moose meat, cut into cubes
Canola oil or olive oil
Tomato sauce
Canned tomatoes, in cubes
Partially skimmed mozzarella cheese, grated
Salt
Pepper
Quantities
1 box of 500 g
1 lb (454 g)
2 tbsp (30 ml)
2 cans of 14 oz (398 ml)
½ can of 14 oz (398 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
1 tsp (5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a pot, bring some water to a boil. Once the water is boiled add the macaroni and let
cook. Once the macaroni is cooked, drain out the water and put the macaroni back into
the pot and set aside.
2- Add some oil to a frying pan and fry the moose until it is well done. Add the tomato
sauce, tomatoes, salt and pepper. Leave cook for 2-3 minutes more.
3- Add the meat mixture to the macaroni and mix well. Top with the cheese.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
220 cal
30 g
16 g
4g
27 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
3,5 g
473 mg
91 mg
4 mg
2 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and fruits: 1/2 serving Milk products: ¼ serving
Grain products: 2 servings
Meat and alternatives: 1/2 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Add more vegetables to this recipe for extra servings of vegetables. Why not serve the
macaroni with a glass of milk and finish the meal with a fruit or fruit salad.
30
Recipe by: Clara Buckle (mother) and Carla Buckle (daugther) of Kegaska
Number of servings: 6 servings of 2 crab cakes
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 20 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Stove top stuffing mix, chicken flavour
1 pack of 120 g
Miracle whip
¼ cup (60 ml)
Crab, bottled or canned
1 can or bottle of 1 lb
Lemon juice
1 tbsp (15 ml)
Partially skimmed Mozzarella or cheddar
1 cup (250 ml)
cheese, grated
Celery, chopped
¼ cup (60 ml)
Green onion, chopped
2 stems
Green pepper, chopped
¼ cup (60 ml)
Carrot, shredded
1
All purpose flour
For rolling the crab cakes before frying
Olive oil or canola oil
For frying the crab cakes
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, mix together all of the ingredients. Form the mixture into 12 crab cakes.
2- Roll each crabcake into some flour before frying them.
3- In a large frying pan add the oil and fry the crab cakes until they are golden brown on
both sides.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 2 crab cakes
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
381 cal
29 g
28 g
17 g
70 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
1,5 g
1039 mg
209 mg
3 mg
8 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 2 crab cakes)
Vegetables and fruits: ¼ serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Milk products: ¼ serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
These great tasting crab cakes can be served with a green salad or some “crudités”, which will
add a serving or two of vegetables to the meal. For dessert, why not have a dish of fruit salad
with some yogurt.
31
33
Recipe by: Marie José Denis (mother) and Colin Lauzon (son) of Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon
Number of servings: 6 servings of ½ cup (125 ml)
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: none, if bakeapples are already cooked
Ingredients
Quantities
Light cream cheese
1 pack of 250 g
Sour cream, 14% M.F.
½ cup (125 ml)
White sugar
1/3 cup (85 ml)
Lemon zest
1 tbsp (15 ml)
Lemon juice
2 tbsp (30 ml)
Vanilla yogurt
½ cup (125 ml)
Bakeapples, cooked
3 cups (750 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, beat the cream cheese with an electric mixer.
2- Add the sour cream, sugar, lemon zest and lemon juice to the cream cheese. Continue
to beat the mixture until the ingredients are well combined.
3- With a spatula, add the vanilla yogurt.
4- Poor the mixture into small serving bowls while alternating with the bakeapples.
5- Refrigerate a few hours.
6- Serve as is or sprinkle some graham crumbs on top of the parfaits.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of ½ cup (125 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
233 cal
26 g
7g
11 g
35 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin C
Vitamin A
7g
314 mg
107 mg
114 mg
611 IU
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of ½ cup)
Vegetables and Fruits: 1 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Milk products: 1 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Replace the ½ cup of sour cream with vanilla yogurt in order to decrease the total fat
content of the recipe or use a lower fat sour cream. This recipe is an excellent source of
vitamin C and dietary fibre due to its bakeapple content. The winner of this recipe
suggests serving the parfait with graham crackers, what a great idea!
35
Recipe by: Colinda Lavallée (mother) and Noah Etheridge (son) of Brador Bay
Makes: 18 cookies
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 10-12 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
All purpose flour
1-1/4 cups (310 ml)
Baking soda
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
Salt
¼ tsp (1.2 ml)
Rolled oats
1-1/4 cups (310 ml)
White sugar
¼ cup (60 ml)
Brown sugar
¼ cup (60 ml)
Redberries, raw
¾ cup (187.5 ml)
White chocolate chips
¾ cup (187.5 ml)
Pecans, chopped
½ cup (125 ml)
All of the ingredients above can be added one at a time to a jar to give a friend. If not,
follow the preparation method below to make the cookies.
Preparation method:
1- Beat ½ cup (125 ml) of non hydrogenated margarine until light and creamy. Add
brown and white sugar and beat until well combined. Add 1 egg and 1 tsp (5 ml) of
vanilla extract. Mix until the ingredients are well combined and the mixture is smooth.
2- Add all of the remaining dry ingredients as shown in the table above to the creamy
mixture and mix until well combined. Drop onto a greased cookie sheet with a
teaspoon. It is possible to add some milk if you find the mixture to be too dry.
3- Bake in a preheated oven at 350°F for 10-12 minutes or until lightly brown.
4- Cool the cookies on a rack.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cookie
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
207 cal
24 g
3g
11 g
15 mg
Dietary fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
1,3 g
137 mg
14 mg
246 IU
0,4 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cookie)
Vegetables and Fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: ¼ serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
To add extra fibre to this recipe, you can replace half of the all purpose flour, with whole
wheat flour. These cookies are high in total fat. In order to decrease the amount of total fat
and calories, use less chocolate chips or pecans and replace them with more redberries or by
adding some raisins or other types of berries. These cookies are still delicious and can be
served for a treat, whether it is for a snack or for dessert with a glass of cold milk.
36
Recipe by: Melva Flynn (mother) and Tyhesia Buckle (daughter) of Middle Bay
Number of servings: 12 servings
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 5-10 minutes
Ingredients
All purpose flour
Baking powder
White sugar
Non hydrogenated margarine
Salt
Meshberries, raw
Water
Quantities
2 cups (500 ml)
4 tsp (20 ml)
1/3 cup (85 ml)
¼ cup (60 ml)
A pinch
2 cups (500 ml)
Enough water to reach a cookie batter
consistency
Preparation method:
1- Add the first 5 ingredients into a microwaveable dish and mix together.
2- Add the meshberries and then, some water until the mixture reaches a consistency of a
cookie batter.
3- Cover the dish loosely and microwave on high for 5 to 10 minutes.
4- Serve as is or with some yogurt.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 piece
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
140 cal
24 g
2g
4g
0 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin C
Vitamin A
1g
338 mg
45 mg
0,1 mg
159 IU
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 piece)
Vegetables and fruits: ¼ serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Add extra fibre to this recipe by using wholewheat flour instead of all purpose flour or go half
and half. It is also possible to add extra fibre by adding more berries, which will also increase
the fruit servings. The water can be replaced by milk in order to have a more nutritious
pudding. Why not serve the pudding with some low fat yogurt for an extra healthy taste and
serve it for dessert.
37
Recipe by: Pearl Buckle (grandmother) and Reagan Bilodeau (grand-daughter) of Old Fort
Bay
Number of servings: 12 servings
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 45-60 minutes
Ingredients
Raw Rhubarb, cut in cubes
Salt
White sugar
All purpose flour
Non hydrogenated margarine
Quantities
4 cups (1 L)
¼ tsp (1.2 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
¾ cup (187.5 ml)
1/3 cup (85 ml)
Preparation method:
1- Place the rhubarb in a baking dish. Sprinkle with the salt.
2- In a bowl, mix together the flour and sugar, add the margarine and mix until the
mixture is crumbly.
3- Spread the flour mixture over the rhubarb.
4- Bake in preheated oven at 350°F for about 45-60 minutes.
Nutrient Analysis per 1 serving of 1 piece
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
158 cal
25 g
1g
6g
0 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
1g
99 mg
40 mg
267 IU
3 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 piece)
Vegetables and fruits: ½ serving
Grain product: ½ serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Add extra fibre to this recipe by replacing the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour or go
half and half. It is even possible to add some rolled oats to this recipe which would increase
the fibre content even more. If you do not have any non hydrogenated margarine on hand why
not use vegetable oil (canola, sunflower or soya). This crumble can be served with yogurt or
with a glass of milk, what a delight!
38
Recipe by: Raymonde Monger (mother) and Claudie Monger-Marcoux (daughter) of
Tête-à-la-Baleine
Number of servings: 12 muffins
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 25-30 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Rolled oats
1 cup (250 ml)
All purpose flour
1 cup (250 ml)
Brown sugar
1/3 cup (85 ml)
Baking powder
1 tsp (5 ml)
Baking soda
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
Salt
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
Blueberries, raw
1 cup (250 ml)
Non hydrogenated margarine, melted
¼ cup (60 ml)
Sour milk (add 1 tsp of vinegar to 1 cup of
1 cup (250 ml)
fresh milk, 2% M.F. to have sour milk)
Egg
1
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, mix together the rolled oats, flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking
soda, salt and blueberries. Set aside.
2- In another bowl, mix together the margarine, sour milk and egg.
3- Make a hole in the middle of the dry ingredients and poor in the liquid ingredients.
Stir until well combined, do not overmix.
4- Poor the mixture into lightly greased muffin tins.
5- Bake in a preheated oven at 400°F for 25-30 minutes.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 muffin
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
141 cal
20 g
4g
5g
17 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
1,4 g
245 mg
49 mg
245 IU
1,8 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 muffin)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Grain products: 1 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
To add extra fibre to this recipe, use whole wheat flour instead of all purpose flour or go half
and half. It is also possible to add extra fibre by adding more blueberries or other berries,
which will also add a serving of fruit. The margarine can be replaced by a good vegetable oil.
The muffins can be served with a glass of milk for dessert, as a snack or even for breakfast.
These muffins can also be made with other berries, such as blackberries, redberries, etc.
39
40
Recipes from the Seniors at Dr.Hodd Pavillon
(From St-Augustine to Kegaska)
Main Meals
Salmon and egg sauce (St-Augustine)
Cod scallop casserole (Chevery)
Seafood casserole (Kegaska)
Side Dish
Turnip loaf (Aylmer Sound)
Desserts
Redberry apple pecan crisp (La Tabatière)
Blackberry grunt (Mutton Bay)
Bakeapple cheesecake squares (Aylmer Sound)
41
43
Recipe by: Mary Gallibois (79 years old) of St-Augustine
Number of servings: 6 servings of salmon, 3 cups (750 ml) of sauce
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 30-45 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Salmon, cut into pieces
Salt
Pepper
Fresh milk, 2% M.F.
Non hydrogenated margarine
Cornstarch
Cream cheese
Eggs, boiled
6 pieces
½ tsp (2,5 ml)
1 tsp (5 ml)
2 cups (500 ml)
1 tbsp (15 ml)
1 tbsp (15 ml)
1 pack of 250 grams
4
Preparation method:
1- Boil the salmon, add salt and pepper and set aside.
2- In a sauce pan, mix together the milk, margarine, cornstarch and cook at medium heat
until the mixture starts to thicken. Stir in the cream cheese and cook on low heat until
it’s all melted and creamy.
3- In another pot, boil the eggs and once they are cook, cut them into small pieces and
add to the sauce. Stir until well combined.
4- Serve the sauce over the salmon.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of ½ cup (125 ml) of sauce with 1 piece salmon
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
509 cal
7g
46 g
33 g
246 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
0,1 g
669 mg
167 mg
1,8 mg
3 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of ½ cup sauce and 1 piece salmon)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Milk products: 1-1/4 servings
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip
To reduce the amount of total fat of this recipe, replace the regular cream cheese by light
cream cheese or simply omit it. For a more complete meal, serve the salmon and sauce with
some rice or couscous and some steamed vegetables or a salad.
45
Recipe by: Mildred Anderson (91 years old) of Chevery
Number of servings: 8 servings of 1 cup
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 30-45 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Onion, chopped
1
Salt pork, cut into cubes
4 small slices
Potatoes, sliced
4 large
Cod fish, filets
1 lb (454 g)
Cream of Mushroom soup
1 can of 284 ml
Can milk
½ can of 385 ml
Partially skimmed mozzarella cheese, grated 1 cup (250 ml)
Breadcrumbs
1/2 cup (125 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a frying pan, fry the salt pork and add the chopped onion, cook until golden brown.
Spread in the bottom of a baking dish.
2- In a pot, bring the sliced potatoes to a boil and cook until they are soft, but still firm.
Drain the potatoes and cover the onions and salt pork with one layer of the cooked
potatoes.
3- In a bowl mix together the mushroom soup and milk. Poor ½ of the soup mixture over
the potatoes. Cover with the cod fish and then, the second layer of potatoes. Poor the
remaining soup mixture over the potatoes.
4- Top with the grated cheese and breadcrumbs. Bake at 350°F for about 30-45 minutes.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
291 cal
26 g
22 g
11 g
53 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
2g
510 mg
226 mg
1 mg
0,86 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and fruits: 1/2 serving
Milk products: 1/2 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip
Fry the onions in some good fat, polyunsaturated or monounsaturated oils (olive oil, canola
oil) instead of salt pork, which is a saturated fat. By replacing the salt pork, you will also
decrease the amount of sodium. It is also possible to add more vegetables to this dish such as
celery, peppers, mushrooms, etc. This casserole dish can be served with a salad or steamed
vegetables for that extra serving of vegetables, and the meal can be completed with a fruit or
some fruit salad topped off with some yogurt.
46
Recipe by: Marion Ransom (84 years old) of Kegaska
Number of servings: 10 servings of 1 cup
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 45-50 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
Shrimp, cooked
2 cups (500 ml)
Lobster meat, cooked, cut in pieces
2 cups (500 ml)
Scallops, cooked, cut into pieces
½ lb (227 g)
Fresh milk, 2% M.F.
3 cups (750 ml)
Non hydrogenated margarine
2 tbsp (30 ml)
Salt
½ tsp (2,5 ml)
Pepper
1 tsp (5 ml)
Cornstarch
3 tbsp (45 ml) or just enough to thicken
Cream cheese
2 packs of 250 grams
Partially skimmed mozzarella cheese, grated 2 cups (500 ml)
Breadcrumbs
¼ cup (60 ml)
Preparation Method:
1- Cook the seafood until well done, then drain and set aside or use bottled seafood. (2
cups of crab meat can be used to substitute any of the 3 seafoods).
2- In a bowl, beat the cream cheese with the margarine. Add the milk, salt, pepper and
cornstarch to make a white sauce. Add the seafood to the cream sauce and mix well.
3- Spread the mixture into a greased baking dish and top with the cheese and
breadcrumbs.
4- Bake at 350°F for about 30 minutes or until the top is golden brown.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 cup
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
407
11 g
30 g
27 g
64 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
0,2 g
777 mg
382 mg
2 mg
2,2 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Milk products: 1-1/4 servings
Grain products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
Add more vegetables such as onions, celery, mushrooms, etc, to the casserole or serve it with
a salad for a serving of vegetables. It is possible to decrease the amount of total fat of this dish
by using light cream cheese instead of the regular one and use 1 pack of cream cheese instead
of 2. There is no need to add extra salt at the table; this dish contains a great amount of salt.
47
49
Recipe by: Bruce Chislett (72 years old) of Aylmer Sound
Number of servings: 8 slices
Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 90 minutes
Ingredients
Turnip, peeled and diced
Pepper
Salt
Ground nutmeg
Fresh milk, 2% M.F.
Eggs
Breadcrumbs
Butter, melted
Quantities
6 cups (1,5 L)
1/8 tsp (0,6 ml)
1/8 tsp (0,6 ml)
1/8 tsp (0,6 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
2
¼ cup (60 ml)
1 tbsp (15 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a saucepan, cover turnip with water and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender.
Drain the turnips and mash.
2- Add salt, pepper and nutmeg to the turnips and mix well.
3- Add milk and eggs, mix well. Spoon the mixture into a greased loaf pan.
4- In a bowl combine breadcrumbs and melted butter, mix well. Sprinkle the
breadcrumbs over the turnip loaf.
5- Bake in a preheated oven at 375°F for 1h30.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 slice
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
83 cal
10 g
4g
3g
53 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
2,5 g
136 mg
61 mg
191 IU
14 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 slice)
Vegetables and fruits: 1-1/4 servings
Grain products: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
This loaf can be served as a side dish or even as an entree.
51
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
53
Recipe by: Elizabeth Bobbitt (89 years old) of La Tabatière
Number of servings: 12 servings
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 50-60 minutes
Ingredients
Apples, peeled, cored and chopped
Redberries, raw
White sugar
All purpose flour
Rolled oats
All purpose flour
Brown sugar
Non hydrogenated margarine, melted
Pecans, chopped
Quantities
3 cups (750 ml)
2 cups (500 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
3 tbsp (45 ml)
1-1/2 cups (375 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
1/3 cup (85 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a large bowl, mix together the apples, redberries, white sugar and 3 tbsp of flour.
Spoon into a greased baking dish.
2- For the topping, in the same large bowl, combine the rolled oats, ½ cup of flour and
brown sugar. Mix well and stir in the melted margarine and pecans until it’s well
combined and crumbly. Sprinkle the topping over the apples.
3- Bake in a preheated oven at 350°F for 50-60 minutes or until the topping is golden
brown and the fruit is tender. Serve warm.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 piece
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
279 cal
42 g
3g
11 g
0 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
2,6 g
111 mg
23 mg
358 IU
2 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 piece)
Vegetables and fruits: 1 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip:
To add extra fibre to this recipe, use whole wheat flour or go half all purpose and half whole
wheat flour. It is also possible to reduce the amount of sugar by a third. Top this crisp with
some yogurt or serve it with a glass of milk for dessert. What a treat!
55
Recipe by: Bertha Bobbitt (87 years old) of Mutton Bay
Number of servings: 8 grunts with sauce
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 20-25 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
White sugar
2/3 cup (165 ml)
Cornstarch
1 tsp (5 ml)
Blackberries, raw
1-1/2 cups (375 ml)
Lemon juice
1 tsp (5 ml)
All purpose flour
2-1/4 cups (560 ml)
Baking powder
4 tsp (20 ml)
Salt
1 tsp (5 ml)
Shortening
½ cup (125 ml)
Egg
1
Fresh milk, 2% M.F.
1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a saucepan, combine sugar, cornstarch, blackberries and lemon juice. Cook while
stirring constantly, until the mixture boils for about 30 seconds. Keep warm.
2- In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add shortening, with a
pastry cutter or 2 knives and mix through until it becomes crumbly.
3- Add the egg and milk to the flour mixture while mixing well. Continue mixing lightly
with a fork until the dough becomes soft and sticky.
4- Drop the dough by tablespoons into the hot blackberry mixture. Cover lightly and let
simmer for about 20-25 minutes.
5- Serve hot, spoon extra sauce over the dough.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 grunt with sauce
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
367 cal
53 g
5g
15 g
39 mg
Dietary fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
2,6 g
453 mg
116 mg
147 IU
6,4 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 grunt with sauce)
Vegetables and fruits: ½ serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip
The shortening in this recipe can be replaced by non hydrogenated margarine in order to
decrease the amount of bad fats (saturated and trans). It is also possible to use half all purpose
flour and half whole wheat flour to add some extra fibre to the recipe. This recipe can be
served as a dessert with a glass of milk or topped with yogurt.
56
Recipe by: Joyce Bobbitt (83 years old) of Aylmer Sound
Number of servings: 24 squares
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 30-45 minutes
Ingredients
All purpose flour
White sugar
Butter
Cream cheese
White sugar
Eggs
Lemon juice
Cold bakeapple jam or other types of jam
Quantities
2 cups (500 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
2/3 cup (165 ml)
2 packs of 250 grams
¾ cup (187.5 ml)
2
1 tbsp (15 ml)
2 cups (500 ml)
Preparation method:
1- Preheat oven to 350°F and grease a baking pan.
2- For the crust, combine the flour and sugar in a medium size bowl. Cut in the butter
with a pastry cutter or 2 knives until crumbly. Press the mixture into the cake pan.
3- Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until lightly golden brown. Let cool onto a rack
while preparing the filling.
4- For the filling, beat the cream cheese and sugar in a large mixing bowl on medium
speed until smooth. Add eggs and lemon juice, while beating until the mixture
becomes smooth.
5- Spread the bakeapple jam evenly over the crust. Poor the cream cheese mixture evenly
over the jam. Bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes or until set. Cool completely on a
rack. Cut into squares.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 square
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
217 cal
21 g
4g
13 g
55 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
1,5 g
122 mg
28 mg
540 IU
19 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 square)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving Milk products: 1/2 serving
Grain products: ¼ serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip
To add extra fibre to this recipe, use half whole wheat flour and all purpose flour or even add
some rolled oats. To decrease the amount of total fat, use light cream cheese instead of
regular. Also, why not use non hydrogenated margarine instead of butter in order to decrease
the amount of saturated fat. The sugar can be decreased in half. These squares can be served
with a glass of milk for dessert.
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58
Recipes from the Seniors at the Antoinette Malouin
Pavillon and Seniors hospitalized at the CSSSBCN
(From Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon, Middle Bay and Mutton Bay)
Main Meals
Stewed fish (Middle Bay)
Baked duck (Mutton Bay)
Desserts
Blueberry pudding (Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon)
Bakeapple pie (Middle Bay)
Redberry squares (Middle Bay)
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61
Recipe by: Theresa Buckle (86 years old) of Middle Bay
Number of servings: 12 servings of 1 cup (250 ml)
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 1 hour
Ingredients
Quantities
Salt pork, cut into pieces
4 small slices
Onions, diced
2
Potatoes, cut into cubes
12
Water
Enough to cover the potatoes
Cod fish, skinned and cut into cubes
1 fish of about 3 lbs (1,36 kg)
Salt
½ tsp (2,5 ml)
Pepper
1 tsp (5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a large size pot, fry the onions with the salt pork until golden brown.
2- Add the potatoes and water and let cook.
3- Add the cod fish, salt and pepper to the pot and cover. Let cook for about 20-30
minutes more.
Nutrient Analysis per serving 1 cup (250 ml)
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
235 cal
29 g
23 g
3g
53 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
2,2 g
200 mg
28 mg
0,9 mg
1,2 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 cup)
Vegetables and Fruits: 1 serving
Grain products: 0 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip
It is possible to decrease the amount of saturated fat and the sodium content of this stew by
using a vegetable oil to fry the onions. Add more vegetables to the stew for extra servings of
vegetables and for a more nutritious meal. For dessert, why not finish the meal with a glass of
milk and a cheesecake bakeapple square (see recipe on page 57).
63
Recipe by: Mable Wellman (87 years old) of Mutton Bay
Number of servings: 8 servings of about 100 g of duck meat with the stuffing
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 2 hours
Ingredients
Quantities
For the Stuffing:
White homemade bread, soaked
1 loaf
Water
To soak the bread
Onions, diced
2
Salt and pepper
1 tsp (5 ml) of each
For the Duck:
Salt pork, cut into pieces
4 slices
Duck, about 3 lbs (1,5 kg)
1
Onion, sliced
1
Salt
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
Pepper
1 tsp (5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, soak the bread in some water until it becomes damp.
2- In another bowl, combine the soaken bread broke into pieces with the diced onions,
salt and pepper. Set aside.
3- Rinse the duck well, inside and out. Stuff the duck with the stuffing.
4- In a roaster, fry the salt pork and add the duck. Cover the duck with the sliced onion,
salt and pepper. Add a bit of water to avoid the duck from sticking.
5- Bake in a preheated oven (350°F) for about 2 hours.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 100 g of duck with stuffing
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
409 cal
31 g
42 g
13 g
148 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Iron
Vitamin B12
2,0 g
890 mg
76 mg
10 mg
1,4 mcg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 100 g of duck with stuffing)
Vegetables and Fruits: 0 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Grain products: 1 serving
Meat and alternatives: 1 serving
Dietitian’s tip
In order to decrease the total fat content of this recipe, especially saturated fat, omit frying the
duck in salt pork, simply bake it in the roaster with no added fat. It will also decrease the salt
content. To complete the meal, serve the duck and stuffing with a serving of vegetables (salad
and boiled vegetables, etc) and why not have a fruit for dessert.
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66
Recipe by: Simone Morency (87 years old) of Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon
Number of servings: 12 servings
Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 30-40 minutes
Ingredients
All purpose flour
Baking powder
Salt
White sugar
Blueberries, raw
Egg, beaten
Water
Quantities
2 cups (500 ml)
2 tsp (10 ml)
½ tsp (2.5 ml)
½ cup (125 ml)
1 cup (250 ml)
1
¾ cup (187.5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Mix well.
2- Add blueberries to the flour mixture and mix well.
3- In a small bowl, beat egg and water, then add to the flour mixture. Mix well.
4- Pour the mixture into a greased square baking dish.
5- Bake in a preheated oven (350°F) for about 30-40 minutes.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 piece
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
130 cal
28 g
3g
0,7 g
16 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
1g
149 mg
26 mg
35 IU
2 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 piece)
Vegetables and Fruits: 0 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Grain products: ½ serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip
It is possible to increase the fibre content of this recipe by using whole wheat flour instead of
all purpose flour or go half and half. It is also possible to increase the fibre content by adding
more blueberries or by adding other types of berries such as redberries, blackberries, etc,
which may give a serving of fruit. It is also possible to increase its nutritional value by using
milk instead of water. This dish can be served as a dessert with a glass of milk or topped with
some yogurt.
Recipe by: Annie Lavallée (87 years old) of Middle Bay
Number of servings: 6 slices
Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 20-30 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
For the dough:
All purpose flour
2 cups (500 ml)
Baking powder
2 tsp (10 ml)
Salt
½ tsp (2,5 ml)
Shortening
1 cup (250 ml)
Cold water
½ cup (125 ml)
For the filling:
Bakeapples
3 cups (750 ml)
White sugar
3/4 cup (187.5 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder and salt. Cut in the shortening with 2
knives until the mixture is crumbly. Add cold water and mix until it forms a dough.
2- On a lightly-floured surface, roll out the dough into a circle to fit the bottom of a 9
inch pie plate. Place the pie dough in the bottom of the pie plate and set aside.
3- In a bowl, combine the bakeapples with the sugar and mix well.
4- Spread the bakeapple filling in the prepared pie crust.
5- On the floured surface, roll the remaining dough and place over the bakeapples. Trim
off the overhanging pie dough and make a few cuts on top of the pie.
6- Bake in the centre of a preheated oven (350°F) and bake for about 20-30 minutes or
until golden brown.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 slice
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total Fat
Cholesterol
633 cal
69 g
6g
37 g
34 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin C
Vitamin A
8,4 g
288 mg
64 mg
112 mg
33 IU
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 slice)
Vegetables and Fruits: 1/2 serving
Grain products: 1 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip
Decrease the amount of saturated and trans fats by replacing the shortening with non
hydrogenated margarine or a vegetable oil (canola or olive oil). Increase the fibre content of
the recipe by using whole wheat flour instead of all purpose flour or go half and half for the
crust. This delicious pie can be served as dessert with some yogurt, a cold glass of milk or if
you really want to treat yourself, a scoop of ice cream.
68
Error!
Recipe by: May Griffin (88 years old) of Middle Bay
Number of servings: 24 squares
Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 20-25 minutes
Ingredients
Quantities
All purpose flour
3 cups (750 ml)
White sugar
1 cup (250 ml)
Baking powder
1 tsp (5 ml)
Butter
½ lb (227 g)
Redberry jam
2 cups (500 ml)
Preparation method:
1- In a bowl mix together the flour, sugar and baking powder.
2- Add butter to the flour mixture and with a pastry cutter or 2 knives, cut butter until the
mixture ressembles coarse crumbs.
3- Press half of the mixture into a greased square baking dish; spread evenly with redberry
jam. Top with remaining flour mixture, press down lightly.
5- Bake in centre of preheated oven (350°F) for about 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.
Nutrient Analysis per serving of 1 square
Calories
Carbohydrate
Protein
Total fat
Cholesterol
231 cal
40 g
2g
7g
24 mg
Dietary Fibre
Sodium
Calcium
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
0,7 g
90 mg
18 mg
290 IU
0,4 mg
Lower North Shore Food Guide Servings
(Per serving of 1 square)
Vegetables and fruits: 0 serving
Grain products: 1/2 serving
Milk products: 0 serving
Meat and alternatives: 0 serving
Dietitian’s tip
To decrease the amount of saturated fat, use non hydrogenated margarine instead of the
butter. To increase the amount of dietary fibre use whole wheat flour instead of all purpose
flour or go half and half. It is even possible to add rolled oats to the recipe for that extra fibre
content. You can even decrease the amount of sugar in this recipe by 1/3. These squares can
be served as a dessert with a cold glass of milk.
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70
References
Arctic Flavours. Nutrient composition of finish wild berries.
http://www.arctic-flavours.fi/. (document consulted on September 5th, 2006).
(on
line).
Brault Dubuc, M. and L. Caron Lahaie. Valeur Nutritive des Aliments. St-Lambert,
Société Brault-Lahaie, 9th edition, 2003, 325 pages.
Callaghan, B. and L. Roblin. Dietitians of Canada, Great Food Fast. Toronto, Robert
Rose, 2000, 192 pages.
Health Canada. Nutrient Value of Some Common Foods. Ottawa, Canadian
Government Publishing, Communication Canada, 2002, 54 pages.
Locong, A and D. Ruel. Guide des interactions médicaments, nutriments et produits
naturels. Les Presses de l’Université Laval, Québec, 2003, 513 pages.
Noss Whitney, E., C. Balog Cataldo and S. Rady Rolfes. Understanding Normal and
Clinical Nutrition. Belmont, Ca, Wadsworth Group, 6th edition, 2002, 875 pages.
71