Download Eugene Ionesco

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Theatre of France wikipedia, lookup

English Renaissance theatre wikipedia, lookup

Theatre of the Oppressed wikipedia, lookup

Theatre wikipedia, lookup

Augsburger Puppenkiste wikipedia, lookup

Medieval theatre wikipedia, lookup

History of theatre wikipedia, lookup

Theatre of the Absurd wikipedia, lookup

Footfalls wikipedia, lookup

Play (play) wikipedia, lookup

All That Fall wikipedia, lookup

The Balcony wikipedia, lookup

Rhinoceros (play) wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Eugene Ionesco and the
Absurdist Theatre
April 6, 2016
à The Theatre of the Absurd – Expression popularized by Martin Esslin in
1961
à Expression of the absurdity of life – Each play is a theatrical metaphor
for the absurdity of life;
à Metaphor – alternately comic and tragic, usually symbolic and always
unusual and bizarre
à Beyond illogical dialogue or stage business:
-  the absurd often implies an ahistorical, non-dialectical dramaturgical
structure.
-  Man is a timeless abstraction incapable of finding a foothold in his
frantic search for a meaning that constantly eludes him.
-  His actions have neither meaning nor direction; the fabula of absurd is
often circular, guided not by dramatic action but by wordplay and a
search for words.
Relevant Information
—  Origins of Absurdism: 19th century in the work of the Danish
philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813 – 1855).
—  He developed and wrote about his own existential philosophy based
around Christianity and addressed the nature in which humans confront
absurdity.
—  Absurdism: humans historically attempt to find meaning in their lives.
This search results in one of two conclusions:
-  Either that life is meaningless
-  Or life contains within it a purpose set forth by a higher power—a
belief in God, or adherence to some religion or other abstract
concept.
—  Kierkegaard describes how such a man would endure such a defiance and
identifies the three major traits of the Absurd Man, later discussed by
Albert Camus:
-  A rejection of escaping existence (suicide)
-  A rejection of help from a higher power
-  And acceptance of his absurd (and despairing) condition.
Sisyphys (1548–49)
by Titian
Sisyphus
Credit: “MatlockFit”
Toffee Apple by Beau White
à There are several “strategies” of the absurd:
—  the nihilistic absurd – practically impossible to draw any
conclusions about the world view or philosophical implications of
the text or acting (Ionesco, Hildesheimer)
—  the absurd as a structural principle used to reflect universal
chaos, the disintegration of language and the lack of a
harmonious image of mankind (Beckett, Adamov)
—  the satirical absurd (satirical in its formulation and plot) gives a
fairly realistic account of the represented world (Dürenmatt, Frisch,
Grass, Havel).
à The Theatre of the Absurd (, as a genre or central theme,
came into being with Eugene Ionesco’s The Bald
Soprano (1950) and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for
Godot (1953).
à Some contemporary representatives: Arthur Adamov
(1908-1971), Jean Genet (1910-1986), Harold Pinter
(1930-2008), Edward Albee (1928-…), Fernando
Arrabal (1932-…)
à Reference is sometimes made to a theatre of derision,
which “seeks to elude any precise definition, and gropes
its way towards the unspeakable or, to borrow a title from
Beckett, the unnamable”
à Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) – Waiting for Godot (1953),
Endgame (1957), Happy Days (1961)
à Eugene Ionesco (1912-2008) – The Bald Soprano (1950),
Rhinoceros (1960)
à Jean Genet (1910-1986) – The Balcony (1956), The Maids
(1947), The Blacks (1953)
à Harold Pinter (1930-2008) – The Birthday Party (1958) The
Homecoming (1965)
Eugene Ionesco
(1912-1994)
—  Romanian-born French dramatist
—  One-act “anti-play” La Cantatrice chauve (1949; The Bald
Soprano) inspired a revolution in dramatic techniques and
helped inaugurate the Theatre of the Absurd.
—  Dramatization of the absurdity of bourgeois life, the
meaninglessness of social conventions, and the futile and
mechanical nature of modern civilization.
—  Bizarrely illogical or fantastic situations = the humorous
multiplication of objects on stage until they overwhelm the actors.
—  Disembodiment of thought and language – Allegory of ideological
contamination
—  Theatre of the Absurd, as a genre or central theme, came into being with
IONESCO’s The Bald Soprano (1949) and BECKETT’s Waiting for
Godot (1953)
—  There are several strategies of the absurd:
-  The nihilistic absurd, in which it is practically impossible to draw any
conclusions about the world view or philosophical implications of the
text or acting (IONESCO, HILDESHEIMER);
-  The absurd as a structural principle used to reflect universal chaos,
the disintegration of language and the lack of a harmonious image of
mankind (BECKETT, ADAMOV);
-  The satirical absurd (satirical in its formulation and plot) gives a fairly
realistic account of the represented world (DÜRRENMATT, FRISCH,
GRASS, HAVEL)
—  Beyond illogical dialogue or stage business, the absurd often implies an
ahistorical, non-dialectical dramaturgical structure.
Few Questions about Rhinoceros
—  What do the various contradictions of the characters say about
them, and about the world of Rhinoceros? Consider Berenger and
Jean, for example.
—  Do the rhinoceroses maintain their human identities, or are they
strictly savage beasts?
—  Discuss Ionesco's dramatic techniques of repetition and
parallelism.
—  What do make of the Logician’s language and speech?
—  What is the function of Ionesco's use of comedy? Does it distract
us from the idea at hand, or call more attention to it?
Interview with Eugene Ionesco
With Claude Sarraute – January 17, 1960